WorldWideScience

Sample records for resin phantom materials

  1. Resin phantoms as skin simulating layers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Karsten, AE

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available of the skin treatment on the outer layers of the skin should be tested on in vitro multi layer skin models. This is not always feasible. For this work, phantoms were used together with skin cancer cells to test the effect of outer layer absorption...

  2. Enhancement of adhesion between resin coating materials and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoaki; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Weerasinghe, Dinesh S; Harada, Naoko; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-07-01

    Resin coating technique is a unique method that improves the dentin bond strength of resin cements in indirect restorations. However, the weak link of a specimen bonded using the resin coating technique was reported to be the bonded interface between the resin coating material and resin cement. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to enhance the bonding performance between a resin coating material and a resin cement. Two light-cured flowable composites, Protect Liner F and Clearfil Flow FX, were used as coating materials, and two dual-cure composite materials, Panavia F 2.0 and Clearfil DC Core Automix, were used as resin cements. The ultimate tensile strength of each material and the microtensile bond strengths of the bonded specimens of resin coating material and resin cement were measured using a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Three-way ANOVA (p=0.05) revealed that the highest microtensile bond strength was obtained using a combination of Clearfil Flow FX and Clearfil DC Core Automix, and when the surface of the coating material was treated with ED Primer II. It was strongly suggested that materials with a higher ultimate tensile strength, when used in both resin coating and cementation, could enhance the bond strength between the two.

  3. Development of tissue mimicking ultrasound phantom materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Sang Chul [Shinheung College, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Young Kun [Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ki Jung [Korea Food Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Suk [Yonsei Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    We carried out studies on develop of the ultrasound tissue mimicking materials (TMM) by synthesis of polymer urethane (C, CCR, TiO{sub 2}, tungsten, graphite, silver type). The major finding were as follows; (1) C type TMM was shown good homogeneity, penetration, gray scale like as liver tissue and propagated speed 1,540 m/s, attenuation 0.5 {approx} 0.7 dB/cm/MHz. (2) TiO{sub 2} type TMM was shown heterogeneous dot echo pattern. (3) Silver type TMM was appear good homogeneous echo pattern like as echo texture of thyroid gland. Therefor, C type TMM will be useful for ultrasound Q/A phantom materials and previous phantom materials.

  4. Materials for phantoms for terahertz pulsed imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Gillian C; Berry, Elizabeth; Smye, Stephen W; Brettle, David S

    2004-01-01

    Phantoms are commonly used in medical imaging for quality assurance, calibration, research and teaching. They may include test patterns or simulations of organs, but in either case a tissue substitute medium is an important component of the phantom. The aim of this work was to identify materials suitable for use as tissue substitutes for the relatively new medical imaging modality terahertz pulsed imaging. Samples of different concentrations of the candidate materials TX151 and napthol green dye were prepared, and measurements made of the frequency-dependent absorption coefficient (0.5 to 1.5 THz) and refractive index (0.5 to 1.0 THz). These results were compared qualitatively with measurements made in a similar way on samples of excised human tissue (skin, adipose tissue and striated muscle). Both materials would be suitable for phantoms where the dominant mechanism to be simulated is absorption (∼100 cm -1 at 1 THz) and where simulation of the strength of reflections from boundaries is not important; for example, test patterns for spatial resolution measurements. Only TX151 had a frequency-dependent refractive index close to that of tissue, and could therefore be used to simulate the layered structure of skin, the complexity of microvasculature or to investigate frequency-dependent interference effects that have been noted in terahertz images. (note)

  5. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2016-03-29

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer resin, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  6. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2018-01-09

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer material, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  7. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  8. Evaluation of image uniformity and radiolucency for computed tomography phantom made of 3-dimensional printing of fused deposition modeling technology by using acrylonitrile but audience styrene resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seoung, Youl Hun [Dept. of of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiolucency for the phantom output to the 3D printing technology. The 3D printing technology was applied for FDM (fused deposition modeling) method and was used the material of ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) resin. The phantom was designed in cylindrical uniformity. An image uniformity was measured by a cross-sectional images of the 3D printed phantom obtained from the CT equipment. The evaluation of radiolucency was measured exposure dose by the inserted ion-chamber from the 3D printed phantom. As a results, the average of uniformity in the cross-sectional CT image was 2.70 HU and the correlation of radiolucency between PMMA CT phantom and 3D printed ABS phantom is found to have a high correlation to 0.976. In the future, this results will be expected to be used as the basis for the phantom production of the radiation quality control by used 3D printing technology.

  9. Evaluation of image uniformity and radiolucency for computed tomography phantom made of 3-dimensional printing of fused deposition modeling technology by using acrylonitrile but audience styrene resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoung, Youl Hun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiolucency for the phantom output to the 3D printing technology. The 3D printing technology was applied for FDM (fused deposition modeling) method and was used the material of ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) resin. The phantom was designed in cylindrical uniformity. An image uniformity was measured by a cross-sectional images of the 3D printed phantom obtained from the CT equipment. The evaluation of radiolucency was measured exposure dose by the inserted ion-chamber from the 3D printed phantom. As a results, the average of uniformity in the cross-sectional CT image was 2.70 HU and the correlation of radiolucency between PMMA CT phantom and 3D printed ABS phantom is found to have a high correlation to 0.976. In the future, this results will be expected to be used as the basis for the phantom production of the radiation quality control by used 3D printing technology

  10. The strengthening of resin cemented dental ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to advance the understanding of the mechanism of resin-strengthening conferred to dental ceramic materials by resin-based composite materials. The investigation is presented as a series of manuscripts. In the first study (Manuscript 3.1), dental porcelain disc-shaped specimens were resin-coated with three resin-based composite materials with different flexural moduli at discrete resin thicknesses. The discs were loaded to failure in a biaxial flexure t...

  11. Water equivalent phantom materials for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-01

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with 192Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm. The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm. As suggested by

  12. Temperature dependence of HU values for various water equivalent phantom materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homolka, P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.homolka@univie.ac.at; Nowotny, R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Gahleitner, A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Osteology, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2002-08-21

    The temperature dependence of water equivalent phantom materials used in radiotherapy and diagnostic imaging has been investigated. Samples of phantom materials based on epoxy resin, polyethylene, a polystyrene-polypropylene mixture and commercially available phantom materials (Solid Water{sup TM}, Gammex RMI and Plastic Water{sup TM}, Nuclear Associates) were scanned at temperatures from 15 to 40 deg. C and HU values determined. At a reference temperature of 20 deg. C materials optimized for CT applications give HU values close to zero while the commercial materials show an offset of 119.77 HU (Plastic Water) and 27.69 HU (Solid Water). Temperature dependence was lowest for epoxy-based materials (EPX-W: -0.23 HU deg. C{sup -1}; Solid Water: -0.25 HU deg. C{sup -1}) and highest for a polyethylene-based material (X0: -0.72 HU deg. C{sup -1}). A material based on a mixture of polystyrene and polypropylene (PSPP1: -0.27 HU deg. C{sup -1}) is comparable to epoxy-based materials and water (-0.29 HU deg. C{sup -1}). (author)

  13. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A glycidyl...

  14. Water equivalent phantom materials for 192 Ir brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-01-01

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with 192Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading 192Ir brach...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to the...

  17. The interaction between lining materials and composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, G L; Davies, E H; Von Fraunhofer, J A

    1981-03-01

    The effects of four lining materials, Dycal, Procal, Cavitec and Poly F cement on Adaptic and Concise have been investigated in vitro. The parameters studied were surface roughness, hardness and colour both with and without an intermediate (or bonding) resin being present between the restorative material and the liner. The effects of the four liners on the composites varied both between the lining materials themselves and with the composite resin. Two materials, Procal and Dycal, had little interaction with the composites, provided an intermediate resin was used with the latter. Cavitec appeared to have an adverse reaction with the composites and Poly F, whilst having no effect on the colour of the composites, did increase surface roughness. The adverse effects of linig materials were ascribed to minor constituents, particularly methyl salicylate, present in the formulation.

  18. Tissue equivalence of some phantom materials for proton beams

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiliev, V; Kostyuchenko, V; Riazantsev, O; Khaibullin, V; Samarin, S; Uglov, A

    2009-01-01

    Tissue and water equivalence of some phantom materials originally developed for conventional radiation therapy was investigated on the ITEP medical proton beam facility. The proton CSDA range in three variants of Plastic Water, lung, adipose, muscle and compact bone substitute materials (CIRS Inc., USA) was measured by a silicon diode as well as the residual proton range in liquid water after passing a slab of each material under investigation. In addition, the proton range in five materials ...

  19. FDI report on adverse reactions to resin-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, P L; Meyer, D M

    2007-02-01

    Resin-based restorative materials are considered safe for the vast majority of dental patients. Although constituent chemicals such as monomers, accelerators and initiators can potentially leach out of cured resin-based materials after placement, adverse reactions to these chemicals are rare and reaction symptoms commonly subside after removal of the materials. Dentists should be aware of the rare possibility that patients could have adverse reactions to constituents of resin-based materials and be vigilant in observing any adverse reactions after restoration placement. Dentists should also be cognisant of patient complaints about adverse reactions that may result from components of resin-based materials. To minimise monomer leaching and any potential risk of dermatological reactions, resin-based materials should be adequately cured. Dental health care workers should avoid direct skin contact with uncured resin-based materials. Latex and vinyl gloves do not provide adequate barrier protection to the monomers in resin-based materials.

  20. A New Class of Phantom Materials for Poroelastography Imaging Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anuj; Yazdi, Iman K; Kongari, Rohit; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2016-05-01

    Poroelastography is an elastographic technique used to image the temporal mechanical behavior of tissues. One of the major challenges in determining experimental potentials and limitations of this technique has been the lack of complex and realistic controlled phantoms that could be used to corroborate the limited number of theoretical and simulation studies available in the literature as well as to predict its performance in complex experimental situations and in a variety of conditions. In the study described here, we propose and analyze a new class of phantom materials for temporal elastography imaging. The results indicate that, by using polyacrylamide, we can generate inhomogeneous elastographic phantoms with controlled fluid content and fluid flow properties, while maintaining mechanical and ultrasonic properties similar to those of soft tissues. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  2. Stable phantom materials for ultrasound and optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C.; Pelissari, Pedro I. B. G. B.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Pavan, Theo Z.

    2017-01-01

    Phantoms mimicking the specific properties of biological tissues are essential to fully characterize medical devices. Water-based materials are commonly used to manufacture phantoms for ultrasound and optical imaging techniques. However, these materials have disadvantages, such as easy degradation and low temporal stability. In this study, we propose an oil-based new tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound and optical imaging, with the advantage of presenting low temporal degradation. A styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) copolymer in mineral oil samples was made varying the SEBS concentration between 5%-15%, and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between 0%-9%. Acoustic properties, such as the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient, were obtained using frequencies ranging from 1-10 MHz, and were consistent with that of soft tissues. These properties were controlled varying SEBS and LDPE concentration. To characterize the optical properties of the samples, the diffuse reflectance and transmittance were measured. Scattering and absorption coefficients ranging from 400 nm-1200 nm were calculated for each compound. SEBS gels are a translucent material presenting low optical absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible region of the spectrum, but the presence of LDPE increased the turbidity. Adding LDPE increased the absorption and scattering of the phantom materials. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images of a heterogeneous phantom made of LDPE/SEBS containing a spherical inclusion were obtained. Annatto dye was added to the inclusion to enhance the optical absorbance. The results suggest that copolymer gels are promising for ultrasound and optical imaging, making them also potentially useful for photoacoustic imaging.

  3. Stable phantom materials for ultrasound and optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C; Pelissari, Pedro I B G B; Deana, Alessandro M; Carneiro, Antonio A O; Pavan, Theo Z

    2017-01-21

    Phantoms mimicking the specific properties of biological tissues are essential to fully characterize medical devices. Water-based materials are commonly used to manufacture phantoms for ultrasound and optical imaging techniques. However, these materials have disadvantages, such as easy degradation and low temporal stability. In this study, we propose an oil-based new tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound and optical imaging, with the advantage of presenting low temporal degradation. A styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) copolymer in mineral oil samples was made varying the SEBS concentration between 5%-15%, and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between 0%-9%. Acoustic properties, such as the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient, were obtained using frequencies ranging from 1-10 MHz, and were consistent with that of soft tissues. These properties were controlled varying SEBS and LDPE concentration. To characterize the optical properties of the samples, the diffuse reflectance and transmittance were measured. Scattering and absorption coefficients ranging from 400 nm-1200 nm were calculated for each compound. SEBS gels are a translucent material presenting low optical absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible region of the spectrum, but the presence of LDPE increased the turbidity. Adding LDPE increased the absorption and scattering of the phantom materials. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images of a heterogeneous phantom made of LDPE/SEBS containing a spherical inclusion were obtained. Annatto dye was added to the inclusion to enhance the optical absorbance. The results suggest that copolymer gels are promising for ultrasound and optical imaging, making them also potentially useful for photoacoustic imaging.

  4. Radiopacity Of Glass-ionomer/composite Resin Hybrid Materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Hara A.T.; Serra M.C.; Rodrigues Junior A.L.

    2001-01-01

    This study visually compared the radiopacity of seven restorative materials (3 resin-modified glass-ionomer cements, 3 polyacid-modified composite resins, and 1 conventional glass-ionomer cement) to a sound tooth structure sample, and an aluminium stepwedge. All hybrid materials were more radiopaque, except for one resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, than both the tooth structure and conventional glass-ionomer cement.

  5. Development of a solid phantom prototype of Mo-99, Tc-99, and Co-57 in epoxy resins for evaluating of the uniformity in SPECT systems images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia D, O.C.; Cortes P, A.; Becerril V, A.; Garcia R, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    A manufacture method of solid phantoms prototype of resin with different radioisotopes is described. The phantom manufactured of molybdenum 99 has an uniformity of 96% determined with a Na(Tl) detector mono channel analyzer with a lead collimator of 1 cm diameter. (Author)

  6. Optical response of the FXG solution to different phantom materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavinato, C.C.; Sakuraba, R.K.; Cruz, J.C.; Campos, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the performance of the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) solution developed at IPEN, prepared with 270 Bloom gelatine (made in Brazil), for clinical electron beams to the reference depth, using different phantom materials. The colour change, optical absorption spectra, intra and inter-batches reproducibility, dose-response, lower detection limit, energy and dose rate dependent response and response uniformity were studied. The excellent results obtained indicate the viability of employing this solution in 2D spectrophotometric dosimetry (could be extended to 3D MRI dosimetry) to be applied in quality assurance for clinical radiotherapy treatment planning of superficial tumours being treated with clinical electron beams.

  7. Radiation processed composite materials of wood and elastic polyester resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapolcai, I.; Czvikovszky, T.

    1983-01-01

    The radiation polymerization of multifunctional unsaturated polyester-monomer mixtures in wood forms interpenetrating network system. The mechanical resistance (compression, abrasion, hardness, etc.) of these composite materials are generally well over the original wood, however the impact strength is almost the same or even reduced, in comparison to the wood itself. An attempt is made using elastic polyester resins to produced wood-polyester composite materials with improved modulus of elasticity and impact properties. For the impregnation of European beech wood two types of elastic unsaturated polyester resins were used. The exothermic effect of radiation copolymerization of these resins in wood has been measured and the dose rate effects as well as hardening dose was determined. Felxural strength and impact properties were examined. Elastic unsaturated polyester resins improved the impact strength of wood composite materials. (author)

  8. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  9. Preparation and Characterizations of Composite Material Based on Carbon Fiber and Two Thermoset Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Fouda Hany; Guo Lin; Elsharkawy Karim

    2017-01-01

    In the present investigation, we used two types of thermoset resins (epoxy resin and phenol formaldehyde resin) with carbon fiber (CF) to produce composite materials. CF/epoxy resin composite and CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite were fabricated and compared between their mechanical properties as compression, tension and flexural. it was found that mechanical properties of CF/epoxy composite higher than mechanical properties of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite such as flexural strength...

  10. Preparation and Characterizations of Composite Material Based on Carbon Fiber and Two Thermoset Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouda Hany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, we used two types of thermoset resins (epoxy resin and phenol formaldehyde resin with carbon fiber (CF to produce composite materials. CF/epoxy resin composite and CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite were fabricated and compared between their mechanical properties as compression, tension and flexural. it was found that mechanical properties of CF/epoxy composite higher than mechanical properties of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite such as flexural strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 30 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite, tensile strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 11.4 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin and axial compression strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 14.5 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin.

  11. Characterization of selected LDEF polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composite materials which received 5 years and 10 months of exposure to the LEO environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. Resin loss and a decrease in mechanical performance as well as dramatic visual effects were observed. However, chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymeric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure. The potential effect of a silicon-containing molecular contamination of these specimens is addressed.

  12. Nonlinear Inelastic Mechanical Behavior Of Epoxy Resin Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekani Fard, Masoud

    Polymer and polymer matrix composites (PMCs) materials are being used extensively in different civil and mechanical engineering applications. The behavior of the epoxy resin polymers under different types of loading conditions has to be understood before the mechanical behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) can be accurately predicted. In many structural applications, PMC structures are subjected to large flexural loadings, examples include repair of structures against earthquake and engine fan cases. Therefore it is important to characterize and model the flexural mechanical behavior of epoxy resin materials. In this thesis, a comprehensive research effort was undertaken combining experiments and theoretical modeling to investigate the mechanical behavior of epoxy resins subject to different loading conditions. Epoxy resin E 863 was tested at different strain rates. Samples with dog-bone geometry were used in the tension tests. Small sized cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical samples were used in compression tests. Flexural tests were conducted on samples with different sizes and loading conditions. Strains were measured using the digital image correlation (DIC) technique, extensometers, strain gauges, and actuators. Effects of triaxiality state of stress were studied. Cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical compression samples undergo stress drop at yield, but it was found that only cubic samples experience strain hardening before failure. Characteristic points of tensile and compressive stress strain relation and load deflection curve in flexure were measured and their variations with strain rate studied. Two different stress strain models were used to investigate the effect of out-of-plane loading on the uniaxial stress strain response of the epoxy resin material. The first model is a strain softening with plastic flow for tension and compression. The influence of softening localization on material behavior was investigated using the DIC system. It was found that

  13. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  14. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Asefi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow, Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists. A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  15. ``Phantom'' Modes in Ab Initio Tunneling Calculations: Implications for Theoretical Materials Optimization, Tunneling, and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, Sergey V.; Pramanik, Dipankar

    2015-03-01

    Development of low-leakage dielectrics for semiconductor industry, together with many other areas of academic and industrial research, increasingly rely upon ab initio tunneling and transport calculations. Complex band structure (CBS) is a powerful formalism to establish the nature of tunneling modes, providing both a deeper understanding and a guided optimization of materials, with practical applications ranging from screening candidate dielectrics for lowest ``ultimate leakage'' to identifying charge-neutrality levels and Fermi level pinning. We demonstrate that CBS is prone to a particular type of spurious ``phantom'' solution, previously deemed true but irrelevant because of a very fast decay. We demonstrate that (i) in complex materials, phantom modes may exhibit very slow decay (appearing as leading tunneling terms implying qualitative and huge quantitative errors), (ii) the phantom modes are spurious, (iii) unlike the pseudopotential ``ghost'' states, phantoms are an apparently unavoidable artifact of large numerical basis sets, (iv) a presumed increase in computational accuracy increases the number of phantoms, effectively corrupting the CBS results despite the higher accuracy achieved in resolving the true CBS modes and the real band structure, and (v) the phantom modes cannot be easily separated from the true CBS modes. We discuss implications for direct transport calculations. The strategy for dealing with the phantom states is discussed in the context of optimizing high-quality high- κ dielectric materials for decreased tunneling leakage.

  16. Development of epoxy resin-type neutron shielding materials (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy.

    1997-12-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear /radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various materials properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 31 refs., 22 tabs., 17 figs

  17. Water equivalent phantom materials for ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-21

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with (192)Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading (192)Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm. The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm. As

  18. Interpenetrating network ceramic-resin composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, M V; Coldea, A; Bilkhair, A; Guess, P C

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the structure and some properties of resin infiltrated ceramic network structure materials suitable for CAD/CAM dental restorative applications. Initially the basis of interpenetrating network materials is defined along with placing them into a materials science perspective. This involves identifying potential advantages of such structures beyond that of the individual materials or simple mixing of the components. Observations from a number of recently published papers on this class of materials are summarized. These include the strength, fracture toughness, hardness and damage tolerance, namely to pointed and blunt (spherical) indentation as well as to burr adjustment. In addition a summary of recent results of crowns subjected to simulated clinical conditions using a chewing simulator are presented. These results are rationalized on the basis of existing theoretical considerations. The currently available ceramic-resin IPN material for clinical application is softer, exhibits comparable strength and fracture toughness but with substantial R-curve behavior, has lower E modulus and is more damage tolerant than existing glass-ceramic materials. Chewing simulation observations with crowns of this material indicate that it appears to be more resistant to sliding/impact induced cracking although its overall contact induced breakage load is modest. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Selecting the Best Materials Compositions of Resin Based Bioasphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, Ary; Widiharjo, Budi; Djumari

    2017-07-01

    Damar asphalt is one type of bioaspal which is a mixture with the main ingredient is a resin as a binder and cooking oil as a solvent. One major drawback of this damar asphalt is the low ductility. To improve the ductility values, then use the added material Filler. Filler serves as a divider between the impurities with damar asphalt, increases ductility and increase the ability of cohesion or bonding between the particles of material damar asphalt. The purpose of this study was to determine damar asphalt modifications to the properties in accordance with the properties of damar asphalt test specifications based on the value of penetration. This method uses some variant on material such as powder bricks and fly ash as a binder. Solvent in constituent used oil and used cooking oil. It also added the polymer latex up to 10% at intervals of 2%. The best composition of damar asphalt materials were obtained with gum rosin, Fly Ash, Oil and Latex. Damar asphalt modification damar asphalt optimum mix of resin (100g pure resin or resin chunk + 350g powder), Fly Ash powder (150g), cooking oil (205g), and latex 4%, ductility increased from 63.5 cm to 119.5 cm, the value of the flash point was originally at temperature of 240 °C to 260 °C, damar asphalt penetration of 68.2 dmm to 43 dmm, and the value of density decreases from 1.01 g / cm3 to 0.99 g / cm3. Damar asphalt at these modifications meet the specifications in terms of solubility in trichlore ethylene is equal to 99.5%, and also meet the affinity of damar asphalt at 99%. With the optimum value, damar asphalt could be categorized as bitumen 40/60 penetration.

  20. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-07

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  1. Diffusion through composite materials made with thermosetting resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Bruno.

    1981-08-01

    Medium and low-level radioactive wastes may be coated in a solid matrix mainly made with thermosetting resins: the study of water and cesium migration through composite materials made with thermosetting resins is usefull to compare the water tightness of different coatings. Disks with a thickness of two millimeters were used to measure the water absorption. Diffusion cells including a plane membrane the thickness of which was at least 70μ were used to measure the diffusion of cesium 137. The diffusion coefficient of water in pure thermosetting resins, polyester or epoxyde, is about 10 -9 cm 2 .s -1 ; the diffusion coefficients of cesium in the same materials are about 10 -12 cm 2 .s -1 ; the introduction of solid particles in these polymers generally induces an acceleration of the diffusion process: the diffusion coefficient may reach 10 -8 cm 2 .s -1 . This lost of water-tightness may be reduced either by rendering insoluble the filler mixed to the polymer, or by diminushing the porosity of the interfacial zones by improving the bonding between the polymer and the filler [fr

  2. Acoustic characterization of polyvinyl chloride and self-healing silicone as phantom materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry M.; Chen, Elvis C. S.

    2015-03-01

    Phantoms are physical constructs used in procedure planning, training, medical imaging research, and machine calibration. Depending on the application, the material a phantom is made out of is very important. With ultrasound imaging, phantom materials used need to have similar acoustic properties, specifically speed of sound and attenuation, as a specified tissue. Phantoms used with needle insertion require a material with a similar tensile strength as tissue and, if possible, the ability to self heal increasing its overall lifespan. Soft polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and silicone were tested as possible needle insertion phantom materials. Acoustic characteristics were determined using a time of flight technique, where a pulse was passed through a sample contained in a water bath. The speed of sound and attenuation were both determined manually and through spectral analysis. Soft PVC was determined to have a speed of sound of approximately 1395 m/s and attenuation of 0.441 dB/cm (at 1 MHz). For the silicone mixture, the respective speed of sound values was within a range of 964.7 m/s and 1250.0 m/s with an attenuation of 0.547 dB/cm (at 1 MHz).

  3. Characterization of tissue-equivalent materials for use in construction of physical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Edvan V. de; Oliveira, Alex C.H. de; Vieira, Jose W.; Lima, Fernando R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Phantoms are physical or computational models used to simulate the transport of ionizing radiation, their interactions with human body tissues and evaluate the deposition of energy. Depending on the application, you can build phantoms of various types and features. The physical phantoms are made of materials with behavior similar to human tissues exposed to ionizing radiation, the so-called tissue-equivalent materials. The characterization of various tissue-equivalent materials is important for the choice of materials to be used is appropriate, seeking a better cost-benefit ratio. The main objective of this work is to produce tables containing the main characteristics of tissue-equivalent materials. These tables were produced in Microsoft Office Excel. Among the main features of tissue-equivalent materials that were added to the tables, are density, chemical composition, physical state, chemical stability and solubility. The main importance of this work is to contribute to the construction of high-quality physical phantoms and avoid the waste of materials

  4. Neutron shielding material based on colemanite and epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a need for compact shielding design such as self-shielding of a PET cyclotron or upgradation of radiation machinery in existing facilities. In these cases, high performance shielding materials are needed. Concrete or polyethylene have been used for a neutron shield. However, for compact shielding, they fall short in terms of performance or durability. Therefore, a new type of neutron shielding material based on epoxy resin and colemanite has been developed. Slab attenuation experiments up to 40 cm for the new shielding material were carried out using a 252Cf neutron source. Measurement was carried out using a REM-counter, and compared with calculation. The results show that the shielding performance is better than concrete and polyethylene mixed with 10 wt% boron oxide. From the result, we confirmed that the performance of the new material is suitable for practical use.

  5. Chairside resin-based provisional restorative materials for fixed prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassler, Howard E; Lowe, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Provisional restorations are vital to fixed prosthodontics treatment, providing an important diagnostic function while in place. In addition to protecting the prepared teeth, provisionalization enables clinicians to refine biologic and biomechanical issues before the final restoration is fabricated. Adjustments can be made in the provisional restoration to achieve both the clinician's and patient's desired results. The fabrication of temporary restorations requires that clinicians be proficient with a variety of materials and techniques that can be used to make well-adapted and functional provisionals. There are many material choices available to temporize a single crown as well as multi-unit fixed partial dentures, and the selection of provisional materials should be made based on a case-by-case evaluation. This article provides a review of polymeric resin provisional materials.

  6. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  7. Evaluation of water-mimicking solid phantom materials for use in HDR and LDR brachytherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Thieben, Maike; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2017-12-01

    In modern HDR or LDR brachytherapy with photon emitters, fast checks of the dose profiles generated in water or a water-equivalent phantom have to be available in the interest of patient safety. However, the commercially available brachytherapy photon sources cover a wide range of photon emission spectra, and the range of the in-phantom photon spectrum is further widened by Compton scattering, so that the achievement of water-mimicking properties of such phantoms involves high requirements on their atomic composition. In order to classify the degree of water equivalence of the numerous commercially available solid water-mimicking phantom materials and the energy ranges of their applicability, the radial profiles of the absorbed dose to water, D w, have been calculated using Monte Carlo simulations in these materials and in water phantoms of the same dimensions. This study includes the HDR therapy sources Nucletron Flexisource Co-60 HDR (60Co), Eckert und Ziegler BEBIG GmbH CSM-11 (137Cs), Implant Sciences Corporation HDR Yb-169 Source 4140 (169Yb) as well as the LDR therapy sources IsoRay Inc. Proxcelan CS-1 (131Cs), IsoAid Advantage I-125 IAI-125A (125I), and IsoAid Advantage Pd-103 IAPd-103A (103Pd). Thereby our previous comparison between phantom materials and water surrounding a Varian GammaMed Plus HDR therapy 192Ir source (Schoenfeld et al 2015) has been complemented. Simulations were performed in cylindrical phantoms consisting of either water or the materials RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, Plastic Water LR, Original Plastic Water (2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, polystyrene and PMMA. While for 192Ir, 137Cs and 60Co most phantom materials can be regarded as water equivalent, for 169Yb the materials Plastic Water LR, Plastic Water DT and RW1 appear as water equivalent. For the low-energy sources 106Pd, 131Cs and 125I, only Plastic Water LR can be classified as water equivalent.

  8. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Biodentine, Resin Modified GIC and Hybrid Composite Resin as a Core Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, Dayalan; Shoba, Krishnamma; Aman, Shibu; Bharkavi, Srinivasan Kumar Indu; Nimmi, Vijayan; Abhilash, Radhakrishnan

    2017-09-01

    The restoration of a severely damaged tooth usually needs a post and core as a part of treatment procedure to provide a corono - radicular stabilization. Biodentine is a class of dental material which possess high mechanical properties with excellent biocompatibility and bioactive behaviour. The sealing ability coupled with optimum physical properties could make Biodentine an excellent option as a core material. The aim of the study was to determine the fracture resistance of Biodentine as a core material in comparison with resin modified glass ionomer and composite resin. Freshly extracted 30 human permanent maxillary central incisors were selected. After endodontic treatment followed by post space preparation and luting of Glass fibre post (Reforpost, Angelus), the samples were divided in to three groups based on the type of core material. The core build-up used in Group I was Biodentine (Septodont, France), Group II was Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (GC, Japan) and Group III was Hybrid Composite Resin (TeEconom plus, Ivoclar vivadent). The specimens were subjected to fracture toughness using Universal testing machine (1474, Zwick/Roell, Germany) and results were compared using One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's Post hoc test. The results showed that there was significant difference between groups in terms of fracture load. Also, composite resin exhibited highest mean fracture load (1039.9 N), whereas teeth restored with Biodentine demonstrated the lowest mean fracture load (176.66 N). Resin modified glass ionomer exhibited intermediate fracture load (612.07 N). The primary mode of failure in Group I and Group II was favourable (100%) while unfavourable fracture was seen in Group III (30%). Biodentine, does not satisfy the requirements to be used as an ideal core material. The uses of RMGIC's as a core build-up material should be limited to non-stress bearing areas. Composite resin is still the best core build-up material owing to its high fracture

  9. Phantom Use: Quantifying In-Library Browsing of Circulating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Victoria H.

    2007-01-01

    Beyond collecting traditional circulation statistics, tracking in-house use of library materials is a significant measure of how patrons use our resources. In our pilot project, Lending Services staff members conducted nightly pick-ups of library materials left on tables, in carrels, in study rooms, as well as books cast aside in the stacks areas…

  10. Effect of silver nanoparticles incorporation on viscoelastic properties of acrylic resin denture base material

    OpenAIRE

    Mahross, Hamada Zaki; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) incorporation on viscoelastic properties of acrylic resin denture base material. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 specimens (60 ? 10 ? 2 mm) of heat cured acrylic resin were constructed and divided into four groups (five for each), according to the concentration of AgNPs (1%, 2%, and 5% vol.) which incorporated into the liquid of acrylic resin material and one group without additives (control group). Th...

  11. Evolution of water equivalent phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabutani, Toshimine; Ida, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    In radiation therapy, the dose absorbed by the target tissue needs to be extremely accurate. In order to obtain the target absorbed dose, radiation dose measurements are performed using a phantom instead of the patient's body, because the target absorbed dose cannot be directly measured. Although water is the best human muscle equivalent phantom, it is not useful for this purpose. Therefore, water equivalent solid phantoms are usually used for the measurements. We compared the following water equivalent solid phantoms for water: Tough water phantom, 457 Solid water phantom, RW-3, Mix-DP, polystyrene resin, polyethylene resin, and acrylic resin. The measurements obtained were ionization current in the phantoms as determined by ionization chamber, tissue-maximum ratio, transmission measurements in water with and without the phantoms, Hounsfield units of the phantoms for uniformity of inside phantoms as determined by computed tomography, and accuracy of the phantoms. Results showed the phantoms to be almost equivalent to water, except for the acrylic resin phantom. However, the phantoms had various characteristics that affected accuracy, and the phantoms underwent change with time. Measurement error was caused by the characteristics of the phantoms. Therefore, it is important to measure the calibration coefficient of phantoms for water, regardless of what is stated on paper. (author)

  12. Microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite to resin-coated dentin: interaction between diamond bur roughness and coating material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Oishi, Takumi; Sugawara, Toyotarou; Hirai, Yoshito

    2009-02-01

    This aim of this study was to determine the effect of type of bur and resin-coating material on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of indirect composite to dentin. Dentin surfaces were first ground with two types of diamond bur and resin-coated using UniFil Bond (UB) or Adper Single Bond (SB), and then bonded to a resin composite disc for indirect restoration with adhesive resin cement. After storage for 24 hr in distilled water at 37 degrees C, microTBS was measured (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). When UB was applied to dentin prepared using the regular-grit diamond bur, microTBS was significantly lower than that in dentin prepared using the superfine-grit bur. In contrast, no significant difference was found between regular-grit and superfine-grit bur with SB. However, more than half of the superfine-grit specimens failed before microTBS testing. These results indicate that selection of bur type is important in improving the bond strength of adhesive resin cement between indirect resin composite and resin-coated dentin.

  13. 49 CFR 173.173 - Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.173 Paint, paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins. (a) When..., paint-related material, adhesives, ink and resins must be packaged as follows: (1) As prescribed in...

  14. Simulated study of solid materials used as phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmonte, Eduardo P.; Pinheiro, Christiano J.G.; Pinto, Nivia G.Villela; Braz, Delson; Pereira Junior, Sielso B.; Lima, Gilberto S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the behavior of electrons in water and compares them with the behavior in the materials you want to analyze. It were simulated, using Monte Carlo code EGS4 (MC), 24 irradiation with electrons of 6 and 20 MeV in different materials (polyethylene C 2 H 4 ) n , polystyrene (C 8 H 8 ) n , lucite (C 5 H 8 O 2 ), nylon (C 6 H 11 NO), water (H 2 O) and solid water (55% polyethylene, polystyrene and 5% 40% calcium oxide). The data show that for the two energies most of radiation does not interact with the first 20 mm materials. However, when analyzed plates of 1 cm, most of the energy is deposited in the first 4 plates in case 6 MeV and in the first ten to 20 MeV electrons, for all materials. In case of similarity in behavior of radiation in water and other materials, it is observed that is in polyethylene and polystyrene that the behaviour of electrons more resembles the behavior in water

  15. Acoustic Performance of Resilient Materials Using Acrylic Polymer Emulsion Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haseog Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been frequent cases of civil complaints and disputes in relation to floor impact noises over the years. To solve these issues, a substantial amount of sound resilient material is installed between the concrete slab and the foamed concrete during construction. A new place-type resilient material is made from cement, silica powder, sodium sulfate, expanded-polystyrene, anhydrite, fly ash, and acrylic polymer emulsion resin. Its physical characteristics such as density, compressive strength, dynamic stiffness, and remanent strain are analyzed to assess the acoustic performance of the material. The experimental results showed the density and the dynamic stiffness of the proposed resilient material is increased with proportional to the use of cement and silica powder due to the high contents of the raw materials. The remanent strain, related to the serviceability of a structure, is found to be inversely proportional to the density and strength. The amount of reduction in the heavyweight impact noise is significant in a material with high density, high strength, and low remanent strain. Finally, specimen no. R4, having the reduction level of 3 dB for impact ball and 1 dB for bang machine in the single number quantity level, respectively, is the best product to obtain overall acoustic performance.

  16. Acoustic Performance of Resilient Materials Using Acrylic Polymer Emulsion Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haseog; Park, Sangki; Lee, Seahyun

    2016-07-19

    There have been frequent cases of civil complaints and disputes in relation to floor impact noises over the years. To solve these issues, a substantial amount of sound resilient material is installed between the concrete slab and the foamed concrete during construction. A new place-type resilient material is made from cement, silica powder, sodium sulfate, expanded-polystyrene, anhydrite, fly ash, and acrylic polymer emulsion resin. Its physical characteristics such as density, compressive strength, dynamic stiffness, and remanent strain are analyzed to assess the acoustic performance of the material. The experimental results showed the density and the dynamic stiffness of the proposed resilient material is increased with proportional to the use of cement and silica powder due to the high contents of the raw materials. The remanent strain, related to the serviceability of a structure, is found to be inversely proportional to the density and strength. The amount of reduction in the heavyweight impact noise is significant in a material with high density, high strength, and low remanent strain. Finally, specimen no. R4, having the reduction level of 3 dB for impact ball and 1 dB for bang machine in the single number quantity level, respectively, is the best product to obtain overall acoustic performance.

  17. Immobilisation Of Spent Ion Exchange Resins Using Portland Cement Blending With Organic Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalina Laili; Mohd Abdul Wahab; Nur Azna Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    Immobilisation of spent ion exchange resins (spent resins) using Portland cement blending with organic material for example bio char was investigated. The performance of cement-bio char matrix for immobilisation of spent ion exchange resins was evaluated based on their compression strength and leachability under different experimental conditions. The results showed that the amount of bio char and spent resins loading effect the compressive strength of the waste form. Several factors affecting the leaching behaviour of immobilised spent resins in cement-bio char matrix. (author)

  18. Development of a vessel-mimicking material for use in anatomically realistic Doppler flow phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Deirdre M; Moran, Carmel M; McNamara, John D; Fagan, Andrew J; Browne, Jacinta E

    2011-05-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol cryogel (PVA-C) is presented as a vessel-mimicking material for use in anatomically realistic Doppler flow phantoms. Three different batches of 10% wt PVA-C containing (i) PVA-C alone, (ii) PVA-C with antibacterial agent and (iii) PVA-C with silicon carbide particles were produced, each with 1-6 freeze-thaw cycles. The resulting PVA-C samples were characterized acoustically (over a range 2.65 to 10.5 MHz) and mechanically to determine the optimum mixture and preparation for mimicking the properties of healthy and diseased arteries found in vivo. This optimum mix was reached with the PVA-C with antibacterial agent sample, prepared after two freeze/thaw cycles, which achieved a speed of sound of 1538 ± 5 m s(-1) and a Young's elastic modulus of 79 ± 11 kPa. This material was used to make a range of anatomically realistic flow phantoms with varying degrees of stenoses, and subsequent flow experiments revealed that higher degrees of stenoses and higher velocities could be achieved without phantom rupturing compared with a phantom containing conventional wall-less vessels. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. All rights reserved.

  19. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (ptested FRC posts is required for effective bonding.

  20. Paraffin-gel tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound-guided needle biopsy phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sílvio L; Pavan, Theo Z; Junior, Jorge E; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2013-12-01

    Paraffin-gel waxes have been investigated as new soft tissue-mimicking materials for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy training. Breast phantoms were produced with a broad range of acoustical properties. The speed of sound for the phantoms ranged from 1425.4 ± 0.6 to 1480.3 ± 1.7 m/s at room temperature. The attenuation coefficients were easily controlled between 0.32 ± 0.27 dB/cm and 2.04 ± 0.65 dB/cm at 7.5 MHz, depending on the amount of carnauba wax added to the base material. The materials do not suffer dehydration and provide adequate needle penetration, with a Young's storage modulus varying between 14.7 ± 0.2 kPa and 34.9 ± 0.3 kPa. The phantom background material possesses long-term stability and can be employed in a supine position without changes in geometry. These results indicate that paraffin-gel waxes may be promising materials for training radiologists in ultrasound biopsy procedures. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Composite materials based on modified epoxy resin and carbon fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalez, Viviane; Barcia, Fabio L.; Soares, Bluma G.

    2006-01-01

    Epoxy resin networks have been modified with block copolymer of polybutadiene and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (DGEBA)-based on epoxy resin. The epoxy resin modified with carboxyl-terminated polybutadiene presented improved impact resistance and outstanding mechanical performance in terms of flexural and tensile properties because of the presence of rubber particles homogeneously dispersed inside the epoxy matrix. This modified system also resulted in an improvement of mechanical properties o...

  2. Color of bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutcigil, Çağatay; Barutcigil, Kubilay; Özarslan, Mehmet Mustafa; Dündar, Ayşe; Yilmaz, Burak

    2017-09-28

    To evaluate the color stability of novel bulk-fill composite resins. Color measurements of a nanohybrid composite resin (Z550) and 3 bulk-fill composite resins (BLK, AFX, XTF; n = 45) were performed before polymerization. After polymerization, color measurements were repeated and specimens were immersed in distilled water or red wine, or coffee. Color change [CIEDE2000 (ΔE 00 )] was calculated after 24 h, 1 and 3 weeks. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests (α = 0.05). Color changes observed after polymerization were significant for all groups. Color changes observed in distilled water for Z550 and AFX were significant. Color changes after stored in red wine and coffee were significant for all groups. Bulk-fill composite resin color change increased over time for all groups in red wine and coffee (P composite resin and bulk-fill composite resins. AFX had the highest color change in distilled water. The color of tested bulk-fill composite resins significantly changed after immersion in beverages and over time. Color change observed with the nanohybrid composite resin after 1 week was stable. Clinicians should keep in mind that tested composite resins may change color when exposed to water and significantly change color immediately after they are polymerized. In addition, the color change continues over time should the patient is a coffee and/or red wine consumer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Diametral tensile strength of four composite resin core materials with and without centered fiber dowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Cornel H; Ji, Donatta Y-J; Rizkalla, Amin S; Santos, Gildo C

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the diametral tensile strength of composite resin core materials with and without fiber dowels. Eight groups were established (n = 20), four with composite resins and four with fiber dowels. Samples were tested using a universal testing machine and evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA and a Tukey B-rank order test (P = 0.05) indicated that the tensile values of two of the four composite resins decreased significantly when their matching fiber dowels were introduced.

  4. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P resin cements exhibited better shear bond strength than the self-adhesive resin cements, except for Panavia cement in the IPS e.max Press group. However, shear bond strengths of the self-adhesive resin cements were dependent on the nature of the ceramic core materials.

  5. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laili, Zalina; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Wahab, Mohd Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins

  6. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laili, Zalina, E-mail: liena@nm.gov.my [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, 43600, Selangor Malaysia (Malaysia); Waste and Environmental Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yasir, Muhamad Samudi [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, 43600, Selangor Malaysia (Malaysia); Wahab, Mohd Abdul [Waste and Environmental Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of 60 Co HDR brachytherapy source in water and in different solid water phantom materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference medium for brachytherapy dose measurements is water. Accuracy of dose measurements of brachytherapy sources is critically dependent on precise measurement of the source-detector distance. A solid phantom can be precisely machined and hence source-detector distances can be accurately determined. In the present study, four different solid phantom materials such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, polystyrene, Solid Water, and RW1 are modeled using the Monte Carlo methods to investigate the influence of phantom material on dose rate distributions of the new model of BEBIG 60 Co brachytherapy source. The calculated dose rate constant is 1.086 ± 0.06% cGy h−1 U−1 for water, PMMA, polystyrene, Solid Water, and RW1. The investigation suggests that the phantom materials RW1 and Solid Water represent water-equivalent up to 20 cm from the source. PMMA and polystyrene are water-equivalent up to 10 cm and 15 cm from the source, respectively, as the differences in the dose data obtained in these phantom materials are not significantly different from the corresponding data obtained in liquid water phantom. At a radial distance of 20 cm from the source, polystyrene overestimates the dose by 3% and PMMA underestimates it by about 8% when compared to the corresponding data obtained in water phantom.

  8. The application of methacrylate resin and the derivation as restorative material of damaged tooth tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adioro Soetojo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of methacrylate resin and the derivation (composite resin and dentin bonding in clinical conservative dentistry has been widely developed. This material could be used to restore class I-V cavity with good aesthetic due to the compatible color with tooth. Composite resin adhesion hydrophobically in enamel that is due to mechanic retention in the form of resin tags which penetrates into enamel porosity. Meanwhile hydrophilic dentin bonding adhesion due to the chemical reaction between functional groups of amino collagen with carbonyl in dentin bonding forming amide binding. In addition mechanical retention in which dentin bonding penetrating into nano inter fibrilar cavity then polymerized. The success of methacrylate resin adhesion restoration is decided by enamel porosity, wetting character of resin, wetting contact angle, good etching acid, optimal humidity of tooth surface, the accuracy of dentist during filling is done etc.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Used to Fabricate Phenolic Based Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Hou, Xiaopeng; Wang, Wenliang; Chang, Jianmin

    2017-06-18

    In this study, bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of renewable biomass was used as the raw material to synthesize bio-oil phenol formaldehyde (BPF) resin-a desirable resin for fabricating phenolic-based material. During the synthesis process, paraformaldehyde was used to achieve the requirement of high solid content and low viscosity. The properties of BPF resins were tested. Results indicated that BPF resin with the bio-oil addition of 20% had good performance on oxygen index and bending strength, indicating that adding bio-oil could modify the fire resistance and brittleness of PF resin. The thermal curing behavior and heat resistance of BPF resins were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Results showed that adding bio-oil had an impact on curing characteristics and thermal degradation process of PF resin, but the influence was insignificant when the addition was relatively low. The chemical structure and surface characteristics of BPF resins were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis demonstrated that adding bio-oil in the amount of 20% was able to improve the crosslinking degree and form more hydrocarbon chains in PF resin.

  10. Surface Hardness of Resin Cement Polymerized under Different Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kesrak, Pimmada; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the surface hardness of two light-cured resin cements polymerized under different ceramic discs. Methods. 40 experimental groups of 2 light-cured resin cement specimens (Variolink Veneer and NX3) were prepared and polymerized under 5 different ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press HT, LT, MO, HO, and Cercon) of 4 thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm), Those directly activated of both resin cements were used as control. After light activation and 3 7 ∘ C storage in an incuba...

  11. The effect of light curing units, curing time, and veneering materials on resin cement microhardness

    OpenAIRE

    Nurcan Ozakar Ilday; Yusuf Ziya Bayindir; Funda Bayindir; Aysel Gurpinar

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose: Several factors may affects microhardness of resin cement under veneering materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different veneering materials, light-curing units and curing times (20/3, 40/6) on the microhardness of dual-cured resin cement. Materials and methods: We pressed dual-cured resin cement specimens (Clearfil SA cement, 5 mm diameter, 1 mm thick) between two microscopic glass slides covered with transparent polystyrene matrix strips to r...

  12. Honeycomb core material for sandwich construction - with common hexagonal walls bonded by thermoplastic resin and free walls carrying layer of resin and masking agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Undetermined, U.

    1991-01-01

    Abstract of NL 8902116 (A) In a honeycomb core material for a sandwich construction, the common hexagonal walls are bonded together by a thermoplastic resin, and the free hexagonal walls carry a layer of the same resin and also a masking agent. - A number of plates of raw material are given strips

  13. Flexural Strength of Cold and Heat Cure Acrylic Resins Reinforced with Different Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Bijan; Firouz, Farnaz; Izadi, Alireza; Ahmadvand, Shahbaz; Radan, Pegah

    2015-05-01

    Heat-polymerized acrylic resin has been the most commonly used denture base material for over 60 years. However, the mechanical strength of acrylic resin is not adequate for long-term clinical performance of dentures. Consequently, fracture is a common clinical occurrence, which often develops in the midline of the denture base. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of cold-cure and heat-cure acrylic resins, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire for denture base repair. Ninety specimens were prepared and allocated to nine groups. Ten specimens were considered as controls, and 80 were divided into 8 experimental groups. In the experimental groups, the specimens were sectioned into two halves from the middle, and were then divided into two main groups: one group was repaired with heat cure acrylic resin, and the other with cold cure acrylic resin. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups: unreinforced, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire. All specimens were subjected to a 3-point bending test, and the flexural strength was calculated. The group repaired with heat cure acrylic resin and reinforced with glass fiber showed the highest flexural strength; however, the group repaired with cold cure acrylic resin and reinforced with polyethylene fibers had the lowest flexural strength. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with heat cure and cold cure acrylic resins without reinforcement. Repairing denture base with heat cure acrylic resin, reinforced with glass fibers increases the flexural strength of denture base.

  14. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-03: Tissue Equivalent Material Phantom to Test and Optimize Coherent Scatter Imaging for Tumor Classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, K; Morris, R; Lakshmanan, M; Greenberg, J; Kapadia, A [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Methods: A breast phantom has been designed to assess the capability of coded aperture coherent x-ray scatter imaging system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, tumor). The tissue-equivalent phantom was modeled as a hollow plastic cylinder containing multiple cylindrical and spherical inserts that can be positioned, rearranged, or removed to model different breast geometries. Each enclosure can be filled with a tissue-equivalent material and excised human tumors. In this study, beef and lard, placed inside 2-mm diameter plastic Nalgene containers, were used as surrogates for fibroglandular and adipose tissue, respectively. The phantom was imaged at 125 kVp, 40 mA for 10 seconds each with a 1-mm pencil beam. The raw data were reconstructed using a model-based reconstruction algorithm and yielded the location and form factor, or momentum transfer (q) spectrum of the materials that were imaged. The measured material form factors were then compared to the ground truth measurements acquired by x-ray diffraction (XRD) imaging. Results: The tissue equivalent phantom was found to accurately model different types of breast tissue by qualitatively comparing our measured form factors to those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Our imaging system has been able to define the location and composition of the various materials in the phantom. Conclusion: This work introduces a new tissue equivalent phantom for testing and optimization of our coherent scatter imaging system for material classification. In future studies, the phantom will enable the use of a variety of materials including excised human tissue specimens in evaluating and optimizing our imaging system using pencil- and fan-beam geometries. United States Department of Homeland Security Duke University

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Used to Fabricate Phenolic Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of renewable biomass was used as the raw material to synthesize bio-oil phenol formaldehyde (BPF resin—a desirable resin for fabricating phenolic-based material. During the synthesis process, paraformaldehyde was used to achieve the requirement of high solid content and low viscosity. The properties of BPF resins were tested. Results indicated that BPF resin with the bio-oil addition of 20% had good performance on oxygen index and bending strength, indicating that adding bio-oil could modify the fire resistance and brittleness of PF resin. The thermal curing behavior and heat resistance of BPF resins were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. Results showed that adding bio-oil had an impact on curing characteristics and thermal degradation process of PF resin, but the influence was insignificant when the addition was relatively low. The chemical structure and surface characteristics of BPF resins were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The analysis demonstrated that adding bio-oil in the amount of 20% was able to improve the crosslinking degree and form more hydrocarbon chains in PF resin.

  16. The effect of light curing units, curing time, and veneering materials on resin cement microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Ozakar Ilday

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Light-curing units, curing time, and veneering materials are important factors for achieving adequate dual cure resin composite microhardness. High-intensity light and longer curing times resulted in the highest microhardness values.

  17. Investigate the Possibility of Tekcast Methods Used for Casting Polymeric Resin Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäsiar H.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Contribution gives an overview of knowledge about the method of centrifugal casting with orientate on Tekcast system. Company Tekcast Industries has developed a device for centrifugal casting, extending the area of production of castings or prototyping of metal or plastic. Materials suitable for the centrifugal casting with flexible operating parameters may include non-ferrous metal alloy based on zinc or aluminum or non-metallic materials such as polyester resins, polyurethane resins, epoxy resins, waxes and the like. The casting process is particularly suitable for a wide range of commercial castings and decorative objects.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Used to Fabricate Phenolic Based Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Yong; Hou, Xiaopeng; Wang, Wenliang; Chang, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of renewable biomass was used as the raw material to synthesize bio-oil phenol formaldehyde (BPF) resin—a desirable resin for fabricating phenolic-based material. During the synthesis process, paraformaldehyde was used to achieve the requirement of high solid content and low viscosity. The properties of BPF resins were tested. Results indicated that BPF resin with the bio-oil addition of 20% had good performance on oxygen index and bending streng...

  19. Influence of the material for preformed moulds on the polymerization temperature of resin materials for temporary FPDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Philipp-Cornelius; Schmitz-Wätjen, Hans; Stiesch, Meike; Eisenburger, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Temperature increase of 5.5 ℃ can cause damage or necrosis of the pulp. Increasing temperature can be caused not only by mechanical factors, e.g. grinding, but also by exothermic polymerization reactions of resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate influences of the form material on the intrapulpal temperature during the polymerization of different self-curing resin materials for temporary restorations. 30 provisonal bridges were made of 5 resin materials: Prevision Temp (Pre), Protemp 4 (Pro), Luxatemp Star (Lux), Structure 3 (Str) and an experimental material (Exp). Moulds made of alginate (A) and of silicone (S) and vacuum formed moulds (V) were used to build 10 bridges each on a special experimental setup. The intrapulpal temperatures of three abutment teeth (a canine, a premolar, and a molar,) were measured during the polymerization every second under isothermal conditions. Comparisons of the maximum temperature (T Max ) and the time until the maximum temperature (t TMax ) were performed using ANOVA and Tukey Test. Using alginate as the mould material resulted in a cooling effect for every resin material. Using the vacuum formed mould, T Max increased significantly compared to alginate ( P material on t TMax . All of the mould materials are suitable for clinical use if the intraoral application time does not exceed the manufacturer's instructions for the resin materials.

  20. Curing efficiency of various resin-based materials polymerized through different ceramic thicknesses and curing time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Won; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this in vitro study was to examine the curing efficiency of various resin-based materials polymerized through ceramic restorations with 3 different thicknesses. Curing efficiency was evaluated by determining the surface microhardness (VHN) of the resin specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four kinds of resin materials were used. Z350 (3M ESPE Filtek™ Z350: A2 Shade), Z250 (3M ESPE Filtek™ Z250: A2 Shade) and Variolink® II (VL: Ivoclar vivadent, base: transparent) either with or without a self-curing catalyst (VLC: Ivoclar vivadent, catalyst: low viscosity/transparent) were filled into the silicone mold (10 mm diameter, 1 mm thick). They were cured through ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press MO-0 ingot ivoclar vivadent, 10 mm diameter, 0.5, 1 and 2 mm thicknesses) by LED light-curing units for 20 and 40 seconds. Vicker's microhardness numbers (VHNs) were measured on the bottom surfaces by a microhardness tester. Data were analyzed using a 3- way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a significance level of 0.05. RESULTS The thickness of ceramic disc increased, the VHNs of all four resin types were decreased (Plight cured for 40 seconds were significantly higher than that of LED for 20 seconds in all four resin materials (Pcuring time resulted higher VHN values of all resin materials. The use of a catalyst produced a greater hardness with all polymerization methods. Restorative resin materials (Z350, Z250) showed higher VHN values than resin cement materials (VL, VLC). PMID:22053242

  1. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  2. Diffusion in composite materials made of thermosetting resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Bruno.

    1981-03-01

    The embedding process of low and medium level radioactive wastes in thermosetting resins allows their containment in a solid matrix. During storage the risk of circulation of water is possible. The aim of this containment process is to prevent radionuclide migration in environment. Ion migration through membranes of thermosetting resins alone or filler added were measured to evaluate released radioactivity by embedded blocks with time and to compare the different embedding formulas. Water influence on diffusion was taken into account considering that radioactive wastes dispersion is faster in a wet medium than in a dry one [fr

  3. Mechanical and antibacterial properties of benzothiazole-based dental resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Lao, Chonghui; Luo, Shuzhen; Liu, Fang; Huang, Qiting; He, Jingwei; Lin, Zhengmei

    2018-04-01

    A synthesized benzothiazole containing mono-methacrylate monomer BTTMA was incorporated into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resin system with a series of mass concentration from 5 to 30 wt.% as an antibacterial agent. The influence of BTTMA on physicochemical properties of dental resin system, such as double bond conversion (DC), volumetric shrinkage (VS), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL) were investigated. Direct contact testing and agar diffusion testing were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of BTTMA containing dental resin. The results showed that BTTMA could endow dental resin with significant antibacterial activity when its concentration reached a certain amount (20 wt.%), and the antibacterial activity of BTTMA containing dental resin was mainly attributed to the immobilized BTTMA instead of the unreacted leachable BTTMA. BTTMA had no negative effect on physicochemical properties of dental resin, and even some BTTMA containing dental resins had advantages like higher DC, lower VS and WS when compared with control resin. Therefore, BTTMA could be considered as a suitable antibacterial agent in dental material, but much more researches concerned about biocompatibility should be done in future to prove whether it could be applied in clinic.

  4. Construction of a preclinical multimodality phantom using tissue-mimicking materials for quality assurance in tumor size measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongsook C; Fullerton, Gary D; Goins, Beth A

    2013-07-29

    World Health Organization (WHO) and the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) working groups advocated standardized criteria for radiologic assessment of solid tumors in response to anti-tumor drug therapy in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively. WHO criteria measure solid tumors in two-dimensions, whereas RECIST measurements use only one-dimension which is considered to be more reproducible (1, 2, 3,4,5). These criteria have been widely used as the only imaging biomarker approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (6). In order to measure tumor response to anti-tumor drugs on images with accuracy, therefore, a robust quality assurance (QA) procedures and corresponding QA phantom are needed. To address this need, the authors constructed a preclinical multimodality (for ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) phantom using tissue-mimicking (TM) materials based on the limited number of target lesions required by RECIST by revising a Gammex US commercial phantom (7). The Appendix in Lee et al. demonstrates the procedures of phantom fabrication (7). In this article, all protocols are introduced in a step-by-step fashion beginning with procedures for preparing the silicone molds for casting tumor-simulating test objects in the phantom, followed by preparation of TM materials for multimodality imaging, and finally construction of the preclinical multimodality QA phantom. The primary purpose of this paper is to provide the protocols to allow anyone interested in independently constructing a phantom for their own projects. QA procedures for tumor size measurement, and RECIST, WHO and volume measurement results of test objects made at multiple institutions using this QA phantom are shown in detail in Lee et al. (8).

  5. Factors affecting the bond strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins to base metal materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Tanoue

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The shear bond strengths of two hard chairside reline resin materials and an auto-polymerizing denture base resin material to cast Ti and a Co-Cr alloy treated using four conditioning methods were investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Disk specimens (diameter 10 mm and thickness 2.5 mm were cast from pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy. The specimens were wet-ground to a final surface finish of 600 grit, air-dried, and treated with the following bonding systems: 1 air-abraded with 50-70-µm grain alumina (CON; 2 1 + conditioned with a primer, including an acidic phosphonoacetate monomer (MHPA; 3 1 + conditioned with a primer including a diphosphate monomer (MDP; 4 treated with a tribochemical system. Three resin materials were applied to each metal specimen. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 10,000 thermocycles. RESULTS: The strengths decreased after thermocycling for all combinations. Among the resin materials assessed, the denture base material showed significantly (p<0.05 greater shear bond strengths than the two reline materials, except for the CON condition. After 10,000 thermocycles, the bond strengths of two reline materials decreased to less than 10 MPa for both metals. The bond strengths of the denture base material with MDP were sufficient: 34.56 MPa for cast Ti and 38.30 for Co-Cr alloy. CONCLUSION: Bonding of reline resin materials to metals assessed was clinically insufficient, regardless of metal type, surface treatment, and resin composition. For the relining of metal denture frameworks, a denture base material should be used.

  6. Effect of silver nanoparticles incorporation on viscoelastic properties of acrylic resin denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahross, Hamada Zaki; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) incorporation on viscoelastic properties of acrylic resin denture base material. A total of 20 specimens (60 × 10 × 2 mm) of heat cured acrylic resin were constructed and divided into four groups (five for each), according to the concentration of AgNPs (1%, 2%, and 5% vol.) which incorporated into the liquid of acrylic resin material and one group without additives (control group). The dynamic viscoelastic test for the test specimens was performed using the computerized material testing system. The resulting deflection curves were analyzed by material testing software NEXYGEN MT. The 5% nanoparticles of silver (NAg) had significantly highest mean storage modulus E' and loss tangent Tan δ values followed by 2% NAg (P 0.05). The AgNPs incorporation within the acrylic denture base material can improve its viscoelastic properties.

  7. Development of a physical 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; Bakic, Predrag; Ullberg, Christer; Derand, Helen; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Develop a technique to fabricate a 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom with known ground truth for image quality assessment of 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems. Methods: The phantom design is based on an existing computer model that can generate breast voxel phantoms of varying composition, size, and shape. The physical phantom is produced in two steps. First, the portion of the voxel phantom consisting of the glandular tissue, skin, and Cooper's ligaments is separated into sections. These sections are then fabricated by high-resolution rapid prototyping using a single material with 50% glandular equivalence. The remaining adipose compartments are then filled using an epoxy-based resin (EBR) with 100% adipose equivalence. The phantom sections are stacked to form the physical anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The authors fabricated a prototype phantom corresponding to a 450 ml breast with 45% dense tissue, deformed to a 5 cm compressed thickness. Both the rapid prototype (RP) and EBR phantom materials are radiographically uniform. The coefficient of variation (CoV) of the relative attenuation between RP and EBR phantom samples was <1% and the CoV of the signal intensity within RP and EBR phantom samples was <1.5% on average. Digital mammography and reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis images of the authors' phantom were reviewed by two radiologists; they reported that the images are similar in appearance to clinical images, noting there are still artifacts from air bubbles in the EBR. Conclusions: The authors have developed a technique to produce 3D anthropomorphic breast phantoms with known ground truth, yielding highly realistic x-ray images. Such phantoms may serve both qualitative and quantitative performance assessments for 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems.

  8. Cashew nut shell liquid resin used as matrix for compound materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes de; Nogueira, Ricardo Emilio Ferreira Quevedo

    1996-01-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid resin a by product of cashew processing industry is a naturally occurring phenol of low cost and are used in Brazil as fuel in the industrial production of cashew nut or as a structural material when associated with coconut fiber or rice shell. A high measured Tg points to noble applications. This paper presents some properties of LCC resin and concludes that it has good perspectives as a composite matrice to work at elevated temperatures. (author)

  9. Flexural Strength of Cold and Heat Cure Acrylic Resins Reinforced with Different Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Bijan; Firouz, Farnaz; Izadi, Alireza; Ahmadvand, Shahbaz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Heat-polymerized acrylic resin has been the most commonly used denture base material for over 60 years. However, the mechanical strength of acrylic resin is not adequate for long-term clinical performance of dentures. Consequently, fracture is a common clinical occurrence, which often develops in the midline of the denture base. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of cold-cure and heat-cure acrylic resins, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire for denture base repair. Materials and Methods: Ninety specimens were prepared and allocated to nine groups. Ten specimens were considered as controls, and 80 were divided into 8 experimental groups. In the experimental groups, the specimens were sectioned into two halves from the middle, and were then divided into two main groups: one group was repaired with heat cure acrylic resin, and the other with cold cure acrylic resin. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups: unreinforced, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire. All specimens were subjected to a 3-point bending test, and the flexural strength was calculated. Results: The group repaired with heat cure acrylic resin and reinforced with glass fiber showed the highest flexural strength; however, the group repaired with cold cure acrylic resin and reinforced with polyethylene fibers had the lowest flexural strength. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with heat cure and cold cure acrylic resins without reinforcement. Conclusion: Repairing denture base with heat cure acrylic resin, reinforced with glass fibers increases the flexural strength of denture base. PMID:26877726

  10. Flexural Strength of Cold and Heat Cure Acrylic Resins Reinforced with Different Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Heidari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Heat-polymerized acrylic resin has been the most commonly used denture base material for over 60 years. However, the mechanical strength of acrylic resin is not adequate for long-term clinical performance of dentures. Consequently, fracture is a com- mon clinical occurrence, which often occurs in the midline of denture base.This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of cold cure and heat cure acrylic resins, rein- forced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire for denture base repair.Materials and Methods: Ninety specimens were prepared and allocated to nine groups. Ten specimens were included in the control group, and 80 were allocated to 8 experi- mental groups. In the experimental groups, the specimens were sectioned into two halves from the middle, and were then divided into two main groups: one group was repaired with heat cure acrylic resin, and the other with cold cure acrylic resin. Each group was di- vided into 4 subgroups: unreinforced, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire. All specimens were then subjected to a 3-point bending test, and the flexural strength was calculated.Results: The group repaired with heat cure acrylic resin and reinforced with glass fiber showed the highest flexural strength; however, the group repaired with cold cure acrylic resin and reinforced with polyethylene fibers had the lowest flexural strength. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with heat cure and cold cure acrylic resins without reinforcement.Conclusion: Repairing denture base with heat cure acrylic resin, reinforced with glass fi- bers increases the flexural strength of denture base.

  11. Fabrication of Closed Hollow Bulb Obturator Using Thermoplastic Resin Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidhan Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Closed hollow bulb obturators are used for the rehabilitation of postmaxillectomy patients. However, the time consuming process, complexity of fabrication, water leakage, and discoloration are notable disadvantages of this technique. This paper describes a clinical report of fabricating closed hollow bulb obturator using a single flask and one time processing method for an acquired maxillary defect. Hard thermoplastic resin sheet has been used for the fabrication of hollow bulb part of the obturator. Method. After fabrication of master cast conventionally, bulb and lid part of the defect were formed separately and joined by autopolymerizing acrylic resin to form one sized smaller hollow body. During packing procedure, the defect area was loaded with heat polymerizing acrylic resin and then previously fabricated smaller hollow body was adapted over it. The whole area was then loaded with heat cure acrylic. Further processes were carried out conventionally. Conclusion. This technique uses single flask which reduces laboratory time and makes the procedure simple. The thickness of hollow bulb can be controlled and light weight closed hollow bulb prosthesis can be fabricated. It also minimizes the disadvantages of closed hollow bulb obturator such as water leakage, bacterial infection, and discoloration.

  12. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, YuPo J [Naperville, IL; Henry, Michael P [Batavia, IL; Snyder, Seth W [Lincolnwood, IL

    2008-11-18

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  13. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, YuPo J [Naperville, IL; Henry, Michael P [Batavia, IL; Snyder, Seth W [Lincolnwood, IL

    2011-07-12

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  14. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira, E-mail: mirabelmcr@iae.cta.br [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Materiais; Costa, Michelle Leali [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (DMT/UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  15. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida; Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira; Costa, Michelle Leali

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  16. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joo Hoon; Choi, Eui Hwan

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  17. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hoon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  18. The Effect of Contrast Material on Radiation Dose at CT: Part I. Incorporation of Contrast Material Dynamics in Anthropomorphic Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W Paul; Marin, Daniele; Nelson, Rendon C; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-06-01

    Purpose To develop a method to incorporate the propagation of contrast material into computational anthropomorphic phantoms for estimation of organ dose at computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods A patient-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of the human cardiovascular system was incorporated into 58 extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) patient phantoms. The PBPK model comprised compartmental models of vessels and organs unique to each XCAT model. For typical injection protocols, the dynamics of the contrast material in the body were described according to a series of patient-specific iodine mass-balance differential equations, the solutions to which provided the contrast material concentration time curves for each compartment. Each organ was assigned to a corresponding time-varying iodinated contrast agent to create the contrast material-enhanced five-dimensional XCAT models, in which the fifth dimension represents the dynamics of contrast material. To validate the accuracy of the models, simulated aortic and hepatic contrast-enhancement results throughout the models were compared with previously published clinical data by using the percentage of discrepancy in the mean, time to 90% peak, peak value, and slope of enhancement in a paired t test at the 95% significance level. Results The PBPK model allowed effective prediction of the time-varying concentration curves of various contrast material administrations in each organ for different patient models. The contrast-enhancement results were in agreement with results of previously published clinical data, with mean percentage, time to 90% peak, peak value, and slope of less than 10% (P > .74), 4%, 7%, and 14% for uniphasic and 12% (P > .56), 4%, 12%, and 14% for biphasic injection protocols, respectively. The exception was hepatic enhancement results calculated for a uniphasic injection protocol for which the discrepancy was less than 25%. Conclusion A technique to model the propagation of

  19. Investigation into the Depth of Cure of Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    glass - ionomer restorative dental materials. Samples of different thicknesses using...attempt at delineating the depth of cure of resin-modified glass - ionomer restorative dental materials. Samples of different thicknesses using Vitremer... glass ionomers liners. Dent Mater 1993:9:198-203. 16. Culbertson BM. Glass - ionomer dental restoratives . Prog Polym Sci 2001 ;26:577-604. 17. Fuji II

  20. A long-term laboratory test on staining susceptibility of esthetic composite resin materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardu, S.; Braut, V.; Gutemberg, D.; Krejci, I.; Dietschi, D.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the color stability of composite resin types designed for esthetic anterior restorations when continuously exposed to various staining agents. Method and Materials: Thirty-six disk-shaped specimens were made of each of 12 composite materials (1 microfilled and 11 hybrid

  1. Effect of polishing systems on stain susceptibility and surface roughness of nanocomposite resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakah, Haifa M; Taher, Nadia M

    2014-09-01

    Different polishing systems vary in their effect on reducing surface roughness and stain susceptibility of dental composite resin materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of 3 polishing systems on the stain susceptibility and surface roughness of 2 nanocomposite resins and a microhybrid composite resin. Forty-five disks (2×10 mm) each were fabricated of 2 nanocomposite resins (Filtek Supreme XT and Tetric EvoCeram) and 1 microhybrid composite resin (Z250). Both sides of the disks were wet finished, and 1 side was polished with PoGo, Astropol, or Hi-Shine (n=5). Unpolished surfaces served as controls. The average roughness (Ra, μm) was measured with a profilometer, and the baseline color was recorded with a spectrophotometer. All specimens were incubated while soaking in a staining solution of coffee, green tea, and berry juice for 3 weeks. The color was recorded again, and the data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA at α=.05 and Tukey multiple comparison tests. All polishing systems improved the staining resistance of Filtek Supreme XT and Z250 but did not affect that of Tetric EvoCeram. The surface color of Filtek Supreme XT was changed significantly and was the smoothest after polishing with PoGo, whereas Hi-Shine produced significantly rougher surfaces but with the lowest color change. Hi-Shine produced the highest color change in Z250. The surface roughness did not differ significantly between the other polishing systems. Tetric EvoCeram showed no significant differences in color change or surface roughness. Staining susceptibility and surface roughness depend mainly on material composition and on the polishing procedures. Polishing improves the staining resistance of composite resins. Nanocomposite resins did not exhibit better staining resistance or surface roughness than microhybrid composite resin. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a solid phantom prototype of Mo-99, Tc-99, and Co-57 in epoxy resins for evaluating of the uniformity in SPECT systems images; Desarrollo de un prototipo de fantoma solido de Mo-99, Tc-99, y Co-57 en resinas epoxicas para evaluacion de la uniformidad en imagenes de sistemas SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia D, O.C. [Facultad de Medicina, UAEM, Toluca, Mexico (Mexico); Cortes P, A.; Becerril V, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Garcia R, J.C. [Instituto de Psiquiatria Ramon de la Fuente, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    A manufacture method of solid phantoms prototype of resin with different radioisotopes is described. The phantom manufactured of molybdenum 99 has an uniformity of 96% determined with a Na(Tl) detector mono channel analyzer with a lead collimator of 1 cm diameter. (Author)

  3. Physical Property Investigation of Two Recently Marketed Resin Composite Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Huysmans  MCDNJM.  12-­‐year   Survival  of   Composite  vs.   Amalgam  Restorations.  J  Dent  Res  2010;  89:1063-­‐   1067...Marketed Resin Composite Restorative Materials 7. Intended publication/meeting: International Association of Dental Research Annual Meeting 8...Marketed Resin Composite Restorative Materials Major Marcus P. Kropf APPROVED; Colo71 Howard W. Roberts Date APPROVED: Col Drew W. Fallis Dean, Air

  4. The influence of powder liquid ratio on the flexural strength of fibre reinforced acrylic resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, G A V M; du Rand, M

    2009-04-01

    Often the powder liquid (P/L) ratio of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resins is changed to modify the handling properties of the material. While it is known that this may influence the mechanical properties of unreinforced PMMA resin, little is known about its effect on fibre reinforced resin. The purpose of this study was to determine how different P/L ratios influence the flexural strength (FS) of a glass fibre reinforced autopolymerizing PMMA resin used for fabricating fixed partial dentures. Two main groups of PMMA resin, 1 unreinforced and 1 reinforced with glass fibre, had 3 subgroups (n=21) each representing a different P/L ratio. The manufacturer's recommended ratio served as control. The specimens were prepared for a 3-point bending test. Using a universal testing machine, maximum force was recorded and the FS was calculated. Median FS values were compared by means of non-parametric analysis of variance (Kruskal-Wallis). A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. FS values of all reinforced subgroups were significantly higher than the values of the unreinforced subgroups (p0.05). Within the reinforced group there was a significant difference between the control group, which had a higher median FS value than the two other subgroups (presin with glass fibre, it is important to use the recommended P/L ratio. For unreinforced PMMA resin the P/L ratio can be changed within limits without adverse effects on the FS.

  5. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Studi Eksperimental Laju Keausan Material Gigi Tiruan dari Resin Akrilik Berpenguat Fiberglass dengan Variasi Susunan Serat Penguat

    OpenAIRE

    Kristasari, Prastika; Kaelani, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Resin akrilik adalah salah satu material yang mulai banyak digunakan sebagai salah satu material untuk pembuatan gigi tiruan. Penelitian sebelumnya tentang analisis pengujian laju keausan resin akrilik berpenguat serat pada dental prosthesis pada kondisi dry sliding menunjukkan hasil nilai laju keausan berkurang dengan adanya penambahan serat[1]. Saat ini belum ada kajian mengenai laju keausan resin akrilik berpenguat serat pada kondisi wet sliding dengan variasi pola susunan serat yang berbe...

  7. Development of a new neutron shielding material, TN trademark Resin Vyal for transport/storage casks for radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, P.

    2004-01-01

    TN trademark Resin Vyal, a patent pending composite, is a new neutron shielding material developed by COGEMA LOGISTICS for transport/storage casks of radioactive materials (spent fuel, reprocessed fuel,..). This material is composed of a thermosetting resin (vinylester resin in solution of styrene) and two mineral fillers (alumine hydrate and zinc borate). Its shielding ability for neutron radiation is related to a high hydrogen content (for slowing down neutrons) and a high boron content (for absorbing neutrons). Source of hydrogen is organic matrix (resin) and alumine hydrate; source of boron is zinc borate. Atomic concentrations are equal to 5.10 22 at/cm 3 for hydrogen and 9.10 20 at/cm 3 for boron. Due to the flame retardant character of components, the final material has a good fire resistance (it is auto-extinguishable). Its density is equal to 1,8. The manufacturing process of these material is easy: it consists in mixing the fillers and pouring in-situ (in cask); so, the curing of this composite, which leads to a three-dimensional structure, takes place at ambient temperature. Temperature resistance of this material was evaluated by performing exposition tests of samples at different temperatures (150 C to 170 C). According to tests results, its maximal temperature of use was confirmed equal to 160 C

  8. Effect of 180 days of water storage on the transverse strength of acetal resin denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Ayla; Ozkan, Yasemin Kulak; Arda, Tugberk; Akalin, Buket

    2010-01-01

    Acetal resin has been used as an alternative denture base and clasp material since 1986. The manufacturers claim that acetal resin has superior physical properties when compared to conventional denture base acrylic resins. Limited information is available about transverse strengths of acetal resin. The purpose of this investigation was to compare transverse strengths of pink and white acetal resins to transverse strengths of conventional heat-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) resin in increasing durations of water storage. A transverse strength test was performed in accordance with International Standards Organization (ISO) specification No 1567. Twenty 65 x 10 x 2.5 mm(3) specimens of each resin were prepared; five specimens of each resin group were subjected to three-point bending test after 50 hours, 30 days, 60 days, and 180 days of water storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Experimental groups' transverse strengths were compared by three-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests. Transverse strength of PMMA denture base material was found to be in accordance with the requirements of ISO specification No 1567. Transverse strengths of white and pink acetal resin could not be calculated in this study, as white and pink acetal resin specimens did not break at the maximum applied force in the three-point bending test. Flexural strength of acetal resin was found to be within the ISO specification limits. As the water storage time increased, the deflection values of PMMA showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Both the white and pink acetal resin showed significant increase in deflection as the water storage time was increased from 50 hours to 180 days (p resin suffered from permanent deformation, but did not break in the three-point bending test. Acetal resin showed significant increase in deflection as the water storage time was increased from 50 hours to 180 days. All materials tested demonstrated deflection values in compliance with ISO

  9. Development of highly effective neutron shielding material made of phenol-novolac type epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Jeong, Myeong Soo; Hong, Sun Seok; Lee, Won Kyoung; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy; Oh, Seok Jin

    1998-06-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. Especially we developed phenol-novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their characteristics were also evaluated. (author). 22 refs., 11 tabs., 21 figs

  10. Radiopacity of bulk fill flowable resin composite materials | Yildirim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of currently marketed bulk fill flowable dental composite materials (Beautifil Bulk Flowable, SDR Flow, Filtek Bulk Fill Flow, and x‑tra Base Bulk Fill). Materials and Methods: Six specimens of each material with a thickness of 1 mm were prepared, and ...

  11. Radiopacity of bulk fill flowable resin composite materials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-23

    Aug 23, 2015 ... Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of currently marketed bulk fill flowable dental composite materials (Beautifil Bulk Flowable, SDR Flow, Filtek Bulk Fill Flow, and x‑tra Base Bulk Fill). Materials and Methods: Six specimens of each material with a thickness of 1 mm were ...

  12. Preliminary guidelines and recommendations for the development of material and process specifications for carbon fiber-reinforced liquid resin molded materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    This document recommends guidance and criteria for the development of material and process specifications and material acceptance documents for liquid resins and continuous carbon fiber reinforcement materials used in liquid molding processes to manu...

  13. Resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitznagel, Frank A; Horvath, Sebastian D; Guess, Petra C; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-01-01

    Resin bonding is essential for clinical longevity of indirect restorations. Especially in light of the increasing popularity of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated indirect restorations, there is a need to assess optimal bonding protocols for new ceramic/polymer materials and indirect composites. The aim of this article was to review and assess the current scientific evidence on the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. An electronic PubMed database search was conducted from 1966 to September 2013 for in vitro studies pertaining the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. The search revealed 198 titles. Full-text screening was carried out for 43 studies, yielding 18 relevant articles that complied with inclusion criteria. No relevant studies could be identified regarding new ceramic/polymer materials. Most common surface treatments are aluminum-oxide air-abrasion, silane treatment, and hydrofluoric acid-etching for indirect composite restoration. Self-adhesive cements achieve lower bond strengths in comparison with etch-and-rinse systems. Thermocycling has a greater impact on bonding behavior than water storage. Air-particle abrasion and additional silane treatment should be applied to enhance the resin bond to laboratory-processed composites. However, there is an urgent need for in vitro studies that evaluate the bond strength to new ceramic/polymer materials. This article reviews the available dental literature on resin bond of laboratory composites and gives scientifically based guidance for their successful placement. Furthermore, this review demonstrated that future research for new ceramic/polymer materials is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Performance of three resin-based materials for treating uranium-contaminated groundwater within a PRB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Catherine S.; Stewart, Douglas I.; Morris, Katherine; Bryant, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Three materials that are designed to treat uranium-contaminated water were investigated. These are a cation exchange resin, IRN 77; an anion exchange resin, Varion AP; and a recently developed material called PANSIL (quartz sand coated with 2% amidoxime resin by weight). The reaction rate, capacity, and effective pH range of the three materials are reported. The capacity and conditional distribution coefficient in neutral, uranyl-contaminated synthetic groundwater containing carbonate are also reported. The suitability of each material for treating uranium-contaminated groundwater using a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) approach is then discussed. All three materials react rapidly in the pH range 5-7, reaching equilibrium in less than 4 h at ∼23 deg. C. The unconditioned cation exchange resin removed 8 g UO 2 2+ per kg of resin from neutral synthetic groundwater containing 30 mg/l of UO 2 2+ , but a lower capacity is anticipated in groundwater with either higher ionic strength or lower UO 2 2+ concentrations. It operates by first acidifying the solution, then sorbing UO 2 2+ , and can release UO 2 2+ when its buffering capacity has been exhausted. The anion exchange resin is very effective at removing anionic uranyl carbonate species from solutions with a pH above 5, with good specificity. Up to 50 g/kg of uranium is removed from contaminated groundwater at neutral pH. PANSIL is effective at sequestering cationic and neutral uranyl species from solutions in the pH range 4.5-7.5, with very good specificity. The capacity of PANSIL is pH-dependent, increasing from about 0.4 g/kg at pH 4.5, to about 1 g/kg at pH 6, and 1.5 g/kg around pH 7.5. In neutral groundwater containing carbonate, both the anion exchange resin and PANSIL exhibit conditional distribution coefficients exceeding 1470 ml/g, which is about an order of magnitude higher than comparable reactive barrier materials reported in the literature

  15. 'It's All Done With Mirrors': V.S. Ramachandran and the Material Culture of Phantom Limb Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Katja

    2016-07-01

    This article examines the material culture of neuroscientist Vilayanur S. Ramachandran's research into phantom limbs. In the 1990s Ramachandran used a 'mirror box' to 'resurrect' phantom limbs and thus to treat the pain that often accompanied them. The experimental success of his mirror therapy led Ramachandran to see mirrors as a useful model of brain function, a tendency that explains his attraction to work on 'mirror neurons'. I argue that Ramachandran's fascination with and repeated appeal to the mirror can be explained by the way it allowed him to confront a perennial problem in the mind and brain sciences, that of the relationship between a supposedly immaterial mind and a material brain. By producing what Ramachandran called a 'virtual reality', relating in varied and complex ways to the material world, the mirror reproduced a form of psycho-physical parallelism and dualistic ontology, while conforming to the materialist norms of neuroscience today.

  16. Epoxy resin synthesis using low molecular weight lignin separated from various lignocellulosic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Chikako; Basnet, Sunita; Otsuka, Masaya; Sasaki, Chizuru; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2015-03-01

    A low molecular weight lignin from various lignocellulosic materials was used for the synthesis of bio-based epoxy resins. The lignin extracted with methanol from steam-exploded samples (steaming time of 5 min at steam pressure of 3.5 MPa) from different biomasses (i.e., cedar, eucalyptus, and bamboo) were functionalized by the reaction with epichlorohydrin, catalyzed by a water-soluble phase transfer catalyst tetramethylammonium chloride, which was further reacted with 30 wt% aqueous NaOH for ring closure using methyl ethyl ketone as a solvent. The glycidylated products of the lignin with good yields were cured to epoxy polymer networks with bio-based curing agents i.e., lignin itself and a commercial curing agent TD2131. Relatively good thermal properties of the bio-based epoxy network was obtained and thermal decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss (Td5) of cedar-derived epoxy resin was higher than that derived from eucalyptus and bamboo. The bio-based resin satisfies the stability requirement of epoxy resin applicable for electric circuit boards. The methanol-insoluble residues were enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce glucose. This study indicated that the biomass-derived methanol-soluble lignin may be a promising candidate to be used as a substitute for petroleum-based epoxy resin derived from bisphenol A, while insoluble residues may be processed to give a bioethanol precursor i.e., glucose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Two-photon polymerization of an epoxy-acrylate resin material system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, R.J.; O'Brien, S.

    2011-01-01

    Improved material systems are of great interest in the development of two-photon polymerization techniques for the fabrication of three dimensional micro- and nano-structures. The properties of the photosensitive resin are important in the realisation of structures with submicron dimensions. In this study investigation of a custom organic resin, cross-linked by a two-photon induced process, using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, is described. A structural, optical and mechanical analysis of the optimised material is presented. The influence of both material system and laser processing parameters on achievable micro-structure and size is presented as are representative structures. Parameters include: laser power, photo-initiator concentration and material composition.

  18. Study on polyethylene glycol/epoxy resin composite as a form-stable phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yutang; Kang Huiying; Wang Weilong; Liu Hong; Gao Xuenong

    2010-01-01

    Form-stable polyethylene glycol (PEG)/epoxy resin (EP) composite as a novel phase change material (PCM) was prepared using casting molding method. In this new material, PEG acts as the latent heat storage material and EP polymer serves as the supporting material, which provides structural strength and prevents the leakage of the melted PEG. The structure and morphology of the novel composite were observed using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The thermo-mechanical property and transition behavior were characterized by polarizing optical microscope (POM), static thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The experimental results show that, as a result of the physical tangled function of the epoxy resin carrier to the PEG segment, the composite macroscopically presents the solid-solid phase change characteristic.

  19. Shear bond strength of four resin cements used to lute ceramic core material to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutayhan; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Usumez, Aslihan

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four resin cements on the shear bond strength of a ceramic core material to dentin. One hundred twenty molar teeth were embedded in a self-curing acrylic resin. The occlusal third of the crowns were sectioned under water cooling. All specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth each according to the resin cement used. One hundred twenty cylindrical-shaped, 2.7-mm wide, 3-mm high ceramic core materials were heat-pressed. The core cylinders were then luted with one of the four resin systems to dentin (Super-Bond C&B, Chemiace II, Variolink II, and Panavia F). Half of the specimens (n = 15) were tested after 24 hours; the other half (n = 15) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 day and then thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa, and the results were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the resin cement used (p 0.05). Significant interactions were present between resin cement and thermocycling (p 0.05). The increase in the shear bond strength values in the Panavia F (4.5 +/- 0.7 MPa) and Variolink II (5.5 +/- 2.1 MPa) groups after thermocycling was also not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Variolink II and Panavia F systems showed higher shear bond strength values than Chemiace II and Super-Bond C&B. They can be recommended for luting ceramic cores to dentin surfaces.

  20. SU-E-T-608: Perturbation Corrections for Alanine Dosimeters in Different Phantom Materials in High-Energy Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Czarnecki, D; Anton, M; Zink, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Alanine dosimeters are often used for in-vivo dosimetry purposes in radiation therapy. In a Monte Carlo study the influence of 20 different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters was investigated. The investigations were performed in high-energy photon beams, covering the whole range from 60 Co up to 25 MV-X. The aim of the study is the introduction of a perturbation correction k env for alanine dosimeters accounting for the environmental material. Methods: The influence of different surrounding materials on the response of alanine dosimeters was investigated with Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc code. The photon source was adapted with BEAMnrc to a 60 Co unit and an Elekta (E nom =6, 10, 25 MV-X) linear accelerator. Different tissue-equivalent materials ranging from cortical bone to lung were investigated. In addition to available phantom materials, some material compositions were taken and scaled to different electron densities. The depth of the alanine detectors within the different phantom materials corresponds to 5 cm depth in water, i.e. the depth is scaled according to the electron density (n e /n e,w ) of the corresponding phantom material. The dose was scored within the detector volume once for an alanine/paraffin mixture and once for a liquid water voxel. The relative response, the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water, was calculated and compared to the corresponding ratio under reference conditions. Results: For each beam quality the relative response r and the correction factor for the environment kenv was calculated. k env =0.9991+0.0049 *((n e /n e,w )−0.7659) 3 Conclusion: A perturbation correction factor k env accounting for the phantom environment has been introduced. The response of the alanine dosimeter can be considered independent of the surrounding material for relative electron densities (n e /n e,w ) between 1 and 1.4. For denser materials such as bone or much less dense

  1. Radiometric determinations of linear mass, resin levels and density of composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutaine, J.L.; Pintena, J.; Tanguy, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the principle, characteristics and performances of a gamma back-scattering gauge developed in cooperation between the CEA and SNPE. This instrument allows for on-line inspection of the linear mass and resin level of strips of composite materials whilst being produced. The industrial application involved boron, carbon and 'Kevlar' fibres. The performance of beta and gamma transmission gauges are also given for inspecting the density of panels and dense composite materials [fr

  2. In vitro evaluation of the bond strength of composite resin foundation materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; Baba, Nadim Z

    2015-10-01

    Achieving adequate bonding of composite resin foundation materials to dentin can be a challenge. Bonding can be affected by the type of bonding material and method used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to test the bond strengths of selected dual-polymerizing composite resin foundation materials to dentin using light, chemical, or dual-polymerized adhesive systems. Eighty freshly extracted human third molars were sectioned vertically into mesial and distal halves and embedded in acrylic resin using a copper cylinder. Specimens were divided into 16 groups. Each group received a resin foundation that was bonded to dentin according to each manufacturer's instructions. All tested foundations were dual polymerized except Tetric Ceram, which was light polymerized. BisCore, Build-it, CompCore, CoreRestore, and FluoroCore resin foundation materials were bonded to dentin with the use of the corresponding adhesives in 3 different bonding methods: adhesive was light polymerized; adhesive was chemically polymerized; and adhesive was dual polymerized. Each specimen was seated in a custom shear test device, and a load was applied with the descending rod of the jig from a mechanical testing machine with a perpendicular force to the dentin-adhesive interface. Statistical analysis was performed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc pairwise comparison with Tukey test when statistically significant differences were found (α=.05). Resin foundation materials bonded to dentin with light-polymerized adhesives produced significantly higher bond strengths than when bonded with chemically or dual-polymerized adhesives. No significant difference was found between the single-component and multiple-components adhesives used with Tetric Ceram and BisCore foundations (P=.083). However, BisCore used with All-Bond 2 adhesive (multiple components) produced significantly lower bond strengths than when used with One-Step (P=.024). Adhesive failure was the most common failure location. Cohesive

  3. In vitro wear of resin-based materials--simultaneous corrosive and abrasive wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correr, Gisele Maria; Bruschi Alonso, Roberta Caroline; Correr Sobrinho, Lourenço; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Ferracane, Jack Liborio

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the wear of resin-based materials caused by the association of abrasive and corrosive processes. Twenty specimens were prepared for each material, cast in epoxy in acrylic rings, polished, and profiled with an MTS 3D Profiler. Antagonists were made from deciduous molars. Specimens were distributed into eight groups (n = 10), according to the material (Filtek Supreme, Point 4, Dyract AP, and Fuji II LC) and the type of slurry (neutral and acidic), and then cycled 100,000 times in the OHSU oral wear simulator. The specimens were cleaned and reprofiled. Volume loss and maximum depth were determined. ANOVA and Tukey's test were used for data analysis (p wear facet on the antagonist was also measured. Composites displayed less wear than the compomer and the resin-modified glass ionomer. Significant differences also were found for cusp wear, with a significant positive correlation shown between cusp and material wear. The acidic slurry significantly increased the wear of the materials compared to the neutral slurry. Exposure to acidic slurry accelerated the wear of resin-based materials.

  4. Comparative evaluation of few physical properties of epoxy resin, resin-modified gypsum and conventional type IV gypsum die materials: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjarlapudi, Manmohan Choudary; Reddy, S Varalakshmi; Madineni, Praveen Kumar; Ealla, Kranti Kiran Reddy; Nunna, Venkata Narayana; Manne, Sanjay Dutt

    2012-01-01

    To compare and evaluate few physical properties of epoxy resin, resin-modified gypsum and conventional type-IV gypsum die material. In the present study, dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength of three die materials like epoxy resin (Diemet-E), resin-modified gypsum (Synarock) and conventional type-IV gypsum (Ultrarock) are analyzed. For dimensional accuracy, master die (Bailey's die) is used and calibrations were made with digital microscope. For surface detail reproduction and transverse strength, rectangular stainless steel master die (Duke's die) was used and calibrations were made with Toolmaker's microscope and Instron universal testing machine respectively. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the means and standard deviation for groups of each test. The results of the study showed statistically significant difference among these materials in dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength. Epoxy resin exhibited superiority in dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength and is nearest to the standards of accurate die material.

  5. Effectiveness of resin-based materials against erosive and abrasive enamel wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyi; Pan, Jie; Zhang, Songmei; Malmstrom, Hans S; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of resin-based materials against erosive enamel wear under erosive and abrasive challenges by orange juice and tooth brushing. Fifty enamel specimens from third molars were assigned to five groups: ICON resin infiltration with no etching (ICON-NE), ICON resin infiltration with 15 % HCl etching (ICON-AE), Seal & Protect sealant (S&P), Tetric EvoFlow (TEF), and control. Erosive lesions were first created on enamel, then treated with resin-based materials. Erosive and abrasive challenges by orange juice and tooth brushing were repeated after treatments. Erosive wear of the treated areas was measured with 3D scanning microscopy, and data were analyzed using ANOVA and paired t tests. Treatments with ICON, S&P, and TEF created a protective material coating of 4.5 ± 1.9 μm, 44.3 ± 8.1 μm, and 84.6 ± 15.7 μm in thickness on the lesion surfaces, respectively. After 15 cycles of erosive and abrasive challenges, enamel or material losses were 21.9 ± 2.3 μm for control, 24.5 ± 4.0 μm for ICON-NE, 24.6 ± 7.4 μm for ICON-AE, 11.2 ± 4.1 μm for S&P, and 3.9 ± 1.9 μm for TEF, respectively. The protective coatings were completely lost in the ICON infiltration groups but remained intact in both the S&P and TEF groups after erosive and abrasive challenges. In contrast to a resin sealant and a flowable composite, ICON infiltration resin was not effective in protecting enamel surfaces from erosive and abrasive wear. Sealant and flowable composite resin may create protective coatings on eroded enamel surfaces and prevent further tissue loss.

  6. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (Presin composite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations.

  7. Antibacterial properties of amalgam and composite resin materials used as cores under crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghadban, A; Al Shaarani, F

    2012-06-01

    The Aim of this Study was to compare the bacterial growth in the bulk of both amalgam and fluoridated composite resin materials used as cores under crowns at core's surface (in the superficial area of the bulk) and depth levels. With 24 lower premolars, 12 of them were restored with metal posts and amalgam cores (group 1). The rest were restored with glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC) posts and fluoridated composite resin cores (group 2). All specimens were covered with aluminium crowns cemented with resin cement, and then they were soaked in natural saliva for three months. Excoriations abraded from the superficial and the depth areas of the core materials were cultured under aerobic conditions on blood agar plates. After incubation for 2 days, colonies formed on the plates were identified, and the CFU mg(-1) counts were recorded accordingly. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent sample T test. The mean values of CFU mg(-1) counts in group 2 excoriations (surface 39.75, and depth 9.75) were higher than the group 1 excoriations (surface 1.67, and depth 0.42). This study supports the use of amalgam for building up cores due to its antibacterial properties. Composite resin, however, enhanced sizable bacterial growth despite the presence of fluoride.

  8. Rubber-like materials derived from biosourced phenolic resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral-Labat, G.; Grishechko, L. I.; Silva, G. F. B. Lenz e.; Kuznetsov, B. N.; Fierro, V.; Pizzi, A.; Celzard, A.

    2017-07-01

    The present work describes new gels derived from cheap, abundant and non-toxic wood bark extracts of phenolic nature, behaving like elastomers. Especially, we show that these materials might be used as rubber springs. Such amazing properties were obtained by a quite simple synthesis based on the autocondensation of flavonoid tannins in water at low pH in the presence of a plasticizer. After gelation and drying, the materials presented elastic properties that could be tuned from hard and brittle to quite soft and deformable, depending on the amount of plasticizer in the starting formulation. Not only the materials containing the relevant amount of plasticizer had stress-strain characteristics in quasi-static and cyclic compression similar to most commercial rubber springs, but they presented outstanding fire retardance, surviving 5 min in a flame at 1000°C in air. Neither flame propagation nor drips were noticed during the fire test, and the materials were auto-extinguishable. These excellent features make these materials potential substitutes to usual organic elastomers.

  9. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-08-10

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  10. Radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials compared to human and bovine teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkan, Gurel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disk specimens 6 mm in diameter and 1 mm thick (N = 220, n = 10) were prepared from the following restorative materials: · eight shades of nanofilled composite (Aelite Aesthetic Enamel), · seven shades of nanohybrid composite (Grandio Universal), · six shades of photopolymerized polyacid modified compomer (Glasiosite), and · one shade of hybrid composite (X-tra fil U). Human canine dentin (n = 10), bovine enamel (n = 10), and an aluminum (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted, and equivalent Al thickness (eq Al) values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The data were analyzed using a non-parametric one-way ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis), and multiple comparisons were made with a Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test (a = 0.05). Different shades of resin-based restorative materials tested did not reveal statistically significant differences within each material group (p > 0.05). Radiopacity values of the resin-based restorative materials investigated varied depending on their types; however, within different shades of one material type, radiopacity values were comparable. Every shade of nanocomposite material other than Aelite Aesthetic Enamel Incisal LT Gray showed comparable radiopacity to human dentin. Other materials tested demonstrated higher radiopacity compared to human dentin and bovine enamel.

  11. Does standoff material affect acoustic radiation force impulse elastography? A preclinical study of a modified elastography phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerieth, Katharina; Gaßmann, Bernhard; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Kemmner, Stephan; Heemann, Uwe; Stock, Konrad Friedrich

    2018-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the influence of standoff material on acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) measurements in an elasticity phantom by using two different probes. Using ARFI elastography, 10 observers measured the shear wave velocity (SWV, m/sec) in different lesions of an elasticity phantom with a convex 4C1 probe and a linear 9L4 probe. The experimental setup was expanded by the use of an interposed piece of porcine muscle as standoff material. The probe pressure on the phantom was registered. Faulty ARFI measurements occurred more often when quantifying the hardest lesion (74.0 kPa 4.97 m/sec) by the 9L4 probe with the porcine muscle as a standoff material interposed between the probe and the phantom. The success rate for ARFI measurements in these series was 52.4%, compared with 99.5% in the other series. The SWV values measured with the 9L4 probe were significantly higher (3.33±1.39 m/sec vs. 2.60±0.74 m/sec, Pmaterial were lower than those without the muscle (significant for 9L4, P=0.040). The deviation from the reference value and the variance increased significantly with the 9L4 probe if the muscle was in situ (B=0.27, P=0.004 and B=0.32, Pmaterial influenced the occurrence of failed measurements as well as the variance and the accuracy of the measured values. The linear high-frequency probe was particularly affected.

  12. INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ON PROPERTIES OF IONOMERIC AND RESIN SEALANT MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Correr, Gisele Maria; Alonso, Roberta Caroline Bruschi; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo; Alves, Marcelo Correa; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of environmental conditions on the degradation of ionomeric and resin sealant materials. Material and Methods: FluroShield, Vitremer, and Ketac Molar disc-shaped specimens (n=18/material) were prepared, polished, subjected to initial hardness and roughness readings. Six discs of each material were randomly assigned to one of three different storage solutions: 0.3% citric acid (CA), demineralization solution (DE), and remineralization solution (RE). The specimens were individually immersed in 3 mL of the test solutions, which were daily changed. After 15 days of storage, new surface roughness and hardness readings were done. Fluoride release in the solutions was measured within 15 days. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's and Contrast tests (α=0.05). Results: The storage in CA increased the roughness of Vitremer and Ketac Molar. A significant reduction in hardness was observed for all materials after storage in all solutions. For all materials, the greatest amounts of fluoride release occurred during the 1st day. FluroShield presented the same patterns of fluoride release in all solutions. Ketac Molar and Vitremer released the highest amounts of fluoride in the CA solution. Conclusions: Ionomeric materials are more susceptible to degradation than resin-based materials under acidic conditions. Acidic conditions lead to a higher fluoride release from ionomeric materials. PMID:19668988

  13. Stickiness of dental resin composite materials to steel, dentin and bonded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Kathrin; Graf, Alexandra; Watts, David; Schedle, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Stickiness is a vital rheological parameter for the clinical handling behavior of unset resin composite restoratives. The aim of this study was to investigate the stickiness of three different resin composites at 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C tested on steel, dentin and dentin covered with different bonding agents. The stickiness instrument, used in this study consists of a vertical cylindrical stainless steel rod, with a flat circular end, and a platform with a cylindrical mold (diameter: 6.1mm, depth: 2.2mm). The test-material surface temperature and the speed of the rod can be modified. It moves slowly into the prepared mold which is filled with unset composite materials. The degree of stickiness is deducted from the height of the "elevation" the material forms when the plunger is withdrawn from the mold until the steelhead detaches itself from the composite. In this study, stickiness was tested directly to the steel plunger and to dentin slices (uncovered or covered with two different bonding agents) fixed to the plunger rod with a clamp. The coefficients of variation (CVs) were generally less than 0.10, indicating that the stickiness instrument offers an adequately reproducible way of testing stickiness. The tested composite materials varied significantly in stickiness. For all investigated materials a decrease of peak heights with increasing speed was found (for all three materials: psteel and least on bonded dentin. The order of stickiness of composites was not affected by testing the stickiness on the different materials. This method allows the characterization of composite resin materials stickiness to steel, as equivalent to dental steel instruments, and to bonded dentin as equivalent to the tooth cavity after preparation. An ideal material should have a sufficient difference between stickiness on steel and dentin so that it remains in the cavity and is not pulled back by the steel instrument.

  14. Thermal conductivity of 2D nano-structured graphitic materials and their composites with epoxy resins

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Mulan; Wan, Chaoying; McNally, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The outstanding thermal conductivity (λ) of graphene and its derivatives offers a potential route to enhance the thermal conductivity of epoxy resins. Key challenges still need to be overcome to ensure effective dispersion and distribution of 2D graphitic fillers throughout the epoxy matrix. 2D filler type, morphology, surface chemistry and dimensions are all important factors in determining filler thermal conductivity and de facto the thermal conductivity of the composite material. ...

  15. Biological Effects of Provisional Resin Materials on Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, S-K; Mahapatra, C; Lee, H-H; Kim, H-W; Lee, J-H

    This study investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity as well as the proinflammatory cytokine expression of provisional resin materials on primary cultured human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Five commercially available provisional resin materials were chosen (SNAP [SN], Luxatemp [LT], Jet [JE], Revotek LC [RL], and Vipi block [VB]). Eluates that were either polymerizing or already set were added to hDPSCs under serially diluted conditions divided into three different setting times (25% set, 50% set, and 100% set) and incubated for 24 hours with 2× concentrated culture media. Cell cytotoxicity tests were performed by LDH assay and live and dead confocal microscope images. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in SN and VB was measured using cytokine antibody arrays. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) or ANOVA followed by the Tukey post hoc test at a significance level of pprovisional resin materials during polymerization (SN, LT, and JE) were cytotoxic to hDPSCs and may adversely affect pulp tissue.

  16. Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum pressure only. The two materials selected for this study are MR50/LTM25, and CFS003/LTM25 with Amoco T300 fiber; both prepregs are manufactured by The Advanced Composites Group. MR50/LTM25 is a unidirectional prepreg tape using Mitsubishi MR50 carbon fiber impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. CRS003/LTM25 is a 2 by 2 twill fabric using Amoco T300 fiber and impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. Among the properties presented in this report are strength, stiffness, bolt bearing, and damage tolerance. Many of these properties were obtained at three environmental conditions: cold temperature/dry (CTD), room temperature/dry (RTD), and elevated temperature/wet (ETW). A few properties were obtained at room temperature/wet (RTW), and elevated temperature/dry (ETD). The cold and elevated temperatures used for testing were -125 F and 180 F, respectively. In addition, several properties related to processing are presented.

  17. Development of breast phantom for quality assessment of mammographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvelos, Jeniffer Miranda; Flores, Mabel Bustos; Amaral, Fernando; Rio, Margarita Chevalier del; Mourao, Arnaldo Prata, E-mail: jenifferarvelos00@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Biomedica; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid (Spain). Faculdad de Medicina. Departmento de Radiologia

    2017-11-01

    Diagnosis of breast cancer in young women may be impaired by the tissue composition of breast in this age group, as fibroglandular tissue is present in greater amount in young women and it has higher density than fibrous and fatty tissues which predominate in women older than 40 years old. The higher density of breast tissue makes it difficult to identify nodules in two-dimensional techniques, due to the overlapping of dense layers. Breast phantoms are used in evaluation and quality control of clinical images, and therefore, it is important to develop non-homogeneous phantoms that may better simulate a real breast. Grouped microcalcifications are often the earliest changes associated with malignant neoplasm of breast. In this work, a phantom was developed in the form of a compressed breast using acrylic resin blend. The resin blend used to fulfill the interior of the phantom has similar mammographic density to the one in fibroglandular tissue, representing a dense breast. The lesions were made of acrylic resin blend and calcium compounds that might simulate breast abnormalities, representing nodules, macrocalcifications and microcalcifications of different dimensions and densities. They were distributed into the ma-terial representing fibroglandular tissue. The developed phantom has a thickness of 1 cm, and it may be matched with other plates to represent a dense breast of thickness between 5 and 6 cm. The main goal of the project is to evaluate the sensitivity of detection of these calcifications in relation to their density and location in the breast in two-dimensional images generated in mammography equipment. Mammographic images allow the visualization of the changes implemented in the phantom. The developed phantom may be used in evaluation of diagnostic images generated through two-dimensional and three-dimensional images. (author)

  18. Development of breast phantom for quality assessment of mammographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvelos, Jeniffer Miranda; Flores, Mabel Bustos; Amaral, Fernando; Rio, Margarita Chevalier del; Mourao, Arnaldo Prata; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais; Universidad Complutense de Madrid

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of breast cancer in young women may be impaired by the tissue composition of breast in this age group, as fibroglandular tissue is present in greater amount in young women and it has higher density than fibrous and fatty tissues which predominate in women older than 40 years old. The higher density of breast tissue makes it difficult to identify nodules in two-dimensional techniques, due to the overlapping of dense layers. Breast phantoms are used in evaluation and quality control of clinical images, and therefore, it is important to develop non-homogeneous phantoms that may better simulate a real breast. Grouped microcalcifications are often the earliest changes associated with malignant neoplasm of breast. In this work, a phantom was developed in the form of a compressed breast using acrylic resin blend. The resin blend used to fulfill the interior of the phantom has similar mammographic density to the one in fibroglandular tissue, representing a dense breast. The lesions were made of acrylic resin blend and calcium compounds that might simulate breast abnormalities, representing nodules, macrocalcifications and microcalcifications of different dimensions and densities. They were distributed into the ma-terial representing fibroglandular tissue. The developed phantom has a thickness of 1 cm, and it may be matched with other plates to represent a dense breast of thickness between 5 and 6 cm. The main goal of the project is to evaluate the sensitivity of detection of these calcifications in relation to their density and location in the breast in two-dimensional images generated in mammography equipment. Mammographic images allow the visualization of the changes implemented in the phantom. The developed phantom may be used in evaluation of diagnostic images generated through two-dimensional and three-dimensional images. (author)

  19. Influence of Curing Light Attenuation Caused by Aesthetic Indirect Restorative Materials on Resin Cement Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Bárbara; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Junior, Washington Steagall; Kawano, Yoshio; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To verify the effect of interposing different indirect restorative materials on degree of conversion (DC), hardness, and flexural strength of a dual-cure resin cement. Methods: Discs (2 mm-thick, n=5) of four indirect restorative materials were manufactured: a layered glass-ceramic (GC); a heat-pressed lithium disilicate-based glass-ceramic veneered with the layered glass-ceramic (LD); a micro-hybrid (MH); and a micro-filled (MF) indirect composite resin. The light transmittance of these materials was determined using a double-beam spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Bar-shaped specimens of a dual-cure resin cement (Nexus 2/SDS Kerr), with (dual-cure mode) and without the catalyst paste (light-cure mode), were photoactivated through the discs using either a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) or a light-emitting diode (LED) unit. As a control, specimens were photoactivated without the interposed discs. Specimens were stored at 37ºC for 24h before being submitted to FT-Raman spectrometry (n=3), Knoop microhardness (n=6) and three-point bending (n=6) tests. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results: MH presented the highest transmittance. The DC was lower in light-cure mode than in dual-cure mode. All restorative materials reduced the cement microhardness in light-cure mode. GC and LD with QTH and GC with LED decreased the strength of the cement for both activation modes compared to the controls. Curing units did not affect DC or microhardness, except when the dual-cure cement was photoactivated through LD (LED>QTH). Flexural strength was higher with QTH compared to LED. Conclusions: Differences in transmittance among the restorative materials significantly influenced cement DC and flexural strength, regardless of the activation mode, as well as the microhardness of the resin cement tested in light-cure mode. Microhardness was not impaired by the interposed materials when the resin cement was used in dual-cure mode. PMID:20613921

  20. A comparison of the accuracy of patterns processed from an inlay casting wax, an auto-polymerized resin and a light-cured resin pattern material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Rajagopal

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The resin pattern materials studied, undergo a significantly less dimensional change than the inlay waxes on prolonged storage. They would possibly be a better alternative to inlay wax in situations requiring high precision or when delayed investment (more than 1 h of patterns can be expected.

  1. Trends in material choice for posterior restorations in an Israeli dental school: composite resin versus amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Gal, Gilad; Weiss, Ervin I

    2011-12-01

    According to a recent American Dental Association survey, posterior composite resin restorations now outnumber amalgam restorations in the United States. Dental schools around the world vary considerably in the extent to which they teach the use of composite resins. We aimed to determine if there has been an increase in the placement of posterior composite restorations in an Israeli dental school and if faculty experience affects the type of posterior restoration placed. In this retrospective study, we recorded and analyzed all the restorations performed by undergraduate students in the last five academic years at the Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine in Jerusalem. All clinical records of student treatments between 2004 and 2009 were screened, and direct restorations were registered. Out of 6,094 posterior restorations performed during the study period, 42.3 percent were made of composite resin, increasing from 36.8 percent in 2004-05 to 48.5 percent in 2008-09, an increase of 11.7 percent. When clinical instructors were asked to state their preference if they themselves were to undergo posterior restoration, similar results were obtained. Instructors with less than ten years' experience preferred posterior composite resin restorations in 54.8 percent of the hypothetical situations, compared with 37.2 percent preferred by instructors with ten years of experience or more. It appears that the use of composite resin was influenced mainly by the prevailing trend and was not based on scientific evidence. Dental faculties should define criteria, based on up-to-date clinical studies, for using new materials, taking into consideration differences among instructors regarding treatment concept.

  2. Evaluation of some water - equivalent plastics as phantom materials for electron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihailescu, D.; Borcia, C.

    2005-01-01

    In the International Code of Practice for Dosimetry TRS-398 published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), water is recommended as the reference medium for the determination of absorbed dose for high-energy electron beams. Plastic phantoms may be used under certain circumstances (electron energy below 10 MeV, R 50 2 ) for electron beam dosimetry. In this case, a depth-scaling factor is required for the conversion of depth in solid phantoms to depth in water. A fluence-scaling factor is also necessary for converting ionization chamber readings in plastic phantom to readings in water. The aim of this paper is to calculate, using Monte Carlo simulations, the depth-scaling factors c pl and fluence-scaling factors h pl of some commercially available water substitute solid phantoms in order to evaluate their water equivalency. Two sets of calculations were performed: one for electron pencil beams and another for 10 x 10 cm 2 parallel beams, both of which are normally incident on water and solid phantoms. We used only mono-energetic beams of 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV. The results were compared with TRS-398 recommended values. In the case of pencil beams, we found that by applying the TRS-398 protocol, unacceptable uncertainties (up to 10%) were introduced in the dose distribution calculations. By contrast, TRS-398 can safely be used for 10 x 10 cm 2 beams (reference beams). In this case, uncertainties lower than 1% were obtained, what was in agreement with other published data. (authors)

  3. Influence of light-curing units and restorative materials on the micro hardness of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuguimiya Rosiane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of indirect restorative materials (IRMs and light-curing units (LCUs on the micro hardness of dual-cured resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 cylindrical samples (2 mm thick were prepared with dual-cured resin cement (Relyx ARC photo-activated with either a QTH (Optilight Plus for 40s or a LED (Radii light-curing unit for 65s. Photo-activation was performed through the 2-mm- thick IRMs and the samples were divided into six groups (n=6 according to the combination of veneering materials (without, ceramic and indirect resin and LCUs (QTH and LED. In the control group, the samples were light-cured with a QTH unit without the interposition of any restorative material. Vickers micro hardness test was performed on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample (load of 50 g for 15 secs. The data were statistically analyzed using a three-way ANOVA followed by Tukey x s post-hoc test ( P < 0.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences on the top surface between the light curing-units ( P > 0.05; however, the LED provided greater hardness on the bottom surface when a ceramic material was used ( P < 0.05. The mean hardness in photo-activated samples, in which there was no interposition of indirect materials, was significantly greater ( P < 0.01. Conclusions: It may be concluded that the interposition of the restorative material decreased the micro hardness in the deeper cement layer. Such decrease, however, was lower when the ceramic was interposed and the cement light-cured with LED.

  4. New Anion-Exchange Resins for Improved Separations of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, Richard A.; Barr, Mary E.

    2001-01-01

    Improved separations of nuclear materials will have a significant impact upon a broad range of DOE activities. DOE-EM Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have identified improved methods for the extraction and recovery of radioactive metal ions from process, waste, and environmental waters as critical needs for the coming years. We propose to develop multifunctional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. Our new ion-exchange resins interface the field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology to provide materials which exhibit superior selectivity and kinetics of sorption and desorption. The following Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new material: Efficient Separations and Processing - radionuclide removal from aqueous phases; Plutonium - Pu, Am or total alpha removal to meet regulatory requirement s before discharge to the environment; Plumes - U and Tc in groundwater, U, Pu, Am, and Tc in soils; Mixed Waste - radionuclide partitioning; High-Level Tank Waste - actinide and Tc removal from supernatants and/or sludges. The basic scientific issues which need to be addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. Synthesis of multifunctionalized extractants and ion-exchange materials that implement key features of the optimized binding site, and testing of these materials, will provide feedback to the modeling and design activities. Resin materials which actively facilitate the uptake of actinide complexes from solution should display both improved selectivity and kinetic properties. The long-range implications of this research, however, go far beyond the nuclear complex. This new methodology of ''facilitated uptake'' could revolutionize ion-exchange technology

  5. Development of microwave absorbing materials prepared from a polymer binder including Japanese lacquer and epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamaru, T.; Katsumata, H.; Uekusa, S.; Ooyagi, H.; Ishimura, T.; Miyakoshi, T.

    Microwave absorption composites were synthesized from a poly urushiol epoxy resin (PUE) mixed with one of microwave absorbing materials; Ni-Zn ferrite, Soot, Black lead, and carbon nano tube (CNT) to investigate their microwave absorption properties. PUE binders were specially made from Japanese lacquer and epoxy resin, where Japanese lacquer has been traditionally used for bond and paint because it has excellent beauty. Japanese lacquer solidifies with oxygen contained in air's moisture, which has difficulty in making composite, but we improved Japanese lacquer's solidification properties by use of epoxy resin. We made 10 mm thickness composite samples and cut them into toroidal shape to measure permittivity, permeability, and reflection loss in frequencies ranging from 50 Hz to 20 GHz. Electric magnetic absorber's composites synthesized from a PUE binders mixed either with Soot or CNT showed significantly higher wave absorption over -27 dB than the others at frequencies around 18 GHz, although Japanese lacquer itself doesn't affect absorption. This means Japanese lacquer can be used as binder materials for microwave absorbers.

  6. [Color stability of ceromer of different thicknesses and resin adhesive materials of different types after accelerated aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likai, Wang; Yanan, Liu; Yan, Zheng; Pingping, Li

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the color stability of ceromer with different thicknesses and different types of resin adhesive materials after accelerated aging and provide references for clinical application and selections. Nine groups of experimental samples were used, and each group contained five samples. We made joint samples with ceromer having three different thicknesses (1.00, 0.75, 0.50 mm) combined with three different resin adhesive materials (RelyX Veneer, RelyX Unicem, Filtek Z350 Flow), respectively. All samples were placed into Xenon Lamp Aging Instrument to implement accelerated aging. Spectrophotometer was used to measure the lightness (L*), red green color value (a*), and blue yellow color value (b*) of all samples before and after accelerated aging. The change of lightness (ΔL), red green color value (Δa), blue yellow color value (Δb), and color variation (ΔE) were also calculated. We investigated the influence of ceromer veneer thicknesses and resin adhesive material types on color variation by two-factor analysis of variance. The thickness and type factors showed significant influence on ΔE values, and exhibited interactions (P Ceromer veneer thickness and resin adhesive material types could affect the color stability of ceromer veneer and resin adhesive materials. The changes in lightness and color in ceromer veneer and resin adhesive materials are considered clinically acceptable after accelerated aging.

  7. Effects of LDEF flight exposure on selected polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Young, Philip R.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1992-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composites materials which received over five years and nine months of exposure to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment in experiment AO134 on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. The changes in mechanical properties of ultimate tensile strength and tensile modulus for exposed flight specimens are compared to the three sets of control specimens. Marked changes in surface appearance are discussed, and resin loss is reported. The chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymetric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure.

  8. Compilation of radiation damage test data. Pt. 2. Thermoset and thermoplastic resins, composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlet, M.; Fontaine, A.; Schoenbacher, H.

    1998-01-01

    This catalogue summarizes radiation damage test data on thermoplastic and thermoset resins and composites. Most of them are epoxy resins used as insulator for magnet coils. Many results are also given for new engineering thermoplastics which can be used either for their electrical properties or for their mechanical properties. The materials have been irradiated either in a 60 Co source, up to integrated absorbed doses between 200 kGy and a few megagrays, at dose rates of the order of 1 Gy/s, or in a nuclear reactor at dose rates of the order of 50 Gy/s, up to doses of 100 MGy. The flexural strength, the deformation and the modulus of elasticity have been measured on irradiated and non-irradiated samples, according to the recommendations of the International Electrotechnical Commissions. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (orig.)

  9. Optical absorption of epoxy resin and its role in the laser ultrasonic generation mechanism in composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratoudaki, T.; Edwards, C.; Dixon, S.; Palmer, S.B.

    2003-01-01

    Epoxy resins are used in various applications and are essential to the fabrication of carbon fibre reinforced composite materials (CFRCs). This paper investigates laser generated ultrasound in epoxy resins using three different lasers, a TEA CO2, a Nd:YAG and a XeCl excimer. In these partially transparent materials the ultrasonic generation mechanism is directly related to the optical absorption depth which can therefore be measured directly from the ultrasonic waveforms using for example a Michelson interferometer as detector. The present work aims firstly to relate the observed amplitude of the longitudinal wave to the optical absorption depth of the epoxy and secondly to evaluate the role of the epoxy resin to the generation of the ultrasound in CFRCs. For the latter, comparative results of generation efficiency between the three wavelengths are presented and an attempt is made to understand the way that the resin matrix influences the generation mechanism of ultrasound in composite materials

  10. Color stability of denture acrylic resins and a soft lining material against tea, coffee, and nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imirzalioglu, Pervin; Karacaer, Ozgul; Yilmaz, Burak; Ozmen Msc, Ilknur

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of four solutions [saliva (control group), saliva+tea, saliva+coffee, saliva+nicotine] on the color of different denture base acrylic resins (heat-polymerized, injection-molded, autopolymerized) and a soft denture liner. Twenty specimens from each type of test material were prepared (2.5 mm diameter, 2 mm thickness). Five specimens from each test material (heat-polymerized, chemically polymerized, injection-molded acrylic resin, soft denture reliner) were stored in each solution in 37 degrees C in a dark environment. Colorimetric measurements were done on the 1st, 7th, and 30th days. Color differences among specimens immersed in saliva (control group), and staining solutions were evaluated over time. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (alpha= 0.05). ANOVA was followed by Tukey test to find which groups differed from each other. Significant color shifts occurred in heat-polymerized and injection-molded acrylic resins in coffee and in soft liner in nicotine over time (p 1). The color shift of soft liner in nicotine was significantly different than that of the remainder of the test materials in nicotine (p 0.05). The effect of staining solutions on the color of each test material in each session was perceivable by the human eye (DeltaE > 1); however, the color shifts of all test materials were clinically acceptable (DeltaE < 3.7) except for soft liner in nicotine, which was not clinically acceptable over time. Therefore, minimizing drinking of such beverages and use of tobacco, particularly when soft liner is applied, may be advantageous for denture wearers for long-term color stability.

  11. Determination of tissue equivalent materials of a physical 8-year-old phantom for use in computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Miri Hakimabad, Hashem; Rafat Motavalli, Laleh

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports on the methodology applied to select suitable tissue equivalent materials of an 8-year phantom for use in computed tomography (CT) examinations. To find the appropriate tissue substitutes, first physical properties (physical density, electronic density, effective atomic number, mass attenuation coefficient and CT number) of different materials were studied. Results showed that, the physical properties of water and polyurethane (as soft tissue), B-100 and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) (as bone) and polyurethane foam (as lung) agree more with those of original tissues. Then in the next step, the absorbed doses in the location of 25 thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as well as dose distribution in one slice of phantom were calculated for original and these proposed materials by Monte Carlo simulation at different tube voltages. The comparisons suggested that at tube voltages of 80 and 100 kVp using B-100 as bone, water as soft tissue and polyurethane foam as lung is suitable for dosimetric study in pediatric CT examinations. In addition, it was concluded that by considering just the mass attenuation coefficient of different materials, the appropriate tissue equivalent substitutes in each desired X-ray energy range could be found.

  12. [Research on bond durability among different core materials and zirconia ceramic cemented by self-adhesive resin cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinyu, Luo; Xiangfeng, Meng

    2017-02-01

    This research estimated shear bond durability of zirconia and different substrates cemented by two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100) before and after aging conditioning. Machined zirconia ceramic discs were cemented with four kinds of core material (cobalt-chromium alloy, flowable composite resin core material, packable composite resin, and dentin) with two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100). All specimens were divided into eight test groups, and each test group was divided into two subgroups. Each subgroup was subjected to shear test before and after 10 000 thermal cycles. All factors (core materials, cements, and thermal cycle) significantly influenced bond durability of zirconia ceramic (P0.05); observed shear bond strength was significantly higher than those of other substrates (Presin core material, and packable composite resin than that of RelyX U100 (P0.05). Different core materials and self-adhesive resin cements can significantly affect bond durability of zirconia ceramic. 
.

  13. Edge chipping resistance and flexural strength of polymer infiltrated ceramic network and resin nanoceramic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyrou, Renos; Thompson, Geoffrey A; Cho, Seok-Hwan; Berzins, David W

    2016-09-01

    Two novel restorative materials, a polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) and a resin nanoceramic (RNC), for computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) applications have recently become commercially available. Little independent evidence regarding their mechanical properties exists to facilitate material selection. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the edge chipping resistance and flexural strength of the PICN and RNC materials and compare them with 2 commonly used feldspathic ceramic (FC) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic (LRGC) CAD-CAM materials that share the same clinical indications. PICN, RNC, FC, and LRGC material specimens were obtained by sectioning commercially available CAD-CAM blocks. Edge chipping test specimens (n=20/material) were adhesively attached to a resin substrate before testing. Edge chips were produced using a 120-degree, sharp, conical diamond indenter mounted on a universal testing machine and positioned 0.1 to 0.7 mm horizontally from the specimen's edge. The chipping force was plotted against distance to the edge, and the data were fitted to linear and quadratic equations. One-way ANOVA determined intergroup differences (α=.05) in edge chipping toughness. Beam specimens (n=22/material) were tested for determining flexural strength using a 3-point bend test. Weibull statistics determined intergroup differences (α=.05). Flexural modulus and work of fracture were also calculated, and 1-way ANOVA determined intergroup differences (α=.05) RESULTS: Significant (Pmaterials for the 4 mechanical properties. Specifically, the material rankings were edge chipping toughness: RNC>LRGC=FC>PICN; flexural strength: RNC=LRGC>PICN>FC; flexural modulus: RNCLRGC=PICN>FC. The RNC material demonstrated superior performance for the mechanical properties tested compared with the other 3 materials. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  14. How much do resin-based dental materials release? A meta-analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landuyt, K L; Nawrot, Tim; Geebelen, B; De Munck, J; Snauwaert, J; Yoshihara, K; Scheers, Hans; Godderis, Lode; Hoet, P; Van Meerbeek, B

    2011-08-01

    Resin-based dental materials are not inert in the oral environment, and may release components, initially due to incomplete polymerization, and later due to degradation. Since there are concerns regarding potential toxicity, more precise knowledge of the actual quantity of released eluates is necessary. However, due to a great variety in analytical methodology employed in different studies and in the presentation of the results, it is still unclear to which quantities of components a patient may be exposed. The objective of this meta-analytical study was to review the literature on the short- and long-term release of components from resin-based dental materials, and to determine how much (order of magnitude) of those components may leach out in the oral cavity. Out of an initial set of 71 studies, 22 were included. In spite of the large statistical incertitude due to the great variety in methodology and lack of complete information (detection limits were seldom mentioned), a meta-analytical mean for the evaluated eluates was calculated. To relate the amount of potentially released material components with the size of restorations, the mean size of standard composite restorations was estimated using a 3D graphical program. While the release of monomers was analyzed in many studies, that of additives, such as initiators, inhibitors and stabilizers, was seldom investigated. Significantly more components were found to be released in organic than in water-based media. Resin-based dental materials might account for the total burden of orally ingested bisphenol A, but they may release even higher amounts of monomers, such as HEMA, TEGDMA, BisGMA and UDMA. Compared to these monomers, similar or even higher amounts of additives may elute, even though composites generally only contain very small amounts of additives. A positive correlation was found between the total quantity of released eluates and the volume of extraction solution. There is a clear need for more accurate

  15. New anion-exchange resins for improved separations of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, M.E.; Bartsch, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    'The overall objective of this research is to develop a predictive capability which allows the facile design and implementation of multi-functionalized anion-exchange materials which selectively sorb metal complexes of interest from targeted process, waste, and environmental streams. The basic scientific issues addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of the metal complex/functional-site interactions in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. The new ion-exchange resins interface the rapidly developing field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion-exchange technology. Various Focus Areas and Crosscutting Programs have described needs that would be favorably impacted by the new materials: Efficient Separations and Processing; Plutonium; Plumes; Mixed Waste; High-Level Tank Waste. Sites within the DOE complex which would benefit from the improved anion-exchange technology include Hanford, INEL, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River. As of April 1998, this report summarizes work after 1.6 years of a 3-year project. The authors technical approach combines empirical testing with theoretical modeling (applied in an iterative mode) in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. They determine actinide-complex speciation in specific media, then develop models for the metal complex/functional-site interactions Synthesis and evaluation of multi-functionalized extractants and ion-exchange materials that implement key features of the optimized binding site provide feedback to the modeling and design activities. Resin materials which actively facilitate the uptake of actinide complexes from solution should display both improved selectivity and kinetic properties. The implementation of the bifunctionality concept involves N-derivatization of pyridinium units from a base poly(4-vinylpyridine) resin with a second cationic site such that the two anion-exchange sites are linked by spacer arms of varying

  16. ‘It’s All Done With Mirrors’: V.S. Ramachandran and the Material Culture of Phantom Limb Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Katja

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the material culture of neuroscientist Vilayanur S. Ramachandran’s research into phantom limbs. In the 1990s Ramachandran used a ‘mirror box’ to ‘resurrect’ phantom limbs and thus to treat the pain that often accompanied them. The experimental success of his mirror therapy led Ramachandran to see mirrors as a useful model of brain function, a tendency that explains his attraction to work on ‘mirror neurons’. I argue that Ramachandran’s fascination with and repeated appeal to the mirror can be explained by the way it allowed him to confront a perennial problem in the mind and brain sciences, that of the relationship between a supposedly immaterial mind and a material brain. By producing what Ramachandran called a ‘virtual reality’, relating in varied and complex ways to the material world, the mirror reproduced a form of psycho-physical parallelism and dualistic ontology, while conforming to the materialist norms of neuroscience today. PMID:27292324

  17. Thermal conductivity of 2D nano-structured graphitic materials and their composites with epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Mulan; Wan, Chaoying; McNally, Tony

    2017-12-01

    The outstanding thermal conductivity (λ) of graphene and its derivatives offers a potential route to enhance the thermal conductivity of epoxy resins. Key challenges still need to be overcome to ensure effective dispersion and distribution of 2D graphitic fillers throughout the epoxy matrix. 2D filler type, morphology, surface chemistry and dimensions are all important factors in determining filler thermal conductivity and de facto the thermal conductivity of the composite material. To achieve significant enhancement in the thermal conductivity of epoxy composites, different strategies are required to minimise phonon scattering at the interface between the nano-filler and epoxy matrix, including chemical functionalisation of the filler surfaces such that interactions between filler and matrix are promoted and interfacial thermal resistance (ITR) reduced. The combination of graphitic fillers with dimensions on different length scales can potentially form an interconnected multi-dimensional filler network and, thus contribute to enhanced thermal conduction. In this review, we describe the relevant properties of different 2D nano-structured graphitic materials and the factors which determine the translation of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of these 2D materials to epoxy resins. The key challenges and perspectives with regard achieving epoxy composites with significantly enhanced thermal conductivity on addition of 2D graphitic materials are presented.

  18. Bonding of resin to dentin. Interactions between materials, substrate and operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to identify and study factors that affect bonding between resin and dentin, including operator variability. Bonding sites were generated in vivo and in vitro and compared using SEM. The effects of experimental water- or acetone-based primers on shear bond strength to dentin were studied in vitro. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to establish any detrimental effects from water on polymerization by determining the degree of conversion of thin films of resin. The interaction between phosphoric acid and dentin was analyzed by measuring calcium leaching by use of atomic absorption spectroscopy. Bond strength of composite resin was measured to dentin with various degrees of demineralization. Gap formation adjacent to composite restorations in standardized dentin cavities was studied in vitro by confocal microscopy. A similar morphological appearance was found for bonding sites generated in vitro vs. in vivo. An acetone-based primer was more dependent on a moist bonding technique than was a water-based system. However, water might influence bonding by interfering with the polymerization of the resin. Calcium leaching from dentin can be predicted by use of a solubility phase diagram. No correlation could be established between calcium leaching and bond strength. Gap formation was more dependent on the operator than the choice of material. A simplified all-in-one adhesive showed less operator variability compared to more complex bonding systems. In vitro bond testing may well indicate the outcome of in vivo trials. The solvents used in bonding agents will influence the performance and, presumably, technique sensitivity. Water rinse time after etching might be a more important consideration than etch time. In spite of the relative importance of the results presented above, the outcome of the multi-operator trial could not be predicted.

  19. Technologies of bearings systems production from composite materials by polyester resin injection into the closed mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аnatoliy M. Turenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of modern technologies for manufacturing components and bearing systems made of composite materials has been conducted. These technologies are based on the polyester resin injection method and do not require high financial costs in manufacturing. The proposed method, due to the low cost of tooling, is convenient to produce a wide range of items made of composite materials, both in large-scale and single-piece production. Composite materials are intensively used in automotive industry, especially for motor racing vehicles’ parts. These technologies allow to solve the problem of creating ultra-light assemblies for modern car bodies, energy-absorbing passive safety elements and other high-loaded parts. They provide better strength and weight characteristics and better specific energy-output ratio of passive safety elements, as compared to conventional materials (metals and plastics. Considering the above, the most appropriate technology for the automotive industry has been assessed with that choice substantiation.

  20. Optimal Composite Material for Low Cost Fabrication of Large Composite Aerospace Structures using NASA Resins or POSS Nanoparticle Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontia, Mark A.; Gruber, Mark B.; Jensen, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    Thermoplastic laminates in situ consolidated via tape or tow placement require full mechanical properties. Realizing full properties requires resin crystallinity to be controlled - partial crystallinity leads to unacceptably low laminate compression properties. There are two approaches: utilize an amorphous matrix resin; or place material made from a semi-crystalline resin featuring kinetics faster than the process. In this paper, a matrix resin evaluation and trade study was completed with commercial and NASA amorphous polyimides on the one hand, and with PEKK mixed with POSS nanoparticles for accelerated crystallinity growth on the other. A new thermoplastic impregnated material, 6 mm wide (0.25-in) AS-4 carbon/LaRC(TradeMark)8515 dry polyimide tow, was fabricated. Since LaRC(TradeMark)8515 is fully amorphous, it attains full properties following in situ consolidation, with no post processing required to build crystallinity. The tow in situ processing was demonstrated via in situ thermoplastic filament winding it into rings.

  1. Testing Penetration of Epoxy Resin and Diamine Hardeners through Protective Glove and Clothing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Mäkelä, Erja A; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-10-01

    Efficient, comfortable, yet affordable personal protective equipment (PPE) is needed to decrease the high incidence of allergic contact dermatitis arising from epoxy resin systems (ERSs) in industrial countries. The aim of this study was to find affordable, user-friendly glove and clothing materials that provide adequate skin protection against splashes and during the short contact with ERS that often occurs before full cure. We studied the penetration of epoxy resin and diamine hardeners through 12 glove or clothing materials using a newly developed test method. The tests were carried out with two ERS test mixtures that had a high content of epoxy resin and frequently used diamine hardeners of different molar masses. A drop (50 µl) of test mixture was placed on the outer surface of the glove/clothing material, which had a piece of Fixomull tape or Harmony protection sheet attached to the inner surface as the collection medium. The test times were 10 and 30 min. The collecting material was removed after the test was finished and immersed into acetone. The amounts of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), isophorone diamine (IPDA), and m-xylylenediamine (XDA) in the acetone solution were determined by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The limit for acceptable penetration of XDA, IPDA, and DGEBA through glove materials was set at 2 µg cm(-2). Penetration through the glove materials was 1.4 µg cm(-2) or less. The three tested chemical protective gloves showed no detectable penetration (clothing materials were found to provide adequate protection during short contact with ERS, in the form of, for example, disposable gloves or clothing materials suitable for aprons and as additional protective layers on the most exposed parts of clothing, such as the front of the legs and thighs and under the forearms. Every ERS combination in use should be tested separately to find the best skin protection material, and this can be done by using this simple

  2. Are linear elastic material properties relevant predictors of the cyclic fatigue resistance of dental resin composites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the linear elastic material properties of direct dental resin composites and correlate them with their fatigue strength under cyclic loading. Bar specimens of twelve resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and tested for elastic modulus (Emod) in 3-point bending (n=10), flexural strength (FS) (n=15) and single-edge-notch-beam fracture toughness (FT) (n=15), both in 4-point bending. Using the same specimen geometry, the flexural fatigue strength (FFS) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz in 4-point bending (n=25). The observation of the fracture surface and fracture profiles was conducted using a scanning electron microscope in order to evaluate the respective fracture mechanisms according to the two different loading conditions. Materials were ranked differently according to the tested parameters. Only weak correlations were found between any of the initial properties and FFS or strength loss. The best correlation to FFS was found to be the Emod (r(2)=0.679), although only slightly. Crack path in both loading conditions was mainly interparticle, with the crack propagating mainly within the matrix phase for fatigued specimens and eventually through the filler/matrix interface for statically loaded specimens. Fracture of large particles or prepolymerized fillers was only observed in specimens of FS and FT. Initial properties were better associated with microstructural features, whereas the fatigue resistance showed to be more dependent on aspects relating to the matrix phase. Our results show that linear elastic properties such as elastic modulus, flexural strength and fracture toughness are not good descriptors of the fatigue resistance of dental resin composite under cyclic bending, and may therefore have limited clinical relevance. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  4. Mechanical and Physical Properties of Two Different Resin-based Materials: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeshen, Hosam; Alturki, Basem N; Albishi, Wjoud W; Alsadi, Fahad M; El-Tubaigy, Khaled M

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) of two different resin-based composite materials (nanofill composite and ormocer) and correlate it with some mechanical properties of these two restorative materials. Two different resin-based materials (Filtek Supreme XT and Admira) were tested. A total of 30 samples of each type of selected composite were prepared. Specimens were immersed in distilled water for 24 hours. Then, the specimens were subjected to DC, hardness, and diametral tensile strength (DTS) measurements. The data obtained were tabulated for statistical analysis. The t-test was used to detect the significant difference among the variables tested in this study. Furthermore, the interrelationship between the studied parameters was investigated using a simple correlation coefficient statistical test. Statistically significant differences were observed regarding DC, hardness, and DTS. Filtek Supreme XT presented the highest values. There was a positive correlation between DC and hardness. Also there was a correlation between DC and DTS, but it was not significant. Under the tested experimental conditions, the DC of Filtek Supreme XT was higher than that of ormocer. Accordingly, Filtek Supreme XT showed better mechanical properties. Filtek Supreme XT showed superior mechanical properties. Therefore, orthodontic bracket-based composite combinations may also be expected to perform well clinically over the lifetime of a bonded orthodontic appliance.

  5. A Study of Resin as Master Jewellery Material, Surface Quality and Machining Time Improvement by Implementing Appropriate Cutting Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspaputra Paryana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a research about art and jewellery product machining that focused in the selection of appropriate material for jewellery master which is machined by CNC. CNC is used for better surface finish for no undercut design and more complex ornament. The need of production speed requires minimum process without reducing the quality of detail ornament significantly. Problems occur when high surface quality is required. In that condition high speed spindle is used with low feeding speed, as a result is high temperature in cutter-material area will melt the resin and build the build-up edge (BUE. Due to the existence of BUE, the cutting tool will no longer cut the resin, as a result the resin will then melt due to friction and the melt resin will then stuck on the relief and surface finish become worst and rework should be done. When required surface is achieved problem also occur in next going process, that is silicon mould making. Due to galvanization process for silicon at about 170°C, resin material may be broken or cracked. Research is then conducted to select appropriate resin type suitable for all production steps.

  6. Pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of different thermoplastic resin denture base materials under impact load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, Hubban; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2018-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to examine the pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of thermoplastic resin denture base materials under an impact load, and to evaluate the modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of thermoplastic resin denture base. Three injection-molded thermoplastic resin denture base materials [polycarbonate (Basis PC), ethylene propylene (Duraflex), and polyamide (Valplast)] and one conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (PMMA, SR Triplex Hot) denture base, all with a mandibular first molar acrylic resin denture tooth set in were evaluated (n=6). Pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of the specimens under an impact load were observed by using pressure-sensitive sheets. The modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of each denture base (n=10) were measured on 15×15×15×3mm 3 specimen by using an ultramicroindentation system. The pressure transmission area, modulus of elasticity, and nanohardness data were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, followed by Tamhane or Tukey HSD post hoc test (α=.05). The maximum pressure transmission data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis H test, followed by Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). Polymethyl methacrylate showed significantly larger pressure transmission area and higher maximum pressure transmission than the other groups (Pdenture bases (Pthermoplastic resin denture base materials. Differences in the modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of each type of denture base were demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Studi Eksperimental Laju Keausan Material Gigi Tiruan dari Resin Akrilik Berpenguat Fiberglass dengan Variasi Susunan Serat Penguat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prastika Kristasari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resin akrilik adalah salah satu material yang mulai banyak digunakan sebagai salah satu material untuk pembuatan gigi tiruan. Penelitian sebelumnya tentang analisis pengujian laju keausan resin akrilik berpenguat serat pada dental prosthesis pada kondisi dry sliding menunjukkan hasil nilai laju keausan berkurang dengan adanya penambahan serat[1]. Saat ini belum ada kajian mengenai laju keausan resin akrilik berpenguat serat pada kondisi wet sliding dengan variasi pola susunan serat yang berbeda dengan kondisi terendam cairan saliva buatan. Metode pengujian ekperimental ini menggunakan alat uji keausan tribometer tipe pin on disk.  Material untuk pin dan disk menggunakan material dari resin akrilik berpenguat serat. Disk diputar dan bergesekan dengan pin. Variabel tetap pengujian ini yaitu panjang lintasan sejauh 505,92 m, beban sebesar 2 kg, dan sliding speed sebesar 0,07 m/s. Perlakuan gesekan dilakukan pada resin akrilik berpenguat serat dengan variasi susunan serat 0%, 7% berpola 6 mm serat acak, dan 7% berpola 6 mm serat teratur. Spesimen direndam dahulu dan saat pengujian keausan dikondisikan terendam dalam cairan saliva buatan. Kemudian, spesimen tersebut dianalisis laju keausannya dan diamati gambar mikro dari permukaan spesimen. Hasil dari penelitian adalah data pengujian berupa nilai laju keausan spesifik terbesar sebesar 0.0126 mm3/Nm yang terdapat pada material resin akrilik tanpa penguat serat dan nilai laju keausan yang terkecil yaitu pada material resin akrilik berpenguat 7% serat berpola teratur sebesar 0.0006 mm3/Nm. Hasil foto mikro menunjukkan bahwa mekanisme keausan yang paling dominan terjadi adalah keausan abrasif dan keausan fatigue.

  8. Rheological analysis of the phenolic and furfuryl resins used in the carbon materials processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Cocchieri Botelho

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon materials processing is an advanced technology due to its aerospace and medical applications. In the aerospace area one can mention the carbon/carbon composites used in rockets and aeronautical brakes; in the medical area one can mention the intrabody implant tools such as heart and hydrocephalic valves and pacemaker electrode tips. The highly sophisticated purpose of its application requires a very tight processing control, which defines the microstructure the mechanical, thermal and electrical characteristics of the final material. The objective of this study is to correlate rheological, chromatographic and thermal analysis of phenolic and furfuryl resins, aiming their use as raw materials in carbon/carbon composite and glassy carbon processing. The obtained results are correlated and used directly in the establishment of the adequate parameters for carbon reinforcement impregnation and to prepare glassy carbon samples with controlled porosity.

  9. Are flowable resin-based composites a reliable material for metal orthodontic bracket bonding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Bárbara; Rosa, Vinícius; Azeredo, Tatiana Rocha; Cruz Filho, Eduardo Augusto Mascarenhas; Miranda, Walter Gomes

    2010-07-01

    To compare the tensile bond strength (TBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of three flowable resin-based composites and three orthodontic adhesive systems for metal bracket bonding. Sixty bovine incisors were randomly divided into six groups. Enamel surfaces were etched with 37 percent phosphoric acid for 30 seconds and stainless steel orthodontic brackets were bonded using either flowable resin-based composites (3M Flow, FL; Tetric Flow, TF; and Wave, WA) or orthodontic bonding systems (Transbond XT, TX; Concise Orthodontic, CO; Fill Magic Ortodôntico, FM). All specimens were thermal cycled and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, after which they were subsequently tested for TBS using a universal testing machine. ARI scores were determined after the failure of brackets. TBS and ARI data were submitted to ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskal-Wallis tests (p=0.05), respectively. Rankings of the resin-based composites based on TBS means (MPa) were TX (6.4 ± 2.1), followed by CO (4.5 ± 2.7), FM (3.7 ± 1.2), FL (3.6 ± 1.2), TF (3.3 ± 1.2), and WA (2.4 ± 0.6). CO exhibited the lowest ARI mean score (0.9 ± 1.2) which was significantly different from the other five materials: TX (2.8 ± 0.42), FM (2.8 ± 0.42), FL (2.9 ± 0.32), TF (2.9 ± 0.32), and WA (3.0 ± 0.01). However, there were no statistically significant differences among the other groups with mean scores of 2.8-3.0. A score of 3.0 indicated that all the resin remained bonded to the tooth surface. The flowable resin-based composites tested (Fl, TF, and WA) used to bond metal orthodontic brackets to bovine enamel had low mean TBS values but acceptable ARI mean scores. Flowable composites may not be appropriate for bracket bonding, unless the teeth to be bonded are not subjected to higher orthodontic stresses, such as those without an antagonist.

  10. Design and manufacturing of anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom for use in nuclear medicine centres in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermosilla, A.; Diaz Londono, G.; Garcia, M.; Ruiz, F.; Andrade, P.; Perez, A.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphic phantoms are used in nuclear medicine for imaging quality control, calibration of gamma spectrometry system for the study of internal contamination with radionuclides and for internal dosimetric studies. These are constructed of materials that have radiation attenuation coefficients similar to those of the different organs and tissues of the human body. The material usually used for the manufacture of phantoms is polymethyl methacrylate. Other materials used for this purpose are polyethylene, polystyrene and epoxy resin. This project presents the design and manufacture of an anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom that includes the cervical spine, trachea and oesophagus, using a polyester resin (ρ 1.1 g cm -3 ). Its linear and mass attenuation coefficients were experimentally determined and simulated by means of XCOM software, finding that this material reproduces the soft tissue ICRU-44 in a range of energies between 80 keV and 11 MeV, with less than a 5 % difference. (authors)

  11. A practice-based evaluation of the handling of a new self-adhesive universal resin luting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J Trevor; Crisp, Russell J; Richter, B

    2006-06-01

    Ease of handling of materials may be considered helpful to achieving good results. The handling properties of a new self-adhesive universal resin luting material were tested in clinical use. Thirteen practitioners were selected at random from the Product Research and Evaluation by Practitioners (PREP) Panel, a United Kingdom-based group of dental practitioners prepared to complete evaluations of new materials and techniques in the practice environment. Explanatory letters, questionnaires and packs of the luting material were sent to the evaluators. The practitioners were asked to use the material and return the questionnaire. 144 restorations were placed using the new self-adhesive resin luting material, which was rated higher by the evaluators for ease of use (4.7 on a visual analogue scale where 5 represented easy to use and 1 represented difficult to use) than both the pre-trial resin-based and 'conventional' luting materials (rated 3.7 and 4.4 respectively on the same scale). The presentation, instructions, convenience of dispensing and handling and viscosity also received high ratings. The new material achieved ratings for ease of use superior to the pre-study resin-based and conventional luting materials in the dental practices of 13 UK dental practitioners.

  12. High irradiance curing and anomalies of exposure reciprocity law in resin-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadis, M; Leprince, J G; Shortall, A C; Devaux, J; Leloup, G; Palin, W M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of high irradiance curing on resultant degree of conversion of 'flowable' resin composites and their counterpart higher viscosity paste materials. Five commercial flowable materials (Venus; Heraeus Kulzer, Synergy D6; Coltene, Premise; Kerr, Grandio; Voco and Gradia; GC Corp) and their counterpart higher viscosity restorative versions were tested. Specimens were cured with a halogen Swiss Master Light (EMS, Switzerland) using five different curing protocols with similar radiant exposure (18J/cm(2)): 400mW/cm(2) for 45s, 900mW/cm(2) for 20s, 1500mW/cm(2) for 12s, 2000mW/cm(2) for 9s and 3000mW/cm(2) for 6s. Degree of conversion (DC) was measured in real time by Fourier transform near infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIRS). Three- and subsequent two way ANOVA testing revealed significant differences (p≤0.02) with respect to "composite type" and "cure protocol" for DC for all 5 product comparisons. Supplementary one-way ANOVA also revealed significant differences between curing protocols (pGrandio (41±0.36 and 62±1.15%, respectively) and Venus (44±0.44 and 67±0.44%, respectively). Conversely, other flowable materials exhibited little or no significant differences between curing modes. Generally, a higher degree of conversion was observed for flowables compared with their more viscous counterpart, except at high irradiance for those materials where a reciprocal relationship with exposure time was not observed. The validity of exposure reciprocity law and final degree of conversion depends on several factors, amongst which resin viscosity and filler content were important. Practitioners should be aware of the importance of resin composite constituents and irradiation protocols. Information on material composition and appropriate radiation sources by manufacturers may assist practitioners with the selection of appropriate curing protocols for specific material/light curing unit combinations with the aim of reducing the

  13. Experimental phantom verification studies for simulations of light interactions with skin: liquid phantoms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Karsten, A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available phantoms to verify model Slide 5 Verification comparison •Layered structure of skin can be modelled • Solid or liquid phantoms can be used for verification • Solid phantoms prepared from resin, absorbing and scattering particles – advantage: multi... layers possible and phantoms stable and durable for repeatability studies • Liquid samples made from Intralipid® and black ink – optical properties of Intralipid® is well documented in literature •Manufacture phantoms – use phantom parameters...

  14. Evaluation of ABS resin disk certified reference materials for heavy metal analysis by x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohata, Masaki; Kidokoro, Toshihiro; Kurahashi, Masayasu; Hioki, Akiharu

    2010-01-01

    ABS resin disk certified reference materials (CRMs) for heavy-metal analysis (NMIJ CRM 8105-a, NMIJ CRM 8106-a, NMIJ CRM 8115-a and NMIJ CRM 8116-a) were evaluated using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) analysis. The homogeneities of elements for both among-disks and within-disk were evaluated by ED-XRF analysis without any sample pre-treatment, which were similar to those evaluated by ICP-MS analysis after a sample digenstion procedure. The normalized XRF sensitivities for Cd, Cr and Pb in different ABS resin disk CRMs were compared, and the differences among them for those ABS resin disks that have similar matrices were observed. Moreover, Hg in those ABS resin disk CRMs was stable for long-term X-ray irradiation during ED-XRF analysis. (author)

  15. Use of Resin-Based Provisional Material to Create the Posterior Palatal Seal in Complete Denture Definitive Impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos

    2017-11-17

    The purpose of this article was to present an alternative procedure using resin-based provisional material to create the posterior palatal seal (PPS). This method offers more practicality in clinical routine and increased control for addition of material to create the PPS when compared to traditional techniques such as the use of impression wax. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. The impact of resin-coating on sub-critical crack extension in a porcelain laminate veneer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xu; Fleming, Garry J P; Addison, Owen

    2017-05-01

    Characterisation of the interaction between crack extension, crack stabilisation and stress/strain relaxation in the polymeric matrix, the interplay between stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical response of a resin-based luting adhesive within a surface defect population could extend PLV restoration longevity by optimising cementation protocols. The aim was to investigate the influence of stress corrosion cracking and the viscoelastic behaviour of a resin-based luting adhesive independently by controlling the environmental conditions operative during test specimen fabrication. The effects of stress corrosion at ceramic crack tips and potential viscoelastic responses to loading of the resin-coated impregnating cracks were isolated. Resin-coated feldspathic ceramic test specimens were fabricated in ambient humidity or following moisture exclusion. Bi-axial flexure strengths of groups (n = 20) were determined at constant loading rates of 2.5, 10, 40, 160 or 640 N/min and data was compared with uncoated controls. Fractographic analyses were performed on all fractured test specimens. Resin-cement coating resulted in significant ceramic strengthening in all conditions tested (p resin- coating significantly increased mean BFS (ptests identified that moisture exclusion resulted in significant increases in BFS values only at intermediate loading rates with no significant differences observed at either the fastest or slowest loading rates (640 and 2.5 N/min, respectively). Mechanical reinforcement of PLV materials by resin-cement systems is yet to be optimized. The viscoelastic behavior of the resin-cement itself can influence the magnitude of reinforcement observed and sub-critical crack growth. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  18. Mechanical properties of resin-ceramic CAD-CAM materials after accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Caleb; Rask, Hailee; Awada, Abdallah

    2017-11-29

    The development of polymer-based computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) milling bocks and the limited availability of independent studies on these materials make it pertinent to evaluate changes in their mechanical properties after simulated aging to identify strengths and limitations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the effect of thermocycling on the flexural properties of ceramic, resin, and resin-ceramic CAD-CAM materials. Studied materials included Lava Ultimate Restorative (LVU; 3M ESPE), Enamic (ENA; VITA Zahnfabrik), Vitablocs Mark II (VM2; VITA Zahnfabrik), and Paradigm MZ100 (MZ1; 3M ESPE). Polished 4×1.2×14 mm bars (n=45 per material) were prepared from standard-size milling blocks. The 2 distilled water baths of the thermocycling apparatus were set to 5°C and 55°C, with a specimen immersion time of 15 seconds and transfer time of 4 seconds. Fifteen specimens from each material group were subjected to a 3-point flexural test at 3 different thermocycling intervals: 0 (control), 5000, and 10 000 cycles. The flexural test was performed over a 12-mm span with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were subjected to multiple analyses of variance and the Tukey HSD post hoc tests (α=.05). Mean flexural strength values for 0, 5000, and 10 000 cycles were 133, 130, and 128 MPa for VM2; 175, 139, and 134 MPa for LVU; 154, 144, and 138 MPa for MZ1; and 149, 136, and 132 MPa for ENA. Mean flexural modulus values were 51, 52, and 54 GPa for VM2; 14, 13, and 13 GPa for LVU; 16, 15, and 15 GPa for MZ1; and 31, 30, and 31 GPa for ENA. Mean modulus of resilience values were 0.17, 0.16, and 0.15 MPa for VM2; 10.1, 0.76, and 0.72 MPa for LVU; 0.77, 0.69, and 0.62 MPa for MZ1; and 0.42, 0.31, and 0.28 MPa for ENA. A significant difference was found among the materials in the mean change of flexural strength (P<.001) and modulus of resilience (P<.05) after thermocycling. No significant difference was found among the

  19. Mechanical properties of resin-ceramic CAD/CAM restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, Abdallah; Nathanson, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The recent development of polymer-based computer-aided design and computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) milling blocks and the limited availability of independent studies on these materials make it pertinent to evaluate their properties and identify potential strengths and limitations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine and compare mechanical properties (flexural strength, flexural modulus, modulus of resilience) and compare the margin edge quality of recently introduced polymer-based CAD/CAM materials with some of their commercially available composite resin and ceramic counterparts. The materials studied were Lava Ultimate Restorative (LVU; 3M ESPE), Enamic (ENA; Vita Zahnfabrik), Cerasmart (CES; GC Dental Products), IPS Empress CAD (EMP; Ivoclar Vivadent AG), Vitablocs Mark II (VM2; Vita Zahnfabrik), and Paradigm MZ100 Block (MZ1; 3M ESPE). Polished 4×1×13.5 mm bars (n=25) were prepared from standard-sized milling blocks of each tested material. The bars were subjected to a 3-point flexural test on a 10-mm span with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. In addition, 42 conventional monolithic crowns (7 per material) were milled. Margin edge quality was observed by means of macrophotography and optical microscopy, providing a qualitative visual assessment and a measurement of existing roughness. The results were analyzed by ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The mean flexural strength of the tested materials ranged from 105 ±9 MPa (VM2) to 219 ±20 MPa (CES). The mean flexural modulus ranged from 8 ±0.25 GPa (CES) to 32 ±1.9 GPa (EMP). The mean modulus of resilience ranged from 0.21 ±0.02 MPa (VM2) to 3.07 ±0.45 MPa (CES). The qualitative assessment of margin edge roughness revealed visible differences among the tested materials, with mean roughness measurements ranging from 60 ±16 μm (CES) to 190 ±15 μm (EMP). The material factor had a significant effect on the mean flexural strength (Pmaterials tested in this study exhibited

  20. Aerospace Composite Materials Delivery Order 0003: Nanocomposite Polymeric Resin Enhancements for Improved Composite Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Chenggang

    2002-01-01

    .... The addition of clays does not significantly alter the viscosity or cure kinetics so that the modified resin will still be suitable for liquid composite molding techniques such as resin transfer molding...

  1. Simulating Resin Infusion through Textile Reinforcement Materials for the Manufacture of Complex Composite Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Pierce

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for weight reduction and greater fuel efficiency continues to spur the use of composite materials in commercial aircraft structures. Subsequently, as composite aerostructures become larger and more complex, traditional autoclave manufacturing methods are becoming prohibitively expensive. This has prompted renewed interest in out-of-autoclave processing techniques in which resins are introduced into a reinforcing preform. However, the success of these resin infusion methods is highly dependent upon operator skill and experience, particularly in the development of new manufacturing strategies for complex parts. Process modeling, as a predictive computational tool, aims to address the issues of reliability and waste that result from traditional trial-and-error approaches. Basic modeling attempts, many of which are still used in industry, generally focus on simulating fluid flow through an isotropic porous reinforcement material. However, recent efforts are beginning to account for the multiscale and multidisciplinary complexity of woven materials, in simulations that can provide greater fidelity. In particular, new multi-physics process models are able to better predict the infusion behavior through textiles by considering the effect of fabric deformation on permeability and porosity properties within the reinforcing material. In addition to reviewing previous research related to process modeling and the current state of the art, this paper highlights the recent validation of a multi-physics process model against the experimental infusion of a complex double dome component. By accounting for deformation-dependent flow behavior, the multi-physics process model was able to predict realistic flow behavior, demonstrating considerable improvement over basic isotropic permeability models.

  2. Flame retardant materials based on BDM/DBA resin and organic-inorganic additives

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    2,2’-diallyl bisphenol A (DBA) modified bismaleimide resins (BDM) are widely used as polymer matrix of high-performance composites in the field of aerospace, transportation, machinery, and electronics. This kind of resin has excellent properties, including good thermal stability, good processing performance, high mechanical strength, excellent dielectric properties, etc. However, as for most organic resins, the flame retardancy of the BMI resins is not so good. In order to expand the use of t...

  3. Characterization of tissue-equivalent materials for use in construction of physical phantoms; Caracterizacao de materiais tecido-equivalentes para uso em construcao de fantomas fisicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Edvan V. de, E-mail: edvanmsn@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira, Alex C.H. de, E-mail: oliveira_ach@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: jose.wilson59@uol.com.br [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cenen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Phantoms are physical or computational models used to simulate the transport of ionizing radiation, their interactions with human body tissues and evaluate the deposition of energy. Depending on the application, you can build phantoms of various types and features. The physical phantoms are made of materials with behavior similar to human tissues exposed to ionizing radiation, the so-called tissue-equivalent materials. The characterization of various tissue-equivalent materials is important for the choice of materials to be used is appropriate, seeking a better cost-benefit ratio. The main objective of this work is to produce tables containing the main characteristics of tissue-equivalent materials. These tables were produced in Microsoft Office Excel. Among the main features of tissue-equivalent materials that were added to the tables, are density, chemical composition, physical state, chemical stability and solubility. The main importance of this work is to contribute to the construction of high-quality physical phantoms and avoid the waste of materials.

  4. Effect of light sources on the bond strength of resin material to thin-walled roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Rosângela Paniago; Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; Rached-Junior, Fuad Jacob Abi; de Souza, Cassio José; Messias, Danielle Cristine; Silva-Sousa, Yara Corrêa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength to the dentin of an adhesive material used for root reinforcement light activated with different sources. Roots were divided into 4 groups (n=15) according to the light source used to activate the resin reinforcement: GI, non-weakened roots (control); GII, halogen light (H) 600 mW/cm²; GIII, LED 800 mW/cm² and GIV, LED 1500 mW/cm². The reinforcement was done with adhesive, composite resin and fiberglass posts. After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned and the first slice of each post region was used in the push out test in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Failure modes of the debonded specimens were examined. Data (MPa) were analyzed by ANOVA and Holm-Sidak test (α=0.05). The second slice from each region was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). LED-1500 (4.69 ± 1.74) provided bond strength similar to the control group (5.05 ± 2.63) and statistically different from H-600 (1.96 ± 0.94) and LED-800 (2.75 ± 1.90), which were similar to each other (presin reinforcement to the dentin.

  5. Bacterial colonization of resin composite cements: influence of material composition and surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Stephanie; Astasov-Frauenhoffer, Monika; Müller, Johannes A; Fischer, Jens; Waltimo, Tuomas; Rohr, Nadja

    2017-08-01

    So-called secondary caries may develop in the cement gap between the tooth and the bonded restoration. Cement materials with a low susceptibility to biofilm formation are therefore desirable. In the present study, the adhesion of Strepococcus mutans onto three adhesive (Multilink Automix, RelyX Ultimate, and Panavia V5) and three self-adhesive (Multilink Speed Cem, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, and Panavia SA plus) resin composite cements was evaluated. Previous studies have failed to evaluate concomitantly the effect of both the composition of the cements and their surface roughness on biofilm formation. The presence of S. mutans on cement surfaces with differing degrees of roughness was therefore recorded using fluorescence microscopy and crystal violet staining, and the composition of the cements was analyzed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping. Biofilm formation on resin composite cements was found to be higher on rougher surfaces, implying that adequate polishing of the cement gap is essential. The use of copper-containing cements (Multilink Automix, Panavia V5, and Panavia SA plus) significantly reduced biofilm formation. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  6. Randomized clinical trial of two resin-modified glass ionomer materials: 1-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, J; Dutra-Corrêa, M; Saraceni, S H C; Ciaramicoli, M T; Kiyan, V H

    2012-01-01

    With institutional review board approval, 33 patients who needed restoration of noncarious cervical lesions (NCCL) were enrolled in this study. A total of 92 NCCL were selected and randomly assigned to three groups: (1) Ambar (FGM), a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (control), combined with the nanofilled composite resin Filtek Supreme Plus (FSP; 3M ESPE); (2) Fuji II LC (GC America), a traditional resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC) restorative material; (3) Ketac Nano (3M ESPE), a nanofilled RMGIC restorative material. Restorations were evaluated at six months and one year using modified United States Public Health Service parameters. At six months after initial placement, 84 restorations (a 91.3% recall rate) were evaluated. At one year, 78 restorations (a 84.8% recall rate) were available for evaluation. The six month and one year overall retention rates were 93.1% and 92.6%, respectively, for Ambar/FSP; 100% and 100%, respectively, for Fuji II LC; and 100% and 100%, respectively, for Ketac Nano with no statistical difference between any pair of groups at each recall. Sensitivity to air decreased for all three adhesive materials from the preoperative to the postoperative stage, but the difference was not statistically significant. For Ambar/FSP, there were no statistical differences for any of the parameters from baseline to six months and from baseline to one year. For Fuji II LC, surface texture worsened significantly from baseline to six months and from baseline to one year. For Ketac Nano, enamel marginal staining increased significantly from baseline to one year and from six months to one year. Marginal adaptation was statistically worse at one year compared with baseline only for Ketac Nano. When parameters were compared for materials at each recall, Ketac Nano resulted in significantly worse color match than any of the other two materials at any evaluation period. At one year, Ketac Nano resulted in significantly worse marginal adaptation than the

  7. Calculation of indoor effective dose factors in ORNL phantoms series due to natural radioactivity in building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstic, D; Nikezic, D

    2009-10-01

    In this paper the effective dose in the age-dependent ORNL phantoms series, due to naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials, was calculated. The absorbed doses for various organs or human tissues have been calculated. The MCNP-4B computer code was used for this purpose. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP Publication 74. The obtained values of dose conversion factors for a standard room are: 1.033, 0.752 and 0.0538 nSv h-1 per Bq kg-1 for elements of the U and Th decay series and for the K isotope, respectively. The values of effective dose agreed generally with those found in the literature, although the values estimated here for elements of the U series were higher in some cases.

  8. Effect of Aging Regimens on Resin Nanoceramic Chairside CAD/CAM Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; ArRejaie, Aws S; Bahgat, Hala A; Baba, Nadim Z

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of cyclic mechanical loading, thermal cycling, and storage in water on a resin nanoceramic chairside computer-aided designed/computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) material compared to a control leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic material. One hundred twenty specimens (18 × 4 × 3 mm) were milled from two chairside CAD/CAM materials' blocks (Lava Ultimate: LU; Vitablock Mark II: VM). Each group included four subgroups (A: n = 20 control; B: n = 20 cyclic loading [105 cycles, 80 N]; C: n = 20 thermal cycling [5 to 55°C]; D: n = 60 water storage [20: 3 months; 20: 6 months; 20: 9 months at 37°C]). Each subgroup included 10 specimens tested for flexure strength using three-point bending in a universal testing machine. The other 10 specimens were tested for surface roughness using an automated profiler followed by testing for surface hardness using a microhardness tester. LU displayed higher flexure strength than VM before and after all the aging conditions. The surface roughness for VM was lower than LU for the control, but both materials showed comparable values and significant increases after 9 months storage in water. After cyclic loading, only VM displayed a significant increase in the surface roughness value (p CAD/CAM material. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Lung pair phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Peter C.; Gordon, N. Ross; Simmons, Kevin L.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  10. Light-curing considerations for resin-based composite materials: a review. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2010-10-01

    As discussed in Part I, the type of curing light and curing mode impact the polymerization kinetics of resin-based composite (RBC) materials. Major changes in light-curing units and curing modes have occurred. The type of curing light and mode employed affects the polymerization shrinkage and associated stresses, microhardness, depth of cure, degree of conversion, and color change of RBCs. These factors also may influence the microleakage in an RBC restoration. Apart from the type of unit and mode used, the polymerization of RBCs is also affected by how a light-curing unit is used and handled, as well as the aspects associated with RBCs and the environment. Part II discusses the various clinical issues that should be considered while curing RBC restorations in order to achieve the best possible outcome.

  11. Field Trial of Resin-Based Composite Materials for the Treatment of Surface Collapses Associated with Former Shallow Coal Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Philip T. Broughton; Mark P. Bettney; Isla L. Smail

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment of ground instability is essential when managing the impacts associated with historic mining. A field trial was undertaken by the Coal Authority to investigate the geotechnical performance and potential use of composite materials comprising resin and fill or stone to safely treat surface collapses, such as crown-holes, associated with shallow mining. Test pits were loosely filled with various granular fill materials. The fill material was injected with commercially availab...

  12. Restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth: an evaluation of coronal microleakage of glass ionomer and composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Arnold, A M; Wilcox, L R

    1990-12-01

    A glass ionomer material was evaluated for coronal microleakage in permanent lingual access restorations of endodontically treated anterior teeth. The material was tested as a restoration, placed over a zinc oxide-eugenol base, and as a base with an acid-etched composite resin veneer and a dentinal bonding agent. Restored teeth were thermocycled, immersed in silver nitrate, developed, and sectioned to assess microleakage. Significant coronal leakage was observed with all materials used.

  13. Effect of toothbrushing abrasion on weight and surface roughness of pH-cycled resin cements and indirect restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakki, Anuradha; Cilli, Renato; de Araújo, Paulo Amarante; Navarro, Maria Fidela de Lima; Mondelli, José; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate wear resistance, by weight loss and roughness changes, of resin cements and indirect restorative materials to toothbrushing and toothbrushing associated with pH-challenge simulation. The following materials were studied: Enforce resin cement (Dentsply), Rely X resin cement (3M ESPE), Variolink II resin cement (Ivoclar/Vivadent), Artglass indirect resin composite (Heraeus Kulzer), and Duceram Plus porcelain (Degussa). Twenty cylindrical specimens were prepared for each material for a total of 10 groups (n = 10). After finishing and polishing, the specimens were subjected to toothbrushing. One group of each material was pH cycled before abrasion. For toothbrushing, a machine containing soft-bristle tips, dentifrice, and water was used. One hundred thousand brushing cycles were performed. Weight loss was determined as the percentage difference between initial (before brushing) and final (after brushing) measurements. Roughness changes were evaluated by the difference between initial and final measurements. Data were analyzed with the paired t test, 2-way ANOVA, and Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). Paired t test showed significant differences in weight loss and roughness after toothbrushing (P <.01). Statistically significant differences were found among materials for both weight loss, which ranged from 0.34% (Duceram Plus) to 1.85% (Enforce/pH), and roughness changes, which ranged from -0.03 microm (Duceram Plus) to 0.29 microm (Rely X/pH). Among cements, Variolink II exhibited the least weight loss and roughness increase. Of all materials, Duceram Plus porcelain presented the lowest weight loss and became smoother after abrasion. pH cycling had no influence on material weight or roughness changes after abrasion.

  14. Effect of storage in water and thermocycling on hardness and roughness of resin materials for temporary restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerusa Cleci de Oliveira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study evaluated the effect of storage in water and thermocycling on hardness and roughness of resin materials for temporary restorations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three acrylic resins (Dencor-De, Duralay-Du, and Vipi Cor-VC were selected and one composite resin (Opallis-Op was used as a parameter for comparison. The materials were prepared according to the manufacturers' instructions and were placed in stainless steel moulds (20 mm in diameter and 5 mm thick. Thirty samples of each resin were made and divided into three groups (n = 10 according to the moment of Vickers hardness (VHN and roughness (Ra analyses: C (control group: immediately after specimen preparation; Sw: after storage in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 hours; Tc: after thermocycling (3000 cycles; 5-55 °C, 30 seconds dwell time. Data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05. RESULTS: Op resin had higher surface hardness values (p 0.05 in roughness among materials (De = 0.31 ± 0.07; Du = 0.51 ± 0.20; VC = 0.41 ± 0.15; Op = 0.42 ± 0.18. Storage in water did not change hardness and roughness of the tested materials (p > 0.05. There was a significant increase in roughness after thermocycling (p < 0.05, except for material Du, which showed no significant change in roughness in any evaluated period (p = 0.99. CONCLUSION: Thermocycling increased the roughness in most tested materials without affecting hardness, while storage in water had no significant effect in the evaluated properties.

  15. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A.S.; Weir, Michael D.; Reynolds, Mark A.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2016-01-01

    A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2) investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC); the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU), and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1), and much greater than RMGI (p control composites (p control composites (p 0.1). In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries. PMID:28774007

  16. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A S; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-11-01

    A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2) investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC); the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU), and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control ( p > 0.1), and much greater than RMGI ( p biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites ( p Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI ( p > 0.1). In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  17. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  18. Resin-Impregnated Carbon Ablator: A New Ablative Material for Hyperbolic Entry Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jaime; Lengowski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Ablative materials are required to protect a space vehicle from the extreme temperatures encountered during the most demanding (hyperbolic) atmospheric entry velocities, either for probes launched toward other celestial bodies, or coming back to Earth from deep space missions. To that effect, the resin-impregnated carbon ablator (RICA) is a high-temperature carbon/phenolic ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material designed to use modern and commercially viable components in its manufacture. Heritage carbon/phenolic ablators intended for this use rely on materials that are no longer in production (i.e., Galileo, Pioneer Venus); hence the development of alternatives such as RICA is necessary for future NASA planetary entry and Earth re-entry missions. RICA s capabilities were initially measured in air for Earth re-entry applications, where it was exposed to a heat flux of 14 MW/sq m for 22 seconds. Methane tests were also carried out for potential application in Saturn s moon Titan, with a nominal heat flux of 1.4 MW/sq m for up to 478 seconds. Three slightly different material formulations were manufactured and subsequently tested at the Plasma Wind Tunnel of the University of Stuttgart in Germany (PWK1) in the summer and fall of 2010. The TPS integrity was well preserved in most cases, and results show great promise.

  19. Preparation of polymer nanocomposite materials based on unsaturated polyester resin and nanosilica A200. Part II - Structural and properties of polymer nanocomposite materials based on unsaturated polyester resin and nanosilica A200 with coupling agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh Minh Dat; Bui Chuong; Bach Trong Phuc; Dinh Van Kai; Luu Van Khue

    2012-01-01

    Effects of coupling agent on the structures and properties of nanocomposite materials based on unsaturated polyester resin and A200 silica nanoparticles were investigated. The viscosity of the resin/A200 silica mixtures increased with increasing coupling agent content because of forming core-shell structures and the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites generally were better than those without coupling agent and appeared a maximum in mechanical properties at 4.0 wt% coupling agent content. IR analyze indicated that the coupling agent had reacted with unsaturated polyester resin and A200 silica nanoparticles. SEM, Fe-SEM and TG-SDC demonstrated more homogeneous dispersion of A200 silica nanoparticles in the polymer matrix and accompanied by lower glass transition temperature and melt temperature. Furthermore, it was also found that the best dispersion route involved a methanol dispersion technique. (author)

  20. Mathematically defined phantoms for organ dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki

    1998-01-01

    There are physical and mathematical phantoms which, for simulating the radiation reactions in the body, composed from more than one tissue equivalent material(s). This review concerns the latter one, particularly the human phantom, for its characteristics, actual models, examples of dose calculation and problems in future. The human phantom is classified into the formula phantom where sizes and properties of human organs/tissues are expressed by the combination of formula, and the voxel phantom where they are expressed by the combination of small cubes (voxel). The formula phantom usually uses quadratic equations for expressing the organ shape and was firstly developed as a MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee)-5 phantom. Based on the MIRD-5, many versions such as female, male and child phantoms have been developed. Voxel phantoms are rather new and are based on CT data of a person. Both phantoms require human numerical data: e.g., from reference man for formula phantom and actual precise CT data for voxel phantom. Dose calculation revealed that, for the low energy photon, doses are rather different between the two phantoms. Future problems involve the further examination on the size and properties of organs, improvement of expression of the phantoms, preparation of standard phantoms, modulation and simplification of the procedure for preparing the voxel phantom and an idea for automatic construction of the human phantom with appropriate parameters. (K.H.)

  1. Solidification of spent ion exchange resin using new cementitious material, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masami; Nishi, Takashi; Chino, Koichi; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1992-01-01

    Cement solidification is a conventional technique to solidify spent ion exchange resin. Swelling property of the ion exchange resin was investigated theoretically and experimentally, as the first step to improve resin content in a cement package. Swelling pressure of the resin was first formulated based on Gregor's swelling model. It was shown that the pressure depended on such factors as ion exchange capacity, type of functional group, crosslinkage and water content. Subsequently, swelling pressures for over forty properties of cation exchange resin (DIAION SK-series) with different exchange capacities, water contents and others were experimentally evaluated using an originally developed method. The pressure changed over a range of 0 ∼ 60 MPa, depending on properties of the ion exchange resin. These results were in close agreement with values calculated by Gregor's model, indicating that the swelling pressure could be evaluated without resorting to experiments. (author)

  2. SU-F-E-10: Student-Driven Exploration of Radiographic Material Properties, Phantom Construction, and Clinical Workflows Or: The Extraordinary Life of CANDY MAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahon, RN; Riblett, MJ; Hugo, GD [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a hands-on learning experience that explores the radiological and structural properties of everyday items and applies this knowledge to design a simple phantom for radiotherapy exercises. Methods: Students were asked to compile a list of readily available materials thought to have radiation attenuation properties similar to tissues within the human torso. Participants scanned samples of suggested materials and regions of interest (ROIs) were used to characterize bulk attenuation properties. Properties of each material were assessed via comparison to a Gammex Tissue characterization phantom and used to construct a list of inexpensive near-tissue-equivalent materials. Critical discussions focusing on samples found to differ from student expectations were used to revise and narrow the comprehensive list. From their newly acquired knowledge, students designed and constructed a simple thoracic phantom for use in a simulated clinical workflow. Students were tasked with setting up the phantom and acquiring planning CT images for use in treatment planning and dose delivery. Results: Under engineer and physicist supervision, students were trained to use a CT simulator and acquired images for approximately 60 different foodstuffs, candies, and household items. Through peer discussion, students gained valuable insights and were made to review preconceptions about radiographic material properties. From a subset of imaged materials, a simple phantom was successfully designed and constructed to represent a human thorax. Students received hands-on experience with clinical treatment workflows by learning how to perform CT simulation, create a treatment plan for an embedded tumor, align the phantom for treatment, and deliver a treatment fraction. Conclusion: In this activity, students demonstrated their ability to reason through the radiographic material selection process, construct a simple phantom to specifications, and exercise their knowledge of clinical

  3. SU-F-E-10: Student-Driven Exploration of Radiographic Material Properties, Phantom Construction, and Clinical Workflows Or: The Extraordinary Life of CANDY MAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, RN; Riblett, MJ; Hugo, GD

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a hands-on learning experience that explores the radiological and structural properties of everyday items and applies this knowledge to design a simple phantom for radiotherapy exercises. Methods: Students were asked to compile a list of readily available materials thought to have radiation attenuation properties similar to tissues within the human torso. Participants scanned samples of suggested materials and regions of interest (ROIs) were used to characterize bulk attenuation properties. Properties of each material were assessed via comparison to a Gammex Tissue characterization phantom and used to construct a list of inexpensive near-tissue-equivalent materials. Critical discussions focusing on samples found to differ from student expectations were used to revise and narrow the comprehensive list. From their newly acquired knowledge, students designed and constructed a simple thoracic phantom for use in a simulated clinical workflow. Students were tasked with setting up the phantom and acquiring planning CT images for use in treatment planning and dose delivery. Results: Under engineer and physicist supervision, students were trained to use a CT simulator and acquired images for approximately 60 different foodstuffs, candies, and household items. Through peer discussion, students gained valuable insights and were made to review preconceptions about radiographic material properties. From a subset of imaged materials, a simple phantom was successfully designed and constructed to represent a human thorax. Students received hands-on experience with clinical treatment workflows by learning how to perform CT simulation, create a treatment plan for an embedded tumor, align the phantom for treatment, and deliver a treatment fraction. Conclusion: In this activity, students demonstrated their ability to reason through the radiographic material selection process, construct a simple phantom to specifications, and exercise their knowledge of clinical

  4. Characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotube-polymethyl methacrylate composite resins as denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Russell; Tao, Junliang; Yu, Bill; Dai, Liming

    2014-04-01

    Most fractures of dentures occur during function, primarily because of the flexural fatigue of denture resins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a polymethyl methacrylate denture base material modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes in terms of fatigue resistance, flexural strength, and resilience. Denture resin specimens were fabricated: control, 0.5 wt%, 1 wt%, and 2 wt% of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were dispersed by sonication. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine quantitative dispersions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in polymethyl methacrylate. Raman spectroscopic analyses were used to evaluate interfacial reactions between the multiwalled carbon nanotubes and the polymethyl methacrylate matrix. Groups with and without multiwalled carbon nanotubes were subjected to a 3-point-bending test for flexural strength. Resilience was derived from a stress and/or strain curve. Fatigue resistance was conducted by a 4-point bending test. Fractured surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA and the Duncan tests were used to identify any statistical differences (α=.05). Thermogravimetric analysis verified the accurate amounts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes dispersed in the polymethyl methacrylate resin. Raman spectroscopy showed an interfacial reaction between the multiwalled carbon nanotubes and the polymethyl methacrylate matrix. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in static and dynamic loadings among the groups. The worst mechanical properties were in the 2 wt% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Ppolymethyl methacrylate groups showed poor fatigue resistance. The scanning electron microscopy results indicated more agglomerations in the 2% multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes-polymethyl methacrylate groups (0.5% and 1%) performed better than the control group during the static flexural test. The results indicated that 2 wt% multiwalled carbon nanotubes

  5. Experimental Investigation on the Specific Heat of Carbonized Phenolic Resin-Based Ablative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Te; Ye, Hong; Zhang, Lisong; Cai, Qilin

    2017-10-01

    As typical phenolic resin-based ablative materials, the high silica/phenolic and carbon/phenolic composites are widely used in aerospace field. The specific heat of the carbonized ablators after ablation is an important thermophysical parameter in the process of heat transfer, but it is rarely reported. In this investigation, the carbonized samples of the high silica/phenolic and carbon/phenolic were obtained through carbonization experiments, and the specific heat of the carbonized samples was determined by a 3D DSC from 150 °C to 970 °C. Structural and compositional characterizations were performed to determine the mass fractions of the fiber and the carbonized product of phenolic which are the two constituents of the carbonized samples, while the specific heat of each constituent was also measured by 3D DSC. The masses of the carbonized samples were reduced when heated to a high temperature in the specific heat measurements, due to the thermal degradation of the carbonized product of phenolic resin in the carbonized samples. The raw experimental specific heat of the two carbonized samples and the carbonized product of phenolic resin was modified according to the quality changes of the carbonized samples presented by TGA results. Based on the mass fraction and the specific heat of each constituent, a weighted average method was adopted to obtain the calculated results of the carbonized samples. Due to the unconsolidated property of the fiber samples which impacts the reliability of the DSC measurement, there is a certain deviation between the experimental and calculated results of the carbonized samples. Considering the similarity of composition and structure, the data of quartz glass and graphite were used to substitute the specific heat of the high silica fiber and carbon fiber, respectively, resulting in better agreements with the experimental ones. Furthermore, the accurate specific heat of the high silica fiber and carbon fiber bundles was obtained by

  6. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of soft denture lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Mustafa; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep; Alkurt, Murat

    2014-10-01

    Adhesive failure between acrylic resin and resilient liner material is commonly encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of 2 different resilient lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base. Ninety-six dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated from heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and 3 mm of the material was cut from the thin midsection. The specimens were divided into 6 groups according to their surface treatments: no surface treatment (control group), 36% phosphoric acid etching (acid group), erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (laser group), airborne-particle abrasion with 50-μm Al2O3 particles (abrasion group), an acid+laser group, and an abrasion+laser group. The specimens in each group were divided into 2 subgroups according to the resilient lining material used: heat-polymerized silicone based resilient liner (Molloplast B) and autopolymerized silicone-based resilient liner (Ufi Gel P). After all of the specimens had been polymerized, they were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 1 week. A tensile bond strength test was then performed. Data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA, and the Sidak multiple comparison test was used to identify significant differences (α=.05). The effects of the surface treatments and resilient lining materials on the surface of the denture base resin were examined with scanning electron microscopy. The tensile bond strength was significantly different between Molloplast B and Ufi Gel P (Presin. Molloplast B exhibited significantly higher bond strength than Ufi Gel P. Altering the surface of the acrylic resin denture base with 36% phosphoric acid etching increased bond strength. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of reline material and denture base surface treatment on the impact strength of a denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz Perez, Luciano Elias; Machado, Ana Lucia; Canevarolo, Sebastião Vicente; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia

    2010-03-01

    In this study, the effect of relining and surface treatment on the impact strength (IS) of a heat-polymerising denture base acrylic resin (Lucitone 550-L) was evaluated. Rectangular bars of L were made (60 x 6 x 2 mm) and relined (2 mm) with the relining resins Ufi Gel Hard (UH) and Tokuso Rebase Fast (TR). Specimens relined with L and intact L, TR and UH specimens were also made (60 x 6 x 4 mm), for comparison. Before relining, the L surface was left untreated or wetted with methyl methacrylate monomer and/or the bonding agents (BA) supplied by manufacturers of the reline resins. V-notches were machined at the midpoint of the length of all specimens. The notches were made either across the width (Nw) or across the thickness of the specimens (Nth). The Charpy impact test was performed using a 0.5-J pendulum, which had been specially designed and constructed. Data were analysed separately for each notch position using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significant difference post-hoc test (p = 0.05). The IS of L was similar to that of L/L. For the Nw notch, treating the denture base L with TR BA and relining with TR reline material produced the highest IS. The IS of specimens made from heat polymerising acrylic resin Lucitone 550 was increased after relining using the hard chairside reline resin TR with its proprietary BA.

  8. Determining the dimensional stability, fracture toughness and flexural strength of light-cured acrylic resin custom tray material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S B; Geerts, G

    2009-06-01

    Light-cured acrylic resin custom tray material is used in commercial dental laboratories but little evidence-based scientific information on its physical properties is available. This study investigates the dimensional stability of light-cured acrylic resin custom tray material and compares its fracture toughness and flexural strength to a chemically-cured acrylic material. For dimensional stability, 20 light-cured specimens were fabricated and measured 3 times at regular time intervals over 48 hours. Mean shrinkage was calculated for each time interval and the mean values were compared to the standard using the Wilcoxon Rank Sum test. A p-value of materials with a single-edge notch were subjected to a compressive load using the 3-point bending technique. For flexural strength, 1 group (n=20) of each material was subjected to a compressive load using 3-point bending. The highest load before failure was used to calculate the fracture toughness and flexural strength. Differences in fracture toughness and flexural strength values between the 2 groups were compared using ANOVA testing. A p-value of 0.05). The fracture toughness and flexural strength were significantly higher for the light-cured material. Trays made from light-cured acrylic resin can be used immediately following polymerization. The light-cured material is more resistant to bending and crack propagation than the chemically-cured type.

  9. The Effect of Finishing and Polishing Techniques on the Surface Roughness and the Color of Nanocomposite Resin Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, Aysun; Yuzbasioglu, Emir; Sarac, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Rough, poorly polished surfaces contribute to staining, plaque accumulation, gingival irritation and recurrent caries. Finishing and polishing techniques are critical factors contributing to the longevity of the direct composite resin restorations. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of finishing and polishing systems on surface roughness of six nanocomposite restorative resins. Thirty specimens of each restorative material (n=180) were placed in a teflon mould (6 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth) and cured with a LED curing unit. Six specimens from each of restorative material were randomly assigned to four groups for finishing and polishing (carbide burs, diamond burs, aluminium oxide discs, silicon rubber polisher) techniques. Mylar strip formed specimens were served as control group. After finishing and polishing procedures surface roughness was evaluated by a profilometer. The data was analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and the Tukey HSD test (α=0.05). Significant differences were found between the groups in terms roughness (prestorative materials. Although mylar matrix strip formed surfaces presents lower surface roughness values, recountouring and polishing of resin restorations are often required in clinical situations. Aluminium oxide discs and carbide finishing burs are suitable for finishing and polishing procedures for nanocomposite restorative resins.

  10. Micro-shear bond strength of different resin cements to ceramic/glass-polymer CAD-CAM block materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Ergun, Gulfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid treatment on bond strength of resin cements to three different types of ceramic/glass containing CAD-CAM block composite materials. CAD-CAM block materials of polymer infiltrated (Vita Enamic), resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate) and nanoceramic (Cerasmart) with a thickness of 1.5mm were randomly divided into two groups according to the surface treatment performed. In Group 1, specimens were wet-ground with silicon carbide abrasive papers up to no. 1000. In Group 2, 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel was applied to ceramics. Three different resin cements (RelyX, Variolink Esthetic and G-CEM LinkAce) were applied to the tubes in 1.2-mm thick increments and light-cured for 40s using LED light curing unit. Half of the specimens (n=10) were submitted to thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5-55°C). The strength measurements were accomplished with a universal testing machine (Lloyd Instruments) at a cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min until the failure occurs. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope. The data were analyzed with multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences between ceramics and resin cements (pceramics (pceramic/glass-polymer materials might promote the bonding capacity of these systems. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  12. Characteristics of novel root-end filling material using epoxy resin and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jin; Na, Hee-Sam; Park, Eun-Joo; Jeon, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical properties and cytotoxicity of a novel root-end filling material (EPC) which is made from epoxy resin and Portland cement as a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) substitute. EPC, developed as a root-end filling material, was compared with MTA and a mixture of AH Plus sealer and MTA (AMTA) with regard to the setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage. Setting times were evaluated using Vicat apparatus. Digital radiographs were taken to evaluate the aluminium equivalent radio-opacity using an aluminium step wedge. Extracted single-rooted teeth were used for leakage test using methylene blue dye. After canal shaping and obturation, the apical 3-mm root was resected, and a root-end cavity with a depth of 3 mm was prepared. The root-end cavities were filled with MTA, AMTA, and EPC for 15 specimens in each of three groups. After setting in humid conditions for 24 h, the specimens were tested for apical leakage. For evaluation of the biocompatibility of EPC, cell (human gingival fibroblast) viability was compared for MTA and Portland cement by MTT assay, and cell morphological changes were compared for MTA and AH Plus by fluorescence microscopy using DAPI and F-actin staining. The setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage were compared using one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc comparison, and the cytotoxicity was compared using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Statistical significance was set at 95%. EPC had a shorter setting time and less microleakage compared with MTA (p Portland cement, was found to be a useful material for root-end filling, with favourable radio-opacity, short setting time, low microleakage, and clinically acceptable low cytotoxicity. The novel root-end filling material would be a potentially useful material for a surgical endodontic procedure with favourable properties.

  13. Production and characterization of composite material based on ablative phenolic resin and carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta

    2002-01-01

    The optimisation of technology for production of moulding compound based on short carbon fibers and ablative phenolic resin is carried out. The characterisation of the starting raw materials is performed and moulding compounds With different fiber/matrix ratios and different fiber lengths are prepared. From the different samples, mouldings are produced by thermal compression. All physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites are tested. From the obtained results the optimal fiber/matrix ratio, for high temperature moulding compounds production are determined. Also, in order to meet the request for high thermal and mechanics properties of the composite, optimization is carded out on the moulding process itself. The optimization is fulfilled by a planned experiment. The full factorial experimental design is applied in which the following parameters are varied: fiber length, temperature and time of the press cycle. Regression equations for the influence of the parameters to the impact resistance, compression strength, flexural strength and the modulus of elasticity of the molding, are obtained. The obtained mechanical properties of the composite rate this material for potential application in the automotive, leisure, military and other industries.(Author)

  14. Evaluation of 3D printing materials for fabrication of a novel multi-functional 3D thyroid phantom for medical dosimetry and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alssabbagh, Moayyad; Tajuddin, Abd Aziz; Abdulmanap, Mahayuddin; Zainon, Rafidah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the three-dimensional printer has started to be utilized strongly in medical industries. In the human body, many parts or organs can be printed from 3D images to meet accurate organ geometries. In this study, five common 3D printing materials were evaluated in terms of their elementary composition and the mass attenuation coefficients. The online version of XCOM photon cross-section database was used to obtain the attenuation values of each material. The results were compared with the attenuation values of the thyroid listed in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements - ICRU 44. Two original thyroid models (hollow-inside and solid-inside) were designed from scratch to be used in nuclear medicine, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy for dosimetry and image quality purposes. Both designs have three holes for installation of radiation dosimeters. The hollow-inside model has more two holes in the top for injection the radioactive materials. The attenuation properties of the Polylactic Acid (PLA) material showed a very good match with the thyroid tissue, which it was selected to 3D print the phantom using open source RepRap, Prusa i3 3D printer. The scintigraphy images show that the phantom simulates a real healthy thyroid gland and thus it can be used for image quality purposes. The measured CT numbers of the PA material after the 3D printing show a close match with the human thyroid CT numbers. Furthermore, the phantom shows a good accommodation of the TLD dosimeters inside the holes. The 3D fabricated thyroid phantom simulates the real shape of the human thyroid gland with a changeable geometrical shape-size feature to fit different age groups. By using 3D printing technology, the time required to fabricate the 3D phantom was considerably shortened compared to the longer conventional methods, where it took only 30 min to print out the model. The 3D printing material used in this study is commercially available and cost

  15. Material characterization of a polyester resin system for the pultrusion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baran, Ismet; Akkerman, Remko; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2014-01-01

    to develop a cure kinetics model which accurately predicts the cure rate evolutions and describes the curing behaviour of the resin over a wide range of different processing conditions. The viscosity of the resin is subsequently obtained from rheological experiments using a rheometer. Based on this, a resin....... The temperature- and curedependent elastic modulus of the resin system is determined using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) in tension mode. A cure hardening and thermal softening model is developed and a least squares non-linear regression analysis is performed. The variation in elastic modulus...... with temperature and phase transition is captured for a fully cured resin sample. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  16. Synthesis and characterization of breast-phantom-based gelatine-glutaraldehyde-TiO2 as a test material for the application of breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhrowiyah, Nuril; Setyaningsih, Novi; Hikmawati, Dyah; Yasin, Moh

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis of breast-phantom-based on gelatine-glutaraldehyde-TiO2 as testing material of breast cancer diagnosis using Near Infrared-Diffuse Optical Tomography (NIR-DOT) is presented. Glutaraldehyde (GA) is added to obtain optimum breast phantom which has same elasticity modulus with mammae. First, synthesis is conducted by mixing gelatine with various amounts of 1 g, 2 g and 3 g with saline solution on 40° C temperature for 30 minutes until they become homogenous. Next, GA with concentration of 0.5 and 1.0% is added. The characterization includes FTIR test, physical test, and mechanical test used to identify group of gelatine’s functions. Elasticity modulus of breast phantom of gelatine composition 2 g and 0.5% GA is obtained at 53.46 kPA which is the approximation of mammae culture elasticity. This composition is chosen to synthesise the next step. In the second step, TiO2 is added with variation of 0.01 g, 0.015 g, 0.02 g, 0.025 g, and 0,03 g. With this variation, it is aimed to get a breast phantom providing image with optimum absorption. The test of this material uses Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), homogeneity test, and analysis of coefficient absorption. The result shows the sample has a good thermal property in the range of 40 - 70° C with a good homogeneity and absorption coefficient of 0.4 mm-1.

  17. CT doses in cylindrical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, J.V.; Huda, W.

    1995-01-01

    A single CT scan of thickness T in a cylindrical phantom produces a three-dimensional dose distribution, which depends primarily on the photon energy spectrum, the x-ray beam shaping filter and the size and composition of the irradiated phantom. Monte Carlo simulations employing monoenergetic photons were employed to investigate the effect of each of these factors on phantom dose distributions. The fractional energies scattered, imparted and transmitted through the CT phantom were calculated. A dose index (D(r)), which is a function of phantom radius r, was computed. Phantom materials investigated included lung, fat, water, soft tissue, acrylic and bone with calculations performed for head (160 mm diameter) and body (320 mm diameter) phantoms. All dose and energy imparted data generated for CT phantoms were normalized using an 'in air' dose (D air ), which is defined as the axial dose (in acrylic) at the isocentre in the absence of any phantom. Results obtained show how CT parameters impact on doses in cylindrical phantoms. These dosimetry data are likely to be useful to estimate energy imparted to phantoms (and patients) undergoing CT examinations. (author)

  18. Effect Of Fly Ash Filler To Dielectric Properties Of The Insulator Material Of Silicone Rubber And Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlas Kitta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently many operated the coal fired power plant to meet the energy needs of the worlds electricity. But the coal fired power plant produces waste that can pollute the environment such as fly ash and bottom ash so requires management to not cause environmental problems because coal fly ash classified as a hazardous waste. Fly ash has a particle size that is very smooth and of some literature research done previously fly ash coal containing silica SiO2 alumina Al2O3 titanium dioxide TiO2 magnesium oxide MgO and zinc oxide ZnO are potentially as filler that are likely to be used as a mixture of silicone rubber and epoxy resin for electrical insulators. So this research theme was engineering insulation materials by utilizing waste coal fly ash. The purpose of this study was to obtain performance characteristics of waste coal fly ash as filler in silicon rubber and epoxy resin. To achieve these objectives the activities that have been done is examined the effects of the use of fly ash as filler in silicone rubber material and epoxy resin. Parameters measured were dielectric strength and relative permittivity. The result of this research is the dielectric strength of silicone rubber rose with increasing quantity of fly ash. Conversely in epoxy resin dielectric strength decreases with increasing quantity of fly ash. Furthermore the measurement results relative permittivity where the value of the relative permittivity of silicon rubber swell if it is filled with fly ash as well as epoxy resin which has a value of permittivity relative to the concentration of fly ash filler material is linear.

  19. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin. Part II: Material properties and clinical features of non-metal clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Aita, Hideki; Ono, Takahiro; Kondo, Hisatomo; Tamaki, Katsushi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Tsukasaki, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masanori; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-04-01

    This position paper reviews physical and mechanical properties of thermoplastic resin used for non-metal clasp dentures, and describes feature of each thermoplastic resin in clinical application of non-metal clasp dentures and complications based on clinical experience of expert panels. Since products of thermoplastic resin have great variability in physical and mechanical properties, clinicians should utilize them with careful consideration of the specific properties of each product. In general, thermoplastic resin has lower color-stability and higher risk for fracture than polymethyl methacrylate. Additionally, the surface of thermoplastic resin becomes roughened more easily than polymethyl methacrylate. Studies related to material properties of thermoplastic resin, treatment efficacy and follow-up are insufficient to provide definitive conclusions at this time. Therefore, this position paper should be revised based on future studies and a clinical guideline should be provided. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of chemical disinfectants and repair materials on the transverse strength of repaired heat-polymerized acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellakwa, Ayman E; El-Sheikh, Ali M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate both the effects of immersion in different chemical disinfectant solutions and the type of repair material on the transverse strength of repaired heat-polymerized acrylic resin. A total of 110 rectangular specimens (65 x 10 x 3 mm) of heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Triplex) were fabricated. After polymerization, the specimens were polished, then stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 week. The specimens were divided into 11 groups (n = 10) coded A to K. Specimens of Group A remained intact (control). The specimens of Groups C to F and Groups H to K were immersed in the following chemical disinfectant solutions (1%, 2.5%, and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and 2% glutaraldehyde, respectively) for 10 minutes. The specimens of all groups except those of Group A were sectioned in the middle to create 10 mm gaps and repaired with the same resin (Groups B to F) and autopolymerizing acrylic resin (Groups G to K). The specimens of Groups C to F and Groups H to K were again immersed in the disinfectant solutions in the same sequence. The transverse strength (N/mm(2)) was tested for failure in a universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to evaluate the effects of both the disinfectant solutions and repair materials on the transverse strength of repaired specimens. All data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test at 95% confidence level. The repaired specimens treated with/without disinfectant solutions showed similar (p > 0.05) transverse strength values. No differences (p > 0.05) were detected among the repaired specimens either with heat-polymerized or autopolymerizing acrylic resins. The intact specimens showed transverse strength values (86.9 +/- 11.8) significantly higher (p disinfectants for the immersion period tested (10 min). The repair material, either heat-polymerized or autopolymerizing acrylic resin

  1. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 16, 2014. Phantom pain Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  2. Human phantom

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    This human phantom has been received by CERN on loan from the State Committee of the USSR for the Utilization of Atomic Energy. It is used by the Health Physics Group to study personel radiation doses near the accelerators.

  3. Method development for the analysis of resinous materials with MALDI-FT-ICR-MS: novel internal standards and a new matrix material for negative ion mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teearu, A; Vahur, S; Rodima, T; Herodes, K; Bonrath, W; Netscher, T; Tshepelevitsh, S; Trummal, A; Lõkov, M; Leito, I

    2017-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is a mass spectrometry (MS) ionization technique suitable for a wide variety of sample types including highly complex ones such as natural resinous materials. Coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass analyser, which provides mass spectra with high resolution and accuracy, the method gives a wealth of information about the composition of the sample. One of the key aspects in MALDI-MS is the right choice of matrix compound. We have previously demonstrated that 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid is suitable for the positive ion mode analysis of resinous samples. However, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid was found to be unsuitable for the analysis of these samples in the negative ion mode. The second problem addressed was the limited choice of calibration standards offering a flexible selection of m/z values under m/z 1000. This study presents a modified MALDI-FT-ICR-MS method for the analysis of resinous materials, which incorporates a novel matrix compound, 2-aminoacridine for the negative ion mode analysis and extends the selection of internal standards with m/z negative (anions of four fluorine-rich sulpho-compounds) ion mode. The novel internal calibration compounds and matrix material were tested for the analysis of various natural resins and real-life varnish samples taken from cultural heritage objects. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Effect of an adhesive resin luting agent on the dowel-head retention of three different core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Gokhan; Cotert, H Serdar; Korkut, Levent

    2005-05-01

    A dowel-and-core restoration may fail due to failure at either the dowel-tooth or dowel head-core material interface. Long-term clinical success of a dowel-and-core restoration depends on retention of both the dowel to the tooth and the dowel head to the core material. Thus, strengthening of the dowel head-core interface is important. This study evaluated the retention between a prefabricated dowel and 3 different core materials with or without a dual-polymerized adhesive resin luting agent. Sixty prefabricated dowels (Gold Plated Anchorage Post) were divided into 3 groups (n=20) consisting of 1 of 3 core materials, amalgam (Standalloy F), light-polymerized resin composite (Clearfil Ray), or glass ionomer (Chelon-Silver). Each core group was divided into 2 subgroups (n=10), and a dual-polymerized adhesive resin luting agent (Panavia F) was applied to the dowel heads of 1 of these subgroups before application of the core material. The manufacturing procedure was standardized by using a plastic index (4.5-mm internal diameter and 5-mm height) and a custom-made dowel holder, which held the dowel head. Prepared specimens were stored in water at room temperature for 3 months and then loaded to fracture in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min until failure. Bond strengths were recorded (MPa). Data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) in a 2 x 3 factorial randomized design (alpha=.05). Afterward, core material differences were computed with 1-way ANOVA for both of the bonded and nonbonded groups. Post hoc multiple comparisons were made with the Dunnett C multiple range test. Dowel-head retention values (MPa) of the tested core materials (mean +/- SD) from the highest to the lowest were as follows: bonded amalgam core, 296.1 +/- 108; bonded composite core, 284.3 +/- 38.3; nonbonded composite core, 177.0 +/- 53.7; nonbonded amalgam core, 128.5 +/- 35.0; bonded glass-ionomer core (GIC), 128.0 +/- 24.5; nonbonded GIC, 61.8 +/- 13

  5. Effect of the properties of natural resin binder in a high friction composite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stephen Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high-friction composite material based on the combination of binder, friction modifiers, fibers and fillers is investigated. In the binder, up to 20% of phenol are replaced by cardanol with various weight ratios of 100/0, 95/5, 90/10, 85/15, 80/20. Cardanol may react both through the phenolic group and the double bond of the side chain yielding addition, condensation and polymerisation reactions that allow the synthesis of tailor-made products and polymers of high value. In the present work, mechanical, thermal and wear characteristics of cardanol based phenolic resin with organic ingredients were manufactured and tested. An analysis of microstructure characteristics of composites was carried out using scanning electron microscope. The effect of environment on the composite was investigated in water, salty water and oil. The results showed that the addition of cardanol reduces the wear resistance and increases the compressibility which reduces the noise propensity.

  6. In-office bleaching efficacy on stain removal from CAD/CAM and direct resin composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Amal; Ardu, Stefano; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Krejci, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of in-office bleaching on stain removal from stained resin composite and ceramic computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) blocks and direct resin composites. Forty disk-shaped samples were fabricated from each of nine materials: six CAD/CAM (VITABLOCS Mark II, Paradigm MZ100, Exp Vita Hybrid Ceramic, VITA ENAMIC, Exp Kerr, and LAVA Ultimate) and three direct resin composites (Filtek Supreme, Venus Diamond, and Filtek Silorane). Samples were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8), each stained with a particular staining solution. Using a calibrated spectrophotometer and a black background, L*a*b* values were assessed before and after 120 days of staining. Samples were subjected to in-office bleaching using 40% hydrogen peroxide gel for one hour. At subsequent assessment, color change (ΔE) was calculated as the difference between L*a*b* values. Both ANOVA and the Duncan test were used to identify differences between groups (α = 0.05). Bleaching resulted in significant differences in ΔE values for all materials (P < .001). Bleaching efficacy was highly influenced by material composition and staining solution. Residual color values after bleaching for ceramic and hybrid ceramics ranged from -0.49 to 2.35, within the clinically acceptable maximum of 3.3. Values after bleaching for resin-based CAD/CAM ranged from -0.7 to 7.08 while direct resin composites values ranged from -1.47 to 25.13. Coffee left the greatest residual color on all materials. Based on material nature, 40% hydrogen peroxide bleaching can remove staining. The new resin-based CAD/CAM blocks showed promising results in terms of color stability. Bleaching using 40% hydrogen peroxide can be an effective method to remove stains from dental restorations. In this way, restoration replacement as a result of discoloration may no longer be necessary. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evaluation of Flexural Strength of Thermocycled Interim Resin Materials Used in Prosthetic Rehabilitation- An In-vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Krishna Kishore; Anne, Gopinadh; Anche, Sampath Chowdary; Chiramana, Sandeep; Muvva, Suresh Babu; Zakkula, Srujana; Jyothula, Ravi Rakesh Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Provisional restoration is an analytical component of fixed prosthodontics serving as a ground plan for the design of fixed dental prosthesis. Flexural strength is critical in case of long standing fixed dental prosthesis, to appreciate success of full mouth rehabilitation cases and temporomandibular joint dysfunction therapies. Aim The present study was to evaluate the flexural strength of different provisional restorative resins used for prosthetic rehabilitation. Materials and Methods Forty identical samples (n=10 for each material) measuring 25mm×2mm×2mm according to ADA/ANSI specification no. 27 were fabricated using autopolymerizing Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) (Group A); heat activated PMMA (Group B); autopolymerizing Bis-GMA composite resin (Group C) and light activated Urethane Dimethacrylate Resin (UDMA) (Group D). For 14 days all these samples were stored in artificial saliva. Ten samples from each material were subjected to thermal cycling for 2500 cycles (5°C to 55°C). Later, a standard three point bending test was conducted on all the specimens with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.75mm/min. Statistical analysis used included Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Results The mean flexural strength of specimens confirmed higher flexural strength for Group C (102.98 Mpa) followed by Group B (91.86 Mpa), Group A (79.13 Mpa) and Group D (60.01 Mpa). There were significant differences between any two materials tested (p treatment. PMID:27790588

  8. Evaluation of plastic materials for range shifting, range compensation, and solid-phantom dosimetry in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Koba, Yusuke; Ogata, Risa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Beam range control is the essence of radiotherapy with heavy charged particles. In conventional broad-beam delivery, fine range adjustment is achieved by insertion of range shifting and compensating materials. In dosimetry, solid phantoms are often used for convenience. These materials should ideally be equivalent to water. In this study, the authors evaluated dosimetric water equivalence of four common plastics, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyoxymethylene (POM). Methods: Using the Bethe formula for energy loss, the Gottschalk formula for multiple scattering, and the Sihver formula for nuclear interactions, the authors calculated the effective densities of the plastics for these interactions. The authors experimentally measured variation of the Bragg peak of carbon-ion beams by insertion of HDPE, PMMA, and POM, which were compared with analytical model calculations. Results: The theoretical calculation resulted in slightly reduced multiple scattering and severely increased nuclear interactions for HDPE, compared to water and the other plastics. The increase in attenuation of carbon ions for 20-cm range shift was experimentally measured to be 8.9% for HDPE, 2.5% for PMMA, and 0.0% for POM while PET was theoretically estimated to be in between PMMA and POM. The agreement between the measurements and the calculations was about 1% or better. Conclusions: For carbon-ion beams, POM was dosimetrically indistinguishable from water and the best of the plastics examined in this study. The poorest was HDPE, which would reduce the Bragg peak by 0.45% per cm range shift, although with marginal superiority for reduced multiple scattering. Between the two clear plastics, PET would be superior to PMMA in dosimetric water equivalence.

  9. Phantom-less bone mineral density (BMD) measurement using dual energy computed tomography-based 3-material decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Philipp; Sedlmair, Martin; Krauss, Bernhard; Wichmann, Julian L.; Bauer, Ralf W.; Flohr, Thomas G.; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2016-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease usually diagnosed at the manifestation of fragility fractures, which severely endanger the health of especially the elderly. To ensure timely therapeutic countermeasures, noninvasive and widely applicable diagnostic methods are required. Currently the primary quantifiable indicator for bone stability, bone mineral density (BMD), is obtained either by DEXA (Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) or qCT (quantitative CT). Both have respective advantages and disadvantages, with DEXA being considered as gold standard. For timely diagnosis of osteoporosis, another CT-based method is presented. A Dual Energy CT reconstruction workflow is being developed to evaluate BMD by evaluating lumbar spine (L1-L4) DE-CT images. The workflow is ROI-based and automated for practical use. A dual energy 3-material decomposition algorithm is used to differentiate bone from soft tissue and fat attenuation. The algorithm uses material attenuation coefficients on different beam energy levels. The bone fraction of the three different tissues is used to calculate the amount of hydroxylapatite in the trabecular bone of the corpus vertebrae inside a predefined ROI. Calibrations have been performed to obtain volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) without having to add a calibration phantom or to use special scan protocols or hardware. Accuracy and precision are dependent on image noise and comparable to qCT images. Clinical indications are in accordance with the DEXA gold standard. The decomposition-based workflow shows bone degradation effects normally not visible on standard CT images which would induce errors in normal qCT results.

  10. Cell death effects of resin-based dental material compounds and mercurials in human gingival fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Franz-Xaver [Walther-Straub-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Munich (Germany); Esters, Magali; Simon, Sabine; Seiss, Mario [Walther-Straub-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kehe, Kai [Bundeswehr Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kleinsasser, Norbert [University of Regensburg, Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Regensburg (Germany); Folwaczny, Matthias; Glas, Juergen; Hickel, Reinhard [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Munich (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    In order to test the hypothesis that released dental restorative materials can reach toxic levels in human oral tissues, the cytotoxicities of the resin-based dental (co)monomers hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisglycidylmethacrylate (BisGMA) compared with methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl) and the amalgam component mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) were investigated on human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) using two different test systems: (1) the modified XTT-test and (2) the modified H 33342 staining assay. The HGF were exposed to various concentrations of the test-substances in all test systems for 24 h. All tested (co)monomers and mercury compounds significantly (P<0.05) decreased the formazan formation in the XTT-test. EC{sub 50} values in the XTT assay were obtained as half-maximum-effect concentrations from fitted curves. Following EC{sub 50} values were found (mean [mmol/l]; s.e.m. in parentheses; n=12; * significantly different to HEMA): HEMA 11.530 (0.600); TEGDMA* 3.460 (0.200); UDMA* 0.106 (0.005); BisGMA* 0.087 (0.001); HgCl{sub 2}* 0.013 (0.001); MeHgCl* 0.005 (0.001). Following relative toxicities were found: HEMA 1; TEGDMA 3; UDMA 109; BisGMA 133; HgCl{sub 2} 887; MeHgCl 2306. A significant (P<0.05) increase of the toxicity of (co)monomers and mercurials was found in the XTT-test in the following order: HEMA < TEGDMA < UDMA < BisGMA < HgCl{sub 2} < MeHgCl. TEGDMA and MeHgCl induced mainly apoptotic cell death. HEMA, UDMA, BisGMA, and HgCl{sub 2} induced mainly necrotic cell death. The results of this study indicate that resin composite components have a lower toxicity than mercury from amalgam in HGF. HEMA, BisGMA, UDMA, and HgCl{sub 2} induced mainly necrosis, but it is rather unlikely that eluted substances (solely) can reach concentrations, which might induce necrotic cell death in the human physiological situation, indicating that other (additional) factors may be involved in

  11. A new approach to influence contact angle and surface free energy of resin-based dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Trellenkamp, Taina; Bergmann, Nora; Raab, Wolfgang H-M; Ritter, Helmut; Janda, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify novel delivery systems and active agents which increase the water contact angle and reduce the surface free energy when added to resin-based dental restorative materials. Two delivery systems based on zeolite or novel polymeric hollow beads (Poly-Pore), loaded with two low surface tension active agents (hydroxy functional polydimethylsiloxane and polydimethylsiloxane) or a polymerizable active agent (silicone polyether acrylate) were used to modify commonly formulated experimental dental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as a standard (ST). Flexural strength, flexural modulus, water sorption, solubility, polymerization shrinkage, surface roughness Ra, contact angle θ, total surface free energy γS, and the apolar γSLW, polar γSAB, Lewis acid γS+ and base γS- components, and the active agents surface tensions γL were determined (Ptension active agents were found not to influence the physical properties but to significantly increase the water contact angle and thus reduce surface free energy of dental resin composites. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Contact angle and surface free energy of experimental resin-based dental restorative materials after chewing simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Beikler, Thomas; Janda, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    To investigate contact angle and surface free energy of experimental dental resin composites containing novel delivery systems of polymeric hollow beads and low-surface tension agents after chewing simulation test. A delivery system of novel polymeric hollow beads differently loaded with two low-surface tension agents was used in different amounts to modify commonly formulated experimental dental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as standard. Surface roughness Ra, contact angle Θ, total surface free energy γS, its apolar γS(LW), polar γS(AB), Lewis acid γS(+) and base γS(-) terms were determined and the results prior to and after chewing simulation test were compared. Significance was phollow beads highly loaded with low-surface tension agents were found to significantly increase contact angle and thus to reduce surface free energy of experimental dental resin composites prior to and after chewing simulation test. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  14. Evaluation of adhesive bonding of lithium disilicate ceramic material with duel cured resin luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambade, Dipti Pravin; Gundawar, Sham M; Radke, Usha M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the adhesive bonding of dual cured resin luting agents with lithium disilicate ceramic material. Porcelain laminate veneers were prepared with lithium disilicate ceramic material i.e. IPS Empress II( E-Max Press). These laminates were bonded with RelyX ARC, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, Duolink and Nexus NX3.The porcelain laminates were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (Pulpdent Corporation) for one minute, washed for 15 sec with three way syringe and dried for 15 sec with air syringe. The silane (Ultradent) was applied with the help of applicator tip in a single coat and kept undisturbed for one minute. The prepared surfaces of the premolars were treated with 37% phosphoric acid (Prime dent) for 15 sec, thoroughly rinsed and dried as per manufactures instructions. The shear bond test was carried out on all samples with the Universal testing machine (Instron U.S.A.) The scanning electron microscopic study was performed at the fractured interface of representative samples from each group of luting agents. In this study, the highest value of shear bond strength was obtained for NEXUS NX3 and the lowest for VARIOLINK II. The difference in bond strength can be interpreted as the difference in fracture resistance of luting agents, to which shearing load was applied during the shear bond strength test. It is inferred from this study that the composition of the luting agent determines the adhesive characteristics in addition to surface treatment and bonding surface area.

  15. Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    microleakage with resulting pulpal sensitivity, staining , and recurrent caries.10 Additionally, incomplete curing of composite resins is associated...minimal stress.10 However, increased demand has led to greater use on posterior teeth , where considerable mechanical challenges occur under function...was placed on a plastic-strip-covered glass slide on a standard white background. The composite resin was injected into the mold and a plastic strip

  16. Substitute materials of furfuryl alcohol in furan resin used for foundry and their technical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yingmin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on a special synthesis process of furan resin, the furfuryl alcohol (FA, the main component of typical no-bake furan resins is substituted by ethanol and xylitol mother liquor which is relatively low price and chemically active. Through orthogonal test, the optimal amount of xylitol liquor, ethanol and modifi er has been determined. Finally, the test results on technical properties show that the performance can meet the production requirement well, which indicate a success in this substituting attempt.

  17. Thermal expansion and swelling of cured epoxy resin used in graphite/epoxy composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents results of experiments in which the thermal expansion and swelling behavior of an epoxy resin system and two graphite/epoxy composite systems exposed to water were measured. It was found that the cured epoxy resin swells by an amount slightly less than the volume of the absorbed water and that the swelling efficiency of the water varies with the moisture content of the polymer. Additionally, the thermal expansion of cured epoxy resin that is saturated with water is observed to be more than twice that of dry resin. Results also indicate that cured resin that is saturated with 7.1% water at 95 C will rapidly increase in moisture content to 8.5% when placed in 1 C water. The mechanism for this phenomenon, termed reverse thermal effect, is described in terms of a slightly modified free-volume theory in conjunction with the theory of polar molecule interaction. Nearly identical behavior was observed in two graphite/epoxy composite systems, thus establishing that this behavior may be common to all cured epoxy resins.

  18. Microleakage of conventional, resin-modified, and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement as primary teeth filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dita Madyarani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glass ionomer cements are one of many dental materials that widely used in pediatric dentistry due to their advantage of fluoride release and chemical bond to tooth structure. Adherence of the filling material to the cavity walls is one of the most important characteristic that need to be examined its effect on microleakage. Purpose: This study was conducted to examine the microleakage of nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement compared with the conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Methods: Standard class V cavities sized 3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm were made on a total of 21 extracted maxillary primary canine teeth and restored with the conventional, resin-modified, dan nano-ionomer glass ionomer cements. All the teeth were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye for 4 hours. The depth of dye penetration was assessed using digital microscope after sectioning the teeth labio-palatally. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: All type of glass ionomer material showed microleakage. Conventional glass ionomer cement demonstrated the least microleakage with mean score 1.29. the resin-modified glass ionomer cements (mean score 1.57 and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement (mean score 2.57. Conclusion: The conventional glassionomer, resin modified glassionomer, and nano-ionomer glassionomer showed micro leakage as filling material in primary teeth cavity. The micro leakage among three types was not significant difference. All three material were comparable in performance and can be used for filling material but still needs a coating material to fill the microleakage.Latar belakang: Semen ionomer kaca adalah salah satu dari banyak bahan gigi yang banyak digunakan dalam praktek kedokteran gigi anak karena bahan tersebut merilis fluoride dan berikatan kimia dengan struktur gigi. Perlekatan bahan tumpatan pada dinding kavitas adalah salah satu karakteristik paling penting yang perlu diteliti efeknya terhadap

  19. Bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement: the effect of surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to self-adhesive resin cement. Two types of CAD/CAM restorative materials (Vita Enamic [VE] and Lava Ultimate [LU]) were used. The specimens were divided into five groups in each test according to the surface treatment performed; Gr 1 (control; no treatment), Gr 2 (sandblasted [SB]), Gr 3 (SB+silane [S]), Gr 4 (hydrofluoric acid [HF]), and Gr 5 (HF+S). A dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE [BF]) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion after 24 h of storage in distilled water or after 30 days using the μTBS test. Following fracture testing, specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM. Surface roughness and morphology of the CAD/CAM restorative materials were characterized after treatment. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment, type of CAD/CAM restorative material, and water storage periods showed a significant effect on the μTBS (p0.05). On the other hand, for the VE/BF system, surface treatment with HF+S showed higher bond strength values compared with SB and HF surface treatments (pmaterials was modified after treatments. The effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement is material dependent. The VE/BF CAD/CAM material provided higher bond strength values compared with the LU/BF CAD/CAM material.

  20. The impact of three strains of oral bacteria on the surface and mechanical properties of a dental resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Karen S; Shih, Han; Gregory, Richard L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if three strains of bacteria could impact the mechanical or surface properties of a dental resin material. Resin material specimens were incubated at 37°C in sterile saline, tryptic soy broth supplemented with sucrose (TSBS), or TSBS inoculated with Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, or Streptococcus sanguis. The specimens were subjected to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after incubation. The flexural strength test was performed once a week for 6 weeks. Microhardness and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed on specimens at 1 and 6 weeks. Differences in the area under the carbonyl peak were statistically significant for the specimens incubated in the media inoculated with either S. mutans or S. gordonii. To determine why S. sanguis did not produce changes as the other bacteria did, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, methacrylic acid, and triethylene glycol were added to bacterial cultures at increasing concentrations. Both methacrylic acid and triethylene glycol reduced the number of colony-forming units of S. sanguis. Specimens incubated in TSBS, saline or in culture with S. sanguis demonstrated a decrease in peak stress in week 1 of the flexure strength test. SEM demonstrated that surface topology changed for those specimens incubated in culture with S. mutans or S. gordonii. The changes in surface topology demonstrated here could contribute to the secondary caries and changes in esthetic properties seen clinically with the use of resin materials in dental restorations.

  1. Current status of visible light activation units and the curing of light-activated resin-based composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ario

    2010-05-01

    Light activation units are standard items of equipment in dental practice. It is essential to understand the many factors which affect the polymerization of light-activated resin composite materials and the choice of a light curing unit. In this respect, the development of high-intensity halogen and light-emitting diode (LED) light curing units (LCUs), many with multiple curing modes, has revolutionized light curing techniques. This article reviews visible light activation unit design and development. Factors influencing the effective use of LCUs and polymerization of resin-based composite materials are discussed, as are the steps which should be taken to maintain the efficiency of units in clinical use. Many LCUs produce lower output intensities than stated by the manufacturer. Newer high power LEDs may present as much of a heat problem as high power quartz tungsten halogen lamps (QTHs).The manufacturer's data should be followed to ensure that the emission spectra of the unit is compatible with the photo-initiator in the resin-based composite material.

  2. Evaluation of 3D printing materials for fabrication of a novel multi-functional 3D thyroid phantom for medical dosimetry and image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alssabbagh, Moayyad; Tajuddin, Abd Aziz; Abdulmanap, Mahayuddin; Zainon, Rafidah

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the three-dimensional printer has started to be utilized strongly in medical industries. In the human body, many parts or organs can be printed from 3D images to meet accurate organ geometries. In this study, five common 3D printing materials were evaluated in terms of their elementary composition and the mass attenuation coefficients. The online version of XCOM photon cross-section database was used to obtain the attenuation values of each material. The results were compared with the attenuation values of the thyroid listed in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements - ICRU 44. Two original thyroid models (hollow-inside and solid-inside) were designed from scratch to be used in nuclear medicine, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy for dosimetry and image quality purposes. Both designs have three holes for installation of radiation dosimeters. The hollow-inside model has more two holes in the top for injection the radioactive materials. The attenuation properties of the Polylactic Acid (PLA) material showed a very good match with the thyroid tissue, which it was selected to 3D print the phantom using open source RepRap, Prusa i3 3D printer. The scintigraphy images show that the phantom simulates a real healthy thyroid gland and thus it can be used for image quality purposes. The measured CT numbers of the PA material after the 3D printing show a close match with the human thyroid CT numbers. Furthermore, the phantom shows a good accommodation of the TLD dosimeters inside the holes. The 3D fabricated thyroid phantom simulates the real shape of the human thyroid gland with a changeable geometrical shape-size feature to fit different age groups. By using 3D printing technology, the time required to fabricate the 3D phantom was considerably shortened compared to the longer conventional methods, where it took only 30 min to print out the model. The 3D printing material used in this study is commercially available and cost

  3. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cements versus resin-based materials as fissure sealants: a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengopal, V; Mickenautsch, S

    2010-02-01

    To appraise quantitatively current evidence regarding the caries-preventing effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RM-GIC) fissure sealants in comparison to that of resin-based fissure sealants. Systematic review with meta-analysis. 8 Anglophone databases and 2 Lusophone databases were searched until 15 April 2009, using a pre-determined search strategy. Clinical trials were considered for inclusion if their titles/abstracts were relevant to the topic, published in English, Portuguese or Spanish and had a two-arm longitudinal study design. The outcome measure of the caries-preventive effect was caries absence on sealed teeth. Two reviewers independently extracted data from the accepted articles in order to complete a 2x2 table for meta-analysis. The unit of interest was the tooth, and the number of caries-free teeth (n) at the end of each time interval (6, 12 and 24 months) was compared against the total number of evaluated teeth (N). Datasets were assessed for their clinical and methodological heterogeneity, following Cochrane guidelines, and only homogeneous datasets were combined for meta-analysis, using a random effects model (RevMan 4.2). Differences in the caries-preventive effect were computed on the basis of the combined Relative Risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Of the 212 articles identified, only 6 trials were included. From these, 19 separate datasets were extracted. For the pooled data, equivalent caries-preventive effects were observed at 6 months (RR= 0.98, 95% CI 0.95- 1.00; p = 0.08); 12 months (RR=1.00, 95% CI 0.96-1.04, p = 0.99) and 24 months (RR=1.01, 95% CI 0.84-1.21, p = 0.91). The 36-month data (not pooled) favoured resin-based sealants (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.88-0.97, p = 0.002). This meta-analysis found no conclusive evidence that either material was superior to the other in preventing dental caries.

  4. In vitro toothbrushing abrasion of dental resin composites: packable, microhybrid, nanohybrid and microfilled materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ratto de Moraes

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated weight loss and surface roughening after toothbrushing of different resin composites: one packable (Solitaire 2, Heraeus Kulzer, one microhybrid (Charisma, Heraeus Kulzer, one nanohybrid (Simile, Pentron and one microfilled (Durafill VS, Heraeus Kulzer. Cylindrical specimens (n = 20 were prepared. Half of the samples were submitted to 60,000 strokes, at 4 Hz, with a dentifrice-water slurry. Control samples (n = 10 remained stored at 37°C. Pre- and post-abrasion parameters for weight (mg and surface roughness (Ra, µm were determined on an analytical balance and a surface profilometer. Data were separately submitted to Repeated Measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 0.05. Percentages of weight loss were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 0.05. The relationship between both evaluations was assessed by Pearson's test (a = 0.05. The means (% for weight loss (standard deviation were 0.65(0.2, 0.93(0.2, 1.25(0.6 and 1.25(0.4 for Simile, Durafill, Charisma and Solitaire, respectively. Baseline roughness means ranged from 0.065(0.01, 0.071(0.01, 0.066(0.02 and 0.074(0.01 for Simile, Durafill, Charisma and Solitaire, respectively, to 0.105(0.04, 0.117(0.03, 0.161(0.03 and 0.214(0.07 after testing. The composites with larger fillers presented higher weight loss and roughening than the finer materials (p < 0.05. For both evaluations, control specimens showed no significant alteration. No significant relationship between loss of weight and roughness alteration was detected (r = 0.322, p = 0.429.

  5. Effect of LED-LCU light irradiance distribution on mechanical properties of resin based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhães Filho, T.R.; Weig, K.M. [Faculdade de Odontologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua São Paulo 28, CEP 24020-150 Niterói (Brazil); Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais (COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68505, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Costa, M.F. [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais (COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68505, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Werneck, M.M. [Engenharia Elétrica (COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68504, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Barthem, R.B. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68528, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Costa Neto, C.A., E-mail: celio@metalmat.ufrj.br [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais (COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68505, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the light power distribution along the tip end of the light guide of three LED-LCUs (Light Curing Units) and to evaluate its effect on the mechanical properties of a polymer based dental composite. Firstly, the light power distribution over the whole area of LED-LCU light guide surface was analyzed by three methods: visual projection observation, spectral measurement and optical spectral analysis (OSA). The light power distribution and the total irradiance were different for the three LEDs used, but the wavelength was within the camphorquinone absorption spectrum. The use of a blank sheet was quite on hand to make a qualitative analysis of a beam, and it is costless. Secondly, specimens of a hybrid composite with approximately 8 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness were produced and polymerized by 20 s exposition time to each LED-LCU. Thirdly, the elastic modulus (E) and hardness (HV) were measured throughout the irradiated area by instrumented micro-indentation test (IIT), allowing to correlate localized power and mechanical properties. Both E and HV showed to be very sensitive to local power and wavelength dependent, but they followed the beam power profile. It was also shown that the mechanical properties could be directly correlated to the curing process. Very steep differences in mechanical properties over very short distances may impair the material performance, since residual stresses can easily be built over it. - Highlights: • A resin based composite (RBC) was polymerized by three different Light Emitting Diodes. • Each LED had its beam profile visually, wavelength and power analyzed. • The effective polymerization power (EPP) varied from 28% to 52% of the total beam power. • Wavelength seems to be as relevant as power in the light curing process. • Mechanical properties depend on the simultaneous effect of wavelength and power.

  6. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Tulga, Ayça

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) ( P CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials.

  7. Characteristics of low polymerization shrinkage flowable resin composites in newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Keiko; Nomoto, Rie; Tsubota, Yuji; Tsuchikawa, Masuji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2017-11-29

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage and other physical properties of newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique, with the brand name BULK BASE (BBS). Polymerization shrinkage was measured according to ISO/FDIS 17304. BBS showed the significantly lowest polymerization shrinkage and significantly higher depth of cure than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). The Knoop hardness, flexural strength and elastic modulus of that were significantly lower than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). BBS had the significantly greatest filler content (p<0.05). SEM images of the surface showed failure of fillers. The lowest polymerization shrinkage was due to the incorporation of a new type of low shrinkage monomer, which has urethane moieties. There were no clear correlations between inorganic filler contents and polymerization shrinkage, flexural strength and elastic modulus. In conclusion, the low polymerization shrinkage of BBS will be useful for cavity treatment in dental clinics.

  8. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Because this is yet another version of tangled sensory wires, the result can be pain. A number of other factors are believed to contribute to phantom pain, including damaged nerve endings, scar tissue at the site of the amputation and the physical memory of pre-amputation pain in the affected area. ...

  9. Temperature changes under demineralized dentin during polymerization of three resin-based restorative materials using QTH and LED units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed-Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Light-curing of resin-based materials (RBMs increases the pulp chamber temperature, with detrimental effects on the vital pulp. This in vitro study compared the temperature rise under demineralized human tooth dentin during light-curing and the degrees of conversion (DCs of three different RBMs using quartz tungsten halogen (QTH and light-emitting diode (LED units (LCUs. Materials and Methods Demineralized and non-demineralized dentin disks were prepared from 120 extracted human mandibular molars. The temperature rise under the dentin disks (n = 12 during the light-curing of three RBMs, i.e. an Ormocer-based composite resin (Ceram. X, Dentsply DeTrey, a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE, and a giomer (Beautifil II, Shofu GmbH, was measured with a K-type thermocouple wire. The DCs of the materials were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results The temperature rise under the demineralized dentin disks was higher than that under the non-demineralized dentin disks during the polymerization of all restorative materials (p 0.05. Conclusions Although there were no significant differences in the DCs, the temperature rise under demineralized dentin disks for the silorane-based composite was higher than that for dimethacrylate-based restorative materials, particularly with QTH LCU.

  10. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  11. GC/MS analytical procedure for the characterization of glycerolipids, natural waxes, terpenoid resins, proteinaceous and polysaccharide materials in the same paint microsample avoiding interferences from inorganic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluveras, Anna; Bonaduce, Ilaria; Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2010-01-01

    An innovative GC/MS procedure for the characterization of organic materials in samples from works of art was developed. It is based on a multistep chemical pretreatment of the samples based on the ammonia extraction of proteins and polysaccharide materials, in order to separate them from lipid and resinous materials. The extraction is then followed by the separation and purification of proteinaceous and polysaccharide materials before hydrolysis, based on the use of monolithic sorbent tip technology with a C4 stationary phase. Lipids and resins are saponified/salified separately. Three fractions are generated and analyzed separately by GC/MS, thus enabling a quantitative analysis to be performed on aldoses and uronic acids, amino acids, mono- and dicarboxylic aliphatic acids, to determine polysaccharide, proteinaceous, and glycerolipid materials and molecular pattern recognition for the natural resin and wax components. With this analytical procedure, for the first time, glycerolipids, natural waxes, and proteinaceous, resinous, and polysaccharide materials can be simultaneously characterized in the same microsample from painted works of art. This new analytical approach prevents any analytical difficulties arising when the sample is divided into several different aliquots to be chemically processed separately, in order to characterize the various classes of organic materials. The procedure was successfully applied to samples from paintings from the Bamiyan Buddhas and a panel painting from the 15th century, highlighting the occurrence of glycerolipids, animal and plant resins, proteinaceous and polysaccharide materials.

  12. Shear bond strength of a denture base acrylic resin and gingiva-colored indirect composite material to zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubochi, Kei; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Yagawa, Shogo; Mori, Serina; Matsumura, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strengths of two gingiva-colored materials (an indirect composite material and a denture base acrylic resin) to zirconia ceramics and determine the effects of surface treatment with various priming agents. A gingiva-colored indirect composite material (CER) or denture base acrylic resin (PAL) was bonded to zirconia disks with unpriming (UP) or one of seven priming agents (n=11 each), namely, Alloy Primer (ALP), Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB+Act), Metal Link (MEL), Meta Fast Bonding Liner (MFB), MR. bond (MRB), and V-Primer (VPR). Shear bond strength was determined before and after 5000 thermocycles. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and Steel-Dwass test. The mean pre-/post-thermalcycling bond strengths were 1.0-14.1MPa/0.1-12.1MPa for the CER specimen and 0.9-30.2MPa/0.1-11.1MPa for the PAL specimen. For the CER specimen, the ALP, CPB, and CPB+Act groups had significantly higher bond strengths among the eight groups, at both 0 and 5000 thermocycles. For the PAL specimen, shear bond strength was significantly lower after thermalcycling in all groups tested. After 5000 thermocycles, bond strengths were significantly higher in the CPB and CPB+Act groups than in the other groups. For the PAL specimens, bond strengths were significantly lower after thermalcycling in all groups tested. The MDP functional monomer improved bonding of a gingiva-colored indirect composite material and denture base acrylic resin to zirconia ceramics. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of surface pretreatment on the short-term bond strength of resin composite to a zirconia-based material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Giovanni; Vichi, Alessandro; Ferrari, Marco

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of airborne-particle abrasion of zirconia before and after sintering, on the bond strength between a zirconia core and an indirect resin composite material. 9 disks of Y-TZP zirconia core were prepared and divided into three equal groups. In Group 1 pre-sintered Y-TZP zirconia was airborne-particle abraded with 120 microm alumina oxide. In Group 2 sintered Y-TZP zirconia was airborne-particle abraded with 120 microm alumina oxide. In Group 3 sintered Y-TZP zirconia was not treated and thus served as the control group. A 10-methacryloylooxydecyldihydrogenphosphate (MDP) containing bonding agent and silane coupling agent mixture was applied to the disks in all three experimental groups. Resin composite for indirect restorations was incrementally layered in a plastic mold to a final thickness of 3 mm. Specimens were sectioned under water cooling to obtain microsticks 6 x 1 x 1 mm in dimension. 30 microsticks per experimental group were generated. Microtensile bond strength test was conducted with a universal testing machine. Fractured microsticks and sections from each group were also examined under an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to evaluate respectively the mode of failure and the zirconia-composite interface. T-test for independent samples was selected to analyze the data. The level of significance was set at P resin composite bond. Airborne-particle abrasion performed before sintering zirconia did not produce any significant differences.

  14. Temperature changes under demineralized dentin during polymerization of three resin-based restorative materials using QTH and LED units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavinasab, Sayed-Mostafa; Khoroushi, Maryam; Moharreri, Mohammadreza; Atai, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    Light-curing of resin-based materials (RBMs) increases the pulp chamber temperature, with detrimental effects on the vital pulp. This in vitro study compared the temperature rise under demineralized human tooth dentin during light-curing and the degrees of conversion (DCs) of three different RBMs using quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) units (LCUs). Demineralized and non-demineralized dentin disks were prepared from 120 extracted human mandibular molars. The temperature rise under the dentin disks (n = 12) during the light-curing of three RBMs, i.e. an Ormocer-based composite resin (Ceram. X, Dentsply DeTrey), a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE), and a giomer (Beautifil II, Shofu GmbH), was measured with a K-type thermocouple wire. The DCs of the materials were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The temperature rise under the demineralized dentin disks was higher than that under the non-demineralized dentin disks during the polymerization of all restorative materials (p 0.05). Although there were no significant differences in the DCs, the temperature rise under demineralized dentin disks for the silorane-based composite was higher than that for dimethacrylate-based restorative materials, particularly with QTH LCU.

  15. The stability of new transparent polymeric materials: The epoxy trimethoxyboroxine system. Part 1: The preparation, characterization and curing of epoxy resins and their copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, E.; Lin, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of resin composition, curing conditions fillers, and flame retardant additives on the flammability of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) as measured by the oxygen index is examined. The oxygen index of DGEBA cured with various curing agents was between 0.198 to 0.238. Fillers and flame retardant additives can increase the oxygen index dependent on the material and the amount used. Changes in the basic cured resin properties can be anticipated with the addition of noncompatible additives. High flame resistant epoxy resins with good stability and mechanical properties are investigated.

  16. Development of a New Cardiac and Torso Phantom for Verifying the Accuracy of Myocardial Perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto; Tomoaki [Dept. of Radiological Science, School of Health Science, International University of Health and Welfare, Otawara(Japan); Kim, Jung Min; Lee, Ki Sung [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Takayama, Teruhiko [Dept. of Clinical Laboratory Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Kitashi, Kitahara [Dept. of Radiology, Fujigaoka Hospital, Showa University, Tokyo (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Corrections of attenuation, scatter and resolution are important in order to improve the accuracy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image reconstruction. Especially, the heart movement by respiration and beating cause the errors in the corrections. Myocardial phantom is used to verify the correction methods, but there are many different parts in the current phantoms in actual human body. Therefore the results using a phantom are often considered apart from the clinical data. We developed a new phantom that implements the human body structure around the thorax more faithfully. The new phantom has the small mediastinum which can simulate the structure in which the lung adjoins anterior, lateral and apex of myocardium. The container was made of acrylic and water-equivalent material was used for mediastinum. In addition, solidified polyurethane foam in epoxy resin was used for lung. Five different sizes of myocardium were developed for the quantitative gated SPECT (QGS). The septa of all different cardiac phantoms were designed so that they can be located at the same position. The proposed phantom was attached with liver and gallbladder, the adjustment was respectively possible for the height of them. The volumes of five cardiac ventricles were 150.0, 137.3, 83.1, 42.7 and 38.6 ml respectively. The SPECT were performed for the new phantom, and the differences between the images were examined after the correction methods were applied. The three-dimensional tomography of myocardium was well reconstructed, and the subjective evaluations were done to show the difference among the various corrections. We developed the new cardiac and torso phantom, and the difference of various corrections was shown on SPECT images and QGS results.

  17. Solid water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguiropulo, M.Y.; Ghilardi Neto, T.; Pela, C.A.; Ghilardi, A.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A phantom were developed for simulating water, based in plastics. The material was evaluated for different energies, and the measures of relative transmission showed that the transmission and the water were inside of 0,6% for gamma rays. The results of this new material were presented, showing that it could be used in photon beam calibration with energies on radiotherapy range. (C.G.C.)

  18. Mechanically switchable solid inhomogeneous phantom for performance tests in diffuse imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Antonio; Torricelli, Alessandro; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Quarto, Giovanna; Re, Rebecca; Sekar, Sanathana K V; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Farina, Andrea; Martelli, Fabrizio; Wabnitz, Heidrun

    2015-12-01

    A mechanically switchable solid inhomogeneous phantom simulating localized absorption changes was developed and characterized. The homogeneous host phantom was made of epoxy resin with black toner and titanium dioxide particles added as absorbing and scattering components, respectively. A cylindrical rod, movable along a hole in the block and made of the same material, has a black polyvinyl chloride cylinder embedded in its center. By varying the volume and position of the black inclusion, absorption perturbations can be generated over a large range of magnitudes. The phantom has been characterized by various time-domain diffuse optics instruments in terms of absorption and scattering spectra, transmittance images, and reflectance contrast. Addressing a major application of the phantom for performance characterization for functional near-infrared spectroscopy of the brain, the contrast was measured in reflectance mode while black cylinders of volumes from ≈20  mm3 to ≈270  mm3 were moved in lateral and depth directions, respectively. The new type of solid inhomogeneous phantom is expected to become a useful tool for routine quality check of clinical instruments or implementation of industrial standards provided an experimental characterization of the phantom is performed in advance.

  19. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000?). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  20. Influence of the base and diluent monomer on network characteristics and mechanical properties of neat resin and composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fróes-Salgado, Nívea Regina de Godoy; Gajewski, Vinícius; Ornaghi, Bárbara Pick; Pfeifer, Carmem Silvia Costa; Meier, Marcia Margarete; Xavier, Tathy Aparecida; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the combination of two dimethacrylate-based monomers [bisphenol A diglycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) or bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (BisEMA)] with diluents either derived from ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, diethylene glycol dimethacrylate, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, tetraethylene glycol dimethacrylate) or 1,10-decanediol dimethacrylate (D3MA) on network characteristics and mechanical properties of neat resin and composite materials. The degree of conversion, maximum rate of polymerization and water sorption/solubility of unfilled resins and the flexural strength and microhardness of composites (after 24 h storage in water and 3 months storage in a 75 vol% ethanol aqueous solution) were evaluated. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The higher conversion and lower water sorption presented by BisEMA co-polymers resulted in greater resistance to degradation in ethanol compared with BisGMA-based materials. In general, conversion and mechanical properties were optimized with the use of long-chain dimethacrylate derivatives of ethylene glycol. D3MA rendered more hydrophobic materials, but with relatively low conversion and mechanical properties.

  1. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. MATERIALS AND METHODS The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. RESULTS The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) (P<.001). For LDC, AS surface treatment showed the highest FPBS results (100.31 ± 10.7 MPa) and the lowest values were obtained in RNC (23.63 ± 9.0 MPa) for control group. SEM analyses showed that the surface topography of CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. CONCLUSION The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials. PMID:29279763

  2. Correlative imaging of fluorescent proteins in resin-embedded plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Karen; Mitchell, Steve; Paultre, Danae; Posch, Markus; Oparka, Karl

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) were developed for live-cell imaging and have revolutionized cell biology. However, not all plant tissues are accessible to live imaging using confocal microscopy, necessitating alternative approaches for protein localization. An example is the phloem, a tissue embedded deep within plant organs and sensitive to damage. To facilitate accurate localization of FPs within recalcitrant tissues, we developed a simple method for retaining FPs after resin embedding. This method is based on low-temperature fixation and dehydration, followed by embedding in London Resin White, and avoids the need for cryosections. We show that a palette of FPs can be localized in plant tissues while retaining good structural cell preservation, and that the polymerized block face can be counterstained with cell wall probes. Using this method we have been able to image green fluorescent protein-labeled plasmodesmata to a depth of more than 40 μm beneath the resin surface. Using correlative light and electron microscopy of the phloem, we were able to locate the same FP-labeled sieve elements in semithin and ultrathin sections. Sections were amenable to antibody labeling, and allowed a combination of confocal and superresolution imaging (three-dimensional-structured illumination microscopy) on the same cells. These correlative imaging methods should find several uses in plant cell biology.

  3. Academy of Dental Materials guidance-Resin composites: Part II-Technique sensitivity (handling, polymerization, dimensional changes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L; Hilton, T J; Stansbury, J W; Watts, D C; Silikas, N; Ilie, N; Heintze, S; Cadenaro, M; Hickel, R

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this work, commissioned by the Academy of Dental Materials, was to review and critically appraise test methods to characterize properties related to critical issues for dental resin composites, including technique sensitivity and handling, polymerization, and dimensional stability, in order to provide specific guidance to investigators planning studies of these properties. The properties that relate to each of the main clinical issues identified were ranked in terms of their priority for testing, and the specific test methods within each property were ranked. An attempt was made to focus on the tests and methods likely to be the most useful, applicable, and supported by the literature, and where possible, those showing a correlation with clinical outcomes. Certain methods are only briefly mentioned to be all-inclusive. When a standard test method exists, whether from dentistry or another field, this test has been identified. Specific examples from the literature are included for each test method. The properties for evaluating resin composites were ranked in the priority of measurement as follows: (1) porosity, radiopacity, sensitivity to ambient light, degree of conversion, polymerization kinetics, depth of cure, polymerization shrinkage and rate, polymerization stress, and hygroscopic expansion; (2) stickiness, slump resistance, and viscosity; and (3) thermal expansion. The following guidance is meant to aid the researcher in choosing the most appropriate test methods when planning studies designed to assess certain key properties and characteristics of dental resin composites, specifically technique sensitivity and handling during placement, polymerization, and dimensional stability. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A resin composite material containing an eugenol derivative for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaroof, A; Rojo, L; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2016-02-01

    To formulate and evaluate new dual cured resin composite based on the inclusion of eugenyl methacrylate monomer (EgMA) with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin systems for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration of endodontically treated teeth. EgMA was synthesized and incorporated at 5% (BTEg5) or 10% (BTEg10) into dual-cure formulations. Curing properties, viscosity, Tg, radiopacity, static and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined and compared with Clearfil™DC Core-Plus, a commercial dual-cure, two-component composite. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey's post-hoc test. The experimental composites were successfully prepared, which exhibited excellent curing depths of 4.9, 4.7 and 4.2 mm for BTEg0, BTEg5 and BTEg10 respectively, which were significantly higher than Clearfil™DC. However, the inclusion of EgMA initially led to a lower degree of cure, which increased when measured at 24 h with values comparable to formulations without EgMA, indicating post-curing. The inclusion of EgMA also lowered the polymerization exotherm thereby reducing the potential of thermal damage to host tissue. Both thermal and viscoelastic analyses confirmed the ability of the monomer to reduce the stiffness of the composites by forming a branched network. The compressive strength of BTEg5 was significantly higher than the control whilst flexural strength increased significantly from 95.9 to 114.8 MPa (BTEg5) and 121.9 MPa (BTEg10). Radiopacity of the composites was equivalent to ∼3 mm Al allowing efficient diagnosis. The incorporation of EgMA within polymerizable formulations provides a novel approach to prepare reinforced resin composite material for intracanal post cementation and core build-up and the potential to impart antibacterial properties of eugenol to endodontic restorations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficacy of ceramic repair material on the bond strength of composite resin to zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmali, Omer; Kapdan, Alper; Harorli, Osman Tolga; Barutcugil, Cagatay; Ozarslan, Mehmet Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite resin in five different repair systems. Sixty specimens (7 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height) of zirconia ceramic were fabricated. All specimen surfaces were prepared with a 30 µm fine diamond rotary cutting instrument with water irrigation for 10 s and dried with oil-free air. Specimens were then randomly divided into six groups for the following different intra-oral repair systems (n = 10): Group 1, control group; Group 2, Cojet system (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany); Group 3, Cimara® System (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany); Group 4, Z-Prime Plus System (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, IL); Group 5, Clearfil™ System (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan); and Group 6, Z-Bond System (Danville, CA). After surface conditioning, a composite resin Grandio (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) was applied to the zirconia surface using a cylindrical mold (5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length) and incrementally filled up, according to the manufacturer's instructions of each intra-oral system. Each specimen was subjected to a shear load at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until fracture. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to analyze the bond strength values. There were significant differences between Groups 2-6 and Group 1. The highest bond strength values were obtained with Group 2 (17.26 ± 3.22) and Group 3 (17.31 ± 3.62), while the lowest values were observed with Group 1 (8.96 ± 1.62) and Group 6 (12.85 ± 3.95). All repair systems tested increased the bond strength values between zirconia and composite resin that used surface grinding with a diamond bur.

  6. Improved resins and novel materials and methods for solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, Ronald [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) has grown to be one of the most widely used methods for isolation and preconcentration of a vast range of compounds from aqueous solutions. By modifying polymeric SPE resins with chelating functional groups, the selective uptake of metals was accomplished. The resin, along with adsorbed metals, was vaporized in the ICP and detection of the metals was then possible using either mass or emission spectroscopy. Drug analyses in biological fluids have received heightened attention as drug testing is on the increase both in sports and in the work environment. By using a direct-injection technique, biological fluids can be injected directly into the liquid chromatographic system with no pretreatment. A new surfactant, a sulfonated form of Brij-30 (Brij-S) is shown to prevent the uptake of serum proteins on commercial HPLC columns by forming a thin coating on the silica C18 surface. Excellent separations of eight or more drugs with a wide range of retention times were obtained. The separations had sharper peaks and lower retention times than similar separations performed with the surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). Quantitative recovery of a number of drugs with limits of detection near 1 ppm with a 5 μl injection volume were obtained. Finally, a method for solid-phase extraction in a syringe is introduced. The system greatly reduced the volume of solvent required to elute adsorbed analytes from the SPE bed while providing a semi-automated setup. SPE in a syringe consists of a very small bed of resin-loaded membrane packed into a GC or HPLC syringe. After extraction, elution was performed with just a few μl of solvent. This small elution volume allowed injection of the eluent directly from the syringe into the chromatographic system, eliminating the handling problems associated with such small volumes.

  7. Efficiency of dual-cured resin cement polymerization induced by high-intensity LED curing units through ceramic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H; Kazama, Re; Asai, T; Kanaya, F; Ishizaki, H; Fukushima, M; Okiji, T

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) and other curing units to cure dual-cured resin cement through ceramic material. A halogen curing unit (Jetlite 3000, Morita), a second-generation LED curing unit (Demi, Kerr), and two high-intensity LED curing units (PenCure 2000, Morita; Valo, Ultradent) were tested. Feldspathic ceramic plates (VITABLOCS Mark II, A3; Vita Zahnfabrik) with thicknesses of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 mm were prepared. Dual-cured resin cement samples (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray Noritake Dental) were irradiated directly or through one of the ceramic plates for different periods (5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds for the high-intensity LED units and 20, 40, 60, or 80 seconds for the others). The Knoop hardness test was used to determine the level of photopolymerization that had been induced in the resin cement. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett's post-hoc test to identify test-control (maximum irradiation without a ceramic plate) differences for each curing unit (presin cement through a ceramic plate resulted in decreased KHN values compared with direct irradiation. When the irradiation period was extended, only the LED units were able to achieve similar KHN values to those observed under direct irradiation in the presence of plates ≥2.0-mm thick. High-intensity LED units require a shorter irradiation period than halogen and second-generation LED curing units to obtain KHN values similar to those observed during direct irradiation.

  8. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  9. Microleakage of composite resin and amalgam core material under complete cast crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, T D; Jensen, J R

    1980-07-01

    Ninety extracted human teeth were used to compare the microleakage of composite resin over, amalgam core, and regular crown preparations under a complete cast gold crown cemented with zinc phosphate cement as determined by 2% fluorescein dye solution. Specimens were compared with and without aging after cementation in a thermal bath by cycling some of them between 4 degrees C and 60 degrees C in a 2% fluorescein dye bath and others in a similar bath held at 37 degrees C. Fluorescein dye (under ultraviolet light) demonstrated microleakage of the specimens between the crown-tooth interface and the core-tooth interface. There were no significant differences in the microleakage due to aging. The specimens held at 37 degrees C in the fluorescein dye bath showed no significant differences between the core preparations and the regular crown preparations. However, when specimens were thermally cycled between 4 degrees C and 60 degrees C, there were significant differences. With thermal cycling, the regular crown preparations were better able to resist microleakage at the crown-tooth interface than either the composite resin core or the amalgam core preparations. The results of this investigation seem to indicate a need for further evaluation of core build-ups under cemented complete gold crowns.

  10. Physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity of an experimental resin-based pulp capping material containing the quaternary ammonium salt and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y W; Yu, F; Zhang, H C; Dong, Y; Qiu, Y N; Jiao, Y; Xing, X D; Tian, M; Huang, L; Chen, J H

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate in vitro the physicochemical properties, cytotoxicity and calcium phosphate nucleation of an experimental light-curable pulp capping material composed of a resin with antibacterial monomer (MAE-DB) and Portland cement (PC). The experimental material was prepared by mixing PC with a resin containing MAE-DB at a 2 : 1 ratio. Cured pure resin containing MAE-DB served as control resin. ProRoot MTA and Dycal served as commercial controls. The depth of cure, degree of monomer conversion, water absorption and solubility of dry samples, calcium release, alkalinizing activity, calcium phosphate nucleation and the cytotoxicity of materials were evaluated. Statistical analysis was carried out using anova followed by Tukey's HSD test (equal variance assumed) or Tamhane test (equal variance not assumed) and independent-samples t-tests. The experimental material had a cure depth of 1.19 mm, and the mean degree of monomer conversion was 70.93% immediately post-cure and 88.75% at 24 h post-cure. The water absorption of the experimental material was between those of MTA and Dycal, and its solubility was significantly less (P material exhibited continuous calcium release and an alkalinizing power between those of MTA and Dycal throughout the test period. Freshly set experimental material, control resin and all 24-h set materials had acceptable cytotoxicity. The experimental material, MTA and Dycal all exhibited the formation of apatite precipitates after immersion in phosphate-buffered saline. The experimental material possessed adequate physicochemical properties, low cytotoxicity and good calcium phosphate nucleation. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Addition of glass fibers and titanium dioxide nanoparticles to the acrylic resin denture base material: comparative study with the conventional and high impact types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M; Beyari, Mohammed M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of addition of glass fibers and titanium dioxide nanoparticles to the conventional acrylic resin. The tested parameters were monomer release, deflection at fracture, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and toughness. The modified acrylic resin groups were compared to the conventional unmodified and high impact types. The correlation between the tested material properties was also evaluated. The materials used were conventional unmodified and high impact acrylic resins. The conventional acrylic resin was modified using 5% glass fibers and 5% titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions and American Dental Association Specification No. 12. Monomer release was measured using isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography. Deflection at fracture, flexural strength, and flexural modulus were measured using three point-bending test with a universal testing machine. The toughness was related to the total area under the load-deflection curve up to the breaking point. The correlation between the tested properties was clarified. All materials released monomer with varying values. The tested materials exhibited comparable values of deflection at fracture. Specimens modified with glass-fibers showed improved flexural strength and toughness similar to that of the high impact acrylic resin. Specimens modified with titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibited reduction in the flexural properties and toughness. No significant changes were observed in the flexural modulus. There were positive correlations between the flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness. On the contrary, there was negative correlation between deflection at fracture and flexural modulus. The most commercially successful method for reinforcement to date is the rubber toughening. The conventional acrylic resin denture base material could be reinforced by glass fibers while titanium dioxide nanoparticles

  12. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes/epoxy resin composites characterization of the starting materials and evaluation of thermal and electrical conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Wellington Marcos da

    2009-01-01

    In this study we investigate the electrical and thermal properties of I) composite materials fabricated with O, I, 0,5 and I wt% of concentric multi-wall carbon nanotubes/epoxy resin (MWNT) dispersed randomly in the resin; 2) MWNT buckypaper/resin composite materials; 3) and neat MWNT buckypaper. Initially, we use the techniques of thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, energy dispersive spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, scanning and transmission electron microscopy for a broadening characterization of the starting materials, to evaluate its morphology, purity, chemical composition and structure, in order to optimize the properties of crosslinked resin and, consequently, of the composite systems. Important parameters such as the average molecular mass and the equivalent weight of epoxy resin (DGEBA) were determined by 1 H-NMR analysis and, after that, resin/curing agent relations with Phr 10, 15, 20 and 53,2 were elaborated and investigated by thermogravimetry, the resin/curing agent relation with Phr 10 showed to be the most thermally stable. This stoichiometric relation was used to elaborate the composites. We have evaluated that the effect of adding 10 wt% of the solvent acetone to the epoxy resin preparation does not alter its properties so we have adopted two routes to fabricate the composites. In the first route we used 10 wt% of acetone and, in the second the MWNT were dispersed in the matrix without using the solvent. However, no significant difference was observed for the dispersion of the bundle tubes in both systems. The electrical conductivity of the composites and buckypapers was evaluated by impedance spectroscopy and the thermal conductivity by the flash laser flash method. Only the buckypapers presented high values for electrical conductivity (10 3 S.m -1 ). The composite systems presented values of 10 -3 S.m -1 , only a bit different from the value of the crosslinked resin. For thermal conductivity, the values for the

  13. Effect of light-curing method and indirect veneering materials on the Knoop hardness of a resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Tetsu Iriyama

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement (Rely-X ARC activated solely by chemical reaction (control group or by chemical / physical mode, light-cured through a 1.5 mm thick ceramic (HeraCeram or composite (Artglass disc. Light curing was carried out using conventional halogen light (XL2500 for 40 s (QTH; light emitting diodes (Ultrablue Is for 40 s (LED; and Xenon plasma arc (Apollo 95E for 3 s (PAC. Bovine incisors had their buccal face flattened and hybridized. On this surface a rubber mold (5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in height was bulk filled with the resin cement. A polyester strip was seated for direct light curing or through the discs of veneering materials. After dry storage in the dark (24 h 37°C, the samples (n = 5 were sectioned for hardness (KHN measurements, taken in a microhardness tester (50 gF load 15 s. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. The cement presented higher Knoop hardness values with Artglass for QTH and LED, compared to HeraCeram. The control group and the PAC/Artglass group showed lower hardness values compared to the groups light-cured with QTH and LED. PAC/HeraCeram resulted in the worst combination for cement hardness values.

  14. Six-month evaluation of a resin/dentin interface created by methacrylate and silorane-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAMPAIO, Renata Kirita Doi; WANG, Linda; de CARVALHO, Rodrigo Varella; GARCIA, Eugenio José; de ANDRADE, Andréa Mello; KLEIN-JÚNIOR, Celso Afonso; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda; MOURA, Sandra Kiss

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the micro-tensile bond strength of methacrylate resin systems to a silorane-based restorative system on dentin after 24 hours and six months water storage. Material and Methods: The restorative systems Adper Single Bond 2/Filtek Z350 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond/Z350 (CF), Adper SE Plus/Z350 (ASEP) and P90 Adhesive System/Filtek P90 (P90) were applied on flat dentin surfaces of 20 third molars (n=5). The restored teeth were sectioned perpendicularly to the bonding interface to obtain sticks (0.8 mm2) to be tested after 24 hours (24 h) and 6 months (6 m) of water storage, in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. The data was analyzed via two-way Analysis of Variance/Bonferroni post hoc tests at 5% global significance. Results: Overall outcomes did not indicate a statistical difference for the resin systems (p=0.26) nor time (p=0.62). No interaction between material x time was detected (p=0.28). Mean standard-deviation in MPa at 24 h and 6 m were: ASB 31.38 (4.53) and 30.06 (1.95), CF 34.26 (3.47) and 32.75 (4.18), ASEP 29.54 (4.14) and 33.47 (2.47), P90 30.27 (2.03) and 31.34 (2.19). Conclusions: The silorane-based system showed a similar performance to methacrylate-based materials on dentin. All systems were stable in terms of bond strength up to 6 month of water storage. PMID:23559117

  15. Six-month evaluation of a resin/dentin interface created by methacrylate and silorane-based materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Kirita Doi SAMPAIO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to compare the micro-tensile bond strength of methacrylate resin systems to a silorane-based restorative system on dentin after 24 hours and six months water storage. Material and Methods The restorative systems Adper Single Bond 2/Filtek Z350 (ASB, Clearfil SE Bond/Z350 (CF, Adper SE Plus/Z350 (ASEP and P90 Adhesive System/Filtek P90 (P90 were applied on flat dentin surfaces of 20 third molars (n=5. The restored teeth were sectioned perpendicularly to the bonding interface to obtain sticks (0.8 mm2 to be tested after 24 hours (24 h and 6 months (6 m of water storage, in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. The data was analyzed via two-way Analysis of Variance/Bonferroni post hoc tests at 5% global significance. Results Overall outcomes did not indicate a statistical difference for the resin systems (p=0.26 nor time (p=0.62. No interaction between material × time was detected (p=0.28. Mean standard-deviation in MPa at 24 h and 6 m were: ASB 31.38 (4.53 and 30.06 (1.95, CF 34.26 (3.47 and 32.75 (4.18, ASEP 29.54 (4.14 and 33.47 (2.47, P90 30.27 (2.03 and 31.34 (2.19. Conclusions The silorane-based system showed a similar performance to methacrylate-based materials on dentin. All systems were stable in terms of bond strength up to 6 month of water storage.

  16. Perubahan warna lempeng resin akrilik yang direndam dalam larutan desinfektan sodium hipoklorit dan klorhexidin (The color changes of acrylic resins denture base material which are immersed in Sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David David

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the acrylic resins properties is the water absorption including color fluids and chemically fluids that affect on the color changes of the acrylic resins. This laboratory experiments studied sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine effect on the color changes of acrylic denture base resins material. The study was conducted by immersing heat cured acrylic plate samples of 26 mm of diameter and 0.4 mm of thickness in sodium hypochlorite for 10; 70 and 140 minutes and chlorhexidine for 15; 105 and 210 minutes. Seven samples were used for each experiment. An optical spectrometer BPX-47 type photo cell and a digital microvoltage were used for the color changes observation. The statistical test used were t-test, One-way ANOVA and LSD with 0.05 significance degree level. The results of the studied showed that the color of acrylic resins denture base plate changed after immersion in sodium hypochlorite for 70 and 140 minutes and chlorhexidine for 105 and 210 minute of immersion.

  17. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of three resin based dual-cure core build-up materials: An In-vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Gaurav; Narad, Aditi; Boruah, Lalit C.; Rajkumar, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The in-vitro study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three recently introduced dual-cure resin based core build-up materials namely ParaCore, FluoroCore, and MultiCore. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty extracted permanent human mandibular molar teeth were taken and sectioned horizontally beneath the dentinoenamel junction to expose the coronal dentin. The specimens obtained were divided into three main groups based on the materials used and then further divided into ...

  18. In vitro antibacterial activity of a novel resin-based pulp capping material containing the quaternary ammonium salt MAE-DB and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanwei; Huang, Li; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Hongchen; Zhou, Wei; Ban, Jinghao; Wei, Jingjing; Liu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Vital pulp preservation in the treatment of deep caries is challenging due to bacterial infection. The objectives of this study were to synthesize a novel, light-cured composite material containing bioactive calcium-silicate (Portland cement, PC) and the antimicrobial quaternary ammonium salt monomer 2-methacryloxylethyl dodecyl methyl ammonium bromide (MAE-DB) and to evaluate its effects on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro. The experimental material was prepared from a 2 : 1 ratio of PC mixed with a resin of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, bisphenol glycerolate dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (4 : 3 : 1) containing 5 wt% MAE-DB. Cured resin containing 5% MAE-DB without PC served as the positive control material, and resin without MAE-DB or PC served as the negative control material. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (Dycal) served as commercial controls. S. mutans biofilm formation on material surfaces and growth in the culture medium were tested according to colony-forming units (CFUs) and metabolic activity after 24 h incubation over freshly prepared samples or samples aged in water for 6 months. Biofilm formation was also assessed by Live/Dead staining and scanning electron microscopy. S. mutans biofilm formation on the experimental material was significantly inhibited, with CFU counts, metabolic activity, viability staining, and morphology similar to those of biofilms on the positive control material. None of the materials affected bacterial growth in solution. Contact-inhibition of biofilm formation was retained by the aged experimental material. Significant biofilm formation was observed on MTA and Dycal. The synthesized material containing HEMA-BisGMA-TEGDMA resin with MAE-DB as the antimicrobial agent and PC to support mineralized tissue formation inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation even after aging in water for 6 months, but had no inhibitory effect on bacteria in solution. Therefore, this material shows

  19. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  20. Effect of priming agents on shear bond strengths of resin-based luting agents to a translucent zirconia material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagawa, Shogo; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Kubochi, Kei; Kimura, Fumiaki; Matsumura, Hideo

    2017-09-19

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of priming agents and artificial aging with thermocycling on shear bond strengths of two resin-based luting agents to a translucent zirconia material. A total of 308 pairs of translucent zirconia disk specimens were divided into seven treatment groups: Alloy Primer (ALP), Clearfil Ceramic Primer Plus (CCP), Meta Fast Bonding Liner (MFB), MR. bond (MRB), Super-Bond PZ Primer Liquid B (PZB), V-Primer (VPR), and an unprimed group (UP). The specimens in each group were bonded with Panavia V5 Universal (UNI) and Opaque shade (OPA). Shear bond strengths (n=11 each) were tested before and after 5000 thermocycles. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Steel-Dwass test. For both 0 and 5000 thermocycles, the ALP (47.8 and 41.5MPa, respectively) and CCP (45.8 and 42.3MPa, respectively) groups showed significantly higher bond strengths than other groups in the UNI luting agent. For the OPA luting agent, CCP group (45.8MPa) exhibited the highest pre-thermocycling bond strength in all groups. The ALP (32.4MPa) and CCP (36.5MPa) groups had significantly higher post-thermocycling shear bond strengths than other groups. In several groups, the shear bond strengths of the UNI luting agent were significantly higher than those of the OPA luting agent before and after thermocycling. Application of priming agents containing hydrophobic phosphate monomer (MDP) yielded the durable bond strengths of resin-based luting agents to a translucent zirconia material. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with 2 Different Fiber-reinforced Composite and 2 Conventional Composite Resin Core Buildup Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Ashly Mary; Amirtharaj, L Vijay; Sanjeev, Kavitha; Mahalaxmi, Sekar

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with 2 fiber-reinforced composite resins and 2 conventional composite resin core buildup materials. Sixty noncarious unrestored human maxillary premolars were collected, endodontically treated (except group 1, negative control), and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10). Group 2 was the positive control. The remaining 40 prepared teeth were restored with various direct core buildup materials as follows: group 3 teeth were restored with dual-cure composite resin, group 4 with posterior composite resin, group 5 with fiber-reinforced composite resin, and group 6 with short fiber-reinforced composite resin. Fracture strength testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test. Fracture patterns for each sample were also examined under a light microscope to determine the level of fractures. The mean fracture resistance values (in newtons) were obtained as group 1 > group 6 > group 4 > group 3 > group 5 > group 2. Group 6 showed the highest mean fracture resistance value, which was significantly higher than the other experimental groups, and all the fractures occurred at the level of enamel. Within the limitations of this study, a short fiber-reinforced composite can be used as a direct core buildup material that can effectively resist heavy occlusal forces against fracture and may reinforce the remaining tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biosurfactants prevent in vitro Candida albicans biofilm formation on resins and silicon materials for prosthetic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochis, Andrea; Fracchia, Letizia; Martinotti, Maria Giovanna; Rimondini, Lia

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the preventive antiadhesion activity of biosurfactants against Candida albicans biofilm. Disks of silicon and acrylic resin for denture prostheses were precoated with increasing concentrations of biosurfactants obtained from endophyte biofilms selected from Robinia pseudoacacia and from Nerium oleander, and afterward infected with C. albicans cells. The number of biofilm cells were detected by colony-forming unit (CFU) counting, cell viability was established by the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) assay, and biosurfactant cytotoxicity was evaluated by the [3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] (MTT) assay. Chlorhexidine was used as control. Precoating with biosurfactants caused a greater reduction (P biosurfactants was observed at low concentrations (78.12 μg/mL and 156.12 μg/mL) which were noncytotoxic. This study demonstrated the preventive antiadhesion activity of biosurfactants against C. albicans biofilm. These agents are amphiphilic, interfere with microbial adhesion, and demonstrate cycompatibility with epithelial cells and fibroblasts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Jaekel, Oliver [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  4. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Raya R; Hünemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Pigozzo, Marco; Ceci, Matteo; Scribante, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin nanoceramic (RNC) material to dentin. In this in vitro study, 30 disks were milled from RNC blocks (Lava Ultimate/3M ESPE) with CAD/CAM technology. The disks were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 recently extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors. The specimens were randomly assigned into 3 groups of 10 teeth each. In Group 1, disks were cemented using a total-etch protocol (Scotchbond™ Universal Etchant phosphoric acid + Scotchbond Universal Adhesive + RelyX™ Ultimate conventional resin cement); in Group 2, disks were cemented using a self-etch protocol (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive + RelyX™ Ultimate conventional resin cement); in Group 3, disks were cemented using a self-adhesive protocol (RelyX™ Unicem 2 Automix self-adhesive resin cement). All cemented specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Instron Universal Testing Machine 3343) and submitted to a shear bond strength test to check the strength of adhesion between the two substrates, dentin, and RNC disks. Specimens were stressed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey's test at a level of significance of 0.05. Post-hoc Tukey testing showed that the highest shear strength values (P resin cements (coupled with etch and rinse or self-etch adhesives) showed better shear strength values compared to self-adhesive resin cements. Furthermore, conventional resin cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values of adhesion.

  6. Cashew nut shell liquid resin used as matrix for compound materials; O LCC (Liquido da castanha do caju) como matriz em materiais compostos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes de; Nogueira, Ricardo Emilio Ferreira Quevedo [Ceara Univ., Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    1996-12-31

    Cashew nut shell liquid resin a by product of cashew processing industry is a naturally occurring phenol of low cost and are used in Brazil as fuel in the industrial production of cashew nut or as a structural material when associated with coconut fiber or rice shell. A high measured Tg points to noble applications. This paper presents some properties of LCC resin and concludes that it has good perspectives as a composite matrice to work at elevated temperatures. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Color stability of nano-filled, micro-hybrid, and silorane-based dental composite resin materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Saud M ALShetili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the color stability of nano-hybrid, micro-hybrid, and silorane-based composite resin restorative materials upon exposure to staining agents. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty composites samples were prepared, 40 from each composite material (Filtek ® Z350, Filtek ® P90, and Filtek ® Z250. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups (10 of each sample. The specimens were incubated for 24 h in distilled water and then for 72 h in corresponding mediums (distilled water, red grape juice, green tea, coffee. The color of all the specimens was assessed before and after exposure with a spectrophotometer and total color change (ΔE was calculated using ΔEFNx01 = [(ΔLFNx012 + (ΔaFNx012 + (ΔbFNx012]1/2. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the means of the solutions were compared by Tukey′s honestly significant difference (HSD (P 0.05 discoloration compared with other media. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it may be concluded that silorane-based composites are more resistant to discoloration than bis-GMA-based composites and coffee had the highest effect on composite discoloration compared to other media.

  8. Effect of various dentin disinfection protocols on the bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Anand; Anil, Akansha; Thomas, Manuel S; Ginjupalli, Kishore

    2017-07-01

    Disinfection of dentin surface prior to any restorative therapy is important for the longevity of the treatment rendered. However, these dentin disinfection methods should itself not interfere with the adhesion of the restorative material. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the effect of various dentin disinfection protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). The occlusal surface of 40 extracted premolars were trimmed to obtain a flat dentinal surface and was randomly divided into four groups. CTRL was the control group; NaOCl was 1% sodium hypochlorite disinfection group; CHX was 2% chlorhexidine disinfection group; and PAD was the photo-activated disinfection group. Then a predetermined dimension of RMGIC was bonded to the pre-treated dentin surfaces. Following this, each sample was tested for SBS using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. Among the test groups, CHX showed the least reduction in SBS and NaOCl the highest reduction in SBS as compared to the control group. PAD on the other hand showed significantly lower SBS than CTRL and CHX groups, but the values were higher than the NaOCl group. Thus, it could be concluded from the present study that use of chlorhexidine based dentin disinfection does interfere with the adhesion of RMGIC. However, photo-activated disinfection should be done with caution. Moreover, sodium hypochlorite based disinfectants should be avoided prior to the use of RMGIC. Key words: Chlorhexidine, Dentin disinfection, Photo-activated disinfection, Resin modified glass ionomer cement, Shear bond strength, Sodium hypochlorite.

  9. Comparison of retention rates of fissure sealants using two flowable restorative materials and a conventional resin sealant: two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Aylin Akbay; Sönmez, Işıl Şaroğlu; Ercan, Ertuğrul; Dülgergil, Türksel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to compare the retention rates of two flowable restorative systems (Admira Flow and Grandio Flow) with that of a conventional resin-based sealant (Fissurit F). The study was planned as a clinical trial with a split-mouth design. A total of 122 sealants (38 Admira Flow, 41 Grandio Flow, 43 Fissurit F) were randomly applied to completely erupted permanent molars in 35 patients aged 9-20 years and followed up for 24 months. Data were analyzed using Pearson's χ(2) and multiple comparison tests. At the end of the follow-up period, Fissurit F had higher retention rates (81.0%) than both Admira Flow (60.5%) and Grandio Flow (57.1%), with p 0.05). The two flowable composite resin materials used as fissure sealant were less retentive than the conventional resin sealant. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Radiopacity and microhardness changes and effect of X-ray operating voltage in resin-based materials before and after the expiration date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirapelli Camila

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study observed alteration in the radiopacity and microhardness of expired resin-based materials compared to non-expired materials and the operating characteristics of the X-ray source used. Five 2 mm-thick cured specimens were prepared for each material: composite resins (P60®, Z100®, and a compomer (Dyract AP®. Radiopacity of the specimens was evaluated comparing the density of the resin-based material to an equivalent (mm density of a 99.5% pure aluminum step wedge using a transmission densitometer. Surface microhardness measurements were carried out using a calibrated Vickers indenter on three different points of the same surface. ANOVA and Tukey tests (pre-set alpha = 0.05 revealed that expired materials showed no significant change in radiopacity. One material (Filtek P60 demonstrated lower radiopacity with lower KVp. Change in microhardness wa s statistically significant for Z100: for this material, the microhardness after expiration was significantly lower than before the expiration date.

  11. Influence of mechanical and chemical degradation on surface gloss of resin composite materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardu, S.; Braut, V.; Uhac, I.; Benbachir, N.; Feilzer, A.J.; Krejci, I.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the changes in surface gloss of different composite materials after simulation of mechanical and chemical aging mechanisms. Methods: 36 specimens were fabricated for each material and polished with 120-, 220-, 500-, 1200-, 2400- and 4000- grit SiC abrasive paper, respectively.

  12. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Poggio; Marco Pigozzo; Matteo Ceci; Andrea Scribante; Riccardo Beltrami; Marco Chiesa

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin nanoceramic (RNC) material to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 disks were milled from RNC blocks (Lava Ultimate/3M ESPE) with CAD/CAM technology. The disks were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 recently extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors. The...

  13. Influence of Curing Units and Indirect Restorative Materials on the Hardness of Two Dual-curing Resin Cements Evaluated by the Nanoindentation Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuguimiya, Rosiane Noqueira; Rode, Kátia Martins; Carneiro, Paula Mendes Acatauassú; Aranha, Ana Cecilia Corrêa; Turbino, Miriam Lacalle

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the hardness of a dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200) and a conventional dual-curing resin cement (RelyX ARC) cured with different light curing units of different wavelengths (Elipar Freelight 2 LED [430 to 480 nm, conventional], Bluephase LED [380 to 515 nm, polywave], AccuCure 3000 Laser [488 nm]) by means of the nanoindentation test. Bovine incisors were cleaned and then sectioned at the cementoenamel junction to remove the crown. After embedding in acrylic, dentin surfaces of the specimens were exposed and ground flat to standardize the surfaces. To simulate clinically placing indirect restorations, ceramic (IPS e.maxPress/Ivoclar Vivadent) or indirect composite resin (SR Adoro/Ivoclar Vivadent) slabs were cemented on dentin surfaces. The specimens were sectioned longitudinally at low speed under constant irrigation and then polished. In the positive control group, the cement was light cured without the interposition of indirect restorative material; in the negative control group, after the indirect restorative material was cemented, no light curing was performed, allowing only chemical polymerization of the cement. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Nanoindentadion hardness of the cement layer was measured under a 100-mN load. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (p resin cements evaluated was negatively influenced by the interposition of an indirect restorative material; only the LEDs were able to maintain the same degree of cement polymerization when an indirect restorative material was used. The photoactivation step is required during the cementation of indirect restorations to ensure adequate polymerization of dual-curing resin cements.

  14. Implications of resin-based composite (RBC) restoration on cuspal deflection and microleakage score in molar teeth: Placement protocol and restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Lauren E J; Politi, Ioanna; Al-Fodeh, Rami S; Fleming, Garry J P

    2017-09-01

    To assess the cuspal deflection of standardised large mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities in third molar teeth restored using conventional resin-based composite (RBC) or their bulk fill restorative counterparts compared with the unbound condition using a twin channel deflection measuring gauge. Following thermocycling, the cervical microleakage of the restored teeth was assessed to determine marginal integrity. Standardised MOD cavities were prepared in forty-eight sound third molar teeth and randomly allocated to six groups. Restorations were placed in conjunction with (and without) a universal bonding system and resin restorative materials were irradiated with a light-emitting-diode light-curing-unit. The dependent variable was the restoration protocol, eight oblique increments for conventional RBCs or two horizontal increments for the bulk fill resin restoratives. The cumulative buccal and palatal cuspal deflections from a twin channel deflection measuring gauge were summed, the restored teeth thermally fatigued, immersed in 0.2% basic fuchsin dye for 24h, sectioned and examined for cervical microleakage score. The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) identified third molar teeth restored using conventional RBC materials had significantly higher mean total cuspal deflection values compared with bulk fill resin restorative restoration (all prestored teeth had significantly the lowest microleakage scores compared with Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (bonded and non-bonded) teeth (all prestoratives behave in a similar manner when used to restore standardised MOD cavities in third molar teeth. It would appear that light irradiation of individual conventional RBCs or bulk fill resin restoratives may be problematic such that material selection is vital in the absence of clinical data. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of asphaltene and resin oils on the viscosity of bituminous petroleum materials to be used as asphalt primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bencomo, M. R.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The bituminous crude from the Machete, Venezuela, area, which has such a fluid consistency that it falls outside the normal scope of the A5TM D-5 (1 penetration test exceeding the 3D-mm ceiling specified in that standard and can be used as an asphalt primer: Like other asphalt products, these materials are -chemically speaking- a mix of numerous naphthenic, paraffinic and aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds containing sulphur, nitrogen, oxygen and so on. They have a dense and a malthene oil phase which, along with the natural hydrocarbons additives used in these products acts as a volatile fluidizer. The former is described as a mix of asphaltenes: complex high molecular weight substances that are insoluble in paraffinic hydrocarbons and soluble in aromatic compounds such as benzene. The malthene oil phase, in turn, consists in a mix of resins and hydrocarbons and together the two constitute a colloidal system. The experiments discussed in the present paper were conducted to determine the effect of the proportion of asphaltenes and resin oils on the viscosity of such bituminous crude emulsions/ with a view to their use as primers. These experiments were run in a Parr batch reactor in a nitrogen atmosphere using n-heptane as a solvent. The resins were separated after the asphaltenes precipitated from the samples and subsequently from the malthene fraction obtained. The results showed that the asphaltenes account for the structural characteristics and consistency of the medium and the resin oils for its cohesive properties/,the malthene oils act as solvents.Los crudos extrapesados procedentes del área Machete (Venezuela son materiales de consistencia blanda o fluida, por lo que se salen del campo en el que normalmente se aplica el ensayo de penetración a productos asfálticos según el método ASTM D-5 (1, cuyo límite máximo es 30 mm, y pueden ser utilizados como pinturas asfálticas de imprimación. Al igual que otros productos

  16. Drying time of tray adhesive for adequate tensile bond strength between polyvinylsiloxane impression and tray resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myong-Hee; Shim, Joon-Sung; Lee, Keun-Woo; Chung, Moon-Kyu

    2009-07-01

    Use of custom tray and tray adhesive is clinically recommended for elastomeric impression material. However there is not clear mention of drying time of tray adhesive in achieving appropriate bonding strength of tray material and impression material. This study is to investigate an appropriate drying time of tray adhesives by evaluating tensile bonding strength between two types of polyvinylsiloxane impression materials and resin tray, according to various drying time intervals of tray adhesives, and with different manufacturing company combination of impression material and tray adhesive. Adhesives used in this study were Silfix (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del, USA) and VPS Tray Adhesive (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) and impression materials were Aquasil Ultra (monophase regular set, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del, USA) and Imprint II Garant (regular body, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany). They were used combinations from the same manufacture and exchanged combinations of the two. The drying time was designed to air dry, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 20 minutes, and 25 minutes. Total 240 of test specimens were prepared by auto-polymerizing tray material (Instant Tray Mix, Lang, Wheeling, Il, USA) with 10 specimens in each group. The specimens were placed in the Universal Testing machine (Instron, model 3366, Instron Corp, University avenue, Nowood, MA, USA) to perform the tensile test (cross head speed 5 mm/min). The statistically efficient drying time was evaluated through ANOVA and Scheffe test. All the tests were performed at 95% confidence level. The results revealed that at least 10 minutes is needed for Silfix-Aquasil, and 15 minutes for VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II, to attain an appropriate tensile bonding strength. VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II had a superior tensile bonding strength when compared to Silfix-Aquasil over 15 minutes. Silfix-Aquasil had a superior bonding strength to VPS Tray Adhesive-Aquasil, and VPS Tray Adhesive-Imprint II had a superior tensile

  17. Spectra from 2.5-15 μm of tissue phantom materials, optical clearing agents and ex vivo human skin: implications for depth profiling of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viator, John A; Choi, Bernard; Peavy, George M; Kimel, Sol; Nelson, J Stuart

    2003-01-01

    Infrared measurements have been used to profile or image biological tissue, including human skin. Usually, analysis of such measurements has assumed that infrared absorption is due to water and collagen. Such an assumption may be reasonable for soft tissue, but introduction of exogenous agents into skin or the measurement of tissue phantoms has raised the question of their infrared absorption spectrum. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode to measure the infrared absorption spectra, in the range of 2-15 μm, of water, polyacrylamide, Intralipid, collagen gels, four hyperosmotic clearing agents (glycerol, 1,3-butylene glycol, trimethylolpropane, Topicare TM ), and ex vivo human stratum corneum and dermis. The absorption spectra of the phantom materials were similar to that of water, although additional structure was noted in the range of 6-10 μm. The absorption spectra of the clearing agents were more complex, with molecular absorption bands dominating between 6 and 12 μm. Dermis was similar to water, with collagen structure evident in the 6-10 μm range. Stratum corneum had a significantly lower absorption than dermis due to a lower content of water. These results suggest that the assumption of water-dominated absorption in the 2.5-6 μm range is valid. At longer wavelengths, clearing agent absorption spectra differ significantly from the water spectrum. This spectral information can be used in pulsed photothermal radiometry or utilized in the interpretation of reconstructions in which a constant μ ir is used. In such cases, overestimating μ ir will underestimate chromophore depth and vice versa, although the effect is dependent on actual chromophore depth. (note)

  18. Penetration of a resin-based filling material into lateral root canals and quality of obturation by different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelotto, André Luiz da Costa; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Araki, Angela Toshie; Akisue, Eduardo; Sydney, Gilson Blitzkow

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the penetration of a resin/polyester polymer-based material (Resilon Real Seal; SybronEndo Corp., Orange, USA) into simulated lateral canals, and the quality of obturations by different techniques. A total of 30 standardized simulated canals were divided into three groups according to the technique of obturation used: MS (McSpadden), SB (SystemB/Obtura II), and LC (Lateral Condensation). To analyze the penetration of the filling material, the simulated canals were digitalized and the images were analyzed using the Leica QWIN Pro v2.3 software. The data of the middle and apical thirds were separately submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Tukey's test for the comparison of the techniques. Results showed a significant difference (p test on interexaminer agreement and the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test indicated no significant difference between filling techniques. It was concluded that Resilon achieves greater levels of penetration when associated with thermoplastic obturation techniques.

  19. [Contact allergy to epoxy resins plastics based on materials collected by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Krecisz, Beata

    2003-01-01

    Of the 5604 patients examined in 1984-2001 for suspected occupational dermatitis, 160 persons (2.8%) showed allergy to epoxy resins plastics. Allergy was more frequent in men (4.9%) than in women (1.2%); in 154 persons, allergy was of occupational etiology (in a group of 160 patients with allergy to epoxy resins, the following proportions were observed: bricklayers, platelayers--17.5%; fitters, turners, machinist millers--13.8%; plastics molders--13.1%; laminators--11.3%; electrical equipment assemblers--10.6%; painters--10.0%). Having compared the frequency of allergy to components of epoxy resins in the years 1984-1993 and 1994-2001, it was found that allergy to resin, reactive diluents and plasticizers was on increase, whereas allergy to amines and acid anhydrides hardeners was on decrease. In a group of 13 chemical compounds entering into the composition of epoxy resins, epoxy resin contributed to the largest number of positive patch tests (77.5% of epoxy-allergic persons). This was followed by triethylenetetramine (23.1%), ethylenediamine (13.1%), phthalic anhydride (8.1%), diethylenetetramine (6.9%) and phenylglycidylether (6.2%). In addition, three patients reacted to both epoxy resin and cycloaliphatic resin.

  20. Surface tridimensional topography analysis of materials and finishing procedures after resinous infiltration of subsurface bovine enamel lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jan; Yang, Fan; Neumann, Konrad; Kielbassa, Andrej M

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of materials and finishing procedures on the surface roughness of infiltrated subsurface bovine enamel lesions. Eighty enamel specimens were prepared from 80 bovine incisors and partially varnished (control). The nonvarnished areas were demineralized (pH 4.95, 28 days) and etched with phosphoric acid gel (20%, 5 seconds). Specimens were randomly divided into two groups, which were each split into four subgroups (each n = 10): E1/E2 (Excite, Ivoclar Vivadent), F1/F2 (Fortify, Bisco), G1/G2 (Glaze and Bond, DMG), and I1/I2 (Icon, DMG). In group 1, resin materials were polymerized and polished using finishing strips by means of a polishing device; in group 2, excess material was removed with a rubber cup before polymerization (without polishing). The surface roughness (Sa) of control, demineralized, and treated surfaces were evaluated topometrically using a focus variation 3D scanning microscope. Demineralized surfaces were significantly rougher than sound enamel (P < .0005, t test). Etching increased Sa significantly to more than 450% of demineralization values (P < .0005). Surfaces of nonpolished infiltrated lesions were significantly rougher than demineralized enamel (P < .0005), while no significant differences could be found among infiltrated subgroups (P = .067), nor between polished and nonpolished groups (P = .359). Application of Glaze and Bond (G2) appeared to reduce Sa values of etched lesions (P < .0005), while with all other subgroups Sa values improved only marginally. Regarding surface roughness, the use of finishing strips after infiltration of subsurface lesions does not seem to be advantageous. Excess material should be removed before light curing, but surface quality of nonprocessed infiltrants seems to be perfectible.

  1. Novel nano-particles as fillers for an experimental resin-based restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, S; Wandrey, C; Raab, W H-M; Janda, R

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the properties of two experimental materials, nano-material (Nano) and Microhybrid, and two trade products, Clearfil AP-X and Filtek Supreme XT. The flexural strength and modulus after 24h water storage and 5000 thermocycles, water sorption, solubility and X-ray opacity were determined according to ISO 4049. The volumetric behavior (DeltaV) after curing and after water storage was investigated with the Archimedes principle. ANOVA was calculated with p<0.05. Clearfil AP-X showed the highest flexural strength (154+/-14 MPa) and flexural modulus (11,600+/-550 MPa) prior to and after thermocycling (117+/-14 MPa and 13,000+/-300 MPa). The flexural strength of all materials decreased after thermocycling, but the flexural modulus decreased only for Filtek Supreme XT. After thermocycling, there were no significant differences in flexural strength and modulus between Filtek Supreme XT, Microhybrid and Nano. Clearfil AP-X had the lowest water sorption (22+/-1.1 microg mm(-3)) and Nano had the highest water sorption (82+/-2.6 microg mm(-3)) and solubility (27+/-2.9 microg mm(-3)) of all the materials. No significant differences occurred between the solubility of Clearfil AP-X, Filtek Supreme XT and Microhybrid. Microhybrid and Nano provided the highest X-ray opacity. Owing to the lower filler content, Nano showed higher shrinkage than the commercial materials. Nano had the highest expansion after water storage. After thermocycling, Nano performed as well as Filtek Supreme XT for flexural strength, even better for X-ray opacity but significantly worse for flexural modulus, water sorption and solubility. The performances of microhybrids were superior to those of the nano-materials.

  2. Physical Property Investigation of Contemporary Glass lonomer and Resin Modified Glass lonomer Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    Innovation in Direct Restorative Materials. Adv Dent Res 2013;25:8-17. 4. Wilson AD, Kent BE. The glass-ionomer cement , a new translucent dental filling...material. J Appl Chem 1971;21:313. 5. Wilson AD, Batchelor RF. Dental silicate cements I. The chemistry of erosion. J Dent Res 1967;46:1078-85. 6...modlfied glass-ionomer dental cements . Biomater 2002;23: 3289-3295. 42. Young A, Sherpa G, Pearson B, Schottlander, Waters DN. Use of Raman Spectroscopy

  3. Clinical evaluation of a new art material: Nanoparticulated resin-modified glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konde, S.; Raj, S.; Jaiswal, D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The success of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) technique depends on the restorative material; hence, clinical studies with various materials are necessary. Aim: The aim of the present study was to clinically evaluate and compare the nanoionomer and high-viscosity glass ionomer using United States Public Health Services (USPHS) Modified Cvar/Ryge Criteria with ART approach. Materials and Methods: Two primary molars in 50 healthy children aged between 5 and 8 years were selected for the study. The teeth were treated with ART and divided into two groups. The group 1 teeth were restored with nanoionomer (Ketac Nano 100 3M ESPE) and group 2 with high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (HVGIC), (Fuji IX GC). Each restoration was evaluated using the USPHS Modified Cvar/Ryge Criteria at baseline and 6 months’ and 12 months’ time interval. Statistical analysis used: Chi-squared (χ2) test. Results: Nanoionomer was significantly better than HVGIC with respect to color match at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months (P0.05), but at 12 months, nanoionomer was statistically better than HVGIC (P0.05). Conclusion: The results indicate that nanoionomer can be a successful alternative restorative material for use with ART technique. PMID:24478966

  4. Microtensile Bond Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    surface texture due to larger filler particles 4 and greater wear of the composite matrix material. The aforementioned study reported that...DVA, Corona , CA). Each bar specimen was loaded to failure, at a cross-head speed of 1mm/min on a universal testing machine (Model 5943, Instron

  5. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  6. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  7. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  8. Green material composites from renewable resources: Polymorphic transitions and phase diagram of beeswax/rosin resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, Yves [Mines-ParisTech., CEMEF, UMR CNRS 7635, 1 rue Claude Daunesse 06904 Sophia Antipolis cedex (France); Mija, Alice [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Thermokinetic Group, Laboratory of Chemistry of Organic and Metallic Materials C.M.O.M., 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Burr, Alain; Darque-Ceretti, Evelyne; Felder, Eric [Mines-ParisTech., CEMEF, UMR CNRS 7635, 1 rue Claude Daunesse 06904 Sophia Antipolis cedex (France); Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas, E-mail: sbirrazz@unice.fr [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Thermokinetic Group, Laboratory of Chemistry of Organic and Metallic Materials C.M.O.M., 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-07-10

    Highlights: {yields} Blends of Rosin and beeswax are studied by DSC, XRD, and optical microscopy. {yields} The first phase diagram beeswax/rosin is established. {yields} Polymorphic transitions are identified and appear to be highly related to rosin content. - Abstract: Rosin and beeswax are two complex natural materials presenting numerous applications in paints, adhesives, varnishes or inks. Melted, they are particularly interesting for their adhesion properties. This paper establishes the first phase diagram beeswax/rosin blends. A systematic approach using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarised optical microscopy (POM) has been performed in order to describe the crystallographic structure and the thermal properties of two materials, beeswax and rosin, and their blends. Indeed, melting, softening and crystallisation temperatures, polymorphic transitions but also crystalline index has been investigated. The resulting phase diagram reveals a complex behaviour in terms of phase transformation and time-dependent phenomenon mainly representative of the complex composition of beeswax.

  9. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARAO Nobuaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. Material and Methods CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS and Block HC (BHC] were pretreated as follows: (a no treatment (None, (b application of a ceramic primer (CP, (c alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB, (d AB followed by CP (AB+CP, and (e glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB followed by CP (GBB+CP. The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS and ResiCem (RC]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0 and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4–60°C were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05. Results For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p0.05. The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (p<0.05, but not for GCCS. The GBB+CP group showed the highest bond strength for both thermal cyclings (p<0.05. Conclusions Air abrasion with glass beads was more effective in increasing bond durability between the resin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP.

  10. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  11. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Segars, William P.; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  12. Adhesion of resin materials to S2-glass unidirectional and E-glass multidirectional fiber reinforced composites: effect of polymerization sequence protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacek, Petr; Pavelka, Vladimir; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different polymerization sequences employed during application of bis-GMAbased particulate filler composites (PFC) or a flowable resin (FR) on fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). Unidirectional, pre-impregnated S2-glass fibers (Dentapreg) and multidirectional preimpregnated E-glass fibers (Dentapreg) (length: 40 mm; thickness: 0.5 mm) were obtained (N = 144, n = 12 per group) and embedded in translucent silicone material with the adhesion surface exposed. The resulting specimens were randomly divided into 12 groups for the following application sequences: a) FRC+PFC (photopolymerized in one step), b) FRC+FR (photopolymerized in one step), c) FRC+PFC (photopolymerized individually), d) FRC+FR (photopolymerized individually), e) FRC (photopolymerized)+intermediate adhesive resin and PFC (photopolymerized in one step), f) FRC (photopolymerized)+intermediate adhesive resin and FR (photopolymerized in one step). The sequences of unidirectional (groups a to f) were repeated for multidirectional (groups g to l) FRCs. PFCs were debonded from the FRC surfaces using the shear bond test in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). On additional specimens from each FRC type, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was performed to characterize the fiber weight content (Wf) (N = 6, n = 3 per group). After debonding, all specimens were analyzed using SEM to categorize the failure modes. The data were statistically analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Significant effects of the FRC type (S2 or E-glass) (p resin type (PFC or FR) (p TGA revealed 55 ± 3 wt% fiber content for multidirectional and 60 ± 3 wt% for unidirectional FRCs tested. Multidirectional pre-impregnated E-glass fibers cannot be recommended in combination with the PFC and FR materials tested in this study. Application of an intermediate adhesive resin layer increases the adhesion of both PFC and FR to unidirectional FRC. FRC and FR can be polymerized in one step, but FRC and PFC

  13. Computer tomographic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonn, A.H.R.; Jacobsen, D.R.; Zech, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    A reference phantom for computer tomography employs a flexible member with means for urging the flexible member into contact along the curved surface of the lumbar region of a human patient. In one embodiment, the reference phantom is pre-curved in an arc greater than required. Pressure from the weight of a patient laying upon the reference phantom is effective for straightening out the curvature sufficiently to achieve substantial contact along the lumbar region. The curvature of the reference phantom may be additionally distorted by a resilient pad between the resilient phantom and a table for urging it into contact with the lumbar region. In a second embodiment of the invention, a flexible reference phantom is disposed in a slot in the top of a resilient cushion. The resilient cushion and reference phantom may be enclosed in a flexible container. A partially curved reference phantom in a slot in a resilient cushion is also contemplated. (author)

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on fluoride release and antibacterial activity of resin dental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fabiola Galbiatti de; Fucio, Suzana Beatriz Portugal de; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenco [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Piracicaba Dental School. Dept. of Dental Materials; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Piracicaba Dental School. Dept. of Pedriatric Dentistry], e-mail: rmpuppin@fop.unicamp.br

    2009-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on fluoride release and antibacterial activity of FluroShield (FS) and Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB). Four groups were formed: G1-FS + gamma; G2-FS without gamma; G3-CPB + gamma; G4-CPB without gamma. For fluoride release analysis, 12 disks of each material were prepared and covered with nail polish, except for one side (50.4 mm{sup 2} area). G1 and G3 were sterilized with a 14.5 KGy dose at 27 deg C for 24 h, while G2 and G4 (controls) were not sterilized and were maintained under the same time and temperature conditions. Fluoride release measurements were made in duplicate (n=6) by an ion specific electrode. The antibacterial activity of the CPB and FS against Streptococcus mutans after gamma sterilization was evaluated by the agar-disc diffusion method. The diameter of the zones of microbial growth inhibition was recorded after 48 h. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=5%). Gamma sterilization decreased the fluoride release of FS by approximately 50%, while CPB was not affected. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) in the antibacterial effect of CPB between gamma and non-gamma sterilization groups. FS presented no antibacterial activity. Gamma irradiation decreased the fluoride release of FS, but did not affect the antibacterial activity of the studied materials. (author)

  15. Effect of gamma irradiation on fluoride release and antibacterial activity of resin dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Fabiola Galbiatti de; Fucio, Suzana Beatriz Portugal de; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenco; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on fluoride release and antibacterial activity of FluroShield (FS) and Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB). Four groups were formed: G1-FS + gamma; G2-FS without gamma; G3-CPB + gamma; G4-CPB without gamma. For fluoride release analysis, 12 disks of each material were prepared and covered with nail polish, except for one side (50.4 mm 2 area). G1 and G3 were sterilized with a 14.5 KGy dose at 27 deg C for 24 h, while G2 and G4 (controls) were not sterilized and were maintained under the same time and temperature conditions. Fluoride release measurements were made in duplicate (n=6) by an ion specific electrode. The antibacterial activity of the CPB and FS against Streptococcus mutans after gamma sterilization was evaluated by the agar-disc diffusion method. The diameter of the zones of microbial growth inhibition was recorded after 48 h. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=5%). Gamma sterilization decreased the fluoride release of FS by approximately 50%, while CPB was not affected. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) in the antibacterial effect of CPB between gamma and non-gamma sterilization groups. FS presented no antibacterial activity. Gamma irradiation decreased the fluoride release of FS, but did not affect the antibacterial activity of the studied materials. (author)

  16. Amalgam or composite resin? Factors influencing the choice of restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, M B; Peres, M A; Peres, K G; Horta, B L; Barros, A D; Demarco, F F

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the patient and tooth factors associated with selection of restorative material in direct posterior restorations in young adults from a population-based birth cohort. A representative sample (n=720) of all 5914 births occurring in Pelotas in 1982 were prospectively investigated, and posterior restorations were assessed in 2006, when the patients were 24 years old. Tooth-related variables (individual level) included restorative material (amalgam or composite), type of tooth, size of cavity, and estimated time in mouth. Data regarding demographic and socio-economic characteristics, oral health, and service utilization patterns during the life course were also assessed (contextual level). Logistic Regression Multilevel models showed that individuals who have accessed dental services by private insurance by age 15 [odds ratio (OR)=1.66 (0.93-2.95)] and who had a higher dental caries index at age 15 (high DMFT tertile) [OR 2.89 (1.59-5.27)] presented more amalgam restorations in the posterior teeth. From tooth-level variables, the frequency of amalgams decreases with increasing number of surfaces enrolled in the cavity preparation (pcomposite or amalgam in posterior direct restorations, showing that, independently of socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, type of payment of dental services and clinical factors are associated with this choice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Radiation resistance of the carbon fiber reinforced composite material with PEEK as the matrix resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-01-01

    In the fast breeder reactor etc. the structural materials are exposed to various environment, i.e., repeated high and low temperature, stress, etc. Irradiation effect (electron radiation) in the mechanical characteristic at low and high temperature has been studied in the PEEK-CF, polyarylether · ether · ketone - carbon fiber composite. Following are the results. (1) Radiation resistance of PEEK-CF is higher than that of PEEK-PES-CF, PEEK - polyethersulfone surface treated CF composite. In PEEK-PES-CF, PES is deteriorated by irradiation so the adhesive power lowers. (2) In the unirradiated PEEK-CF, its mechanical characteristic decreases beyond 140 deg C. With increase of the radiation dose, however, the characteristic rises. (3) Mechanical characteristic of PEEK-CF thus little drops by the heat treatment after the irradiation. (Mori, K.)

  18. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  19. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  20. Preparation and characterization of hybrid materials of epoxy resin type bisphenol a with silicon and titanium oxides by sol-gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo C, A.; Osuna A, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid materials were synthesized from epoxy resins as a result bisphenol type A-silicon oxide and epoxy resin bisphenol type A-titanium oxide were obtained. The synthesis was done by sol-gel process using tetraethyl orthosilicate (Teos) and titanium isopropoxide (I Ti) as inorganic precursors. The molar ratio of bisphenol A to the inorganic precursors was the studied variable. The materials were characterized by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The hybrid nature of the materials was demonstrated through thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy. In both systems, as the amount of alkoxide increased, the bands described above were more defined. This behavior indicates the interactions between the resin and the alkoxides. Hybrids with Teos showed a smoother and homogeneous surface in its entirety, without irregularities. Hybrids with titanium isopropoxide had low roughness. Both Teos and I Ti hybrids showed a decrease on the atomic weight percentage of carbon due to a slight reduction of the organic part on the surface. (Author)

  1. Preparation and characterization of hybrid materials of epoxy resin type bisphenol a with silicon and titanium oxides by sol-gel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo C, A.; Osuna A, J. G., E-mail: acc.carrillo@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Blvd. Venustiano Carranza y Jose Cardenas Valdes, 25000 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    Hybrid materials were synthesized from epoxy resins as a result bisphenol type A-silicon oxide and epoxy resin bisphenol type A-titanium oxide were obtained. The synthesis was done by sol-gel process using tetraethyl orthosilicate (Teos) and titanium isopropoxide (I Ti) as inorganic precursors. The molar ratio of bisphenol A to the inorganic precursors was the studied variable. The materials were characterized by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The hybrid nature of the materials was demonstrated through thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy. In both systems, as the amount of alkoxide increased, the bands described above were more defined. This behavior indicates the interactions between the resin and the alkoxides. Hybrids with Teos showed a smoother and homogeneous surface in its entirety, without irregularities. Hybrids with titanium isopropoxide had low roughness. Both Teos and I Ti hybrids showed a decrease on the atomic weight percentage of carbon due to a slight reduction of the organic part on the surface. (Author)

  2. Material-Dependent Implant Artifact Reduction Using SEMAC-VAT and MAVRIC: A Prospective MRI Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filli, Lukas; Jud, Lukas; Luechinger, Roger; Nanz, Daniel; Andreisek, Gustav; Runge, Val M; Kozerke, Sebastian; Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the degree of artifact reduction in magnetic resonance imaging achieved with slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) in combination with view angle tilting (VAT) and multiacquisition variable resonance image combination (MAVRIC) for standard contrast weightings and different metallic materials. Four identically shaped rods made of the most commonly used prosthetic materials (stainless steel, SS; titanium, Ti; cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, CoCr; and oxidized zirconium, oxZi) were scanned at 3 T. In addition to conventional fast spin-echo sequences, metal artifact reduction sequences (SEMAC-VAT and MAVRIC) with varying degrees of artifact suppression were applied at different contrast weightings (T1w, T2w, PDw). Two independent readers measured in-plane and through-plane artifacts in a standardized manner. In addition, theoretical frequency-offset and frequency-offset-gradient maps were calculated. Interobserver agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient. Interobserver agreement was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.86-0.99). Stainless steel caused the greatest artifacts, followed by CoCr, Ti, and oxZi regardless of the imaging sequence. While for Ti and oxZi rods scanning with weak SEMAC-VAT showed some advantage, for SS and CoCr, higher modes of SEMAC-VAT or MAVRIC were necessary to achieve artifact reduction. MAVRIC achieved better artifact reduction than SEMAC-VAT at the cost of longer acquisition times. Simulations matched well with the apparent geometry of the frequency-offset maps. For Ti and oxZi implants, weak SEMAC-VAT may be preferred as it is faster and produces less artifact than conventional fast spin-echo. Medium or strong SEMAC-VAT or MAVRIC modes are necessary for significant artifact reduction for SS and CoCr implants.

  3. Effect of LED-LCU light irradiance distribution on mechanical properties of resin based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães Filho, T R; Weig, K M; Costa, M F; Werneck, M M; Barthem, R B; Costa Neto, C A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the light power distribution along the tip end of the light guide of three LED-LCUs (Light Curing Units) and to evaluate its effect on the mechanical properties of a polymer based dental composite. Firstly, the light power distribution over the whole area of LED-LCU light guide surface was analyzed by three methods: visual projection observation, spectral measurement and optical spectral analysis (OSA). The light power distribution and the total irradiance were different for the three LEDs used, but the wavelength was within the camphorquinone absorption spectrum. The use of a blank sheet was quite on hand to make a qualitative analysis of a beam, and it is costless. Secondly, specimens of a hybrid composite with approximately 8mm diameter and 2mm thickness were produced and polymerized by 20s exposition time to each LED-LCU. Thirdly, the elastic modulus (E) and hardness (HV) were measured throughout the irradiated area by instrumented micro-indentation test (IIT), allowing to correlate localized power and mechanical properties. Both E and HV showed to be very sensitive to local power and wavelength dependent, but they followed the beam power profile. It was also shown that the mechanical properties could be directly correlated to the curing process. Very steep differences in mechanical properties over very short distances may impair the material performance, since residual stresses can easily be built over it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation of CMC-modified melamine resin spherical nano-phase change energy storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaofeng; Huang, Zhanhua; Zhang, Yanhua

    2014-01-30

    A novel carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified melamine-formaldehyde (MF) phase change capsule with excellent encapsulation was prepared by in situ polymerization. Effects of CMC on the properties of the capsules were studied by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the CMC-modified capsules had an average diameter of about 50nm and good uniformity. The phase change enthalpy of the capsules was increased and the cracking ratio decreased by incorporating a suitable amount of CMC. The optimum phase change enthalpy of the nanocapsules was 83.46J/g, and their paraffin content was 63.1%. The heat resistance of the capsule shells decreased after CMC modification. In addition, the nanocapsule cracking ratio of the nanocapsules was 11.0%, which is highly attractive for their application as nano phase change materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The DOE in-vivo phantom library program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    The use of improved in vivo bioassay calibration phantoms in recent years has led to significant advances in the detection capabilities of in vivo counting laboratories, and increased ability to cross-calibrate various systems and laboratories for standardization purposes in DOE programs. The cost of these phantoms are significant, though, and this inhibits successful intercomparisons for improving calibrations. A recent CIRRPC Workshop on Internal Dosimetry in April 1992 recommended establishing intercomparison programs for in vivo measurements and improved phantom designs. Improved phantoms, developed at PNL with NIST-traceable source reference material loadings, proven solid tissue substitutes, and extensive documentation on construction, activity, and physical and chemical composition are available through a newly operational library. These phantoms use original LLNL molds and existing BOMAB phantom shells, but with improved tissue substitutes. All phantom materials have been extensively tested for their chemical, physical, and radiation transmission properties, and are tailored for identical transmission characteristics at the photon energies of concern. PNL has been pursuing approval from NIST for open-quotes certificationclose quotes of these phantoms. The DOE Phantom Library loans organ, whole-body, and through cooperation with USTR, an Am-241 skeletal phantom to DOE contractor laboratories without cost. Only the price of shipping the phantom is requested. This paper will discuss the operation of the library, the current and planned holdings, the quality of phantom construction, and planning for NIST cooperation in certifying these phantoms

  6. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  7. Modeling of ultrasonic wave propagation in composite materials obtained by the resin transfer molding process; Modelisation de la propagation ultrasonore dans les materiaux composites obtenus par le procede de fabrication RTM (Resin Transfer Molding)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonne, S.

    2003-11-01

    The Resin Transfer Molding process for manufacturing composite materials is used to produce parts of complex shape. During the ultrasonic examination of such parts, attenuation is measured to characterize possible porosity content (a potential defect in this material). However, strong variation of attenuation is observed including on sound plates. The present study aims at explaining this by developing a model for ultrasonic propagation and attenuation in such parts which complex microstructure exhibits a multiple-scale aspect. An original model has been developed to predict attenuation at the elementary scale of an unidirectional layer of carbon fibers in an epoxy matrix. It couples multiple scattering by fibers and viscoelastic losses phenomena. It has been experimentally validated and applies to arbitrary two-phase fiber reinforced composites whatever the fiber volume fraction. At the upper scale of a ply made of several elementary layers of various orientations, the anisotropic behavior of ultrasonic waves and their attenuation are obtained by a homogenization procedure. An actual plate is made of several plies separated by pure resin layers. Plies and layers thicknesses are highly variable. A statistical study has been conducted to evaluate the influence of these geometrical variations on the ultrasonic transmission predicted by a model derived from Thomson-Haskell formalism. Ultrasonic attenuation variability practically observed is quantitatively reproduced and explained as resulting from the geometrical irregularity of the microstructure. (author)

  8. Effect of bulk-fill base material on fracture strength of root-filled teeth restored with laminate resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, N A; Maghaireh, G A; Ghannam, A S; Palamara, J E

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of using a bulk-fill flowable base material on fracture strength and fracture patterns of root-filled maxillary premolars with MOD preparations restored with laminate restorations. Fifty extracted maxillary premolars were selected for the study. Standardized MOD cavities with endodontic treatment were prepared for all teeth, except for intact control. The teeth were divided randomly into five groups (n=10); (Group 1) sound teeth, (Group 2) unrestored teeth; (Group 3) MOD cavities with Vitrebond base and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal); (Group 4) MOD cavities with 2mm GIC base (Fuji IX GP) and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal) open laminate, (Group 5) MOD cavities were restored with 4mm of bulk-fill flowable base material (SDR) and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal). All teeth were thermocycled and subjected to a 45° ramped oblique load in a universal testing machine. Fracture load and fracture patterns were recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Dunnett's T3 test. Restoration in general increased the fracture strength compared to unrestored teeth. The fracture strength of group 5 (bulk-fill) was significantly higher than the fracture strength of the GIC laminate groups and not significantly different from the intact teeth (355±112N, P=0.118). The type of failure was unfavorable for most of the groups, with the majority being mixed failures. The use of a bulk-fill flowable base material significantly increased the fracture strength of extracted root-filled teeth with MOD cavities; however it did not improve fracture patterns to more favorable ones. Investigating restorative techniques that may improve the longevity of root-filled premolar teeth restored with direct resin restorations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Er:YAG laser and air abrasion on the microleakage of a resin-based fissure sealant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Erdemir, Ugur; Yildiz, Esra

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different surface pre-treatment techniques on the microleakage of a resin-based fissure sealant material. Thirty-five molars were divided into the following seven groups based on the surface pre-treatment technique used: (a) Erbium: Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Er:YAG) laser (7 W); (b) Er:YAG laser (7 W)+acid etching (with 37% phosphoric acid); (c) Er:YAG laser (5.5 W); (d) Er:YAG laser (5.5 W)+acid etching; (e) air abrasion+acid etching; (f) air abrasion; and (g) conventional acid etching. The sealant was placed according to the manufacturers' instructions and light-cured for 20 sec. The sealed teeth were thermocycled for 10,000 cycles (5°-55°C), then immersed in 5% methylene blue for 24 h and sectioned mesiodistally. Each section was analyzed and photographed using a light microscope. Microleakage was assessed quantitatively by the degree of dye penetration and also qualitatively, scored on a three-point rating scale. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Kruskal-Wallis test. The level of significance was set at p laser irradiation exhibited significantly higher microleakage than those conditioned with air abrasion followed by acid etching, and those conditioned with conventional acid etching (p Air abrasion followed by acid etching, as well as conventional acid etching, provided a sufficient seal, whereas laser irradiation alone or in combination with acid etching exhibited higher microleakage than did the other groups. Conventional acid etching remains the most effective and the simplest technique.

  10. Development of a novel resin-based dental material with dual biocidal modes and sustained release of Ag+ ions based on photocurable core-shell AgBr/cationic polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weiwei; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xi; Chen, Yinyan; Li, Qiang; Xing, Xiaodong; Xiao, Yuhong; Peng, Xuefeng; Ye, Zhiwen

    2017-07-01

    Research on the incorporation of cutting-edge nano-antibacterial agent for designing dental materials with potent and long-lasting antibacterial property is demanding and provoking work. In this study, a novel resin-based dental material containing photocurable core-shell AgBr/cationic polymer nanocomposite (AgBr/BHPVP) was designed and developed. The shell of polymerizable cationic polymer not only provided non-releasing antibacterial capability for dental resins, but also had the potential to polymerize with other methacrylate monomers and prevented nanoparticles from aggregating in the resin matrix. As a result, incorporation of AgBr/BHPVP nanocomposites did not adversely affect the flexural strength and modulus but greatly increased the Vicker's hardness of resin disks. By continuing to release Ag + ions without the impact of anaerobic environment, resins containing AgBr/BHPVP nanoparticles are particularly suitable to combat anaerobic cariogenic bacteria. By reason of the combined bactericidal effect of the contact-killing cationic polymers and the releasing-killing Ag + ions, AgBr/BHPVP-containing resin disks had potent bactericidal activity against S. mutans. The long-lasting antibacterial activity was also achieved through the sustained release of Ag + ions due to the core-shell structure of the nanocomposites. The results of macrophage cytotoxicity showed that the cell viability of dental resins loading less than 1.0 wt% AgBr/BHPVP was close to that of neat resins. The AgBr/BHPVP-containing dental resin with dual bactericidal capability and long term antimicrobial effect is a promising material aimed at preventing second caries and prolonging the longevity of resin composite restorations.

  11. Shear bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable composite resin for lithium disilicate-reinforced CAD/CAM ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Sancakli, Erkan; Eren, Meltem Mert; Ozel, Sevda; Yucel, Taner; Yildiz, Esra

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of different surface pretreatment techniques on the surface roughness and shear bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable composite resin for use with lithium disilicate-reinforced CAD/CAM ceramic material. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of one hundred thirty lithium disilicate CAD/CAM ceramic plates with dimensions of 6 mm × 4 mm and 3 mm thick were prepared. Specimens were then assigned into five groups (n=26) as follows: untreated control, coating with 30 µm silica oxide particles (Cojet™ Sand), 9.6% hydrofluoric acid etching, Er:YAG laser irradiation, and grinding with a high-speed fine diamond bur. A self-adhering flowable composite resin (Vertise Flow) was applied onto the pre-treated ceramic plates using the Ultradent shear bond Teflon mold system. Surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy. Shear bond strength test were performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Surface roughness data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD tests. Shear bond strength test values were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at α=.05. RESULTS Hydrofluoric acid etching and grinding with high-speed fine diamond bur produced significantly higher surface roughness than the other pretreatment groups (Presin used as repair composite resin exhibited very low bond strength irrespective of the surface pretreatments used. PMID:25551002

  12. Biokompatibilitas Gelas Ionomer Modifikasi Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Rotua Lestari M

    2008-01-01

    Saat ini banyak berkembang material baru dalam dunia kedokteran gigi diantaranya adalah Gelas ionomer modifikasi resin yang dikembangkan untuk mengatasi kekurangan-kekurangan dari gelas ionomer konvensional. Adanya penambahan monomer resin daIam bentuk 2-hydroxyethylmetacylate (HEMA) telah meningkatkan kekuatan dari bahan ini. Gelas ionomer modifikasi resin mempunyai sifat-sifat fisis dan mekanis yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan gelas ionomer konvensional. Gelas ionomer modifikasi ...

  13. Light Transmission of Novel CAD/CAM Materials and Their Influence on the Degree of Conversion of a Dual-curing Resin Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem; Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    To evaluate the light transmission characteristics of different types, shades, and thicknesses of novel CAD/CAM materials and their effect on the degree of conversion (DC) of a dual-curing resin cement. Square specimens (12 × 12 mm2) of three CAD/CAM materials - GC Cerasmart, Lava Ultimate, Vita Enamic - of different thicknesses (1.00, 1.50, and 2.00 mm, n = 5 per thickness) were irradiated with an LED unit. The amount of transmitted light was quantified. Thereafter, the DC% of the dual-curing resin cement (RelyX Ultimate) was recorded after 15 min using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey's HSD post-hoc test at a significance level of p light irradiation (p  0.05). Conversely, material thickness significantly affected light transmission (p light irradiation; p = 0.637 for DC). Linear regression analysis showed a correlation between delivered energy and DC% results of the Vita Enamic (R² = 0.4169, p light transmission in 2-mm-thick specimens of all CAD/CAM materials indicates that proper curing of the cement beneath CAD/CAM materials should be ensured.

  14. The effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser application on the micropush-out bond strength of fiber posts to resin core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Cengiz, Esra; Ozan, Oguz; Ramoglu, Serhat; Yilmaz, Hasan Guney

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, and garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser application to different surface treatments on the micropush-out bond strengths between glass and quartz fiber posts and composite resin core material. Different types of lasers have been used as an alternative to airborne particle abrasion and other surface treatment methods to enhance the bond strength of dental materials. However, there is no study regarding the use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser as a surface treatment method for fiber posts in order to improve the bond strength. Ninety-six quartz and 96 glass fiber posts with a coronal diameter of 1.8 mm were randomly divided into eight groups according the surface treatments applied. Gr 1 (control, no surface treatment), Gr 2 (sandblasting with 50 μm Al2O3), Gr 3 (9 % hydrofluoric acid for 1 min), Gr 4 (24% H2O2 for 1 min), Gr 5 (CH2Cl2 for 1 min), Gr 6 (1 W), Gr 7 (1.5 W), and Gr 8 (2 W) Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation. The resin core material was applied to each group, and then 1 mm thick discs (n=12) were obtained for the micropush-out test. Data were statistically analyzed. For the quartz fiber post group, all surface treatments showed significantly higher micropush-out bond strengths than the control group (pmaterial. However, the hydroflouric acid group showed the lowest bond strength values. The type of post and surface treatment might affect the bond strength between fiber posts and resin core material; 1 W and 1.5 W Er,Cr:YSGG laser application improved adhesion at the post/core interface.

  15. Influence of halogen irradiance on short- and long-term wear resistance of resin-based composite materials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bhamra, Gurcharn S

    2009-02-01

    The Oregon Health Science University (OHSU) four-chamber oral wear simulator was used to examine the impact of halogen irradiance on the short- and long-term wear behavior of four-methacrylate resin-based composites (RBCs). The hypothesis proposed was that exacerbated wear would occur following the long-term wear of RBCs irradiated under non-optimized irradiance conditions.

  16. Autoclave processing for composite material fabrication. 1: An analysis of resin flows and fiber compactions for thin laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    High quality long fiber reinforced composites, such as those used in aerospace and industrial applications, are commonly processed in autoclaves. An adequate resin flow model for the entire system (laminate/bleeder/breather), which provides a description of the time-dependent laminate consolidation process, is useful in predicting the loss of resin, heat transfer characteristics, fiber volume fraction and part dimension, etc., under a specified set of processing conditions. This could be accomplished by properly analyzing the flow patterns and pressure profiles inside the laminate during processing. A newly formulated resin flow model for composite prepreg lamination process is reported. This model considers viscous resin flows in both directions perpendicular and parallel to the composite plane. In the horizontal direction, a squeezing flow between two nonporous parallel plates is analyzed, while in the vertical direction, a poiseuille type pressure flow through porous media is assumed. Proper force and mass balances have been made and solved for the whole system. The effects of fiber-fiber interactions during lamination are included as well. The unique features of this analysis are: (1) the pressure gradient inside the laminate is assumed to be generated from squeezing action between two adjacent approaching fiber layers, and (2) the behavior of fiber bundles is simulated by a Finitely Extendable Nonlinear Elastic (FENE) spring.

  17. Shear bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable composite resin for lithium disilicate-reinforced CAD/CAM ceramic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ugur; Sancakli, Hande Sar; Sancakli, Erkan; Eren, Meltem Mert; Ozel, Sevda; Yucel, Taner; Yildiz, Esra

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of different surface pretreatment techniques on the surface roughness and shear bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable composite resin for use with lithium disilicate-reinforced CAD/CAM ceramic material. A total of one hundred thirty lithium disilicate CAD/CAM ceramic plates with dimensions of 6 mm × 4 mm and 3 mm thick were prepared. Specimens were then assigned into five groups (n=26) as follows: untreated control, coating with 30 µm silica oxide particles (Cojet™ Sand), 9.6% hydrofluoric acid etching, Er:YAG laser irradiation, and grinding with a high-speed fine diamond bur. A self-adhering flowable composite resin (Vertise Flow) was applied onto the pre-treated ceramic plates using the Ultradent shear bond Teflon mold system. Surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy. Shear bond strength test were performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Surface roughness data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD tests. Shear bond strength test values were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at α=.05. Hydrofluoric acid etching and grinding with high-speed fine diamond bur produced significantly higher surface roughness than the other pretreatment groups (Presin used as repair composite resin exhibited very low bond strength irrespective of the surface pretreatments used.

  18. A novel specimen-preparing method using epoxy resin as binding material for LIBS analysis of powder samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linli; Lin, Qingyu; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-11-01

    In view of the inevitable preprocessing of powder samples for LIBS detection, epoxy resin glue was investigated for the first time as a binder of powder samples due to its superior property of improved performance in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique as a quantitative analytical tool. For comparative studies of the epoxy resin and traditional polyethylene (PE) pellets in soil, sample detection, the signal intensities of Fe (I) at 404.58 nm, Ca (I) at 443.57 nm, and Cr (I) at 453.52 nm, were studied and subsequently, the calibration curves for these elements were constructed using the standard samples with variable concentrations. The signal intensities of epoxy resin samples were, on average, about 2 times greater than those obtained with the traditional PE pellet samples. Meanwhile, the resin samples showed better R square values of 0.981, 0.985 and 0.979 for curves of Fe (I) 404.58 nm, Ca (I) 443.57 nm, and Cr (I) 453.52 nm, compared to the 0.974, 0.950 and 0.934, of the PE pellet samples. Furthermore, the former represented lower limits of detection (LOD) for Fe, Ca and Cr. These experimental results indicated that this proposed novel method based on epoxy resin can attach samples of properties of high homogeneity, cohesiveness, smoothness and hardness, which are conducive to system stability, testing accuracy and signal enhancement. This method can make LIBS more practical in powder sample analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of silver-supported materials on the mechanical and antibacterial properties of reinforced acrylic resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Zhihui; Zhu, Bangshang; Chen, Rongrong; Huang, Zhuoli; Zhu, Cailian; Zhang, Xiuyin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The novel Novaron-nano-ZrO 2 –ABW/PMMA composites was synthesized. • Nano-ZrO 2 and ABWs could increase the mechanical behavior of this composites. • Novaron had synergistic effect to improve the composites mechanical property and the 4 wt% was the optimal proportion. • Novaron could improve the antibacterial properties through their direct contact with the bacteria. • The composites did not have an adverse affect on cell viability. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silver-supported material (Novaron (N)) in acrylic resin (poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)) composites, which reinforced with zirconium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-ZrO 2 ) and aluminum borate whiskers (ABWs), on the mechanical behavior, antibacterial properties and cytotoxicity. Silanized ABWs (4 wt%) and nano-ZrO 2 (2 wt%) were mixed with PMMA powder to obtain nano-ZrO 2 –ABW/PMMA matrices. Various amounts of Novaron particles were incorporated into the matrices and the pure PMMA to test the flexural strength. In addition, Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Canidia albicans (C. albicans) biofilms on the specimen surface and in the culture medium were investigated for metabolic activity and colony-forming units (CFUs). Extracts taken in the cell culture medium of the specimens were used to evaluate cell viability. Results showed that the silanized nano-ZrO 2 and ABWs could improve the flexural strength of composites compared with the pure PMMA. Novaron itself had no mechanical function for composites while it had synergistic effect when it mixed with silanized nano-ZrO 2 and ABWs. And when 4 wt% (N-4) Novaron mixed in nano-ZrO 2 –ABW/PMMA composites, flexural strength achieved an increase of 44%, getting the maximum value. For the antibacterial properties, the values of MTT and CFUs of S. mutans and C. albicans biofilms on the composites surface were greatly reduced (p < 0.05) with the higher proportion of Novaron, and no significant

  20. In vitro evaluation of topical fluoride pH and their effect on surface hardness of composite resin-based restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujeeb, Abdul; Mansuri, Samir; Hussain, Seema Abid; Ramaswamy, Kausar

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to correlate the pH and fluoride ion uptake with surface hardness of composite resin based restorative materials after topical fluoride application. Forty disks of each of test materials Composite (Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), Resin modified glass ionomer (Vitremer) and Compomer (Dyract AP) were made and ten disks of each material were placed in different test solutions - 1.23% APF gel, Sodium fluoride mouth rinse, 0.9% neutral fluoride and distilled water (Control group). After 36 hours of immersion, specimens were subjected to microhardness testing machine for evaluation of surface hardness. The greater hardness deterioration for all materials resulted with 1.23% APF gel when compared to the control group. Composite (Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) showed 17.13 VHN (control group 59.11 VHN). Vitremer showed 9.71 VHN (control group 37.71 VHN). Compomer showed 19.22 VHN (control group 36.78 VHN). 1.23% ApF gel significantly decreased hardness of composite, Vitremer and Compomer. Hardness deterioration associated with sodium fluoride mouth rinse and 0.9% neutral fluoride was less compared to 1.23% ApF gel.

  1. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of three resin based dual-cure core build-up materials: An In-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Gaurav; Narad, Aditi; Boruah, Lalit C; Rajkumar, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    The in-vitro study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three recently introduced dual-cure resin based core build-up materials namely ParaCore, FluoroCore, and MultiCore. One hundred twenty extracted permanent human mandibular molar teeth were taken and sectioned horizontally beneath the dentinoenamel junction to expose the coronal dentin. The specimens obtained were divided into three main groups based on the materials used and then further divided into four sub-groups based on time interval with ten samples each. The dentin surface was treated with the respective adhesives of the groups and then bulk filled with core build-up materials. The attained samples were than subjected to shear loading in Instron Universal Testing Machine. The data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's HSD, and Levene's test. The mean SBS was highest in MultiCore at all time periods as compared to FluoroCore and ParaCore and was also higher at 48 h thermocycling in all three groups studied. MultiCore dual-cure resin based core build-up material showed the highest mean SBS as compared to FluoroCore and ParaCore. SBS was not negatively affected by thermocycling.

  2. In Vitro Solubility and Wear Rates of Silorane and Dimethacrylate Resin Based Composite Restorative Materials under Different pH Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Tarek A; Tubaigy, Khalid M; Raffat, Eman M; Al-Agha, Ebaa I

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different pH solutions on the solubility and wear resistance of Silorane and dimethacrylate resin based composite restorative materials. Materials and Methods: Two different resin based restorative materials (Filtek Silorane P90 and hybrid composite Z100) were tested. Different pH solutions (2.5 and 5) also were used. A total of 60 samples of each type of selected composite were prepared. Specimens were immersed in each type of pH solutions (2.5 and 5) and distilled water as a control group for 24 h then the specimens was subjected to the required mechanical tests. Results: Significant statistical differences were observed regarding water solubility and wear values in different pH solutions. Filtek Silorane presented the smallest values of water solubility and wear values. Conclusion: Under tested experimental conditions, the pH solutions used in this study showed pronounced effect on water solubility and wear values of both two restorative materials. Finally, within the limitation of this study we recommended to use Filtek Silorane (P90) instead of hybrid (Z100) due to its low solubility values under different pH solutions. PMID:26225097

  3. The influence of resin flexural modulus on the magnitude of ceramic strengthening.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to determine the magnitude of ceramic resin-strengthening with resin-based materials with varying flexural moduli using a regression technique to assess the theoretical strengthening at a \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness. The hypothesis tested was that experimentally, increasing resin flexural modulus results in increased resin-strengthening observed at a theoretical \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness.

  4. Surface hardness evaluation of different composite resin materials: influence of sports and energy drinks immersion after a short-term period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Erdemir

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of sports and energy drinks on the surface hardness of different composite resin restorative materials over a 1-month period. Material and Methods: A total of 168 specimens: Compoglass F, Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, and Premise were prepared using a customized cylindrical metal mould and they were divided into six groups (N=42; n=7 per group. For the control groups, the specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C and the water was renewed daily. For the experimental groups, the specimens were immersed in 5 mL of one of the following test solutions: Powerade, Gatorade, X-IR, Burn, and Red Bull, for two minutes daily for up to a 1-month test period and all the solutions were refreshed daily. Surface hardness was measured using a Vickers hardness measuring instrument at baseline, after 1-week and 1-month. Data were statistically analyzed using Multivariate repeated measure ANOVA and Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests (α=0.05. Results: Multivariate repeated measures ANOVA revealed that there were statistically significant differences in the hardness of the restorative materials in different immersion times (p<0.001 in different solutions (p<0.001. The effect of different solutions on the surface hardness values of the restorative materials was tested using Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests, and it was observed that specimens stored in distilled water demonstrated statistically significant lower mean surface hardness reductions when compared to the specimens immersed in sports and energy drinks after a 1-month evaluation period (p<0.001. The compomer was the most affected by an acidic environment, whereas the composite resin materials were the least affected materials. Conclusions: The effect of sports and energy drinks on the surface hardness of a restorative material depends on the duration of exposure time, and the composition of the material.

  5. A new technology for separation and recovery of materials from waste printed circuit boards by dissolving bromine epoxy resins using ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, P.; Chen, Y.; Wang, L.Y.; Qian, G.Y.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► WPCBs were heated in [EMIM + ][BF 4 − ] for recovering solider at 240 °C. ► The bromine epoxy resins in WPCBs were all dissolved in [EMIM + ][BF 4 − ] at 260 °C. ► Used [EMIM + ][BF 4 − ] is treated by water to obtain regeneration. - Abstract: Recovery of valuable materials from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) is quite difficult because WPCBs is a heterogeneous mixture of polymer materials, glass fibers, and metals. In this study, WPCBs was treated using ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimizadolium tetrafluoroborate [EMIM + ][BF 4 − ]). Experimental results showed that the separation of the solders went to completion, and electronic components (ECs) were removed in WPCBs when [EMIM + ][BF 4 − ] solution containing WPCBs was heated to 240 °C. Meanwhile, metallographic observations verified that the WPCBs had an initial delamination. When the temperature increased to 260 °C, the separation of the WPCBs went to completion, and coppers and glass fibers were obtained. The used [EMIM + ][BF 4 − ] was treated by water to generate a solid–liquid suspension, which was separated completely to obtain solid residues by filtration. Thermal analyses combined with infrared ray spectra (IR) observed that the solid residues were bromine epoxy resins. NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) showed that hydrogen bond played an important role for [EMIM + ][BF 4 − ] dissolving bromine epoxy resins. This clean and non-polluting technology offers a new way to recycle valuable materials from WPCBs and prevent environmental pollution from WPCBs effectively.

  6. A new technology for separation and recovery of materials from waste printed circuit boards by dissolving bromine epoxy resins using ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P; Chen, Y; Wang, L Y; Qian, G Y; Zhou, M; Zhou, J

    2012-11-15

    Recovery of valuable materials from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) is quite difficult because WPCBs is a heterogeneous mixture of polymer materials, glass fibers, and metals. In this study, WPCBs was treated using ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimizadolium tetrafluoroborate [EMIM+][BF4-]). Experimental results showed that the separation of the solders went to completion, and electronic components (ECs) were removed in WPCBs when [EMIM+][BF4-] solution containing WPCBs was heated to 240 °C. Meanwhile, metallographic observations verified that the WPCBs had an initial delamination. When the temperature increased to 260 °C, the separation of the WPCBs went to completion, and coppers and glass fibers were obtained. The used [EMIM+][BF4-] was treated by water to generate a solid-liquid suspension, which was separated completely to obtain solid residues by filtration. Thermal analyses combined with infrared ray spectra (IR) observed that the solid residues were bromine epoxy resins. NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) showed that hydrogen bond played an important role for [EMIM+][BF4-] dissolving bromine epoxy resins. This clean and non-polluting technology offers a new way to recycle valuable materials from WPCBs and prevent environmental pollution from WPCBs effectively. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Phantom Torso model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Phantom Torso is a tissue-muscle plastic anatomical model of a torso and head. It contains over 350 radiation measuring devices to calculate the radiation that penetrates internal organs in space travel. The Phantom Torso is one of three radiation experiments in Expedition Two including the Borner Ball Neutron Detector and Dosimetric Mapping.

  8. Polymerization shrinkage stress of resin-based dental materials: A systematic review and meta-analyses of technique protocol and photo-activation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Meereis, Carine Tais Welter; de Oliveira da Rosa, Wellington Luiz; da Silva, Adriana Fernandes; Piva, Evandro

    2018-03-08

    A systematic review was conducted to determine whether there were any alternative technique or additional step strategies available to reduce and control polymerization shrinkage stress development in dental resin-based restorative materials. This report followed the PRISMA Statement. A total of 36 studies were included in this review. Two reviewers performed a literature search up to December 2016, without restriction of the year of publication, in seven databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, LILACS, IBECS, and BBO. Only in vitro studies that evaluated polymerization shrinkage stress by direct testing were included. Pilot studies, reviews and in vitro studies that evaluated polymerization shrinkage stress by indirect methods (e.g., microleakage or cuspal deflection measurements), finite elemental analysis or mathematical models were excluded. Of the 6.113 eligible articles, 36 studies were included in the qualitative analysis, and the meta-analysis was performed with 25 studies. A global comparison was performed with random-effects models (α = 0.05). The strategies were subdivided as follows: the use of an alternative technique protocol of placing the material inside the tooth cavity; the modification of the irradiation intensity or total energy delivered to the material; the use of an alternative light-curing source; or the use of an alternative photo-activation mode. All alternative strategies showed statistically significant differences when compared with their respective controls (p material by means of an alternative technique protocol or by modifying the irradiant intensity or total energy delivered to the material during photo-activation. Moreover, the use of an alternative photo-activation mode (intermittent light, exponential, soft-start or pulse delay modes) was shown to be an effective strategy for reducing and controlling stress development in resin-based dental materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of ceramic material and resin cement systems on the color stability of laminate veneers after accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Min; Choi, Yu-Sung

    2018-01-05

    Laminate veneers are susceptible to color change during clinical service. Studies that compare the effects of different ceramic and resin cement systems on color stability are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the color stability of laminate veneers after accelerated aging using different ceramic and resin cement systems. Ceramic specimens (N=168; shade A1; thickness, 0.50 ±0.05 mm; diameter, 10.00 ±0.10 mm) were prepared using nanofluorapatite and lithium disilicate (high translucency [HT] to low translucency [LT]) ceramics. Light-polymerizing (LP) cements were classified by brightness (high or low). Dual-polymerizing cements were classified by composition (base-only [DB] or base-catalyst [DC]) for comparison of color stability on the basis of polymerization type. DB cement was light-polymerizing, whereas DC cement was dual-polymerizing. They were further classified by shade (transparent, white, or yellow [n=7, each]). Color difference (ΔE) values were obtained by spectrophotometric quantification of L* (lightness), a* (green-red), and b* (blue-yellow) values before and after aging. The Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon signed rank, and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used for statistical analysis. After specimens were subjected to accelerated aging, HT ceramic specimens luted with yellow-shade DC cement exhibited the greatest color change (ΔE=2.11), whereas HT and LT ceramic specimens luted with low-brightness LP cement exhibited the least color change (ΔE=1.37). In HT ceramic specimens, which exhibited the greatest color change of the 3 ceramic types, transparent shade cement exhibited significantly lower ΔE values than the other shades with DB (Pceramics. The ΔE values of DB cement were not always lower than those of DC cement. For all specimens, the aging of laminate veneers decreased the L* values and increased the a* and b* values. Ceramic and resin-cement systems affected the color stability of laminate veneers

  10. Evaluation of the color durability of acrylic resin veneer materials after immersion in common beverages at different time intervals: A spectrophotometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Kohli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proper function, esthetics, and cost are the prime factors to be considered while selecting bridge veneering materials. The purpose of the study is to evaluate color durability of acrylic veneer materials after immersion in common beverages at different time intervals. Methods: Spectrophotometer was used for taking color measurements based on the transmission of light through the specimens made of the selected materials which were Tooth moulding powder (DPI and Acrylux (Ruthinium. Thirty specimens of standardized dimensions were prepared from each material. The specimens were divided into three groups of 10 each. One group of each material was immersed in tea (TajMahal and another group of each material in cola (Pepsi as the staining solutions. The remaining group of 10 from each material served as control and was stored in distilled water. Color measurements were obtained pre-immersion, and after 1, 15, and 30 days of immersion. Results: Tooth moulding powder displayed better color durability than Acrylux over the 1 month immersion period in both staining solutions. Tea resulted in more discoloration compared to cola (Pepsi. Conclusion: The difference in the color durability of Acrylux and Tooth moulding powder may be attributed to the differences in the composition of tested resin veneering materials, i.e. their polar properties, which contribute to the absorption of staining solution, and the different brands and the strengths of the solutions.

  11. Investigation of porous graphitic carbon for triterpenoids and natural resinous materials analysis by high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhourri-Frih, B; Chaimbault, P; Dequeral, D; André, P; Lafosse, M

    2012-06-01

    Natural resinous materials are mainly composed of pentacyclic triterpenes which exhibit a large number of interesting medicinal activities. However, the presence of numerous isomers within the active substances makes their screening by HPLC very challenging. Porous graphitic carbon was investigated as stationary phase to achieve triterpenes isomers separation. The influence of various parameters (temperature, formic acid concentration and mobile phase composition) on the retention was considered. A usual decrease of the retention of triterpenes was observed with the increase of the temperature. Therefore, separation in resinous materials was performed at 25°C. Acetonitrile-isopropanol mixture was chosen as mobile phase in gradient elution and leads to the best compromise between efficiency and high resolution. The lack of chromophore groups in the pentacyclic triterpenes structures required the use of mass spectrometry detection. Moreover, atmospheric pressure photo-ionisation mass spectrometry prevents compounds fragmentation which was helpful for spectra interpretation and compounds identification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Potentiometric Sensors for Pr(III Based on N-N᾽o-Phenylene-bis(salicylideneimine Using Epoxy Resin and PVC as Binding Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma Harish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Praseodymium(III ion selective electrodes have been prepared using N-N᾽o-phenylene-bis(salicylideneimine as a suitable electro-active material. Several membranes comprising of varying compositions of electro-active material with epoxy resin and polyvinylchloride (PVC as binding materials were prepared. However the one with composition 50% Schiff᾽s base and 50% binder was found to exhibit best performance. The sensor with epoxy resin as binder presents a linear dynamic range of 1.0×10-6 to 1.0×10-1 M with a Nernstian slope of 19.9 mV/decade. The sensor has a quick response time. (less than 10 s. The reproducibility of the electrode is about 6 months without any considerable, noticeable potential divergence. The sensor is effective in pH range of 3.00-8.62. In case of PVC as binding material; the results are compared for same composition of electro-active material. The sensor presents a linear dynamic range of 1.0×10-6 to 1.0×10-1 M with a slope of 14.0 mV/decade. The response time of the sensor is found to be 20s with a reproducibility of 4 months. The sensor is effective in pH range of 2.97-8.90. Effect of internal solution was studied and both the electrodes could satisfactorily be used in partially non-aqueous medium. Selectivity coefficients for both the electrodes have been determined by FIM (fixed interference method with respect to many rare earth metal ions, alkali & alkaline earth metal ions and some transition metal ions. Both the electrodes were successfully employed as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Pr(III ions with oxalic acid and EDTA.

  13. Influence of different surface treatments on the short-term bond strength and durability between a zirconia post and a composite resin core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgungor, Gokhan; Sen, Deniz; Aydin, Murat

    2008-05-01

    Reliable bonding between zirconia posts and composite resin core materials is difficult to achieve because of the smooth surface texture and lack of silica content of zirconia posts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the short-term bond strength and durability between a zirconia post and a composite resin core material. Eighty zirconia posts were divided into 4 groups (n=20). Specimens received 1 of 4 different surface treatments: group AIRB, airborne-particle abrasion; group TSC-SIL, tribochemical silica coating (CoJet system) and silanization (ESPE Sil); group AIRB-BSIL, airborne-particle abrasion and MDP-containing primer (Clearfil SE Bond Primer)/silane coupling agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator) mixture application; and group TSC-BSIL, tribochemical silica coating and MDP-containing primer/silane coupling agent mixture application. Average surface roughness (Ra) of zirconia posts produced by airborne-particle abrasion or silica coating was measured using an optical profilometer. Composite resin core foundations (Build-it FR) were formed using transparent acrylic resin tubes (12mm in length and 7mm in diameter). Each group was further divided into 2 subgroups of 10 specimens and stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C, either for 24 hours or for 150 days with 37,500 thermal cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, with a dwell time of 30 seconds. Following water storage, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 2-mm-thick post-and-core specimens under water cooling. Push-out tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. Debonded post surfaces were examined with SEM. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (alpha=0.05). No significant differences were detected between the Ra values of airborne-particle-abraded and silica-coated specimens (P=.781). The short-term mean bond strengths for

  14. Head phantoms for transcranial focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Matthew D C; Farnum, Mercy; Khaled, Mohamad; Elias, W Jeff; Hananel, Arik; Snell, John W; Kassell, Neal F; Aubry, Jean-Francois

    2015-04-01

    In the ongoing endeavor of fine-tuning, the clinical application of transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound (tcMRgFUS), ex-vivo studies wlkiith whole human skulls are of great use in improving the underlying technology guiding the accurate and precise thermal ablation of clinically relevant targets in the human skull. Described here are the designs, methods for fabrication, and notes on utility of three different ultrasound phantoms to be used for brain focused ultrasound research. Three different models of phantoms are developed and tested to be accurate, repeatable experimental options to provide means to further this research. The three models are a cadaver, a gel-filled skull, and a head mold containing a skull and filled with gel that mimics the brain and the skin. Each was positioned in a clinical tcMRgFUS system and sonicated at 1100 W (acoustic) for 12 s at different locations. Maximum temperature rise as measured by MR thermometry was recorded and compared against clinical data for a similar neurosurgical target. Results are presented as heating efficiency in units (°C/kW/s) for direct comparison to available clinical data. The procedure for casting thermal phantom material is presented. The utility of each phantom model is discussed in the context of various tcMRgFUS research areas. The cadaveric phantom model, gel-filled skull model, and full head phantom model had heating efficiencies of 5.3, 4.0, and 3.9 °C/(kW/s), respectively, compared to a sample clinical heating efficiency of 2.6 °C/(kW/s). In the seven research categories considered, the cadaveric phantom model was the most versatile, though less practical compared to the ex-vivo skull-based phantoms. Casting thermal phantom material was shown to be an effective way to prepare tissue-mimicking material for the phantoms presented. The phantom models presented are all useful in tcMRgFUS research, though some are better suited to a limited subset of applications depending on the researchers

  15. Application of resin lining system for countermeasures for preventing leakage from openings in low temperature materials storage; Teion busshitsu chozoji no ekimore oyobi reiki more taisaku toshite no kobunshikei zairyo no tekiyosei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Y. [Ehime Univ., Ehime (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Seki, S.

    1996-12-21

    Recently, many of the low temperature materials such as LNG and LPG used as an energy substitution for petroleum were stored in the reclaimed land of the sea side district, however, it is necessary for those storage methods to enlarge sites. Therefore, it was considered to directly store the low temperature materials in openings excavated in the rock mountains. However, countermeasures for leakage of liquid and cold gas from cracks in openings would be an important subject. In this study, as a countermeasure for leakage of liquid and cold gas in the case in which low temperature materials were stored in openings in the rock mountains, the lining of resin materials on the surface of openings was proposed. Characteristics of strength and deformation and values of the thermal physical properties for the resin materials at the low temperature were obtained by experiments. This material was compared with granite supposed as a parent rock, and the thermal property of the resin materials was understood. Next, an analysis was conducted in the case of using the resin materials as a lining, the behavior of the surrounding rocks of the openings and the stability of the lining were investigated. 17 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Influence of 2% chlorhexidine on pH, calcium release and setting time of a resinous MTA-based root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacinto, Rogério Castilho; Linhares-Farina, Giane; Sposito, Otávio da Silva; Zanchi, César Henrique; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    The addition of chlorhexidine (CHX) to a resinous experimental Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (E-MTA) based root-end filling material is an alternative to boost its antimicrobial activity. However, the influence of chlorhexidine on the properties of this material is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2% chlorhexidine on the pH, calcium ion release and setting time of a Bisphenol A Ethoxylate Dimethacrylate/Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (Bis-EMA/MTA) based dual-cure experimental root-end filling material (E-MTA), in comparison with E-MTA without the addition of CHX and with conventional white MTA (W-MTA). The materials were placed in polyethylene tubes, and immersed in deionized water to determine pH (digital pH meter) and calcium ion release (atomic absorption spectrometry technique). The setting time of each material was analyzed using Gilmore needles. The data were statistically analyzed at a significance level of 5%. E-MTA + CHX showed an alkaline pH in the 3 h period of evaluation, the alkalinity of which decreased but remained as such for 15 days. The pH of E-MTA + CHX was higher than the other two materials after 7 days, and lower after 30 days (p pH and calcium ion release. However, it also prevented setting of the material.

  17. Rapid prototyping of biomimetic vascular phantoms for hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Jianting; Melchiorri, Anthony J.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Mathews, Scott A.; Coburn, James C.; Sorg, Brian S.; Chen, Yu; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2015-12-01

    The emerging technique of rapid prototyping with three-dimensional (3-D) printers provides a simple yet revolutionary method for fabricating objects with arbitrary geometry. The use of 3-D printing for generating morphologically biomimetic tissue phantoms based on medical images represents a potentially major advance over existing phantom approaches. Toward the goal of image-defined phantoms, we converted a segmented fundus image of the human retina into a matrix format and edited it to achieve a geometry suitable for printing. Phantoms with vessel-simulating channels were then printed using a photoreactive resin providing biologically relevant turbidity, as determined by spectrophotometry. The morphology of printed vessels was validated by x-ray microcomputed tomography. Channels were filled with hemoglobin (Hb) solutions undergoing desaturation, and phantoms were imaged with a near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging system. Additionally, a phantom was printed incorporating two disjoint vascular networks at different depths, each filled with Hb solutions at different saturation levels. Light propagation effects noted during these measurements-including the influence of vessel density and depth on Hb concentration and saturation estimates, and the effect of wavelength on vessel visualization depth-were evaluated. Overall, our findings indicated that 3-D-printed biomimetic phantoms hold significant potential as realistic and practical tools for elucidating light-tissue interactions and characterizing biophotonic system performance.

  18. Analysis of resin-dentin interface morphology and bond strength evaluation of core materials for one stage post-endodontic restorations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Bitter

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Restoration of endodontically treated teeth using fiber posts in a one-stage procedure gains more popularity and aims to create a secondary monoblock. Data of detailed analyses of so called "post-and-core-systems" with respect to morphological characteristics of the resin-dentin interface in combination with bond strength measurements of fiber posts luted with these materials are scarce. The present study aimed to analyze four different post-and-core-systems with two different adhesive approaches (self-etch and etch-and-rinse. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human anterior teeth (n = 80 were endodontically treated and post space preparations and post placement were performed using the following systems: Rebilda Post/Rebilda DC/Futurabond DC (Voco (RB, Luxapost/Luxacore Z/Luxabond Prebond and Luxabond A+B (DMG (LC, X Post/Core X Flow/XP Bond and Self Cure Activator (Dentsply DeTrey (CX, FRC Postec/MultiCore Flow/AdheSE DC (Ivoclar Vivadent (MC. Adhesive systems and core materials of 10 specimens per group were labeled using fluorescent dyes and resin-dentin interfaces were analyzed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM. Bond strengths were evaluated using a push-out test. Data were analyzed using repeated measurement ANOVA and following post-hoc test. RESULTS: CLSM analyses revealed significant differences between groups with respect to the factors hybrid layer thickness (p<0.0005 and number of resin tags (p = 0.02; ANOVA. Bond strength was significantly affected by core material (p = 0.001, location inside the root canal (p<0.0005 and incorporation of fluorescent dyes (p = 0.036; ANOVA. CX [7.7 (4.4 MPa] demonstrated significantly lower bond strength compared to LC [14.2 (8.7 MPa] and RB [13.3 (3.7 MPa] (p<0.05; Tukey HSD but did not differ significantly from MC [11.5 (3.5 MPa]. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that bond strengths inside the root canal were not affected by the adhesive approach of the post-and-core-system. All systems

  19. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Mayank; Amarnath, G S; Muddugangadhar, B C; Swetha, M U; Das, Kopal Anshuraj Ashok Kumar

    2014-04-01

    The condition of the denture bearing tissues may be adversely affected by high stress concentration during function. Chairside Denture (Hard and Soft) reliners are used to distribute forces applied to soft tissues during function. Tensile and shear bond strength has been shown to be dependent on their chemical composition. A weak bond could harbor bacteria, promote staining and delamination of the lining material. To investigate tensile and shear bond strength of 4 different commercially available denture relining materials to conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin. 4 mm sections in the middle of 160 Acrylic cylindrical specimens (20 mm x 8 mm) were removed, packed with test materials (Mollosil, G C Reline Soft, G C Reline Hard (Kooliner) and Ufi Gel Hard and polymerized. Specimens were divided into 8 groups of 20 each. Tensile and shear bond strength to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin were examined by Instron Universal Tensile Testing Machine using the equation F=N/A (F-maximum force exerted on the specimen (Newton) and A-bonding area= 50.24 mm2). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Bonferroni Test and Hsu's MCB for multiple pairwise comparisons to asses any significant differences between the groups. The highest mean Tensile bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (6.49+0.08 MPa) and lowest for G C Reline Soft (0.52+0.01 MPa). The highest mean Shear bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (16.19+0.1 MPa) and lowest for Mollosil (0.59+0.05 MPa). The Benferroni test showed a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength and the mean shear bond strength when the two denture soft liners were compared as well as when the two denture hard liners were compared. Hsu's MCB implied that Ufi gel hard is better than its other closest competitors. The Tensile and Shear bond strength values of denture soft reliners were significantly lower than denture hard reliners. How to cite the

  20. Thermal Response and Stability Characteristics of Bistable Composite Laminates by Considering Temperature Dependent Material Properties and Resin Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M.; Ziaei-Rad, S.; Salehi, H.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the stability characteristics and thermal response of a bistable composite plate with different asymmetric composition were considered. The non-linear finite element method (FEM) was utilized to determine the response of the laminate. Attention was focused on the temperature dependency of laminate mechanical properties, especially on the thermal expansion coefficients of the composite graphite-epoxy plate. Also the effect of including the resin layers on the stability characteristics of the laminate was investigated. The effect of the temperature on the laminate cured configurations in the range of 25°C to 180°C and -60°C to 40°C was examined. The results indicate that the coefficient of thermal expansions has a major effect on the cured shapes. Next, optical microscopy was used to characterize the laminate composition and for the first time the effect of including the resin layers on the actuation loads that causes snapping behavior between two stable shapes was studied. The results obtained from the finite element simulations were compared with experimental results and a good correlation was obtained. Finally, the stability characteristics of a tapered composite panel were investigated for using in a sample winglet as a candidate application of bistable structures.

  1. Phantom limb pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limb is still there. This is called phantom sensation. You may feel: Pain in your limb even though it is physically not there Tingly Prickly Numb Hot or cold Like your missing toes or fingers are moving ...

  2. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  3. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, conventional resin cements (coupled with etch and rinse or self-etch adhesives showed better shear strength values compared to self-adhesive resin cements. Furthermore, conventional resin cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values of adhesion.

  4. Recycling of plastic group composite materials. 3. ; Current situation in recycling of thermosetting resin composite materials in Japan, Europe and America. Plastic ki fukugo zairyo no recycle. 3. ; Netsukokasei jushi fukugo zairyo no recycle no Nichiobei no genjo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iimori, H. (Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-15

    This paper describes the current situation in Japan, Europe and America on recycling of thermosetting resin composite materials, and material treatment and resource re-utilization with emphasis on FRP. Land reclamation would become impossible eventually as a result of difficulty in land procurement, soil contamination, and residents' objection. Pulverization consists of a flow comprising disassembling, cutting, crushing, pulverization, and classification. Pyrolysis heats materials in steam, oxygen-free or low-oxygen atmosphere to recover combustible gases, oils, and resin material solids. Incineration requires incinerator designs that take into account incinerator damages due to black smoke and molten glassfibers. Japan, Europe, and America which have common environmental and legislative regulation issues have begun researches simultaneously. Europe has advanced with pulverization systems in reaching practical use levels, and North America has been using the systems practically. The pyrolytic means are in a feasibility study phase. The issue of the car scrapping law in Germany is inevitable to become a common problem for the EC countries. The automobile industries in North America have been working on technical development under joint investments. Treatment technologies in Japan have nearly reached the levels in Europe and America. Responses to structural change requirements from consumption type to environmental protection type are required. 14 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  6. The effects of silane-SiO2 nanocomposite films on Candida albicans adhesion and the surface and physical properties of acrylic resin denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yodmongkol, Sirasa; Chantarachindawong, Rojcharin; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Amornsakchai, Taweechai; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2014-12-01

    Polysiloxane has been used as a coupling material in restorative dental materials for several decades. However, few studies are available on the application of polysiloxane in other dental prosthesis functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of silane-SiO2 nanocomposite films on Candida albicans adhesion and the surface and physical properties of acrylic resin denture base materials. Specimens were separated into 2 groups, uncoated and coated. They were coated with a film by using the dip-coating method. Specimens were incubated with Candida albicans 10(7) cells/mL for 1 hour, and the adherent cells were counted under an optical microscope. The following surface properties were measured: surface chemical composition with Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, surface roughness with a surface profiler, surface energy with the sessile drop method, and surface hardness with a microhardness tester. The physical properties, including water sorption, water solubility, ultimate flexural strength, and flexural modulus, were evaluated according to International Organization for Standardization 20795-1 requirements. The adhesion of Candida albicans and the surface properties of the specimens were investigated after cleaning with effervescent tablets and brushing. An MTT assay was used to evaluate the coated specimens. The results were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). A significant reduction in Candida albicans adhesion (P=.002) was observed before cleaning. In addition, the surface energy was comparable (P=.100), the surface hardness increased significantly (P=.008), and the surface roughness remained unchanged (P=.310). After cleaning with effervescent tablets, a significant decrease in Candida albicans adhesion (P=.002) and in surface roughness (P=.008) was observed; however, similar surface energies were measured (P=.100). After cleaning with a toothbrush, the adhesion of Candida albicans was significantly higher on

  7. Influence of 2% chlorhexidine on pH, calcium release and setting time of a resinous MTA-based root-end filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Castilho JACINTO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of chlorhexidine (CHX to a resinous experimental Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (E-MTA based root-end filling material is an alternative to boost its antimicrobial activity. However, the influence of chlorhexidine on the properties of this material is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2% chlorhexidine on the pH, calcium ion release and setting time of a Bisphenol A Ethoxylate Dimethacrylate/Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (Bis-EMA/MTA based dual-cure experimental root-end filling material (E-MTA, in comparison with E-MTA without the addition of CHX and with conventional white MTA (W-MTA. The materials were placed in polyethylene tubes, and immersed in deionized water to determine pH (digital pH meter and calcium ion release (atomic absorption spectrometry technique. The setting time of each material was analyzed using Gilmore needles. The data were statistically analyzed at a significance level of 5%. E-MTA + CHX showed an alkaline pH in the 3 h period of evaluation, the alkalinity of which decreased but remained as such for 15 days. The pH of E-MTA + CHX was higher than the other two materials after 7 days, and lower after 30 days (p < 0.05. All of the materials were found to release calcium ions throughout the 30 days of the study. The addition of CHX increased the calcium ion release of E-MTA to levels statistically similar to W-MTA. E-MTA showed shorter initial and final setting time, compared with W-MTA (p < 0.05. The addition of 2% CHX to MTA prevented setting of the material. The addition of CHX to E-MTA increased its pH and calcium ion release. However, it also prevented setting of the material.

  8. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  9. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  10. Evaluation of the bond strength of different adhesive agents to a resin-modified calcium silicate material (TheraCal LC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadas, Muhammed; Cantekin, Kenan; Gumus, Husniye; Ateş, Sabit Melih; Duymuş, Zeynep Yesil

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of different adhesive agents to TheraCal LC and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and examined the morphologic changes of these materials with different surface treatments. A total of 120 specimens, 60 of MTA Angelus (AMTA), and 60 of TheraCal LC, were prepared and divided into six subgroups according to the adhesive agent used; these agents included Scotchbond Multipurpose, Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil Protect Bond, Clearfil S 3 Bond, OptiBond All-in-One, and G-aenial Bond. After application of adhesive agents, Filtek Z250 composite resin was placed onto the specimens. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, followed by examination of the fractured surfaces. The surface changes of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance. Although no significant differences were found among the bond strengths of different adhesives to AMTA (p = 0.69), a significant difference was found in terms of bond strengths of different adhesives to the TheraCal LC surface (p TheraCal LC compared to the bond with other adhesives. TheraCal LC bonded significantly more strongly than AMTA regardless of the adhesive agents tested. Resin-modified calcium silicate showed higher bond strength than AMTA in terms of the composite bond to these materials with different bonding systems. On the other hand, the highest shear bond-strength values were found for composite bonds with the combination of TheraCal LC and the total-etch adhesive system. SCANNING 38:403-411, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Surface hardness evaluation of different composite resin materials: influence of sports and energy drinks immersion after a short-term period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ugur; Yildiz, Esra; Eren, Meltem Mert; Ozel, Sevda

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of sports and energy drinks on the surface hardness of different composite resin restorative materials over a 1-month period. A total of 168 specimens: Compoglass F, Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, and Premise were prepared using a customized cylindrical metal mould and they were divided into six groups (N=42; n=7 per group). For the control groups, the specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C and the water was renewed daily. For the experimental groups, the specimens were immersed in 5 mL of one of the following test solutions: Powerade, Gatorade, X-IR, Burn, and Red Bull, for two minutes daily for up to a 1-month test period and all the solutions were refreshed daily. Surface hardness was measured using a Vickers hardness measuring instrument at baseline, after 1-week and 1-month. Data were statistically analyzed using Multivariate repeated measure ANOVA and Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests (α=0.05). Multivariate repeated measures ANOVA revealed that there were statistically significant differences in the hardness of the restorative materials in different immersion times (psports and energy drinks after a 1-month evaluation period (psports and energy drinks on the surface hardness of a restorative material depends on the duration of exposure time, and the composition of the material.

  12. Deformable and durable phantoms with controlled density of scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisaillon, Charles-Etienne; Lamouche, Guy; Dufour, Marc; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre [Industrial Materials Institute, National Research Council Canada, 75 de Mortagne, Boucherville, Quebec J4B 6Y4 (Canada); Maciejko, Romain [Optoelectronics Laboratory, Engineering Physics, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, PO Box 6079, Station ' Centre-ville' Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada)], E-mail: charles-etienne.bisaillon@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca, E-mail: guy.lamouche@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca, E-mail: marc.dufour@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca, E-mail: jean-pierre.monchalin@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca, E-mail: romain.maciejko@polytml.ca

    2008-07-07

    We have developed deformable and durable optical tissue phantoms with a simple and well-defined microstructure including a novel combination of scatterers and a matrix material. These were developed for speckle and elastography investigations in optical coherence tomography, but should prove useful in many other fields. We present in detail the fabrication process which involves embedding silica microspheres in a silicone matrix. We also characterize the resulting phantoms with scanning electron microscopy and optical measurements. To our knowledge, no such phantoms were proposed in the literature before. Our technique has a wide range of applicability and could also be adapted to fabricate phantoms with various optical and mechanical properties. (note)

  13. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  14. Influence of Manufacturing Processes on the Performance of Phantom Lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Chest counting is an important tool for estimating the radiation dose to individuals who have inhaled radioactive materials. Chest counting systems are calibrated by counting the activity in the lungs of phantoms where the activity in the phantom lungs is known. In the United States a commonly used calibration phantom was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is referred to as the Livermore Torso Phantom. An important feature of this phantom is that the phantom lungs can be interchanged so that the counting system can be challenged by different combinations of radionuclides and activity. Phantom lungs are made from lung tissue substitutes whose constituents are foaming plastics and various adjuvants selected to make the lung tissue substitute similar to normal healthy lung tissue. Some of the properties of phantom lungs cannot be readily controlled by phantom lung manufacturers. Some, such as density, are a complex function of the manufacturing process, while others, such as elemental composition of the bulk plastic are controlled by the plastics manufacturer without input, or knowledge of the phantom manufacturer. Despite the fact that some of these items cannot be controlled, they can be measured and accounted for. This report describes how manufacturing processes can influence the performance of phantom lungs. It is proposed that a metric that describes the brightness of the lung be employed by the phantom lung manufacturer to determine how well the phantom lung approximates the characteristics of a human lung. For many purposes, the linear attenuation of the lung tissue substitute is an appropriate surrogate for the brightness

  15. A comprehensive study of soft magnetic materials based on FeSi spheres and polymeric resin modified by silica nanorods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strečková, M.; Füzer, J.; Kobera, Libor; Brus, Jiří; Fáberová, M.; Bureš, R.; Kollár, P.; Lauda, M.; Medvecký, L.; Girman, V.; Hadraba, Hynek; Baťková, M.; Baťko, I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 147, č. 3 (2014), s. 649-660 ISSN 0254-0584 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : composite materials * magnetic materials * chemical synthesis Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass (UFM-A) Impact factor: 2.259, year: 2014

  16. Nanosilica Modification of Elastomer-Modified VARTM Epoxy Resins for Improved Resin and Composite Toughness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinette, Jason; Bujanda, Andres; DeSchepper, Daniel; Dibelka, Jessica; Costanzo, Philip; Jensen, Robert; McKnight, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Recent publications have reported a synergy between rubber and silica in modified epoxy resins that results in significantly improved fracture toughness without reductions in other material properties...

  17. A novel and facile strategy for highly flame retardant polymer foam composite materials: Transforming silicone resin coating into silica self-extinguishing layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Li; Li, Shi-Neng; Wu, Lian-Bin; Jiang, Jian-Xiong; Tang, Long-Cheng

    2017-08-15

    In this study, a novel strategy was developed to fabricate highly flame retardant polymer foam composite materials coated by synthesized silicone resin (SiR) polymer via a facile dip-coating processing. Applying the SiR polymer coating, the mechanical property and thermal stability of SiR-coated polymer foam (PSiR) composites are greatly enhanced without significantly altering their structure and morphology. The minimum oxygen concentration to support the combustion of foam materials is greatly increased, i.e. from LOI 14.6% for pure foam to LOI 26-29% for the PSiR composites studied. Especially, adjusting pendant group to SiOSi group ratio (R/Si ratio) of SiRs produces highly flame retardant PSiR composites with low smoke toxicity. Cone calorimetry results demonstrate that 44-68% reduction in the peak heat release rate for the PSiR composites containing different R/Si ratios over pure foam is achieved by the presence of appropriate SiR coating. Digital and SEM images of post-burn chars indicate that the SiR polymer coating can be transformed into silica self-extinguishing porous layer as effective inorganic barrier effect, thus preserving the polymer foam structure from fire. Our results show that the SiR dip-coating technique is a promising strategy for producing flame retardant polymer foam composite materials with improved mechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface hardness evaluation of different composite resin materials: influence of sports and energy drinks immersion after a short-term period

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERDEMİR, Ugur; YİLDİZ, Esra; EREN, Meltem Mert; OZEL, Sevda

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of sports and energy drinks on the surface hardness of different composite resin restorative materials over a 1-month period. Material and Methods: A total of 168 specimens: Compoglass F, Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, and Premise were prepared using a customized cylindrical metal mould and they were divided into six groups (N=42; n=7 per group). For the control groups, the specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37º C and the water was renewed daily. For the experimental groups, the specimens were immersed in 5 mL of one of the following test solutions: Powerade, Gatorade, X-IR, Burn, and Red Bull, for two minutes daily for up to a 1-month test period and all the solutions were refreshed daily. Surface hardness was measured using a Vickers hardness measuring instrument at baseline, after 1-week and 1-month. Data were statistically analyzed using Multivariate repeated measure ANOVA and Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests (α=0.05). Results: Multivariate repeated measures ANOVA revealed that there were statistically significant differences in the hardness of the restorative materials in different immersion times (phardness values of the restorative materials was tested using Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests, and it was observed that specimens stored in distilled water demonstrated statistically significant lower mean surface hardness reductions when compared to the specimens immersed in sports and energy drinks after a 1-month evaluation period (phardness of a restorative material depends on the duration of exposure time, and the composition of the material. PMID:23739850

  19. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study...

  20. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin. Part II: Material properties and clinical features of non-metal clasp dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo

    2014-01-01

    This position paper reviews physical and mechanical properties of thermoplastic resin usedfor non-metal clasp dentures, and describes feature of each thermoplastic resin in clinicalapplication of non-metal clasp dentures and complications based on clinical experience ofexpert panels. Since products of thermoplastic resin have great variability in physical andmechanical properties, clinicians should utilize them with careful consideration of thespecific properties of each product. In general, ...

  1. The effects of material loading and flow rate on the disinfection of pathogenic microorganisms using cation resin-silver nanoparticle filter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpenyana-Monyatsi, L.; Mthombeni, N. H.; Onyango, M. S.; Momba, M. N. B.

    2017-08-01

    Waterborne diseases have a negative impact on public health in instances where the available drinking water is of a poor quality. Decentralised systems are needed to provide safe drinking water to rural communities. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop and investigate the point-of-use (POU) water treatment filter packed with resin-coated silver nanoparticles. The filter performance was evaluated by investigating the effects of various bed masses (10 g, 15 g, 20 g) and flow rates (2 mL/min, 5 mL/min, 10 mL/min) by means of breakthrough curves for the removal efficiency of presumptive Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio cholerae from spiked groundwater samples. The results revealed that, as the bed mass increases the breakthrough time also increases with regards to all targeted microorganisms. However, when the flow rate increases the breakthrough time decreased. These tests demonstrated that resin-coated silver nanoparticle can be an effective material in removing all targeted microorganisms at 100% removal efficiency before breakthrough points are achieved. Moreover the filter system demonstrated that it is capable of producing 15 L/day of treated water at an operating condition of 10 mL/min flow rate and 15 g bed mass, which is sufficient to provide for seven individuals in the household if they consume 2 L/person/day for drinking purpose. Therefore, the bed mass of the filter system should be increased in order for it to produce sufficient water that will conform to the daily needs of an individual.

  2. NOTE: A dynamic optical imaging phantom based on an array of semiconductor diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Correia, Teresa; Khakoo, Imran; Gibson, Adam P.; Everdell, N. L.

    2008-11-01

    An electrically-activated phantom for evaluating diffuse optical imaging systems has been designed based on an array of semiconductor diodes which are used to heat a thermochromic dye embedded in a solidified polyester resin with tissue-like optical properties. The array allows individual diodes to be addressed sequentially, thus simulating the movement of a small volume of contrasting optical absorption. Two designs of diode-array phantom are described and results of imaging experiments are presented.

  3. A dynamic optical imaging phantom based on an array of semiconductor diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebden, Jeremy C; Correia, Teresa; Khakoo, Imran; Gibson, Adam P; Everdell, N L [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-07

    An electrically-activated phantom for evaluating diffuse optical imaging systems has been designed based on an array of semiconductor diodes which are used to heat a thermochromic dye embedded in a solidified polyester resin with tissue-like optical properties. The array allows individual diodes to be addressed sequentially, thus simulating the movement of a small volume of contrasting optical absorption. Two designs of diode-array phantom are described and results of imaging experiments are presented. (note)

  4. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  5. Karakteristik Komposit Resin Berkemampuan Mengalir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Irawan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of resin composites as posterior restoratives has markedly increased over the past decade. The patients demand for better esthetics, concerns related to possible mercury toxicity from amalgam and improvements in resin composite materials have significantly contributed the popularity of these materials. Early problems related to composites included excessive wear, less of anatomic form, post operative sensitivity, secondary caries and marginal leakage. Marginal adaptation still remains an unavoidable problem for composite restoration, especially at the gingival wall of cervical or Class II restoration. In an attempt to improve marginal sealing, many techniques and lining materials have been designed. To reduce stress generated by polymerization shrinkage, applying and curing of resin composites in layers is often recommended. Using a thick adhesive layer or low-viscosity resin may, due to its elastic properties, serve as a flexible intermediate layer and compensate for the polymerization stress created in resin composite. Flowable composites were created by retaining the same small particle size of traditional hybrid composite but reducing the filler content and allowing the increased resin to reduce the viscosity of the mixture. Flowable composites were introduced in 1996 as liners, fissure sealants and also in tunnel preparations. They have been suggested for Class I, II, III and V cavity restorations, preventive resin restorations and composite, porcelain and amalgam repairing. Their usage as a liner under high filled resins in posterior restorations has been shown to improve the adaptation of composites and effectively achieve clinically acceptable results. This article attempts to give a broad characteristics of different types of flowable composites. 

  6. Jamitons: Phantom Traffic Jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowszun, Jorj

    2013-01-01

    Traffic on motorways can slow down for no apparent reason. Sudden changes in speed by one or two drivers can create a chain reaction that causes a traffic jam for the vehicles that are following. This kind of phantom traffic jam is called a "jamiton" and the article discusses some of the ways in which traffic engineers produce…

  7. The Phantom Menace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vium, Christian

    2013-01-01

    as a phantom menace, which asserts itself through a form of omnipresent fear, nurtured by an inherent opaqueness. As this fundamental fear progressively permeates the nomadic landscape, it engenders a recasting of mobile strategies among the nomadic pastoralist groups who inhabit the interstitial desert spaces....

  8. Five-year evaluation of a low-shrinkage Silorane resin composite material: A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Malene; Dige, Irene; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical performance of a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite material (Filtek™ Silorane, 3 M-Espe) by comparing it with a methacrylate-based composite material (Ceram•X™, Dentsply DeTrey). Material and methods A number of 72patients...... caries was found in two teeth (Filtek™ Silorane). One tooth showed hypersensitivity (Ceram•X™). Conclusion Restorations of both materials were clinically acceptable after 5 years. This study did not find any advantage of the silorane-based composite over the methacrylate-based composite, which indicates...... that the low-shrinkage of Filtek™ Silorane may not be a determinant factor for clinical success in class II cavities. Clinical relevance This paper is the first to evaluate the 5-year clinical performance of a low-shrinkage composite material....

  9. 76 FR 8774 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade... polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury. On...

  10. Porous carbon materials for Li-S batteries based on resorcinol-formaldehyde resin with inverse opal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Mukesh; Choudhury, Soumyadip; Gruber, Katharina; Simon, Frank; Fischer, Dieter; Albrecht, Victoria; Göbel, Michael; Koller, Stefan; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2014-09-01

    This study reports on a novel approach to fabrication of carbon-sulfur composite material and demonstrates its application as cathode for Li-S batteries. Firstly, highly porous carbon material has been prepared by exploiting PMMA colloidal crystal arrays as sacrificial template and subsequently mixing with elemental sulfur at 155 °C. The resulting carbon-sulfur composite cathode material possess very high intrinsic surface area, conductivity and has been found to demonstrate as high as 1600 mAh g-1 capacity in 1st discharge cycle and about 300-400 mAh g-1 in 50th discharge cycle.

  11. Effect of two fluoride varnishes on the color stability of three resin-based restorative materials: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafaroji, Raha; Biria, Mina; Ameri, Farhad; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Qahari, Pasha; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of two fluoride varnishes on color stability of three resin-based restorative materials. Fifty-four discs (14.5 × 1.7 mm) were fabricated from A2 and A3 shades of a compomer (F2000), a flowable composite (Z350), and a hybrid composite (Z250), and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Dura Shield (colored) and Fluor Protector (colorless) fluoride varnishes were applied onto the discs. The coating was cleaned using a low-speed handpiece and nylon bristle brush after 24 h of storage in distilled water. A second coating was then applied. A control group with no coating was immersed in distilled water and used. The CIE L*a*b* color scale was measured before the treatments and following each cleaning utilizing a spectrophotometer. The colored fluoride varnish exhibited the highest overall color change (∆E) after the first and the second cleaning procedures in all the materials. Among these, the greatest color change was observed in the A3 shade of F2000, followed by the A3 shade of Z-250. The ∆E was less than 3.3 in all groups, and was therefore clinically acceptable. Color changes following the application of fluoride varnishes were found to be clinically acceptable in all groups. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Activation of Magnesium Lignosulfonate and Kraft Lignin: Influence on the Properties of Phenolic Resin-Based Composites for Potential Applications in Abrasive Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Klapiszewski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium lignosulfonate and kraft lignin were activated by different oxidizing agents for use in phenolic resin composites used for the production of abrasive components. The physicochemical properties of the oxidized materials were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, dynamic mechanical-thermal analysis (DMTA and inverse gas chromatography (IGC. The homogeneity of the model abrasive composites containing the studied products was assessed based on observations obtained using a scanning electron microscope (SEM. FTIR and XPS analysis of the oxidized products indicated that the activation process leads mainly to the formation of carbonyl groups. The IGC technique was used to assess changes in the surface energy and the acid–base properties of the studied biopolymers. The changes in the acid–base properties suggest that more groups acting as electron donors appear on the oxidized surface of the materials. DMTA studies showed that the model composites with 5% magnesium lignosulfonate oxidized by H2O2 had the best thermomechanical properties. Based on the results it was possible to propose a hypothetical mechanism of the oxidation of the natural polymers. The use of such oxidized products may improve the thermomechanical properties of abrasive articles.

  13. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  14. Validation study of the thorax phantom Lungman for optimization purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Pérez, Sunay; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Struelens, Lara; Bosmans, Hilde

    2017-03-01

    This work aims to investigate the advantages and limitations of the Kyoto Kagaku thorax phantom Lungman for use in chest radiography optimization studies. First, patient survey data were gathered for chest posterior anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) examinations in a standard chest X-ray room over a period of one year, using a Caesium Iodide (CsI) based flat panel detector with automatic exposure control (AEC). Parameters surveyed included exposure index (EI), dose area product (DAP) and AEC exposure time. PA and LAT projections of the phantom were then compared to these values. Additionally, the equivalence in millimetres of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was established for the different regions of the Lungman phantom (lungs and mediastinum). Finally, a voxel model of the Lungman phantom was developed by the segmentation of a volumetric dataset of the phantom acquired using CT scanning. Subsequently, the model was used in Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE/penEasy code to calculate the energy deposited in the organs of the phantom. This enabled comparison of the phantom tissue-equivalent materials with materials defined by ICRP 89 in terms of energy deposition. For the survey data, close agreement was found between phantom and the median values for the patient data (deviations ranged from 4% to 31%, one outlier). The phantom lung region is equivalent to 89 mm to 106 mm of PMMA, depending on tube voltage. Energy deposited in the phantom material compared to those for ICRP defined material differed by at most 36% in AP irradiations and 49% in PA irradiations.

  15. Optimal Composite Materials using NASA Resins or POSS Nanoparticle Modifications for Low Cost Fabrication of Large Composite Aerospace Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reduced mass composite materials are crucial to the success of aerospace systems, but their adoption is inhibited because they require autoclave consolidation, a...

  16. EDF specifications on nuclear grade resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, Darren; Gressier, Frederic; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Ranchoux, Gilles; Marteau, Herve; Labed, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Ion exchange resins are widely used across EDF, especially within the nuclear division for the purification of water. Important applications include primary circuit, secondary circuit and effluent treatment, which require high quality nuclear grade resins to retain the dissolved species, some of which may be radioactive. There is a need for more and more efficient purification in order to decrease worker dose during maintenance but also to decrease volumes of radioactive resin waste. Resin performance is subject to several forms of degradation, including physical, chemical, thermal and radioactive, therefore appropriate resin properties have to be selected to reduce such effects. Work has been done with research institutes, manufacturers and on EDF sites to select these properties, create specifications and to continuously improve on these specifications. An interesting example of research regarding resin performance is the resin degradation under irradiation. Resins used in the CVCS circuit of EDF nuclear power plants are subject to irradiation over their lifetime. A study was carried out on the effects of total integrated doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 MGy on typically used EDF mixed bed resins in a 'mini-CVCS' apparatus to simultaneously test actual primary circuit fluid. The tests confirmed that the resins still perform efficiently after a typical CVCS radiation dose. Certain resins also need additional specifications in order to maintain the integrity of the particular circuits they are used in. Recently, EDF has updated its requirements on these high purity nuclear grade resins, produced generic doctrines for all products and materials used on site which include resins of all grades, and as a result have also updated a guide on recommended resin usage for the French fleet of reactors. An overview of the evolutions will be presented. (authors)

  17. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Ng; Jimmy C. M. Hsiao; Keith C. T. Tong; Harry Kim; Yanjie Mai; Keith H. S. Chan

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin ...

  18. Epoxy Resins in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Henry

    1960-01-01

    A method of embedding biological specimens in araldite 502 (Ciba) has been developed for materials available in the United States. Araldite-embedded tissues are suitable for electron microscopy, but the cutting qualities of the resin necessitates more than routine attention during microtomy. The rather high viscosity of araldite 502 also seems to be an unnecessary handicap. The less viscous epoxy epon 812 (Shell) produces specimens with improved cutting qualities, and has several features—low shrinkage and absence of specimen damage during cure, minimal compression of sections, relative absence of electron beam-induced section damage, etc.—which recommends it as a routine embedding material. The hardness of the cured resin can be easily adjusted by several methods to suit the materials embedded in it. Several problems and advantages of working with sections of epoxy resins are also discussed. PMID:13822825

  19. Resin Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    to see plastic deformation of the surface. 8.1.4.3 Density: Density using the Archimedes principle (ASTM D 792). 8.1.4.4 Density as a Function of...the cure and postcure, quickly cool the sample to 0 °C or lower the temperature to quench the reaction, and then ramp the temperature at 5 °C/min to...prepared by pouring 10 g of resin into a 30-mL screw-cap scintillation vial and adding appropriate amounts of initiator, catalyst, and inhibitor

  20. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation...... was conducted by a trained interviewer. Results: Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19–88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2–46). Phantom...... scale, ranging from 0 to 100, was 36 (range: 1–89). One-third of the patients experienced phantom pain every day. Chilliness, windy weather and psychological stress/fatigue were the most commonly reported triggers for pain. Conclusions: Phantom pain after eye amputation is relatively common. The pain...

  1. Regular phantom black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronnikov, K A; Fabris, J C

    2006-06-30

    We study self-gravitating, static, spherically symmetric phantom scalar fields with arbitrary potentials (favored by cosmological observations) and single out 16 classes of possible regular configurations with flat, de Sitter, and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. Among them are traversable wormholes, bouncing Kantowski-Sachs (KS) cosmologies, and asymptotically flat black holes (BHs). A regular BH has a Schwarzschild-like causal structure, but the singularity is replaced by a de Sitter infinity, giving a hypothetic BH explorer a chance to survive. It also looks possible that our Universe has originated in a phantom-dominated collapse in another universe, with KS expansion and isotropization after crossing the horizon. Explicit examples of regular solutions are built and discussed. Possible generalizations include k-essence type scalar fields (with a potential) and scalar-tensor gravity.

  2. Realistic torso phantom for calibration of in-vivo transuranic-nuclide counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirotani, Takashi

    1988-01-01

    A realistic torso phantom with average body size of Japanese adult males has been developed for the calibration of counting systems used for in-vivo measurements of plutonium and other actinides. The phantom contains removable model organs (lungs, liver, kidneys and heart), model trachea and artificial rib cage, and also includes chest plates that can be placed over the chest to simulate wide range adipose/muscle ratio in the human chest. Tissue substitutes used in the phantom were made of polyurethane with different concentrations of ester of phosphoric acid. Model lungs were made of foamed polyurethane with small quantities of the additive, and the artificial rib cage was made of epoxy resin with calcium carbonate. The experimental data have shown that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration. (author)

  3. Methodology for construction of hollow spheres for use in physical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.C.H.; Lima, F.R.A.; Oliveira, F.; Vieira, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET), quantitative evaluation of spatial resolution/object size, attenuation and scatter effects is often performed using phantoms with hollow spheres. Fillable, plastic-walled spheres are commercially available in several sizes. Radioactive solutions in any concentration can be injected into the spheres. Hollow spheres have several desirable traits, including repeatable, consistent use, and standardization across measurements at different institutions, since identical items are distributed by a single manufacturer. The objective of this work is to describe a methodology for construction of hollow spheres using rapid prototyping. It was used the software SolidWork (2014) to create five 3D models of the hollow spheres with inner diameters of 10 mm, 13 mm, 17 mm, 22 mm, and 28 mm. These models were based on hollow spheres of NEMA/IEC PET body phantom. It was used a Cubex Duo 3D printer (3D Systems) to build the hollow spheres. The material used was the ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) resin. (authors)

  4. Effective properties of linear random materials: application to Al/SiC and resin/glass composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Serge; Lebon, Frédéric

    2008-10-01

    Here we present a statistical study on the effective linear properties of random materials, i.e., microstructures which are random lattices described by a stochastic process. The local numerical procedure associated with the homogenization methods used here was based on a wavelet-element method. The resulting numerical results are compared with those obtained using classical theories. A new approach was developed in order to determine the effective properties in cases where the characteristics of the microstructure are not known.

  5. In Situ Carbon Coated LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Cathode Material Prepared by Prepolymer of Melamine Formaldehyde Resin Assisted Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon coated spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 were prepared by spray-drying using prepolymer of melamine formaldehyde resin (PMF as carbon source of carbon coating layer. The PMF carbon coated LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 was characterized by XRD, SEM, and other electrochemical measurements. The as-prepared lithium nickel manganese oxide has the cubic face-centered spinel structure with a space group of Fd3m. It showed good electrochemical performance as a cathode material for lithium ion battery. After 100 discharge and charge cycles at 0.5 C rate, the specific discharge capacity of carbon coated LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 was 130 mAh·g−1, and the corresponding capacity retention was 98.8%. The 100th cycle specific discharge capacity at 10 C rate of carbon coated LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 was 105.4 mAh·g−1, and even the corresponding capacity retention was 95.2%.

  6. Effect of different palatal vault shapes on the dimensional stability of glass fiber-reinforced heat-polymerized acrylic resin denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkiz, Mehmet; Arslan, Demet; Tuncdemir, Ali Riza; Bilgin, M Selim; Aykul, Halil

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different palatal vault shapes on the dimensional stability of a glass fiber reinforced heat polymerized acrylic resin denture base material. Three edentulous maxilla with shallow, deep and medium shaped palatal vaults were selected and elastomeric impressions were obtained. A maxillary cast with four reference points (A, B, C, and D) was prepared to serve as control. Point (A) was marked in the anterior midline of the edentulous ridge in the incisive papillary region, points (B) and (C) were marked in the right and left posterior midlines of the edentulous ridge in the second molar regions, and point (D) was marked in the posterior palatal midline near the fovea palatina media (Figure 2). To determine linear dimensional changes, distances between four reference points (A-B, A-C, A-D and B-C) were initially measured with a metal gauge accurate within 0.1 mm under a binocular stereo light microscope and data (mm) were recorded. No significant difference of interfacial distance was found in sagittal and frontal sections measured 24 h after polymerization and after 30 days of water storage in any of experimental groups (P>.05). Significant difference of linear dimension were found in all experimental groups (Pbases did not affect the magnitude of interfacial gaps between the bases and the stone cast surfaces.

  7. Material Properties of a Tricalcium Silicate-containing, a Mineral Trioxide Aggregate-containing, and an Epoxy Resin-based Root Canal Sealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüllage, Raquel-Kathrin; Urban, Kent; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till

    2016-12-01

    The aim was to compare the solubility, radiopacity, and setting times of a tricalcium silicate-containing (BioRoot RCS; Septodont, St Maur-des-Fossés, France) and a mineral trioxide aggregate-containing sealer (MTA Fillapex; Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) with an epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus; Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany). Solubility in distilled water, radiopacity, and setting time were evaluated in accordance with ISO 6876:2012. The solubility was also measured after soaking the materials in phosphate-buffered saline buffer (PBS). All data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls test. After immersion for 1 minute in distilled water, BioRoot RCS was significantly less soluble than AH Plus and MTA Fillapex (P  .05). The final setting time was 324 (±1) minutes for BioRoot RCS and 612 (±4) minutes for AH Plus. The difference was statistically significant (P < .05). MTA Fillapex did not set completely even after 1 week. The solubility and radiopacity of the sealers were in accordance with ISO 6876:2012. PBS decreased the solubility of BioRoot RCS. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro two-body wear of inlay-onlay composite resin restoratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, A R; Nicholls, J I; Brudvik, J S

    1991-02-01

    Inlay-onlay composite resin restorations have been introduced to the profession as alternatives to amalgam and direct composite resins. Two-body wear testing was performed on three inlay-onlay resins and one direct composite resins using a machine designed to produce sliding wear. The composite resins were opposed by human enamel, type III gold alloy, and porcelain. Of the investigated materials, the homogeneously microfilled inlay-onlay material showed significantly less wear. The direct composite resin showed significantly the greatest wear. The hybrid inlay-onlay resins showed intermediate wear. The hybrid inlay-onlay resins and the direct composite (small particle, heavily filled) resin created wear tracks in the opposing surfaces while the homogeneous microfill inlay-onlay resin did not. The depth of the observed wear tracks in the opposing surface was sufficiently substantial to warrant further investigation into the wear of materials that oppose composite resin restorations.

  9. Comparative evaluation of compressive strength and flexural strength of conventional core materials with nanohybrid composite resin core material an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Narasimha; Vinod, V

    2013-09-01

    Several dental materials have been used for core build-up procedures. Most of these materials were not specifically developed for this purpose, but as a consequence of their properties, have found application in core build-up procedures. Improvements in composites and the development of nanocomposites have led to their use as a core build up material due to their superior mechanical properties, optical properties and ease of handling. However it is not clear if they have better mechanical properties than the conventional core build up materials like amalgam, GIC and dual cure composite core build up material. The strength of the core material is very important and this study was undertaken to compare the mechanical properties of materials used for direct core foundations. The differences between the compressive strength and flexural strength of Filtek Z350 nanocomposite with conventional core build up materials like Amalgam, Vitremer GIC and Fluorocore were tested. Cylindrical plexi glass split molds of dimension 6 ± 1 mm [height] x4 ± 1 mm [diameter] were used to fabricate 15 samples of each core material for testing the compressive strength and rectangular plexi glass split molds of dimension 25 ± 1 mm [length] x 2 ± 1 mm[height] x2 ± 1 mm [width] used for fabricating samples for flexural strength. The samples were stored a water bath at 250 °C for 24 h before testing. The samples were tested using a Universal Instron testing machine. The results of the study showed that Fluorocore had the highest compressive strength and flexural strength followed by Filtek Z350 [nanocomposite] Amalgam had the least flexural strength and Vitremer GIC had the least compressive strength. Thus flurocore and nanocomposite are stronger than other core build up materials and hence should be preferred over other conventional core build up materials in extensively damaged teeth.

  10. Changes in the surface of four calcium silicate-containing endodontic materials and an epoxy resin-based sealer after a solubility test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, R P; Sousa-Neto, M D; Versiani, M A; Rached-Júnior, F A; De-Deus, G; Miranda, C E S; Pécora, J D

    2012-05-01

    To compare the changes in the surface structure and elemental distribution, as well as the percentage of ion release, of four calcium silicate-containing endodontic materials with a well-established epoxy resin-based sealer, submitted to a solubility test. Solubility of AH Plus, iRoot SP, MTA Fillapex, Sealapex and MTA-Angelus (MTA-A) was tested according to ANSI/ADA Specification 57. The deionized water used in the solubility test was submitted to atomic absorption spectrophotometry to determine and quantify Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+) and Pb(2+) ions release. In addition, the outer and inner surfaces of nonsubmitted and submitted samples of each material to the solubility test were analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Statistical analysis was performed by using one-way anova and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Solubility results, in percentage, sorted in an increasing order were -1.24 ± 0.19 (MTA-A), 0.28 ± 0.08 (AH Plus), 5.65 ± 0.80 (Sealapex), 14.89 ± 0.73 (MTA Fillapex) and 20.64 ± 1.42 (iRoot SP). AH Plus and MTA-A were statistically similar (P > 0.05), but different from the other materials (P filler particles were more distinguishable. EDX analysis displayed high levels of calcium and carbon at the surface of Sealapex, MTA Fillapex and iRoot SP. AH Plus and MTA-A were in accordance with ANSI/ADA's requirements regarding solubility whilst iRoot SP, MTA Fillapex and Sealapex did not fulfil ANSI/ADA's protocols. High levels of Ca(2+) ion release were observed in all materials except AH Plus. SEM/EDX analysis revealed that all samples had morphological changes in both outer and inner surfaces after the solubility test. High levels of calcium and carbon were also observed at the surface of all materials except AH Plus and MTA-A. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  11. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  12. 75 FR 67105 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan AGENCY: United States International... granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice... polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material...

  13. Treatment of White Spot Lesions with Icon (Resin Infiltration)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    FROM: 59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 8 MAR2017 1. Your paper, entitled T reatment of White Spot Lesions with Icon ( Resin ... Resin Infiltration) 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Treatment of White Spot lesions with Icon ( Resin In filtration) 7. FUNDING

  14. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended to be painted...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended...

  16. Development of a phantom to test fully automated breast density software – A work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waade, G.G.; Hofvind, S.; Thompson, J.D.; Highnam, R.; Hogg, P.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Mammographic density (MD) is an independent risk factor for breast cancer and may have a future role for stratified screening. Automated software can estimate MD but the relationship between breast thickness reduction and MD is not fully understood. Our aim is to develop a deformable breast phantom to assess automated density software and the impact of breast thickness reduction on MD. Methods: Several different configurations of poly vinyl alcohol (PVAL) phantoms were created. Three methods were used to estimate their density. Raw image data of mammographic images were processed using Volpara to estimate volumetric breast density (VBD%); Hounsfield units (HU) were measured on CT images; and physical density (g/cm 3 ) was calculated using a formula involving mass and volume. Phantom volume versus contact area and phantom volume versus phantom thickness was compared to values of real breasts. Results: Volpara recognized all deformable phantoms as female breasts. However, reducing the phantom thickness caused a change in phantom density and the phantoms were not able to tolerate same level of compression and thickness reduction experienced by female breasts during mammography. Conclusion: Our results are promising as all phantoms resulted in valid data for automated breast density measurement. Further work should be conducted on PVAL and other materials to produce deformable phantoms that mimic female breast structure and density with the ability of being compressed to the same level as female breasts. Advances in knowledge: We are the first group to have produced deformable phantoms that are recognized as breasts by Volpara software. - Highlights: • Several phantoms of different configurations were created. • Three methods to assess phantom density were implemented. • All phantoms were identified as breasts by the Volpara software. • Reducing phantom thickness caused a change in phantom density.

  17. Characterization of the materials used in the construction of a physical phantom for calibration of {sup 18}F-FDG internal dosimetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vital, Katia D.; Mendes, Bruno M.; Fonseca, Telma C.F.; Silva, Teógenes A. da, E-mail: katiadvitall@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Internal Dosimetry Laboratory (LDI) of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) in Minas Gerais, Brazil, is responsible for the routine monitoring of Occupationally Exposed Individuals (OEIs) to {sup 18}F-FDG and other radiopharmaceuticals produced at CDTN. The monitoring system is usually calibrated using a physical head simulator, since {sup 18}F is usually incorporated into the brain at the time of contamination. However, the geometry of the brain is not adequately represented by the latex pocket, which does not fill the entire volume of the volume skull. In this study, the characterization of the materials regarding the composition, density and attenuation coefficient of the materials used in the production of the new physical head simulator was carried out. An equivalent tissue material containing 97% water, 2.5% agar, 0.5% urea and 8 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG was produced, the interior of the skull was filled with the material. After solidification, experimental measurements were performed on the NaI(Tl) 3 {sup x}3{sup s}cintillation detector, the density of the simulant material was determined by the flotation method and the attenuation coefficient of the XCOM database software provided by NIST. It was concluded that the PVC skull has acceptable characteristics to simulate a human skull in {sup 18}F-FDG internal dosimetry. The agar gel was shown to be a stable material capable of modeling different geometries and simulating the incorporation of {sup 18}F-FDG into the brain. (author)

  18. Characterization of the materials used in the construction of a physical phantom for calibration of 18F-FDG internal dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vital, Katia D.; Mendes, Bruno M.; Fonseca, Telma C.F.; Silva, Teógenes A. da

    2017-01-01

    The Internal Dosimetry Laboratory (LDI) of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) in Minas Gerais, Brazil, is responsible for the routine monitoring of Occupationally Exposed Individuals (OEIs) to 18 F-FDG and other radiopharmaceuticals produced at CDTN. The monitoring system is usually calibrated using a physical head simulator, since 18 F is usually incorporated into the brain at the time of contamination. However, the geometry of the brain is not adequately represented by the latex pocket, which does not fill the entire volume of the volume skull. In this study, the characterization of the materials regarding the composition, density and attenuation coefficient of the materials used in the production of the new physical head simulator was carried out. An equivalent tissue material containing 97% water, 2.5% agar, 0.5% urea and 8 MBq of 18 F-FDG was produced, the interior of the skull was filled with the material. After solidification, experimental measurements were performed on the NaI(Tl) 3 x 3 s cintillation detector, the density of the simulant material was determined by the flotation method and the attenuation coefficient of the XCOM database software provided by NIST. It was concluded that the PVC skull has acceptable characteristics to simulate a human skull in 18 F-FDG internal dosimetry. The agar gel was shown to be a stable material capable of modeling different geometries and simulating the incorporation of 18 F-FDG into the brain. (author)

  19. Effect of placement of calcium sulphate when used for the repair of furcation perforations on the seal produced by a resin-based material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, L; Liu, J; Yin, S-H; Tan, J; Wang, F-M; Li, W; Xue, J

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the sealing ability of calcium sulphate when used under composite resin for the repair of furcation perforations having different diameters. Perforations of different diameter were created in the floors of pulp chambers in 60 extracted human molar teeth with either a number 3 (1 mm diameter) or 5 (1.5 mm diameter) round bur. The specimens of each group were divided into four sub-groups which were repaired with composite resin either alone or in combination with calcium sulphate that created an artificial floor (15 teeth group(-1)). Eight teeth without furcation perforations served as negative controls. In the leakage detection device, 1 mol L(-1) glucose solution was forced under a pressure of 1.5 KPa from the crown towards the pulp chamber floor. The concentration of leaked glucose was measured at 1, 2, 4, 7, 10, 15 and 20 days using a glucose oxidase method and the data evaluated using the rank sum test. The specimens with larger perforations repaired with composite resin alone had significantly more leakage (P resin, leakage in smaller perforations was markedly lower than that in larger ones (P resin alone (P > 0.05). Calcium sulphate significantly improved the sealing ability of 1 mm perforations repaired with composite resin but not for 1.5 mm perforations.

  20. Phantom breast syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom breast syndrome is a type of condition in which patients have a sensation of residual breast tissue and can include both non-painful sensations as well as phantom breast pain. The incidence varies in different studies, ranging from approximately 30% to as high as 80% of patients after mastectomy. It seriously affects quality of life through the combined impact of physical disability and emotional distress. The breast cancer incidence rate in India as well as Western countries has risen in recent years while survival rates have improved; this has effectively increased the number of women for whom post-treatment quality of life is important. In this context, chronic pain following treatment for breast cancer surgery is a significantly under-recognized and under-treated problem. Various types of chronic neuropathic pain may arise following breast cancer surgery due to surgical trauma. The cause of these syndromes is damage to various nerves during surgery. There are a number of assumed factors causing or perpetuating persistent neuropathic pain after breast cancer surgery. Most well-established risk factors for developing phantom breast pain and other related neuropathic pain syndromes are severe acute postoperative pain and greater postoperative use of analgesics. Based upon current evidence, the goals of prophylactic strategies could first target optimal peri-operative pain control and minimizing damage to nerves during surgery. There is some evidence that chronic pain and sensory abnormalities do decrease over time. The main group of oral medications studied includes anti-depressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, N-methyl-D-asparate receptor antagonists, mexilitine, topical lidocaine, cannabinoids, topical capsaicin and glysine antagonists. Neuromodulation techniques such as motor cortex stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and intrathecal drug therapies have been used to treat various neuropathic pain syndromes.

  1. The Phantom of Liberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    One of the few things we have in common in contemporary society is the future of our children. But it seems that even the “we” of childhood, of learning and free play, has turned into a common ground for instrumentalization and competition. Today, the pedagogical paradox—Kant’s meditation on the ......? These are some of the questions addressed by The Phantom of Liberty, which sets out to reestablish a social and aesthetic dialogue between visual art and psychology, philosophy, pedagogy, and critical journalism....

  2. Resin technologies: construction and staining of resin TMA's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howat, William J; Wilson, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    The traditional formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, and therefore the tissue microarrays created from it, provide good morphology but with a compromised antigenicity when compared to frozen tissue. In contrast, while solving the issue of antigenicity, frozen tissue suffers from a lack of morphology. We have demonstrated that tissue microarrays constructed in glycol methacrylate resin, when combined with a cold acetone fixation step, have been able to combine the superior morphology of resin-embedded sections with the superior antigenicity of frozen tissue for prospectively collected material.

  3. Microbiological study of water-softener resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, J M; Engelhard, W E; Parsons, J E

    1969-09-01

    Microbial identification using effluents backflushed from exhausted urban and rural tank resins and cleaned resins containing the sulfonated copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene (SDB) were completed, along with microbial assessment of the concentrated stock salt brine. Forty-four different bacterial and fungal genera were identified. Extensive biochemical and animal virulence tests completed on one of the six bacterial salt brine isolates indicated a pathogenic staphylococcal strain. The retention of Staphylococcus aureus, a Flavobacterium sp, and Escherichia coli B bacteriophage was demonstrated both by using the nonexhausted sodium-regenerated resin and by using the same resin exchanged with different mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. Effluent counts completed after bacterial seepage through the resins indicated the Pb(++) exchanged resin removed 55% of the bacteria; Na(+), Fe(++), and Al(+++) removed 31 to 36% and Ca(++) and Cu(++) removed about 10 to 15%. Seventy per cent or more of the bacteriophage was removed by Fe(++), Cu(++), and Al(+++), whereas the Ca(++) and Na(++) cations removed 25 to 31%. Over a 77-day period, nonsterile tap water was passed through bacterial seeded and uninoculated SDB (Na) resin columns. Effluent and resin elution counts demonstrated the growth and survival of 2 different bacteria per column. Increased bacterial retention, survival, and multiplication occurred concomitantly with accumulation of organic and inorganic materials and the Ca(++) and Mg(++) cations from the tap water. Furthermore, microbial elution from resin particles taken from column depths of 1, 8, and 16 cm indicated a bacterial diminution with increasing depths.

  4. Construction of mammography phantoms with a 3D printer and tested with a TIMEPIX system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-García, J. S.; Roque, G. A.; Ávila, C. A.

    2017-11-01

    We present a new mammography phantom made of hydroxyapatite crystals with different sizes and shapes, to emulate anthropomorphic microcalcifications, which we locate at different depths of a PMMA embedding material. The aim of the phantom presented is to address some issues of the standard commercial ones that are being used for comparing 3D vs 2D mammography systems. We present X-ray images, taken under the same conditions, for both a commercial phantom and the new proposed phantom. We compare signal to noise ratios (SNR) obtained for both cases. This phantom has been constructed to be easily assembled within different configurations to emulate modified features that might be of medical interest.

  5. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Chlorotrifluoroethylene-1,1-difluoroethylene-tetrafluoroethylene co-polymer resins produced by copolymerization of..., Extrusion, and Coating Materials,” which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and...

  6. Collaborative study for the quality control of trace element determinations in paint coatings. Part 2. Certification of alkyd resin paint reference materials for the migratable contents of trace elements (CRMs 620 and 623).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, P; Walker, R; Quevauviller, P

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the preparation, homogeneity studies and certification of a series of two paint reference materials (mild steel coated with alkyd resin paint, CRM620, and comminuted paint from alkyd resin paint, CRM623) which have been produced in support of the EU Toy Safety Directive (88/378/EEC). The reference materials have been certified for levels of toxic element migration using the method specified in European Standard EN71-3:1994 published by the European Committee for Standardization. As such, the certified values, indicative values and range data quoted for the reference materials in this paper are method specific and relate only to European Standard EN71-3:1994. The paper summarizes the analytical work carried out and gives a description of the analytical methods used to measure As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Sb and Se, the 8 toxic elements specified in European Standard EN71-3:1994, in the sample extracts. Descriptions of the reference materials, certified values, indicative values together with their associated uncertainties or range of laboratory means as appropriate are given. The preparation of a (not certified) reference material (beechwood coated with nitrocellulose paint, RM621) is also described and assigned values for As, Ba, Cd and Se are given. The Hg content could not be certified in any of the reference materials, owing to a high dispersion of results.

  7. Evaluation of Resin-Resin Interface in Direct Composite Restoration Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Iovan, G.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resin-resin interface when a universal bonding agent was used in two different strategies in direct restoration repair. Two composite resins (a micro-filled hybrid and a nano-filled hybrid) as old restorations that have to be repair, a universal bonding agent and a micro-filled hybrid composite resin (different then that aged) as new material for repair were chosen for the study. Non-aged samples were used as control and aged samples were used as study groups. The universal bonding agent was applied in etch-and-rinse and in self-etch strategies. The interface between old and new composite resins was evaluated by SEM and the microleakage was assessed by scoring the dye penetration. Very good adaptation of the two different composite resins placed in direct contact in non-aged samples was recorded. No gaps or defects were visible and strong resin-resin contact was observed. After aging, enlargement of resin-resin junction were observed in most of the samples and a increased dye penetration was recorded irrespective of the strategy (etch-and-rinse or self-etch) used for bonding agent application.

  8. Emission and Mechanical Evaluations of Vinyl-Ester Resin Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sands, James

    2003-01-01

    Vinyl-ester resins (VE) are frequently used in liquid molding of composite materials for several applications including naval and army structures, commercial boat manufacturing, and building construction...

  9. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Ng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  10. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith H. S.; Mai, Yanjie; Kim, Harry; Tong, Keith C. T.; Ng, Desmond; Hsiao, Jimmy C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  11. Regional heating patterns of RF hyperthermia applicators in phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, G.; Ruggera, P.S.; Samulski, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    An elliptical phantom (20 cm by 30 cm cross-section and 40 cm long) with a 1 cm fat layer filled with muscle material was used to compare the induced heating patterns of the NCDRH helical coil, a Henry Medical Magnetrode coil, both with a diameter of 35.6 cm, and the BSD Annular Phased Array System (APAS). Temperature profiles were taken in the midplane cross-sectional slice along the major and minor axes of the phantom. These profiles were measured with a Vitek thermistor probe and the associated specific absorption rates (SAR) were determined from this data. SAR curves for each applicator were obtained along the major and minor axes of the phantom. The depths of heating of the Magnetrode applicator are considerably smaller than those for the helical applicator. Heating patterns for the APAS can be highly variable and asymmetric depending on the frequency of operation and the location of the phantom within the APAS aperture. While the APAS requires a water bolus for good coupling, the NCDRH and Magnetrode coils need only to be air coupled for good phantom coupling. Both the helical applicator and APAS can provide significant heating in the central region of the phantom. However, the heating of the helical coil does not critically depend on the phantom loading

  12. Design of a head phantom produced on a 3D rapid prototyping printer and comparison with a RANDO and 3M lucite head phantom in eye dosimetry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, Peter; Figl, Michael; Wartak, Andreas; Glanzer, Mathias; Dünkelmeyer, Martina; Hojreh, Azadeh; Hummel, Johann

    2017-04-21

    An anthropomorphic head phantom including eye inserts allowing placement of TLDs 3 mm below the cornea has been produced on a 3D printer using a photo-cured acrylic resin to best allow tissue equivalence. Thus H p (3) can be determined in radiological and interventional photon radiation fields. Eye doses and doses to the forehead have been compared to an Alderson RANDO head and a 3M Lucite skull phantom in terms of surface dose per incident air kerma for frontal irradiation since the commercial phantoms do not allow placement of TLDs 3 mm below the corneal surface. A comparison of dose reduction factors (DRFs) of a common lead glasses model has also been performed. Eye dose per incident air kerma were comparable between all three phantoms (printed phantom: 1.40, standard error (SE) 0.04; RANDO: 1.36, SE 0.03; 3M: 1.37, SE 0.03). Doses to the forehead were identical to eye surface doses for the printed phantom and the RANDO head (ratio 1.00 SE 0.04, and 0.99 SE 0.03, respectively). In the 3M Lucite skull phantom dose on the forehead was 15% lower than dose to the eyes attributable to phantom properties. DRF of a sport frame style leaded glasses model with 0.75 mm lead equivalence measured were 6.8 SE 0.5, 9.3 SE 0.4 and 10.5 SE 0.5 for the RANDO head, the printed phantom, and the 3M Lucite head phantom, respectively, for frontal irradiation. A comparison of doses measured in 3 mm depth and on the surface of the eyes in the printed phantom revealed no difference larger than standard errors from TLD dosimetry. 3D printing offers an interesting opportunity for phantom design with increasing potential as printers allowing combinations of tissue substitutes will become available. Variations between phantoms may provide a useful indication of uncertainty budgets when using phantom measurements to estimate individual personnel doses.

  13. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS) Resin with Polyester ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akorede

    glass fibres, to produce hard and strong structural materials. The use of carbon fibre to reinforce epoxide resin is a fairly recent development. Carbon reinforced epoxy resins are extremely strong materials with a very high value of Young's. Modulus, compared with other plastic materials, and they are finding applications in ...

  14. Estimation of computed tomography dose in various phantom shapes and compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Lae

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate CTDI (computed tomography dose index at center) for various phantom shapes, sizes, and compositions by using GATE (geant4 application for tomographic emission) simulations. GATE simulations were performed for various phantom shapes (cylinder, elliptical, and hexagonal prism PMMA phantoms) and phantom compositions (water, PMMA, polyethylene, polyoxymethylene) with various diameters (1-50 cm) at various kVp and mAs levels. The CTDI100center values of cylinder, elliptical, and hexagonal prism phantom at 120 kVp, 200 mAs resulted in 11.1, 13.4, and 12.2 mGy, respectively. The volume is the same, but CTDI 100center values are different depending on the type of phantom. The water, PMMA, and polyoxymethylene phantom CTDI 100center values were relatively low as the material density increased. However, in the case of Polyethylene, the CTDI 100center value was higher than that of PMMA at diameters exceeding 15 cm (CTDI 100center : 35.0 mGy). And a diameter greater than 30 cm (CTDI 100center : 17.7 mGy) showed more CTDI 100center than Water. We have used limited phantoms to evaluate CT doses. In this study, CTDI 100center values were estimated and simulated by GATE simulation according to the material and shape of the phantom. CT dosimetry can be estimated more accurately by using various materials and phantom shapes close to human body

  15. Methods and preliminary findings of a cost-effectiveness study of glass-ionomer-based and composite resin sealant materials after 2 yr

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldman, A.S.; Chen, X.; Fan, M.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of glass-carbomer, conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer cement (HVGIC) [without or with heat (light-emitting diode (LED) thermocuring) application], and composite resin sealants were compared after 2 yr in function. Estimated net costs per sealant were obtained from data

  16. Post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, A.U.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin using a digital microhardness tester. Change in hardness of these materials over a period of 6 months was compared to that of conventional glass ionomer cements and a composite resin. With the exception of the composite resin, all materials showed a significant increase in hardness over 24 h after their initial set. Dual-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed decreased hardness with increased storage time in saline at 37 o C. Results suggest that the addition of resins to glass ionomer cements does not improve initial hardness and does not negate the acid-base reaction of conventional cements. Resin addition may, however, lead to increased water sorption and decreased hardness. (author)

  17. Application of voxel phantoms in whole body counting for the validation of calibration phantoms and the assessment of uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlan de, L.; Blanchardon, E.; Franck, D.; Roch, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Calibration of whole body counting facilities is always performed using phantoms that are more or less representative of human body. New approaches using voxel phantoms have been shown as a potential way of progress toward a better representation of the measured subject. In this frame, the work presented here is dedicated to show the application of voxel phantoms in whole body counting. A first study was performed to validate this approach with a physical phantom dedicated to fission and activation products (FAP) measurement, IGOR, and a Graphical User Interface, developed at IRSN internal dose assessment laboratory, called OEDIPE (French acronym for tool for personalized internal dose assessment) associated with the Monte-Carlo code MCNP. Validation of the method was done by comparing the results of real measurements and simulations using voxel phantoms obtained from CT scan images of IGOR. To go further in this application a comparison between the IGOR voxel based phantom with a voxel human body (Zubal Phantom) was performed. Results show a good agreement between Zubal and IGOR phantoms, proving the ability of IGOR phantom to represent the human body, with respect to the FAP measurements. Nevertheless, calibration procedures always consider an homogeneous distribution of the contamination in the body that may not be realistic. In order to assess the errors made when considering sources homogeneously distributed in the body in comparison with real contamination, a study was carried out taking into account the biokinetic behaviour of the radioactive material for two modes of exposure: the ingestion of 137 Cs in soluble form and the inhalation of insoluble 60 Co considering several days after an acute incorporation. Results show that a difference of up to 50 % can be found when considering either homogeneous distribution or realistic distribution of the sources. It shows the ability of OEDIPE to better assess the uncertainties in whole body counting and

  18. Active phantoms: a paradigm for ultrasound calibration using phantom feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Alexis; Guo, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Haichong K; Kang, Hyun Jae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M

    2017-07-01

    In ultrasound (US)-guided medical procedures, accurate tracking of interventional tools is crucial to patient safety and clinical outcome. This requires a calibration procedure to recover the relationship between the US image and the tracking coordinate system. In literature, calibration has been performed on passive phantoms, which depend on image quality and parameters, such as frequency, depth, and beam-thickness as well as in-plane assumptions. In this work, we introduce an active phantom for US calibration. This phantom actively detects and responds to the US beams transmitted from the imaging probe. This active echo (AE) approach allows identification of the US image midplane independent of image quality. Both target localization and segmentation can be done automatically, minimizing user dependency. The AE phantom is compared with a crosswire phantom in a robotic US setup. An out-of-plane estimation US calibration method is also demonstrated through simulation and experiments to compensate for remaining elevational uncertainty. The results indicate that the AE calibration phantom can have more consistent results across experiments with varying image configurations. Automatic segmentation is also shown to have similar performance to manual segmentation.

  19. Development of neonate phantom for estimating medical exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T. [Oita Univ. of Nursing and Health Sciences, Oita (Japan); Mitarai, T.; Ono, K.; Hada, M.; Ninomiya, H.; Kato, Y. [Oita Prefectural Hospital, Oita (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    The distribution and volume ratio of radiation sensitive organs such as red bone marrow are different between neonates and adults. In addition, the body sizes of neonates in NICU are smaller than normal neonates. Consequently, it is important to estimate a neonatal dose for X-ray examinations in NICU. However, there are few reports on quantitative estimates of measured or mathematically calculated doses for neonatal X-ray examinations. In order to estimate their dose, we made a physical neonatal phantom and estimated its dose using both measurement and calculation methods. In determining the phantom geometry, the body sizes were measured for neonates of NICU in Oita prefectural hospital. As body parameters, weights, heights and trunk sizes were obtained. The weight of phantom was determined to be 2000 g based on these data. The height of the phantom is 43.5 cm, and the trunk width is determined to be 9.5 cm. The whole shape was expressed with rectangular solids without bone region to avoid the difficulties on phantom construction and calculations. The height and other body size parameters were calculated as a function of body weight, which were determined as regression lines on these data. The weights of lungs were calculated using NIRS-M-115, and the positions were determined according to anatomical geometry. The components of the phantom were soft tissue and lung, and tough water and tough lung phantoms were selected as materials of the phantom. For the purpose of the dose measurement, the phantom was located in the incubator of NICU, and exposed under 4 kinds of the conditions of ordinary X-ray examination, which were for chest, combined abdomen-chest, abdomen and head radiographs using a portable X-ray machine. A film-badge was put on the center of exposed area for each examination, and measured entrance surface dose of the phantom. The glass dosimeters were also used. The measured doses of chest, combined abdomen-chest and abdomen were 0.1-0.12 mSv. The Monte

  20. Development of neonate phantom for estimating medical exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.; Mitarai, T.; Ono, K.; Hada, M.; Ninomiya, H.; Kato, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The distribution and volume ratio of radiation sensitive organs such as red bone marrow are different between neonates and adults. In addition, the body sizes of neonates in NICU are smaller than normal neonates. Consequently, it is important to estimate a neonatal dose for X-ray examinations in NICU. However, there are few reports on quantitative estimates of measured or mathematically calculated doses for neonatal X-ray examinations. In order to estimate their dose, we made a physical neonatal phantom and estimated its dose using both measurement and calculation methods. In determining the phantom geometry, the body sizes were measured for neonates of NICU in Oita prefectural hospital. As body parameters, weights, heights and trunk sizes were obtained. The weight of phantom was determined to be 2000 g based on these data. The height of the phantom is 43.5 cm, and the trunk width is determined to be 9.5 cm. The whole shape was expressed with rectangular solids without bone region to avoid the difficulties on phantom construction and calculations. The height and other body size parameters were calculated as a function of body weight, which were determined as regression lines on these data. The weights of lungs were calculated using NIRS-M-115, and the positions were determined according to anatomical geometry. The components of the phantom were soft tissue and lung, and tough water and tough lung phantoms were selected as materials of the phantom. For the purpose of the dose measurement, the phantom was located in the incubator of NICU, and exposed under 4 kinds of the conditions of ordinary X-ray examination, which were for chest, combined abdomen-chest, abdomen and head radiographs using a portable X-ray machine. A film-badge was put on the center of exposed area for each examination, and measured entrance surface dose of the phantom. The glass dosimeters were also used. The measured doses of chest, combined abdomen-chest and abdomen were 0.1-0.12 mSv. The Monte

  1. Calculational evaluations of the proposal for a reference dosimetric phantom for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjugg, H.; Seppaelae, T.; Auterinen, I.; Kotiluoto, P.; Savolainen, S.

    2001-01-01

    agreement with each other. According to these results, the proposed reference phantom can be considered as a good model of an infinite phantom, and all the larger phantoms with same wall thickness and materials are usable as standard dosimetric phantom for BNCT dosimetry. The lower limit for the standard dosimetric phantom size will be presented in addition, when the simulation results are acquired for the indicated smaller phantom (author)

  2. Synthesis and characterizations of melamine-based epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciotti, Laura; Roviello, Giuseppina; Tarallo, Oreste; Borbone, Fabio; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Catauro, Michelina; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-09-05

    A new, easy and cost-effective synthetic procedure for the preparation of thermosetting melamine-based epoxy resins is reported. By this innovative synthetic method, different kinds of resins can be obtained just by mixing the reagents in the presence of a catalyst without solvent and with mild curing conditions. Two types of resins were synthesized using melamine and a glycidyl derivative (resins I) or by adding a silane derivative (resin II). The resins were characterized by means of chemical-physical and thermal techniques. Experimental results show that all the prepared resins have a good thermal stability, but differ for their mechanical properties: resin I exhibits remarkable stiffness with a storage modulus value up to 830 MPa at room temperature, while lower storage moduli were found for resin II, indicating that the presence of silane groups could enhance the flexibility of these materials. The resins show a pot life higher than 30 min, which makes these resins good candidates for practical applications. The functionalization with silane terminations can be exploited in the formulation of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials.

  3. Liquid Resins-Based Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Fuke

    In this review, additive manufacturing technologies using liquid resins as materials are reviewed from the perspective of printing technologies and materials. Most importantly, recent progress of new printing technologies and printers as well as novel printing materials and their applications are summarized, based on which potential future research directions are discussed at the end of this review.

  4. Phantom stars and topology change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBenedictis, Andrew; Garattini, Remo; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we consider time-dependent dark-energy star models, with an evolving parameter ω crossing the phantom divide ω=-1. Once in the phantom regime, the null energy condition is violated, which physically implies that the negative radial pressure exceeds the energy density. Therefore, an enormous negative pressure in the center may, in principle, imply a topology change, consequently opening up a tunnel and converting the dark-energy star into a wormhole. The criteria for this topology change are discussed and, in particular, we consider a Casimir energy approach involving quasilocal energy difference calculations that may reflect or measure the occurrence of a topology change. We denote these exotic geometries consisting of dark-energy stars (in the phantom regime) and phantom wormholes as phantom stars. The final product of this topological change, namely, phantom wormholes, have far-reaching physical and cosmological implications, as in addition to being used for interstellar shortcuts, an absurdly advanced civilization may manipulate these geometries to induce closed timelike curves, consequently violating causality.

  5. Evaluating the effect of in-process material on the binding mechanisms of surrogate viral particles to a multi-modal anion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew R; Burnham, Michael S; Johnson, Sarah A; Lute, Scott C; Brorson, Kurt A; Roush, David J

    2018-02-10

    Bacteriophage binding mechanisms to multi-modal anion exchange resin may include both anion exchange and hydrophobic interactions, or the mechanism can be dominated by a single moiety. However, previous studies have reported binding mechanisms defined for simple solutions containing only buffer and a surrogate viral spike (i.e. bacteriophage ΦX174, PR772, and PP7). We employed phage spiked in-process monoclonal antibody (mAb) pools to model binding under bioprocessing conditions. These experiments allow the individual contributions of the mAb, in-process impurities, and buffer composition on mechanistic removal of phages to be studied. PP7 and PR772 use synergetic binding by the positively charged quaternary amine and the hydrophobic aromatic phenyl group to bind multi-modal resin. ΦX174's binding mechanism remains inconclusive due to operating conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanistic understanding of fouling of protein A chromatography resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Mili; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-08-12

    This paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of how fouling of Protein A resin takes place. Binding and mass transport properties of widely used agarose-based Protein A resin, MabSelect SuRe™, have been examined to understand the mechanism of resin fouling. There could be various factors that impact resin fouling. These include product/impurity build-up due to components in the feed material and ligand degradation due to the use of harsh buffers. To unravel their contributions, cycling studies were performed with and without product loading. The results presented in this paper provide a lucid understanding of the causative factors that limit Protein A chromatographic resin lifetime. The capacity fall for protein A resin at the end of 100th cycle due to use of feed material was found to be five times greater than that without using feed material. Compared to the fresh resin, the cycled resin samples shows 24% reduction in particle porosity and 51% reduction in pore mass transfer coefficient. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to qualitatively monitor accumulation of foulants on the cycled resin. Fouled resin sample contained a dense residue in the interior and exterior of resin particle both as a film at the bead surface and as granules. The surface activation energy increased five times in the case of fouled resin sample. The major event in fouling was identified as the non-specific adsorption of the feed material components on resin, signaling that pore diffusion is the rate limiting step. It is anticipated that these findings will assist in development of a more robust and economical downstream manufacturing process for monoclonal antibody purification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A methodology for developing anisotropic AAA phantoms via additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Galarreta, Sergio; Antón, Raúl; Cazón, Aitor; Finol, Ender A

    2017-05-24

    An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent focal dilatation of the abdominal aorta at least 1.5 times its normal diameter. The criterion of maximum diameter is still used in clinical practice, although numerical studies have demonstrated the importance of biomechanical factors for rupture risk assessment. AAA phantoms could be used for experimental validation of the numerical studies and for pre-intervention testing of endovascular grafts. We have applied multi-material 3D printing technology to manufacture idealized AAA phantoms with anisotropic mechanical behavior. Different composites were fabricated and the phantom specimens were characterized by biaxial tensile tests while using a constitutive model to fit the experimental data. One composite was chosen to manufacture the phantom based on having the same mechanical properties as those reported in the literature for human AAA tissue; the strain energy and anisotropic index were compared to make this choice. The materials for the matrix and fibers of the selected composite are, respectively, the digital materials FLX9940 and FLX9960 developed by Stratasys. The fiber proportion for the composite is equal to 0.15. The differences between the composite behavior and the AAA tissue are small, with a small difference in the strain energy (0.4%) and a maximum difference of 12.4% in the peak Green strain ratio. This work represents a step forward in the application of 3D printing technology for the manufacturing of AAA phantoms with anisotropic mechanical behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom

  9. An improved Virtual Torso phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Gary H; Crowley, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The virtual phantom that was previously designed by the Human Monitoring Laboratory had some limitations. It contained no sternum and the ribs extended all the way round the torso, whereas in reality the central part of the chest is covered with a mixture of cartilage (ribs) and bone (sternum). The ribs were located below the chest wall which added to the thickness of the chest wall. The lungs did not touch the inner surface of the chest wall along their length due to the differences in curvature between the ellipsoidal lungs and the ellipsoidal cylinder that defined the torso. As a result there was extra intervening tissue between the lungs and the chest wall. This was shown to have a noticeable effect on the simulation of low energy photons. The virtual phantom has been redesigned and comparison of measured and calculated counting efficiencies shows that it is a good representation of both of LLNL or JAERI at all photon energies measured. The redesigned virtual phantom agrees to within 11% of the torsos' counting efficiency over the energy range 17 - 240 keV. Before modification, the virtual phantom's counting efficiency was a of factor three lower at 17 keV and a factor of two lower at 20 keV; now it is within 5% at 17 keV and within 10% at 20 keV. This phantom can now be reliably used to simulate lung counting. The virtual phantom still contains no sternum and the ribs extend all the way round the torso, whereas in reality the central part of the chest is covered with cartilage (ribs) and bone (sternum). However, the above results indicate that this is not a major flaw in the design of the virtual phantom, as agreement between the Monte Carlo results and experimental data is good. (author)

  10. Quantification of breast density using dual-energy mammography with liquid phantom calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Alfonso R; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Breast density is a widely recognized potential risk factor for breast cancer. However, accurate quantification of breast density is a challenging task in mammography. The current use of plastic breast-equivalent phantoms for calibration provides limited accuracy in dual-energy mammography due to the chemical composition of the phantom. We implemented a breast-equivalent liquid phantom for dual-energy calibration in order to improve the accuracy of breast density measurement. To design these phantoms, three liquid compounds were chosen: water, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol. Chemical compositions of glandular and adipose tissues, obtained from NIST database, were used as reference materials. Dual-energy signal of the liquid phantom at different breast densities (0% to 100%) and thicknesses (1 to 8 cm) were simulated. Glandular and adipose tissue thicknesses were estimated from a higher order polynomial of the signals. Our results indicated that the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast-equivalent liquid phantoms match those of the target material. Comparison between measured and known breast density data shows a linear correlation with a slope close to 1 and a non-zero intercept of 7%, while plastic phantoms showed a slope of 0.6 and a non-zero intercept of 8%. Breast density results derived from the liquid calibration phantoms showed higher accuracy than those derived from the plastic phantoms for different breast thicknesses and various tube voltages. We performed experimental phantom studies using liquid phantoms and then compared the computed breast density with those obtained using a bovine tissue model. The experimental data and the known values were in good correlation with a slope close to 1 (∼1.1). In conclusion, our results indicate that liquid phantoms are a reliable alternative for calibration in dual-energy mammography and better reproduce the chemical properties of the target material. (paper)

  11. Design and fabrication of a realistic anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom for MR purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Sossena; Krishnamurthy, Narayanan; Santini, Tales; Raval, Shailesh; Farhat, Nadim; Holmes, John Andy; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to design an anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom that can be used for MRI and other electromagnetic applications. Materials and methods An eight compartment, physical anthropomorphic head phantom was developed from a 3T MRI dataset of a healthy male. The designed phantom was successfully built and preliminarily evaluated through an application that involves electromagnetic-tissue interactions: MRI (due to it being an available resource). The developed phantom was filled with media possessing electromagnetic constitutive parameters that correspond to biological tissues at ~297 MHz. A preliminary comparison between an in-vivo human volunteer (based on whom the anthropomorphic head phantom was created) and various phantoms types, one being the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom, were performed using a 7 Tesla human MRI scanner. Results Echo planar imaging was performed and minimal ghosting and fluctuations were observed using the proposed anthropomorphic phantom. The magnetic field distributions (during MRI experiments at 7 Tesla) and the scattering parameter (measured using a network analyzer) were most comparable between the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom and an in-vivo human volunteer. Conclusion The developed anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom can be used as a resource to various researchers in applications that involve electromagnetic-biological tissue interactions such as MRI. PMID:28806768

  12. Petroleum Resins: Separation, Character, and Role in Petroleum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Ivar; Speight, James

    2001-01-01

    In petroleum science, the term resin generally implies material that has been eluted from various solid adsorbents, whereas the term maltenes (or petrolenes) indicates a mixture of the resins and oils obtained as filtrates from the asphaltene precipitation. Thus, after the asphaltenes are precipi......In petroleum science, the term resin generally implies material that has been eluted from various solid adsorbents, whereas the term maltenes (or petrolenes) indicates a mixture of the resins and oils obtained as filtrates from the asphaltene precipitation. Thus, after the asphaltenes...... are precipitated, adsorbents are added to the n-pentane solutions of the resins and oils, by which process the resins are adsorbed and subsequently recovered by the use of a more polar solvent, and the oils remain in solution. The resin fraction plays an important role in the stability of petroleum and prevents...... of the fact that the resin fraction is extremely important to the stability of petroleum, there is surprisingly little work reported on the characteristics of the resins. This article summarizes the work that has been carried out in determining the character and properties of the resin constituents...

  13. Design, manufacture, and evaluation of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom purpose-built for radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, K. M.; Ebert, M. A.; Kron, T.; Howlett, S. J.; Cornes, D.; Hamilton, C. S.; Denham, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was designed and constructed to meet specific criteria for multicenter radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison. Methods: Three dimensional external and organ outlines were generated from a computed tomography image set of a male pelvis, forming the basis of design for an anatomically realistic phantom. Clinically relevant points of interest were selected throughout the dataset where point-dose values could be measured with thermoluminescence dosimeters and a small-volume ionization chamber. Following testing, three materials were selected and the phantom was manufactured using modern prototyping techniques into five separate coronal slices. Time lines and resource requirements for the phantom design and manufacture were recorded. The ability of the phantom to mimic the entire treatment chain was tested. Results: The phantom CT images indicated that organ densities and geometries were comparable to those of the original patient. The phantom proved simple to load for dosimetry and rapid to assemble. Due to heat release during manufacture, small air gaps and density heterogeneities were present throughout the phantom. The overall cost for production of the prototype phantom was comparable to other commercial anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantom was shown to be suitable for use as a ''patient'' to mimic the entire treatment chain for typical external beam radiotherapy for prostate and rectal cancer. Conclusions: The phantom constructed for the present study incorporates all characteristics necessary for accurate Level III intercomparison studies. Following use in an extensive Level III dosimetric comparison over a large time scale and geographic area, the phantom retained mechanical stability and did not show signs of radiation-induced degradation.

  14. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Materials and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age...... 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments...... up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using...

  15. Versatile composite resins simplifying the practice of restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margeas, Robert

    2014-01-01

    After decades of technical development and refinement, composite resins continue to simplify the practice of restorative dentistry, offering clinicians versatility, predictability, and enhanced physical properties. With a wide range of products available today, composite resins are a reliable, conservative, multi-functional restorative material option. As manufacturers strive to improve such properties as compression strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, water sorption, and wear resistance, several classification systems of composite resins have been developed.

  16. Ultrasonic cleaning reduces the residual monomer in acrylic resins

    OpenAIRE

    Charasseangpaisarn, Taksid; Wiwatwarrapan, Chairat; Leklerssiriwong, Nonthida

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose: The residual monomer remaining in acrylic resin can cause an allergic reaction and is toxic to oral soft tissue. This study determined the effect of the duration of ultrasonic cleaning on the amount of residual methyl methacrylate monomer in one heat-polymerized acrylic resin, Meliodent, and three autopolymerized acrylic resins, Unifast Trad Ivory, Unifast Trad Pink, and Unifast III. Materials and methods: Thirty-six disc-shaped specimens of each brand were prepared and...

  17. A Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Ceramic and Resin Denture Teeth on Different Acrylic Resin Bases

    OpenAIRE

    Corsalini, Massimo; Venere, Daniela Di; Pettini, Francesco; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Catapano, Santo; Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Carossa, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of different resin bases and artificial teeth made of ceramic or acrylic resin materials and whether tooth-base interface may be treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting. Experimental measurements were carried on 80 specimens consisting of a cylinder of acrylic resin into which a single tooth is inserted. An ad hoc metallic frame was realized to measure the shear bond strength at the tooth-base interface. A complete factorial pl...

  18. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes/epoxy resin composites characterization of the starting materials and evaluation of thermal and electrical conductivity;Compositos resina epoxi/nanotubos de carbonos de paredes multiplas: caracterizacao dos materiais de partida e avaliacao das condutividades eletrica e termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Wellington Marcos da

    2009-07-01

    In this study we investigate the electrical and thermal properties of I) composite materials fabricated with O, I, 0,5 and I wt% of concentric multi-wall carbon nanotubes/epoxy resin (MWNT) dispersed randomly in the resin; 2) MWNT buckypaper/resin composite materials; 3) and neat MWNT buckypaper. Initially, we use the techniques of thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, energy dispersive spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, scanning and transmission electron microscopy for a broadening characterization of the starting materials, to evaluate its morphology, purity, chemical composition and structure, in order to optimize the properties of crosslinked resin and, consequently, of the composite systems. Important parameters such as the average molecular mass and the equivalent weight of epoxy resin (DGEBA) were determined by {sup 1}H-NMR analysis and, after that, resin/curing agent relations with Phr 10, 15, 20 and 53,2 were elaborated and investigated by thermogravimetry, the resin/curing agent relation with Phr 10 showed to be the most thermally stable. This stoichiometric relation was used to elaborate the composites. We have evaluated that the effect of adding 10 wt% of the solvent acetone to the epoxy resin preparation does not alter its properties so we have adopted two routes to fabricate the composites. In the first route we used 10 wt% of acetone and, in the second the MWNT were dispersed in the matrix without using the solvent. However, no significant difference was observed for the dispersion of the bundle tubes in both systems. The electrical conductivity of the composites and buckypapers was evaluated by impedance spectroscopy and the thermal conductivity by the flash laser flash method. Only the buckypapers presented high values for electrical conductivity (10{sup 3} S.m{sup -1}). The composite systems presented values of 10{sup -3} S.m{sup -1}, only a bit different from the value of the crosslinked resin. For thermal

  19. Monte Carlo dose calculations for phantoms with hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazalova, M; Verhaegen, F; Coolens, C; Childs, P; Cury, F; Beaulieu, L

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients with hip prostheses are severely degraded by metal streaking artefacts. The low image quality makes organ contouring more difficult and can result in large dose calculation errors when Monte Carlo (MC) techniques are used. In this work, the extent of streaking artefacts produced by three common hip prosthesis materials (Ti-alloy, stainless steel, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy) was studied. The prostheses were tested in a hypothetical prostate treatment with five 18 MV photon beams. The dose distributions for unilateral and bilateral prosthesis phantoms were calculated with the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc MC code. This was done in three phantom geometries: in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry, and in an artefact-corrected geometry. The artefact-corrected geometry was created using a modified filtered back-projection correction technique. It was found that unilateral prosthesis phantoms do not show large dose calculation errors, as long as the beams miss the artefact-affected volume. This is possible to achieve in the case of unilateral prosthesis phantoms (except for the Co-Cr-Mo prosthesis which gives a 3% error) but not in the case of bilateral prosthesis phantoms. The largest dose discrepancies were obtained for the bilateral Co-Cr-Mo hip prosthesis phantom, up to 11% in some voxels within the prostate. The artefact correction algorithm worked well for all phantoms and resulted in dose calculation errors below 2%. In conclusion, a MC treatment plan should include an artefact correction algorithm when treating patients with hip prostheses

  20. Poly(vinyl alcohol) gels as photoacoustic breast phantoms revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, W.; Piras, D.; Heijblom, M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    A popular phantom in photoacoustic imaging is poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel fabricated by freezing and thawing (F–T) aqueous solutions of PVA. The material possesses acoustic and optical properties similar to those of tissue. Earlier work characterized PVA gels in small test specimens where

  1. Poly(vinyl alcohol) gels as photoacoustic breast phantoms revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Heijblom, Michelle; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    A popular phantom in photoacoustic imaging is poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel fabricated by freezing and thawing (F-T) aqueous solutions of PVA. The material possesses acoustic and optical properties similar to those of tissue. Earlier work characterized PVA gels in small test specimens where

  2. Biodegradation of acrylic based resins: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Ana F; Neves, Cristina B; de Almeida, Marise S; Pinheiro, Lídia M; Oliveira, Sofia Arantes e; Lopes, Luís P; Castro, Matilde F

    2010-05-01

    The development of different types of materials with application in dentistry is an area of intense growth and research, due to its importance in oral health. Among the different materials there are the acrylic based resins that have been extensively used either in restorations or in dentures. The objective of this manuscript was to review the acrylic based resins biodegradation phenomena. Specific attention was given to the causes and consequences of materials degradation under the oral environment. Information from scientific full papers, reviews or abstracts published from 1963 to date were included in the review. Published material was searched in dental literature using general and specialist databases, like the PubMED database. Published studies regarding the description of biodegradation mechanisms, in vitro and in vivo release experiments and cell based studies conducted on acrylic based resins or their components were evaluated. Studies related to the effect of biodegradation on the physical and mechanical properties of the materials were also analyzed. Different factors such as saliva characteristics, chewing or thermal and chemical dietary changes may be responsible for the biodegradation of acrylic based resins. Release of potential toxic compounds from the material and change on their physical and mechanical properties are the major consequences of biodegradation. Increasing concern arises from potential toxic effects of biodegradation products under clinical application thus justifying an intensive research in this area. 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of core-to-dentin thickness ratio on the biaxial flexural strength, reliability, and fracture mode of bilayered materials of zirconia core (Y-TZP) and veneer indirect composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Naichuan; Liao, Yunmao; Zhang, Hai; Yue, Li; Lu, Xiaowen; Shen, Jiefei; Wang, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Indirect composite resins (ICR) are promising alternatives as veneering materials for zirconia frameworks. The effects of core-to-dentin thickness ratio (C/Dtr) on the mechanical property of bilayered veneer ICR/yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) core disks have not been previously studied. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effects of C/Dtr on the biaxial flexural strength, reliability, and fracture mode of bilayered veneer ICR/ Y-TZP core disks. A total of 180 bilayered 0.6-mm-thick composite resin disks in core material and C/Dtr of 2:1, 1:1, and 1:2 were tested with either core material placed up or placed down for piston-on-3-ball biaxial flexural strength. The mean biaxial flexural strength, Weibull modulus, and fracture mode were measured to evaluate the variation trend of the biaxial flexural strength, reliability, and fracture mode of the bilayered disks with various C/Dtr. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests were used to evaluate the variation tendency of fracture mode with the C/Dtr or material placed down during testing (α=.05). Light microscopy was used to identify the fracture mode. The mean biaxial flexural strength and reliability improved with the increase in C/Dtr when specimens were tested with the core material either up and down, and depended on the materials that were placed down during testing. The rates of delamination, Hertzian cone cracks, subcritical radial cracks, and number of fracture fragments partially depended on the C/Dtr and the materials that were placed down during testing. The biaxial flexural strength, reliability, and fracture mode in bilayered structures of Y-TZP core and veneer ICR depend on both the C/Dtr and the material that was placed down during testing. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Restoration techniques and marginal overhang in Class II composite resin restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to compare in vitro interproximal overhang formation of Class II composite resin restoration when using different matrix systems. METHODS: 240 lower left molar phantom head teeth with an MO-preparation were divided into 12 groups (n=20). In six groups a

  6. Comparison of computed tomography dose index in polymethyl methacrylate and nylon dosimetry phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supawitoo Sookpeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computed tomography (CT scanning has been growing steadily. Therefore, CT dose measurement is becoming increasingly important for patient protection and optimization. A phantom is an important tool for dose measurement. This paper focuses on the evaluation of a CT dosimetry phantom made from nylon, instead of the standard polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, which is not readily available or is too expensive in some countries. Comparison between phantoms made from the two materials is made in terms of measurements of the CT dose indices (CTDI. These were measured for four different beam widths and kVp settings at the center and periphery in head and body phantoms made from both materials and weighted CTDIs (CTDIw were calculated. CT numbers along the z-axis of the phantom were also measured at the center and four peripheral positions of each scanned slice to check phantom homogeneity. Results showed that values for the CTDIw measured in the nylon phantoms were slightly higher than those from the PMMA while CT numbers for nylon were lower than those of PMMA. This is because the mass attenuation coefficient of the nylon is higher. Nylon could be used as a substitute material for CT dosimetry phantom to enable measurements and adjustment factors are given which could be used to estimate PMMA values for making comparisons with displayed values.

  7. Comparison of computed tomography dose index in polymethyl methacrylate and nylon dosimetry phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookpeng, Supawitoo; Cheebsumon, Patsuree; Pengpan, Thanyawee; Martin, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) scanning has been growing steadily. Therefore, CT dose measurement is becoming increasingly important for patient protection and optimization. A phantom is an important tool for dose measurement. This paper focuses on the evaluation of a CT dosimetry phantom made from nylon, instead of the standard polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), which is not readily available or is too expensive in some countries. Comparison between phantoms made from the two materials is made in terms of measurements of the CT dose indices (CTDI). These were measured for four different beam widths and kVp settings at the center and periphery in head and body phantoms made from both materials and weighted CTDIs (CTDIw) were calculated. CT numbers along the z-axis of the phantom were also measured at the center and four peripheral positions of each scanned slice to check phantom homogeneity. Results showed that values for the CTDIw measured in the nylon phantoms were slightly higher than those from the PMMA while CT numbers for nylon were lower than those of PMMA. This is because the mass attenuation coefficient of the nylon is higher. Nylon could be used as a substitute material for CT dosimetry phantom to enable measurements and adjustment factors are given which could be used to estimate PMMA values for making comparisons with displayed values. PMID:27051170

  8. Introduction of a stack-phantom for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, C.; Schnell, P.O.; Jacobsson, H.; Engelin, L.; Danielsson, A.M.; Johansson, L.; Larsson, S.A.; Pagani, M.; Stone-Elander, S.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: We have previously developed a new flexible phantom system for SPECT, i.e. 'the stack phantom' (Eur. J. Nucl. Med. 27, No.2, 131-139, 2000). The unique feature of this phantom system is that it allows studies with, as well as without major degrading impacts from photon attenuation and Compton scattering. The specific aim of this work was to further develop the system with special reference to PET. Material and methods: The principle of the phantom concept is discrete sampling of 3D objects by a series of equidistant 2D planes. The 2D planes are a digitised set of 2D sections, representing the radioactivity distribution in the object of interest. Using a grey scale related to the radioactivity concentration, selected images are printed by radioactive ink on thin paper sheets and stacked into the 3D structure with low-density or with tissue equivalent material in between. Using positron emitting radionuclides, the paper sheets alone may not be sufficiently thick to avoid annihilation losses due to escaping positrons. In order to investigate the amount of additional material needed, a spot of radioactivity ( 18 F) was printed out and subsequently covered by adding thin plastic films (0.055mm) on both sides of the paper. Short PET scans (ECAT 921) were performed and the count-rate was registered after each additional layer of plastic cover. A first prototype, a cylindrical cold-spot phantom was constructed on the basis of these results. Nine identical sheets were printed out and first mounted in between 4 mm plates of polystyrene (density 1.04 g/cm 3 ). After a PET-scan, the paper sheets were re-mounted in between a low-density material (Divinycell, H30, density 0.03 g/cm 3 ) before repeating the PET scan. Results: For 18 F, the number of registered annihilation photons increased with increasing number of plastic sheets from 70% for the pure paper sheet to about 100% with 0.5 mm plastic cover on each side. PET of the low-density stacked cold spot phantom

  9. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as

  10. Phantom pain : A sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, Susanne; Bosmans, JC; Van der Schans, CP; Geertzen, JHB; Dijkstra, PU

    2004-01-01

    Purpose : To analyse how decisions to dichotomise the frequency and impediment of phantom pain into absent and present influence the outcome of studies by performing a sensitivity analysis on an existing database. Method : Five hundred and thirty-six subjects were recruited from the database of an

  11. Cerebral NIRS performance testing with molded and 3D-printed phantoms (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianting; Huang, Stanley; Chen, Yu; Welle, Cristin G.; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2017-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has emerged as a low-cost, p