WorldWideScience

Sample records for resin particle diameter

  1. Multi-scale analysis of the effect of nano-filler particle diameter on the physical properties of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Inoue, Sayuri; Sakai, Takahiko; Abe, Tomohiro; Kitagawa, Haruaki; Imazato, Satoshi

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of silica nano-filler particle diameters in a computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) composite resin (CR) block on physical properties at the multi-scale in silico. CAD/CAM CR blocks were modeled, consisting of silica nano-filler particles (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 nm) and matrix (Bis-GMA/TEGDMA), with filler volume contents of 55.161%. Calculation of Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios for the block at macro-scale were analyzed by homogenization. Macro-scale CAD/CAM CR blocks (3 × 3 × 3 mm) were modeled and compressive strengths were defined when the fracture loads exceeded 6075 N. MPS values of the nano-scale models were compared by localization analysis. As the filler size decreased, Young's moduli and compressive strength increased, while Poisson's ratios and MPS decreased. All parameters were significantly correlated with the diameters of the filler particles (Pearson's correlation test, r = -0.949, 0.943, -0.951, 0.976, p CAD/CAM CR blocks can be enhanced by loading silica nanofiller particles of smaller diameter. CAD/CAM CR blocks by using smaller silica nano-filler particles have a potential to increase fracture resistance.

  2. Mean particle diameters : From statistical definition to physical understanding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderliesten, M.

    2008-01-01

    Mean particle diameters are important for the science of particulate systems. This thesis deals with a definition system for these mean diameters, called Moment-Ratio (M-R) definition system, and provides a general statistical and physical basis. Also, the current DIN/ISO definition system is

  3. Diameter measurements of polystyrene particles with atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnaes, J.

    2011-09-01

    The size of (nano) particles is a key parameter used in controlling their function. The particle size is also important in order to understand their physical and chemical properties and regulate their number in health and safety issues. In this work, the geometric diameters of polystyrene spheres of nominal diameter 100 nm are measured using atomic force microscopy. The measurements are based on the apex height and on the average distance between neighbouring spheres when they form a close-packed monolayer on a flat mica substrate. The most important influence parameters for the determination of the geometric diameter are the lateral air gaps and deformation of the spheres. The lateral air gaps are caused by significant size variations of the individual spheres, and a correction is calculated based on the simulation of packing of spheres. The deformation of the spheres is caused mainly by capillary forces acting when they are in contact with each other or with the mica substrate. Based on calculated capillary forces and the literature values of the elastic properties of the polystyrene and mica, the deformation is estimated to be 2 nm with a standard uncertainty of 2 nm. The geometric diameter of the polystyrene spheres was measured with a combined standard uncertainty of ≈3 nm. The measured vertical diameter of 92.3 nm and the certified mobility equivalent diameter measured by differential mobility analysis (DMA) are marginally consistent at a confidence level of 95%. However, the measured lateral geometric diameter was 98.9 nm and is in good agreement with DMA.

  4. Threshold Particle Diameters in Miniemulsion Reversible-Deactivation Radical Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Tobita

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Various types of controlled/living radical polymerizations, or using the IUPAC recommended term, reversible-deactivation radical polymerization (RDRP, conducted inside nano-sized reaction loci are considered in a unified manner, based on the polymerization rate expression, Rp = kp[M]K[Interm]/[Trap]. Unique miniemulsion polymerization kinetics of RDRP are elucidated on the basis of the following two factors: (1 A high single molecule concentration in a nano-sized particle; and (2 a significant statistical concentration variation among particles. The characteristic particle diameters below which the polymerization rate start to deviate significantly (1 from the corresponding bulk polymerization, and (2 from the estimate using the average concentrations, can be estimated by using simple equations. For stable-radical-mediated polymerization (SRMP and atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP, an acceleration window is predicted for the particle diameter range, . For reversible-addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization (RAFT, degenerative-transfer radical polymerization (DTRP and also for the conventional nonliving radical polymerization, a significant rate increase occurs for . On the other hand, for  the polymerization rate is suppressed because of a large statistical variation of monomer concentration among particles.

  5. Continuous Measurement of Particle Hygroscopicity as a Function of Diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, C. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Ziemba, L. D.; Thornhill, K. L.; Moore, R.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Winstead, E. L.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Wagner, N.; Langridge, J. M.; Richardson, M.; Lack, D. A.; Law, D. C.; Shingler, T.; Sorooshian, A.

    2012-12-01

    An ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer (UHSAS, Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO, USA) has been substantially modified to humidify the aerosol sample stream. The size distribution of deliquesced particles at humidities as high as 95% is measured. By combining a Mie model of instrument response with measurements of dry and wet size distributions, the hygroscopic growth factor as a function of particle diameter can be estimated. By operating a second, well-calibrated dry UHSAS simultaneously with the humidified UHSAS, the size-dependent particle hygroscopicity can be determined continuously, which is particularly useful for airborne sampling where rapid time response is required. The technique has been applied to laboratory particles of inorganic salts and of polystyrene latex, and to mixed sulfate/organic particles and dense forest fire smoke measured on an aircraft during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) project. Results will be compared with measurements of aerosol extinction at different RH values and of hygroscopic growth made with a differential aerosol sizing and hygroscopicity spectrometer probe (DASH-SP). Initial evaluations of changes in hygroscopicity due to processing in convective clouds will be presented. Limitations of the technique, such as the effects of external mixtures and insoluble components, will be discussed.

  6. Microscopic Approaches to Decomposition and Burning Processes of a Micro Plastic Resin Particle under Abrupt Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohiwa, Norio; Ishino, Yojiro; Yamamoto, Atsunori; Yamakita, Ryuji

    To elucidate the possibility and availability of thermal recycling of waste plastic resin from a basic and microscopic viewpoint, a series of abrupt heating processes of a spherical micro plastic particle having a diameter of about 200 μm is observed, when it is abruptly exposed to hot oxidizing combustion gas. Three ingenious devices are introduced and two typical plastic resins of polyethylene terephthalate and polyethylene are used. In this paper the dependency of internal and external appearances of residual plastic embers on the heating time and the ingredients of plastic resins is optically analyzed, along with appearances of internal micro bubbling, multiple micro explosions and jets, and micro diffusion flames during abrupt heating. Based on temporal variations of the surface area of a micro plastic particle, the apparent burning rate constant is also evaluated and compared with those of well-known volatile liquid fuels.

  7. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution in composite resin cores with fiber posts of varying diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kazuhiko; Ino, Teruno; Iwase, Naoki; Shimizu, Eitaroh; Suzuki, Megumi; Satoh, Goh; Ohkawa, Shuji; Fujisawa, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA), stress distributions in the remaining radicular tooth structure were investigated under the condition of varying diameters of fiber post for fiber post-reinforced composite resin cores (fiber post and core) in maxillary central incisors. Four 3D-FEA models were constructed: (1) fiber post (ø1.2, ø1.4, and ø1.6 mm) and composite resin core; and (2) gold-cast post and core. Maximum stresses in the tooth structure for fiber post and core were higher than that for gold-cast post and core. In the former models, stresses in the tooth structure as well as in the composite resin were slightly reduced with increase in fiber post diameter. These results thus suggested that to reduce stress in the remaining radicular tooth with a large coronal defect, it is recommended to accompany a composite resin core with a fiber post of a large diameter.

  8. Evaluation of inorganic particles of composite resins with nanofiller content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Hörlle, Lucas; Oshima, Hugo Mitsuo; Hirakata, Luciana Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were evaluate by energy dispersed X-ray (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the inorganic particles of three nanofilled composite resins, comparing particles sizes, shape and composition, and the filler weight content by thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA). Three composite resins classified as nanofilled were selected to this study: Esthet-X; Grandio; Filtek Supreme XT. The shade was standardized (A2) for enamel (E) or dentin (D). Ten samples with 20 mg (±10 mg) of each composite resin were submitted to thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) in order to record the filler weight content (wt%). The amount of inorganic phase ranged from 75.75 to 87 wt%, to Esthet-X (D) and Grandio (D), respectively. The filler composition was analyzed by energy dispersed X-ray (EDS), and the size and shape were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The filler average size (µm) obtained by SEM were: Esthet-X (E) 1.16; Esthet-X (D) 1.39; Filtek Supreme XT (E) 0.6 (nanocluster); Filtek Supreme XT (D) 1.14 (nanocluster); Grandio (E) 2.05 and Grandio (D) 3.1. Silica (SiO2), Ba and Al were observed through EDS. The shape of Esthet-X and Grandio fillers showed similar characteristics with high quantity of irregular inorganic particles and heterogeneous filler. However, Filtek Supreme XT showed spherical and regular particles with homogeneous distribution and sizes. Based in the analysis of nanofilled composites inorganic phase, inconsistencies of weight content, composition, shape and size can be stated between the literature and manufacturer's instructions.

  9. Electron radiation curing of particle boards and fiber building boards impregnated with artificial resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaudy, R.; Proksch, E. (Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf GmbH Inst. fuer Chemie)

    1980-06-01

    The hardening of wood particle boards and fiber building boards impregnated with artificial resins using a technical electron accelerator was examined. Suitable resin-monomer mixtures were selected by in-vitro-tests. A styrene-free unsaturated polyester resin and acrylic-modified melamine resins turned out be suitable, whereas other unsaturated polyesters and activators used for curing by gamma irradiation did not fit. The hardened boards showed markedly inceased hardness and reduced swelling, but only moderate weather resistance.

  10. Influence of tube and particle diameter on heat transport in packed beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borkink, J.G.H.; Borkink, J.G.H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Influence of the tube and particle diameter and shape, as well as their ratio, on the radial heat transport in packed beds has been studied. Heat transport experiments were performed with four different packings in three wall-cooled tubes, which differed in inner diameter only. Experimental values

  11. Puffing and inhalation behaviour in cigarette smoking: Implications for particle diameter and dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, Colin; McGrath, Conor; Warren, Nigel; Biggs, Philip; McAughey, John, E-mail: colin_dickens@bat.co [British American Tobacco, Group R and D Centre, Southampton, SO15 8TL (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    Inhalation of tobacco smoke aerosol is a two-step process involving puffing followed by inhalation. Measured smoke deposition efficiencies in the lung (20-70%) are greater than expected for smoke particles of diameter 150 - 250 nm CMD. Various mechanisms have been put forward to explain this enhanced deposition pattern, including coagulation, hygroscopic growth, condensation and evaporation, changes in composition, or changes in inhalation behaviour. This paper represents one of a series of studies seeking to better quantify smoke chemistry, inhalation behaviour and cumulative particle growth. The studies have been conducted to better understand smoke dosimetry and links to disease as part of a wider programme defining risk and potential harm reduction. In this study, it was noted that particle deposition increased with increasing inhalation depth, and that smoke inhalation volumes were generally greater than normal tidal breathing volumes. A weak association was observed between particle diameter and puff flow, but no strong association between particle diameter and retention efficiency.

  12. Study on effective particle diameters and coolability of particulate beds packed with irregular multi-size particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W.; Kudinov, P.; Bechta, S.

    2013-08-01

    One of the key questions in severe accident research is the coolability of the debris bed, i.e., whether decay heat can be completely removed by the coolant flow into the debris bed. Extensive experimental and analytical work has been done to substantiate the coolability research. Most of the available experimental data is related to the beds packed with single size (mostly spherical) particles, and less data is available for multi-size/irregular-shape particles. There are several analytical models available, which rely on the mean particle diameter and porosity of the bed in their predictions. Two different types of particles were used to investigate coolability of particulate beds at VTT, Finland. The first type is irregular-shape Aluminum Oxide gravel particles whose sizes vary from 0.25 mm to 10 mm, which were employed in the STYX experiment programme (2001-2008). The second type is spherical beads of Zirconium silicate whose sizes vary between 0.8 mm to 1 mm, which were used in the COOLOCE tests (Takasuo et al., 2012) to study the effect of multi-dimensional flooding on coolability. In the present work, the two types of particles are used in the POMECO-FL and POMECO-HT test facility to obtain their effective particle diameters and dryout heat flux of the beds, respectively. The main idea is to check how the heaters' orientations (vertical in COOLOCE vs. horizontal in POMECO-HT) and diameters (6 mm in COOLOCE vs. 3 mm in POMECO-HT) affect the coolability (dryout heat flux) of the test beds. The tests carried out on the POMECO-FL facility using a bed packed with aluminum oxide gravel particles show the effective particle diameter of the gravel particles is 0.65 mm, by which the frictional pressure gradient can be predicted by the Ergun equation. After the water superficial velocity is higher than 0.0025 m/s, the pressure gradient is underestimated. The effective particle diameter of the zirconium particles is found as 0.8 mm. The dryout heat flux is measured on

  13. Effects of Prepolymerized Particle Size and Polymerization Kinetics on Volumetric Shrinkage of Dental Modeling Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Yub Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control. The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction particle size analysis, respectively. Linear polymerization shrinkage strains of the resins were monitored for 20 minutes using a custom-made linometer, and the final values (at 20 minutes were converted into volumetric shrinkages. The final volumetric shrinkage values for the modeling resins were statistically similar (P>0.05 or significantly larger (P<0.05 than that of the control resin and were related to the polymerization kinetics (P<0.05 rather than the PMMA bead size (P=0.335. Therefore, the optimal control of the polymerization kinetics seems to be more important for producing high-precision resin structures rather than the use of dental modeling resins.

  14. Low-density lipoprotein particle diameter and mortality: the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Tanja B; Kleber, Marcus E; März, Winfried; Silbernagel, Günther; Siekmeier, Rüdiger; Wieland, Heinrich; Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Koenig, Wolfgang; Scharnagl, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether differences in average diameter of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles were associated with total and cardiovascular mortality. We studied 1643 subjects referred to coronary angiography, who did not receive lipid-lowering drugs. During a median follow-up of 9.9 years, 398 patients died, of these 246 from cardiovascular causes. We calculated average particle diameters of LDL from the composition of LDL obtained by β-quantification. When LDL with intermediate average diameters (16.5-16.8 nm) were used as reference category, the hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors for death from any cause were 1.71 (95% CI: 1.31-2.25) and 1.24 (95% CI: 0.95-1.63) in patients with large (>16.8 nm) or small LDL (<16.5 nm), respectively. Adjusted HRs for death from cardiovascular causes were 1.89 (95% CI: 1.32-2.70) and 1.54 (95% CI: 1.06-2.12) in patients with large or small LDL, respectively. Patients with large LDL had higher concentrations of the inflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein than patients with small or intermediate LDL. Equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation revealed characteristic and distinct profiles of LDL particles in persons with large (approximately even distribution of intermediate-density lipoproteins and LDL-1 through LDL-6) intermediate (peak concentration at LDL-4) or small (peak concentration at LDL-6) average LDL particle diameters. Calculated LDL particle diameters identify patients with different profiles of LDL subfractions. Both large and small LDL diameters are independently associated with increased risk mortality of all causes and, more so, due to cardiovascular causes compared with LDL of intermediate size. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Centrifugal Pump Effect on Average Particle Diameter of Oil-Water Emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, A.; Eskin, A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we review the process of oil-water emulsion particles fragmentation in a turbulent flow created by a centrifugal pump. We examined the influence of time necessary for oil-water emulsion preparation on the particle size of oil products and the dependence of a centrifugal pump emulsifying capacity on the initial emulsion dispersion. The investigated emulsion contained the brand fuel oil M-100 and tap water; it was sprayed with a nozzle in a gas-water flare. After preparation of the emulsion, the centrifugal pump was turned on and the emulsion samples were taken before and after the pump passing in 15, 30 and 45 minutes of spraying. To determine the effect the centrifugal pump has on the dispersion of the oil-water emulsion, the mean particle diameter of the emulsion particles was determined by the optical and microscopic method before and after the pump passing. A dispersion analysis of the particles contained in the emulsion was carried out by a laser diffraction analyzer. By analyzing the pictures of the emulsion samples, it was determined that after the centrifugal pump operation a particle size of oil products decreases. This result is also confirmed by the distribution of the obtained analyzer where the content of fine particles with a diameter less than 10 μm increased from 12% to 23%. In case of increasing emulsion preparation time, a particle size of petroleum products also decreases.

  16. Reducing the critical particle diameter in (highly) asymmetric sieve-based lateral displacement devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkshoorn, J P; Schutyser, M A I; Sebris, M; Boom, R M; Wagterveld, R M

    2017-10-26

    Deterministic lateral displacement technology was originally developed in the realm of microfluidics, but has potential for larger scale separation as well. In our previous studies, we proposed a sieve-based lateral displacement device inspired on the principle of deterministic lateral displacement. The advantages of this new device is that it gives a lower pressure drop, lower risk of particle accumulation, higher throughput and is simpler to manufacture. However, until now this device has only been investigated for its separation of large particles of around 785 µm diameter. To separate smaller particles, we investigate several design parameters for their influence on the critical particle diameter. In a dimensionless evaluation, device designs with different geometry and dimensions were compared. It was found that sieve-based lateral displacement devices are able to displace particles due to the crucial role of the flow profile, despite of their unusual and asymmetric design. These results demonstrate the possibility to actively steer the velocity profile in order to reduce the critical diameter in deterministic lateral displacement devices, which makes this separation principle more accessible for large-scale, high throughput applications.

  17. The effect of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy resin dowel diameter on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Kuan Chuan; Lui, Joo Loon

    2014-10-01

    To determine the effect of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy resin (FRC) dowels of different diameters on the failure load of endodontically treated teeth with different remaining dentine and reinforcing resin composite (RRC) thicknesses and the mode of failure in each group. Fifty extracted intact human maxillary central incisors were decoronated 2 mm incisal to the buccal cementoenamel junction and endodontically treated. The teeth were randomly assigned to one of five groups (n = 10): group B, dowel space prepared with size 0 dowel drill/size 0 FRC dowel/no RRC; group W, size 1 dowel space/size 1 FRC dowel/no RRC; group R, size 3 dowel space/size 3 FRC dowel/no RRC; group WR, size 3 dowel space/size 1 FRC dowel/RRC; group BR, size 3 dowel space/size 0 FRC dowel/RRC. Ferrules of 2 and 0.5 mm were prepared at the facio-lingual and proximal margin respectively. All specimens were restored with a Ni-Cr crown, thermocycled and loaded at 135° from the long axis in a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by post hoc comparisons (Bonferroni) with α = 0.05. Mean failure loads (N) for groups B, W, R, WR, and BR were as follows: 1406 (SD = 376), 1259 (379), 1085 (528), 959 (200), and 816 (298). Significant differences were found between groups B and BR. Group B had the highest favorable failure mode. Within the limitations of this study, the use of a smaller FRC dowel and RRC is recommended rather than enlargement of dowel spaces to accurately fit larger FRC dowels, as the enlargement of dowel space may increase the risk of unfavorable failure. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Stability of large diameter W1/O/W2 emulsion particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guoxiu; Su Lin; Chen Sufen; Li Bo; Yao Hong; Deng Yi; Wei Jianjun

    2012-01-01

    W 1 /O/W 2 double emulsion particles of around 2 mm diameter were prepared using emulsion microencapsulation method. The stability of the particles was studied under the quasi-static condition and the rotating flow field, respectively, with the variation of the organic phase concentration and the water-soluble polymer concentration. The enhancement mechanism of the kinetic stability of the particles was explored based on force analysis and deformation analysis. The results show that, both under the quasi-static condition and the rotating flow field, the stability of W 1 /O/W 2 double emulsion particles increases with the in- crease of PS concentration. However, it increases firstly and then decreases when PVA concentration increases. Moreover, in some conditions, the kinetic stability of W 1 /O/W 2 double emulsion particles is greatly enhanced in the rotating flow field com- pared with under the quasi-static condition. (authors)

  19. Radial heat transfer in fixed-bed packing with small tube/particle diameter ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grah, A.; Nowak, U.; Schreier, M.; Adler, R.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents an integrating approach to the description of radial heat transfer in catalyst packing with a flow without chemical reactions. The derived model combines the conventional αW model with the more recent λr( r) model. Particular attention is paid to small tube/particle diameter ratios. Experimental data including different tube diameters and particle shapes are used for adjustment. Spheres were used to represent a type of ordered single-size packing, and hollow cylinders to represent a type of chaotic random packing. A gradual quasi-steady experimental concept allows measurement of temperature gradients even at low flow velocities. Adjusted radial temperature profiles are compared with known approaches from literature, and correlation equations for heat transfer parameters are specified.

  20. Collection performance of air filters for DOP particles below 0.3μm diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yuji; Miyamoto, Katsuhiro; Mori, Teiji; Koizumi, Akira

    1982-01-01

    Collection performance of a HEPA filter and a new type filter which was recently developed for removing fine particles below 0.3 μm was verfied by using a laser aerosol particle counter in the particle size range from 0.12 to 0.42 μm diameter in which the filter performance was not sufficiently clarified. Tested filter sheets were 14.5cm by 14.5cm in dimensions. DOP particles ranging from 0.12 to 0.17 μm exhibited higher penetration of HEPA filter than DOP particles from 0.27 to 0.42 μm by a factor of 20 at the standard face velocity of 2.4cm/sec. The penetration of HEPA filter was 6.6 x 10 -4 for 0.12 to 0.17 μm DOP particles, and that of the new type filter was 3.1 x 10 -6 . It was confirmed that overall system penetration of two HEPA filters in series could be described as the product of each stage penetration. (author)

  1. Effects of adding silica particles on certain properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement

    OpenAIRE

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of incorporation of silica particles with different concentrations on some properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC): Microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Materials and Methods: Silica particle was incorporated into RMGIC powder to study its effects, one type of RMGIC (Type II visible light-cured) and three concentrations of silica particles (0.06, 0.08, and 0.1% weight)...

  2. Mechanical properties of dental resin composites by co-filling diatomite and nanosized silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hua; Zhu Meifang; Li Yaogang; Zhang Qinghong; Wang Hongzhi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical property effects of co-filling dental resin composites with porous diatomite and nanosized silica particles (OX-50). The purification of raw diatomite by acid-leaching was conducted in a hot 5 M HCl solution at 80 deg. C for 12 h. Both diatomite and nanosized SiO 2 were silanized with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The silanized inorganic particles were mixed into a dimethacrylate resin. Purified diatomite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherm. Silanized inorganic particles were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a thermogravimetric analysis. The mechanical properties of the composites were tested by three-point bending, compression and Vicker's microhardness. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show the cross-section morphologies of the composites. Silanization of diatomite and nanosized silica positively reinforced interactions between the resin matrix and the inorganic particles. The mechanical properties of the resin composites gradually increased with the addition of modified diatomite (m-diatomite). The fracture surfaces of the composites exhibited large fracture steps with the addition of m-diatomite. However, when the mass fraction of m-diatomite was greater than 21 wt.% with respect to modified nanosized silica (mOX-50) and constituted 70% of the resin composite by weight, the mechanical properties of the resin composites started to decline. Thus, the porous structure of diatomite appears to be a crucial factor to improve mechanical properties of resin composites.

  3. Sorption of Uranium Ions from Their Aqueous Solution by Resins Containing Nanomagnetite Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud O. Abd El-Magied

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic amine resins composed of nanomagnetite (Fe3O4 core and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA/N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA shell were prepared by suspension polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate with N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide in the presence of nanomagnetite particles and immobilized with different amine ligands. These resins showed good magnetic properties and could be easily retrieved from their suspensions using an external magnetic field. Adsorption behaviors of uranium ions on the prepared resins were studied. Maximum sorption capacities of uranium ions on R-1 and R-2 were found to be 92 and 158 mg/g. Uranium was extracted successfully from three granite samples collected from Gabal Gattar pluton, North Eastern Desert, Egypt. The studied resins showed good durability and regeneration using HNO3.

  4. Preparation of alkyd resins containing PEG unit and their dispersing effects of inorganic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chill Won; Gong, Myoung Seon [Dept. of Chemistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea); Kim, Chang Bae [Dept. of Chemistry, Dankook University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol)-containing alkyd resins were prepared for the dispersing agent and binder by reacting the carboxy-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) with 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane monostearate obtained from 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane and stearic acid. Dispersing properties of titanium dioxide and talc were compared by measuring transmittance of the dispersing solutions, and rate of the sedimentation in 1,1,1-trichloroethane. These alkyd resins, which contained both hydrophilic and lipophilic parts, showed a good dispersion of the polar inorganic particles in the non-polar solvent. The dispersing effect of the PEG-containing alkyd resins showed its maximum when the molecular weights of hydrophilic and lipophilic parts were almost the same. This happened when the alkyd resin was prepared from PEG 1000, which turned out to agree well with HLB value 10.25. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Temperature changes of one-piece implants during the setting of acrylic resin temporary crown. The effect of implant diameter. An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutzkey, S; Cohen, O; Lauritano, D; Moses, O; Ormianer, Z; Tal, H; Kolerman, R; Carinci, F; Matalon, S

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate changes in temperature of one-piece titanium implant surface during the setting of acrylic resin temporary crowns and to correlate thermal changes to implant diameter. Thirty-three one-piece implants (ARRP, Alpha-Biotec) were divided into 3 groups according to diameter size (G1=3 mm, G2=3.3 mm, G3=3.6 mm). Implants were mounted on an acrylic glass apparatus. Thermocouples were positioned at the most coronal thread. Lower incisor temporary polycarbonate crowns were filled with 80 μL of self-curing acrylic resin and positioned immediately on the implant abutment. Thermal changes of the implant surface were recorded continuously for 10 min. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The mean initial temperature (C0) of groups G1, G2 and G3 was similar (24.79±0.78ºC, 25.26±0.63ºC, 24.97±1.06ºC, respectively). The setting of the acrylic resin temporary crown resulted in a significant increase in the implant surface temperature of all groups. The mean thermal amplitude (ΔC) for groups G1, G2 and G3 were 6.79±1.02ºC, 6.61±0.94ºC, 6.65±1.26ºC, respectively. The mean time to maximum temperature (Tmax) for groups G1, G2 and G3 were 337.38±42.91 sec, 324.69±41.46 sec and 317.98±37.91 sec respectively (P>0.05). Direct application of auto-polymerizing resin to the titanium abutment of one-piece implants significantly increased the cervical implant surface temperature. Implant diameter did not influence the temperature changes.

  6. Effect of resin-composite filler particle size and shape on shrinkage-stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Julian D; Maisuria, Amit; Vogel, Karin; Watts, David C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of variations in filler particle size and shape on the polymerization shrinkage-stress kinetics of resin-composites. A model series of 12 VLC resin-composites were studied. The particulate dispersed phase volume fraction was 56.7%: these filler particles were systematically graded in size, and further were either spherical or irregular. A Bioman instrument (cantilever beam method) was employed to determine the shrinkage-stress kinetics following 40s irradiation (600 mW/cm(2)) at 23°C (n=3). All data were captured for 60 min and the final shrinkage-stress calculated. Shrinkage-stress varied between 3.86 MPa (SD 0.14) for S3 (spherical filler particles of 500 nm) and 8.44 MPa (SD 0.41) for I1 (irregular filler particles of 450 nm). The shrinkage-stress values were generally lower for those composites with spherical filler particles than those with irregular filler particles. The differences in shrinkage-stress with filler particle size and shape were statistically significant (pparticles exhibit lower shrinkage-stress values compared to those with irregular filler particles. Shrinkage-stress and shrinkage-stress rate vary in a complex manner with variations in the size of the dispersed phase particles: a hypothesized explanation for the effect of filler particle size and shape is presented. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of filler particles morphology of resin-composites on cavity packing force for repeated condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleem, Muhammad; Watts, David C

    2017-05-31

    Effect of variation in morphology and size of filler particles, temperature and increase in condensation speed on packability of resincomposites was investigated. Eight experimental light-cured resin-composites (RZDn series) were tested. Each material was placed in a cylindrical mould at 26 or 32ºC. A flat-ended stainless-steel probe (φ=6 mm) was mechanically lowered with two different speeds 2 and 8 mm/s onto and into at the surface of the unset sample until a compressive force of 1 N was reached. This was repeated for five cycles, and from each cycle F p was calculated. All spherical and irregular filler particle resin-composites showed a decrease in F p with increase in number of compressions. Increase in temperature also decreased F p , but this effect was not very prominent in the case of irregular filler resin-composites. Filler particle morphology, increase in temperature and compression cycle speed has a prominent effect on packability of resin-composites.

  8. Physical and mechanical properties of bio-composites from wood particles and liquefied wood resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    Compression molded composites were made from wood particles and a liquefied wood/phenol/formaldehyde co-condensed resin. Based on our previous research, a phenol to wood (P/W) ratio of 2/1 was chosen for this study. The two experimental variables selected were: 1) liquefaction temperature (150o and 180oC) and 2) cooking method (atmospheric and sealed). Panels were...

  9. The mechanical properties of nanofilled resin-based composites: characterizing discrete filler particles and agglomerates using a micromanipulation technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curtis, Andrew R

    2009-02-01

    To assess the mechanical properties of discrete filler particles representative of several inorganic fillers in modern dental resin-based composites (RBCs) and to assess the validity of a novel micromanipulation technique.

  10. Voltage-Induced Nonlinear Conduction Properties of Epoxy Resin/Micron-Silver Particles Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhaoming; Lu, Pin; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Qingguo

    2018-01-01

    The nonlinear conduction properties of epoxy resin (ER)/micron-silver particles (MP) composites were investigated. Under sufficient high intensity applied constant voltage, the obvious nonlinear conduction properties of the samples with volume fraction 25% were found. With increments in the voltage, the conductive switching effect was observed. The nonlinear conduction mechanism of the ER/MP composites under high applied voltages could be attributed to the electrical current conducted via discrete paths of conductive particles induced by the electric field. The test results show that the ER/MP composites with nonlinear conduction properties are of great potential application in electromagnetic protection of electron devices and systems.

  11. Effect of Home Bleaching on Microleakage of Fiber-reinforced and Particle-filled Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching may exert some negative effects on existing composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of home bleaching on microleakage of fiber-reinforced and particle-filled composite resins. Materials and methods. Ninety class V cavities (1.5×2×3 mm were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 90 bovine teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=15 and restored as follows: Groups 1 and 2 with Z100, groups 3 and 4 with Z250, and groups 5 and 6 with Nulite F composite resins. All the specimens were thermocycled. Groups 1, 3 and 5 were selected as control groups (without bleaching and the experimental groups 2, 4 and 6 were bleached with 22% carbamide peroxide gel. All the samples were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours and then sectioned longitudinally. Dye penetration was evaluated under a stereomicroscope (×25, at both the gingival and incisal margins. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (α=0.05. Results. Statistical analyses revealed that bleaching gel increased microleakage only at gingival margins with Z250 (P=0.007. Moreover, the control groups showed a statistically significant difference in microleakage at their gingival margins. Nulite F had the maximum microleakage while Z250 showed the minimum (P=0.006. Conclusion. Microleakage of home-bleached restorations might be related to the type of composite resin used.

  12. The Effect of Particle Diameter Silica and the Kind of Reagent at the Adsorption of Zirconium with Silica Gel Column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunardjo; Budi Sulistyo; Pristi Hartati

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to know the optimum condition of the particle diameter silica and the kind of reagent at the adsorption of zirconium with silica gel. In this investigation with the absorption process by silica gel column and the equipment provided by column of absorption and silica filling material. The investigation parameters in this experiment were the particle diameter silica and the kind of reagent at the adsorption of zirconium with silica gel. The experiment was performed firstly setting apparatus and weighed the silica gel and put in the absorber column. Weighed the ZrO 2 and HfCl 4 and put in the Erlenmeyer. The solution of the ZrO 2 and HfCl 4 put in the column absorption. If the exact time the rate of solution was stopped and the yield of absorption will be analyzed with X Ray Diffraction and EDTA titration. The experiment varied by parameters the particle diameter silica and the kind of reagent at the adsorption of zirconium with silica gel. Particle diameter silica varied with: 0.150 mm; 0.300 mm; 0.425 mm and 3.000 mm. The parameter of kind reagent: H 2 O and C 2 H 5 OH. The result of this investigation could be concluded that the optimum of the particle diameter silica was 0.150 mms or the absorption efficiency 32.88 %. And the parameter of kind reagent optimum was C 2 H 5 OH or the absorption efficiency 84.28 %. (author)

  13. Processing large-diameter poly(L-lactic acid) microfiber mesh/mesenchymal stromal cell constructs via resin embedding: an efficient histologic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Alessandro, Delfo; Danti, Serena; Pertici, Gianni; Moscato, Stefania; Metelli, Maria Rita; Petrini, Mario; Danti, Sabrina; Berrettini, Stefano; Nesti, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we performed a complete histologic analysis of constructs based on large diameter ( > 100 μm) poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) microfibers obtained via dry-wet spinning and rat Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (rMSCs) differentiated towards the osteogenic lineage, using acrylic resin embedding. In many synthetic polymer-based microfiber meshes, ex post processability of fiber/cell constructs for histologic analysis may face deterring difficulties, leading to an incomplete investigation of the potential of these scaffolds. Indeed, while polymeric nanofiber (fiber diameter = tens of nanometers)/cell constructs can usually be embedded in common histologic media and easily sectioned, preserving the material structure and the antigenic reactivity, histologic analysis of large polymeric microfiber/cell constructs in the literature is really scant. This affects microfiber scaffolds based on FDA-approved and widely used polymers such as PLLA and its copolymers. Indeed, for such constructs, especially those with fiber diameter and fiber interspace much larger than cell size, standard histologic processing is usually inefficient due to inhomogeneous hardness and lack of cohesion between the synthetic and the biological phases under sectioning. In this study, the microfiber/MSC constructs were embedded in acrylic resin and the staining/reaction procedures were calibrated to demonstrate the possibility of successfully employing histologic methods in tissue engineering studies even in such difficult cases. We histologically investigated the main osteogenic markers and extracellular matrix molecules, such as alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, osteocalcin, TGF-β1, Runx2, Collagen type I and the presence of amorphous, fibrillar and mineralized matrix. Biochemical tests were employed to confirm our findings. This protocol permitted efficient sectioning of the treated constructs and good penetration of the histologic reagents, thus allowing distribution and expression of

  14. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gamal, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, 11711 Cairo (Egypt); Abdalla, Ayman M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Najran University, Najran (Saudi Arabia); Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering, Najran University, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-Hady, E.E. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, BO 61519, Minia (Egypt)

    2015-09-15

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (V{sub f}) in DAM–ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ{sub 3} and V{sub f} increases while I{sub 3} slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ{sub 3}, V{sub f} and I{sub 3} are higher in CR-39 than DAM–ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently V{sub f} increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and V{sub f} in the polymer. A relationship between V{sub f} and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  15. Fracture strength of zirconia implant abutments on narrow diameter implants with internal and external implant abutment connections: A study on the titanium resin base concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Asgeirsson, Asgeir G; Thoma, Daniel S; Fehmer, Vincent; Aspelund, Thor; Özcan, Mutlu; Pjetursson, Bjarni E

    2018-03-11

    There is limited knowledge regarding the strength of zirconia abutments with internal and external implant abutment connections and zirconia abutments supported by a titanium resin base (Variobase, Straumann) for narrow diameter implants. To compare the fracture strength of narrow diameter abutments with different types of implant abutment connections after chewing simulation. Hundred and twenty identical customized abutments with different materials and implant abutment connections were fabricated for five groups: 1-piece zirconia abutment with internal connection (T1, Cares-abutment-Straumann BL-NC implant, Straumann Switzerland), 1-piece zirconia abutment with external hex connection (T2, Procera abutment-Branemark NP implant, Nobel Biocare, Sweden), 2-piece zirconia abutments with metallic insert for internal connection (T3, Procera abutment-Replace NP implant, Nobel Biocare), 2-piece zirconia abutment on titanium resin base (T4, LavaPlus abutment-VarioBase-Straumann BL-NC implant, 3M ESPE, Germany) and 1-piece titanium abutment with internal connection (C, Cares-abutment-Straumann BL-NC implant, Straumann, Switzerland). All implants had a narrow diameter ranging from 3.3 to 3.5 mm. Sixty un-restored abutments and 60 abutments restored with glass-ceramic crowns were tested. Mean bending moments were compared using ANOVA with p-values adjusted for multiple comparisons using Tukey's procedure. The mean bending moments were 521 ± 33 Ncm (T4), 404 ± 36 Ncm (C), 311 ± 106 Ncm (T1) 265 ± 22 Ncm (T3) and 225 ± 29 (T2) for un-restored abutments and 278 ± 84 Ncm (T4), 302 ± 170 Ncm (C), 190 ± 55 Ncm (T1) 80 ± 102 Ncm (T3) and 125 ± 57 (T2) for restored abutments. For un-restored abutments, C and T4 had similar mean bending moments, significantly higher than those of the three other groups (p < .05). Titanium abutments (C) had significantly higher bending moments than identical zirconia abutments (T1) (p < .05). Zirconia

  16. Structural Color Tuning: Mixing Melanin-Like Particles with Different Diameters to Create Neutral Colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Ayaka; Kohri, Michinari; Yoshioka, Shinya; Taniguchi, Tatsuo; Kishikawa, Keiki

    2017-04-18

    We present the ability to tune structural colors by mixing colloidal particles. To produce high-visibility structural colors, melanin-like core-shell particles composed of a polystyrene (PSt) core and a polydopamine (PDA) shell, were used as components. The results indicated that neutral structural colors could be successfully obtained by simply mixing two differently sized melanin-like PSt@PDA core-shell particles. In addition, the arrangements of the particles, which were important factors when forming structural colors, were investigated by mathematical processing using a 2D Fourier transform technique and Voronoi diagrams. These findings provide new insights for the development of structural color-based ink applications.

  17. Primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, T.; Ehara, K.

    2011-02-01

    The national primary standard for the number concentration of liquid-borne particles in the 10 to 20 µm diameter range has been developed at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan. The standard consists of a total number counting type flow cytometer (T-FCM) and an electronic balance. The T-FCM is a commercial flow cytometer modified so that the total number of particles in an aqueous suspension sampled in a test tube can be counted, and the electronic balance is used to determine the mass of the suspension. This standard is intended to be used for calibrating commercial standard suspensions of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL) particles. The measurand in the calibration is the mass-based number concentration (the particle number in a unit mass of a suspension), and the calibration capability covers the concentration range from 5 × 102 to 2 × 106 particles g-1. When the concentration of the suspension is higher than 2 × 103 particles g-1, the suspension is first diluted to about 1 × 103 particles g-1 to suppress the coincidence loss in particle counting by the T-FCM. The validity of the calibration with the T-FCM was examined by comparison with an independent method in which a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to determine the number concentration of particles deposited on a silicon wafer. For a suspension of 10 µm PSL particles with a concentration of approximately 1 × 106 particles g-1, the concentration values determined by the T-FCM and SEM methods were 1.042 × 106 and 1.035 × 106 particles g-1, respectively: The difference was less than 0.7%. The relative expanded uncertainty of the measurement by the T-FCM method with the coverage factor k = 2 was 4.4%.

  18. Effect of Silver Nano-particles on Tensile Strength of Acrylic Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Tahereh; Hamedi-Rad, Fahimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is widely used for the fabrication of removable prostheses. Silver nano-particles (AgNps) have been added to PMMA because of their antimicrobial properties, but their effect on the mechanical properties of PMMA is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AgNps on the tensile strength of PMMA. Materials and methods. For this study, 12 specimens were prepared and divided into two groups. Group 1 included PMMA without AgNps and group 2 included PMMA mixed with 5 wt% of AgNps. Tensile strength of the specimens was measured by Zwick Z100 apparatus. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS using t-test. Statistical significance was defined at Pparticles. Within the limitations of this study, tensile strength of acrylic resin specimens was influenced by silver nano-particles.

  19. Synthesis and study of properties of dental resin composites with different nanosilica particles size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabela, Maria M; Sideridou, Irini D

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work was the synthesis of light-cured resin nanocomposites using nanosilica particles with different particle size and the study of some physical-mechanical properties of the composites. Various types of silica nanoparticles (Aerosil) with average particle size of 40, 20, 16, 14, and 7 nm, used as filler were silanized with the silane 3-methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPS). The total amount of silane used was kept constant at 10 wt% relative to the filler weight to ensure the complete silanization of nanoparticles. The silanizated silica nanoparticles were identified by FT-IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Then the silanized nanoparticles (55 wt%) were mixed with a photoactivated Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 wt/wt) matrix. Degree of conversion of composites was determined by FT-IR analysis. The static flexural strength and flexural modulus were measured using a three-point bending set up. The dynamic thermomechanical properties were determined by dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). Sorption, solubility and volumetric change were determined after storage of composites in water or ethanol/water solution 75 vol% for 30 days. The TGA for composites was performed in nitrogen atmosphere from 30 to 700 °C. As the average silica particle size decreases, the percentage amount of MPS attached on the silica surface increases. However, the number of MPS molecules attached on the silica surface area of 1 nm(2) is independent of filler particle size. As the average filler particles size decreases a progressive increase in the degree of conversion of composites and an increase in the amount of sorbed water is observed. The prepared composites containing different amount of silica filler, with different particle size, but with the same amount of silanized silica and organic matrix showed similar flexural strength and flexural modulus, except composite with the lowest filler particle size, which showed lower flexural modulus. Copyright © 2011

  20. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  1. From Agglomerates of Spheres to Irregularly Shaped Particles: Determination of Dynamic Shape Factors from Measurements of Mobility and Vacuum Aerodynamic Diameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Cai, Yong; Imre, Dan G.

    2006-03-01

    With the advert of aerosol instrumentation it has become possible to simultaneously measure individual particle mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters. For spherical particles these two diameters yield individual particle density. In contrast, assigning a physical meaning to the mobility or aerodynamic diameter of aspherical particles is not straightforward. This paper presents an experimental exploration of the effect of particle shape on the relationship between mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters. We make measurements on systems of three types: 1) Agglomerates of spheres, for which the density and the volume are known; 2) Ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, succinic acid and lauric acid irregularly shaped particles of known density; and 3) Internally mixed particles, containing organics and ammonium sulfate, of unknown density and shape. For agglomerates of spheres we observed alignment effects in the DMA and report the first measurements of the dynamic shape factors (DSFs) in free molecular regime. We present here the first experimental determination of the DSF of ammonium sulfate particles. We find for ammonium sulfate particles a DSF that increases from 1.03 to 1.07 as particle mobility diameter increases from 160 nm to 500 nm. Three types of NaC1 particles were generated and characterized: nearly spherical particles with DSF of ~1.02; cubic with DSF that increases from 1.065 to 1.17 as particle mobility diameter increases from 200 nm to 900 nm; and compact agglomerates with DSF 1.3-1.4. Organic particles were found very nearly spherical. The data suggest that particles composed of binary mixtures of ammonium sulfate and succinic acid have lower dynamic shape factors than pure ammonium sulfate particles. However, for internally mixed ammonium sulfate and lauric acid particles we cannot distinguish between nearly spherical particles with low density and particles with DSF of 1.17.

  2. Use of small diameter column particles to enhance HPLC determination of histamine and other biogenic amines in seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simat, Vida; Dalgaard, Paw

    2011-01-01

    Pre-column and post-column HPLC derivatization methods were modified and evaluated for the identification and quantification of nine biogenic amines in seafood Two HPLC methods with column particles of 1 8 mu m or 3 mu m in diameter were modified and compared to classical methods using 5 mu m...... column particles Both pre-column derivatization with dansyl chloride and post-column derivatization with O-phthalaldehyde were studied The HPLC methods were compared with respect to the time of elution eluent consumption backpressure as well as separation sensitivity recovery and repeatability...... for determination of biogenic amines in lean canned tuna and fatty frozen herring The modified methods using smaller column particles of 1 8 mu m or 3 mu m allowed biogenic amines to be separated and quantified faster (23-59%) and with less eluent consumption (59-62%) than classical HPLC methods Backpressures were...

  3. The determination of the hydrodynamic diameter of magnetic particles using FRS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopcansky, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53 Kosice (Slovakia); Timko, Milan [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53 Kosice (Slovakia)]. E-mail: timko@saske.sk; Potocova, Ivana [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53 Kosice (Slovakia); Koneracka, Martina [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53 Kosice (Slovakia); Jurikova, Alena [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53 Kosice (Slovakia); Tomasovicova, Natalia [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53 Kosice (Slovakia); Stelina, Julius [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, Velky Diel, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia); Musil, Ctibor [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, Velky Diel, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia); Bracinik, Juraj [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, Velky Diel, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia)

    2005-03-15

    A new method for the determination of the size distribution of magnetic carrier systems, as well as for the proof of successful immobilization of biomolecules to magnetic particles was developed and tested. The method is based on the Forced Rayleigh Scattering (FRS) experiment, in which a diffraction concentration grating is created in a thin sample of colloidal fluid due to the absorption of an optical interference field.

  4. Effect of silver nano particles on flexural strength of acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodagar, Ahmad; Kassaee, Mohammad Zaman; Akhavan, Azam; Javadi, Negar; Arab, Sepideh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2012-04-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, is widely used for fabrication of removable orthodontic appliances. Silver nano particles (AgNps) have been added to PMMA because of their antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of AgNps on the flexural strength of PMMA. Acrylic liquid containing 0.05% and 0.2% AgNps was prepared for two kinds of acrylic resins: Rapid Repair &Selecta Plus. Two groups without AgNps were used as control groups. For each one, flexural strength was investigated via Three Point Bending method for the 15 acrylic blocks. Two-way ANOVA, one way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis. Rapid Repair without AgNps showed the highest flexural strength. Addition of 0.05% AgNps to Rapid Repair, significantly decreased its flexural strength while, continuing the addition up to 0.2% increased it nearly up to its primary level. In contrast, addition of AgNps to Selecta Plus increased its flexural strength but addition of 0.05% nano particles was more effective than 0.2%. The effect of AgNps on flexural strength of PMMA depends on several factors including the type of acrylics and the concentrations of nano particles. Copyright © 2011 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Silver Nano-particles on Tensile Strength of Acrylic Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghaffari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA is widely used for the fabrication of removable prostheses. Silver nano-particles (AgNps have been added to PMMA because of their antimicrobial properties, but their effect on the mechanical properties of PMMA is unknown. Theaim of this study was to investigate the effects of AgNps on the tensile strength of PMMA. Materials and methods. For this study, 12 specimens were prepared and divided into two groups. Group 1 included PMMA without AgNps and group 2 included PMMA mixed with 5 wt% of AgNps. Tensile strength of the specimens was measured by Zwick Z100 apparatus. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS using t-test. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results. This study showed that the mean tensile strengthof PMMA in group 2 was significantly lower than that in group 1. Therefore, the tensile strength decreased significantly after incorporation of silver nano-particles. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, tensile strength of acrylic resin specimens was influenced by silver nano-particles.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Resin Composites Filled with Combustion Synthesized h-BN Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyan-Lung Chung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of epoxy resin composites filled with combustion-synthesized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN particles was investigated. The mixing of the composite constituents was carried out by either a dry method (involving no use of solvent for low filler loadings or a solvent method (using acetone as solvent for higher filler loadings. It was found that surface treatment of the h-BN particles using the silane 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS increases the thermal conductivity of the resultant composites in a lesser amount compared to the values reported by other studies. This was explained by the fact that the combustion synthesized h-BN particles contain less –OH or active sites on the surface, thus adsorbing less amounts of GPTMS. However, the thermal conductivity of the composites filled with the combustion synthesized h-BN was found to be comparable to that with commercially available h-BN reported in other studies. The thermal conductivity of the composites was found to be higher when larger h-BN particles were used. The thermal conductivity was also found to increase with increasing filler content to a maximum and then begin to decrease with further increases in this content. In addition to the effect of higher porosity at higher filler contents, more horizontally oriented h-BN particles formed at higher filler loadings (perhaps due to pressing during formation of the composites were suggested to be a factor causing this decrease of the thermal conductivity. The measured thermal conductivities were compared to theoretical predictions based on the Nielsen and Lewis theory. The theoretical predictions were found to be lower than the experimental values at low filler contents (< 60 vol % and became increasing higher than the experimental values at high filler contents (> 60 vol %.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Resin Composites Filled with Combustion Synthesized h-BN Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shyan-Lung; Lin, Jeng-Shung

    2016-05-20

    The thermal conductivity of epoxy resin composites filled with combustion-synthesized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) particles was investigated. The mixing of the composite constituents was carried out by either a dry method (involving no use of solvent) for low filler loadings or a solvent method (using acetone as solvent) for higher filler loadings. It was found that surface treatment of the h-BN particles using the silane 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) increases the thermal conductivity of the resultant composites in a lesser amount compared to the values reported by other studies. This was explained by the fact that the combustion synthesized h-BN particles contain less -OH or active sites on the surface, thus adsorbing less amounts of GPTMS. However, the thermal conductivity of the composites filled with the combustion synthesized h-BN was found to be comparable to that with commercially available h-BN reported in other studies. The thermal conductivity of the composites was found to be higher when larger h-BN particles were used. The thermal conductivity was also found to increase with increasing filler content to a maximum and then begin to decrease with further increases in this content. In addition to the effect of higher porosity at higher filler contents, more horizontally oriented h-BN particles formed at higher filler loadings (perhaps due to pressing during formation of the composites) were suggested to be a factor causing this decrease of the thermal conductivity. The measured thermal conductivities were compared to theoretical predictions based on the Nielsen and Lewis theory. The theoretical predictions were found to be lower than the experimental values at low filler contents ( 60 vol %).

  8. Feasibility of automated dropsize distributions from holographic data using digital image processing techniques. [particle diameter measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, S. P.; Girard, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    An automated technique for measuring particle diameters and their spatial coordinates from holographic reconstructions is being developed. Preliminary tests on actual cold-flow holograms of impinging jets indicate that a suitable discriminant algorithm consists of a Fourier-Gaussian noise filter and a contour thresholding technique. This process identifies circular as well as noncircular objects. The desired objects (in this case, circular or possibly ellipsoidal) are then selected automatically from the above set and stored with their parametric representations. From this data, dropsize distributions as a function of spatial coordinates can be generated and combustion effects due to hardware and/or physical variables studied.

  9. [Influences of composition on brush wear of composite resins. Influences of particle size and content of filler].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, S

    1990-07-01

    The influences of the composition on abrasion resistance of composite resins were examined using various experimental composite resins which had various matrix resin, filler size and content. The abrasion test was conducted by the experimental toothbrush abrasion testing machine developed in our laboratory. Three series of heat-curing composite resins were tested. One series was made from a Bis-MPEPP or UDMA monomer, and a silica filler with an average particle size of 0.04, 1.9, 3.8, 4.3, 7.5, 13.8 and 14.1 microns. The filler content of this series was constant at 45 wt%. The second series contained a silica filler of 4.3 microns in a content ranging from 35 to 75 wt%. The third series contained a microfiller (0.04 microns) and macrofiller (4.3 microns) in total content of 45 wt%. In this series, the microfiller was gradually replaced by 5, 15, 25 and 45 wt% of the macrofiller. The results obtained for these three series indicated that the abrasion resistance of composite resins was controlled by the inorganic filler, mainly filler size and content. The abrasion loss did not vary with the difference of matrix resin. When the particle size of the filler was below about 5 microns, the abrasion resistance decreased markedly with the decrease in filler size. The composite resin which contained a 0.04 or 1.9 micron filler was less resistant to toothbrush wear than the unfilled matrix resin. However, the microfiller also contributed to abrasion resistance when used in combination with the macrofiller, although abrasion resistance decreased with the increase in the microfiller concentration. The increase of filler content clearly improved the abrasion resistance when used the macrofiller. The analysis of these results and SEM observations of the brushed surfaces of samples suggested that the toothbrush abrasion was three-body abrasion caused by the abrasive in the toothpaste, and affected by the difference in the particle size between abrasive and filler, and between

  10. The Physical and Chemical Properties of Fine Carbon Particles-Pinewood Resin Blends and Their Possible Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviwe Melapi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of biomass gasification technology is very important in the sense that it helps to relieve the dwindling supply of natural gas from fossil fuels, and the desired product of its gasification process is syngas. This syngas is a mixture of CO and H2; however, by-products such as char, tar, soot, ash, and condensates are also produced. This study, therefore, investigated selected by-products recovered from the gasification process of pinewood chips with specific reference to their potential application in other areas when used as blends. Three samples of the gasification by-products were obtained from a downdraft biomass gasifier system and were characterized in terms of chemical and physical properties. FTIR analysis confirmed similar spectra in all char-resin blends. For fine carbon particles- (soot- resin blends, almost the same functional groups as observed in char-resin blends appeared. In bomb calorimeter measurements, 70% resin/30% char blends gave highest calorific value, followed by 50% resin/50% soot blends with values of 35.23 MJ/kg and 34.75 MJ/kg consecutively. Provided these by-products meet certain criteria, they could be used in other areas such as varnishes, water purification, and wind turbine blades.

  11. Enhancement of dispersion and adhesion of B4C particles in epoxy resin using direct ultrasonic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Jiheon; Kim, Jaewoo; Bae, Yeonjoo; Seo, Young Soo

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enhanced adhesion and dispersion of B 4 C particles in epoxy resin was achieved. → FTIR spectrum was used for examination of B 4 C adhesion with epoxy resin. → Direct ultrasonic excitation causes enhanced surface treatment of B 4 C. → We developed an epoxy based neutron shield with higher mechanical properties. - Abstract: Enhancement of the mechanical properties of the B 4 C/epoxy composites, which is used as a neutron shield for spent nuclear fuel cask, was achieved by direct ultrasonic dispersion of the B 4 C particles in the hardener using an immersed horn, while those prepared without direct ultrasonic dispersion showed insufficient adhesion as well as some agglomerates in the epoxy resin. Degrees of agglomeration and adhesion were analyzed by means of the SEM images and the FTIR peaks belong to C-C stretching mode of the hardener ring, which was lowered and flattened by van der Waals interaction between the B 4 C particles and the hardener ring substituent. The tensile strength of the B 4 C/epoxy composites prepared by direct ultrasonic dispersion was maintained (or increased) compared to that for the neat epoxy matrix, while those prepared without ultrasonic dispersion were degraded significantly. Consequently, direct ultrasonic dispersion process developed in this investigation could achieve uniform dispersion as well as strong adhesion of the B 4 C particles in/with the epoxy matrix enhancing the material properties without any chemical treatment resulting unwanted impurities.

  12. Thermo-mechanical characterization of siliconized E-glass fiber/hematite particles reinforced epoxy resin hybrid composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arun Prakash, V.R., E-mail: vinprakash101@gmail.com; Rajadurai, A., E-mail: rajadurai@annauniv.edu.in

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Particles dimension have reduced using Ball milling process. • Importance of surface modification was explored. • Surface modification has been done to improve adhesion of fiber/particles with epoxy. • Mechanical properties has been increased by adding modified fiber and particles. • Thermal properties have been increased. - Abstract: In this present work hybrid polymer (epoxy) matrix composite has been strengthened with surface modified E-glass fiber and iron(III) oxide particles with varying size. The particle sizes of 200 nm and <100 nm has been prepared by high energy ball milling and sol-gel methods respectively. To enhance better dispersion of particles and improve adhesion of fibers and fillers with epoxy matrix surface modification process has been done on both fiber and filler by an amino functional silane 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS). Crystalline and functional groups of siliconized iron(III) oxide particles were characterized by XRD and FTIR spectroscopy analysis. Fixed quantity of surface treated 15 vol% E-glass fiber was laid along with 0.5 and 1.0 vol% of iron(III) oxide particles into the matrix to fabricate hybrid composites. The composites were cured by an aliphatic hardener Triethylenetetramine (TETA). Effectiveness of surface modified particles and fibers addition into the resin matrix were revealed by mechanical testing like tensile testing, flexural testing, impact testing, inter laminar shear strength and hardness. Thermal behavior of composites was evaluated by TGA, DSC and thermal conductivity (Lee’s disc). The scanning electron microscopy was employed to found shape and size of iron(III) oxide particles adhesion quality of fiber with epoxy matrix. Good dispersion of fillers in matrix was achieved with surface modifier APTMS. Tensile, flexural, impact and inter laminar shear strength of composites was improved by reinforcing surface modified fiber and filler. Thermal stability of epoxy resin was improved

  13. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  14. Nanoparticles Decorated on Resin Particles and Their Flame Retardancy Behavior for Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour F. Attia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New nanocomposites have been developed by doping of amberlite IR120 resin with spherical TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of maleate diphosphate. Polystyrene composites of resin, maleate diphosphate, and resin-maleate diphosphate were prepared individually. This is in addition to preparation of polymer nanocomposites of polystyrene-resin doped TiO2 nanoparticles-maleate diphosphate. The flame retardancy and thermal stability properties of these developed polymer composites were evaluated. The inclusion of resin and resin doped nanoparticles improved the fire retardant behavior of polystyrene composites and enhanced their thermal stability. Synergistic behavior between flame retardant, resin, and nanoparticles was detected. The rate of burning of the polymer nanocomposites was recorded as 10.7 mm/min achieving 77% reduction compared to pure polystyrene (46.5 mm/min. The peak heat release rate (PHRR of the new polymer composites has reduced achieving 46% reduction compared to blank polymer. The morphology and dispersion of nanoparticles on resin and in polymer nanocomposites were characterized using transmission and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The flame retardancy and thermal properties were evaluated using UL94 flame chamber, cone tests, and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively.

  15. Effects of decreasing activated carbon particle diameter from 30 μm to 140 nm on equilibrium adsorption capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Long; Nishimura, Yuki; Takaesu, Hideki; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2017-11-01

    The capacity of activated carbon particles with median diameters (D50s) of >∼1 μm for adsorption of hydrophobic micropollutants such as 2-methylisolborneol (MIB) increases with decreasing particle size because the pollutants are adsorbed mostly on the exterior (shell) of the particles owing to the limited diffusion penetration depth. However, particles with D50s of adsorption capacities for MIB and several other environmentally relevant adsorbates. The adsorption capacities for low-molecular-weight adsorbates, including MIB, deceased with decreasing particle size for D50s of less than a few micrometers, whereas adsorption capacities increased with decreasing particle size for larger particles. The oxygen content of the particles increased substantially with decreasing particle size for D50s of less than a few micrometers, and oxygen content was negatively correlated with adsorption capacity. The decrease in adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size for the smaller particles was due to particle oxidation during the micromilling procedure used to decrease D50 to ∼140 nm. When oxidation was partially inhibited, the MIB adsorption capacity decrease was attenuated. For high-molecular-weight adsorbates, adsorption capacity increased with decreasing particle size over the entire range of tested particle sizes, even though particle oxygen content increased with decreasing particle size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Adhesion Between Submicron Filler Particles and a Polymeric Matrix on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Epoxy-Resin-Based Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolova, O. Yu.; Biktagirova, I. R.; Danilaev, M. P.; Klabukov, M. A.; Polsky, Yu. E.; Pillai, Saju; Tsentsevitsky, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of composites based on an ED-20 epoxy resin, modified with ZnO and ZnO particles untreated or encapsulated in polystyrene, were studied. It is shown that the introduction of polystyrene-encapsulated ZnO submicroparticles into the epoxy resin changed its supramolecular structure in comparison with that of the resin filled with untreated ones. It was established that the presence of shell on the filler particles affected the mechanical properties of the polymer composites — their hardness increased by 22.5% and elastic modulus by 13%.

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Indirect Particle-Filled Composite Resin CAD/CAM Partial Crowns after 24 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Moritz; Koller, Christina; Reymus, Marcel; Mehl, Albert; Hickel, Reinhard

    2017-04-19

    Resin-based CAD/CAM compound materials might be promising for single-tooth restorations. Insufficient clinical data are available for this new material class. The purpose of this study was to describe initial clinical in vivo results for indirect particle-filled composite resin CAD/CAM restorations after 24 months. Indirect particle-filled composite resin restorations were fabricated with a CAD/CAM method (CEREC Bluecam intraoral scanner, CEREC MCXL milling unit) by calibrated dental students. Forty-two partial crown restorations were seated adhesively in 30 patients with caries lesions or insufficient restorations (baseline). Strict inclusion criteria were defined for the patient collective. Follow-up evaluation comprised 40 restorations after 12 months and 33 restorations after 24 months. Evaluation criteria were modified FDI criteria with grades (1) to (5). Rating with FDI criteria (5) was defined as clinical failure. Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon-Test (p CAD/CAM restorations after 12 months was 95.0% with two debondings observed. The cumulative success rate for indirect particle-filled composite resin CAD/CAM restorations after 24 months was 85.7% with two tooth fractures and one debonding. Statistically significant differences were found for baseline and 24-month follow-up evaluation for anatomic form and marginal adaptation criterion examined in respect to FDI criteria guidelines (Wilcoxon-Test, p CAD/CAM restorations having a clinical success rate of 85.7% after 24 months. Adhesive bonding procedures need to be ensured carefully. A longer clinical evaluation period is necessary to draw further conclusions. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. The mechanical properties of nanofilled resin-based composites: characterizing discrete filler particles and agglomerates using a micromanipulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Andrew R; Palin, William M; Fleming, Garry J P; Shortall, Adrian C C; Marquis, Peter M

    2009-02-01

    To assess the mechanical properties of discrete filler particles representative of several inorganic fillers in modern dental resin-based composites (RBCs) and to assess the validity of a novel micromanipulation technique. RBCs with microhybrid (Filtek Z250), 'nanohybrid' (Grandio) and 'nanofilled' (Filtek Supreme), filler particle morphologies were investigated. Filler particles were provided by the manufacturer or separated from the unpolymerized resin using a dissolution technique. Filler particles (n=30) were subjected to compression using a micromanipulation technique between a descending glass probe and a glass slide. The number of distinct fractures particles underwent was determined from force/displacement and stress/deformation curves and the force at fracture and pseudo-modulus of stress was calculated. Agglomerated fillers ('nanoclusters') exhibited up to four distinct fractures, while spheroidal and irregular particles underwent either a single fracture or did not fracture following micromanipulation. Z-tests highlighted failure of nanoclusters to be significant compared with spheroidal and irregular particles (P<0.05). The mean force at first fracture of the nanoclusters was greater (1702+/-909 microN) than spheroidal and irregular particles (1389+/-1342 and 1356+/-1093 microN, respectively). Likewise, the initial pseudo-modulus of stress of nanoclusters (797+/-555 MPa) was also greater than spheroidal (587+/-439 MPa) or irregular (552+/-275 MPa) fillers. The validity of employing the micromanipulation technique to determine the mechanical properties of filler particulates was established. The 'nanoclusters' exhibited a greater tendency to multiple fractures compared with conventional fillers and possessed a comparatively higher variability of pseudo-modulus and load prior to and at fracture, which may modify the damage tolerance of the overall RBC system.

  19. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornavoi, Denise Cremonezzi; Agnelli, José Augusto Marcondes; Panzeri, Heitor; Dos Reis, Andréa Cândido

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated artificial aging (AAA) on the color change of composite resins used in dentistry. Three composite resins were evaluated: Two microhybrids and one hybrid of higher viscosity, with different amounts and sizes of filler particles, shades C2 and B2. A total of 54 specimens were obtained (18 for each composite resin), made of a Teflon matrix (15 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height). The color measurements were obtained with a Spectrophotometer, (PCB 6807 BYK Gardner) before and after AAA. Data were submitted to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (α >0.05), ANOVA and Tukey test (α composite resins with the same shades was analyzed. All composite resins showed unacceptable color changes after AAA (ΔE > 3). Considering the variable ∆E, it was observed that the color tone C2 was already statistically different for the microhybrid composite resin prior to AAA (P composite resins (P composite resin group, before aging the composite resin hybrid of higher viscosity B2 showed the highest color variation rate and microhybrid with zirconium/silica C2 showed the lowest. All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2) and after (B2). It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  20. Experimental relationship between the specific resistance of a HEPA [High Efficiency Particulate Air] filter and particle diameters of different aerosol materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novick, V.J.; Monson, P.R.; Ellison, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    The increase in pressure drop across a HEPA filter has been measured as a function of the particle mass loading using two materials with different particle morphologies. The HEPA filter media chosen, is identical to the filter media used in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) on the Savannah River Reactors. The velocity through the test filter media was the same as the velocity through the AACS media, under normal operating flow conditions. Sodium Chloride challenge particles were generated using an atomizer, resulting in regularly shaped crystalline forms. Ammonium chloride aerosols were formed from the gas phase reaction of HCl and NH 4 OH vapors resulting in irregular agglomerates. In both cases, the generation conditions were adjusted to provide several different particle size distributions. For each particle size distribution, the mass of material loaded per unit area of filter per unit pressure drop for a given filtration velocity (1/Specific resistance) was measured. Theoretical considerations in the most widely accepted filter cake model predict that the mass per unit area and per unit pressure drop should increase with the particle density times the particle diameter squared. However, these test results indicate that the increase in the mass loaded per unit area per unit pressure drop, for both materials, can be better described by plotting the specific resistance divided by the particle density as an inverse function of the particle density times the particle diameter squared. 9 refs., 7 figs

  1. [Acute toxicity and bio-distribution of silver nitrate and nano-silver with different particle diameters in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T Z; Gong, F; Zhang, B Y; Sun, J D; Zhang, T; Kong, L; Xue, Y Y; Tang, M

    2016-10-20

    Objective: To explore the acute toxic effect and the cumulative target organ of silver nitrate and nano-silver with two different particle diameters in rats. Methods: Thirty-six adult SD rats were divided into small particle size nano-silver group (SNS), large particle size nano-silver group (LNS), silver nitrate group (SN), and control group (C) according to the random number table, with 9 rats in each group. The rats of the four groups were respectively injected with 10 mg/mL nano-silver solution (particle diameter of 20 nm, prepared by saline) in silver dose of 30 mg/kg by tail vein for once, 10 mg/mL nano-silver solution (particle diameter of 100 nm, prepared by saline) in silver dose of 30 mg/kg, 1.67 mg/mL silver nitrate solution (prepared by glucose solution) in silver dose of 3 mg/kg, and 30 mg/mL polyvinylpyrrolidone solution (prepared by saline) in dose of 90 mg/kg. (1) Toxicity test. The general observation was performed within 14 days after injection, and the deviation between value of body mass before injection and each of that on post injection day (PID) 1, 7, and 14 were respectively recorded. On PID 1, 7, and 14, 3 rats of each group were harvested for determination of serum content of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total protein, and albumin by fully automatic biochemical analyzer. Then the rats were sacrificed immediately, and heart tissue, liver tissue, spleen tissue, lung tissue, kidney tissue, and brain tissue were collected to calculate the organ coefficient. Organ samples with obvious changes in organ coefficient were collected for histopathological observation by HE staining, with 3 samples in each group at each time point. (2) Bio-distribution. The specimens of heart, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney of rats from groups SNS, LNS, and SN were collected for detection of silver content by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, with 3 samples in each group at each time point. Data were processed with

  2. Microleakage of nano-particle-filled resin-modified glass ionomer using atraumatic restorative technique in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadenya, Rose; Smith, Jennifer; Mante, Francis

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the marginal leakage of nano-particle-filled resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC) restorations made using atraumatic restorative technique (ART) and conventional technique. Twenty primary molars with carious dentin on the buccal surfaces were restored with RMGIC using ART. The teeth were thermally cycled, sectioned and stained with methylene blue. Micro-leakage was compared to a second set of teeth restored conventionally. No significant difference (p > 0.05) in leakage was noted between the conventional and ART groups. The authors concluded that ART with RMGIC provides margins that show comparable leakage to conventionally restored primary teeth.

  3. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  4. Cyanate Ester Resin Modified with Nano-particles for Inclusion in Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    transition. The impact strength of the fully cured specimens were determined using a Tinius Olsen Charpy impact strength tester. The samples were machined...by swinging the pendulum for 11 half cycles. 2.3 Results and Discussion The effect of CNT loading on the viscosity of BECy resin at 23 oC is

  5. The Distribution of PM10 and PM2.5 Dust Particles Diameter in Airborne at the Cement Factory Neighboring Area, Citeureup - Bogor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatot Suhariyono; Muji Wiyono

    2003-01-01

    The distribution analysis in PM 10 and PM 2.5 dust particle diameter has been carried out at residence area around the cement factory, Citeureup - Bogor to estimate deposition of dust particles that is accepted by public. The dust particles were sampled at the dwellings by using a cascade impactor on four wind directions and 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 m radius from the Plant one as the center of the cement factory at Citeureup - Bogor. Measurements at the north direction were the Gunung Putri, Kranggan, Bojong Nangka villages, and Gunung Putri dwellings. The south directions were Tarikolot and Pasir Mukti villages. The west directions were guest house, Puspanegara, Puspasari, and Citatah villages. The northwest directions were Puspanegara, Gunung Putri, Puspasari, and Kranggan villages. The analysis result showed that the diameter distribution of PM 10 dust particles at outdoor is ranging from 0.4 to 4.7 μm, and has the weight percentage is high in average approximate 17.91 % of total dust weight on 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3000 m radius. The distributions of indoor PM 2.5 dust particles diameter show a stable 12.27 % weight percentage of total dust weight from 0.4 to 2.1 μm. (author)

  6. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of molybdenum/phenolic resin composites binding with aluminum nitride particles for diamond cutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Te; Lee, Hsun-Tsing; Chen, Jem-Kun

    2013-11-01

    Novolac-type bisphenol-F based molybdenum-phenolic resins/silane-modified aluminum nitride (Mo-BPF/m-AlN) composites were successfully prepared. In the preparation process, molybdate reacted with bisphenol-F based phenolic resins (BPF) to form a low cross-linked Mo-BPF with new Mosbnd O bonds which were confirmed by the FTIR and XPS spectra. Simultaneously, a special silane-modified aluminum nitride (m-AlN) was prepared with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modifier. Then, this m-AlN was fully mixed with Mo-BPF to form Mo-BPF/m-AlN which can be further cured with hexamethylenetetramine at 200 °C. The structure and characterization of BPF, Mo-BPF and Mo-BPF/m-AlN were determined by using FTIR, DSC, DMA, TGA, SEM, mechanical properties and contact angle measurements. SEM photographs show that m-AlN particles are uniformly distributed in the Mo-BPF/m-AlN composites. Also there are no gaps or void between m-AlN and Mo-BPF phases, which implies a strong physical bonding between the two phases. The glass transition temperature, thermal resistance, flexural strength, and hardness of Mo-BPF are respectively higher than those of BPF. This is due to the presence of Mosbnd O cross-linking bonds in Mo-BPF. When the m-AlN was additionally incorporated into Mo-BPF, the well-dispersed and well-adhered m-AlN can further promote all the above-mentioned properties of the composites. Typically, the glass transition temperature, decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss and flexural strength of Mo-BPF/m-AlN are 245 °C, 428 °C and 82.7 MPa respectively, which are much higher than the corresponding values of 184 °C, 358 °C and 58.2 MPa for BPF. In addition, the hygroscopic nature of BPF can be inhibited by treating with molybdate or incorporating with m-AlN. This is due to that the m-AlN is hydrophobic and Mosbnd O groups in Mo-BPF are more hydrophobic than OH groups in BPF. Furthermore, Mo-BPF/m-AlN was compared with BPF in the performance as a binder for diamond cutting

  8. Vertical pneumatic conveying in dilute and dense-phase flows: experimental study of the influence of particle density and diameter on fluid dynamic behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narimatsu C.P.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of particle size and density on the fluid dynamic behavior of vertical gas-solid transport of Group D particles in a 53.4 mm diameter transport tube were studied. For the conditions tested, the experimental curves of pressure gradient versus air velocity presented a minimum pressure gradient point, which is associated with a change in the flow regime from dense to dilute phase. The increases in particle size from 1.00 to 3.68 mm and in density from 935 to 2500 kg/m³ caused an increase in pressure gradient for the dense-phase transport region, but were not relevant in dilute transport. The transition velocity between dense and dilute flow (Umin also increased with increasing particle density and diameter. An empirical equation was fitted for predicting transition air velocity for the transport of glass spheres. Additional experiments, covering a wider range of conditions and particles properties, are still needed to allow the fitting of a generalized equation for prediction of Umin.

  9. Multi-objective optimization of cooling air distributions of grate cooler with different clinker particles diameters and air chambers by genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Wei; Cui, Zheng; Cheng, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-objective optimization model of air distributions of grate cooler by genetic algorithm is proposed. • Optimal air distributions of different conditions are obtained and validated by measurements. • The most economic average diameters of clinker particles is 0.02 m. • The most economic amount of air chambers is 9. - Abstract: The paper proposes a multi-objective optimization model of cooling air distributions of grate cooler in cement plant based on convective heat transfer principle and entropy generation minimization analysis. The heat transfer and flow models of clinker cooling process are brought out at first. Then the modified entropy generation numbers caused by heat transfer and viscous dissipation are considered as objective functions respectively which are optimized by genetic algorithm simultaneously. The design variables are superficial velocities of air chambers and thicknesses of clinker layer on different grate plates. The model is verified by a set of Pareto optimal solutions and scattered distributions of design variables. Sensitive analysis of average diameters of clinker particles and amount of air chambers are carried out based on the optimization model. The optimal cooling air distributions are compared by heat recovered, energy consumption of cooling fans and heat efficiency of grate cooler. And all of them are selected from the Pareto optimal solutions based on energy consumption of cooling fans minimization. The results show that the most effective and economic average diameter of clinker particles is 0.02 m and the amount of air chambers is 9.

  10. Computational study of fluid flow and heat transfer in composite packed beds of spheres with low tube to particle diameter ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jian; Wu, Jiangquan; Zhou, Lang; Wang, Qiuwang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Flow and heat transfer in composite packed beds with low d t /d pe are investigated. • The wall effect would be restrained with radially layered composite packing (RLM). • Heat flux and overall heat transfer efficiency can be improved with RLM packing. - Abstract: The effect of the tube wall on the fluid flow and heat transfer would be important in the packed bed with low tube to particle diameter ratio, which may lead to flow and temperature maldistributions inside, and the heat transfer performance may be lowered. In the present paper, the flow and heat transfer performances in both the composite and uniform packed beds of spheres with low tube to particle diameter were numerically investigated, where the composite packing means randomly packing with non-uniform spheres and the uniform packing means randomly packing with uniform spheres, including radially layered composite packing (RLM), axially layered composite packing (ALM), randomly composite packing (RCM) and randomly uniform packing (RPM). Both the composite and uniform packings were generated with discrete element method (DEM), and the influence of the wall effect on the flow and heat transfer in the packed beds were carefully studied and compared with each other. Firstly, it is found that, the wall effect on the velocity and temperature distributions in the randomly packed bed of uniform spheres (RPM) with low tube to particle diameter ratio were obvious. The average velocity of the near-tube-wall region is higher than that of the inner-tube region in the bed. When the tube wall is adiabatic, the average temperature of the near-tube-wall region is lower. With radially layered composite packing method (RLM), smaller pores would be formed close to the tube wall and big flow channels would be formed in the inner-tube region of the bed, which would be benefit to restrain the wall effect and improve heat transfer in the bed with low tube to particle diameter ratio. Furthermore, it is also

  11. Effect of titania particles on the microstructure and properties of the epoxy resin coatings on sintered NdFeB permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.L.; Huang, Z.X.; Luo, J.M.; Zhong, Z.C.

    2014-01-01

    The nanometer titania particles enhanced epoxy resin composite coatings were prepared on the sintered NdFeB permanent magnets by cathodic electrophoretic deposition. The effects of titania particle concentrations on the microstructure and properties of the epoxy coatings were investigated by surface and cross-sectional morphologies observation, surface roughness and microhardness measurement, H 2 SO 4 solution immersion test, neutral salt spray test and magnetic properties measurement. The results showed that the thickness of epoxy coatings with and without the titania particles addition was about 40 μm. The titania particles could be uniformly dispersed and embedded in the epoxy matrix if the titania particles concentration was lower than 40 g/l. With increasing titania particle concentrations, the number of the particles embedded in the epoxy matrix increased and the surface roughness and microhardness of the composite coatings increased. At the same time, the weight loss of the coated samples immersed in H 2 SO 4 solution decreased and the neutral salt spray time of the coated samples prolonged. It could be concluded that the titania particles did not change the thickness of the epoxy coatings and did not deteriorate the magnetic properties of NdFeB substrates, but could greatly improve the microhardness and corrosion resistance of the epoxy coatings. - Highlights: • The titania particles enhanced epoxy resin coatings were prepared on sintered NdFeB by cathodic electrophoretic deposition. • The titania particles could be uniformly dispersed and embedded in the epoxy resin matrix. • With increasing titania concentrations, the surface roughness and the microhardness of composite coatings increased. • The addition of titania particles greatly improved the corrosion resistance of the epoxy coatings. • The composition coatings did not deteriorate the magnetic properties of NdFeB substrates

  12. Effect of titania particles on the microstructure and properties of the epoxy resin coatings on sintered NdFeB permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.L., E-mail: jlxu@nchu.edu.cn; Huang, Z.X.; Luo, J.M.; Zhong, Z.C., E-mail: zzhong.2006@yahoo.com.cn

    2014-04-15

    The nanometer titania particles enhanced epoxy resin composite coatings were prepared on the sintered NdFeB permanent magnets by cathodic electrophoretic deposition. The effects of titania particle concentrations on the microstructure and properties of the epoxy coatings were investigated by surface and cross-sectional morphologies observation, surface roughness and microhardness measurement, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution immersion test, neutral salt spray test and magnetic properties measurement. The results showed that the thickness of epoxy coatings with and without the titania particles addition was about 40 μm. The titania particles could be uniformly dispersed and embedded in the epoxy matrix if the titania particles concentration was lower than 40 g/l. With increasing titania particle concentrations, the number of the particles embedded in the epoxy matrix increased and the surface roughness and microhardness of the composite coatings increased. At the same time, the weight loss of the coated samples immersed in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution decreased and the neutral salt spray time of the coated samples prolonged. It could be concluded that the titania particles did not change the thickness of the epoxy coatings and did not deteriorate the magnetic properties of NdFeB substrates, but could greatly improve the microhardness and corrosion resistance of the epoxy coatings. - Highlights: • The titania particles enhanced epoxy resin coatings were prepared on sintered NdFeB by cathodic electrophoretic deposition. • The titania particles could be uniformly dispersed and embedded in the epoxy resin matrix. • With increasing titania concentrations, the surface roughness and the microhardness of composite coatings increased. • The addition of titania particles greatly improved the corrosion resistance of the epoxy coatings. • The composition coatings did not deteriorate the magnetic properties of NdFeB substrates.

  13. Impact Resistance Enhancement by Adding Core-Shell Particle to Epoxy Resin Modified with Hyperbranched Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiping Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A core-shell particle was fabricated by grafting amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer to the surface of silica nanoparticles. The influences of core-shell particle contents on the tensile and impact strength of the epoxy thermosets modified with amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer were discussed in detail. For comparison, core-shell particle was added into the epoxy/polyamide system for toughness improvement. Results from tensile and impact tests are provided. The introduction of core-shell particle into the epoxy/polyamide systems just slightly enhanced the tensile and impact strength. The incorporation of 3 wt % core-shell particle could substantially improve the tensile and impact strength of epoxy/amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer thermosets. Field emission-scanning electron microscope images of the impact fracture surfaces showed that the excellent impact resistance of epoxy/amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer/core-shell particle thermosets may be attributed to the synergistic effect of shearing deformation and crack pinning/propagation, which is induced by the good compatibility between epoxy matrix and core-shell particle in the presence of amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer.

  14. Evaluating the Performance of Iron Nano-particle Resin in Removing Fluoride from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Mahvi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive amounts of fluoride in drinking water pose serious health problems. It is, therefore, essential to remove it from drinking water by appropriate water treatment processes down to standard levels for preventing the health risks associated. The aim of this study was to determine the performance of a kind of hybrid sorbent resin in removing fluoride from water. Batch experiments were performed to investigate adsorption isotherms and the effects of experimental parameters such as contact time (5-120 min and pH (3-9. Results revealed that fluoride adsorption rate was initially rapid but continued at a slower rate before it reached equilibrium in 120 min. Optimum fluoride removal was observed at a pH range of 3-5.5. The data obtained from the experiments were fitted with Langmiur model.

  15. Influence of nano-particle diameter on superconducting properties in BaMO3(M = Sn, Hf)/YBa2Cu3Oy quasi-multilayered films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaki, T.; Uraguchi, Y.; Makihara, T.; Suenaga, M.; Sueyoshi, T.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Mitugi, F.; Ikegami, T.

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the influence of diameter and spatial distribution of three-dimensional (3D) pinning centers on critical current density Jc, BMO (BaSnO3 (BSO) or BaHfO3 (BHO)) doped YBa2Cu3Oy (YBCO) thin films were fabricated by a quasi-multilayering process using a pulsed laser deposition method. The prepared films are referred as BMO(m,n)Ts, where m and n denotes the number of laser pulse on the BMO target and the total number of BMO/YBCO bilayers, respectively and Ts is the growth temperature. BSO(1,100)750 and BSO(1,100)770 show the improvement of Jc in comparison with the pure YBCO sample in wide range of magnetic field directions at 65 K. However, at 77.3 K, improvement of Jc was seen in only BSO(1,100)770. The BSO nano-particles within BSO(1,100)770 are considered to have larger diameter, so that BSO nano-particles can immobilize the flux lines in the high temperature region. In addition, BSO(1,100)770 shows the high peak of Jc centered at θ = 0° in the angular dependence of Jc. On the other hand, the Jc of BHO(1,100)770 falls below that of pure YBCO samples in all magnetic field orientation. In addition, at 65 K, there is no peak of Jc at any angles except for θ = 90°. These results indicates that the diameter of BHO nano-particles in BHO(1,100)770 might be much smaller than that of BSO nano-particle and BHO nanoparticles cannot work as effective pinning center.

  16. Investigation on the effect of mixed rapeseed stalk residues with wood particles, and mixing of melamine and urea formaldehyde resin on properties of manufactured particleboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Kord

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the possibility of using the rapeseed stalk mixed with industrial wood particles for manufacturing particleboard with target density of 0.7 gr/cm3 was considered. Variable factors such as mixing ratios of rapeseed stalk with industrial wood particles at five mixing levels of (0-100, 25-75, 50-50, 75-25 and 100-0 percent, mixing ratios of melamine resin with urea formaldehyde at three levels of 0-100, 15-85 and 30-70 percent, and kind of board at two levels of homogenate and layer were considered. 10 percent resin based on oven dried weight of particles, 2 percent catalyzer based on oven dried weight of resin, press temperature and time with 170 OC and 7 minute, press pressure and rate with 30 Kg/cm3 and 4.5 mm/min were fixed. Then, the boards were manufactured and the physical and mechanical properties including modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, internal bonding, water absorption and thickness swelling were measured according to EN standard. Results indicated that the modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, water absorption and thickness swelling of boards increased with increase rapeseed stalk loading; however, the internal bonding decreased. Also, the use of melamine urea formaldehyde resin caused to improve the mechanical strength and dimensional stability in the samples.

  17. RETRACTED: The influence of sand diameter and wind velocity on sand particle lift-off and incident angles in the windblown sand flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Tian-Li; Zheng, Xiao-Jing; Duan, Shao-Zhen; Liang, Yi-Rui

    2013-05-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. This article has been retracted at the request of the Editors-in-Chief. This article also contains significant similarity with parts of text, written by the same author(s), that have appeared in Tian-Li Bo, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Shao-Zhen Duan, Yi-Rui Liang, The influence of wind velocity and sand grain diameter on the falling velocities of sand particles, Powder Technology, Volume 241, June 2013, Pages 158-165. Tian-Li Bo, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Shao-Zhen Duan, Yi-Rui Liang, Analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux, Acta Mechanica Sinica, April 2013, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 158-165. Tian-Li Bo, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Shao-Zhen Duan, Yi-Rui Liang, Influence of sand grain diameter and wind velocity on lift-off velocities of sand particles, The European Physical Journal E, May 2013, 36:50. Tian-Li Bo, Shao-Zhen Duan, Xiao-Jing Zheng, Yi-Rui Liang, The influence of sand bed temperature on lift-off and falling parameters in windblown sand flux, Geomorphology, Volume 204, 1 January 2014, Pages 477-484. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  18. The Effect of Silver Nano Particles on Candida Albicans and Streptococcus Mutans in Denture Acrylic Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghahremanloo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Denture stomatitis is a common complication in patients wearing dentures and preventing the proliferation of related microorganisms and their induced infections is noteworthy. The aim of the present study was to assess the antimicrobial effect of acrylic resins containing various concentrations of silver nanoparticles, on Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, the effect of four different concentrations of silver nanoparticles in 160 acrylic samples (10mm *4mm on standard and hospital isolated strains of two different microorganisms were investigated. The samples were soaked (containing silver nanoparticles and control in bacterial suspension and the antimicrobial tests were performed after 0, 1, 6 and 24 hours. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe the data and one-way variance analysis test was performed to compare groups. Results: Results have shown that in concentration of 2.5% the highest mean difference for standard S. mutans, after 24h of exposure was 540.0±14.4 (P

  19. Characterization, optical properties and laser ablation behavior of epoxy resin coatings reinforced with high reflectivity ceramic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenzhi; Kong, Jing; Wu, Taotao; Gao, Lihong; Ma, Zhuang; Liu, Yanbo; Wang, Fuchi; Wei, Chenghua; Wang, Lijun

    2018-04-01

    Thermal damage induced by high power energy, especially high power laser, significantly affects the lifetime and performance of equipment. High-reflectance coating/film has attracted considerable attention due to its good performance in the damage protection. Preparing a high-reflectance coating with high reaction endothermal enthalpy will effectively consume a large amount of incident energy and in turn protect the substrate from thermal damage. In this study, a low temperature process was used to prepare coatings onto substrate with complex shape and avoid thermal effect during molding. An advanced high reflection ceramic powder, La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ , was added in the epoxy adhesive matrix to improve the reflectivity of coating. The optical properties and laser ablation behaviors of coatings with different ceramic additive ratio of La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ and modified epoxy-La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ with ammonium polyphosphate coatings were investigated, respectively. We found that the reflectivity of coatings is extremely high due to mixed high-reflection La1‑xSrxTiO3+δ particles, up to 96% at 1070 nm, which can significantly improve the laser resistance. In addition, the ammonium polyphosphate modifies the residual carbon structure of epoxy resin from discontinuous fine particles structure to continuous and porous structure, which greatly enhances the thermal-insulation property of coating. Furthermore, the laser ablation threshold is improved obviously, which is from 800 W cm‑2 to 1000 W cm‑2.

  20. Investigations of DPPC effect on Al 2O 3 particles in the presence of (phospho)lipases by the zeta potential and effective diameter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiącek, Agnieszka Ewa

    2011-02-01

    Adsorption of phospholipid (DPPC) from NaCl electrolyte solution (or from chloroform solution) on Al2O3 particles in suspension was investigated by means of the zeta potential and effective diameter measurements as a function of pH using dynamic light scattering. Al2O3 particles were precovered with an amount of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine sufficient to cover the alumina surface by the statistical mono- or bilayer (ML or BL). It was found that DPPC from NaCl solution was adsorbed on Al2O3 surface independently of phospholipid concentration, which resulted in decrease of the initial zeta potential of Al2O3 suspension. When alumina was precovered with DPPC from chloroform (ML or BL) some reorientation of phospholipid molecules could take place. Despite the lowering of the zeta potential value in both cases (from both aqueous and chloroform solution) DPPC stabilized the Al2O3 particle aggregates, which resulted in smaller and smoother changes of the aggregate size during 2-experiment hours due to steric and electrostatic stabilization. In the next series of experiments the effect of enzymes (phospholipase A2 or lipase Candida cylindracea) on the behavior of Al2O3/DPPC particles was studied. The kind of the enzymes, the hydrolysis products, which were palmitic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine (or glycerylphosphorylcholine), and pH changed the suspension zeta potential and influenced the stability of these systems. Lipase was found to be a more active enzyme than phospholipase. The electrokinetic parameters connected with the adsorption process and resulting from the enzyme action seem to be helpful for characterization of the Al2O3/DPPC suspension and the activity of the enzymes, which is discussed in the paper.

  1. Effect of nano SiO{sub 2} particles on the morphology and mechanical properties of POSS nanocomposite dental resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yizhi; Sun, Yi, E-mail: sunyi@hit.edu.cn; Zeng, Fanlin [Harbin Institute of Technology, Department of Astronautic Science and Mechanics (China); Xie, Weili, E-mail: xwl811@126.com [Harbin Medical University, Department of Stomatology (China); Liu, Yang [Harbin Stomatology Hospital (China); Geng, Lin [Harbin Institute of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2014-12-15

    Nanocomposite dental resins composed of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposite matrix and 0, 0.5,1, 1.5 and 2 wt% nano SiO{sub 2} as filler were prepared by light curing method. The nanocomposite resins were characterized by performing compressive, three-point flexure, nanoindentation and nanoscratch testings as well as optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope analysis. The effects of different nano SiO{sub 2} contents were studied on compressive strength, flexural strength, hardness and resistance of composite resin. From the mechanical results, it was found that nano SiO{sub 2} effectively enhanced the mechanical properties of the composite resins at low content. With the increase of the nano SiO{sub 2} content, the mechanical properties decreased. It was attributed to the content of nano SiO{sub 2} and dispersion of nanoparticles in matrix.

  2. Influence of airborne-particle abrasion on mechanical properties and bond strength of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos Jose; Santana, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pereira, Janaina Carla; Araujo, Tatiana Santos; Menezes, Murilo Souza

    2008-06-01

    Controversy exists concerning the use of fiber-reinforced posts to improve bond strength to resin cement because some precementation treatments can compromise the mechanical properties of the posts. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of airborne-particle abrasion on the mechanical properties and microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of carbon/epoxy and glass/bis-GMA fiber-reinforced resin posts. Flexural strength (delta(f)), flexural modulus (E(f)), and stiffness (S) were assessed using a 3-point bending test for glass fiber-reinforced and carbon fiber-reinforced resin posts submitted to airborne-particle abrasion (AB) with 50-microm Al(2)O(3), and for posts without any surface treatment (controls) (n=10). Forty glass fiber (GF) and 40 carbon fiber (CF) posts were submitted to 1 of 4 surface treatments (n=10) prior to MTBS testing: silane (S); silane and adhesive (SA); airborne-particle abrasion with 50-microm Al(2)O(3) and silane (ABS); airborne-particle abrasion, silane, and adhesive (ABSA). Two composite resin restorations (Filtek Z250) with rounded depressions in the lateral face were bilaterally fixed to the post with resin cement (RelyX ARC). Next, the specimen was sectioned with a precision saw running perpendicular to the bonded surface to obtain 10 bonded beam specimens with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2). Each beam specimen was tested in a mechanical testing machine (EMIC 2,000 DL), under stress, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). Failure patterns of tested specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 3-point bending test demonstrated significant differences among groups only for the post type factor for flexural strength, flexural modulus, and stiffness. The carbon fiber posts exhibited significantly higher mean flexural strength (P=.001), flexural modulus (P=.003), and stiffness (P=.001) values when compared with glass

  3. Synthesis of wrinkled mesoporous silica and its reinforcing effect for dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruili; Habib, Eric; Zhu, X X

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the reinforcing effect of wrinkled mesoporous silica (WMS), which should allow micromechanical resin matrix/filler interlocking in dental resin composites, and to investigate the effect of silica morphology, loading, and compositions on their mechanical properties. WMS (average diameter of 496nm) was prepared through the self-assembly method and characterized by the use of the electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and the N 2 adsorption-desorption measurements. The mechanical properties of resin composites containing silanized WMS and nonporous smaller silica were evaluated with a universal mechanical testing machine. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to study the fracture morphology of dental composites. Resin composites including silanized silica particles (average diameter of 507nm) served as the control group. Higher filler loading of silanized WMS substantially improved the mechanical properties of the neat resin matrix, over the composites loaded with regular silanized silica particles similar in size. The impregnation of smaller secondary silica particles with diameters of 90 and 190nm, denoted respectively as Si90 and Si190, increased the filler loading of the bimodal WMS filler (WMS-Si90 or WMS-Si190) to 60wt%, and the corresponding composites exhibited better mechanical properties than the control fillers made with regular silica particles. Among all composites, the optimal WMS-Si190- filled composite (mass ratio WMS:Si190=10:90, total filler loading 60wt%) exhibited the best mechanical performance including flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength and Vickers microhardness. The incorporation of WMS and its mixed bimodal fillers with smaller silica particles led to the design and formulation of dental resin composites with superior mechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Controlled release of chlorhexidine from a HEMA-UDMA resin using a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dong; Shahid, Saroash; Hasan, Samiul Md; Whiley, Robert; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Cattell, Michael J

    2018-02-26

    To functionalize novel chlorhexidine (CHX) particles with iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles and control their release kinetics in a dental resin using an external magnetic field. Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were synthesized and incorporated into spherical CHX particles and the powder was freeze dried. Resin disc specimens were produced using a UDMA-HEMA resin mixed with freeze dried spherical Fe 3 O 4 -CHX particles (5wt.%), which were placed into a Teflon mould (10mm diameter×1mm depth) and covered with a Mylar strip. A MACS magnet was left in contact for 0min (Group 1), 5min (Group 2) or 10min (Group 3) and the resin discs subsequently light cured (Bluedent LED pen, Bulgaria) for 60s per side. The resin discs were immersed in deionized water at various time points up to 650h. UV-Vis absorbance was used to determine the CHX content. CHX released for each time point was determined. The functionalized CHX particles and resin discs were characterized using TEM, TGA, EDX and SEM. Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (20nm) incorporated into the spherical CHX particles led to a mean (SD) particle size reduction from 17.15 (1.99)μm to 10.39 (2.61)μm. The presence of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles in the spherical CHX particles was confirmed with SEM, EDX, and TGA. SEM of Group 1 resin discs (no magnetic exposure) showed functionalized CHX spheres were homogeneously distributed within the resin discs. For resin discs which had magnetic exposure (5 or 10min) the particles started to cluster nearer the surface (Group 2: 43.7%, Group 3: 57.3%), to a depth of 94μm. UV-Vis absorbance revealed Group 1 resin discs had a cumulative CHX release of 4.4% compared to 5.9% for Group 2 and 7.4% for Group 3 resin discs, which had magnetic exposure (5, 10min). Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticle functionalized CHX spheres demonstrated a magnetic field responsive property. A magnetic field responsive release of CHX may be useful in clinical situations where the drug can be directed to give a tailored release at the site

  5. Novel processing of bioglass ceramics from silicone resins containing micro- and nano-sized oxide particle fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, L; Bernardo, E; Colombo, P; Cacciotti, I; Bianco, A; Bellucci, D; Sola, A; Cannillo, V

    2014-08-01

    Highly porous scaffolds with composition similar to those of 45S5 and 58S bioglasses were successfully produced by an innovative processing method based on preceramic polymers containing micro- and nano-sized fillers. Silica from the decomposition of the silicone resins reacted with the oxides deriving from the fillers, yielding glass ceramic components after heating at 1000°C. Despite the limited mechanical strength, the obtained samples possessed suitable porous architecture and promising biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics, as testified by preliminary in vitro tests. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. LA-ICP-MS of rare earth elements concentrated in cation-exchange resin particles for origin attribution of uranium ore concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Shiho; Limbeck, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) concentrated on cation-exchange resin particles were measured with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to obtain chondrite-normalized REE plots. The sensitivity of REE increased in ascending order of the atomic number, according to the sensitivity trend in pneumatic nebulization ICP-MS (PN-ICP-MS). The signal intensities of REE were nearly proportional to the concentrations of REE in the immersion solution used for particle-preparation. Minimum measurable concentration calculated from the net signals of REE was approximately 1 ng/g corresponding to 0.1 ng in the particle-preparation solution. In LA analysis, formation of oxide and hydroxide of the light REE and Ba which causes spectral interferences in the heavy REE measurement was effectively attenuated due to the solvent-free measurement capability, compared to conventional PN-ICP-MS. To evaluate the applicability of the proposed method, the REE-adsorbed particles prepared by immersing them in a U-bearing solution (commercially available U standard solution) were measured with LA-ICP-MS. Aside from the LA analysis, each concentration of REE in the same U standard solution was determined with conventional PN-ICP-MS after separating REE by cation-exchange chromatography. The concentrations of REE were ranging from 0.04 (Pr) to 1.08 (Dy) μg/g-U. The chondrite-normalized plot obtained through LA-ICP-MS analysis of the U standard sample exhibited close agreement with that obtained through the PN-ICP-MS of the REE-separated solution within the uncertainties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Tetsurou (Nitto Denko Corp., Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)); Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu

    1989-09-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author).

  8. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tetsurou; Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu.

    1989-01-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author)

  9. and phenol–formaldehyde resin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    formaldehyde resin (PFR) modified with tetraethylorthosilicate are investigated in detail. The chemical synthesis of PFR, its modification with nanometer- sized SiO2 particles created by sol–gel method and subsequent coating, enables a preparation of ...

  10. Surface areas of turbostratic graphitic carbons prepared from a resin using nickel particles, 20 nm, as graphitization catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oya, A.; Inoue, E.; Otani, S.; Marsh, H.

    1981-11-01

    Nickel particles were used to graphitize catalytically a non-graphitizing carbon to create a turbostratic graphitic material called the T/SUB/s-component. This method was examined by X-ray diffraction. Coals on heat treatment to temperatures >1270 K form T/SUB/s-component carbons. Therefore, considerations of the properties of the T/SUB/s-component carbon may have relevance to considerations of the operational performances of blast furnace coke. (22 refs.)

  11. Studies of transformation and particle-binding of resin acids during oxidative treatment of effluent from two New Zealand pulp mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanber, S A; Langdon, A G; Wilkins, A L

    2008-02-01

    Reactor studies of aerobic degradation of effluent from the first and last ponds of the treatment system of two New Zealand pulp and paper mills indicated that filterable BOD(5), resin acids and transformed resin acids, free and bound, degraded at similar rates. During oxidative treatment the resin acids of untreated effluent became increasingly bound to particulate material and a sediment high in abiet-13-enoic acid was formed.

  12. Fabrication of micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin on aluminum by AFM probe processing and electrophoretic coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Sakairi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)], E-mail: takahasi@elechem1-mc.eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2008-11-30

    Micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin were fabricated on aluminum by anodizing, atomic force microscope (AFM) probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition. Barrier type anodic oxide films of 15 nm thickness were formed on aluminum and then the specimen was scratched with an AFM probe in a solution containing acrylic acid/melamine resin nano-particles to remove the anodic oxide film locally. After scratching, the specimen was anodically polarized to deposit acrylic acid/melamine resin electrophoretically at the film-removed area. The resin deposited on the specimen was finally cured by heating. It was found that scratching with the AFM probe on open circuit leads to the contamination of the probe with resin, due to positive shifts in the potential during scratching. Scratching of the specimen under potentiostatic conditions at -1.0 V, however, resulted in successful resin deposition at the film-removed area without probe contamination. The rate of resin deposition increased as the specimen potential becomes more positive during electrophoretic deposition. Arrays of resin dots with a few to several tens {mu}m diameter and 100-1000 nm height, and resin walls with 100-1000 nm height and 1 {mu}m width were obtained on specimens by successive anodizing, probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition.

  13. Primary particle diameter differentiation and bimodality identification by five analytical methods using gold nanoparticle size distributions synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letzel, Alexander; Gökce, Bilal; Menzel, Andreas; Plech, Anton; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2018-03-01

    For a known material, the size distribution of a nanoparticle colloid is a crucial parameter that defines its properties. However, measured size distributions are not easy to interpret as one has to consider weighting (e.g. by light absorption, scattering intensity, volume, surface, number) and the way size information was gained. The radius of a suspended nanoparticle can be given as e.g. sphere equivalent, hydrodynamic, Feret or radius of gyration. In this study, gold nanoparticles in water are synthesized by pulsed-laser ablation (LAL) and fragmentation (LFL) in liquids and characterized by various techniques (scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), analytical disc centrifugation (ADC), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-vis spectroscopy with Mie-Gans Theory) to study the comparability of different analytical techniques and determine the method that is preferable for a given task related to laser-generated nanoparticles. In particular, laser-generated colloids are known to be bimodal and/or polydisperse, but bimodality is sometimes not analytically resolved in literature. In addition, frequently reported small size shifts of the primary particle mode around 10 nm needs evaluation of its statistical significance related to the analytical method. Closely related to earlier studies on SAXS, different colloids in defined proportions are mixed and their size as a function of the nominal mixing ratio is analyzed. It is found that the derived particle size is independent of the nominal mixing ratio if the colloid size fractions do not overlap considerably. Conversely, the obtained size for colloids with overlapping size fractions strongly depends on the nominal mixing ratio since most methods cannot distinguish between such fractions. Overall, SAXS and ADC are very accurate methods for particle size analysis. Further, the ability of different methods to determine the nominal mixing ratio of sizes fractions is studied

  14. Aerosol-phase activity of iodine captured from a triiodide resin filter on fine particles containing an infectious virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbuch, B K; Harnish, D A; Balzli, C; Lumley, A; Kinney, K; Wander, J D

    2015-06-01

    To avoid interference by water-iodine disinfection chemistry and measure directly the effect of iodine, captured from a triiodide complex bound to a filter medium, on viability of penetrating viral particles. Aerosols of MS2 coli phage were passed through control P100 or iodinated High-Efficiency Particulate Air media, collected in plastic bags, incubated for 0-10 min, collected in an impinger containing thiosulphate to consume all unreacted iodine, plated and enumerated. Comparison of viable counts demonstrated antimicrobial activity with an apparent half-life for devitalization in tens of seconds; rate of kill decreased at low humidity and free iodine was captured by the bags. The results support the mechanism of near-contact capture earlier proposed; however, the disinfection chemistry in the aerosol phase is very slow on the time scale of inhalation. This study shows that disinfection by filter-bound iodine in the aerosol phase is too slow to be clinically significant in individual respiratory protection, but that it might be of benefit to limit airborne transmission of infections in enclosed areas. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Synthesis of novel chlorhexidine spheres with controlled release from a UDMA-HEMA resin using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dong; Shahid, Saroash; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Cattell, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Establish the release kinetics of new chlorhexidine particles incorporated in a dental resin, and with the application of ultrasound. Spherical chlorhexidine particles (SCP) were synthesized (5wt%), freeze dried and incorporated into UDMA-HEMA resins. Chlorhexidine diacetate (CDP) (5wt%) was similarly incorporated in separate resins. Resin discs were immersed in deionized water, and a release profile established (650h). Ultrasound was used to trigger chlorhexidine (CHX) release from the resin discs at specific durations (10-30s) and time intervals (1-425h). Chlorhexidine content was determined by UV-vis absorption. The chlorhexidine particles/polymer composites were characterized using TGA, SEM, and confocal microscopy. SCP exhibited structures with high chlorhexidine content (90-95%), and a Mean (SD) diameter of 17.2 (2.5)μm which was significantly (presin discs with increasing durations (10-30s) resulted in higher drug release rates. CDP release rates (CHX) over 650h were: 23.5% (10s), 42.6% (20s), 51.2% (30s), and for SCP (CHX) were; 9.8% (10s), 12.3% (20s), and 14.0% (30s). SEM/confocal microscopy revealed CDP discs exhibited dissolution associated with the particle surface and SCP from the interior. Chlorhexidine spheres incorporated in a dental resin demonstrated a responsive and lower CHX release. Ultrasound enhanced CHX release and is useful in clinical situations where the drug is required on demand to treat severe or persistent infections. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Failure Diameter Resolution Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-19

    Previously the SURFplus reactive burn model was calibrated for the TATB based explosive PBX 9502. The calibration was based on fitting Pop plot data, the failure diameter and the limiting detonation speed, and curvature effect data for small curvature. The model failure diameter is determined utilizing 2-D simulations of an unconfined rate stick to find the minimum diameter for which a detonation wave propagates. Here we examine the effect of mesh resolution on an unconfined rate stick with a diameter (10mm) slightly greater than the measured failure diameter (8 to 9 mm).

  17. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  18. Toughening mechanism in elastometer-modified epoxy resins: Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, A. F.; Pearson, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Several plaques of Epon 828, cured with piperidine, modified with hycar(r) CTBN 1300X8, Hycar(R) CTBN 1300X13, and Hycar(R) CTBN 1300x15, and in some cases modified with biphenol A (BPA), yielded properly toughened epoxies with rubber particle diameters ranging from 0.1 to 10 microns. Fracture toughness experiments indicate that toughness was more a function of rubber content than the rubber particle size. Tensile volumetric behavior of the near resin exhibits two regions: an initial region where the increase in volume strain was due to the Poisson's effect, and a second region where a slower rate of increase in volume strain was due to shear deformation. Tensile volumetric deformation of an elastomer-modified epoxy exhibits the same type of behavior to that of the neat resin at low rates ( 3.2x0.01 sec(-1)). But at very high strain rates, which correspond more closely to the strain rates at the crack tip, there exists an increase in volume strain beyond the Poisson's effect. TEM, SEM and OM studies indicate that the rubber particles had voided. When a thin section from the deformed region is viewed under crossed-polarized light, shear bands are seen connecting voided rubber particles. From this information cavitation and enhanced shear band formation is proposed as the toughening mechanism.

  19. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  20. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  1. Physicomechanical and antibacterial properties of experimental resin-based dental sealants modified with nylon-6 and chitosan nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, María F; Otte, Andrew D; Gregory, Richard L; Pinal, Rodolfo; Ferreira-Zandoná, Andrea; Bottino, Marco C

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate resin-based experimental dental sealants containing electrospun nylon-6 (N6) and chitosan (CH) fibers in an attempt to improve the physicomechanical properties and provide an antibacterial protective effect, respectively. Electrospun N6 and CH mats were immersed into a resin mixture, light-cured, and then cryomilled to obtain micron-sized resin-modified fiber particles. Different levels of the novel cryomilled particles (i.e. 1, 2.5, and 5% relative to the resin mixture, % by weight) were used to prepare the N6- and CH-containing sealants. A commercial sealant and the experimental resin mixture (unfilled) were used as controls. Flexural strength (FS), Vickers microhardness (VH), and agar diffusion tests were performed. The data were analyzed at the 5% significance level. No significant difference in fiber diameter of N6 (503 ± 31 nm) and CH (595 ± 38 nm) was observed. Upon cryomilling, the resin-modified CH and N6 mats led to the formation of irregularly-shaped particles, with an average diameter of 14.24 µm and 15.87 µm, respectively. CH-5% had significantly higher FS (115.3 ± 1.3 MPa) than all the other groups. CH-1% had significantly higher hardness values (38.3 ± 0.3 VHN) than all the other groups. Collectively, the results indicated that CH-containing sealants presented the highest FS and hardness; however, none of the CH-containing sealants displayed antimicrobial properties. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The influence of monomeric resin and filler characteristics on the performance of experimental resin-based composites (RBCs) derived from a commercial formulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hahnel, Sebastian

    2012-04-01

    To explore experimental RBCs derived from a successful commercially available RBC (Grandio) to investigate resin monomer blend and filler parameters (volume fraction, density and diameter) on RBC performance.

  3. Prediction of the viscosity reduction due to dissolved CO2 of and an elementary approach in the supercritical CO2 assisted continuous particle production of a polyester resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalawade, Sameer P.; Nieborg, Vincent H. J.; Picchioni, Francesco; Janssen, L. P. B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The dissolution of CO2 in a polymer causes plasticization of the polymer and hence, its viscosity is reduced. A model based on the free volume theory has been used for a polyester resin, which shows a considerable reduction in the viscosity due to dissolved M. Therefore, superctitical CO2 has been

  4. Karakteristik Komposit Resin Berkemampuan Mengalir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Irawan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of resin composites as posterior restoratives has markedly increased over the past decade. The patients demand for better esthetics, concerns related to possible mercury toxicity from amalgam and improvements in resin composite materials have significantly contributed the popularity of these materials. Early problems related to composites included excessive wear, less of anatomic form, post operative sensitivity, secondary caries and marginal leakage. Marginal adaptation still remains an unavoidable problem for composite restoration, especially at the gingival wall of cervical or Class II restoration. In an attempt to improve marginal sealing, many techniques and lining materials have been designed. To reduce stress generated by polymerization shrinkage, applying and curing of resin composites in layers is often recommended. Using a thick adhesive layer or low-viscosity resin may, due to its elastic properties, serve as a flexible intermediate layer and compensate for the polymerization stress created in resin composite. Flowable composites were created by retaining the same small particle size of traditional hybrid composite but reducing the filler content and allowing the increased resin to reduce the viscosity of the mixture. Flowable composites were introduced in 1996 as liners, fissure sealants and also in tunnel preparations. They have been suggested for Class I, II, III and V cavity restorations, preventive resin restorations and composite, porcelain and amalgam repairing. Their usage as a liner under high filled resins in posterior restorations has been shown to improve the adaptation of composites and effectively achieve clinically acceptable results. This article attempts to give a broad characteristics of different types of flowable composites. 

  5. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Zirconia Ceramic Using Adhesive Primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Ariovaldo; Brito, Rui Barbosa; Kina, Sidney; Andrade, Oswaldo Scopin; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Carvalho, Andreia Assis; Giannini, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of adhesive primers on the microshear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia ceramic. Fifty zirconia plates (12 mm × 5 mm × 1.5 mm thick) of a commercially available zirconium oxide ceramic (ZirCad) were sintered, sandblasted with aluminum oxide particles, and cleaned ultrasonically before bonding. The plates were randomly divided into five groups of 10. Three resin cements were selected (RelyX ARC, Multilink Automix, Clearfil SA Cement self-adhesive resin cement), along with two primers (Metal-Zirconia Primer, Alloy Primer) and one control group. The primers and resin cements were used according to manufacturers' recommendations. The control group comprised the conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC) without adhesive primer. Test cylinders (0.75 mm diameter × 1 mm high) were formed on zirconia surfaces by filling cylindrical Tygon tube molds with resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C, then tested for shear strength on a Shimadzu EZ Test testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Bond strength data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Dunnett's test (5%). The bond strength means in MPa (± s.d.) were: RelyX ARC: 28.1 (6.6); Multilink Automix: 37.6 (4.5); Multilink Automix + Metal-Zirconia Primer: 55.7 (4.0); Clearfil SA Cement: 46.2 (3.3); and Clearfil SA Cement + Alloy Primer: 47.0 (4.1). Metal-Zirconia Primer increased the bond strength of Multilink Automix resin cement to zirconia, but no effect was observed for Alloy Primer using Clearfil SA Cement. RelyX ARC showed the lowest bond strength to zirconia. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Evaluating the effect of in-process material on the binding mechanisms of surrogate viral particles to a multi-modal anion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew R; Burnham, Michael S; Johnson, Sarah A; Lute, Scott C; Brorson, Kurt A; Roush, David J

    2018-02-10

    Bacteriophage binding mechanisms to multi-modal anion exchange resin may include both anion exchange and hydrophobic interactions, or the mechanism can be dominated by a single moiety. However, previous studies have reported binding mechanisms defined for simple solutions containing only buffer and a surrogate viral spike (i.e. bacteriophage ΦX174, PR772, and PP7). We employed phage spiked in-process monoclonal antibody (mAb) pools to model binding under bioprocessing conditions. These experiments allow the individual contributions of the mAb, in-process impurities, and buffer composition on mechanistic removal of phages to be studied. PP7 and PR772 use synergetic binding by the positively charged quaternary amine and the hydrophobic aromatic phenyl group to bind multi-modal resin. ΦX174's binding mechanism remains inconclusive due to operating conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis of Prebiotic Caramels Catalyzed by Ion-Exchange Resin Particles: Kinetic Model for the Formation of Di-d-fructose Dianhydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Cerda, Imelda-Elizabeth; Thammavong, Phahath; Caqueret, Vincent; Porte, Catherine; Mabille, Isabelle; Garcia Fernandez, José Manuel; Moscosa Santillan, Mario; Havet, Jean-Louis

    2018-02-21

    Caramel enriched in di-d-fructose dianhydrides (DFAs, a family of prebiotic cyclic fructodisaccharides) is a functional food with beneficial properties for health. The aim of this work was to study the conversion of fructose into DFAs catalyzed by acid ion-exchange resin, in order to establish a simplified mechanism of the caramelization reaction and a kinetic model for DFA formation. Batch reactor experiments were carried out in a 250 mL spherical glass flask and afforded up to 50% DFA yields. The mechanism proposed entails order 2 reactions that describe fructose conversion on DFAs or formation of byproducts such as HMF or melanoidines. A third order 1 reaction defines DFA transformation into fructosyl-DFAs or fructo-oligosaccharides. The influence of fructose concentration, resin loading and temperature was studied to calculate the kinetic parameters necessary to scale up the process.

  8. Properties of a nanodielectric cryogenic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Physical properties of a nanodielectric composed of in situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles ({le} 5 nm in diameter) and a cryogenic resin are reported. The dielectric losses were reduced by a factor of 2 in the nanocomposite, indicating that the presence of small TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles restricted the mobility of the polymer chains. Dielectric breakdown data of the nanodielectric was distributed over a narrower range than that of the unfilled resin. The nanodielectric had 1.56 times higher 1% breakdown probability than the resin, yielding 0.64 times thinner insulation thickness for the same voltage level, which is beneficial in high voltage engineering.

  9. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Ng; Jimmy C. M. Hsiao; Keith C. T. Tong; Harry Kim; Yanjie Mai; Keith H. S. Chan

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin ...

  10. Effects of Hot Chemical Etching and 10-Metacryloxydecyl Dihydrogen Phosphate (MDP) Monomer on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics to Resin-Based Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Canan; Çakırbay Tanış, Merve; Şen, Murat

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the hot chemical etching method on the shear bond strength between zirconia and two resin cements. Sixty zirconia specimens (13 × 7.5 × 2.5 mm 3 ) were prepared and treated as follows: (1) airborne-particle abrasion with 50 μm Al 2 O 3 particles; (2) hot chemical etching for 10 minutes; (3) hot chemical etching for 30 minutes. Sixty composite cylinders of 3 mm diameter and height were prepared and bonded to zirconia specimens, which were divided into subgroups A and B. Group A: cemented with conventional resin cement (Variolink II); group B: cemented with 10-metacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) monomer containing resin cement (Panavia SA) after the application of surface treatments. Next, the specimens were stored in 37ºC distilled water for 24 hours. Following water storage, shear bond strength test was performed at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed in a universal testing machine. The statistical analyses were performed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. p MDP monomer-containing resin cement, Panavia SA, improved the resin bonding of zirconia ceramics when combined with airborne-particle abrasion. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Resin Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    to see plastic deformation of the surface. 8.1.4.3 Density: Density using the Archimedes principle (ASTM D 792). 8.1.4.4 Density as a Function of...the cure and postcure, quickly cool the sample to 0 °C or lower the temperature to quench the reaction, and then ramp the temperature at 5 °C/min to...prepared by pouring 10 g of resin into a 30-mL screw-cap scintillation vial and adding appropriate amounts of initiator, catalyst, and inhibitor

  12. Microbiological study of water-softener resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, J M; Engelhard, W E; Parsons, J E

    1969-09-01

    Microbial identification using effluents backflushed from exhausted urban and rural tank resins and cleaned resins containing the sulfonated copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene (SDB) were completed, along with microbial assessment of the concentrated stock salt brine. Forty-four different bacterial and fungal genera were identified. Extensive biochemical and animal virulence tests completed on one of the six bacterial salt brine isolates indicated a pathogenic staphylococcal strain. The retention of Staphylococcus aureus, a Flavobacterium sp, and Escherichia coli B bacteriophage was demonstrated both by using the nonexhausted sodium-regenerated resin and by using the same resin exchanged with different mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. Effluent counts completed after bacterial seepage through the resins indicated the Pb(++) exchanged resin removed 55% of the bacteria; Na(+), Fe(++), and Al(+++) removed 31 to 36% and Ca(++) and Cu(++) removed about 10 to 15%. Seventy per cent or more of the bacteriophage was removed by Fe(++), Cu(++), and Al(+++), whereas the Ca(++) and Na(++) cations removed 25 to 31%. Over a 77-day period, nonsterile tap water was passed through bacterial seeded and uninoculated SDB (Na) resin columns. Effluent and resin elution counts demonstrated the growth and survival of 2 different bacteria per column. Increased bacterial retention, survival, and multiplication occurred concomitantly with accumulation of organic and inorganic materials and the Ca(++) and Mg(++) cations from the tap water. Furthermore, microbial elution from resin particles taken from column depths of 1, 8, and 16 cm indicated a bacterial diminution with increasing depths.

  13. Cytotoxicity of resin-based luting cements to pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Elaine Cristina Voltolini; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto De Souza

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of components released from different types of luting cements to two cell lines obtained from pulp tissue. Three types of luting cements were evaluated, distributed into the following groups: G1--negative control (no treatment); G2--resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Rely X Luting 2); G3--self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X U200); and G4--conventional resin cement (Rely X ARC). Standardized cylindrical specimens (14 mm diameter and 1 mm thick) prepared with the dental materials were immersed in culture medium (DMEM) for 24 hours to obtain the extracts (DMEM + components released from the cements). Then, the extracts were applied to cultured odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells or human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). Finally, cell viability (MTT assay), cell death (Annexin/PI) (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 5%) and cell morphology (SEM) were assessed. Cements' components in contact with cells (SEM/EDS) and pH of the extracts were also evaluated. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (G2) caused the most intense toxic effect to the two cell lines; the cell viability reduction was around 95.8% and 89.4% for MDPC-23 cells and HDPCs, respectively, which was statistically significantly different compared with that of the negative control group (G1). Also, a high quantity of particles leached from this ionomeric cement was found on the cells, which showed intense morphological alterations. In the G2 group, 100% necrosis was observed for both cell lines, and an acidic pH was detected on the extract. Conversely, Rely X U200 (G3) and Rely X ARC (G4), which presented low solubility and no alteration in pH, caused only slight cytotoxicity to the cultured cells.

  14. Disinfection of denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J J; Cameron, S M; Runyan, D A; Craft, D W

    1999-02-01

    During repair or adjustments of acrylic resin removable complete and partial dentures, particles of the acrylic resin from the interior of the prosthesis may expose dental personnel to microbial health hazards if the prosthesis has not been thoroughly disinfected. This study investigates the efficacy of a commercially prepared microbial disinfectant (Alcide) on the external and internal surfaces of acrylic resins. Four groups of acrylic resin were incubated in an experimental model to simulate the oral environment over time. Specimens were treated in 2 groups, disinfected and not disinfected, and then further grouped by breaking and not breaking. Analysis was performed with microbial colony counts, SEM, and statistical analyses. Viable microorganisms still remain on the internal and external surfaces of treated resins. Chlorine dioxide reduces, but does not eliminate, viable microorganisms on these dental prostheses.

  15. In vitro two-body wear of inlay-onlay composite resin restoratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, A R; Nicholls, J I; Brudvik, J S

    1991-02-01

    Inlay-onlay composite resin restorations have been introduced to the profession as alternatives to amalgam and direct composite resins. Two-body wear testing was performed on three inlay-onlay resins and one direct composite resins using a machine designed to produce sliding wear. The composite resins were opposed by human enamel, type III gold alloy, and porcelain. Of the investigated materials, the homogeneously microfilled inlay-onlay material showed significantly less wear. The direct composite resin showed significantly the greatest wear. The hybrid inlay-onlay resins showed intermediate wear. The hybrid inlay-onlay resins and the direct composite (small particle, heavily filled) resin created wear tracks in the opposing surfaces while the homogeneous microfill inlay-onlay resin did not. The depth of the observed wear tracks in the opposing surface was sufficiently substantial to warrant further investigation into the wear of materials that oppose composite resin restorations.

  16. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Tahereh-Sadat; Erfan, Mohammad; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Masaeli, Reza; Rezaei, Yashar; Bagheri, Hossein; Erfan, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm). Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length) were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan) was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm) surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness.

  17. Efficacy of polishing kits on the surface roughness and color stability of different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaagaoglu, H; Aslan, T; Gürbulak, A; Albayrak, H; Taşdemir, Z; Gumus, H

    2017-05-01

    Different polishing kits may have different effects on the composite resin surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and color stability of four different composites which was applied different polishing technique. Thirty specimens were made for each composite resin group (nanohybrid, GrandioSo-GS; nanohybrid, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic-CME; hybrid, Valux Plus-VP; micro-hybrid, Ruby Comp-RC; [15 mm in diameter and 2 mm height]), with the different monomer composition and particle size from a total of 120 specimens. Each composite group was divided into three subgroups (n = 10). The first subgroup of the each composite subgroups served as control (C) and had no surface treatment. The second subgroup of the each composite resin groups was polished with finishing discs (Bisco Finishing Discs; Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, IL, USA). The third subgroup of the each composite resin was polished with polishing wheel (Enhance and PoGo, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany). The surface roughness and the color differences measurement of the specimens were made and recorded. The data were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test, and regression analysis was used in order to examine the correlation between surface roughness and color differences of the specimens (α = 0.05). The Kruskal-Wallis test indicated significant difference among the composite resins in terms of ΔE (P composite resins in terms of surface roughness (P > 0.05). Result of the regression analysis indicated statistically significant correlation between Ra and ΔE values (P < 0.05, r2 = 0.74). The findings of the present study have clinical relevance in the choice of polishing kits used.

  18. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh-Sadat Jafarzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm. Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness.

  19. SEM and elemental analysis of composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoda, H.; Yamada, T.; Inokoshi, S.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four chemically cured, 21 light-cured anterior, three light-cured anterior/posterior, and 18 light-cured posterior composite resins were examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the elemental composition of their filler particles was analyzed with an energy dispersive electron probe microanalyzer. According to the results obtained, the composite resins were divided into five groups (traditional, microfilled type, submicrofilled type, hybrid type, and semihybrid), with two additional hypothetical categories (microfilled and hybrid). Characteristics of each type were described with clinical indications for selective guidance of respective composite resins for clinical use

  20. Removal of p-nitrophenol by a water-compatible hypercrosslinked resin functionalized with formaldehyde carbonyl groups and XAD-4 in aqueous solution: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianhan; Yan, Cheng; Huang, Kelong

    2009-04-01

    Chloromethylated styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers were post-crosslinked through Fredel-Crafts alkylation reaction and a water-compatible hypercrosslinked resin HJ-1 was developed successfully. It can be wetted directly by water and can be used without any wetting process. It was applied to remove p-nitrophenol in aqueous solution in comparison with the commercial Amberlite XAD-4 resin. Their adsorption behaviors for p-nitrophenol were conducted and it was found the adsorption dynamics obeyed the pseudo-second-order rate equation and the intra-particle diffusion was the rate-limiting step. The adsorption isotherms can be correlated to Freundlich isotherm and the adsorption capacity onto HJ-1 resin was much larger than XAD-4. The maximum adsorption capacity of p-nitrophenol for HJ-1 resin was measured to be 179.4 mg/g with the equilibrium concentration at 178.9 mg/l and the maximum removal percentage was predicted to be 98.3%. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters were calculated and the adsorption was mainly driven by enthalpy change. The micropore structure, the size matching between the pore diameter of HJ-1 resin and the molecular size of p-nitrophenol, and polarity matching between the formaldehyde carbonyl groups of HJ-1 resin and p-nitrophenol bring the larger adsorption capacity and higher adsorption affinity.

  1. Characteristics of floc formation of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tetsurou; Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu.

    1989-01-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of floc formation. The physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin were measured and the factors related to floc formation of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index. It was found that these factors were mixing ratio, nature of resins and particle size of resins. In addition, it was assumed on the bases of these results that the amount of resin floc was related to sum of the surface electric charges of both resins. The filling ratio of resin floc was related to their product by multiplication and an experimental expression was obtained. The specific settle volume of resin floc could then be simulated by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author)

  2. Characteristics of floc formation of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Tetsurou (Nitto Denko Corp., Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)); Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu

    1989-09-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of floc formation. The physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin were measured and the factors related to floc formation of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index. It was found that these factors were mixing ratio, nature of resins and particle size of resins. In addition, it was assumed on the bases of these results that the amount of resin floc was related to sum of the surface electric charges of both resins. The filling ratio of resin floc was related to their product by multiplication and an experimental expression was obtained. The specific settle volume of resin floc could then be simulated by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author).

  3. Particle size effects on protein and virus-like particle adsorption on perfusion chromatography media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-01-02

    The resin structure, chromatographic behavior, and adsorption kinetics of proteins and virus-like-particles (VLPs) are studied for POROS HS 20 and POROS HS 50 (23 and 52 μm mean diameter, respectively) to determine the effects of particle size on perfusion chromatography and to determine the predictive ability of available models. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) show similar structures for the two resins, both containing 200-1000 nm pores that transect a network of much smaller pores. For non-binding conditions, trends of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) as a function of reduced velocity are consistent with perfusion. The estimated intraparticle flow fractions for these conditions are 0.0018 and 0.00063 for POROS HS 20 and HS 50, respectively. For strong binding conditions, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) shows asymmetrical intraparticle concentrations profiles and enhanced rates of IgG adsorption on POROS HS 20 at 1000 cm/h. The corresponding effective diffusivity under flow is 2-3 times larger than for non-flow conditions and much larger than observed for POROS HS 50, consistent with available models. For VLPs, however, adsorption is confined to a thin layer near the particle surface for both resins, suggesting that the bound VLPs block the pores. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Ng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  5. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith H. S.; Mai, Yanjie; Kim, Harry; Tong, Keith C. T.; Ng, Desmond; Hsiao, Jimmy C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  6. Activated Carbon by Co-pyrolysis and Steam Activation from Particle Board and Melamine Formaldehyde Resin: Production, Adsorption Properties and Techno Economic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Vanreppelen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the top strategic objectives and research areas in Europe is recovering wood from processing and end of life products. However, there are still several "contaminated" wood products that are not or only partly reused/recycled. Particle board waste which is contaminated with aminoplasts is one of these products. In addition, a considerable amount of aminoplast waste resinis produced for the production of particle board that cannot be re-used or recycled. The chemical properties of these wastes (high nitrogen content of 5.9 wt% and 54.1 wt% for particle board and melamine formaldehyde respectively make them ideal precursors for the production of nitrogenised activated carbon. The profitability of the produced activated carbon is investigated by calculating the net present value, the minimum selling price and performing a Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis. Encouraging results for a profitable production are obtained even though the current assumptions start from a rather pessimistic scenario.

  7. Deposition of crystalline hydroxyapatite nano-particle on zirconia ceramic: a potential solution for the poor bonding characteristic of zirconia ceramics to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Abbas; Nikzad, Sakineh; Yazdani, Arash; Atri, Faezeh; Fazel Anvari-Yazdi, Abbas

    2017-07-01

    The poor bonding strength of zirconia to different dental substrates is one of the challenging issues in restorative dentistry. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent biocompatible material with fine bonding properties. In this study, it was hypothesized that hydroxyapatite coating on zirconia would improve its bond strength. Forty-five zirconia blocks were prepared and randomly divided into three groups: hydroxyapatite coating, sandblasting, and no preparation (control). The blocks were bonded to cement and the micro-shear bond strength was measured following load application. The bond strength values were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test in 3 groups and paired comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U test. The failure patterns of the specimens were studied by a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope and then analyzed by the chi-square test (significance level = 0.05). Deposition of hydroxyapatite on the zirconia surface significantly improved its bond strength to the resin cement in comparison with the control specimens (p < 0.0001). Also, the bond strength was similar to the sandblasted group (p = 0.34). The sandblasted and control group only showed adhesive failure, but the hydroxyapatite coated group had mixed failures, indicating the better quality of bonding (p < 0.0001). As a final point, hydroxyapatite coating on the zirconia surface improved the bond strength quality and values.

  8. Composite materials based on modified epoxy resin and carbon fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalez, Viviane; Barcia, Fabio L.; Soares, Bluma G.

    2006-01-01

    Epoxy resin networks have been modified with block copolymer of polybutadiene and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (DGEBA)-based on epoxy resin. The epoxy resin modified with carboxyl-terminated polybutadiene presented improved impact resistance and outstanding mechanical performance in terms of flexural and tensile properties because of the presence of rubber particles homogeneously dispersed inside the epoxy matrix. This modified system also resulted in an improvement of mechanical properties o...

  9. The kinetics of fossil resin extraction from a flotation concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.; Yu, Q.; Miller, J.D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The kinetics of fossil resin extraction from a flotation concentrate by heptane were investigated as a function of process variables using monosize particles. Experimental results provide for a better understanding of the refining process and the basis for subsequent design and construction of a continuous resin refining circuit. Based on the effect of process variables (particle size, stirring speed, and temperature) the resin extraction rate appears to be controlled by surface solvation phenomena. The initial extraction rate was found to be inversely proportional to the initial particle size and a kinetic model is being developed to describe the experimental results.

  10. Isotachophoresis system having larger-diameter channels flowing into channels with reduced diameter and with selectable counter-flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2018-03-06

    An isotachophoresis system for separating a sample containing particles into discrete packets including a flow channel, the flow channel having a large diameter section and a small diameter section; a negative electrode operably connected to the flow channel; a positive electrode operably connected to the flow channel; a leading carrier fluid in the flow channel; a trailing carrier fluid in the flow channel; and a control for separating the particles in the sample into discrete packets using the leading carrier fluid, the trailing carrier fluid, the large diameter section, and the small diameter section.

  11. Direct measurement of colloidal interactions between polyaniline surfaces in a UV-curable coating formulation: the effect of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and resin composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Shadi; Claesson, Per M; Pan, Jinshan; Thormann, Esben

    2014-02-04

    The interactions between polyaniline particles and polyaniline surfaces in polyester acrylate resin mixed with 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate monomer have been investigated using contact angle measurements and the atomic force microscopy colloidal probe technique. Polyaniline with different characteristics (hydrophilic and hydrophobic) were synthesized directly on spherical polystyrene particles of 10 μm in diameter. Surface forces were measured between core/shell structured polystyrene/polyaniline particles (and a pure polystyrene particle as reference) mounted on an atomic force microscope cantilever and a pressed pellet of either hydrophilic or hydrophobic polyaniline powders, in resins of various polymer:monomer ratios. A short-range purely repulsive interaction was observed between hydrophilic polyaniline (doped with phosphoric acid) surfaces in polyester acrylate resin. In contrast, interactions between hydrophobic polyaniline (doped with n-decyl phosphonic acid) were dominated by attractive forces, suggesting less compatibility and higher tendency for aggregation of these particles in liquid polyester acrylate compared to hydrophilic polyaniline. Both observations are in agreement with the conclusions from the interfacial energy studies performed by contact angle measurements.

  12. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  13. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju; Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vitol, Elina; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 °C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 °C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  14. The influence of the size and surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles on the rheological properties of alkyd resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoman Tijana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spherical TiO2 particles of different size were dispersed in alkyd resin based on soybean oil. Four samples of TiO2 particles were used, three commercial and one obtained by acid catalyzed hydrolysis of titanium tetraisopropoxide. The size of the synthesized nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy. Surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles was performed with propyl gallate and lauryl gallate. The influence of the size of TiO2 nanoparticles, their concentration and type of the surface modification on the rheological properties of alkyd resin was investigated. The obtained results have shown that the viscosity of the prepared dispersions was higher than viscosity of the pure resin, it increases with decreasing particle diameter and decreases with frequency increase. Surface modified particles showed higher influence on the viscosity of alkyd resin than unmodified, because their hydrodynamic volume is higher due to the presence of the adsorbed gallates, leading to the increase of effective volume fraction of particles in dispersion. For the lowest TiO2 concentration, the viscosity was higher for sample modified with lauryl gallate, due to the higher thickness of the adsorbed layer. The increase of concentration, because of less dispersion stability of the particles modified with propyl gallate, leads to particles agglomeration. The presence of agglomerates, which was confirmed by a change in the slope of the functional dependence of storage modulus on loss modulus, leads to a rapid increase in viscosity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172062 i br. 45020

  15. Resin screening for the removal of pyridine-derivatives from waste-water by solvent impregnated resin technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, J.; Schuur, Boelo; de Haan, A.B.

    2013-01-01

    The selective removal of pyridine derivatives by solvent impregnated resins has been studied. A solvent impregnated resin consists of a macro-porous particle that is impregnated with a solvent. This technology allows the use liquid–liquid extraction in fixed-bed operation, and prevents problems like

  16. Mechanistic understanding of fouling of protein A chromatography resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Mili; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-08-12

    This paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of how fouling of Protein A resin takes place. Binding and mass transport properties of widely used agarose-based Protein A resin, MabSelect SuRe™, have been examined to understand the mechanism of resin fouling. There could be various factors that impact resin fouling. These include product/impurity build-up due to components in the feed material and ligand degradation due to the use of harsh buffers. To unravel their contributions, cycling studies were performed with and without product loading. The results presented in this paper provide a lucid understanding of the causative factors that limit Protein A chromatographic resin lifetime. The capacity fall for protein A resin at the end of 100th cycle due to use of feed material was found to be five times greater than that without using feed material. Compared to the fresh resin, the cycled resin samples shows 24% reduction in particle porosity and 51% reduction in pore mass transfer coefficient. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to qualitatively monitor accumulation of foulants on the cycled resin. Fouled resin sample contained a dense residue in the interior and exterior of resin particle both as a film at the bead surface and as granules. The surface activation energy increased five times in the case of fouled resin sample. The major event in fouling was identified as the non-specific adsorption of the feed material components on resin, signaling that pore diffusion is the rate limiting step. It is anticipated that these findings will assist in development of a more robust and economical downstream manufacturing process for monoclonal antibody purification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of some chemical surface modifications on resin zirconia adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Wong, Hai Ming

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of various chemical surface modifications on adhesion between zirconia and resin adhesive. Pre-sintered zirconia discs were sectioned from commercial cylindrical blocks and polished with abrasive papers under running tap water. All the discs were randomly divided into five study groups according to the methods of surface treatment, including: the control group (fully sintered, without any modification), group S (fully sintered and sandblasted with silica coated alumina particles), group HN (fully sintered and etched with a blend of mineral acid solution at 100 °C for 25 min), group HF (fully sintered and etched with 48% hydrofluoric acid solution at 100 °C for 25 min), and group Si (coated with silica particles and then fully sintered). The mean value of surface roughness was evaluated before further treatment. Resin stubs (3.6mm in diameter and 3mm in height) were adhered and light cured on each zirconia disc after the application of a silane coupling agent. In each group, all the samples were further divided into three subgroups with each n=12, one for the measurement of initial adhesion strength (shear bond) value and the other two were tested after thermal cycling for 10,000 and 20,000 cycles, respectively. The results were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Turkey HSD (pzirconia surface crystallinity. The morphological appearance of zirconia surface after surface treatment was observed with SEM. The control group showed the lowest initial shear bond strength (SBS) value (16.8 ± 2.4 MPa) and did not survive the aging treatments. All the investigated surface treatments improved resin zirconia bond strength significantly, the group S displaying the highest initial value of 25.1 ± 2.7 MPa. However, the highest resistance to the aging effects of thermal cycling was found in group Si. It was further shown in the XRD examination that only the grit-blasting caused the crystalline transformation from tetragonal phase to monoclinic phase (T

  18. Effect of Various Surface Treatment on Repair Strength of Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Alizade

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: In some clinical situations, repair of composite restorations is treatment of choice. Improving the bond strength between one new and old composite usually requires increased surface roughness to promote mechanical interlocking sincechemical bonding might not be adequate. Similarly, the treatment of a laboratory fabricated resin composite restoration involves the same procedures, and there is a need to create the strongest possible bond of a resin cement to a previously polymerized composite.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the shear bond strength of repaired to aged composite resin.Materials and Methods: Eighty four cylindrical specimens of a composite resin were fabricated and stored in distilled water for 100 days prior to surface treatment. Surface treatment of old composite was done in 6 groups as follow:1- Air abrasion with CoJet sand particles with micoretcher + silane + dentin bonding agent2- Air abrasion with 50μm Al2O3 particles+ phosphoric acid+ silane+ dentin bonding agent3- Air abrasion with 50μm Al2O3 particles + phosphoric acid + dentin bonding agent4- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + silane + dentin bonding agent5- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + dentin bonding agent6- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + composite activator + dentin bonding agentThen fresh composite resin was bonded to treated surfaces. Twelve specimens were also fabricated as control group with the same diameter but with the height twice as much as other specimens. All of the specimens were thermocycled prior to testing for shear bondstrength. The bond strength data were analyzed statistically using one way ANOVA test, t test and Duncan's grouping test.Results: One-way ANOVA indicated no significant difference between 7 groups (P=0.059. One-way ANOVA indicated significant difference between the three diamond bur groups (P=0.036. Silane had a significant effect on the repair bond

  19. Protein a resin lifetime study: Evaluation of protein a resin performance with a model-based approach in continuous capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behere, Ketki; Cha, Bumjoon; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2018-01-22

    A modified shrinking core model (MSCM) has been used to describe the mechanism for the degradation of Protein A resin particles taking place under continuous chromatographic operation. The model is based on the hypothetical shrinkage of the boundary layer of the resin particles, which house the active Protein A ligands within their pores. The caustic during the sanitization phase of chromatography has been determined to cause the Protein A ligand degradation. Protein A resins provided by manufacturers possess unique caustic stability, which has been used in MSCM to appraise the ligand degradation. The kinetic model utilized semiempirical parameters including diffusion constant, rate constant, stoichiometric factor, and reaction order. The parameters were estimated from column breakthrough experiments to simulate continuous Protein A chromatography for three distinct resins. The reaction order has been identified as the key parameter for predicting the degradation kinetics. The recorded reaction orders vary for three different resins with the resin B showing the highest reaction order of 4 and lowest being 1.65 for the resin C. The model can predict the effects of caustic on resin performance and displayed that minimal degradation of the resins A and B occurred, when exposed to 0.1 N and 0.2N NaOH, retaining up to 96% binding capacity after 240 cycles. The adsorption study conducted for the resin B demonstrated the dynamic physical and chemical changes transpiring through the life cycle of the resin, further supported the degradation model. The performance data demonstrate that the resin B exhibits the desirable performance, with higher reaction order indicating slower resin degradation, higher binding capacities, and increased sustenance of this binding capacity for extended duration. The degradation model can be extended to build effective cleaning strategies for continuous downstream processing.

  20. Shrinkage-stress kinetics of photopolymerised resin-composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Julian D.

    The use of directly-placed substances as restorative materials in teeth remains the technique of choice for preserving function and form in teeth that have cavities. The current aesthetic restorative materials of choice are resin-composite materials, although these undergo molecular densification during polymerisation, which has deleterious effects. Although shrinkage-strain is the cause, it is the shrinkage-stress effects that may be seen as being responsible for the problems with adhesive resin-based restorations that are encountered clinically, the bond may fail with separation of the material from the cavity wall, leading to marginal discolouration, pulpal irritation and subsequent necrosis, post operative sensitivity, recurrent caries and eventual failure of restorations. Other outcomes include cohesive fracture of enamel or cusps, cuspal movement (strain) and persistent pain. The aims of this research were to characterise the effects of variations in resin-composite formulation on shrinkage-strain and shrinkage-stress kinetics. In particular, the influence of the size and morphology of the dispersed phase was investigated through the study of experimental formulations. Polymerisation shrinkage-strain kinetics were assessed with the bonded-disk method. It was found that resin-composites with spherical filler particles had significantly lower shrinkage-strain compared to those with irregular filler particles. Additionally, shrinkage-strain was found to be dependent on the size of filler particle, and this trend was related, in part, to differences in the degree of conversion. The data were also used to calculate the activation energy for each material, and a relationship between this and filler particle size for the irregular fillers was demonstrated. A fixed-compliance cantilever beam instrument (Bioman) was used for characterisation of shrinkage-stress kinetics. Significant differences were identified between materials in relation to filler particle size and

  1. The DIAMET campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, G.

    2012-04-01

    DIAMET (DIAbatic influences on Mesoscale structures in ExTratropical storms) is a joint project between the UK academic community and the Met Office. Its focus is on understanding and predicting mesoscale structures in synoptic-scale storms, and in particular on the role of diabatic processes in generating and maintaining them. Such structures include fronts, rain bands, secondary cyclones, sting jets etc, and are important because much of the extreme weather we experience (e.g. strong winds, heavy rain) comes from such regions. The project conducted two field campaigns in the autumn of 2011, from September 14 - 30 and November 24 - December 14, based around the FAAM BAe146 aircraft with support from ground-based radar and radiosonde measurements. Detailed modelling, mainly using the Met Office Unified model, supported the planning and interpretation of these campaigns. This presentation will give a brief overview of the campaigns. Both in September and November-December the weather regime was westerly, with a strong jet stream directed across the Atlantic. Three IOPs were conducted in September, to observe a convective band ahead of an upper-level trough, waves on a long trailing cold front, and a warm conveyor belt associated with a secondary cyclone. In November-December six IOPs were conducted, to observe frontal passages and high winds. This period was notable for a number of very strong windstorms passing across the north of the UK, and gave us an opportunity to examine bent-back warm fronts in the southern quadrant of these storms where the strongest winds are found. The case studies fell into two basic patterns. In the majority of cases, dropsonde legs at high level were used to obtain a cross-section of winds and thermodynamic structure (e.g. across a front), followed by in situ legs at lower levels (generally where the temperature was between 0 and -10°) to examine microphysical processes, especially ice multiplication and the extent of supercooled water

  2. Mechanical properties and strengthening mechanism of epoxy resin reinforced with nano-SiO2 particles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chufan; Tan, Yefa; Yang, Xupu; Xu, Ting; Wang, Lulu; Qi, Zehao

    2018-03-01

    Nano-SiO2 particles and MWCNTs were used to reinforce the EPs. The mechanical properties of the composites and the strengthening mechanisms of nano-SiO2 and MWCNTs on the mechanical properties of epoxy composites were studied. The results show that the mechanical properties of the reinforced epoxy composites are greatly improved. Especially, nano-SiO2/MWCNTs/EP composites exhibit the most excellent mechanical properties. The synergistic strengthening mechanisms of nano-SiO2 and MWCNTs on the EP are the micro plastic deformation effect, micro-cracks and their divarication effect, and the pull-out effect of MWCNTs in EP matrix, which can reduce the extent of stress concentration and absorb more energy.

  3. Solid-phase extraction with slurry injection of the resin into ETAAS for trace determination of thallium in natural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoshi, Nukatsuka; Hiroyuki, Seitoh; Kunio, Ohzeki

    2004-01-01

    Thallium in natural water samples was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after 1000-fold enrichment by mini solid-phase extraction from a 100-mL sample solution. A TI-pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate complex formed in a sample solution of pH 1.6 was extracted on fine particles of a cellulose nitrate resin dispersed in the sample solution. The cellulose nitrate resin was then collected on a membrane filter (25 mm ) by filtration under suction using a glass funnel with an effective filtration area of 0.64 cm 2 . As a result, a circular thin layer of the resin phase with a diameter of 9 mm was obtained. Then the resin phase was carved out by an acrylate resin puncher with a 10-mm hole to put it into a sample cup containing 100 μL of 10 mM HNO 3 containing 0.5 mM NaCl. The resin phase was suspended in the solution by ultrasonication. 1000-fold enrichment was thus attained within 15 min, and the suspension was delivered to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The linear calibration graph was obtained in the range of 0-4 ng of TI in 100 mL of a sample solution. The detection limit obtained by 3 σ method was 0.19 ng. The proposed method was applied to the determination of TI in natural water samples. The results showed the concentration of TI in seawater was 12.1 ± 1.8 pg mL -1 for the calibration graph method and 12.6 ± 1.4 pg mL -1 for the standard addition method. A snowmelt sample contained 20.7 ± 1.0 pg mL -1 of TI. (author)

  4. Characteristics of epoxy resin/SiO2 nanocomposite insulation: effects of plasma surface treatment on the nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Phung, B T; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2013-05-01

    The present study compares the effects of two different material processing techniques on modifying hydrophilic SiO2 nanoparticles. In one method, the nanoparticles undergo plasma treatment by using a custom-developed atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium plasma reactor. With the other method, they undergo chemical treatment which grafts silane groups onto their surface and turns them into hydrophobic. The treated nanoparticles are then used to synthesize epoxy resin-based nanocomposites for electrical insulation applications. Their characteristics are investigated and compared with the pure epoxy resin and nanocomposite fabricated with unmodified nanofillers counterparts. The dispersion features of the nanoparticles in the epoxy resin matrix are examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. All samples show evidence that the agglomerations are smaller than 30 nm in their diameters. This indicates good dispersion uniformity. The Weibull plot of breakdown strength and the recorded partial discharge (PD) events of the epoxy resin/plasma-treated hydrophilic SiO2 nanocomposite (ER/PTI) suggest that the plasma-treated specimen yields higher breakdown strength and lower PD magnitude as compared to the untreated ones. In contrast, surprisingly, lower breakdown strength is found for the nanocomposite made by the chemically treated hydrophobic particles, whereas the PD magnitude and PD numbers remain at a similar level as the plasma-treated ones.

  5. Differences in mean fibre diameter and fibre diameter variance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sampled at five different body locations (Figure 1) at an age of 15 months. Samples were analysed by the Wool Testing. Bureaux, using an Optical Fibre Diameter Analyser which measured 4000 individual fibres in each sample. Apart from the mean, the variance of fibre diameter within samples was available. The statistical ...

  6. Wheel Diameter and Speedometer Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Clifton

    2010-01-01

    Most introductory physics students have seen vehicles with nonstandard wheel diameters; some may themselves drive "low-rider" cars or "big-wheel" pickup trucks. But how does changing wheel diameter affect speedometer readout for a given speed? Deriving the answer can be followed readily by students who have been introduced to rotation, and it…

  7. Arsenic Removal from Water Using Various Adsorbents: Magnetic Ion Exchange Resins, Hydrous Ion Oxide Particles, Granular Ferric Hydroxide, Activated Alumina, Sulfur Modified Iron, and Iron Oxide-Coated Microsand

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Shahnawaz

    2011-09-30

    The equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of arsenic on six different adsorbents were investigated with one synthetic and four natural types (two surface and two ground) of water. The adsorbents tested included magnetic ion exchange resins (MIEX), hydrous ion oxide particles (HIOPs), granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), activated alumina (AA), sulfur modified iron (SMI), and iron oxide-coated mic - rosand (IOC-M), which have different physicochemical properties (shape, charge, surface area, size, and metal content). The results showed that adsorption equilibriums were achieved within a contact period of 20 min. The optimal doses of adsorbents determined for a given equilibrium concentration of C eq = 10 μg/L were 500 mg/L for AA and GFH, 520–1,300 mg/L for MIEX, 1,200 mg/L for HIOPs, 2,500 mg/L for SMI, and 7,500 mg/L for IOC-M at a contact time of 60 min. At these optimal doses, the rate constants of the adsorbents were 3.9, 2.6, 2.5, 1.9, 1.8, and 1.6 1/hr for HIOPs, AA, GFH, MIEX, SMI, and IOC-M, respectively. The presence of silicate significantly reduced the arsenic removal efficiency of HIOPs, AA, and GFH, presumably due to the decrease in chemical binding affinity of arsenic in the presence of silicate. Additional experiments with natural types of water showed that, with the exception of IOC-M, the adsorbents had lower adsorption capacities in ground water than with surface and deionized water, in which the adsorption capacities decreased by approximately 60–95 % .

  8. Forecasting the Particle Diameter Size Distribution in P92 (X10CrWMoVNb9-2 Steel After Long-Term Ageing at 600 and 650 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zieliński A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigations on microstructure of P92 steel in the as-received condition and after 105 h ageing at 600 and 650 °C were carried out. For the recorded images of microstructure, the quantitative analysis of precipitates was performed. On that basis, a statistical analysis of collected data was made with the aim of estimating parameters of selected theoretical statistical distribution. Then, the forecast for average precipitate diameter and standard deviation of such a distribution for the time of 1,5*105h at 600 and 650 °C was calculated. The obtained results of investigations confirm the possibility of using, in evaluation of degradation degree for materials in use, the forecasting methods derived from mathematical statistics, in particular the theory of stochastic processes and methods of forecasting by analogy.

  9. Encapsulation of an EP67-Conjugated CTL Peptide Vaccine in Nanoscale Biodegradable Particles Increases the Efficacy of Respiratory Immunization and Affects the Magnitude and Memory Subsets of Vaccine-Generated Mucosal and Systemic CD8+ T Cells in a Diameter-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuturi, Bala V K; Tallapaka, Shailendra B; Yeapuri, Pravin; Curran, Stephen M; Sanderson, Sam D; Vetro, Joseph A

    2017-05-01

    The diameter of biodegradable particles used to coencapsulate immunostimulants and subunit vaccines affects the magnitude of memory CD8 + T cells generated by systemic immunization. Possible effects on the magnitude of CD8 + T cells generated by mucosal immunization or memory subsets that potentially correlate more strongly with protection against certain pathogens, however, are unknown. In this study, we conjugated our novel host-derived mucosal immunostimulant, EP67, to the protective MCMV CTL epitope, pp89, through a lysosomal protease-labile double arginine linker (pp89-RR-EP67) and encapsulated in PLGA 50:50 micro- or nanoparticles. We then compared total magnitude, effector/central memory (CD127/KRLG1/CD62L), and IFN-γ/TNF-α/IL-2 secreting subsets of pp89-specific CD8 + T cells as well as protection of naive female BALB/c mice against primary respiratory infection with MCMV 21 days after respiratory immunization. We found that decreasing the diameter of encapsulating particle from ∼5.4 μm to ∼350 nm (i) increased the magnitude of pp89-specific CD8 + T cells in the lungs and spleen; (ii) partially changed CD127/KLRG1 effector memory subsets in the lungs but not the spleen; (iii) changed CD127/KRLG1/CD62L effector/central memory subsets in the spleen; (iv) changed pp89-responsive IFN-γ/TNF-α/IL-2 secreting subsets in the lungs and spleen; (v) did not affect the extent to which encapsulation increased efficacy against primary MCMV respiratory infection over unencapsulated pp89-RR-EP67. Thus, although not observed under our current experimental conditions with MCMV, varying the diameter of nanoscale biodegradable particles may increase the efficacy of mucosal immunization with coencapsulated immunostimulant/subunit vaccines against certain pathogens by selectively increasing memory subset(s) of CD8 + T cells that correlate the strongest with protection.

  10. Effects of 35% Carbamide Peroxide Gel on Surface Roughness and Hardness of Composite Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sharafeddin, F.; Jamalipour, GR.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Bleaching agents may not be safe for dental materials. The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the effects of Opalescent Quick ?in-office bleaching gel? containing 35% carbamide peroxide on the surface roughness and hardness of microfilled (Heliomolar) and hybride (Spectrum TPH) composite resins. Materials and Methods: Twenty specimens of Spectrum TPH composite resins and twenty Heliomolar composite resins were fabricated using a metallic ring (6.5 mm diameter and 2.5 mm...

  11. Effect of various teas on color stability of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç Ata, Gül; Gokay, Osman; Müjdeci, Arzu; Kivrak, Tugba Congara; Mokhtari Tavana, Armin

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of various teas on color stability of resin composites. Two methacrylate-based (Arabesk Top, Grandio) and a silorane-based (Filtek Silorane) resin composites were used. 110 cylindrical samples of each resin composite were prepared (2 mm thickness and 8 mm diameter), polished and stored in distilled water (37°C for 24 hours). They were randomly divided into 11 groups (n= 10) and color measurements were taken. Then the samples were immersed in tap water (control), a black tea, a green tea or one of the eight herbal-fruit teas (37°C for 1 week) and subsequently subjected to the final color measurements. The color change of samples (ΔE*) was calculated, data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests. Teas, resin composites and their interactions were significant (P= 0.000). All the teas and control caused color changes in all three resin composites. Rosehip tea caused the most color changes, while tap water showed the least in all resin composites. Arabesk Top had the most staining potential in all the teas and control, whereas Filtek Silorane was the most stain resistant except Grandio immersed in sage tea. Color stability of all resin composites used were affected from both structure of resin materials and constituents of teas used. All resin composites were susceptible to staining by all teas especially rosehip tea. Arabesk Top composite showed the greatest color susceptibility in all teas and Filtek Silorane the least with one exception. Color of resin composites can be negatively affected from teas consumed. Clinicians should advise patients that drinking different kind of teas could intensify surface staining of resin based restorations.

  12. The synthesis and characterization of water-reducible nanoscale Colloidal Unimolecular Polymer (CUP) particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddles, Cynthia Jeannette

    The coatings industry has adapted to more stringent guidelines in paint formulations. Current VOC (volatile organic compound) limits placed by the federal government have pushed the industry toward the development of paint formulations which have very little to no VOC's. The development of Colloidal Unimolecular Polymer (CUP) particles is a step in the direction of providing a resin system which exists in zero VOC aqueous dispersion. The CUP particles are a part of the polymer field of Single Chain Nano Particles (SCNP) and ranged in diameters of 3-9 nm. The research presented in this dissertation describes the synthesis and design of these particles along with the various means of instrumentation used to gain insight into the structure and nature of these particles when suspended in aqueous medium.

  13. Variable solar control using thermotropic core/shell particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehling, Olaf; Seeboth, Arno; Ruhmann, Ralf; Potechius, Elvira; Vetter, Renate [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research (IAP), Department of Chromogenic Polymers, Volmerstr. 7B, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Haeusler, Tobias [Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU Cottbus), Chair of Applied Physics/Thermophysics, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Subject of our recent investigations is the utilization of a reversible thermotropic material for a self-regulating sun protection glazing that controls the solar energy input in order to avoid overheating. Based on the well-established UV curing technology for laminated glass a superior thermotropic material with tunable switching characteristics and of low material costs was developed. The polymer layer contains core/shell particles homogeneously dispersed in a UV-cured resin. The particle core in turn consists of an n-alkane mixture that is responsible for the temperature-induced clear/opaque switching. To obtain particles of well-defined size and with a narrow size distribution, the miniemulsion polymerization technique was used. The visible and solar optical properties (normal-normal, normal-hemispherical, and normal-diffuse transmittance) in the off (clear) and in the on state (opaque) were determined by UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopy. Samples containing particles of high median diameter (>800 nm) primarily scatter in the forward direction. However, with smaller particles (300-600 nm) a higher backscattering (reflection) efficiency was achieved. The largest difference in the normal-hemispherical transmittance could be found with a particle amount of 6% and a median scattering domain diameter of {proportional_to}380 nm. (author)

  14. Shear bond strength of a self‑etched resin cement to an indirect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-15

    Nov 15, 2014 ... Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of resin cement (Rely X‑U200) bonded to differently conditioned indirect composite samples. Materials and Methods: Sixty‑six composite resin specimens (5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were prepared with an indirect ...

  15. [Refinement study of macroporous resin for Huang-Lian-Jie-Du decoction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-bin; Lu, Ning; Yang, Jin-ping; Lin, Jian-qun; Lin, Jian-qiang

    2007-10-01

    To study refinement of macroporous resin to Huang-Lian-Jie-Du decoction. The content changes of berberine, geniposide and total alkaloid in the solution which went through the macroporous resin were determined by TLC or spectrophotometry. The type of resin, absorption and desorption condition were optimized. YWD-09D macroporous resin was suitable for refinement of Huang-Lian-Jie-Du decoction. The absorptive capacity of the resin was 1: 1.3. The concentration of solution was 0.4 g/ml, pH 4 and current velocity was 2 ml/min. The ratio of diameter and high of the resin column was 1:20. The desorption solution was 90% alcohol of 4BV. YWD-09D macroporous resin and its selected condition are suitable for refinement of Huang-Lian-Jie-Du decoction.

  16. Resin secretory structures of Boswellia papyrifera and implications for frankincense yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolera, Motuma; Menger, David; Sass-Klaassen, Ute; Sterck, Frank J; Copini, Paul; Bongers, Frans

    2013-01-01

    Frankincense, a gum-resin, has been tapped from Boswellia papyrifera trees for centuries. Despite the intensive tapping and economic interest of B. papyrifera, information on the resin secretory structures, which are responsible for synthesis, storage and transport of frankincense, is virtually absent. This study describes the type, architecture and distribution of resin secretory structures of B. papyrifera and its relevance for the ecophysiology and economic use of the tree. The type and architecture of resin secretory structures present in bark and wood was investigated from transversal, tangential and radial sections of bark and wood samples. The diameter and density (number of resin canals mm(-2)) of axial resin canals were determined from digital images of thin sections across the different zones of inner bark. Resin canals form a three-dimensional network within the inner bark. Yet, the intact resin-conducting and producing network is on average limited to the inner 6·6 mm of the inner bark. Within the inner bark, the density of non-lignified axial resin canals decreases and the density of lignified resin canals increases from the vascular cambium towards the outer bark. In the wood, only radial resin canals were encountered. Frankincense tapping techniques can be improved based on knowledge of bark anatomy and distribution and architecture of resin secretory structures. The suggested new techniques will contribute to a more sustainable frankincense production that enhances the contribution of frankincense to rural livelihoods and the national economy.

  17. Diameter 2 properties and convexity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abrahamsen, T. A.; Hájek, Petr Pavel; Nygaard, O.; Talponen, J.; Troyanski, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 232, č. 3 (2016), s. 227-242 ISSN 0039-3223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-07378S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : diameter 2 property * midpoint locally uniformly rotund * Daugavet property Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.535, year: 2016 https://www.impan.pl/pl/wydawnictwa/czasopisma-i-serie-wydawnicze/studia- mathematica /all/232/3/91534/diameter-2-properties-and-convexity

  18. Evaluation of four surface coating treatments for resin to zirconia bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Pow, Edmond H N; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P

    2014-04-01

    To compare the effects of four surface coating methods on resin to zirconia shear bond strength. Eighty pre-sintered zirconia discs were prepared and randomly divided into five study groups according to the corresponding methods of surface treatments as follows: group C (control group, fully sintered without any surface treatment), group S (fully sintered and then sandblasted with silica coated alumina powder), group G (fully sintered and then coated with glazing porcelain followed by acid etching), group Si (pre-coated with silica slurry then fully sintered), and group Z (coated with zirconia particles and then fully sintered). The observation of surface morphology and elemental composition analysis were conducted by SEM and EDX. Self-adhesive resin cement stubs (diameter 3.6mm and height 3mm) were then bonded on the zirconia discs with a cylindrical shape. Both initial and artificial aged (including 30-day water storage, thermal cycling for 3000 and 6000 cycles) shear bond strengths were then evaluated. All the tested coating methods showed significantly higher shear bond strengths than the control group, in both dry and aged conditions. Group S produced the strongest initial zirconia/resin bonding (19.7MPa) and the control group had the lowest value (8.8MPa). However, after thermal cycling, group Z exhibited the highest mean value. All the samples in the control group failed in the thermal cycling. Both different coating methods (ptreatments (pcoating might be a reliable way in enhancing adhesion between resin and zirconia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, M.; Brzostowski, A.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt was made to decrease the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin, taking place during radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified with cinnamic and acrylic acids. A composition of 90 parts of polyester resin, 10 parts of epoxy resin modified with cinnamic acid, and 150 parts of a silica filler showed a volume shrinkage of 1.2%. (author)

  20. Diameters of classes of smooth functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, S. N.

    1995-08-01

    We describe the weak asymptotic behaviour of diameters of n-th order of the unit ball of W_p^l H^\\omega (I^d) in L_q(I^d), where I=(0,1), in dependence on n. Namely we consider the Kolmogorov diameter, the Gel'fand diameter, the linear diameter, the Aleksandrov diameter and the entropy diameter.

  1. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000?). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  2. Effect of configuration factor on gap formation in hybrid composite resin, low-shrinkage composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Parvin M; Mousavinasab, Sayyed M; Hasanli, Elham

    2015-05-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is one of the important factors in creation of gap between dental structure and composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of configuration factor (C-factor) on gap formation in a hybrid composite resin, a low shrinkage composite resin and a resin modified glass ionomer restorative material. Cylindrical dentin cavities with 5.0 mm diameter and three different depths (1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mm) were prepared on the occlusal surface of 99 human molars and the cavities assigned into three groups (each of 33). Each group contained three subgroups depend on the different depths and then cavities restored using resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC Improved) and two type composite resins (Filtek P90 and Filtek Z250). Then the restorations were cut into two sections in a mesiodistal direction in the middle of restorations. Gaps were measured on mesial, distal and pulpal floor of the cavities, using a stereomicroscope. Data analyses using Kruskal-Wallist and Mann-Whitney tests. Increasing C-factor from 1.8 to 3.4 had no effect on the gap formation in two type composite resins, but Fuji II LC Improved showed significant effect of increasing C-factor on gap formation. Taken together, when C-factor increased from 1.8 up to 3.4 had no significant effect on gap formation in two tested resin composites. Although, Filtek P90 restorations showed smaller gap formation in cavities walls compared to Filtek Z250 restorations. High C-factor values generated the largest gap formation. Silorane-based composite was more efficient for cavity sealing than methacrylate-based composites and resin modified glass ionomer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Ultrafine particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J.; Wierzbicka, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Particle number (PN) concentrations (10-300 nm in size) were continuously measured over a period of ∼45 h in 56 residences of nonsmokers in Copenhagen, Denmark. The highest concentrations were measured when occupants were present and awake (geometric mean, GM: 22.3 × 103 cm-3), the lowest when...... the homes were vacant (GM: 6.1 × 103 cm-3) or the occupants were asleep (GM: 5.1 × 103 cm-3). Diary entries regarding occupancy and particle related activities were used to identify source events and apportion the daily integrated exposure among sources. Source events clearly resulted in increased PN...... concentrations and decreased average particle diameter. For a given event, elevated particle concentrations persisted for several hours after the emission of fresh particles ceased. The residential daily integrated PN exposure in the 56 homes ranged between 37 × 103 and 6.0 × 106 particles per cm3·h/day (GM: 3...

  4. Synthesis method of asymmetric gold particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Bong-Hyun; Murata, Michael; Hahm, Eunil; Lee, Luke P

    2017-06-07

    Asymmetric particles can exhibit unique properties. However, reported synthesis methods for asymmetric particles hinder their application because these methods have a limited scale and lack the ability to afford particles of varied shapes. Herein, we report a novel synthetic method which has the potential to produce large quantities of asymmetric particles. Asymmetric rose-shaped gold particles were fabricated as a proof of concept experiment. First, silica nanoparticles (NPs) were bound to a hydrophobic micro-sized polymer containing 2-chlorotritylchloride linkers (2-CTC resin). Then, half-planar gold particles with rose-shaped and polyhedral structures were prepared on the silica particles on the 2-CTC resin. Particle size was controlled by the concentration of the gold source. The asymmetric particles were easily cleaved from the resin without aggregation. We confirmed that gold was grown on the silica NPs. This facile method for synthesizing asymmetric particles has great potential for materials science.

  5. A genetic-neural artificial intelligence approach to resins optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Denise C.; Barros, Marcio P.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a preliminary study about the viability and adequacy of a new methodology for the definition of one of the main properties of ion exchange resins used for isotopic separation. Basically, the main problem is the definition of pelicule diameter in case of pelicular ion exchange resins, in order to achieve the best performance in the shortest time. In order to achieve this, a methodology was developed, based in two classic techniques of Artificial Intelligence (AI). At first, an artificial neural network (NN) was trained to map the existing relations between the nucleus radius and the resin's efficiency associated with the exchange time. Later on, a genetic algorithm (GA) was developed in order to find the best pelicule dimension. Preliminary results seem to confirm the potential of the method, and this can be used in any chemical process employing ion exchange resins. (author)

  6. A Study on Tensile Behavior and Water Uptake of Wood Powder-Composites Based on Epoxy and Unsaturated Polyester Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Amir hossein Pirayeshfar; M.Mahdi Jalili; Yahya Musavi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, two kinds of epoxy resins (i.e. high-viscosity and low-viscosity) as well as one polyester resin (orthophthalic grade) were selected and examined as pure resins and also as a polymeric matrix for producing wood-composites. In this study, tensile properties, water uptake, and degradation of samples in water were also investigated. The results show that addition of wood particles to the thermoset resins strongly impresses on their tensile behavior and water uptake. Tensile studie...

  7. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D

    2007-01-09

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12-inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead

  8. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D

    2006-11-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12 inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24 inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead

  9. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D

    2007-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed pilot-scale hydraulic/chemical testing of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange (IX) resin for the River Protection Project Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project. The RF resin cycle testing was conducted in two pilot-scale IX columns, 1/4 and 1/2 scale. A total of twenty-three hydraulic/chemical cycles were successfully completed on the spherical RF resin. Seven of the cycles were completed in the 12-inch IX Column and sixteen cycles were completed in the 24-inch IX Column. Hydraulic testing showed that the permeability of the RF resin remained essentially constant, with no observed trend in the reduction of the permeability as the number of cycles increased. The permeability during the pilot-scale testing was 2 1/2 times better than the design requirements of the WTP full-scale system. The permeability of the resin bed was uniform with respect to changes in bed depth. Upflow Regeneration and Simulant Introduction in the IX columns revealed another RF resin benefit; negligible radial pressures to the column walls from the swelling of resin beads. In downflow of the Regeneration and Simulant Introduction steps, the resin bed particles pack tightly together and produce higher hydraulic pressures than that found in upflow. Also, upflow Simulant Introduction produced an ideal level bed for the twenty cycles completed using upflow Simulant Introduction. Conversely, the three cycles conducted using downflow Simulant Introduction produced an uneven bed surface with erosion around the thermowells. The RF resin bed in both columns showed no tendency to form fissures or pack more densely as the number of cycles increased. Particle size measurements of the RF resin showed no indication of particle size change (for a given chemical) with cycles and essentially no fines formation. Micrographs comparing representative bead samples before and after testing indicated no change in bead

  10. Macroporous resin purification of peptides with umami taste from soy sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Mingzhu; Zhao, Mouming; Lin, Lianzhu; Dong, Yi; Chen, Huiping; Feng, Mengying; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Su, Guowan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performance and separation characteristics of four macroporous resins for purifying umami peptides from soy sauce were examined. Results showed that the resins could separate the peptides of soy sauce, and the particle diffusion kinetics model was suitable for describing the whole exothermic (ΔH resins, while the pseudo-second-order kinetics model accurately described the XAD-16 and HP-2 MGL resins. Furthermore, the adsorption processes of the peptides followed the Freundlich model. The XAD-16 resin was the most effective resin for the enrichment of peptides due to its high adsorption and total desorption capacities. Interestingly, the umami peptides were enriched in the deionized water fraction. This study provides new insights into exploring performance and separation characteristics of macroporous resins on soy sauce, and indicated that peptide may be the contributor to the umami taste in Chinese soy sauce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental study on strain sensing by small-diameter FBG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong-mei; Li, Qiufeng; Zhu, Lujia; Liang, Dakai

    2016-11-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were attractive in various fields for structural health monitoring. Because of their accurate performance and real time response, embedded FBG sensors are promising for strain monitoring in composite materials. As an optical fiber sensor was embedded inside a composite, interface would form around the embedded optical fiber and the host polymer composite. In order to study the influence of the embedded optical fiber to the mechanical character, finite elemental analysis was applied to study the stress distribution inside the composite. Keeping the resin rich area the same size, laminates with optical fibers in different diameters, which were 250 and 125 micrometers, were analyzed. The simulation results represent that stress singularity would occur around the embedded optical fiber. The singularity value for the laminate with optical fiber at 250 micrometer was higher than that with optical fiber at 125 micrometer. Micro- cracks would arise at the stress singularity point. Therefore, the optical fiber in smaller diameter was preferred since the mechanical strength could be higher. Four points bending test was carried out on a steel beam with a small-diameter FBG on the bottom surface. Besides, a strain gauge was stuck on bottom to validate the monitoring results by FBG sensor. The tested results indicated that the strain monitoring results by the small-diameter FBG sensor almost identical with the theoretical ones and what recorded by strain gauge. The maximum testing error for the designed FBG is less than 2% compared with the theoretical one.

  12. Precisely controlled resorcinol-formaldehyde resin coating for fabricating core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Shengjie; Zang, Jun; Xu, Chaofa; Zheng, Ming-Sen; Dong, Quan-Feng; Sun, Daohua; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2013-07-01

    This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic spheres are promising catalyst supports for oxygen reduction reaction. And yolk-shell structured Au@HCS nanoreactors with ultrathin shells exhibit high catalytic activity and recyclability in confined catalysis.This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic

  13. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC TM (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine TM (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into th...

  14. Preparation and characterization of Bismaleimide resin/titania nanocomposites via sol-gel process

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Guotao; Huang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resin/ titania nanocomposites were synthesized from allylated-phenolic modified bismaleimide resin and TiO2 via the sol-gel process of tetrabutyltitanate (Ti(OnBu)4, TBT). These nanocomposite materials were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, FE-SEM, TGA and DMA. It was found that the nano-scale TiO2 particles were formed in the AP-BMI resin matrix, and the average primary particle size of the dispersed phase in the nanocomposites was less than 100nm, but the particle aggregates w...

  15. Electrodeposition of Asphaltenes. 2. Effect of Resins and Additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khvostichenko, Daria S; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2010-01-01

    Electrodeposition of asphaltenes from oil/heptane, asphaltene/heptane, and asphaltene/heptane/additive mixtures has been investigated. Toluene, native petroleum resins, and a synthetic asphaltene dispersant, p-nonylphenol, were used as additives. The addition of these components led to partial...... of preparation of the mixture and the toluene content. Introduction of petroleum resins into asphaltene/heptane mixtures resulted in neutralization of the asphaltene particle charge. The addition of p-nonylphenol to asphaltene suspensions in heptane did not alter the charge of asphaltene particles. Current...

  16. Effective adsorption of nitroaromatics at the low concentration by a newly synthesized hypercrosslinked resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanhong; Xu, Chao; Sun, Weizhi; Liu, Fusheng; Yu, Shitao; Xian, Mo

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, a series of hypercrosslinked resins (CH series) was prepared in systematically designed conditions for the adsorption of nitroaromatics from aqueous solution. The newly synthesized CH-10 possesses a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area up to 1,329.3 m 2 /g which is larger than that of the widely used hypercrosslinked resin H-103 and it exhibits great advantage over H-103 when subjected to nitrobenzene at low concentrations. The adsorption capacity of CH-10 for nitrobenzene is 1.4 times as much as that of H-103 at the concentration of 100 mg/L. Kinetic study by film diffusion model and intra-particle diffusion model revealed that its distinctive mesoporous structure within pore diameters between 2 and 6 nm played significant role in the mass transfer at low concentrations, and these unique mesopores also resulted in better adsorption capacity, which was confirmed by adsorption thermodynamics study. Moreover, the CH series displayed a good affinity to a wide scope of nitroaromatics and exhibited excellent dynamic adsorption and desorption properties in fixed bed.

  17. Effect of preheat repetition on color stability of methacrylate- and silorane-based composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed Kahnamouei, Mehdi; Gholizadeh, Sarah; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Daneshpooy, Mehdi; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Rezaei, Yashar

    2017-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preheating methacrylate- and silorane-based composite resins on their color stability up to 40 times at 55‒60°C. Methods. Seventy-six methacrylate and silorane-based composite resin samples, with a diameter of 10 mm and a height of 2 mm, were divided into 4 groups (n=19). After the samples were prepared, their color parameters were determined using a reflective spectrophotometer. The composite resin samples were separately stored in a solution of tea for 40 consecutive days. Then the samples underwent a color determination procedure again using a spectrophotometer and color changes were recorded. Finally two-way ANOVA was used to study the effect of composite temperature on its staining (Pcomposite resin samples compared to non-heated samples at P=0.005 and P=0.029 for silorane-based and Z250 composite resin samples, respectively. Results. Both composite resin type (P=0.014) and preheating (Pcomposite resin samples, up to 55‒60°C for 40 rounds, resulted in more color changes compared with unheated composite resin samples. After storage in a solution of tea the color change rate in the composite resin samples of silorane-based was higher than the Z250 composite resin samples.

  18. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    to epoxy resin remained stable over the study period. Of the patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test, 71% returned a questionnaire; 95 patients had worked with epoxy resin in the occupational setting, and, of these, one-third did not use protective gloves and only 50.5% (48) had participated...

  19. HIGH ASPECT RATIO ION EXCHANGE RESIN BED - HYDRAULIC RESULTS FOR SPERICAL RESIN BEADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duignan, M; Charles Nash, C; Timothy Punch, T

    2007-01-01

    A principal role of the DOE Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of a large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. An in-tank ion exchange unit is being considered for cesium removal to accelerate waste processing. This unit is planned to have a relatively high bed height to diameter ratio (10:1). Complicating the design is the need to cool the ion exchange media; therefore, the ion exchange column will have a central cooling core making the flow path annular. To separate cesium from waste the media being considered is made of resorcinol formaldehyde resin deposited on spherical plastic beads and is a substitute for a previously tested resin made of crystalline silicotitanate. This spherical media not only has an advantage of being mechanically robust, but, unlike its predecessor, it is also reusable, that is, loaded cesium can be removed through elution and regeneration. Resin regeneration leads to more efficient operation and less spent resin waste, but its hydraulic performance in the planned ion exchange column was unknown. Moreover, the recycling process of this spherical resorcinol formaldehyde causes its volume to significantly shrink and swell. To determine the spherical media's hydraulic demand a linearly scaled column was designed and tested. The waste simulant used was prototypic of the wastes' viscosity and density. This paper discusses the hydraulic performance of the media that will be used to assist in the design of a full-scale unit

  20. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  1. Enhancement of adhesion between resin coating materials and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoaki; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Weerasinghe, Dinesh S; Harada, Naoko; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-07-01

    Resin coating technique is a unique method that improves the dentin bond strength of resin cements in indirect restorations. However, the weak link of a specimen bonded using the resin coating technique was reported to be the bonded interface between the resin coating material and resin cement. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to enhance the bonding performance between a resin coating material and a resin cement. Two light-cured flowable composites, Protect Liner F and Clearfil Flow FX, were used as coating materials, and two dual-cure composite materials, Panavia F 2.0 and Clearfil DC Core Automix, were used as resin cements. The ultimate tensile strength of each material and the microtensile bond strengths of the bonded specimens of resin coating material and resin cement were measured using a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Three-way ANOVA (p=0.05) revealed that the highest microtensile bond strength was obtained using a combination of Clearfil Flow FX and Clearfil DC Core Automix, and when the surface of the coating material was treated with ED Primer II. It was strongly suggested that materials with a higher ultimate tensile strength, when used in both resin coating and cementation, could enhance the bond strength between the two.

  2. Chemical characterization and bioactivity of epoxy resin and Portland cement-based sealers with niobium and zirconium oxide radiopacifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viapiana, Raqueli; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Hungaro-Duarte, Marco Antonio; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Camilleri, Josette

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize and to evaluate the bioactivity potential of experimental root canal sealers (ES) based on Portland cement, epoxy resin with nano- and micro-particles of niobium or zirconium oxide used as radiopacifiers in comparison to AH Plus and MTA Fillapex. Specimens of the sealers (10 mm in diameter×1 mm thick) were prepared and the radiopacity was evaluated according to ISO 6876 (2012) specifications. Characterization of the sealers was performed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) immediately after setting and after immersion for 28 days in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS). In addition X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were also performed. The pH and calcium ion release were measured after 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after completion of seating using a digital pH meter and an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, respectively. The experimental sealers exhibited an average radiopacity of 2.5 mm thickness of aluminum, which was similar to MTA Fillapex (P>0.05) and inferior to AH Plus (Pepoxy resin and radiopacifier exhibited a degree of bioactivity although no evidence of cement hydration was demonstrated on material characterization. The radiopacifier particle size had limited effect on the sealer microstructure and chemical properties. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  4. Study on thermal conductive BN/novolac resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shasha; Qi, Shuhua; Liu, Nailiang; Cao, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Boron nitride (BN) particles were used to modify novolac resin. → BN particles were pretreated by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. → The thermal conductivity trend of composite almost agrees with the predicted data from the Maxwell-Eucken model. → At BN concentration of 80 wt.%, thermal conductivity value of composite is 4.5 times that of pure novolac resin. → Combined use of the larger and smaller particles with a mass ratio of 1:2 provides the composites with the maximum thermal conductivity among the testing systems. → The composite thermal property also increases with an increase in the BN concentration. - Abstract: In this study, γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane-treated boron nitride (BN) particles were used to modify novolac resin. The effect of varying the BN concentration, particle size, and hybrid BN fillers with the binary particle size distribution on the thermal conductivity of the composites was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed homogeneously dispersed treated BN particles in the matrix. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity increased as the BN concentration was increased. This behavior was also observed when the filler size was increased. Experimentally obtained thermal conductivity values agree with the predicted data from the Maxwell-Eucken model well at less than 70 wt.% BN loading. A larger particle size BN-filled novolac resin exhibits a higher thermal conductivity than a smaller particle size BN-filled one. The combined use of 0.5 and 15 μm particles with a mass ratio of 2:1 achieved the maximum thermal conductivity among the testing systems. The thermal resistance properties of the composites were also studied.

  5. Evaluation of ion exchange resins for iron control in copper electro-winning solutions; Evaluacion de resinas de intercambio ionico para el control de hierro en soluciones de electro-obtencion de cobre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parada, F.; Dreisinger, D.; Wilkomirsky, I.

    2010-07-01

    Two commercial resins were evaluated for the extraction of iron from a copper electrowinning solution. Both resins efficiently extract iron. The Mono phosphonic resin has a greater charge capacity than the Diphonix resin and the Diphonix resin shows faster kinetics. Experimental results of the interrupted test and tests with different particle size of resins have demonstrated that extraction kinetics is controlled by diffusion into the particle in both resins. A good agreement with Fick's model for diffusion inside the particles confirms the proposed mechanism. Finally, temperature favors the process kinetics and its effect on the diffusion coefficient follows Arrhenius law, obtaining a value of 4,89 kcal/mol for the Mono phosphonic resin and 4,94 kcal/mol for the Diphenox resin. The aforementioned values are close to typical values for the proposed diffusional control which are 6 to 10 kcal/mol. (Author)

  6. Effect of alumina air-abrasion on mechanical bonding between an acrylic resin and casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takaya; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Tanoue, Naomi; Naito, Koji; Yamashita, Miyuki; Matsumura, Hideo

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the effect of alumina air-abrasion with different pressure on bonding between an acrylic resin and casting alloys. Disk specimens (8 and 10 mm in diameter) were cast from a silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au, Castwell M.C.12) alloy and a titanium-aluminum-niobium alloy (Ti-6Al-7Nb, T-Alloy Tough). The disks were air-abraded with alumina particles (50-70 microm) under different air-pressures (0 unabraded, 0.1, and 0.6 MPa). The disk pairs were bonded together with a tri-n-butylborane (TBB)-initiated acrylic resin, and shear bond strengths were determined both before and after thermocycling. Bond strength varied from a maximum of 37.1 MPa to a minimum of 3.6 MPa for the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy, whereas bond strength to Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy ranged from 34.7 MPa to 0.1 MPa. Specimens abraded with 0.6 MPa pressure recorded the greatest post-thermocycling bond strength (21.7 MPa and 17.9 MPa), and unabraded specimens showed the lowest strength (3.6 MPa and 0.1 MPa) for both alloys. Post-thermocycling bond strength to the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy was higher than that to the Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy under identical air-abrading conditions. It can be concluded that alumina air-abrasion with an air-pressure of 0.6 MPa is effective in enhancing retentive characteristics of the TBB-initiated resin joined to the alloys.

  7. Tensile bond strength of an adhesive resin cement to different alloys having various surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Amara; Loza, Maria A; Elias, Augusto; Mukhopadhyay, Siuli; Looney, Stephen; Rueggeberg, Frederick A

    2009-02-01

    The ability of a resin cement to bond to a restorative alloy is critical for maximal crown retention to nonideal preparations. Surface treatment and metal type may have an important role in optimizing resin-to-metal strength. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of surface pretreatment on the tensile strength of base and noble metals bonded using a conventional resin cement. Cylindrical plastic rods (9.5 mm in diameter), cast in base (Rexillium NBF) or noble metal (IPS d.SIGN 53), were divided into rods 10 mm in length (n=10-12). Specimens were heated in a porcelain furnace to create an oxide layer. Test specimens were further subjected to airborne-particle abrasion (50-microm Al(2)O(3) particles) alone or with the application of a metal primer (Alloy Primer). Similarly treated rod ends were joined using resin cement (RelyX ARC), thermocycled (x500, 5 degrees -55 degrees C) and stored (24 hours, 37 degrees C) before debonding using a universal testing machine. Debond strength and failure site were recorded. Rank-based ANOVA for unbalanced designs was used to test for significant interaction (alpha=.050). Each pair of treatments was compared separately for each metal (Bonferroni-adjusted significance level of .0083, overall error rate for comparisons, .05). The 2 metals were compared separately for each of the 3 treatments using an adjusted significance level of .017, maintaining an overall error rate of .05. A multinomial logit model was used to describe the effect of metal type and surface pretreatment on failure site location (alpha=.05). Interaction between metal type and surface pretreatment was significant for stress values (P=.019). Metal type did not significantly affect tensile bond strength for any of the compared surface pretreatments. Metal primer significantly improved tensile bond strength for each metal type. Most failures tended to occur as either adhesive or mixed in nature. Metal primer application significantly enhanced tensile bond

  8. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L*a*b* system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab*) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested. PMID:23559921

  9. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet·X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram·X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO, after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h, for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco. The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE LFNx01aFNx01bFNx01 system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DE abFNx01 between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  10. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab(*)) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  11. On the performance of small diameter gas cyclones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halasz, Marcos Roberto Teixeira

    2002-02-01

    Small diameter cyclones represent a potential alternative for the removal of small diameter particles from gaseous mixtures as well as the environmental control of their emission. In order to establish feasible configurations of a small diameter cyclone applied in the separation of solid particles dispersed in a gas and considering a large quantify of experimental data in literature, neural networks were used to estimate the equipment grade efficiency and pressure drop. In order to evaluate a performance of many small diameters configurations and analysis was carried of parametrical sensibility which determines the most important variables on separation efficiency determination. A set of experimental runs was carried out in a lab-scale mini-cyclone in order to obtain the separation efficiency and pressure drop for different configurations, and evaluate the feasibility of coupling a post-cyclone device to improve the equipment overall performance. The cyclones used presented diameters of 0.03 and 0.05 m and the remaining dimensions varied proportionally about those found in Stairmand high-efficiency cyclones. Experimental separation efficiencies up to 99% were obtained in this work. These results confirm the feasibility of the experimental set-up configuration proposed. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the esthetic effect of resin cements and try-in pastes on ceromer veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wenzhong; Jiang, Tao; Ma, Xiao; Liang, Shanshan; Wang, Zhejun; Sa, Yue; Wang, Yining

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of various shades of resin cements on the final color of ceromer veneers and analyse the agreement of resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes. Ceromer disks (Ceramage, 1.0mm×10mm diameter) were bonded to resin background disks (3.0mm×10mm diameter) using five shades of resin cements (RelyX Veneer), whilst butylphthalate was placed between ceromer and resin background as the control group (n=5). The corresponding try-in pastes were placed between ceromer and resin background disks using the specimens of the control group. After colorimetric evaluations, the thickness of ceromer disks was reduced to 0.8 and 0.5mm. Color measurements were repeated at each thickness. To analyse masking ability of the cement, resin background disks with 0.1mm thick cement layer were fabricated using five shades of resin cements (n=5). Two-way ANOVA of ΔE values of cement shades and control group revealed significant differences in cement shade and thickness, and their interaction (p2.0) in 0.5mm thick specimens and WO shade in 0.8mm thick specimens. There were no perceptible color differences between resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes. The effect of resin cements on the final color of ceromer veneers depended on cement shades and thickness of ceromer. The color of resin cements and corresponding try-in pastes achieved high agreement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nanomechanical properties of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Akhtar, R; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2012-12-01

    To determine by nanoindentation the hardness and elastic modulus of resin-composites, including a series with systematically varied filler loading, plus other representative materials that fall into the categories of flowable, bulk-fill and conventional nano-hybrid types. Ten dental resin-composites: three flowable, three bulk-fill and four conventional were investigated using nanoindentation. Disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material using a metallic mold. Specimens were irradiated in the mold at top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points (40s each) with light curing unit at 650mW/cm(2). Specimens were then mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. After grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were investigated using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius). Each specimen was loaded at one loading rate and three different unloading rates (at room temperature) with thirty indentations, per unloading rate. The maximum load applied by the nanoindenter to examine the specimens was 10mN. Dependent on the type of the resin-composite material, the mean values ranged from 0.73GPa to 1.60GPa for nanohardness and from 14.44GPa to 24.07GPa for elastic modulus. There was a significant positive non-linear correlation between elastic modulus and nanohardness (r(2)=0.88). Nonlinear regression revealed a significant positive correlation (r(2)=0.62) between elastic moduli and filler loading and a non-significant correlation (r(2)=0.50) between nanohardness and filler loading of the studied materials. Varying the unloading rates showed no consistent effect on the elastic modulus and nanohardness of the studied materials. For a specific resin matrix, both elastic moduli and nanohardness correlated positively with filler loading. For the resin-composites investigated, the group-average elastic

  14. Urea-formaldehyde resins: production, application, and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryawan, A.; Risnasari, I.; Sucipto, T.; Heri Iswanto, A.; Rosmala Dewi, R.

    2017-07-01

    Urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin, one of the most important formaldehyde resin adhesives, is a polymeric condensation product of formaldehyde with urea, and being widely used for the manufacture of wood-based composite panels, such as plywood, particleboard, and fiberboard. In spite of its benefits such as fast curing, good performance in the panels (colorless), and lower cost; formaldehyde emission (FE) originated from either UF resin itself or composite products bonded by UF resins is considered a critical drawback as it affects human health particularly in indoor environment. In order to reduce the FE, lowering formaldehyde/urea (F/U) mole ratio in the synthesis of the UF resin was done. In this study, synthesis of UF resins was carried out following the conventional alkaline-acid two-step reaction with a second addition of urea, resulting in F/U mole ratio around 1.0, namely 0.95; 1.05, and 1.15. The UF resins produced were used as binder for particleboard making. The board was manufactured in the laboratory using shaving type particle of Gmelina wood, 8% UF resin based on oven dry particle, and 1% NH4Cl (20%wt) as hardener for the resin. The target of the thickness was 10 mm and the dimension was 25 cm x 25 cm. The resulted particleboard then was evaluated the physical and the mechanical properties by Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) A 5908 (2003). Further, the resulted particleboard also was used for the mice cage’s wall in order to mimic the real living environment. After four weeks exposure in the cages, the mice then were evaluated their mucous organs as well as their blood. The experiment results were as follows: 1) It was possible to synthesis UF resins with low F/U mole ratio; 2) However, the particleboard bonded UF resins with low F/U mole ratio showed poor properties, particularly on the thickness swelling and modulus of elasticity; 3) There was no significant differences among the mucous organs of the mice after a month exposure FE originated from

  15. Influence of different power outputs of intraoral Nd:YAG laser on shear bond strength of a resin cement to nickel-chromium dental alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    sadat Madani, Azam; Astaneh, Pedram Ansari; Shahabi, Sima; Nakhaei, Mohammad Reza; Bagheri, Hossein G; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Up to now, there is no any experience about the application of dental lasers to bond resin composites to metal surfaces in dentistry. The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate if the laser irradiation of ceramic-covered alloy surface would improve the bond strength of resin to metal, and if different parameters of laser output may influence the strength of this bond. Fifty three cylinders (thickness of 5 mm and diameter of 10 mm) were made up of a commercially available nickel-chromium alloy by lost-wax technique. Forty prepared specimens were divided into four groups. Five specimens in each group were covered by slurry of dental opaque porcelain and irradiated by Nd:YAG laser using different output parameters for each group. Other five specimens in each group were treated using the same laser parameters without porcelain covering. Five sandblasted specimen served as control group. Panavia F2.0 was bonded on the metal surfaces using polyethylene tubes. In ceramic-coated specimens, silane was applied to achieve chemical bond between silica particles and resin cement. All specimens were thermocycled and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) test (50 kgf at 0.5 mm/min). Two specimens of each ceramic-coated laser-treated groups were studied using scanning electron microscopy and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy which showed stabilization of silica particles on the metal surface. ANOVA procedure showed that although shear bond strength was significantly higher in porcelain-covered laser treated samples, but the effect of power output of laser irradiation was not significant (P = 0.917). There were no statistically significant difference between SBS in control samples and laser treated specimens without porcelain covering. It can be concluded that Nd:YAG laser surface treatment may improve the silica coating of alloy surface to achieve better resin-metal bond.

  16. Physical and chemical durability of cement impregnated epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryantoro

    1997-01-01

    Immobilization of simulation radioactive waste contains Cs and Sr with cement impregnated epoxy resin has been done. Low level liquid waste in 30% weight mixed cement homogeneously and then set in its curing time about 28 days. Waste from was impregnated with epoxy resin (Bisphenol-A-diglycidylether) and use Triethylenteramin as catalyst. the sample of cement impregnated epoxy resin 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm in diameter and length was tested by Paul Weber. The compressive strength was obtained of 4.08 kN.cm - 2. The sochxlet apparatus was run on flow rate of 300 ml/hour at 100 o C and during 24 hours. The leaching rate of Cs was round on 5.5 x 10 - 4 g.cm - 2.d - 1 and Sr was 6.1 x 10 - 4 g.cm - 2.d - 1 (author)

  17. Shear bond strength of the amalgam-resin composite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Camilo; Sanchez, Eliana; Alapati, Satish; Seghi, Robert; Johnston, William

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the initial and one year shear bond strengths (SBS) of resin composite bonded to amalgam using Amalgambond-Plus. Resin composite cylinders (Point 4, Kerr Corporation) were bonded to either etched-enamel (A), 50% etched enamel-50% polished amalgam (B), airborne-particle abraded amalgam (C), carbide bur prepared amalgam (D) and airborne-particle abraded 50% amalgam-50% etched-enamel (E). Shear bond strengths were determined using a standardized testing device (Ultradent Products) in a universal testing machine (Instron model 4204). The failed interfaces were evaluated with SEM to obtain visual evidence of the failure mode. ANOVA indicated significant differences among the groups (p composite masking has the strongest, most durable SBS on airborne-particle abraded amalgam and airborne-particle abraded enamel-amalgam surfaces and could be used as a method to improve the esthetics of amalgam restorations.

  18. Importance of resin ducts in reducing ponderosa pine mortality from bark beetle attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jeffrey M; Kolb, Thomas E

    2010-11-01

    The relative importance of growth and defense to tree mortality during drought and bark beetle attacks is poorly understood. We addressed this issue by comparing growth and defense characteristics between 25 pairs of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) trees that survived and trees that died from drought-associated bark beetle attacks in forests of northern Arizona, USA. The three major findings of our research were: (1) xylem resin ducts in live trees were >10% larger (diameter), >25% denser (no. of resin ducts mm(-2)), and composed >50% more area per unit ring growth than dead trees; (2) measures of defense, such as resin duct production (no. of resin ducts year(-1)) and the proportion of xylem ring area to resin ducts, not growth, were the best model parameters of ponderosa pine mortality; and (3) most correlations between annual variation in growth and resin duct characteristics were positive suggesting that conditions conducive to growth also increase resin duct production. Our results suggest that trees that survive drought and subsequent bark beetle attacks invest more carbon in resin defense than trees that die, and that carbon allocation to resin ducts is a more important determinant of tree mortality than allocation to radial growth.

  19. Modification of unsaturated polyester resins using nano-size core ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modification of unsaturated polyester resins using nano-size core-shell particles. MO Munyati, PA Lovell. Abstract. No Abstract Available Journal of Science and Technology Special Edition 2004: 24-31. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  20. Emulsification of resin modified by simultaneous graft polymerization with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Fumio; Sasaki, Takashi; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1983-01-01

    Emulsification of the epoxy resins, onto which hydrophilic groups were introduced by simultaneous co-graft polymerization with electron beam irradiation, were studied. Resins modified with use of ionic monomers such as methacrylic acid (MAc), diethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DE), tetramethylammonium methacrylate (TMAMA), or methacryloyloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (QDM) formed latexes, when they were dissolved into small amounts of solvents followed by the addition of water. A higher composition of hydrophilic monomer in the resin-monomer mixture gave a latex with a smaller particle size and higher storage stability. TMAMA and QDM, both of which were incompatible with epoxy resin, were very effective in decreasing the particle size and increasing stability of a latex. It was also ascertained that an alkyd resin were able to emulsified similarly by grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and MAc. (author)

  1. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  2. Thermal and mechanical behaviour of sub micron sized fly ash reinforced polyester resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantha Kumar, P.; Rajadurai, A.; Muthuramalingam, T.

    2018-04-01

    The utilization of particles reinforced resin matrix composites is being increased owing to its lower density and high strength to weight ratio. In the present study, an attempt has been made to synthesize fly ash particles reinforced polyester resin composite for engine cowling application. The thermal stability and mechanical behaviours such as hardness and flexural strength of the composite with 2, 3 and 4 weight % of reinforcement is studied and analyzed. The thermo gravimetric analysis indicates that the higher addition of reinforcement increases the decomposition temperature due to its refractory nature. It is also observed that the hardness increases with higher filler addition owing to the resistance of FA particles towards penetration. The flexural strength is found to increase up to the addition of 3% of FA particles, whereas the polyester resin composite prepared with 4% FA particles addition is observed to have low flexural strength owing to agglomeration of particles.

  3. Color Stability of the Bulk-Fill Composite Resins with Different Thickness in Response to Coffee/Water Immersion

    OpenAIRE

    Sayna Shamszadeh; Seyedeh Mahsa Sheikh-Al-Eslamian; Elham Hasani; Ahmad Najafi Abrandabadi; Narges Panahandeh

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the color stability of bulk-fill and conventional composite resin with respect to thickness and storage media. Twenty specimens of a conventional composite resin (6?mm diameter and 2?mm thick) and 40 specimens of the bulk-fill Tetric EvoCeram composite resin at two different thicknesses (6?mm diameter and 2?mm thick or 4?mm thick, n = 20) were prepared. The specimens were stored in distilled water during the study period (28?d). Half of the specimens were remained in dist...

  4. Bismaleimide Copolymer Matrix Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John A.; Heimbuch, Alvin H.; Hsu, Ming-Ta S.; Chen, Timothy S.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite composites, prepared from 1:1 copolymer of two new bismaleimides based on N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have mechanical properties superior to those prepared from other bismaleimide-type resins. New heat-resistant composites replace metal in some structural applications. Monomers used to form copolymers with superior mechanical properties prepared by reaction of MMAB with maleic or citraconic anhydride.

  5. Penentuan Supplier Resin Dengan Menggunakan Analytical Network Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septian Ricky Adi Pratama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pengambilan keputusan multikriteria adalah proses pemilihan suatu alternatif terbaik dari beberapa allternatif yang ada berdasarkan sejumlah kriteria dari suatu permasalahan. Pemilihan supplier yang terjadi pada PT. KTI divisi particle board selama ini hanya bersifat objektif, sehingga terjadi berbagai permasalahan didalam produksi yang disebabkan kualitas bahan baku (resin tidak sesuai dengan standar yang ditetapkan perusahaan. Selain itu terjadi keterlambatan pengiriman, hal ini berpengaruh terhadap umur resin (live time resin dimana kualitas resin juga akan menurun. Masalah yang lain ialah mengenai respon atau tanggapan dari supplier terhadap keluhan-keluhan perusahaan. Setiap supplier resin memiliki kekurangan dan kelebihan dalam setiap kriterianya, ada 4 kriteria yang harus dipenuhi setiap supplier resin yaitu kualitas (Quality, pengiriman (Delivery, respon (Responsiveness dan harga (Cost. Penelitian ini memodelkan hubungan saling mempengaruhi dan dependency antar kriteria dan alternatif supplier, menerjemahkan preferensi pengambilan keputusan dalam bentuk skala numeric dan mensintensis hasil berupa prioritas alternatif supplier. Metode ANP digunakan untuk memodelkan hubungan tersebut dan mendapatkan prioritas dari penilaian pengambil keputusan dengan pembentukkan super matriks. Super matriks didapatkan dari perbandingan berpasangan elemen yang dipengaruhi terhadap elemen yang mempengaruhinya. Hasil yang diperoleh adalah bobot prioritas global untuk alternatif supplier yang menunjukkan urutan terpilihnya. Suppiler PT PAI menduduki peringkat pertama, diikuti supplier PT. DOVER, dan urutan ketiga  PT. ARUKI dan urutan keempat AICA.

  6. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  7. Evaluation of surface physical properties of acrylic resins for provisional prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hilgenberg, Sérgio Paulo; Orellana-Jimenez, Emigdio Enrique; Sepúlveda-Navarro, Wilmer Fabian; Arana-Correa, Beatriz Elena; Alves, Dario César Teixeira; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2008-01-01

    Acrylic resins used for provisional prostheses should have satisfactory superficial characteristics in order to ensure gingival health and low bacterial attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the superficial roughness and contact angle after two types of polishing and the Vickers hardness of three acrylic resins (Duralay - G1, Dencrilay - G2, and Dencor - G3), all shade 66, indicated for provisional fixed prostheses. Five 20 x 3 ± 1 mm diameter discoid specimens were obt...

  8. Effects of silane-modified fillers on properties of dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydınoğlu, Aysu; Yoruç, Afife Binnaz Hazar

    2017-10-01

    The effect of silanization on the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of dental composites was investigated. Silica fillers were obtained from colloidal silica solution, Ludox® HS-40 and they were silanized by using 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) in an acidic media. Mineralogical and chemical structures of unsilanized and silanized fillers were determined by using XRD and FT-IR analyses. The modification of unsilanized/silanized fillers were investigated by performing XPS and TGA analyses. The morphological evaluations, surface area, and particle size measurements were performed by using SEM, BET, and Zeta-Sizer, respectively. Eventually, pure and amorphous silica fillers were obtained. Furthermore, the weight percentage of the silane in silica/silane structure was compatible with theoretical values. SEM images, surface area, and particle size measurements showed that agglomeration tendencies of silanized fillers were lower compared to silanized fillers because of the MPTMS addition. Experimental composites (5/10/10/5BisGMA/HEMA/UDMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 70wt% silanized/unsilanized SiO 2 ) were fabricated into 4mm diameter×6mm thick discs for compressive strength (CS), angular flexural strength (AFS), curing depth (CD), and polymerization shrinkage (PS) on a 25×2×2mm rectangular Teflon mold for flexural strength (FS) and modulus of elasticity (E) tests. The curing depth (CD) and degree of polymerization percentage (DP) of composites were determined. Consequently, results showed that mechanical properties and DP of composite resins can be greatly influenced by silanization as a result of the organic matrix-inorganic filler interface bonding formed by silane structures. Despite of these findings, silanization of the SiO 2 was not effected DC and PS values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulation on Effect of Preform Diameter in Injection Stretch Blow Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Z. Q.; Rosli, Nurrina; Oktaviandri, Muchamad

    2018-03-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is the most common material of resin for manufacturing plastic bottle by injection stretch blow molding due to its excellent properties. As various issues of health and environmental hazards due to the PET use have risen, PET bottle manufacture may be improved by minimizing the wall thickness to reduce the PET use. One of the critical qualifications of the manufacturing process which lead to the wall thickness distribution is the initial preform diameter. In this project, we used the ANSYS Polyflow with aim to evaluate the wall thickness distribution of PET bottle for different diameter of initial preform. As a result, only 4 mm preform diameter presented wall thickness below than 1 mm. On the other hand, at least 6 mm preform diameter can permit the wall thickness 1.3 mm i.e. at the shoulder area.

  10. Biokompatibilitas Gelas Ionomer Modifikasi Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Rotua Lestari M

    2008-01-01

    Saat ini banyak berkembang material baru dalam dunia kedokteran gigi diantaranya adalah Gelas ionomer modifikasi resin yang dikembangkan untuk mengatasi kekurangan-kekurangan dari gelas ionomer konvensional. Adanya penambahan monomer resin daIam bentuk 2-hydroxyethylmetacylate (HEMA) telah meningkatkan kekuatan dari bahan ini. Gelas ionomer modifikasi resin mempunyai sifat-sifat fisis dan mekanis yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan gelas ionomer konvensional. Gelas ionomer modifikasi ...

  11. Optimization of the resin application on the purification system of ISFSF RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junaidi

    1998-01-01

    The purification system in the spent fuel storage is to maintain the coolant water quality to the constant. This system uses the resin of IRN 77-Anion in the mixed bed filter as contamination capture. The returned water flow to the storage will be analyzed to the monitor the bed efficiency. This system can be optimally operated if the mixed bed is contained by 200 liters of resin and this is equivalent with the 0.5 m high of bed and 0.75 m in diameter. The resin must be flushed to be cleaned or changed when the pressure difference in the bed filter is higher than 0.5 bar

  12. Effect of preheat repetition on color stability of methacrylate- and silorane-based composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Abed Kahnamouei, Mehdi; Gholizadeh, Sarah; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Daneshpooy, Mehdi; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Rezaei, Yashar

    2017-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preheating methacrylate- and silorane-based composite resins on their color stability up to 40 times at 55‒60°C. Methods. Seventy-six methacrylate and silorane-based composite resin samples, with a diameter of 10 mm and a height of 2 mm, were divided into 4 groups (n=19). After the samples were prepared, their color parameters were determined using a reflective spectrophotometer. The composite resin samples were separately sto...

  13. The effect of light curing units, curing time, and veneering materials on resin cement microhardness

    OpenAIRE

    Nurcan Ozakar Ilday; Yusuf Ziya Bayindir; Funda Bayindir; Aysel Gurpinar

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose: Several factors may affects microhardness of resin cement under veneering materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different veneering materials, light-curing units and curing times (20/3, 40/6) on the microhardness of dual-cured resin cement. Materials and methods: We pressed dual-cured resin cement specimens (Clearfil SA cement, 5 mm diameter, 1 mm thick) between two microscopic glass slides covered with transparent polystyrene matrix strips to r...

  14. SEX DETERMINATION FROM FEMORAL HEAD DIAMETERS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... Request for reprints to: Dr. P S Igbigbi, Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Private Bag 360 Chichiri, Blantyre 3 Malawi. SEX DETERMINATION .... Figure 2. Bar chart showing the ranges of head diameters of male and female femurs. (RVD-Right vertical diameter; LVD-Left vertical diameter; RTD -.

  15. 7 CFR 51.2850 - Diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diameter. 51.2850 Section 51.2850 Agriculture... Diameter. Diameter means the greatest dimension measured at right angles to a straight line running from the stem to the root. ...

  16. 7 CFR 51.3211 - Diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diameter. 51.3211 Section 51.3211 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Bermuda-Granex-Grano Type Onions Definitions § 51.3211 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest dimension of the onion at right angles to a line running from the stem to the root. Metric...

  17. Discharge of viscous UV-curable resin droplets by screen printing for UV nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Akira; Uehara, Takuya; Nagase, Kazuro; Ikedo, Hiroaki; Hiroshiba, Nobuya; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Masaru

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrated a coating method of screen printing for discharging droplets of a high-viscosity resin on a substrate for ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprint lithography (NIL). Compared with a spin-coated resin film on a silicon substrate, discharged resin droplets on a silicon substrate were effective in terms of the uniformity of residual layer thickness (RLT) in contact with a mold with various pattern densities. Fluorescence microscope observations with a fluorescent-dye-containing UV-curable resin enabled the evaluation of the shapes of resin droplets discharged on a substrate surface. Widely used screen mesh plates composed of a stainless mesh covered with a patterned emulsion film caused defects of undischarged parts, whereas defects-free resin droplets with a narrow size distribution were discharged by mesh-free plates prepared with laser ablation. The pitch-to-diameter ratio in the configuration of 10-µm-diameter holes needs to be larger than 2.5 times for printing a resin having a viscosity of 12,800 mPa s.

  18. Speedy fabrication of diameter-controlled Ag nanowires using glycerolunder microwave irradiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diameter-controlled Ag nanowires were rapidly fabricated (1 min) using inexpensive, abundant, and environmentally-friendly glycerol as both reductant and solvent under non-stirred microwave irradiation conditions; no Ag particles were formed using conventional heating methods. Th...

  19. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Astalan, Andrea; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden); Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Lak, Aidin; Ludwig, Frank [Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig, D‐38106 Braunschweig Germany (Germany); IJzendoorn, Leo J. van [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Westphal, Fritz; Grüttner, Cordula [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, D ‐18119 Rostock (Germany); Gehrke, Nicole [nanoPET Pharma GmbH, D ‐10115 Berlin Germany (Germany); Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Johansson, Christer, E-mail: christer.johansson@acreo.se [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also investigate how the effective particle magnetic moment is coupled to the individual moments of the single-domain nanocrystals by using different measurement techniques: DC magnetometry, AC susceptometry, dynamic light scattering and TEM. We have studied two magnetic multi-core particle systems – BNF Starch from Micromod with a median particle diameter of 100 nm and FeraSpin R from nanoPET with a median particle diameter of 70 nm – and one single-core particle system – SHP25 from Ocean NanoTech with a median particle core diameter of 25 nm.

  20. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Astalan, Andrea; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Lak, Aidin; Ludwig, Frank; IJzendoorn, Leo J. van; Westphal, Fritz; Grüttner, Cordula; Gehrke, Nicole; Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva; Johansson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also investigate how the effective particle magnetic moment is coupled to the individual moments of the single-domain nanocrystals by using different measurement techniques: DC magnetometry, AC susceptometry, dynamic light scattering and TEM. We have studied two magnetic multi-core particle systems – BNF Starch from Micromod with a median particle diameter of 100 nm and FeraSpin R from nanoPET with a median particle diameter of 70 nm – and one single-core particle system – SHP25 from Ocean NanoTech with a median particle core diameter of 25 nm

  1. Influence of different surface treatments on the short-term bond strength and durability between a zirconia post and a composite resin core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgungor, Gokhan; Sen, Deniz; Aydin, Murat

    2008-05-01

    Reliable bonding between zirconia posts and composite resin core materials is difficult to achieve because of the smooth surface texture and lack of silica content of zirconia posts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the short-term bond strength and durability between a zirconia post and a composite resin core material. Eighty zirconia posts were divided into 4 groups (n=20). Specimens received 1 of 4 different surface treatments: group AIRB, airborne-particle abrasion; group TSC-SIL, tribochemical silica coating (CoJet system) and silanization (ESPE Sil); group AIRB-BSIL, airborne-particle abrasion and MDP-containing primer (Clearfil SE Bond Primer)/silane coupling agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator) mixture application; and group TSC-BSIL, tribochemical silica coating and MDP-containing primer/silane coupling agent mixture application. Average surface roughness (Ra) of zirconia posts produced by airborne-particle abrasion or silica coating was measured using an optical profilometer. Composite resin core foundations (Build-it FR) were formed using transparent acrylic resin tubes (12mm in length and 7mm in diameter). Each group was further divided into 2 subgroups of 10 specimens and stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C, either for 24 hours or for 150 days with 37,500 thermal cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, with a dwell time of 30 seconds. Following water storage, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 2-mm-thick post-and-core specimens under water cooling. Push-out tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. Debonded post surfaces were examined with SEM. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (alpha=0.05). No significant differences were detected between the Ra values of airborne-particle-abraded and silica-coated specimens (P=.781). The short-term mean bond strengths for

  2. Properties of the Carboxylate ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Bert; Dario, Maarten; Boren, Hans; Torstenfelt, Boerje; Puigdomenech, Ignasi; Johansson, Claes

    2002-09-01

    Weakly acidic, carboxylic resin has been selected, together with strong base anion resins, for water purification at the Forsmark 1 and 2 reactors. For the strong (but not the weak) ion exchange resin the Nuclear Power Inspectorate has given permission to dispose the spent resins in the SFR 1 (the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste). This report gives a review of the carboxylic resins and comes to the conclusion that the resins are very stable and that there should not exist any risks for increased leaching of radionuclides from SFR 1 if these resins are disposed (compared to the strong resins)

  3. Method for the fabrication of a fuel body from an agglomerate of fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redding, G.B.

    1977-01-01

    The suggestion deals with the form of coating of a synthetic resin on nuclear fuel particles already having a fission product inhiliting coating. The resin forms a fuel body from the particles. It is proposed to fill a hollow form with nuclear fuel particles, to then pour in liquid synthetic resin and to pour it off again so that only the resin retaired by the surface tension remains on the particles. The mass is then solidified by heat treatment. A high packing density is achieved. (IHOE) [de

  4. Method for the fabrication of a fuel body from an agglomerate of fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redding, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    The suggestion deals with the form of coating of a synthetic resin on nuclear fuel particles already having a fission product inhibiting coating. The resin forms a fuel body from the particles. It is proposed to fill a hollow form with nuclear fuel particles, to then pour in liquid synthetic resin and to pour it off again so that only the resin retained by the surface tension remains on the particles. The mass is then solidified by heat treatment. A high packing density is achieved. (UWI) [de

  5. [Enriching of total flavonoids from Herba Leonuri with polyamide and macroporous resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan-Ni; Xu, De-Sheng; Feng, Yi; Wei, Hong-Chang

    2008-02-01

    To study the enriching method of total flavonoid from Herba Leonuri with polyamide and macroporous resin. Seven enriching and purifying methods were compared with the yield and purity as indexes. The method of enriching with polyamide and macroporous resin was confirmed and the process of purifying was determined by orthogonal design. D101 resin is packed by wet method, the ratio of diameter to height is 1:7. After mixed with the extract liquids, the weight of wet resin increased to 3 times of the dry resin. Evaporated the wet resin to dryness, mixed well with a little of 95% ethanol and dry polyamide powder, evaporated them to dryness again. Elute with deionized water until the effluent being colourless, then loaded it on the macroporous adsorptive resin, elute with 50% ethanol, the volume of effluents was collected to 7 times of the column volume. The purity of total flavonoids reached to 23%, while the diversion rate from raw Herba Leonuri was to 69%. The process is simple and convenient, and the regeneration of resin is easy, which has a good application foreground.

  6. Modeling and mechanical performance of carbon nanotube/epoxy resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Vijay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The MWCNT fillers are uniformly dispersed in the epoxy resin, which improved the mechanical properties of epoxy resin. ► Modified Halpin–Tsai model is useful to calculate the Young’s modulus of MWCNT/epoxy resin composite. ► The experimental moduli are within the variation of 27% with the theoretical values. -- Abstract: The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) addition on mechanical properties of epoxy resin was investigated to obtain the tensile strength, compressive strength and Young’s modulus from load versus displacement graphs. The result shows that the tensile strength, compressive strength and Young’s modulus of epoxy resin were increased with the addition of MWCNT fillers. The significant improvements in tensile strength, compressive strength and Young’s modulus were obtained due to the excellent dispersion of MWCNT fillers in the epoxy resin. The dispersion of MWCNT fillers in epoxy resin was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Also, Halpin–Tsai model was modified by considering the average diameter of internal/external of multi-walled nanotube and orientation factor (α) to calculate the Young’s modulus of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/epoxy resin composite. There was a good correlation between the experimentally obtained Young’s modulus and modified Halpin–Tsai model.

  7. Temperature rise during polymerization of different cavity liners and composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Ozcan; Turel, Verda; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thermal insulating properties of different light curing cavity liners and composite resins during light emitting diode (LED) curing. Sixty-four dentin discs, 1 mm thick and 8 mm in diameter, were prepared. Specimens were divided into four groups. Calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2), resin-modified glass ionomer cement, flowable composite and adhesive systems were applied to dentin discs according to the manufacturers' instructions. The rise in temperature during polymerization with a LED curing unit (LCU) was measured using a K-type thermocouple connected to a data logger. Subsequently, all specimens were randomly divided into one of two groups. A silorane-based composite resin and a methacrylate-based composite resin were applied to the specimens. Temperature rise during polymerization of composite resins with LCU were then measured again. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey analyses. There were significant differences in temperature rise among the liners, adhesives, and composite resins (P < 0.05). Silorane-based composite resin exhibited significantly greater temperature rises than methacrylate-based resin (P < 0.05). The smallest temperature rises were observed in Ca(OH)2 specimens. Thermal insulating properties of different restorative materials are important factors in pulp health. Bonding agents alone are not sufficient to protect pulp from thermal stimuli throughout curing.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of an N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.F.

    1977-10-01

    A chelating ion-exchange resin with N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylene-diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) used as the ligand chemically bonded to XAD-4 by an ester linkage, HEDTA-4, was synthesized. It is stable under normal experimental conditions with the liquid chromatograph. The structure of the resin was confirmed by an infrared spectrum, and by potentiometric titrations. The capacity of the resin was also obtained by potentiometric titration and by a nitrogen analysis. The resin was used to pack a column of 5 mm internal diameter and 5 cm long. The effect of pH on the retention of different metal ions on the resin was studied. It was found that the resin was most selective for chromium(III), copper(II), lead(II), mercury(II), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV) and zinc(II) at a pH of less than 3. Furthermore, the resin proves to be functioning with a chelating mechanism rather than ion-exchange, and it can concentrate trace metal ions in the presence of a large excess of calcium and magnesium. This makes the resin potentially useful for purifying and analyzing drinking water

  9. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  10. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  11. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira; Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I.; Domb, Abraham J.

    2010-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  12. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel); Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry (Israel); Domb, Abraham J., E-mail: avid@ekmd.huji.ac.i [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel)

    2010-02-15

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  13. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2016-03-29

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer resin, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  14. Waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resin obtained by miniemulsion polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Murillo

    Full Text Available Abstract Four waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resins (HBRAA were synthesized by miniemulsion polymerization from a hyperbranched alkyd resin (HBR, methyl methacrylate (MMA, butyl acrylate (BA and acrylic acid (AA, by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO and ammonium persulfate (AP as initiators. The reaction between HBR and acrylic monomers was evidenced by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The conversion percentage, glass transition temperature (Tg, content of acrylic polymer (determined by soxhlet extraction and molecular weight increased with the content of acrylic monomers used in the synthesis. The main structure formed during the synthesis was the HBRAA. The analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS showed that the particle size distribution of HBRAA2, HBRAA3 and HBRAA4 resins were mainly monomodal. The film properties (gloss, flexibility, adhesion and drying time of the HBRAA were good.

  15. Durability of resin cement bond to aluminium oxide and zirconia ceramics after air abrasion and laser treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, Richard M; Cavalcanti, Andrea N; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Pilecki, Peter; Sherriff, Martyn; Melo, Luciana; Watson, Timothy F

    2011-02-01

    The erbium laser has been introduced for cutting enamel and dentin and may have an application in the surface modification of high-strength aluminum oxide and zirconia ceramics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the durability of the bond of conventional dual-cured resin cements to Procera Al(2)O(3) and zirconium oxide ceramics after surface treatment with air abrasion and erbium laser. One hundred twenty Al(2)O(3) and 120 zirconia specimens measuring 3 × 3 × 0.7 mm(3) were divided equally into three groups, and their surfaces treated as follows: either untreated (controls), air abraded with Al(2)O(3) particles, or erbium-laser-treated at a power setting of 200 mJ. The surface of each specimen was then primed and bonded with one of two dual-cured resin cements (either SCP-100 Ceramic Primer and NAC-100 or Monobond S and Variolink II) using a 1-mm thick Tygon tube mold with a 0.75-mm internal bore diameter. After 24 hours and 6 months of water storage at 37°C, a microshear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Surface morphology was examined using a confocal microscope, and failure modes were observed using an optical microscope. The data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier nonparametric survival analysis. In the case of zirconia, air abrasion and Erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser treatment of the ceramic surface resulted in a significant reduction in the bond strengths of both resin cements after 6 months water storage; however, when the zirconia surface was left untreated, the SCP-100/NAC-100 group did not significantly reduce in bond strength. In the case of alumina, no treatment, air abrasion and Er:YAG laser treatment of the surface led to no significant reduction in the bond strengths of the three SCP-100/NAC-100 groups after 6 months water storage, whereas all three Monobond S/Variolink II groups showed a significant reduction. Er:YAG laser treatment of the zirconia surface did not result in a durable resin

  16. Positron emission particle tracking in pulsatile flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitant; Wiggins, Cody; Ruggles, Arthur

    2017-05-01

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is increasingly used to understand the flow characteristics in complex systems. This research utilizes PEPT to measure pulsatile flow of frequency 2.1 Hz in an elastic Masterkleer PVC tube of 19 mm inner diameter and 3.2 mm wall thickness. Anion exchange resin beads are labeled with 18F and delivered to a pump driven flow loop with motorized ball valve used to develop the pulsatile flow. Data are collected in the tube with circular cross section, and measurements are also collected with a section of the tube pinched. Nominal flow velocities are near 1 m/s and Reynolds numbers near 20,000. Many thousand PEPT particle traces are collected and synchronized with the flow pulsation. These Lagrangian data are presented as a series of 20 still frames depicting the 3-D velocity field present during each phase of the flow pulsation. Pressure data are also collected to resolve the pressure wave front moving through the open elastic tube at velocity 15.2 m/s.

  17. Efecto de surfactantes polimerizables en la distribución de tamaño de partícula, pH, viscosidad, contenidos de sólidos y de monómero residual de una resina estireno-butilacrilato Effect of polymerizable surfactants on particle size distribution, pH, viscosity, contents of solids and residual monomer of a styrene-butylacrylate resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Rios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados de la polimerización en emulsión de una resina acrílica estirenada usando surfactantes polimerizables, los cuales presentan ventajas técnicas como baja formación de espuma, alta resistencia de la película al contacto con agua y buena estabilidad en la polimerización. Se evaluó el efecto de estos surfactantes polimerizables en la distribución de tamaños de partícula de la resina; además se determinaron propiedades finales de la resina tales como porcentaje de sólidos, porcentaje de monómero libre, viscosidad y pH. Estos resultados se compararon con los obtenidos usando surfactantes convencionales no polimerizables del tipo alquil fenol etoxilado y alquilarilpoliglicol éter sulfato de sodio. Los resultados indican que que se pueden remplazar totalmente los surfactantes convencionales no polimerizables por los surfactantes poliméricos evaluados sin afectar significativamente las propiedades de la resina, mientras que la sustitución parcial de los surfactantes no polimerizables por los polimerizables induce, en algunos casos, a la formación de partículas con mayor tamaño a las presentes en la muestra estándar.Results on the emulsion polymerization of a styrenated acrylic resin using polymerizable surfactants are presented. These surfactants exhibit low foaming, high film strength upon contact with water and good stability in the polymerization. A comparison was made with results for conventional non-polymerizable alkyl aryl polyglycol ether sulphate, sodium salt and nonylphenolethoxylate surfactants. The effect of these polymerizable surfactants on the particle size distribution of the resin was evaluated; in addition to determining the final properties of the resin such as solids content, free monomer content, viscosity and pH. It is feasible to totally replace non-polymerizable surfactants by the polymerizable surfactants evaluated without affecting significantly the properties of the resin, while

  18. Effect of dentin-cleaning techniques on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M J M C; Bapoo, H; Rizkalla, A S; Santos, G C

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the influence of different cleansing techniques on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement to dentin. A total of 33 noncarious human molars were sectioned mesiodistally and embedded in chemically cured resin with the buccal or lingual surfaces facing upward. Superficial dentin was exposed and resin disk provisional restorations were cemented to the dentin surfaces with noneugenol provisional cement and were stored in distilled water at 37°C. After seven days, the provisional restorations were removed and 13 specimens were randomly assigned to each of the five groups (n=13), according to the following cleansing treatments: G1-excavator (control); G2-0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate; G3-40% polyacrylic acid; G4-mixture of flour pumice and water; and G5-sandblasting with 50 μm aluminum oxide particles at a pressure of 87 psi. Resin composite disks (Filtek Supreme Plus, 3M ESPE Dental Products, St Paul, MN, USA) 4.7 (±0.1) mm in diameter and 3.0 (±0.5) mm in height were cemented with self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE), photocured, and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength testing was conducted using a universal test machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-B rank order test. Sandblasting with aluminum oxide (11.32 ± 1.70 MPa) produced significantly higher shear bond strength values compared with any other treatment groups (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between G1-control (7.74 ± 1.72 MPa), G2-chlorhexidine (6.37 ± 1.47 MPa), and G4-pumice (7.33 ± 2.85 MPa) (p<0.05).

  19. Synthesis, structural characterization, and performance evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The 177 underground storage tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site contain an estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction of the tank wastes for vitrification. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, an organic ion-exchange resin with high selectivity and capacity for the cesium ion, which is a candidate ion-exchange material for use in remediation of tank wastes. The report includes information on the structure/function analysis of R-F resin and the synthetic factors that affect performance of the resin. CS-100, a commercially available phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin, and currently the baseline ion-exchanger for removal of cesium ion at Hanford, is compared with the R-F resin. The primary structural unit of the R-F resin was determined to consist of a 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted resorcinol ring unit while CS-100, was composed mainly of a 1,2,4-trisubstituted ring. CS-100 shows the presence of phenoxy-ether groups, and this may account for the much lower decontamination factor of CS-100 for cesium ion. Curing temperatures for the R-F resin were found to be optimal at 105--130C. At lower temperatures, insufficient curing, hence crosslinking, of the polymer resin occurs and selectivity for cesium drops. Curing at elevated temperatures leads to chemical degradation. Optimal particle size for R-F resin is in the range of 20--50 mesh-sized particles. R-F resin undergoes chemical degradation or oxidation which destroys ion-exchange sites. The ion-exchange sites (hydroxyl groups) are converted to quinones and ketones. CS-100, though it has much lower performance for cesium ion-exchange, is significantly more chemically stable than R-F resin. To gamma radiation, CS-100 is more radiolytically stable than R-F resin

  20. Synthesis, structural characterization, and performance evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The 177 underground storage tanks at the DOE`s Hanford Site contain an estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction of the tank wastes for vitrification. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, an organic ion-exchange resin with high selectivity and capacity for the cesium ion, which is a candidate ion-exchange material for use in remediation of tank wastes. The report includes information on the structure/function analysis of R-F resin and the synthetic factors that affect performance of the resin. CS-100, a commercially available phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin, and currently the baseline ion-exchanger for removal of cesium ion at Hanford, is compared with the R-F resin. The primary structural unit of the R-F resin was determined to consist of a 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted resorcinol ring unit while CS-100, was composed mainly of a 1,2,4-trisubstituted ring. CS-100 shows the presence of phenoxy-ether groups, and this may account for the much lower decontamination factor of CS-100 for cesium ion. Curing temperatures for the R-F resin were found to be optimal at 105--130C. At lower temperatures, insufficient curing, hence crosslinking, of the polymer resin occurs and selectivity for cesium drops. Curing at elevated temperatures leads to chemical degradation. Optimal particle size for R-F resin is in the range of 20--50 mesh-sized particles. R-F resin undergoes chemical degradation or oxidation which destroys ion-exchange sites. The ion-exchange sites (hydroxyl groups) are converted to quinones and ketones. CS-100, though it has much lower performance for cesium ion-exchange, is significantly more chemically stable than R-F resin. To gamma radiation, CS-100 is more radiolytically stable than R-F resin.

  1. New acrylic resin composite with improved thermal diffusivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messersmith, P B; Obrez, A; Lindberg, S

    1998-03-01

    Studies have shown that physical characteristics of denture base materials may affect patient acceptance of denture prostheses by altering sensory experience of food during mastication. Thermal diffusivity is one material property that has been cited as being important in determining gustatory response, with denture base acrylic resins having low thermal diffusivity compared with denture base metal alloys. This study prepared and characterized experimental acrylic resin composite material with increased thermal diffusivity. Sapphire (Al2O3) whiskers were added to conventional denture base acrylic resin during processing to achieve loadings of 9.35% and 15% by volume. Cylindrical test specimens containing an embedded thermocouple were used to determine thermal diffusivity over a physiologic temperature range (0 degree to 70 degrees C). Thermal diffusivities of the sapphire containing composites were found to be significantly higher than the unmodified acrylic resin. Thermal diffusivity was found to increase in proportion to the volume percentage of sapphire filler, which suggested that the high aspect ratio ceramic particles formed a pathway for heat conduction through the insulating polymer matrix. The thermal diffusivity of denture base acrylic resin was increased by the addition of thermally conducting sapphire whiskers.

  2. Influence of different ceramics on resin cement Knoop Hardness Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Gilberto A; Agarwal, Parul; Miranzi, Benito A S; Platt, Jeffrey A; Valentino, Thiago Assunção; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated: (1) the effect of different ceramics on light attenuation that could affect microhardness, measured as the Knoop Hardness Number (KHN), of a resin cement immediately and 24 hours after polymerization and (2) the effect of different activation modes (direct light-activation, light activation through ceramics and chemical activation) on the KHN of a resin cement. Resin cement Rely XARC (3M ESPE) specimens 5.0 mm in diameter and 1.0 mm thickwere made in a Teflon mold covered with a polyester film. The cement was directly light activated for 40 seconds with an XL 2500 curing unit (3M ESPE) with 650 mW/cm2, light activated through ceramic discs of Duceram Plus (DeguDent), Cergogold (DeguDent), IPS Empress (Ivoclar), IPS Empress 2 (Ivoclar), Procera (NobelBiocare), In Ceram Alumina (Vita) and Cercon (DeguDent), having a 1.2 mm thickness or chemically activatedwith-out light application. The resin cement specimens were flattened, and KHN wasobtained using an HMV 2 microhardnesstester (Shimadzu) with a load of 50 g applied for 15 seconds 100 microm from the irradiated surface immediately and after storage at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Ten measurements were made for each specimen, with three specimens for each group at each time. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05). The KHN of the resin cement was not only affected by the mode of activation, but also by the post-activation testing time. The mean KHN of the resin cementfor chemical activation and through all ceramics showed statistically significant lower values compared to direct activation immediately and at 24 hours. The KHN for 24 hourspost-activation was always superior to the immediate post-activation test except with direct activation. The most opaque ceramics resulted in the lowest KHN values.

  3. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  4. Correcting for particle size effects on plasma actuator particle image velocimetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masati, A.; Sedwick, R. J.

    2018-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is often used to characterize plasma actuator flow, but particle charging effects are rarely taken into account. A parametric study was conducted to determine the effects of particle size on the velocity results of plasma actuator PIV experiments. Results showed that smaller particles more closely match air flow velocities than larger particles. The measurement uncertainty was quantified by deconvolving the particle image diameter from the correlation diameter. The true air velocity was calculated by linearly extrapolating to the zero-size particle diameter.

  5. Chromatography resin support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin applicator. 872.3140 Section 872.3140 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of...

  7. Kekerasan mikro resin komposit packable dan bulkfill dengan kedalaman kavitas berbeda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diatri Nari Ratih

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microhardness of packable and bulkfill composite resin with different cavity depths. Bulkfill composite resin restorations are increasingly popular because the material can be irradiated with a thickness reaching 4 mm, making it easier to apply. The objective of this study was to determine the differences in the microhardness between packable and bulkfill composite resin restorations with a cavity depth of 2 mm and 4 mm. This study was done using 32 Teon molds (5 mm diameter, and grouped randomly into 4 groups in which each consisted of 8 samples. Group 1A, packable composite resin was applied to the mold with a cavity depth of 2 mm. Group 1B, bulkfill composite resin was applied to the mold with a cavity depth of 2 mm. Group 2A, packable composite resin was applied with a depth of 4 mm. Group 2B, bulkfill composite resin was applied with a depth of 4 mm. Each sample was immersed in articial saliva with a pH of 6.8 and stored in an incubator at a temperature of 37°C for 24 hours. The hardness of each sample was tested using Vickers indenter microhardness tester. The data obtained were then analyzed by using two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test. The results showed that bulkfill composite resin with a cavity depth of 2 mm has the highest average of microhardness (31.09 ± 2.02 VHN, followed by packable composite resin with a depth of 2 mm (17.52 ± 1.25 VHN, bulkfill with a depth of 4 mm (11.97 ± 1.23 VHN and packable with a depth of 4 mm (3.18 ± 0.85 VHN. The two-way ANOVA analysis showed that there are significant differences between the types of composite resin and cavity depths (p < 0.05, and there is interaction between the types of composite resin and cavity depth (p<0.05. In conclusion, the microhardness of packable composite resin is lower than that of bulkfill at a cavity depth of 2 and 4 mm.   ABSTRAK Restorasi resin komposit dengan bulkfill semakin populer karena material tersebut dapat disinar dengan ketebalan sampai 4

  8. Functionalizing a dentin bonding resin to become bioactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Zehnder, Matthias; Schweizer, Thomas; Stark, Wendelin J; Attin, Thomas; Mohn, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    To investigate chemo-mechanical effects of incorporating alkaline bioactive glass nanoparticles into a light-curable dental resin matrix. An unfilled Bis-GMA/TEGDMA material was infiltrated with up to 20 wt% of ultrafine SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-Bi2O3 particles. The unfilled and filled resins were investigated regarding their viscosity before setting and compared to commercially available materials. Set specimens were immersed for 21 days in phosphate buffered saline at 37°C. Water uptake, pH, Knoop hardness, and degree of conversion of freshly polymerized and stored samples were investigated. Resin surfaces were viewed and mapped in a scanning electron microscope for the formation of calcium phosphate (Ca/P) precipitates. In addition, Raman spectroscopy was performed. Numeric values were statistically compared (pSiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-Bi2O3 particles into the resin matrix. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Surface Treatment Methods on the Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramics Systems, Resin Cements and Tooth Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkuş Emek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of airborne-particle abrasion (APA and tribochemical silica coating (TSC surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramics systems, resin cements and tooth surface

  10. Some Tensile Properties of Unsaturated Polyester Resin Reinforced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recent emergence of nano science and nano technology has added another dimension to the staple of the modern composite technology. Instead of micron diameter fibres and particles, nano particles are being incorporated into polymer matrices to form a composite blend known as polymer nano composites (PNCs).

  11. Leaching studies on ion exchange resins immobilized in bitument matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosche Filho, C.E.; Chandra, U.; Villalobos, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    To study radionuclide leaching from bitumen waste forms, many samples of bitumen mixed with ion-exchange resin labelled with 134 Cs were prepared. The resins used in the tests were nuclear grade mixed cationic/anionic bead resins. Different bittumen types were assayed: two destilled and to oxidized bitumens. Laboratory to scale samples, with surface/volume ratio (S/V) = 1, were molded to 5 cm diameter and 10 cm height. The composition of the mixtures were: 30, 40, 50 and 60% by weight of dried resin with bitumen. The leachant was deionized water with a leachant volume to sample surface rario of about 8 cm. Leached fractions were collected according to the recommendation of ISO method, with complete exchange of leachant beckers after each sampling. The volume collected for analysis was one liter. Marinelli were used for counting in a Ge(Li) detector. Up to now, results of 250 days have been accumulated. Samples prepared with distilled bitumen have shown a diffusion coefficient of the order of 10 -14 cm 2 /sec and those prepared with oxidized bitumen yielded a diffusion coefficient of the order of 10 -12 cm 2 /sec. Mathematical models of transport phenomena applied to cylindrical geometry were employed to fit experimental data. (Author) [pt

  12. Effect of Ingested Liquids on Color Change of Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek Afzali, Beheshteh; Ghasemi, Amir; Mirani, Asrin; Abdolazimi, Zahra; Akbarzade Baghban, Alireza; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-08-01

    Color change of composite restorations is well known to dentists. However, the effect of commonly consumed drinks on discoloration of composite resins has yet to be determined. This study sought to assess the color change of a nanofilled (Premise) and a flowable composite resin (Premise flowable) following simulated consumption of tea, cola, iron drops and multivitamin syrup. Forty disk-shaped specimens (7 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were fabricated from each composite resin. The baseline color values were measured according to the CIE L*a*b* system using digital imaging. The specimens of each restorative material were randomly divided into five groups (eight each) according to the storage media namely tea, cola, iron drops, multivitamin syrup or distilled water (control). The specimens were immersed in staining solutions for three hours daily over a 40-day test period. Following this, the color change values (ΔE*) were calculated. For statistical analyses, the color differences were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (Pcomposite resins (P>0.05). In both composite materials, the difference among the solutions was not significant (P>0.05). Under the tested experimental conditions, both restorative materials were susceptible to discoloration by all four staining solutions. The color change values were not related to the solution or the type of material used.

  13. Mechanical and Physical Properties of Low Density Kenaf Core Particleboards Bonded with Different Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Jani Saad; Izran Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Single layer kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) core particleboards bonded with urea formaldehyde (UF), phenol formaldehyde (PF) and polymeric 4,4-methyl phenylmethane di-isocyanate (PMDI) resins were manufactured. The boards were fabricated with three different densities i.e 350 kg/m3, 450 kg/m3 and 550 kg/m3. Each type of the resin used was sprayed at three different resin loadings on the kenaf core particles. The boards produced was evaluated for its modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticit...

  14. Preparation and characterization of manganese dioxide impregnated resin for radionuclide pre-concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Zsolt [Radiation Safety Department, Institute of Isotopes, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege utca 29-33, H-1121, Budapest (Hungary)], E-mail: varga@iki.kfki.hu

    2007-10-15

    An easy and reproducible preparation of manganese dioxide impregnated resin of homogeneous particles has been described. The characteristics of radium, thorium, uranium and plutonium uptake (pH dependency, kinetic studies and matrix dependency) have been determined in batch mode. The resin due to its high efficiency for radium, uranium and thorium at neutral pH values can be an effective tool for radionuclide pre-concentration from liquid samples even with high dissolved solid content.

  15. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  16. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  17. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  18. Microshear bond strength of preheated silorane- and methacrylate-based composite resins to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbuga, Sezer; Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Cayabatmaz, Muhammed; Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Cantekin, Kenan; Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preheating on microshear bond strength (MSBS) of silorane and methacrylate-based composite resins to human dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into three main groups: (1) composite resins were heated upto 68 °C; (2) cooled to 4 °C; and (3) control [room temperature (RT)]. Each group was then randomly subdivided into four subgroups according to adhesive system used [Solobond M (Voco), All Bond SE (Bisco), Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) (Kuraray), Silorane adhesive system (SAS) (3M ESPE)]. Resin composite cylinders were formed (0.9 mm diameter × 0.7 mm length) and MSBS of each specimen was tested. The preheated groups exhibited the highest MSBS (p composite resins may be an alternative way to increase the MSBS of composites on dentin. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Resin glycosides from Porana duclouxii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wen-Bing; Zhang, Dai-Gui; Liu, Chun-Jie; Li, Guan-Hua; Li, You-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    A new intact resin glycoside (3) and two glycosidic acids (1 and 2), all having a common trisaccharide moiety and (11S)-hydroxytetradecanoic acid or (3S,11S)-dihydroxytetradecanoic acid as the aglycone, were obtained from the roots of Porana duclouxii. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and chemical correlations. These compounds represent the first examples of resin glycosides from the genus Porana.

  20. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  1. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the

  2. [Study on purification of total flavonoids from seed residue of Hippophae rhamnoides with macroporous resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qun-hua; Qu, Wei-jing; Li, Jia-gui; Deng, Yun-xia

    2004-03-01

    To study the conditions and parameters of purifying total flavonoids from seed residue of H. rhamnoides. Absorption capacity of three resins for total flavonoids was compared. With the yield and purity as indexes, the process of absorbing and purifying total flavonoids from seed residue with D101 macroporous resin absorbent was selected by orthogonal design. The D101 resin was the best of the three resins and its absorption capacity was determined to be 63.00 mg x g(-1) wet resin. The optimum process condition was 30% ethanol as eluting solvent, wet resin vs crude herbs: 2:1, diameter vs height: 1:10, eluting solvent vs crude herbs: 10:1, absorbing time for 3 h. The yield of total flavonoids from seeds residue of H. rhamnoides by this process was 2.39%, and the purity reached 64.81%. The process is simple and convenient and the regeneration of resin is easy. So this method of purification is advisable.

  3. The effect of soda immersion on nano hybrid composite resin discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chair Effendi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Composite resin is the tooth-colored restorative material which most of the people are fond of due to their aesthetic value. The composite resin discoloration may happen because of the intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Soda water is one of the beverages which can cause the composite resin discoloration. Purpose: The study was aimed to determine the effect of soda immersion on nano hybrid composite resin discoloration. Methods: The study was an experimental laboratory study using 100 shade A3 nano hybrid composite resin specimens with the diameter of 5 mm and density of 2mm. The samples were divided into 5 groups, each group was immersed in different beverages. The beverages were mineral water; lemon-flavored soda; strawberry-flavored soda; fruit punch-flavored soda; and orange-flavored soda for 3, 7, 14 and 21 days respectively, in the temperature of 37o C. The discoloration measurement utilizes Spectrophotometer, Vita Easy Shade, and uses CIEL*a*b* method. Results: The result showed that the duration of immersion in soda had an effect on the Nano hybrid composite resin discoloration. Strawberry and fruit punch- flavored soda were the most influential components toward the discoloration. Nevertheless, the generally-occurred discoloration was clinically acceptable (∆E ≤ 3,3. Conclusion: The study suggested that the soda immersion duration has effect on Nano hybrid composite resin discoloration.Latar belakang: Resin komposit adalah material sewarna gigi yang diminati masyarakat karena memiliki nilai estetik yang baik. Perubahan warna resin komposit dapat terjadi karena faktor intrinsik dan ekstrinsik. Minuman soda merupakan salah satu minuman yang dapat menyebabkan perubahan warna pada resin komposit. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penelitian ini untuk meneliti perubahan warna resin komposit nanohibrida akibat perendaman dalam minuman soda. Metode: Metode yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah eksperimental laboratorik dengan menggunakan

  4. Curing efficiency of various resin-based materials polymerized through different ceramic thicknesses and curing time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Won; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this in vitro study was to examine the curing efficiency of various resin-based materials polymerized through ceramic restorations with 3 different thicknesses. Curing efficiency was evaluated by determining the surface microhardness (VHN) of the resin specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four kinds of resin materials were used. Z350 (3M ESPE Filtek™ Z350: A2 Shade), Z250 (3M ESPE Filtek™ Z250: A2 Shade) and Variolink® II (VL: Ivoclar vivadent, base: transparent) either with or without a self-curing catalyst (VLC: Ivoclar vivadent, catalyst: low viscosity/transparent) were filled into the silicone mold (10 mm diameter, 1 mm thick). They were cured through ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press MO-0 ingot ivoclar vivadent, 10 mm diameter, 0.5, 1 and 2 mm thicknesses) by LED light-curing units for 20 and 40 seconds. Vicker's microhardness numbers (VHNs) were measured on the bottom surfaces by a microhardness tester. Data were analyzed using a 3- way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a significance level of 0.05. RESULTS The thickness of ceramic disc increased, the VHNs of all four resin types were decreased (Plight cured for 40 seconds were significantly higher than that of LED for 20 seconds in all four resin materials (Pcuring time resulted higher VHN values of all resin materials. The use of a catalyst produced a greater hardness with all polymerization methods. Restorative resin materials (Z350, Z250) showed higher VHN values than resin cement materials (VL, VLC). PMID:22053242

  5. The influence of resin cements on the final color of ceramic veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Dong; Hong, Guang; Xing, Wen-Zhong; Wang, Yi-Ning

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of three brands of resin cement on the final color of ceramic veneers. 50 disk-shaped ceramic specimens (IPS e.Max, 0.6mm×8.0mm diameter) and disk-shaped composite resin background specimens (4.0mm×8.0mm diameter) were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=5). These paired specimens were bonded using ten shades of resin cement (Variolink Veneer, shades LV-3, LV-2, MV, HV+2, HV+3; Panavia F, shades light and brown; and RelyX™ Veneer, shades WO, TR, A3). A spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade) was used to measure the color parameters (CIE L*a*b* values) of the paired disks before and after cementation. The color differences (ΔE values) after cementation were calculated and statistically analyzed by the One-way ANOVA (at the significant level pceramic disks were measured in terms of the increase in L* value, and the decrease in Cab(*) value after bonding with the resin cement. The ΔE values of ceramic disks after cementation ranged from 1.38 to 7.16. The ΔE values were more than 3.3 when the ceramic disks were cemented with resin cements in shade HV+3 (4.90) and shade WO (7.16). One-way ANOVA of ΔE values revealed significant differences in the resin cement shades. Resin cements can affect the final color of ceramic veneer restorations, and the extent of this effect varies according to the resin cement shades. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of the steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise-Flow versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and  bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise

  7. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise™Flow Self-Adhering Flowable Composite, Kerr Dental, USA versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self

  8. Thermally stimulated current spectra of binder resin powders for copiers: Correction for thermal shrinkage of the sample powder compactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezakt, K.; Murata, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Thermally stimulated current (TSC) spectra observed under open- circuit condition for styrene- acrylic binder resin powder compactions for toners are corrected for their thermal shrinkage during TSC observation. For this binder resin, extrinsic current from motion of powder compactions with charges due to their thermal shrinkage was found to be much more effective than the sensitivity coefficient of a TSC measuring apparatus used. Particle size dependence of charge retention power of the resin powders was also examined by using this correction method and found that it decreased with decreasing their particle size.

  9. Kinetics of filtration of model crud with ion exchange resin bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Ishigure, K.; Fujita, N.

    1987-01-01

    A simple mathematical model is presented to depict the filtration mechanism of crud or colloidal particles in the ion exchange resin bed. In this model the filtration process is classified into four stages, corresponding to the increase in the deposited amounts of the particles on the surfaces of the resins during the filtration process. In the first stage, it is assumed that the adhesion of crud particles is mainly controlled by the electrokinetic interaction between the particle and the virgin surfaces of the resins, while in the third stage the crud particles interact with the particles already adsorbed in the resins. The second stage is a transient period between the first and third stages. In the final stage, the clogging effect becomes significant. At the first stage of filtration, the model explains the rapid decrease of filtration efficiency, which is a matter of great concern from the practical point of view. A comparison is made between the model and laboratory experiments, using monodispersed α-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles as model crud, and it is found that the proposed mechanism of filtration process seems quite reasonable

  10. Application of nanoemulsions in the regeneration of adsorbent polymeric resins; Emprego de nanoemulsoes na regeneracao de resinas polimericas adsorvedoras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Josane A.; Queiros, Yure G.C.; Vieira, Helida V.P.; Lucas, Elizabete F.; Mansur, Claudia R.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas. Lab. de Macromoleculas e Coloides na Industria de Petroleo], e-mails: josaneacosta@yahoo.com.br, yuregomes@ima.ufrj.br, elucas@ima.ufrj.br, celias@ima.ufrj.br

    2011-07-01

    In this work, the solbrax/water/polyoxyethylene nanoemulsions were produced under high pressure homogenizer (HPH). These systems presented droplets diameter ranging between 7 to 30 nm. The nanoemulsions were used in regeneration of a polymeric resin, which has been used in treatment of oily water. This resin was contaminated with different kinds of oils. The nanoemulsions presented high cleaning efficiency, above of 90% and its performance was higher than equivalent micellar systems. (author)

  11. Synthesis, Characterization and Applications of New Nonmetallic Photocatalysts -- Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin and Boron Carbon Oxynitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ting

    This thesis describes the synthesis, characterization and applications of two kinds of nonmetallic photocatalysts: resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) resin and boron carbon oxynitride (BCNO). Part I: Catalyst-free hydrothermal method was developed to synthesize RF resin. It started with a solution containing only resorcinol and formaldehyde. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) spectrometer and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The particle size (diameter: 100nm-4microm) of RF the spheres was controlled by changing the concentration of the reactants. With increasing particle size, visible light absorption of the product was also increased. These RF spheres could degrade Rhodamine B and generate OH radicals under visible light irradiation. Besides, highly concentrated starting reactants would form large macroporous gel instead of individual particles. This kind of gel could be easily shaped to dishes and tubes, which could be used in filtration and degradation of air pollutants. Part II: The BCNO was prepared by heating a mixture of boric acid, melamine and PEG in atmosphere. The optical properties of the products were measured by UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy with integrating sphere. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that all BCNO compounds had the turbostratic boron nitride (t-BN) structure. Meanwhile, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) were used to determine the chemical composition of the catalyst. The BCNO could be identified as t-BN with N atoms partly substituted by O and C atoms. The degree of substitution affected its photocatalytic properties. Perdew--Burke--Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange model was introduced to simulate the density of state (DOS) of BCNO using these supercells. Simulation results indicated that C and O substitution induced occupied impurity states in the gap region which modified the band

  12. Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of Conventional Resin Cement and Self-adhesive Resin Cement bonded to Lithium Disilicate: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anip K; Mohan, Dennis; Sunith, M; Mandokar, Rashmi B; Suprasidh, S; Rajan, Soumya

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the shear bond strengths of conventional resin cement and self-adhesive resin cement bonded to lithium disilicate. A total of 40 extracted human molar teeth were mounted in self-cure acrylic resin. Teeth were prepared to obtain flat occlusal surface. About 40 lithium disilicate specimens of dimension-10 mm in diameter and thickness of 2 mm-were fabricated using lost wax technique. The samples were divided into four groups: Groups I, II, III, and IV (n = 10). The specimens were surface treated with Monobond S silane coupling agent. Self-etching primer and bonding agent were applied on the bonding surface of the teeth in groups I and III. The specimens were bonded to the primed teeth with the Multilink N resin cement and subjected to the universal testing machine. The specimens were light-cured. Specimens in groups II and IV were luted to teeth using self-adhesive cement RelyX U100. The same force was applied over the specimen as mentioned above. Excess cement was removed, and light curing was done. The specimens in groups III and IV were subjected to thermocycling for 10,000 cycles at temperatures altering between 5°C and 55°C. The shear bond strengths of conventional resin cement and self-adhesive resin cement with lithium disilicate were tested before and after thermocycling. Results indicated that thermocycling has no significant effect on the bond strengths of conventional or self-adhesive resin cement. However, from the study, it is seen that conventional resin cement had a higher shear bond strength value than the self-adhesive resin cement. There was a significant difference between the average shear bond strength values of conventional resin cement (Multilink N) and self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100) when bonded to lithium disilicate disks, and thermocycling had no significant effect on the bond strength of conventional or self-adhesive resin cements. Among all-ceramic systems available, lithium disilicate materials

  13. Effective diameters and corresponding states of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, Fernando

    Effective hard-sphere diameters of fluids with purely repulsive interactions are derived from a generalized corresponding-states principle of Leland, Rowlinson and coworkers. Various alternative definitions are discussed and related. Virial expansions of the effective diameters and their corresponding volumes are obtained and compared with results of perturbation theory. Applications are made to inverse-power potentials, the repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones potential and hard spherocylinders and dumbells.

  14. Appendiceal diameter: CT versus sonographic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orscheln, Emily S. [University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Trout, Andrew T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Ultrasound and CT are the dominant imaging modalities for assessment of suspected pediatric appendicitis, and the most commonly applied diagnostic criterion for both modalities is appendiceal diameter. The classically described cut-off diameter for the diagnosis of appendicitis is 6 mm when using either imaging modality. To demonstrate the fallacy of using the same cut-off diameter for both CT and US in the diagnosis of appendicitis. We conducted a retrospective review of patients younger than 18 years who underwent both US and CT of the appendix within 24 h. The shortest transverse dimension of the appendix was measured at the level of the proximal, mid and distal appendix on US and CT images. We compared mean absolute difference in appendiceal diameter between US and CT, using the paired t-test. We reviewed exams of 155 children (58.7% female) with a mean age of 11.3 ± 4.2 years; 38 of the children (24.5%) were diagnosed with appendicitis. The average time interval between US and CT was 7.0 ± 5.4 h. Mean appendiceal diameter measured by CT was significantly larger than that measured by US in cases without appendicitis (5.3 ± 1.0 mm vs. 4.7 ± 1.1 mm, P < 0.0001) and in cases with appendicitis (8.3 ± 2.2 mm vs. 7.0 ± 2.0 mm, P < 0.0001). Mean absolute diameter difference at any location along the appendix was 1.3-1.4 mm in normal appendices and 2 mm in cases of appendicitis. Measured appendiceal diameter differs between US and CT by 1-2 mm, calling into question use of the same diameter cut-off (6 mm) for both modalities for the diagnosis of appendicitis. (orig.)

  15. Bijective Diameters of Gene Tree Parsimony Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorecki, Pawel; Eulenstein, Oliver

    2017-08-04

    Synthesizing median trees from a collection of gene trees under the biologically motivated gene tree parsimony (GTP) costs has provided credible species tree estimates. GTP costs are defined for each of the classic evolutionary processes. These costs count the minimum number of events necessary to reconcile the gene tree with the species tree where the leaf-genes are mapped to the leaf-species through a function called labeling. To better understand the synthesis of median trees under these costs there is an increased interest in analyzing their diameters. The diameters of a GTP cost between a gene tree and a species tree are the maximum values of this cost of one or both topologies of the trees involved. We are concerned about the diameters of the GTP costs under bijective labelings. While these diameters are linear time computable for the gene duplication and deep coalescence costs, this has been unknown for the classic gene duplication and loss, and for the loss cost. For the first time, we show how to compute these diameters and proof that this can be achieved in linear time, and thus, completing the computational time analysis for all of the bijective diameters under the GTP costs.

  16. Auxin and ethylene regulation of diameter growth in trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savidge, R A

    1988-12-01

    Recent studies on the phytohormonal regulation of seasonal cell-division activity in the cambium, primary-wall radial expansion of cambial derivatives, differentiation of xylem cells, and growth of the cortex in forest trees of the north temperate zone are reviewed. Indol-3-ylacetic acid (IAA, auxin) has been characterized by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in the cambial region of Abies balsamea, Pinus densiflora, Pinus sylvestris and Quercus robur. All of the evidence supports the hypothesis that developing leaves and extending shoots are primary sources of IAA. The rate of ethylene emanation varies among conifer species when adjoining phloem and cambial tissues are incubated in vitro. The cambium from young cuttings of Abies balsamea produces more ethylene than that from older cuttings. Ethylene production by seven-year-old Abies balsamea cambium is substantially increased in vitro when the tissue is provided with exogenous 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and IAA. In response to elevated ethylene concentrations, cortex growth is accelerated in both hardwood and conifer seedlings. Ethrel (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid) increases ray size and ray-cell number and promotes traumatic resin-canal development in xylem. In Ulmus americana, endogenous ethylene concentrations are inversely correlated with cambial activity. Ethylene decreases vessel diameter in Acer negundo, Acer platanoides and Ulmus americana. Several studies suggest that ethylene has a role in regulating reaction-wood formation in both conifers and hardwoods.

  17. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  18. Profile of Fluoride Release from a Nanohybrid Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Assed Bezerra Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the amount and profile of fluoride release from a fluoride-containing nanohybrid composite resin (Tetric® N-Ceram by direct potentiometry. Thirty specimens (5 mm diameter x 3 mm high; n=10/material were made of Tetric® N-Ceram, Vitremer® resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (positive control or Filtek® Z350 nanofill composite resin (negative control. The specimens were stored individually in plastic tubes containing 1 mL of artificial saliva at 37°C, which was daily renewed during 15 days. At each renewal of saliva, the amount of fluoride ions released in the solution was measured using a fluoride ion-selective electrode with ion analyzer, and the values obtained in mV were converted to ppm (µg/mL. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test at a significance level of 5%. The results showed that the resins Tetric® N-Ceram and Filtek® Z350 did not release significant amounts of fluoride during the whole period of evaluation (p>0.05. Only Vitremer® released significant amounts of fluoride ions during the 15 days of the experiment, with greater release in first 2 days (p0.05. In conclusion, the nanohybrid composite resin Tetric® N-Ceram did not present in vitro fluoride-releasing capacity throughout the 15 days of study.

  19. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Asefi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow, Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists. A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  20. Brightness calibrates particle size in single particle fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihe; Sun, Zezhou; Di, Weihua; Qin, Weiping; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-04-01

    This Letter provides a novel approach to quantify the particle sizes of highly bright semiconductor polymer dots (Pdots) for single-particle imaging and photobleaching studies. A quadratic dependence of single-particle brightness on particle size was determined by single-particle fluorescence imaging and intensity statistics. In terms of the same imaging conditions, the particle diameter can be quantified by comparing the individual brightness intensity with associated calibration curve. Based on this sizing method, photobleaching trajectories and overall photon counts emitted by single particles were analyzed. It is found that photobleaching rate constants of different sized Pdots are not strongly dependent on particle diameter except the sparsely occurring fluorescence blinking in certain dim particles and the rapid photobleaching component in some bright particles. The overall photon counts increase with increasing particle diameter. However, those larger than 30 nm deviate away from the increasing tendency. These results reveal the significance of selecting appropriate Pdots (≤30  nm) for single-particle imaging and tracking applications.

  1. Rheological properties of flowable resin composites and pit and fissure sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beun, Sébastien; Bailly, Christian; Devaux, Jacques; Leloup, Gaëtane

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the viscoelastic properties of commercially available flowable resin composites and resin-based pit and fissure sealants. The weight percentage of filler particles and the morphology of the filler particles were also investigated. Eight flowable resin composites (Admira Flow, Filtek Flow, FlowLine, Grandio Flow, Point-4 Flowable, Revolution Formula 2, Tetric Flow and X-Flow) and four pit and fissure sealants (Clinpro, Delton FS+, Estiseal F and Guardian Seal) were tested. Rheological measurements were performed using a dynamic oscillation rheometer. The filler weight content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the morphology of the particles was investigated by scanning-electron microscopy (SEM). Flowable resin composites are non-Newtonian, shear-thinning materials. As the shear rate increased, the complex viscosity decreased drastically. They all showed elasticity even at the lowest frequencies. They also all showed thixotropy. Pit and fissure sealants are non-Newtonian, very low-viscosity fluids. No correlation was found between the rheological properties and the filler weight content or the particles' shape. Huge differences are observed in the viscosity and flow characteristics of flowable resin composites that can have a potential influence on their clinical behavior during handling and thus on their clinical indications. Pit and fissure sealants show very different rheological properties from one another.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of resorcinol-formaldehyde resin chars doped by zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gun'ko, Vladimir M.; Bogatyrov, Viktor M.; Oranska, Olena I.; Urubkov, Iliya V.; Leboda, Roman; Charmas, Barbara; Skubiszewska-Zięba, Jadwiga

    2014-06-01

    Polycondensation polymerization of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) mixtures in water with addition of different amounts of zinc acetate and then carbonization of dried gels are studied to prepare ZnO doped chars. Zinc acetate as a catalyst of resorcinol-formaldehyde polycondensation affects structural features of the RF resin (RFR) and, therefore, the texture of chars prepared from Zn-doped RFR. The ZnO doped chars are characterized using thermogravimetry, low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). At a relatively high content of zinc acetate (1 mol per 10-40 mol of resorcinol) in the reaction mixture, the formation of crystallites of ZnO (zincite) occurs in a shape of straight nanorods of 20-130 nm in diameter and 1-3 μm in length. At a small content of zinc acetate (1 mol per 100-500 mol of resorcinol), ZnO in composites is XRD amorphous and does not form individual particles. The ZnO doped chars are pure nanoporous at a minimal ZnO content and nano-mesoporous or nano-meso-macroporous at a higher ZnO content.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of resorcinol–formaldehyde resin chars doped by zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gun’ko, Vladimir M., E-mail: vlad_gunko@ukr.net [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Bogatyrov, Viktor M.; Oranska, Olena I. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Urubkov, Iliya V. [Kurdyumov Institute of Metal Physics, 36 Vernadsky Boulevard, 03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Leboda, Roman; Charmas, Barbara; Skubiszewska-Zięba, Jadwiga [Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, 20031 Lublin (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Polycondensation polymerization of resorcinol–formaldehyde (RF) mixtures in water with addition of different amounts of zinc acetate and then carbonization of dried gels are studied to prepare ZnO doped chars. Zinc acetate as a catalyst of resorcinol–formaldehyde polycondensation affects structural features of the RF resin (RFR) and, therefore, the texture of chars prepared from Zn-doped RFR. The ZnO doped chars are characterized using thermogravimetry, low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). At a relatively high content of zinc acetate (1 mol per 10–40 mol of resorcinol) in the reaction mixture, the formation of crystallites of ZnO (zincite) occurs in a shape of straight nanorods of 20–130 nm in diameter and 1–3 μm in length. At a small content of zinc acetate (1 mol per 100–500 mol of resorcinol), ZnO in composites is XRD amorphous and does not form individual particles. The ZnO doped chars are pure nanoporous at a minimal ZnO content and nano-mesoporous or nano-meso-macroporous at a higher ZnO content.

  4. Large-diameter carbon-composite monofilaments. [production method and characteristics of carbon composite monofilaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, W. G.; Pinoli, P. C.; Karlak, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Large-diameter carbon composite monofilaments with high strength and high modulus were produced by pregging multifiber carbon bundles with suitable organic resins and pyrolysing them together. Two approaches were developed to increase the utilization of fiber tensile strength by minimizing stress concentration defects induced by dissimilar shrinkage during pyrolysis. These were matrix modification to improve char yield and strain-to-failure and fiber-matrix copyrolysis to alleviate matrix cracking. Highest tensile strength and modulus were obtained by heat treatments to 2873 K to match fiber and matrix strain-to-failure and develop maximum monofilament tensile-strength and elastic modulus.

  5. Catalyst and its diameter dependent growth kinetics of CVD grown GaN nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Chandan; Chander, D. Sathish; Ramkumar, J.; Dhamodaran, S.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: GaN nanowires with controlled diameter and aspect ratio has been grown using a simple CVD technique. The growth kinetics of CVD grown nanowires investigated in detail for different catalysts and their diameters. A critical diameter important to distinguish the growth regimes has been discussed in detail. The results are important which demonstrates the growth of diameter and aspect ratio controlled GaN nanowires and also understand their growth kinetics. Highlights: ► Controlled diameter and aspect ratio of GaN nanowires achieved in simple CVD reactor. ► Nanowire growth kinetics for different catalyst and its diameters were understood. ► Adatoms vapor pressure inside reactor plays a crucial role in growth kinetics. ► Diffusion along nanowire sidewalls dominate for gold and nickel catalysts. ► Gibbs–Thomson effect dominates for palladium catalyst. -- Abstract: GaN nanowires were grown using chemical vapor deposition with controlled aspect ratio. The catalyst and catalyst-diameter dependent growth kinetics is investigated in detail. We first discuss gold catalyst diameter dependent growth kinetics and subsequently compare with nickel and palladium catalyst. For different diameters of gold catalyst there was hardly any variation in the length of the nanowires but for other catalysts with different diameter a strong length variation of the nanowires was observed. We calculated the critical diameter dependence on adatoms pressure inside the reactor and inside the catalytic particle. This gives an increasing trend in critical diameter as per the order gold, nickel and palladium for the current set of experimental conditions. Based on the critical diameter, with gold and nickel catalyst the nanowire growth was understood to be governed by limited surface diffusion of adatoms and by Gibbs–Thomson effect for the palladium catalyst.

  6. Analysis of Natural Graphite, Synthetic Graphite, and Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compact Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacting process involved overcoating TRISO particles and compacting them in a steel die. The overcoating step is the process of applying matrix to the OPyC layer of TRISO particles in a rotating drum in order to build up an overcoat layer of desired thickness. The matrix used in overcoating is a mixture of natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and thermosetting resin in the ratio, by weight, of 64:16:20. A wet mixing process was used for AGR-1 and AGR-2, in that the graphites and resin were mixed in the presence of ethyl alcohol. The goal of the wet mixing process was to 'resinate' the graphite particles, or coat each individual graphite particle with a thin layer of resin. This matrix production process was similar to the German, Chinese, Japanese, and South African methods, which also use various amount of solvent during mixing. See Appendix 1 for information on these countries matrix production techniques. The resin used for AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by Hexion, specifically Hexion grade Durite SC1008. Durite SC1008 is a solvated (liquid) resole phenolic resin. A resole resin does not typically have a hardening agent added. The major constituent of SC1008 is phenol, with minor amounts of formaldehyde. Durite SC1008 is high viscosity, so additional ethyl alcohol was added during matrix production in order to reduce its viscosity and enhance graphite particle resination. The current compacting scale up plan departs from a wet mixing process. The matrix production method specified in the scale up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered phenolic resin and graphite are all fed into a jet mill at the same time. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. The jet milling/mixing process requires that a suite of solid or powdered resins be investigated. The synthetic graphite used in AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by SGL Carbon, grade KRB2000. KRB

  7. I-V characteristic and mechanism of carbon black filled epoxy resin matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoyong; Li, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2007-07-01

    The I-V characteristic of the epoxy resin matrix composites containing conductive carbon black (CB) and sprayed CB is experimentally studied. The test results indicate that the I-V characteristic of the CB filled epoxy resin matrix composites is affected by the CB diameter. The composites containing sprayed CB with the diameter of 123nm have a linear relation between current and voltage and no variation in resistance post-exposed to an electric field. However, the composites containing conductive CB with the diameter of 33nm have a nonlinear I-V characteristic and the resistance of the composites post-exposed to an electric field decreases dramatically. A DC circuit model based on the experimental research is proposed. The occurrence of the electrical breakdown induces the nonlinear I-V characteristic and the dramatic decrease of the electrical resistance of the composites post-exposed to an electric field.

  8. Resin technologies: construction and staining of resin TMA's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howat, William J; Wilson, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    The traditional formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, and therefore the tissue microarrays created from it, provide good morphology but with a compromised antigenicity when compared to frozen tissue. In contrast, while solving the issue of antigenicity, frozen tissue suffers from a lack of morphology. We have demonstrated that tissue microarrays constructed in glycol methacrylate resin, when combined with a cold acetone fixation step, have been able to combine the superior morphology of resin-embedded sections with the superior antigenicity of frozen tissue for prospectively collected material.

  9. Directed growth of diameter-tunable nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozturk, Birol; Talukdar, Ishan; Flanders, Bret N [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, 145 Physical Sciences II, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2007-09-12

    This study characterizes a method for controlling the nanowire diameter in the directed electrochemical nanowire assembly technique, where alternating voltages applied to electrodes in simple salt solutions induce the crystallization of metallic wires. Dendritic solidification is identified as an important component of this technique. A characteristic of dendritic solidification is that the growth velocity and tip radius are anti-correlated. This relationship is exploited here to realize diameter-tunable nanowire growth. The experimental parameter that provides this control is {omega}, the frequency of the alternating voltage. Increasing {omega} effectively steepens the metal cation concentration gradient at the wire-solution interface, thereby increasing the growth velocity of the wire. For indium wires, increasing {omega} from 0.5 to 3.5 MHz increases their growth velocity from 11 to 78 {mu}m s{sup -1} and reduces their diameter from 770 to 114 nm. Gold wires exhibit diameter-tunability that ranges from 150 nm to 45 nm. Thus, it is possible to tune the wire diameter from the microscale down to the nanoscale. Moreover, this control is a consequence of non-stationary dendritic growth, which distinguishes this process from most previously studied examples of dendritic solidification.

  10. Special Resins for Stereolithography: In Situ Generation of Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Taormina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The limited availability of materials with special properties represents one of the main limitations to a wider application of polymer-based additive manufacturing technologies. Filled resins are usually not suitable for vat photo-polymerization techniques such as stereolithography (SLA or digital light processing (DLP due to a strong increment of viscosity derived from the presence of rigid particles within the reactive suspension. In the present paper, the possibility to in situ generate silver nanoparticles (AgNPs starting from a homogeneous liquid system containing a well dispersed silver salt, which is subsequently reduced to metallic silver during stereolithographic process, is reported. The simultaneous photo-induced cross-linking of the acrylic resin produces a filled thermoset resin with thermal-mechanical properties significantly enhanced with respect to the unfilled resin, even at very low AgNPs concentrations. With this approach, the use of silver salts having carbon-carbon double bonds, such as silver acrylate and silver methacrylate, allows the formation of a nanocomposite structure in which the release of by-products is minimized due to the active role of all the reactive components in the three dimensional (3D-printing processes. The synergy, between this nano-technology and the geometrical freedom offered by SLA, could open up a wide spectrum of potential applications for such a material, for example in the field of food packaging and medical and healthcare sectors, considering the well-known antimicrobial effects of silver nanoparticles.

  11. Epoxy Resins in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Henry

    1960-01-01

    A method of embedding biological specimens in araldite 502 (Ciba) has been developed for materials available in the United States. Araldite-embedded tissues are suitable for electron microscopy, but the cutting qualities of the resin necessitates more than routine attention during microtomy. The rather high viscosity of araldite 502 also seems to be an unnecessary handicap. The less viscous epoxy epon 812 (Shell) produces specimens with improved cutting qualities, and has several features—low shrinkage and absence of specimen damage during cure, minimal compression of sections, relative absence of electron beam-induced section damage, etc.—which recommends it as a routine embedding material. The hardness of the cured resin can be easily adjusted by several methods to suit the materials embedded in it. Several problems and advantages of working with sections of epoxy resins are also discussed. PMID:13822825

  12. Stress analysis in bone tissue around single implants with different diameters and veneering materials: a 3-D finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution on bone tissue with a single prosthesis supported by implants of large and conventional diameter and presenting different veneering materials using the 3-D finite element method. Sixteen models were fabricated to reproduce a bone block with implants, using two diameters (3.75×10 mm and 5.00×10 mm), four different veneering materials (composite resin, acrylic resin, porcelain, and NiCr crown), and two loads (axial (200 N) and oblique (100 N)). For data analysis, the maximum principal stress and von Mises criterion were used. For the axial load, the cortical bone in all models did not exhibit significant differences, and the trabecular bone presented higher tensile stress with reduced implant diameter. For the oblique load, the cortical bone presented a significant increase in tensile stress on the same side as the loading for smaller implant diameters. The trabecular bone showed a similar but more discreet trend. There was no difference in bone tissue with different veneering materials. The veneering material did not influence the stress distribution in the supporting tissues of single implant-supported prostheses. The large-diameter implants improved the transference of occlusal loads to bone tissue and decreased stress mainly under oblique loads. Oblique loading was more detrimental to distribution stresses than axial loading. © 2013.

  13. Process for Molding Nonreinforced (Neat) Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Void free moldings obtained for neat, condensation, thermosetting resins. Thermally and mechanically treat resin prior to molding to reduce amount of volatiles. With volatiles reduced molding temperature and pressure are applied in way to drive out remaining volatiles during molding.

  14. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used...

  15. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship between chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)

  16. Production of renewable phenolic resins by thermochemical conversion of biomass: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Effendi, A.; Gerhauser, H.; Bridgwater, A.V. [Bio-Energy Research Group, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    This review covers the production and utilisation of liquids from the thermal processing of biomass and related materials to substitute for synthetic phenol and formaldehyde in phenol formaldehyde resins. These resins are primarily employed in the manufacture of wood panels such as plywood, MDF, particle-board and OSB. The most important thermal conversion methods for this purpose are fast pyrolysis and vacuum pyrolysis, pressure liquefaction and phenolysis. Many feedstocks have been tested for their suitability as sources of phenolics including hard and softwoods, bark and residual lignins. Resins have been prepared utilising either the whole liquid product, or a phenolics enriched fraction obtained after fractional condensation or further processing, such as solvent extraction. None of the phenolics production and fractionation techniques covered in this review are believed to allow substitution of 100% of the phenol content of the resin without impacting its effectiveness compared to commercial formulations based on petroleum derived phenol. This survey shows that considerable progress has been made towards reaching the goal of a price competitive renewable resin, but that further research is required to meet the twin challenges of low renewable resin cost and satisfactory quality requirements. Particular areas of concern are wood panel press times, variability of renewable resin properties, odour, lack of reactive sites compared to phenol and potential for increased emissions of volatile organic compounds. (author)

  17. Method for loading resin beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Rainey, R.H.; Greene, C.W.; Shockley, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145 to 200 0 C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145 0 C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO 3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate

  18. Uranium sorption by tannin resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares Rieumont, S.; Martinez Luzardo, J.; Torres Hernandez, J.; Lima Cazorla, D. de la Rosa.

    1998-01-01

    The sorption of uranium by immobilised Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. and Lysiloma latisiliqua L tannins was investigated. Immobilization condition were analyzed. These resins resulted suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. At pH 5.5 maximum in sorption capacity is registered. The presence of appreciable amount of sodium chloride do not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these that could be found in sea water and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. Tannin resins can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity

  19. Inlet Diameter and Flow Volume Effects on Separation and Energy Efficiency of Hydrocyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikli, Ş.; Olcay, A. B.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates hydrocyclone performance of an oil injected screw compressor. Especially, the oil separation efficiency of a screw compressor plays a significant role for air quality and non-stop working hour of compressors has become an important issue when the efficiency in energy is considered. In this study, two separation efficiency parameters were selected to be hydrocyclone inlet diameter and flow volume height between oil reservoir surface and top of the hydrocyclone. Nine different cases were studied in which cyclone inlet diameter and flow volume height between oil reservoir surface and top were investigated in regards to separation and energy performance aspects and the effect of the parameters on the general performance appears to be causing powerful influence. Flow inside the hydrocyclone geometry was modelled by Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) and hydro particles were tracked by Discrete Phase Model (DPM). Besides, particle break up was modelled by the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model. The reversed vortex generation was observed at different planes. The upper limit of the inlet diameter of the cyclone yields the centrifugal force on particles to decrease while the flow becomes slower; and the larger diameter implies slower flow. On the contrary, the lower limit is increment in speed causes breakup problems that the particle diameters become smaller; consequently, it is harder to separate them from gas.

  20. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  1. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  2. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  3. Development of metal-resin composite for dental magnet keepers, Part 2: Optimum 4-META content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Hiroko; Miyagawa, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Six kinds of experimental magnetic resin composites containing SUS447J1 stainless steel particles as filler were prepared. UDMA/MAA resin with an MAA mole fraction of 0.67 was used as the matrix resin. The effects of six levels of 4-META content (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 mass%) on the setting and flexural properties were studied. The metal filler content in each paste was 90 mass%. Although working time and setting time significantly diminished with the increase of the BPO and DMPT contents, both working time and setting time satisfied the ISO 4049 requirements for all experimental levels. Flexural strength and elastic modules significantly improved with the increase of 4-META content up to 10%. The optimum 4-META content necessary to develop better composite resins for magnetic attachment has been clarified.

  4. Radiation curing of γ-Al2O3 filled epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Kim, Dong Jin; Nho, Young Chang

    2003-01-01

    Epoxy resins are widely utilized as high performance thermosetting resins for many industrial applications but characterized by a relatively low toughness. Recently, the incorporation with rigid inorganic was suggested to improve the mechanical properties of epoxy resins. In the present work, an attempt has been taken to disperse nano-sized γ- Al 2 O 3 particles into diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy resins for improvement of the mechanical properties. These hybrid epoxy-alumina composites were prepared using by the γ-ray curing technique that was conducted with 100kGy under nitrogen at room temperature. The composites were characterized by determining gel content, UTM (Instron model 4443), SEM, FT-IR studies

  5. Comparison of impact strength of acrylic resin reinforced with kevlar and polyethylene fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, G; Bhargava, K

    2002-01-01

    The present study was done to evaluate the impact strengths of heat-activated acrylic resins reinforced with Kevlar fibres, polyethylene fibres and unreinforced heat activated acrylic resin. Each of three groups had 25 specimens. Brass rods of uniform length of 40 mm and diameter of 8 mm were used to prepare the moulds. A combination of long fibres (40 mm length) and short fibres (6 mm length) were used. The total amount of fibres incorporated was limited to 2% by weight of the resin matrix. Short and long fibres of equal weight were incorporated. The short fibres were mixed with polymer and monomer and packed into the mould, while, the long axis of the specimen, perpendicular to the applied force. The specimens were then processed. Impact strength testing was done on Hounsfield's impact testing machine. Kevlar fibre reinforced heat activated acrylic resin specimens recorded higher mean impact strength of 0.8464 Joules, while polyethylene fibres reinforced heat activated acrylic resin recorded mean impact strength of 0.7596 joules. The unreinforced heat activated acrylic resin recorded mean impact strength of 0.3440 Joules.

  6. Effect of bench time polymerization on depth of cure of dental composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, K.; Yudhit, A.; Sari, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of bench time before light cured polymerization on the depth of cure of dental composite resin. Nanofiller composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT,3M, ESPE,China) was used in this study. Sixty samples of nanofiller composite resin were made and divided into control and test groups with bench time for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. For the test group, composite resins were stored in refrigerator with 4°C temperatures. Meanwhile, for the control groups, the composite resin was stored at room temperature. The samples were prepared using metal mould with size diameter of 6 mm and 4 mm in thickness. Samples were cured for 20 s by using visible blue light curing unit. Part of samples that unpolymerized were removed by using a plastic spatula. The remaining parts of samples were measured by digital caliper and noted as depth of cure (mm). Data were analyzed to one-way ANOVA and LSD tests (p≤0.05). Results showed there was no significance differences between test groups (p=0.5). A 60 minutes bench time group showed the highest depth of cure value among test group, and it was almost similar with control group value. It can be concluded that longer bench time can increase the depth of cure of composite resin.

  7. Height - Diameter predictive equations for Rubber (Hevea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BUKOLA

    The importance of calibrating models on height-diameter relationship can never be over emphasized in predicting mean ... parameters that variously important in forest growth modeling and many sustainable forest management options(e.g., Van ..... Natural forest Ecosystem, southwest Nigeria. Research Journal of Forestry ...

  8. Liquid-vapor rectilinear diameter revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrabos, Y.; Lecoutre, C.; Marre, S.; Beysens, D.; Hahn, I.

    2018-02-01

    In the modern theory of critical phenomena, the liquid-vapor density diameter in simple fluids is generally expected to deviate from a rectilinear law approaching the critical point. However, by performing precise scannerlike optical measurements of the position of the SF6 liquid-vapor meniscus, in an approach much closer to criticality in temperature and density than earlier measurements, no deviation from a rectilinear diameter can be detected. The observed meniscus position from far (10 K ) to extremely close (1 mK ) to the critical temperature is analyzed using recent theoretical models to predict the complete scaling consequences of a fluid asymmetry. The temperature dependence of the meniscus position appears consistent with the law of rectilinear diameter. The apparent absence of the critical hook in SF6 therefore seemingly rules out the need for the pressure scaling field contribution in the complete scaling theoretical framework in this SF6 analysis. More generally, this work suggests a way to clarify the experimental ambiguities in the simple fluids for the near-critical singularities in the density diameter.

  9. Maximum Diameter of Impacting Liquid Droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, N.; de Bruin, K.G.; Bartolo, D.; Josserand, C.; Bonn, D.

    2014-01-01

    The maximum diameter a droplet that impacts on a surface will attain is the subject of controversy, notably for high-velocity impacts of low-viscosity liquids such as water or blood. We study the impact of droplets of simple liquids of different viscosities, and a shear-thinning complex fluid

  10. Photoacoustic determination of blood vessel diameter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Klaessens, John H.G.M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Hopman, Jeroen C.W.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Thijssen, Johan M.; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2004-01-01

    A double-ring sensor was applied in photoacoustic tomographic imaging of artificial blood vessels as well as blood vessels in a rabbit ear. The peak-topeak time (τ pp) of the laser (1064 nm) induced pressure transient was used to estimate the axial vessel diameter. Comparison with the actual vessel

  11. Diameter preserving linear maps and isometries, II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study linear bijections of simplex spaces A ( S ) which preserve the diameter of the range, that is, the seminorm ϱ ( f ) = sup { | f ( x ) − f ( y ) | : x , y ∈ S } . Author Affiliations. Félix Cabello Sánchez1. Departamento de Matemáticas, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas 06071- Badajoz, Spain. Dates. Manuscript ...

  12. Transient magnetic birefringence for determining magnetic nanoparticle diameters in dense, highly light scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köber, Mariana; Moros, Maria; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M.; Luna, Mónica; Briones, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    The increasing use of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications calls for further development of characterization tools that allow for determining the interactions of the nanoparticles with the biological medium in situ. In cell-incubating conditions, for example, nanoparticles may aggregate and serum proteins adsorb on the particles, altering the nanoparticles’ performance and their interaction with cell membranes. In this work we show that the aggregation of spherical magnetite nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity in dense, highly light scattering media by making use of magnetically induced birefringence. Moreover, the hydrodynamic particle diameter distribution of anisometric nanoparticle aggregates can be determined directly in these media by monitoring the relaxation time of the magnetically induced birefringence. As a proof of concept, we performed measurements on nanoparticles included in an agarose gel, which scatters light in a similar way as a more complex biological medium but where particle-matrix interactions are weak. Magnetite nanoparticles were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the hydrodynamic diameter distribution was determined in situ. For the different particle functionalizations and agarose concentrations tested, we could show that gel electrophoresis did not yield a complete separation of monomers and small aggregates, and that the electrophoretic mobility of the aggregates decreased linearly with the hydrodynamic diameter. Furthermore, the rotational particle diffusion was not clearly affected by nanoparticle-gel interactions. The possibility to detect nanoparticle aggregates and their hydrodynamic diameters in complex scattering media like cell tissue makes transient magnetic birefringence an interesting technique for biological applications.

  13. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution — ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  14. Hygroscopic expansion kinetics of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrahlah, A; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the extent and rate of hygroscopic expansion of resin composites at 37°C. Eight resin composites were examined: 1 micro-hybrid (Bright Light(®)), 5 nano-hybrids (Experimental Vertise™; Nanoceram-Bright(®); Tetric EvoCeram(®); Grandio(®) SO; Ceram X™ duo) and 2 flowables (X-tra base; Venus(®) Diamond Flow). Five disks (15 mm×2 mm) of each material were prepared. The mean change in specimen diameter was recorded by a custom-built non-contact laser micrometer. Specimens were initially measured dry and then at fixed time intervals, over 150 days, after storage in distilled water at 37±1°C. Data were re-expressed in volumetric terms and analysed by repeated measures ANOVA, one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (α=0.05). The volumetric hygroscopic expansion ranged from 0.58 to 2.26 and can be considered in three bands. First, Experimental Vertise had the highest expansion (pGrandio So, Nanoceram-Bright and X-tra base, with no significant difference between them. For the size (2mm thickness) and shape of specimen measured, equilibrium was attained in all cases by 60 days. Within this set of resin-composites the equilibrium expansion varied by almost 400% of the lowest material. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. MWCNTs/Resin Nanocomposites: Structural, Thermal, Mechanical and Dielectric Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Alexopoulos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were manufactured, characterized and added to a typical aeronautical resin matrix at different concentrations as nano-reinforcement. The carbon content of produced MWCNTs was determined to be around 98.5% while they consisted of 13-20 wall-layers and their external diameter had an average size in between 20 and 50 nm. MWCNTs were dispersed in an epoxy resin system and tensile specimens for different MWCNTs concentrations were prepared in an open mould. Electrical wiring was attached to the specimens’ surface and surface electrical resistance change was in-situ monitored during monotonic tension till fracture. Performed tensile tests showed that the MWCNTs addition increased both modulus of elasticity and ultimate tensile strength on the nano-composites with a simultaneously dramatic ductility decrease. The MWCNTs addition enhanced the investigated resin matrix with monitoring ability; electrical resistance change of the investigated tensile tests was correlated in the elastic regime with axial nominal strain and the gauge factor of the different MWCNTs concentration specimens were calculated. It was found that lowest MWCNTs concentration gave the best results in terms of piezo-resistivity and simultaneously the least enhancement in the mechanical properties.

  16. Elution of monomer from different bulk fill dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Mehmet Ata; Cebe, Fatma; Cengiz, Mehmet Fatih; Cetin, Ali Rıza; Arpag, Osman Fatih; Ozturk, Bora

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the elution of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, HEMA, and Bis-EMA monomers from six bulk fill composite resins over four different time periods, using HPLC. Six different composite resin materials were used in the present study: Tetric Evo Ceram Bulk Fill (Ivoclar Vivadent, Amherst, NY), X-tra Fill (VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany), Sonic Fill (Kerr, Orange, CA, USA), Filtek Bulk Fill (3M ESPE Dental Product, St. Paul, MN), SDR (Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany), EQUIA (GC America INC, Alsip, IL). The samples (4mm thickness, 5mm diameter) were prepared and polymerized for 20s with a light emitted diode unit. After fabrication, each sample was immediately immersed in 75wt% ethanol/water solution used as extraction fluid and stored in the amber colored bottles at room temperature. Ethanol/water samples were taken (0.5mL) at predefined time intervals:10m (T1), 1h (T2), 24h (T3) and 30 days (T4). These samples were analyzed by HPLC. The obtained data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD at significance level of pcomposites (pcomposite resins in all time periods and the amount of eluted monomers was increased with time. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser application on the micropush-out bond strength of fiber posts to resin core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Cengiz, Esra; Ozan, Oguz; Ramoglu, Serhat; Yilmaz, Hasan Guney

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, and garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser application to different surface treatments on the micropush-out bond strengths between glass and quartz fiber posts and composite resin core material. Different types of lasers have been used as an alternative to airborne particle abrasion and other surface treatment methods to enhance the bond strength of dental materials. However, there is no study regarding the use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser as a surface treatment method for fiber posts in order to improve the bond strength. Ninety-six quartz and 96 glass fiber posts with a coronal diameter of 1.8 mm were randomly divided into eight groups according the surface treatments applied. Gr 1 (control, no surface treatment), Gr 2 (sandblasting with 50 μm Al2O3), Gr 3 (9 % hydrofluoric acid for 1 min), Gr 4 (24% H2O2 for 1 min), Gr 5 (CH2Cl2 for 1 min), Gr 6 (1 W), Gr 7 (1.5 W), and Gr 8 (2 W) Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation. The resin core material was applied to each group, and then 1 mm thick discs (n=12) were obtained for the micropush-out test. Data were statistically analyzed. For the quartz fiber post group, all surface treatments showed significantly higher micropush-out bond strengths than the control group (pmaterial. However, the hydroflouric acid group showed the lowest bond strength values. The type of post and surface treatment might affect the bond strength between fiber posts and resin core material; 1 W and 1.5 W Er,Cr:YSGG laser application improved adhesion at the post/core interface.

  18. Diterpene resin acids in conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2006-11-01

    Diterpene resin acids are a significant component of conifer oleoresin, which is a viscous mixture of terpenoids present constitutively or inducibly upon herbivore or pathogen attack and comprises one form of chemical resistance to such attacks. This review focuses on the recent discoveries in the chemistry, biosynthesis, molecular biology, regulation, and biology of these compounds in conifers.

  19. Occupational exposure to epoxy resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Kersting, K.

    2014-01-01

    Products based on epoxy resins as a binder have become popular in various settings, among which the construction industry and in windmill blade production, as a result of their excellent technical properties. However, due to the same properties epoxy products are a notorious cause of allergic skin

  20. Effect of placement of calcium sulphate when used for the repair of furcation perforations on the seal produced by a resin-based material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, L; Liu, J; Yin, S-H; Tan, J; Wang, F-M; Li, W; Xue, J

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the sealing ability of calcium sulphate when used under composite resin for the repair of furcation perforations having different diameters. Perforations of different diameter were created in the floors of pulp chambers in 60 extracted human molar teeth with either a number 3 (1 mm diameter) or 5 (1.5 mm diameter) round bur. The specimens of each group were divided into four sub-groups which were repaired with composite resin either alone or in combination with calcium sulphate that created an artificial floor (15 teeth group(-1)). Eight teeth without furcation perforations served as negative controls. In the leakage detection device, 1 mol L(-1) glucose solution was forced under a pressure of 1.5 KPa from the crown towards the pulp chamber floor. The concentration of leaked glucose was measured at 1, 2, 4, 7, 10, 15 and 20 days using a glucose oxidase method and the data evaluated using the rank sum test. The specimens with larger perforations repaired with composite resin alone had significantly more leakage (P resin, leakage in smaller perforations was markedly lower than that in larger ones (P resin alone (P > 0.05). Calcium sulphate significantly improved the sealing ability of 1 mm perforations repaired with composite resin but not for 1.5 mm perforations.

  1. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2018-01-09

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer material, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  2. Precisely controlled resorcinol-formaldehyde resin coating for fabricating core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Shengjie; Zang, Jun; Xu, Chaofa; Zheng, Ming-Sen; Dong, Quan-Feng; Sun, Daohua; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2013-08-07

    This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic spheres are promising catalyst supports for oxygen reduction reaction. And yolk-shell structured Au@HCS nanoreactors with ultrathin shells exhibit high catalytic activity and recyclability in confined catalysis.

  3. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  4. Mechanical and Magnetic Properties of YBCO Superconductor with Bi/CNT Composite and Resin/CNT Impregnation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, W. S.; Jang, G. E. [Dept. of Advaned Materials Enginnering, Chungbuk National Uniersity, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Y. H.; Sung, T. H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    Bi/CNT composite and resin/CNT were chosen to improve the mechanical properties of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}(YBCO) superconductor. In order to elucidate the effects of Bi/CNT composite and resin/CNT in YBCO superconductors, melt texture superconductor were impregnated by mixed compound of Bi and CNT into the artificial holes parallel to the c-axis, which were drilled on the YBCO superconductor. Various amount of Bi/CNT and resin/CNT were impregnated to YBCO superconductor with different holes diameters. Typical artificial holes diameters were 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0 mm respectively. Result of three-point bending test measurement, the bending strength with resin/CNT impregnation was improved up to 59.64 MPa as compared with 50.79 MPa of resin/CNT free bulk. Resin/CNT impregnation has been found to be one of the effective ways in improving the mechanical properties of bulk superconductor.

  5. Effect of Surface Treatment with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser on Bond Strength between Cement Resin and Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Atefat, Mohammad; Beheshti, Maryam; Safavi, Nassimeh; Mojtahedi, Maryam; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman

    2014-01-01

    Since it is not possible to form an adequate micromechanical bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using common surface treatment techniques, laser pretreatment has been suggested for zirconia ceramic surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. In this in vitro study thirty discs of zirconia with a diameter of 6 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into two groups of 15. In the test group the zirconia disc surfaces were irradiated by CO2 laser with an output power of 3 W and energy density of 265.39 j/cm(2). Composite resin discs were fabricated by plastic molds, measuring 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness and were cemented on zirconia disk surfaces with Panavia F2.0 resin cement (Kuraray Co. Ltd, Osaka, Japan). Shear bond strength was measured by a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fracture type was assessed under a stereomicroscope at ×40. Surface morphologies of two specimens of the test group were evaluated under SEM before and after laser pretreatment. Data was analyzed by paired t-test (p value resin cement and zirconia ceramic (p value = 0.001). Under the limitations of this study, surface treatment with CO2 laser increased the SBS between resin cement and the zirconia ceramic.

  6. Coke from small-diameter tubes analyzed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, L.F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism for coke deposit formation and the nature of the coke itself can vary with the design of the ethylene furnace tube bank. In this article, coke deposits from furnaces with small-diameter pyrolysis tubes are examined. The samples were taken from four furnaces of identical design (Plant B). As in both the first and second installments of the series, the coke deposits were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX). The deposits from the small-diameter tubes are compared with the coke deposits from the furnace discussed in earlier articles. Analysis of the coke in both sets of samples are then used to offer recommendations for improved decoking procedures, operating procedures, better feed selection, and better selection of the metallurgy used in furnace tubes, to extend the operating time of the furnace tubes by reducing the amount and type of coke build up

  7. On finding minimum-diameter clique trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, J.R.S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science); Peyton, B.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-08-01

    It is well-known that any chordal graph can be represented as a clique tree (acyclic hypergraph, join tree). Since some chordal graphs have many distinct clique tree representations, it is interesting to consider which one is most desirable under various circumstances. A clique tree of minimum diameter (or height) is sometimes a natural candidate when choosing clique trees to be processed in a parallel computing environment. This paper introduces a linear time algorithm for computing a minimum-diameter clique tree. The new algorithm is an analogue of the natural greedy algorithm for rooting an ordinary tree in order to minimize its height. It has potential application in the development of parallel algorithms for both knowledge-based systems and the solution of sparse linear systems of equations. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  8. EDF specifications on nuclear grade resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, Darren; Gressier, Frederic; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Ranchoux, Gilles; Marteau, Herve; Labed, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Ion exchange resins are widely used across EDF, especially within the nuclear division for the purification of water. Important applications include primary circuit, secondary circuit and effluent treatment, which require high quality nuclear grade resins to retain the dissolved species, some of which may be radioactive. There is a need for more and more efficient purification in order to decrease worker dose during maintenance but also to decrease volumes of radioactive resin waste. Resin performance is subject to several forms of degradation, including physical, chemical, thermal and radioactive, therefore appropriate resin properties have to be selected to reduce such effects. Work has been done with research institutes, manufacturers and on EDF sites to select these properties, create specifications and to continuously improve on these specifications. An interesting example of research regarding resin performance is the resin degradation under irradiation. Resins used in the CVCS circuit of EDF nuclear power plants are subject to irradiation over their lifetime. A study was carried out on the effects of total integrated doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 MGy on typically used EDF mixed bed resins in a 'mini-CVCS' apparatus to simultaneously test actual primary circuit fluid. The tests confirmed that the resins still perform efficiently after a typical CVCS radiation dose. Certain resins also need additional specifications in order to maintain the integrity of the particular circuits they are used in. Recently, EDF has updated its requirements on these high purity nuclear grade resins, produced generic doctrines for all products and materials used on site which include resins of all grades, and as a result have also updated a guide on recommended resin usage for the French fleet of reactors. An overview of the evolutions will be presented. (authors)

  9. Lunar Regolith Particle Shape Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekhaefer, Rebecca; Hardy, Sandra; Rickman, Douglas; Edmunson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Future engineering of structures and equipment on the lunar surface requires significant understanding of particle characteristics of the lunar regolith. Nearly all sediment characteristics are influenced by particle shape; therefore a method of quantifying particle shape is useful both in lunar and terrestrial applications. We have created a method to quantify particle shape, specifically for lunar regolith, using image processing. Photomicrographs of thin sections of lunar core material were obtained under reflected light. Three photomicrographs were analyzed using ImageJ and MATLAB. From the image analysis measurements for area, perimeter, Feret diameter, orthogonal Feret diameter, Heywood factor, aspect ratio, sieve diameter, and sieve number were recorded. Probability distribution functions were created from the measurements of Heywood factor and aspect ratio.

  10. Magnetocaloric effect and corrosion resistance of La(Fe, Si)13 composite plates bonded by different fraction of phenolic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K. S.; Xue, J. N.; Wang, Y. X.; Sun, H.; Long, Y.

    2018-04-01

    La(Fe, Si)13-based composite plates were successfully fabricated using different amount of phenolic resin. The introduction of phenolic resin as binder increased the corrosion resistance and maintained giant magnetocaloric effect for La(Fe, Si)13-based composite plates. It was found that corroded spots were firstly observed on the boundaries between resin and La(Fe, Si)13 particles, rather than in La(Fe, Si)13-based particles, after being immersed in static distilled water. The corrosion rate decreased significantly with the increase of resin content. And the increase of the content of phenolic resin leads to the reduction of corrosion current density. Meanwhile, the volumetric magnetic entropy change ΔSM decreases slightly as the content of phenolic resin increases. The ΔSM of the plates with 3 wt.%, 5 wt.% and 8 wt.% resin are 63.1, 61.2 and 59.8 mJ/cm3 K under a low magnetic field change of 1 T, respectively.

  11. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  12. Characteristics of diallyl phthalate resin as a fission track detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuruta, T

    1999-01-01

    Diallyl phthalate (DAP) resin plates were irradiated with fission fragments, and then etched in aqueous solution of KOH. Etched tracks were observed and counted by using an optical microscope. The detection efficiency of fission fragments was about 100% for both perpendicular and random incidence. DAP plates were insensitive to alpha particles and fast neutrons. These characteristics are suitable for detecting selected fission fragments, which coexist with alpha particles or fast neutrons. DAP plates are valuable for quantitative analysis of fissionable materials and neutron dosimetry. DAP and allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) were formed into copolymers in various ratios. The copolymers showed intermediate characteristics between DAP and CR-39. The fabrication of the copolymers made it possible to control the discrimination level for detection of heavy charged particles.

  13. Shear bond strength and failure types of polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin and titanium treated with surface conditioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun-Pil; Kim, Su-Sung; Yang, Hong-So; Vang, Mong-Sook

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength and failure types of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin to commercially pure (CP) titanium, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy using a metal surface conditioner. The PMMA denture base resin (5 x 5 x 5 mm(3)) was cured onto disks, 10 mm in diameter and 2.5-mm thick. The shear bond strength of the PMMA resin with the surface conditioner was significantly higher than that without (P < .05). There was no significant difference between the types of metal. The conditioned specimens showed mixed failures, whereas the nonconditioned specimens exhibited only adhesive failure at the metal-resin interface.

  14. A genetic-neural artificial intelligence approach to resins optimization; Uma metodologia baseada em inteligencia artificial para otimizacao de resinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Denise C.; Barros, Marcio P.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.br; mbarros@ien.gov.br

    2005-07-01

    This work presents a preliminary study about the viability and adequacy of a new methodology for the definition of one of the main properties of ion exchange resins used for isotopic separation. Basically, the main problem is the definition of pelicule diameter in case of pelicular ion exchange resins, in order to achieve the best performance in the shortest time. In order to achieve this, a methodology was developed, based in two classic techniques of Artificial Intelligence (AI). At first, an artificial neural network (NN) was trained to map the existing relations between the nucleus radius and the resin's efficiency associated with the exchange time. Later on, a genetic algorithm (GA) was developed in order to find the best pelicule dimension. Preliminary results seem to confirm the potential of the method, and this can be used in any chemical process employing ion exchange resins. (author)

  15. Gelation of small diameter, thoria sol microspheres in non-flowing alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.A.; Salas, N.I.

    1970-01-01

    A study was made to determine the parameters affecting the mass transfer of water during gelation of 2 M thoria sols in nonflowing alcohol systems. The alcohols used were 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2EH) and mixtures of isoamyl alcohol (iAA) and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. The maximum gelled particle diameters were determined for 5- and 11-ft-long columns of alcohol. Mass transfer theory was used in the development of a computer program to predict the maximum diameters expected. With an increase in iAA concentration, the maximum gelled particle diameter increased. Cracking and deformation were noted, primarily in the larger spheres, at iAA concentrations greater than 30 vol percent. The predictions from correlations indicated the expected trends but were, in general, 10 to 20 percent low

  16. Fracture toughness, compressive strength and load-bearing capacity of short glass fibre-reinforced composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the reinforcing effect of short E-glass fibre fillers on fracture related mechanical properties of dental composite resin with a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) polymer matrix. Experimental short fibre composite (FC) resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibres, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using a high speed mixing machine. Test specimens were made bar shaped (3 × 6 × 25 mm3), cylindrical (6 mm length × 3 mm diameter) and cubic (9.5 × 5.5 × 3 mm3) from the experimental FC resin and conventional particulate composite resin (Grandio) as control. The test specimens (n = 8) were either dry stored or water stored (37°C for 30 days) before the mechanical tests. A three-point loading test and compression test were carried out according to ISO 10477 and a static loading test was carried out using a steel ball (Ø 3.0 mm) with a speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Experimental fibre composite had a significantly higher mechanical performance for fracture toughness (14 MNm-1.5), compression strength (129 MPa) and static load-bearing capacity (1584 N) than the control composite (2 MNm-1.5, 112 MPa and 1031 N). The resin with short E-glass fibre fillers and IPN-polymer matrix yielded improved mechanical performance compared to the conventional particulate composite resin.

  17. Comparative study between the radiopacity levels of high viscosity and of flowable composite resins, using digital imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Emiko S; Silveira, Gilson P; Cortes, Arthur R; Brucoli, Henrique C

    2012-01-01

    The development of countless types and trends of high viscosite and flowable composite resins, with different physical and chemical properties applicable to their broad use in dental clinics calls for further studies regarding their radiopacity level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity levels of high viscosity and the flowable composite resins, using digital imaging. 96 composite resin discs 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick were radiographed and analyzed. The image acquisition system used was the Digora® Phosphor Storage System and the images were analyzed with the Digora software for Windows. The exposure conditions were: 70 kVp, 8 mA, and 0.2 s. The focal distance was 40 cm. The image densities were obtained with the pixel values of the materials in the digital image. Most of the high viscosity composite resins presented higher radiopacity levels than the flowable composite resins, with statistically significant differences between the trends and groups analyzed (P composite resins, Tetric®Ceram presented the highest radiopacity levels and Glacier® presented the lowest. Among the flowable composite resins, Tetric®Flow presented the highest radiopacity levels and Wave® presented the lowest.

  18. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  19. Synthesis of Hydrophobic, Crosslinkable Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Bismaleimides have also been crosslinked with radical initiators to produce brittle networks [4].If a damine is added, chain extension and radical crosslinkinq...are produced during cure.The company also produced a similar phenylene based resin, with pendant nitrile groups which could be crosslinked without the...benzenes and tetra substituted cyclopentadienones [881. g. Preparation of poly 1,4 phenylene by nickel (0> catalysed electropolymerisation 1891. Cont’d

  20. Deposition and detection of particles during integrated circuit manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wali, F.; Knotter, D. Martin; Kelly, John J.; Kuper, F.G.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract—Deposition mechanism of silica particles on silicon wafers was investigated by depositing specially prepared mono-dispersed particles (mean diameter = 330 nm). To measure particles of the size below the detection limit of our particle measurement tools, silica particles with luminance core

  1. Fast and robust shape diameter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuangmin; Liu, Taijun; Shu, Zhenyu; Xin, Shiqing; He, Ying; Tu, Changhe

    2018-01-01

    The shape diameter function (SDF) is a scalar function defined on a closed manifold surface, measuring the neighborhood diameter of the object at each point. Due to its pose oblivious property, SDF is widely used in shape analysis, segmentation and retrieval. However, computing SDF is computationally expensive since one has to place an inverted cone at each point and then average the penetration distances for a number of rays inside the cone. Furthermore, the shape diameters are highly sensitive to local geometric features as well as the normal vectors, hence diminishing their applications to real-world meshes which often contain rich geometric details and/or various types of defects, such as noise and gaps. In order to increase the robustness of SDF and promote it to a wide range of 3D models, we define SDF by offsetting the input object a little bit. This seemingly minor change brings three significant benefits: First, it allows us to compute SDF in a robust manner since the offset surface is able to give reliable normal vectors. Second, it runs many times faster since at each point we only need to compute the penetration distance along a single direction, rather than tens of directions. Third, our method does not require watertight surfaces as the input-it supports both point clouds and meshes with noise and gaps. Extensive experimental results show that the offset-surface based SDF is robust to noise and insensitive to geometric details, and it also runs about 10 times faster than the existing method. We also exhibit its usefulness using two typical applications including shape retrieval and shape segmentation, and observe a significant improvement over the existing SDF.

  2. Bond strength between zirconium ceramic and dual resinous cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Galan Junior

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the influence of different surface treatments on the bond strength between the resinous cement Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and the structure of In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany. Methods: Fifteen ceramic blocks were assessed: Group 1, finishing with abrasive paper; Group 2, finishing, airborne Al2O3 particle abrasion and silanization; Group 3, finishing, airborne particle abrasion, silicatization and silanization. After treatment, the blocks received cementation of resin composite cylinders with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan and were submitted to the shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine. Results: The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA and multiple comparison Student-Newman-Keuls test: Group 1 (9.66 ± 1.67 MPa < Group 2 (16.61 ± 3.38 MPa = Group 3 (19.23 ± 5.69 MPa, with p = 0.007. Conclusion: The structures of the In-Ceram YZ system (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany associated with Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan require previous etching to achieve greater bond strength between the ceramic and cement, and this treatment may be performed with airborne particle abrasion I or traditional silicatization, both followed by silanization.

  3. Analysis of camphorquinone in composite resins as a function of shade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvim, Hugo H; Alecio, Alberto C; Vasconcellos, Walison A; Furlan, Maysa; de Oliveira, José E; Saad, Jose R C

    2007-10-01

    To identify and quantify the camphorquinone (CQ) used in different brands of composite resins as a function of the shade analyzed. Filtek Z250 A3 (FZA3), Filtek Z-250 Incisal (FZI), Pyramid Enamel A1 (PEA1), Pyramid Enamel Translucent (PET), Filtek Supreme A3E (FSA3) and Filtek Supreme GT (FSGT) were used. Five hundred milligrams of each resin were weighed and then dissolved in 1.0 ml of methanol. The samples were centrifuged to accelerate the sedimentation of the inorganic particles. 0.8 ml of the supernatant solution was collected with a pipette and assessed under gas chromatography coupled to the mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The results were compared to pure CQ solutions, used as a standard. Student's t-test, (p=0.05) significant at the level of 5%, compared the results of each brand shade. A smaller amount of camphorquinone was found in Filtek Z-250 (FZI) resin incisal shade when compared to (FZA3) A3 shade. On the other hand, Filtek Supreme resin featured a statistically larger camphorquinone amount in the incisal shade. In Pyramid Enamel resin camphorquinone was found only in shade A1, while the photoinitiator used in the Translucent shade was not identified. Based on the data obtained, it is possible to conclude that a single composite resin brand may feature differences in amount and type of photoinitiator used.

  4. 29 mm Diameter Target Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olivas, Eric Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Naranjo, Angela Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Frank Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, Roman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-10-23

    After numerous delays, the test of the 29 mm diameter target was conducted on 8/18/2017. The complete target design report, dated 8/15/2016, is reproduced below for completeness. This describes in detail the 10 disk target with varying thickness disks. The report presents and discusses the test results. In brief summary, there appears to have been multiple instrumentation errors. Measured temperatures, pressures and IR camera window temperature measurement are all suspect. All tests were done at 35 MeV, with 171 μA current, or 6 kW of beam power.

  5. A simplified technique to determine intraparticle diffusivity of macro-reticular resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kawakita

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Both resins and activated carbons are commonly used as adsorbents in water and wastewater treatment. In general, intraparticle diffusion mechanisms within macro reticular resin particles (such as XAD-2000 are different from those in activated carbon particles. Currently, completely mixed batch reactor (CMBR technique can be used to determine the intraparticle diffusivity for phenolic compounds adsorbed onto activated carbon systems. However, the technology cannot determine the intraparticle diffusivity accurately if the fluid-film resistance is significant, such as synthetic macro-reticular resins. Therefore, this study develops a technique to determine the intraparticle diffusivities of XAD-2000 resin. This paper characterized the concentration decay curves of para-nitrophenol in CMBR to determine effective pore diffusivity (DP of the resin. The obtained mean and standard deviation of DP are about 1.1 × 10−5 and 3.2 × 10−6 (cm2 s−1, respectively. The technology developed in this study has the advantages of significant chemical saving and easy operation.

  6. Evaluation of adhesion of reline resins to the thermoplastic denture base resin for non-metal clasp denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choe, Han Cheol; Son, Mee Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tensile and transverse bond strength of chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II, Mild Rebaron LC) to a thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) used for non metal clasp denture. The results were compared with those of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20) and a thermoplastic polyamide resin (Biotone). The failure sites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the mode of failure. As results, the bond strength of reline resins to a thermoplastic acrylic resin was similar to the value of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin. However, thermoplastic polyamide resin showed the lowest value. The results of this study indicated that a thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasps denture allows chairside reline and repair. It was also found that the light-polymerized reline resin had better bond strength than the autopolymerizing reline resin in relining for a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin and a thermoplastic acrylic resin.

  7. Sagittal Abdominal Diameter: Application in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Da Silva-Ferreira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Excess visceral fat is associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD has recently been highlighted as an indicator of abdominal obesity, and also may be useful in predicting cardiovascular risk. The purpose of the present study was to review the scientific literature on the use of SAD in adult nutritional assessment. A search was conducted for scientific articles in the following electronic databases: SciELO , MEDLINE (PubMed and Virtual Health Library. SAD is more associated with abdominal fat (especially visceral, and with different cardiovascular risk factors, such as, insulin resistance, blood pressure, and serum lipoproteins than the traditional methods of estimating adiposity, such as body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio. SAD can also be used in association with other anthropometric measures. There are still no cut-off limits established to classify SAD as yet. SAD can be an alternative measure to estimate visceral adiposity. However, the few studies on this diameter, and the lack of consensus on the anatomical site to measure SAD, are obstacles to establish cut-off limits to classify it.

  8. MICRON-SIZED POLYMER PARTICLES FROM TANZANIAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micron sized polymeric particles were prepared from cashew nut shell liquid and subsequently functionalized to produce micron-sized carboxylated cation exchange resin (MCCER). By titrimetry and analytical procedures employing atomic absorption spectrometry, an assessment of the cation exchange capability of the ...

  9. Diffusion through composite materials made with thermosetting resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Bruno.

    1981-08-01

    Medium and low-level radioactive wastes may be coated in a solid matrix mainly made with thermosetting resins: the study of water and cesium migration through composite materials made with thermosetting resins is usefull to compare the water tightness of different coatings. Disks with a thickness of two millimeters were used to measure the water absorption. Diffusion cells including a plane membrane the thickness of which was at least 70μ were used to measure the diffusion of cesium 137. The diffusion coefficient of water in pure thermosetting resins, polyester or epoxyde, is about 10 -9 cm 2 .s -1 ; the diffusion coefficients of cesium in the same materials are about 10 -12 cm 2 .s -1 ; the introduction of solid particles in these polymers generally induces an acceleration of the diffusion process: the diffusion coefficient may reach 10 -8 cm 2 .s -1 . This lost of water-tightness may be reduced either by rendering insoluble the filler mixed to the polymer, or by diminushing the porosity of the interfacial zones by improving the bonding between the polymer and the filler [fr

  10. Protein A chromatography resin lifetime-impact of feed composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Mili; Rathore, Anurag S; Lintern, Katherine; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2018-01-05

    Adsorbent lifetime during protein A chromatography is not readily predicted or understood, representing a key challenge to be addressed for biopharmaceutical manufacturers. This article focuses on the impact of feed composition on the performance of a typical agarose-based protein A resin across a lifetime of 50 cycles. Cycling studies were performed using three different feed materials with varying levels of feed components including proteases, histones, DNA, and nonhistone proteins. Changes in the process and quality attributes were measured. The DBCs were not seen to vary between conditions although there was a reduction in particle porosity in all cases. Fluorescence spectroscopy and LC-MS/MS were used to identify the contribution and extent of fouling to the observed capacity loss. Residual protein A ligand density and deposition of foulants (HCP, residual mAb, and DNA) varied between the three feed materials. Resins cycled in feed materials containing high concentrations of HCP and histones were seen to have greater extents of capacity loss. The mode of performance loss, capacity loss, or impact on product quality was seen to vary depending on the feed material. The results indicate that feed material composition may be correlated to the rate and mode of resin aging as a basis for improved process understanding. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. Effect of incorporating BisGMA resin on the bonding properties of silane and zirconia primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Shen, Hong; Suh, Byoung In

    2013-11-01

    Some silane primers and some zirconia primers contain extra resins such as bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate (BisGMA) in their formulations for better wetting. No studies exist on the bonding properties of zirconia and silane primers, which contain extra resins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of incorporating BisGMA resin on the bonding properties of silane and zirconia primers. Silica-base lithium disilicate was etched and treated with BisGMA-incorporated Porcelain Primer, unmodified Porcelain Primer, or resin-containing Kerr Silane. Zirconia ceramic was airborne-particle abraded and treated with BisGMA-incorporated Monobond Plus, unmodified Monobond Plus, or BisGMA-containing ZPrime Plus. After primer treatment and cleaning with ethanol, the contact angles were measured to determine surface change (n=10). Shear bond strength tests were also performed to measure the adhesion strength between resin cements and ceramic surfaces (n=10). Data were statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey multiple comparison as a post hoc test (significance level .05). The incorporation of BisGMA resin did not significantly influence the bond strength or contact angle of the zirconia primer (P>.05), but it did significantly reduce those of the silane primer (PSilane (22 degrees, 23 MPa) had a similar contact angle and higher bond strength than the control (21 degrees, 18 MPa), but lower than Porcelain Primer (88 degrees, 34 MPa). Resin-containing ZPrime Plus (75 degrees, 29 MPa) had a similar contact angle and higher bond strength than both Monobond Plus (74 degrees, 18 MPa) and the control (15 degrees, 4 MPa). The addition of BisGMA resin significantly inhibited the efficacy of silane-containing porcelain primers but did not affect that of phosphate-containing zirconia primers. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  13. Solidifying power station resins and sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.S.D.; Haigh, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive ion exchange resins and sludges arise at nuclear power stations from various operations associated with effluent treatment and liquid waste management. As the result of an intensive development programme, the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has designed a process to convert power station resins and sludges into a shielded, packaged solid monolithic form suitable for final disposal. Research and development, the generic CEGB sludge/resin conditioning plant and the CEGB Active Waste Project are described. (U.K.)

  14. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Nagem Filho, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill ...

  15. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  16. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion wit...

  17. The Effect of Irradiation Distance on Microhardness of Resin Composites Cured with Different Light Curing Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic-Nagas, Isil; Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the microhardness of five different resin composites at different irradiation distances (2 mm and 9 mm) by using three light curing units (quartz tungsten halogen, light emitting diodes and plasma arc). Methods: A total of 210 disc-shaped samples (2 mm height and 6 mm diameter) were prepared from different resin composites (Simile, Aelite Aesthetic Enamel, Clearfil AP-X, Grandio caps and Filtek Z250). Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen, light emitting diode and plasma arc curing units at two irradiation distances (2 mm and 9 mm). Then the samples (n=7/per group) were stored dry in dark at 37°C for 24 h. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the resin composite layer with a microhardness tester (Shimadzu HMV). Data were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that the resin composite groups, the type of the light curing units and the irradiation distances have significant effects on the microhardness values (P<.05). Conclusions: Light curing unit and irradiation distance are important factors to be considered for obtaining adequate microhardness of different resin composite groups. PMID:20922164

  18. Surface morphology changes of acrylic resins during finishing and polishing phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Serra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The finishing and polishing phases are essential to improve smoothness and shining on the surface of acrylic resins used to make removable orthodontic appliances. A good surface finishing reduces roughness, which facilitates hygiene, prevents staining and provides greater comfort to the patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to analyze the changes on surface morphology of acrylic resins during finishing and polishing phases. METHODS: Thirty discs (10 mm in diameter and 5 mm in length were made with acrylic resin and randomly divided into ten groups. The control group did not receive any treatment while the other groups received gradual finishing and polishing. The last group received the entire finishing and polishing procedures. Surface morphology was qualitatively analyzed through scanning electron microscopy and quantitatively analyzed through a laser profilometer test. RESULTS: The acrylic resin surfaces without treatment showed bubbles which were not observed in the subsequent phases. Wearing out with multilaminated burs, finishing with wood sandpaper and finishing with water sandpaper resulted in surfaces with decreasing irregularities. The surfaces that were polished with pumice and with low abrasive liquids showed high superficial smoothness. CONCLUSION: Highly smooth acrylic resin surfaces can be obtained after mechanical finishing and polishing performed with multilaminated burs, wood sandpaper, water sandpaper, pumice and low abrasive liquids.

  19. Self-lubricating, wear resistant protic ionic liquid-epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Aviles

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new self-lubricating, wear resistant epoxy resin material (ER+DCi has been obtained by addition of a 9 wt.% of the room-temperature protic ionic liquid (PIL tri-[bis(2-hydroxyethylammonium] citrate (DCi to the mixture of the prepolymer and the hardener composed of a mixture of amines. The highly polar tricationic protic ammonium carboxylate ionic liquid shows a high contact angle on the resin surface and distributes inside the epoxy matrix as spheres of around 50 µm in diameter, with a mean density of approximately 38 mm2. The presence of the ionic liquid fluid phase inside the cavities has been determined by SEM observation of fracture surfaces and FTIR microscopy. The DCi phase reduces the residual curing enthalpy and the glass transition temperature, as determined by DSC, without significantly changing microhardness or electrical resistivity values. DMA analysis shows that DCi reduces storage modulus, loss modulus and tan δ values. The tribological performance of the new material has been compared with that of the neat epoxy resin under pin-on-disc sliding conditions. ER+DCi shows more than 50% reduction of the friction coefficient with respect to neat epoxy resin, and no surface damage, in contrast with the severe wear that takes place in the case of neat epoxy resin. A self-lubrication mechanism by release of the ionic liquid lubricant under load is proposed.

  20. Color stability of visible light cured composite resin after soft drink immersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizatul Khairani Hasan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Composite resin is a tooth-colored filling material containing Bis-GMA which exhibits water sorption properties. People tend to consume soft drink with various colors. Water sorption properties can alter the color stability of composite resin purpose. Purpose: This study was to determine the influence of immersion durations of composite resin in soft drink on color stability. Methods: The visible-light cured hybrid composite resin and soft drink were used. Ten disk specimens (2.5 mm thickness and 15 mm diameter of composite resin were prepared and light cured for 20 seconds, then stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37° C. The initial color of specimens were measured by Chromameter. After that, each specimen was immersed in 30 ml of soft drink up to 48, 72, and 96 hours at 37° C. The specimens’ color were measured again after each immersion. The color changes were calculated by CIE L*a*b* system formula. The data was analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and LSD (α = 0.05. Result: The ANOVA showed that the immersion durations of composite resin in soft drinks had significant influence on the color stability (p < 0.05. The LSD0.05 tests showed significant differences among all groups. The least color change was detected from the group of 48 hours immersion, while the greatest color change was from the group of 96 hours immersion. Conclusions: The immersion of composite resin in soft drinks influenced the color stability (began after 48 hours immersion.

  1. Surface flashover performance of epoxy resin microcomposites improved by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yin; Min, Daomin; Li, Shengtao; Li, Zhen; Xie, Dongri; Wang, Xuan; Lin, Shengjun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy resin microcomposites were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV. • Surface flashover voltage increase with the increase of electron beam energy. • Both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. • Deposition energy in epoxy resin microcomposites increases with electron beam energy, and surface trap properties are determined by deposition energy. • The influence of surface conductivity and trap distribution on flashover voltage is discussed. - Abstract: The influencing mechanism of electron beam irradiation on surface flashover of epoxy resin/Al 2 O 3 microcomposite was investigated. Epoxy resin/Al 2 O 3 microcomposite samples with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 1 mm were prepared. The samples were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV and a beam current of 5 μA for 5 min. Surface potential decay, surface conduction, and surface flashover properties of untreated and irradiated samples were measured. Both the decay rate of surface potential and surface conductivity decrease with an increase in the energy of electron beam. Meanwhile, surface flashover voltage increase. It was found that both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. The increase in the energy and density of deep surface traps enhance the ability to capture primary emitted electrons. In addition, the decrease in surface conductivity blocks electron emission at the cathode triple junction. Therefore, electron avalanche at the interface between gas and an insulating material would be suppressed, eventually improving surface flashover voltage of epoxy resin microcomposites.

  2. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks.

  3. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  4. Effect of surface conditioning modalities on the repair bond strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Pereira, Sarina Maciel; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Pekkan, Gurel

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning protocols on the repair strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex, simulating the clinical chipping phenomenon. Forty disk-shaped zirconia core (Lava Zirconia, 3M ESPE) (diameter: 3 mm) specimens were veneered circumferentially with a feldspathic veneering ceramic (VM7, Vita Zahnfabrik) (thickness: 2 mm) using a split metal mold. They were then embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic with the bonding surfaces exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning protocols (n = 10 per group): group 1, veneer: 4% hydrofluoric acid (HF) (Porcelain Etch) + core: aluminum trioxide (50-µm Al2O3) + core + veneer: silane (ESPE-Sil); group 2: core: Al2O3 (50 µm) + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane; group 3: veneer: HF + core: 30 µm aluminum trioxide particles coated with silica (30 µm SiO2) + core + veneer: silane; group 4: core: 30 µm SiO2 + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane. Core and veneer ceramic were conditioned individually but no attempt was made to avoid cross contamination of conditioning, simulating the clinical intraoral repair situation. Adhesive resin (VisioBond) was applied to both the core and the veneer ceramic, and resin composite (Quadrant Posterior) was bonded onto both substrates using polyethylene molds and photopolymerized. After thermocycling (6000 cycles, 5°C-55°C), the specimens were subjected to shear bond testing using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure modes were identified using an optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope images were obtained. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed statistically using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Bonferroni Holm correction (α = 0.05). Group 3 demonstrated significantly higher values (MPa) (8.6 ± 2.7) than those of the other groups (3.2 ± 3.1, 3.2 ± 3, and 3.1 ± 3.5 for groups 1, 2, and 4

  5. Heat-cured Acrylic Resin versus Light-activated Resin: A Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Although light-activated resins (Eclipse) have been reported to possess superior physical and mechanical properties compared with the heat-cured acrylic resins (Lucitone-199), a few studies have compared overdentures with a locator attachment constructed from heat-cured acrylic resins with those constructed ...

  6. Comparison of shear test methods for evaluating the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chae, Soyeon; Lee, Yunhee; Han, Geum-Jun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-11-01

    This study compared the sensitivity of three shear test methods for measuring the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic and evaluated the effects of surface treatment methods on the bonding. Polished zirconia ceramic (Cercon base, DeguDent) discs were randomly divided into four surface treatment groups: no treatment (C), airborne-particle abrasion (A), conditioning with Alloy primer (Kuraray Medical Co.) (P) and conditioning with Alloy primer after airborne-particle abrasion (AP). The bond strengths of the resin cement (Multilink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) to the zirconia specimens of each surface treatment group were determined by three SBS test methods: the conventional SBS test with direct filling of the mold (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) with resin cement (Method 1), the conventional SBS test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) using resin cement (Method 2) and the microshear bond strength (μSBS) test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 0.8 mm × 1 mm) using resin cement (Method 3). Both the test method and the surface treatment significantly influenced the SBS values. In Method 3, as the SBS values increased, the coefficients of variation decreased and the Weibull parameters increased. The AP groups showed the highest SBS in all of the test methods. Only in Method 3 did the P group show a higher SBS than the A group. The μSBS test was more sensitive to differentiating the effects of surface treatment methods than the conventional SBS tests. Primer conditioning was a stronger contributing factor for the resin bond to zirconia ceramic than was airborne-particle abrasion.

  7. Particle size distribution control of Pt particles used for particle gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiji, M.; Akiba, H.; Nagao, H.; Hirasawa, I.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is particle size distribution (PSD) control of submicron sized Pt particles used for particle gun. In this report, simple reaction crystallization is conducted by mixing H2PtCl6 and ascorbic acid. Without the additive, obtained Pt particles have broad PSD and reproducibility of experiment is low. With seeding, Pt particles have narrow PSD and reproducibility improved. Additionally, mean particle diameter of 100-700 nm is controlled by changing seeding amount. Obtained particles are successfully characterized as Pt by XRD results. Moreover, XRD spectra indicate that obtained particles are polycrystals. These experimental results suggest that seeding consumed nucleation, as most nuclei attached on the seed surface. This mechanism virtually restricted nucleation to have narrow PSD can be obtained.

  8. Bonding of glass ceramic and indirect composite to non-aged and aged resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Özcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-02-01

    Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged resin composite to an indirect resin composite and pressed glass ceramic using two resin cements. Disk-shaped specimens (diameter: 3.5, thickness: 3 mm) (N = 160) produced from a microhybrid resin composite (Quadrant Anterior Shine) were randomly divided into eight groups. While half of the specimens were kept dry at 37°C for 24 h, the other half was aged by means of thermocycling (6000 times, 5°C to 55°C). The non-aged and aged resin composites were bonded to a highly filled indirect composite (Estenia) and a pressed glass ceramic (IPS Empress II) using either a photopolymerizing (Variolink Veneer) or a dual-polymerizing (Panavia F2.0) resin cement. While cementation surfaces of both the direct and indirect composite materials were silica coated (30 µm SiO2, CoJet-Sand) and silanized (ESPE-Sil), ceramic surfaces were conditioned with hydrofluoric acid (20 s), neutralized, and silanized prior to cementation. All specimens were cemented under a load of 750 g. Shear force was applied to the adhesive interface in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure types of the specimens were identified after debonding. Significant effects of aging (p ceramic in combination with both cements showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Both indirect composite (24.3 ± 5.1 MPa) and glass ceramic in combination with Variolink (22 ± 9 MPa) showed the highest results on non-aged composites, but were not significantly different from one another (p > 0.05). On the aged composites, indirect composite and glass ceramic showed no significant difference in bond strength within each material group (p > 0.05), with both Panavia (17.2 ± 6 and 15 ± 5.5 MPa, respectively) and Variolink (19 ± 8

  9. Selecting the Best Materials Compositions of Resin Based Bioasphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, Ary; Widiharjo, Budi; Djumari

    2017-07-01

    Damar asphalt is one type of bioaspal which is a mixture with the main ingredient is a resin as a binder and cooking oil as a solvent. One major drawback of this damar asphalt is the low ductility. To improve the ductility values, then use the added material Filler. Filler serves as a divider between the impurities with damar asphalt, increases ductility and increase the ability of cohesion or bonding between the particles of material damar asphalt. The purpose of this study was to determine damar asphalt modifications to the properties in accordance with the properties of damar asphalt test specifications based on the value of penetration. This method uses some variant on material such as powder bricks and fly ash as a binder. Solvent in constituent used oil and used cooking oil. It also added the polymer latex up to 10% at intervals of 2%. The best composition of damar asphalt materials were obtained with gum rosin, Fly Ash, Oil and Latex. Damar asphalt modification damar asphalt optimum mix of resin (100g pure resin or resin chunk + 350g powder), Fly Ash powder (150g), cooking oil (205g), and latex 4%, ductility increased from 63.5 cm to 119.5 cm, the value of the flash point was originally at temperature of 240 °C to 260 °C, damar asphalt penetration of 68.2 dmm to 43 dmm, and the value of density decreases from 1.01 g / cm3 to 0.99 g / cm3. Damar asphalt at these modifications meet the specifications in terms of solubility in trichlore ethylene is equal to 99.5%, and also meet the affinity of damar asphalt at 99%. With the optimum value, damar asphalt could be categorized as bitumen 40/60 penetration.

  10. Diameters and cross-sectional areas of branches in the human pulmonary arterial tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfield, K; Woldenberg, M J

    1989-03-01

    Measurements were made of the diameters of the three branches meeting at each of 1,937 bifurcations in the pulmonary arterial tree, using resin casts from two fully inflated human lungs. Cross-sectional areas of the parent branch and of the daughter branches were calculated and plotted on a log-log plot, which showed that mean cross-sectional area increases in a constant proportion of 1.0879 at bifurcations. The mean value of the ratio of daughter branch diameters at bifurcations was 0.7849. The mean value of the exponent z in the equation flow = k (diameter(z)) was found to be 2.3 +/- 0.1, which is equal to the optimal value for minimizing power and metabolic costs for fully developed turbulent flow. Although Reynolds number may exceed 2,000 in the larger branches of the pulmonary artery, turbulent flow probably does not occur, and in the peripheral branches Reynolds number is always low, excluding turbulent flow in these branches. This finding seems to be incompatible with the observed value of z. A possible explanation may be that other factors may need to be taken into account when calculating the theoretical optimum value of z for minimum power dissipation, such as the relatively short branches and the disturbances of flow occurring at bifurcations. Alternatively, higher arterial diameters reduce acceleration of the blood during systole, reduce turbulent flow, and increase the reservoir function of the larger arteries. These higher diameters result in a lower value of z.

  11. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS ) Resin with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    synthetic) resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate ...

  12. Development of sustained release fast-disintegrating tablets using various polymer-coated ion-exchange resin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seong Hoon; Park, Kinam

    2008-04-02

    Complex formation between drugs and ion-exchange resins was investigated and the effects of coating by various aqueous polymeric dispersions on the complexes were evaluated for developing new sustained-release fast-disintegrating tablets (FDTs). Complexes of ion-exchange resin and dextromethorphan, a model drug, were prepared using different particle sizes of the resins. Aqueous colloidal dispersions of ethylcellulose (EC) and poly(vinyl acetate) (Kollicoat SR30D) were used for fluid-bed coating. Based on drug loading, release profiles, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, the coated particles were granulated with suitable tablet excipients and then compressed into the tablets. Drug release profiles and SEM pictures were compared before and after the manufacturing processes. As the particle size of resins increased, the drug loading and release rate decreased due to the reduced effective diffusion coefficient and surface area. Higher coating level decreased the release rate further. In contrast to EC, Kollicoat SR30D coated particles could be compressed into tablets without any rupture or cracks on the coating since the mechanical properties of the polymer was more resistant to the manufacturing processes. This resulted in no significant changes in release rates. SEM showed the mechanical strength of the polymers affected the morphological change after compression. When the drug release profiles were applied into Boyd model and Higuchi equation, the linear relationship was observed, indicating that the diffusion within the resin matrix is the rate-controlling step.

  13. Resin composite for sealing and its use in a solar cell. Fushiyo jushi soseibutsu oyobi sore wo mochiita taiyo denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, H.; Mimura, T.; Takehara, N.

    1994-01-28

    This invention presents resin composites for sealing of a solar cell composed of a hardening resin and a thermoplastic resin which has a number average molecular weight larger than that of the hardening resin and is soluble in the hardening resin, and the invention affords a solar cell to endure a long-term stable operation and to give a good performance. The hardening resin includes unsaturated polyester resin, phenolic resin, alkyd resin, unsaturated acrylic resin, epoxy resin, polyurethane resin, melamine resin, diallyl phthalate resin, their oligomers and their modifications. The thermoplastic resin includes saturated polyester resin, phenolic resin, acrylic resin, styrene resin, epoxy resin, polyurethane resin, polyvinyl acetate resin, polyvinyl chloride resin, polyvinyl alcohol resin, polyacetal resin, their modifications and their copolymer resin. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Effects of Excess Cu Addition on Photochromic Properties of AgCl-Urethane Resin Composite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Miyazaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AgCl-resin photochromic composite films were prepared using AgNO3, HCl-EtOH, CuCl2 ethanol solutions, and a urethane resin as starting materials. The AgCl particle size in the composite films, which was confirmed via TEM observations, was 23–43 nm. The AgCl composite films showed photochromic properties: coloring induced by UV-vis irradiation and bleaching induced by cessation of UV-vis irradiation. The coloring and bleaching speed of the composite film increases with increasing CuCl2 mixing ratio.

  15. Curing kinetics of alkyd/melamine resin mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Jovičić Mirjana C.; Radičević Radmila Ž.

    2009-01-01

    Alkyd resins are the most popular and useful synthetic resins applied as the binder in protective coatings. Frequently they are not used alone but are modified with other synthetic resins in the manufacture of the coatings. An alkyd/melamine resin mixture is the usual composition for the preparation of coating called 'baking enamel' and it is cured through functional groups of resins at high temperatures. In this paper, curing kinetics of alkyd resins based on castor oil and dehydrated castor...

  16. The effect of tooth age on colour adjustment potential of resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A; Nakajima, M; Seki, N; Foxton, R M; Tagami, J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tooth age on colour adjustment potential of resin composite restorations in human teeth. Twenty extracted human premolars with an A2 shade, extracted for orthodontic reasons from younger patients (20-28yrs) (younger teeth) and periodontal reasons from older patients (45-69yrs) (older teeth), were used in this study. Cylindrical shaped cavities (3.0mm depth; 2.0mm diameter) were prepared in the centre of the crowns on the buccal surface. One of four resin composites of A2 shade (Kalore, KA; Solare, SO; Clearfil Majesty, MJ; Beautifil II, BF) was placed in the cavity, and the colour was measured at four areas (0.4mm×0.4mm) on the restored teeth (area 1; tooth area 1.0mm away from the border of resin composite restoration: area 2; tooth border area 0.3mm away from margin of resin composite restoration: area 3; resin composite border area 0.3mm away from margin of resin composite restoration: area 4; resin composite area at the centre of resin composite restoration) using a spectrophotometer (Crystaleye). The colour of each area was determined according to the CIELAB colour scale. Colour differences (ΔE*) between the areas of 1 and 2, 2 and 3, 3 and 4 and 1 and 4 were calculated, and also the ratio of ΔE*area2-3 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area2-3/1-4), ΔE*area3-4 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area3-4/1-4) and ΔE*area1-2 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area1-2/1-4) as a parameter of the colour shift in resin composite restoration, were determined. Moreover, the light transmission characteristics of the resin materials and dentine discs from the younger and older teeth were measured using a goniophotometer. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, and Dunnett's T3 and t-test for the post hoc test. ΔE*area2-3 (colour difference between resin composite and tooth at the border) and ΔE*area1-4 (colour difference between resin composite and tooth) of the older teeth groups were significantly larger than those of younger

  17. Input to Resin Column Structural Analysis if Autocatalytic Resin Reaction Occurs in HB-Line Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallman, D.F.

    2001-07-10

    Solutions of plutonium in nitric acid are purified and concentrated using anion resin prior to precipitation. There have been instances of resin column explosions caused by autocatalytic reactions of anion resins in nitric acid within the DOE complex

  18. Gold Loading on Ion Exchange Resins in Non-Ammoniacal Resin-Solution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Muslim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The loading of gold using strong base anion exchange resin in non-ammoniac resin-solution (NARS systems has been studied. The loading of gold onto ion exchange resins is affected by polythionate concentration, and trithionate can be used as the baseline in the system. The results also show that resin capacity on gold loading increases due to the increase in the equilibrium thiosulfate concentration in the NARS system. Gold loading performances show the need of optimization the equilibrium concentrations of thiosulfate in the NARS system. Keywords: equilibrium, gold loading, resin capacity, thiosulfate, trithionate

  19. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as

  20. The solidification of spent resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiao, S. J.; Tsai, C. M.; Shyu, Y. H.

    1991-01-01

    A quasi-steady apparatus was applied to measure the thermal conductivity of solids ranging in size for 0.3 to 200 L, and temperature distributions in the solids were recorded during the curing, and theoretical equation for conduction in a cylindrical form with uniform energy generation was established to define the thermal state of reaction. The heat of reaction calculated from the theoretical equation with experimental values for the maximum temperature and thermal conductivity agrees very well with the data reported. The relationships among heat of reaction and amount of curing agent, retardant, loading of spent resin, and water were established

  1. Color Stability of the Bulk-Fill Composite Resins with Different Thickness in Response to Coffee/Water Immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamszadeh, Sayna; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh Mahsa; Hasani, Elham; Abrandabadi, Ahmad Najafi; Panahandeh, Narges

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the color stability of bulk-fill and conventional composite resin with respect to thickness and storage media. Twenty specimens of a conventional composite resin (6 mm diameter and 2 mm thick) and 40 specimens of the bulk-fill Tetric EvoCeram composite resin at two different thicknesses (6 mm diameter and 2 mm thick or 4 mm thick, n = 20) were prepared. The specimens were stored in distilled water during the study period (28 d). Half of the specimens were remained in distilled water and the other half were immersed in coffee solution 20 min/d and kept in distilled water between the cycles. Color changes (ΔE) were measured using the CIE L (⁎) a (⁎) b (⁎) color space and a digital imaging system at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days of storage. Data were analyzed using Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test (P Composite resins showed significant increase in color changes by time (bulk-fill > conventional; P color changes with increasing the increment thickness, which was significant at 14 (P Color change of bulk-fill composite resin was greater than that of the conventional one after coffee staining and is also a function of increment thicknesses.

  2. Influence of light curing unit and ceramic thickness on temperature rise during resin cement photo-activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Mastrofrancisco, Sarina; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different ceramic thickness on heat generation during resin cement photo-activation by QTH (quartz-tungsten-halogen), LED (light emitting diode), and PAC (plasma arc-curing) LCUs (light curing units). The resin cement used was Rely X ARC (3M-ESPE), and the ceramic was IPS Empress Esthetic (Ivoclar-Vivadent), of which 0.7-, 1.4- and 2.0-mm thick disks, 0.8 mm in diameter were made. Temperature increase was recorded with a type-K thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). An acrylic resin base was built to guide the thermocouple and support the 1.0-mm thick dentin disk. A 0.1-mm thick black adhesive paper matrix with a perforation 6 mm in diameter was placed on the dentin to contain the resin cement and support the ceramic disks of different thicknesses. Three LCUs were used: QTH, LED and PAC. Nine groups were formed (n=10) according to the interaction: 3 ceramic thicknesses, 1 resin cement and 3 photo-activation methods. Temperature increase data were submitted to Tukey's test (5%). For all ceramic thicknesses, a statistically significant difference in temperature increase was observed among the LCUs, with the highest mean value for the QTH LCU (p0.05). The interaction of higher energy density with smaller ceramic thickness showed higher temperature increase values.

  3. Air bubble-induced detachment of polystyrene particles with different sizes from collector surfaces in a parallel plate flow chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Suarez, C; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2001-01-01

    Particle size was found to be an important factor in air bubble-induced detachment of colloidal particles from collector surfaces in a parallel plate flow chamber and generally polystyrene particles with a diameter of 806 nm detached less than particles with a diameter of 1400 nm. Particle

  4. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS Resin with Polyester Resin in Composite Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Ugoamadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural resins can compete effectively with the synthetic ones in composite development. In this research, cashew nuts were picked and processed for the extraction of the resin content. The resin (natural resin so obtained was mixed with cobalt amine (accelerator, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (catalyst to develop two sets of composite specimens – specimens without fibres and specimens reinforced with glass fibres. This method of sample specimen development was repeated with polyester (synthetic resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate compressive strength of 55MPa compared to that of polyester resin with an ultimate strength of 68MPa. The result of tensile strength proved cashew nut shell liquid resin (with ultimate strength of 44MPa to be better than polyester resin with 39MPa as ultimate tensile strength. This means that natural resins could be a better substitute for the synthetic ones when the required quantities of fibers (reinforcements and fillers are used in the fibre-reinforced plastic composite developments.

  5. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4) rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (presin increments.

  6. Effect of thickness of indirect restoration and distance from the light-curing unit tip on the hardness of a dual-cured resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Andréia Bolzan; Tango, Rubens Nisie; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Alves, Marcelo Corrêa; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the Knoop hardness and polymerization depth of a dual-cured resin cement, light-activated at different distances through different thicknesses of composite resin. One bovine incisor was embedded in resin and its buccal surface was flattened. Dentin was covered with PVC film where a mold (0.8-mm-thick and 5 mm diameter) was filled with cement and covered with another PVC film. Light curing (40 s) was carried out through resin discs (2, 3, 4 or 5 mm) with a halogen light positioned 0, 1, 2 or 3 mm from the resin surface. After storage, specimens were sectioned for hardness measurements (top, center, and bottom). Data were subjected to split-plot ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). The increase in resin disc thickness decreased cement hardness. The increase in the distance of the light-curing tip decreased hardness at the top region. Specimens showed the lowest hardness values at the bottom, and the highest at the center. Resin cement hardness was influenced by the thickness of the indirect restoration and by the distance between the light-curing unit tip and the resin cement surface.

  7. Magnetic properties of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles incorporated in a polystyrene resin matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnava, P. P.; Senaratne, U.; Buc, E. C.; Naik, R.; Naik, V. M.; Tsoi, G. M.; Wenger, L. E.

    2007-07-01

    γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticles ranging in average diameter from 3to10nm were synthesized into a polystyrene resin matrix by an ion-exchange method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectroscopy, and SQUID magnetometry. The average particle size as determined from XRD and TEM was found to be strongly dependent upon the initial Fe valence state of the starting chloride salt(s) and on the number of steps that the salt introduction and ion-exchange process were repeated. Regardless of the initial Fe valence state and processing conditions, Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed that the Fe in the resulting nanoparticles existed only as Fe(III) ions and that γ-Fe2O3 was the only phase present. The values of the saturation magnetization at 5K were found to be dependent upon the processing conditions and ranged from 203to333emu/cm3 , which are significantly smaller than the bulk value (408emu/cm3) for γ-Fe2O3 . As expected, the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behavior with the magnetic moments becoming frozen with decreasing temperature as evidenced by the appearance of a six-line splitting in the Mössbauer spectra, a bifurcation in the zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) magnetizations, and an opening in the MV -vs- H hysteresis curves. The values of magnetic anisotropy constant (1.2-2.1×106ergs/cm3) determined from the differences between the ZFC and FC magnetizations were found to be higher than the bulk value (1.1×105ergs/cm3) for γ-Fe2O3 , and are probably due to surface effects. Likewise, the nanoparticle size distributions as deduced from the blocking temperature distribution function f(TB) based on fits to the difference in the ZFC and FC magnetization curves as well as from fits of the MV -vs- H curves in the superparamagnetic regime with a Langevin function indicate fairly broad distributions of particle sizes with the particle sizes being comparable to those deduced from XRD

  8. resin as polymer-supported synthesis support

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    dichloro-5,6-dicyano- benzoqunone ... ports used most widely in SPOS are Merrifield resin .... (2 × 10 mL). The resin was dried at 50°C for one hour to give white beads. IR (KBr): 3108, 3312 cm–1. 1H-NMR (500 MHz, CDCl3): δ 7⋅13 (br s, PS), 7⋅01.

  9. [Delayed asthma bronchiale due to epoxy resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authried, Georg; Al-Asadi, Haifaa; Møller, Ulla; Sherson, David Lee

    2013-10-28

    Epoxy resin is a low molecular weight agent, which can cause both acute and delayed allergic reactions. However, it is known causing skin reactions with direct or airborne contact. Rarely it can cause airway reactions like asthma bronchiale. We describe a case of a windmill worker who developed delayed asthma bronchiale due to airborne contact with epoxy resin.

  10. Epoxidation of linseed oil-Alkyd resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motawie, A.M.; Ismail, E.A.; Mazroua, A.M.; Abd EI Aziem, M.S.; Ramadan, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Three types of different linseed oil-alkyd resin ( Alk (I), Alk (II), and Alk (III) ) were prepared with the calculated amounts of mono glycerides and adipic acid (1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 Eq.Wt) respectively via monoglyceride method. The obtained alkyd resins were epoxidized via reaction with the calculated quantities of peracetic acid, which was prepared by the reaction of acetic anhydride with H 2 O 2 . Epoxidation occurred with the ratio (1: 1, 1 :3, and 1:6 Eq. Wt) of alkyd to peracetic acid. The effect of reaction time on the epoxy group content was measured during the epoxidation process. The prepared alkyd resins were analyzed by IR and H 1 NMR. The metal coated film properties of epoxidized alkyd resins were compared with those of unmodified alkyd resins. It was observed that the coating films of epoxidized alkyd resins have better in drying properties, hardness, adhesion, impact and flexibility than those of un epoxidized alkyd resins. The flammability properties of the paper coated films for the prepared brominated epoxidized alkyd resins were found to be fire retardant

  11. Facile synthesis of hypercrosslinked resins via chloromethylation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A sort of non-polystyrene type hypercrosslinked resin was firstly synthesized through chloromethylation of simple aryl molecules (benzene, toluene, naphthalene, diphenyl), succedent continuous Friedel–Crafts alkylation polymerization and post-crosslinking reaction. The chemical and porous structures of these novel resins ...

  12. Making of polymer fine particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Isamu

    1990-01-01

    The polymer particles having spherical shape and uniform grain diameter are applied to various fields such as powder coating, cosmetics, medicines, foods and others. These polymer fine particles are synthesized from monomers at the temperature higher than room temperature by emulsifying polymerization, suspension polymerization or dispersion polymerization, using polymerization initiator. The diameter of such synthesized fine particles is from 0.1 to 10 μm. In this study, the method of synthesizing polymer fine particles by dispersion radiation polymerization process without using polymerization initiator and emulsifying agent was examined. Monomers are dissolved in the solvent, in which monomers are soluble but polymers are insoluble, and by polymerizing with radiation, polymer fine particles are synthesized. It has the merits that additive agents are not contained, and the synthesis can be done at room temperature. The method and the results are reported. As the mechanism of forming fine particles, the reaction of beginning polymerization and the precipitation of polymers are explained. By controlling reaction temperature and monomer concentration, particle diameter can be adjusted. The monomers used were styrene, methyl metacrylate and vinyl acetate. (K.I.)

  13. A Study on Tensile Behavior and Water Uptake of Wood Powder-Composites Based on Epoxy and Unsaturated Polyester Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir hossein Pirayeshfar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two kinds of epoxy resins (i.e. high-viscosity and low-viscosity as well as one polyester resin (orthophthalic grade were selected and examined as pure resins and also as a polymeric matrix for producing wood-composites. In this study, tensile properties, water uptake, and degradation of samples in water were also investigated. The results show that addition of wood particles to the thermoset resins strongly impresses on their tensile behavior and water uptake. Tensile studies show that addition of wood powder improves the tensile properties of polyester resin as compared with viscosity epoxy one, although its modulus value is relatively less than that of low viscosity epoxy resin. Water uptake measurements also revealed that pure polyester resin and its related composites possess minimum water uptake and less degradation in water as compared with corresponding epoxy specimens and from which the lowest extent of materials is extracted and migrated to the water even after 50 days immersion in water.

  14. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  15. Electrodialytic decontamination of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nott, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a novel electrodialytic decontamination process for the selective removal of radioactive Cs from spent ion exchange resins containing large amounts of Li is described. The process involves passage of a dc electric current through a bed of the spent ion exchange resin in a specially designed electrodialytic cell. The radiocesium so removed from a volume of the spent resin is concentrated onto a much smaller volume of a Cs selective sorbent to achieve a significant radioactive waste volume reduction. Technical feasibility of the electrodialytic resin decontamination process has been demonstrated on a bench scale with a batch of simulated spent ion exchange resin and using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide as the Cs selective sorbent. A volume reduction factor between 10 and 17 has been estimated. The process appears to be economically attractive. Improvements in process economics can be expected from optimization of the process. Other possible applications of the EDRD process have been identified

  16. Embedding of reactor wastes in plastic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    STEAG Kernenergie GmbH is so far the only firm commercially to condition radioactive bead ion exchange resins by embedding in polystyrene resins. The objective of the work reported here was to study and develop methods for immobilization of other reactor wastes in plastic resins. Comparison studies on high quality cement however showed favourable results for cement with respect to process safety and economy. For this reason STEAG interrupted its work in the field of resin embedding after about one year. The work carried out during this period is surveyed in this report, which includes a comprehensive literature study on reactor wastes and their solidification in plastic resins as well as on regulations with regard to radioactive waste disposal in the member states of the European Communities

  17. Surface roughness of composite resins subjected to hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Ana Carolina Cabral; Bohner, Lauren Oliveira Lima; de Godoi, Ana Paula Terossi; Colucci, Vivian; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Catirse, Alma Blásida Concepción Elizaur Benitez

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of hydrochloric acid on surface roughness of composite resins subjected to brushing. Sixty samples measuring 2 mm thick x 6 mm diameter were prepared and used as experimental units. The study presented a 3x2 factorial design, in which the factors were composite resin (n=20), at 3 levels: microhybrid composite (Z100), nanofilled composite (FiltekTM Supreme), nanohybrid composite (Ice), and acid challenge (n=10) at 2 levels: absence and presence. Acid challenge was performed by immersion of specimens in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.2) for 1 min, 4 times per day for 7 days. The specimens not subjected to acid challenge were stored in 15 mL of artificial saliva at 37 oC. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to abrasive challenge by a brushing cycle performed with a 200 g weight at a speed of 356 rpm, totaling 17.8 cycles. Surface roughness measurements (Ra) were performed and analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p≤0.05). Surface roughness values were higher in the presence (1.07±0.24) as compared with the absence of hydrochloric acid (0.72±0.04). Surface roughness values were higher for microhybrid (1.01±0.27) compared with nanofilled (0.68 ±0.09) and nanohybrid (0.48±0.15) composites when the specimens were not subjects to acid challenge. In the presence of hydrochloric acid, microhybrid (1.26±0.28) and nanofilled (1.18±0,30) composites presents higher surface roughness values compared with nanohybrid (0.77±0.15). The hydrochloric acid affected the surface roughness of composite resin subjected to brushing.

  18. Particle motion in fluidised beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, M.G.

    1999-07-01

    Gas fluidised beds are important components in many process industries, e.g. coal combustors and granulators, but not much is known about the movement of the solids. Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) enables the movement of a single, radioactive tracer particle to be followed rapidly and faithfully. Experiments were carried out in columns sized between 70 and 240mm. diameter, operating in the bubbling regime at ambient process conditions using particles of group B and D (Geldart Classification). Particle motion was tracked and the data applied to models for particle movement at the gas distributor as well as close to other surfaces and to models for particle circulation in beds of cohesive particles. In the light of these data, models for particle and bubble interaction, particle circulation, segregation, attrition, erosion, heat transfer and fluidised bed scale-up rules were reassessed. Particle motion is directly caused by bubble motion, and their velocities were found to be equal for particles travelling in a bubble. PEPT enables particle circulation to be measured, giving a more accurate correlation for future predictions. Particle motion follows the scale-up rules based on similarities of the bubble motion in the bed. A new group of parameters was identified controlling the amount of attrition in fluidised beds and a new model to predict attrition is proposed. (author)

  19. Packing configuration performance for small stem diameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikin, J.A.; Spence, C.G.; Cumming, D.

    1997-01-01

    The extensive use of graphite packing and its excellent track record for large isolating valves in CANDU, Primary Heat Transfer (PHT) systems has resulted in an increased application of graphite packing on the conventional side. Many of these applications are in air operated valves (AOVs) where the packing sets are used on small stem diameters (<1 inch) with frequent short-cycling strokes (± 10% of full stroke). The direct application of the proven packing configurations for large isolated valves to control valve application has generated problems such as stiction, packing wear and, in isolated cases, stem stall. To address this issue, a test program was conducted at AECL, CRL by MED branch. The testing showed that by reconfiguring the packing sets and using PTFE wafers reductions in stem friction of 50% at ambient conditions, a 3 fold at hot conditions are achievable. The test program also demonstrated benefits gained in packing wear with different stem roughness finishes and the potential need to exercise small stems valves that see less than full stroke cycling. The paper describes the tests results and provides field support experience. (author)

  20. Waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resin obtained by mini emulsion polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo, Edwin; Lopez, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Four waterborne hyper branched alkyd-acrylic resins (HBRAA) were synthesized by mini emulsion polymerization from a hyper branched alkyd resin (HBR), methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA) and acrylic acid (AA), by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and ammonium persulfate (AP) as initiators. The reaction between HBR and acrylic monomers was evidenced by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The conversion percentage, glass transition temperature (T g ), content of acrylic polymer (determined by soxhlet extraction) and molecular weight increased with the content of acrylic monomers used in the synthesis. The main structure formed during the synthesis was the HBRAA. The analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the particle size distribution of HBRAA2, HBRAA3 and HBRAA4 resins were mainly mono modal. The film properties (gloss, flexibility, adhesion and drying time) of the HBRAA were good. (author)

  1. Waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resin obtained by mini emulsion polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murillo, Edwin, E-mail: edwinalbertomurillo@gmail.com [Grupo de Investigacion en Materiales Polimericos (GIMAPOL), Universidad Francisco de Paula Santander, San Jose de Cucuta (Colombia); Lopez, Betty [Grupo de Investigacion en Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle, Medellin (Colombia)

    2016-10-15

    Four waterborne hyper branched alkyd-acrylic resins (HBRAA) were synthesized by mini emulsion polymerization from a hyper branched alkyd resin (HBR), methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA) and acrylic acid (AA), by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and ammonium persulfate (AP) as initiators. The reaction between HBR and acrylic monomers was evidenced by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The conversion percentage, glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), content of acrylic polymer (determined by soxhlet extraction) and molecular weight increased with the content of acrylic monomers used in the synthesis. The main structure formed during the synthesis was the HBRAA. The analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the particle size distribution of HBRAA2, HBRAA3 and HBRAA4 resins were mainly mono modal. The film properties (gloss, flexibility, adhesion and drying time) of the HBRAA were good. (author)

  2. New system applying image processor to automatically separate cation exchange resin and anion exchange resin for condensate demineralizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tsuneyasu; Nagao, Nobuaki; Yoshimori, Yasuhide; Inoue, Takashi; Yoda, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    In PWR plant, condensate demineralizer is equipped to remove corrosive ion in condensate water. Mixed bed packing cation exchange resin (CER) and anion exchange resin (AER) is generally applied, and these are regenerated after separation to each layer periodically. Since the AER particle is slightly lighter than the CER particle, the AER layer is brought up onto the CER layer by feeding water upward from the bottom of column (backwashing). The separation performance is affected by flow rate and temperature of water for backwashing, so normally operators set the proper condition parameters regarding separation manually every time for regeneration. The authors have developed the new separation system applying CCD camera and image processor. The system is comprised of CCD camera, LED lamp, image processor, controller, flow control valves and background color panel. Blue color of the panel, which is corresponding to the complementary color against both ivory color of AER and brown color of CER, is key to secure the system precision. At first the color image of the CER via the CCD camera is digitized and memorized by the image processor. The color of CER in the field of vision of the camera is scanned by the image processor, and the position where the maximum difference of digitized color index is indicated is judged as the interface. The detected interface is able to make the accordance with the set point by adjusting the flow rate of backwashing. By adopting the blue background panel, it is also possible to draw the AER out of the column since detecting the interface of the CER clearly. The system has provided the reduction of instability factor concerning separation of resin during regeneration process. The system has been adopted in two PWR plants in Japan, it has been demonstrating its stable and precise performance. (author)

  3. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative 137 Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either 85 Sr or 60 Co. Release rates of 137 Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement

  4. Effect of organoclay incorporation on dental resin morphology;Efeito da incorporacao de argila oganofilica na morfologia de resina adontologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Nadja M.S.; Reis, Romulo P.B. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Leite, Itamara F. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais; Morais, Crislene R.S.; Silva, Suedina M.L., E-mail: suedina@dema.ufcg.edu.b [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present work was to incorporate nanosilicates in commercial dental resins in order to prepare dental nanocomposites competitive as commercial nanoparticulates dental resins. Thus, a silicate, Cloisite 20A (C20A), was incorporated in a microhybrid dental resin (Z100) and morphological properties of the nanocomposites evaluated as a function of the incorporation method and the amount of filler employed. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results evidence that nanocomposites have been obtained and according to SEM results, the morphology of microhybrid resin was modified when C20A nanoparticulate was incorporated improve the size distribution and reduce the agglomeration of the particles. (author)

  5. High Strain Rate Compressive Behavior of Polyurethane Resin and Polyurethane/Al2O3 Hollow Sphere Syntactic Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dung D. Luong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane resins and foams are finding extensive applications. Seat cushions and covers in automobiles are examples of these materials. In the present work, hollow alumina particles are used as fillers in polyurethane resin to develop closed-cell syntactic foams. The fabricated syntactic foams are tested for compressive properties at quasistatic and high strain rates. Strain rate sensitivity is an important concern for automotive applications due to the possibility of crash at high speeds. Both the polyurethane resin and the syntactic foam show strain rate sensitivity in compressive strength. It is observed that the compressive strength increases with strain rate. The energy absorbed up to 10% strain in the quasistatic regime is 400% higher for the syntactic foam in comparison to that of neat resin at the same strain rate.

  6. Antifungal Effect of Silver Nanoparticles in Acrylic Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghahremanloo

    Full Text Available Introduction: In patients using dental prosthesis, growth of various microorganisms under the prosthesis base which leads to inflammation and infections such as candidiasis is common. The aim of this study was to assess the antifungal effects of acrylic resins containing silver nanoparticles on candida Albicans.Materials & Methods: To accomplish this in vitro study inorder to prepare acrylic samples, metallic cylindricals with a diameter of 10mm and thickness of 4mm were used. Forty samples as standard control group and 40 samples containing silver nanoparticles in four different concentrations were used. Immersion of samples in fungal suspension (standard and hospitally isolated were carried out to accomplish antifungal tests. After 0,1,6 and 24 hours the fungal colonies were counted. To describe the data and to compare groups, student-t test was used.Results: In the silver nanoparticles with 2.5% concentration, the highest mean difference for standard candida Albicans after 24 hours of exposure time was 501.0±23.1 and for 5% concentration after 6 hours of exposure time was 953±87 and for 10% concentration after 6 hours of exposure time was 1000±24.9.Conclusion: In acrylic resins, increasing both the silver nanoparticles concentration and the exposure time will increase the antifungal effect.

  7. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles in the workplace: Exploring sampling techniques and strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.H.; Gijsbers, J.H.J.; Lurvink, M.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, toxicological and epidemiological studies on health effects related to particle exposure suggest that 'ultrafine particles' (particles with an aerodynamic diameter of <100 nm) may cause severe health effects after inhalation. Although the toxicological mechanisms for these effects have not

  8. Preparation and characterization of ZnO-PMMA resin nanocomposites for denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierech, Mariusz; Wojnarowicz, Jacek; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Bączkowski, Bohdan; Grudniak, Anna Maria; Wolska, Krystyna Izabela; Łojkowski, Witold; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to investigate the antifungal activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) against Candida albicans. Some attempts have been made to find out the best way to introduce ZnONPs into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin material and to determine some parameters of a newly formed composite. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were manufactured and their basic physical parameters were determined (average particle size, density, specific surface area). Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ZnONPs was determined for the Candida albicans standard strain. The average size of ZnO conglomerates in the monomer solution of PMMA resin was measured using a dynamic light scattering instrument. PMMA resin samples with incorporated ZnONPs were produced. The morphology of nanopowder and the newly formed composite was examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition, the roughness parameter of PMMA resin material was investigated before and after ZnONPs modification. Nanopowder with the average particle size of 30 nm, density of 5.24 g/cm3 and surface area of 39 m2/g was obtained. MIC was determined at the level of 0.75 mg/mL. The average size of ZnO conglomerates in the monomer solution of acrylic resin dropped by 11 times after ultrasound activation. SEM examination of a newly formed composite showed a successful introduction of ZnONPs confirmed by the energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. There were no statistically significant differences in the biomaterial roughness before and after the modification of ZnONPs. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into acrylic resin used for the production of denture bases. The presence of nanoparticles with sizes below 100 nm was confirmed. Nevertheless a newly created composite needs to be further investigated to improve its homogeneity, and to check its microbiological properties, strength and biocompatibility prior to its possible clinical use.

  9. Direct spectrometry: a new alternative for measuring the fluorescence of composite resins and dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Tm; de Oliveira, Hpm; Severino, D; Balducci, I; Huhtala, Mfrl; Gonçalves, Sep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluorescence intensity of different composite resins and compare those values with the fluorescence intensity of dental tissues. Different composite resins were used to make 10 discs (2 mm in depth and 4 mm in diameter) of each brand, divided into groups: 1) Z (Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE), 2) ES (Esthet-X, Dentsply), 3) A (Amelogen Plus, Ultradent), 4) DVS (Durafill-VS, Heraeus Kulzer) with 2 mm composite resin for enamel (A2), 5) OES ([Esthet-X] opaque-OA [1 mm] + enamel-A2 [1 mm]); 6) ODVSI ([Charisma-Opal/Durafill-VSI], opaque-OM (1 mm) + translucent [1mm]), and 7) DVSI ([Durafill- VSI] translucent [2 mm]). Dental tissue specimens were obtained from human anterior teeth cut in a mesiodistal direction to obtain enamel, dentin, and enamel/dentin samples (2 mm). The fluorescence intensity of specimens was directly measured using an optic fiber associated with a spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB 4000) and recorded in graphic form (Origin 8.0 program). Data were submitted to statistical analysis using Dunnet, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests. Light absorption of the composite resins was obtained in a spectral range from 250 to 450 nm, and that of dental tissues was between 250 and 300 nm. All composite resins were excited at 398 nm and exhibited maximum emissions of around 485 nm. Fluorescence intensity values for all of the resins showed statistically significant differences (measured in arbitrary units [AUs]), with the exception of groups Z and DVS. Group DVSI had the highest fluorescence intensity values (13539 AU), followed by ODVS (10440 AU), DVS (10146 AU), ES (3946 AU), OES (3841 AU), A (3540 AU), and Z (1146 AU). The fluorescence intensity values for the composite resins differed statistically from those of dental tissues (E=1380 AU; D=6262 AU; E/D=3251 AU). The opacity interfered with fluorescence intensity, and group Z demonstrated fluorescence intensity values closest to that of tooth enamel. It is concluded that the

  10. Fabrication of engineered particle-doped light diffuser with a soft transparent mold of UV-curable polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jicheng; Liu, Yanhua; Shen, Su; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-11-01

    Engineered particle-doped light diffuser is realized by a simple, low-cost soft lithographic method. A flexible photopolymerizable mold is employed as an intermediate transferring template directly from the developed photoresist texture to fabricate engineered particle-doped light diffuser. The well-designed surface microstructure can directionally scatter the incident light, while the doped ultra-violet curable resin with low concentration of the 2 μm-diameter organosilicone particles can homogenize the scattering light without decreasing transmittance. Experimental results show that the measured transmittance can be as high as 96.9% with little backscattering effect over the whole visible regime. Meanwhile, the haze raises from 30% to 75% with increased dopant concentration from 1 wt% to 7 wt% and thickness of the residual layer from 10 μm to 40 μm remained in the imprinting process. The proposed engineered particle-doped light diffuser can manage scattering angle, luminance uniformity and haze, thus it has the capability of homogenizing light and eliminating striations to create more visually pleasing structured lighting in commercial and residential environments. We anticipate that the approach appears to be a strong candidate for future development because of its scalable nature, environmentally-friendly process and relatively low cost.

  11. Mockup Small-Diameter Air Distribution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Poerschke and A. Rudd

    2016-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to be brought easily within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air hander unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives an equal amount of airflow, regardless of the duct position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions, each duct continues to receive similar airflow. The design method uses an additive approach to reach the total needed zonal airflow. Once the cubic feet per minute needed to satisfy the thermal load of a zone has been determined, the total number of duct runs to a zone can be calculated by dividing the required airflow by the standard airflow from each duct. The additive approach greatly simplifies the design effort and reduces the potential for duct design mistakes to be made. Measured results indicate that this plenum design can satisfy the heating load. However, the total airflow falls short of satisfying the cooling load in a hypothetical building. Static pressure inside the plenum box of 51.5 Pa limited the total airflow of the attached mini-split heat pump blower, thus limiting the total thermal capacity. Fan energy consumption is kept to 0.16 to 0.22 watt/CFM by using short duct runs and smooth duct material.

  12. Body diameters in 3 - 6 years old children from Plovdiv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tineshev Slavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to analyze the body diameters in 3-6 year old children. The biacromial diameters were taken as well as the two chest diameters, the bicristal and bitrohanterial diameters in 316 children (157 boys and 159 girls 3, 4, 5 and 6 years of age attending kindergarten in Plovdiv. The analysis shows that all diameters, with the exception of the bitrohanterial have higher values in boys. The absolute year's increment of the diameters is greater in girls. The growth velocity of the researched features is greatest at the age of 3-4 and 4-5, decreasing at different rates for the different features at the age of 5-6. The only exception is the sagittal chest diameter in both sexes and the bitrohanterial diameters in girls.

  13. Evaluation of Resin-Resin Interface in Direct Composite Restoration Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Iovan, G.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resin-resin interface when a universal bonding agent was used in two different strategies in direct restoration repair. Two composite resins (a micro-filled hybrid and a nano-filled hybrid) as old restorations that have to be repair, a universal bonding agent and a micro-filled hybrid composite resin (different then that aged) as new material for repair were chosen for the study. Non-aged samples were used as control and aged samples were used as study groups. The universal bonding agent was applied in etch-and-rinse and in self-etch strategies. The interface between old and new composite resins was evaluated by SEM and the microleakage was assessed by scoring the dye penetration. Very good adaptation of the two different composite resins placed in direct contact in non-aged samples was recorded. No gaps or defects were visible and strong resin-resin contact was observed. After aging, enlargement of resin-resin junction were observed in most of the samples and a increased dye penetration was recorded irrespective of the strategy (etch-and-rinse or self-etch) used for bonding agent application.

  14. Effects of Different Surface Treatment Methods and MDP Monomer on Resin Cementation of Zirconia Ceramics an In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akçaboy, Cihan

    2015-01-01

    Resin cements are generally preferred for cementation of zirconia ceramics. Resin bonding of zirconia ceramics cannot be done with the same methods of traditional ceramics because zirconia is a silica-free material. In recent years, many methods have been reported in the literature to provide the resin bonding of zirconia ceramics. The purpose of this in vitro study is to evaluate effects of different surface treatments and 10-metacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) monomer on shear bond strength between zirconia and resin cement. 120 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: sandblasting, group II: sandblasting + tribochemical silica coating + silane, group III: sandblasting + Nd:YAG (neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser. One specimen from each group was evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Specimens in each group were bonded either with conventional resin cement Variolink II or with a MDP containing resin cement Panavia F2.0. Subgroups of bonded specimens were stored in distilled water (37°C) for 24 hours or 14 days. Following water storage shear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min in a universal test machine. Then statistical analyses were performed. Highest shear bond strength values were observed in group II. No significant difference between group I and III was found when Panavia F2.0 resin cement was used. When Variolink II resin cement was used group III showed significantly higher bond strength than group I. In group I, Panavia F2.0 resin cement showed statistically higher shear bond strength than Variolink II resin cement. In group II no significant difference was found between resin cements. No significant difference was found between specimens stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours and 14 days. In group I surface irregularities with sharp edges and grooves were observed. In group II less roughened surface was observed with silica particles. In group III surface microcracks

  15. Bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four kinds of injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, a polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and a polycarbonate) and PMMA, as a control, were tested. The eight types of surface treatment: ((1) no treatment, (2) air abrasion, (3) dichloromethane, (4) ethyl acetate, (5) 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (6) air abrasion and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (7) tribochemical silica coating, and (8) tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin) were applied to each specimen. The chairside autopolymerizing reline resins were bonded to disks of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. All of the specimens were immersed in water for 4 months and then thermocycled for 10,000 cycles in water between 5 and 55°C. The shear bond strengths were determined. The shear bond strengths of the two polyamides treated using air abrasion, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate and no treatment were exceedingly low. The greatest bond strength was recorded for the polyethylene terephthalate copolymer specimens treated with tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (22.5MPa). The bond strengths of the other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins increased using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin were the most effective surface treatments among all denture base resins tested. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunogold Staining of London Resin (LR) White Sections for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skepper, Jeremy N; Powell, Janet M

    2008-06-01

    INTRODUCTIONIn post-embedding methods of immunogold staining, the cells or tissues are fixed chemically or cryoimmobilized, dehydrated, and embedded in epoxy or acrylic resins. Thin sections (50-70 nm in thickness) are cut using an ultramicrotome with a diamond knife, using a water bath to collect the sections as they slide off the knife. The sections are stretched with solvent vapor or a heat source and collected onto either bare or plastic-coated nickel grids. The sections are then stained immunochemically with primary antibodies raised against antigens exposed on the surface of the sections. The primary antibodies are visualized by staining immunochemically with secondary antibodies raised against the species and isotype of the primary antibodies, conjugated to colloidal gold particles. The immunochemically stained sections are then contrast stained with salts of uranium (uranyl acetate) and lead (lead citrate) to reveal the ultrastructure of the cells, and are finally viewed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). LR White was introduced as a low-toxicity alternative to epoxy resins, which frequently contained carcinogens. Unlike the simplest acrylic resins, in which monomers are polymerized to form long chains, the LR resins contain aromatic cross-linkers to improve the stability of the sections under the electron beam. LR White and Gold both have very low viscosity and readily penetrate, even into dense tissue. In this protocol, aldehyde-fixed tissue is dehydrated in ethanol, impregnated in LR White resin and polymerized under vacuum or in a nitrogen atmosphere before sectioning and immunogold staining.

  17. Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin via microwave-assisted ball milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, Rong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chen, Ding, E-mail: ma97chen@hotmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Qianxia [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Bian, Zhibing; Dai, Haixiong; Zhang, Chi [Jiangsu Jinling Special Paint Co., Ltd., Yangzhou 225212 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • TiH{sub 2} was modified with epoxy resin by microwave-assisted ball milling. • The epoxy ring was opened under the coupling effect of microwave and ball milling. • Microwave-assisted ball milling improved the compatibility of TiH{sub 2} with epoxy. - Abstract: Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin was carried out via microwave-assisted ball milling and the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetry (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). A sedimentation test was performed to investigate the compatibility of the modified nano titanium hydride with the epoxy resin. The results show that the epoxy resin molecules were grafted on the surface of nano titanium hydride particles during the microwave-assisted ball milling process, which led to the improvement of compatibility between the nanoparticles and epoxy resin. According to the FT-IR, the grafting site was likely to be located around the epoxy group due to the fact that the epoxy ring was opened. However, compared with microwave-assisted ball milling, the conventional ball milling could not realize the surface modification, indicating that the coupling effect of mechanical force and microwave played a key role during the process.

  18. [Comparison of surface roughness of nanofilled and microhybrid composite resins after curing and polishing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Lv, Da; Liu, Kailei; Zhang, Weisheng; Yao, Yao; Liao, Chuhong

    2014-05-01

    To compare the surface roughness of nanofilled dental composite resin and microhybrid composite resins after curing and polishing. A nanofilled composite (Z350) and 4 microhybrid composites (P60, Z250, Spectrum, and AP-X) were fabricated from the lateral to the medial layers to prepare 8 mm×8 mm×5 mm cubical specimens. The 4 lateral surfaces of each specimens were polished with abrasive disks (Super-Snap). Profilometer was used to test the mean surface roughness (Ra) after polishing. P60 had the lowest Ra (0.125∓0.030 µm) followed by Z250 and Spectrum. The Ra of Z350 (0.205∓0.052 µm) was greater than that of the other 3 resins, and AP-X had the roughest surfaces. Under scanning electron microscope, the polished faces of P60 resin were characterized by minor, evenly distributed particles with fewer scratches; the polished faces of Z350 presented with scratches where defects of the filling material could be seen. The nanofilled composite Z350 has smooth surface after polishing by abrasive disks, but its smoothness remains inferior to that of other micro-hybrid composite resins.

  19. Simultaneous separation and detection of actinides in acidic solutions using an extractive scintillating resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roane, J E; DeVol, T A

    2002-11-01

    An extractive scintillating resin was evaluated for the simultaneous separation and detection of actinides in acidic solutions. The transuranic extractive scintillating (TRU-ES) resin is composed of an inert macroporous polystyrene core impregnated with organic fluors (diphenyloxazole and 1,4-bis-(4-methyl-5-phenyl-2-oxazolyl)benzene) and an extractant (octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide in tributyl phosphate). The TRU-ES resin was packed into FEP Teflon tubing to produce a flow cell (0.2-mL free column volume), which is placed into a scintillation detection system to obtain pulse height spectra and time series data during loading and elution of actinides onto/from the resin. The alpha-particle absolute detection efficiencies ranged from 77% to 96.5%, depending on the alpha energy and quench. In addition to the on-line analyses, off-line analyses of the effluent can be conducted using conventional detection methods. The TRU-ES resin was applied to the quantification of a mixed radionuclide solution and two actual waste samples. The on-line characterization of the mixed radionuclide solution was within 10% of the reported activities whereas the agreement with the waste samples was not as good due to sorption onto the sample container walls and the oxidation state of plutonium. Agreement between the on-line and off-line analyses was within 35% of one another for both waste samples.

  20. An insight into current concepts and techniques in resin bonding to high strength ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, R; Kaur, P

    2016-06-01

    Reliable bonding between high strength ceramics and resin composite cement is difficult to achieve because of their chemical inertness and lack of silica content. The aim of this review was to assess the current literature describing methods for resin bonding to ceramics with high flexural strength such as glass-infiltrated alumina and zirconia, densely sintered alumina and yttria-partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline ceramic (Y-TZP) with respect to bond strength and bond durability. Suitable peer reviewed publications in the English language were identified through searches performed in PubMed, Google Search and handsearches. The keywords or phrases used were 'resin-ceramic bond', 'silane coupling agents', 'air particle abrasion', 'zirconia ceramic' and 'resin composite cements'. Studies from January 1989 to June 2015 were included. The literature demonstrated that there are multiple techniques available for surface treatments but bond strength testing under different investigations have produced conflicting results. Within the scope of this review, there is no evidence to support a universal technique of ceramic surface treatment for adhesive cementation. A combination of chemical and mechanical treatments might be the recommended solution. The hydrolytic stability of the resin ceramic bond should be enhanced. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  1. Produced water treatment using polymeric resins; Resinas polimericas para tratamento da agua produzida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louvisse, Ana Maria Travalloni; Freire, Norma de Oliveira [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Queiros, Yure Gomes de Carvalho; Silva, Carla Michele Frota da; Barros, Cintia Chagas; Lucas, Elizabeth Fernandes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas

    2008-07-01

    The treatment and disposal of oily waters from oil production and refining processes represent an important technological pass for attendance of the ambient legislation and to the politics of the Cia of search of the environmental excellence. The reuse or reinjection of the co-produced water has been considered an interesting strategical alternative, however, the water quality requirement for these processes demands a pretreatment step, considering the exit effluent from primary and secondary treatment processes currently used. This work presents resulted of the polymeric resin development for tertiary treatment of oily waters with low oil and grasses content and fine solids, including the dissolved fraction. These resins can adsorb, in reversible form, organic components. Its high adsorption capacity is determined by the polarity, superficial area, range of porosity and a wide distribution of particle size and pore. Another important characteristic is the possibility of its use in some cycles of work due to its weak forces of interaction between the contaminants and the surface of the resin. Regeneration can be carried through of diverse forms, including the use of solvent, with or without the variation of temperature and/or pH. The gotten results indicated a high resin adsorption capacity, with concentrated oily water treatment volume 10,000 times the volume of resin used. (author)

  2. Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin via microwave-assisted ball milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Rong; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Qianxia; Bian, Zhibing; Dai, Haixiong; Zhang, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • TiH 2 was modified with epoxy resin by microwave-assisted ball milling. • The epoxy ring was opened under the coupling effect of microwave and ball milling. • Microwave-assisted ball milling improved the compatibility of TiH 2 with epoxy. - Abstract: Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin was carried out via microwave-assisted ball milling and the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetry (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). A sedimentation test was performed to investigate the compatibility of the modified nano titanium hydride with the epoxy resin. The results show that the epoxy resin molecules were grafted on the surface of nano titanium hydride particles during the microwave-assisted ball milling process, which led to the improvement of compatibility between the nanoparticles and epoxy resin. According to the FT-IR, the grafting site was likely to be located around the epoxy group due to the fact that the epoxy ring was opened. However, compared with microwave-assisted ball milling, the conventional ball milling could not realize the surface modification, indicating that the coupling effect of mechanical force and microwave played a key role during the process

  3. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joo Hoon; Choi, Eui Hwan

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  4. Influence of Finishing and Polishing Techniques and Abrasion on Transmittance and Roughness of Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Pma; Ramos, T M; de Azevedo, C S; de Lima, E; de Souza, Shj; Turbino, M L; Cesar, P F; Matos, A B

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of finishing and polishing systems and toothbrush abrasion on transmittance (T) and surface roughness (Ra) of three composite resins (Filtek Z350 XT, Tetric N-Ceram, and IPS Empress Direct). Eighteen resin disks (10 mm diameter × 2 mm thick) finished by polyester strips had initial surface smoothness recorded, representing phase 1 (P1). Specimens were divided into three groups (n=6) according to the finishing/polishing instrument used (OneGloss, TopGloss, and Sof-Lex) to compose phase 2 samples (P2). Then specimens were subjected to 514 cycles of toothbrush simulation using a toothpaste slurry, with a constant load applied to soft bristles, and were then washed (phase 3=P3). After each phase, the specimens were examined by an optical profiler and spectrophotometer to measure Ra and T. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance, Tukey and Pearson tests. T values were statistically influenced by composite resin ( p=0.000) and phase of measurement ( p=0.000) factors, while the finishing/polishing system used ( p=0.741) did not affect T. On the other hand, Ra values were statistically affected by the factor finishing/polishing system ( p=0.000), but not by composite resin ( p=0.100) and phase of measurement ( p=0.451). Tetric N-Ceram and Empress Direct presented higher values of roughness when polished by OneGloss, while TopGloss and Sof-Lex showed a lower roughness. It can be concluded that composite resins transmitted more light after dental abrasion. Transmittance of composite resins was not modified by the distinct roughness created by finishing/polishing instruments.

  5. Behavior of resin-based endodontic sealer cements in thin and thick films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Epita S; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2012-09-01

    For root canal fillings, a thin layer of sealer cement is generally recommended. However, with resin-based sealers, lower bond strength to dentin has been shown in thin layers compared to thick, contrary to typical behavior of adhesive layers between two adherents. The aim of this study was to evaluate tensile and shear bond strength of thin and thick films of three resin-based sealers (one epoxy-based and two methacrylate-based) materials and to investigate corner effects of one methacrylate-based resin sealer. Freshly mixed sealer cements were placed between metal-to-metal surfaces of plano-parallel stainless steel aligned rods with diameter 4.7 mm. Ten samples were prepared for each type, thickness (0.1 and 1.0 mm) of sealer and test. Tensile and shear strengths were measured after 48 h for the methacrylate-based materials and after 7 days for the epoxy-based material using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Corner effects were investigated using one methacrylate-based resin material. Film thickness had a highly significant influence on both tensile and shear strengths. For methacrylate resin-based sealers, thin films had higher bond strength than thick (ptensile and shear bond strength). With the epoxy-based sealer either no difference (shear) or lower bond strength in thin films (tensile; ptensile bond strength results. The higher tensile and shear bond strength of resin-based sealer in thin films is the opposite of that previously reported for bonding to dentin. The substrate clearly has an important role in failure behavior. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors affecting the bond strength of denture base and reline acrylic resins to base metal materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Tanoue

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The shear bond strengths of two hard chairside reline resin materials and an auto-polymerizing denture base resin material to cast Ti and a Co-Cr alloy treated using four conditioning methods were investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Disk specimens (diameter 10 mm and thickness 2.5 mm were cast from pure Ti and Co-Cr alloy. The specimens were wet-ground to a final surface finish of 600 grit, air-dried, and treated with the following bonding systems: 1 air-abraded with 50-70-µm grain alumina (CON; 2 1 + conditioned with a primer, including an acidic phosphonoacetate monomer (MHPA; 3 1 + conditioned with a primer including a diphosphate monomer (MDP; 4 treated with a tribochemical system. Three resin materials were applied to each metal specimen. Shear bond strengths were determined before and after 10,000 thermocycles. RESULTS: The strengths decreased after thermocycling for all combinations. Among the resin materials assessed, the denture base material showed significantly (p<0.05 greater shear bond strengths than the two reline materials, except for the CON condition. After 10,000 thermocycles, the bond strengths of two reline materials decreased to less than 10 MPa for both metals. The bond strengths of the denture base material with MDP were sufficient: 34.56 MPa for cast Ti and 38.30 for Co-Cr alloy. CONCLUSION: Bonding of reline resin materials to metals assessed was clinically insufficient, regardless of metal type, surface treatment, and resin composition. For the relining of metal denture frameworks, a denture base material should be used.

  7. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hoon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  8. Magnetorheology of submicron diameter iron microwires dispersed in silicone oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R C; Karli, J O; Vavreck, A N; Zimmerman, D T; Ngatu, G T; Wereley, N M

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the magnetorheological (MR) properties of suspensions containing iron microwires with 260 nm diameter and two distinct length distributions of 5.4 ± 5.2 µm and 7.6 ± 5.1 µm suspended in silicone oil (0.45 Pa s). The rheological properties of these fluids were determined using a parallel plate rheometer equipped with a variable strength electromagnet. The shear stress was measured as a function of shear rate for increasing applied magnetic fields. These results were modeled using the Bingham-plastic constitutive model to determine the apparent yield stress and viscosity as a function of increasing volume fraction and length of microwires. At a saturated magnetic flux density, the yield stress using the 5.4 µm microwires was found to be 0.65, 2.23, and 4.76 kPa for the 2, 4, and 6 vol% suspensions, respectively. For the 7.6 µm wires, the yield stress increases to 8.2 kPa for the 6 vol% suspension. Compared with conventional MR fluids employing spherical particles, the degree of settling is markedly decreased in the microwire-based fluids. At 6 vol%, conventional fluids display appreciable settling whereas the microwire-based fluids display no discernable settling. Moreover, the rod-shaped microwires are shown to increase the yield stress of the fluids and enhance the MR performance

  9. Diameter-tailored telecom-band luminescence in InP/InAs heterostructure nanowires grown on InP (111)B substrate with continuously-modulated diameter from microscale to nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Tateno, Kouta; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Gotoh, Hideki

    2018-04-02

    We report diameter-tailored luminescence in telecom band of InP/InAs multi-heterostructure nanowires with continuously-modulated diameter from microscale to nanoscale. By using the self-catalyzed vapor-solid-liquid approach, we tune the indium particle size, and consequently the InP/InAs nanowire diameter, during growth by modulating the flow rate of the indium source material. This technique allows a high degree of continuous tuning in a wide scale from microscale to nanoscale. Hence it offers an original way to bridge the gap between microscale-featured photolithographic and nanoscale-featured nanolithographic processes and to incorporate InAs quantum disks with tunable diameters into a single InP/InAs quantum heterostructure nanowire. We realized site-defined nanowires with nanoscale diameters initiated from site-defined microscale-diameter particles made with a conventional photolithographic process. The luminescence wavelength from InAs quantum disks is directly connected to the nanowire diameter, by which the strain in the InAs quantum disks is tailored. This work provides new opportunities in the fabrication and design of nanowire devices that extends beyond what is achievable with the current technologies and enables the nanowire shape to be engineered thus offering the potential to broaden the application range of nanowire devices.

  10. Diameter-tailored telecom-band luminescence in InP/InAs heterostructure nanowires grown on InP (111)B substrate with continuously-modulated diameter from microscale to nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Tateno, Kouta; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Gotoh, Hideki

    2018-04-01

    We report diameter-tailored luminescence in telecom band of InP/InAs multi-heterostructure nanowires with continuously-modulated diameter from microscale to nanoscale. By using the self-catalyzed vapor-solid-liquid approach, we tune the indium particle size, and consequently the InP/InAs nanowire diameter, during growth by modulating the flow rate of the indium source material. This technique allows a high degree of continuous tuning in a wide scale from microscale to nanoscale. Hence it offers an original way to bridge the gap between microscale-featured photolithographic and nanoscale-featured nanolithographic processes and to incorporate InAs quantum disks with tunable diameters into a single InP/InAs quantum heterostructure nanowire. We realized site-defined nanowires with nanoscale diameters initiated from site-defined microscale-diameter particles made with a conventional photolithographic process. The luminescence wavelength from InAs quantum disks is directly connected to the nanowire diameter, by which the strain in the InAs quantum disks is tailored. This work provides new opportunities in the fabrication and design of nanowire devices that extends beyond what is achievable with the current technologies and enables the nanowire shape to be engineered thus offering the potential to broaden the application range of nanowire devices.

  11. Two-body wear simulation influence on some direct and indirect dental resin biocomposites - A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracostea, Adriana; Morar, Nadina; Florea, Adrian; Soanca, Andrada; Badea, Mindra Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively assess the outcomes of two in vitro aging methods, thermal-cycling and twobody wear simulation accomplished with a dual-axis chewing device, on the surface characteristics of eight direct and indirect dental resin biocomposites. Eighty mesial-occlusal-distal dental cavities were restored with four direct nanohybrid composite materials and with four nano- and micro-hybrid lab-fabricated resin composite inlays. After the restored teeth were subjected to thermal-cycling and wear simulation based on mechanical loading, the surface texture features of the restorations were separately analysed for each of the methods, on epoxy resin models using a digital camera, computer-aided-design system, optical stereo-microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. All the dental restorative resin based composites used in this investigation displayed different cyclic wear patterns after undergoing mechanical loading. After thermal-cycling, the group of resin composite inlays showed a better adaptation, a smoother and more polished occlusal surface compared with direct restorative materials. Only two of direct nanohybrid resin composites performed better after two aging methods. One nanohybrid and the other two microhybrid resin inlays did not perform as expected when they were subjected to simulated wear compared to the rest of test materials. The use of the two-body wear simulation method revealed important information about the behavior of the dental resin-based composites when multiple oral factors are involved in a lab-simulated condition. Furthermore, the macro- and micro-morphological analysis showed different abrasion patterns among the materials being tested according to the filler percentage and distribution of the particles within the resin matrix.

  12. Lumbar Vertebral Canal Diameters in Adult Ugandan Skeletons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The midsagittal, transverse diameters of the lumbar vertebral canal and the anteroposterior diameter of the inferior vertebral notch were measured using an electronic digital caliper. Collected data was analyzed using SPSS 12.0 computer program. Results and discussion: In both sexes, the midsagittal diameter of the canal ...

  13. Aortic Root Diameter and Longitudinal Blood Pressure Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Ingelsson, Erik; Pencina, Michael J.; Levy, Daniel; Aragam, Jayashri; Mitchell, Gary F.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2008-01-01

    Proximal aortic diameter, including aortic root (AoR) diameter, has been inversely related to pulse pressure (PP) in cross-sectional studies. So, investigators have hypothesized that a smaller AoR diameter may increase risk of developing hypertension. Prospective studies are lacking to test this hypothesis.

  14. Mineralogy of fossil resins in Northern Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdasarov, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The investigation is focused on identification and origin of fossil resins from the Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary sediments of Northern Eurasia on the basis of detailed study of their physical and chemical characteristics: morphology; size; mass; density; optical, mechanical, and thermal properties; chemical composition; etc. The composition of amorphous organic minerals with polymeric structure, fossil resins included, is studied with IR spectrometry, the EPR method, derivatography at low heating rates, XRD, chemical analysis, emission spectrometry, etc. The results of investigation summarized for the Baltic-Dnieper, North Siberian, and Far East amber-bearing provinces show some similarity of fossil resins in combination with specific features inherent to each province. Resins from the Baltic-Dnieper province should be termed as amber (succinite). Their variety is the most characteristic of Northern and Eastern Europe. Amber-like fossil resins from the North Siberian and Far East provinces are irrelevant to succinite. They usually occur as brittle resins, namely, retinite and gedanite, without jewelry value. Viscous fossil resin rumänite with an expected high economic value occurs in the Far East, on the shore of Sakhalin Island.

  15. Investigation of fossil resins and amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yu. Makarova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fossil resins and amber are a product of lithogenesis of resinous substances of higher plants – resinite. These components of plants, like other lipoid ingredients (suberins, coutines, sporinins, natural rubbers are resistant to microbial action, so they are well preserved in bacterial processing of organic matter in the stages of sedimento- and diagenesis, and are well diagnosed in microscopic studies. They occur in a rather wide age range of sedimentary rocks. The amber of the Baltic region of the Eocene age is most fully studied. The article presents the results of a study of the collection of fossil resins and amber from various regions of the world. Samples were studied microscopically; carbon isotope analysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy were performed. The most informative analysis of high-molecular polymeric compounds is IR spectroscopy. It was found that in the analyzed samples of fossil resins of different ages, aromatic compounds are not observed, most of which are first volatilized in fossilization processes. The possibility of influencing the group composition of amber and amber-like resins for sedimentation, diagenesis and catagenesis is discussed. The IR spectra of fossil and modern resin conifers are compared. Using the IR spectroscopy method, an attempt was made to identify the botanical origin of fossil resins.

  16. On the design of dental resin-based composites: a micromechanical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Bill; Kotousov, Andrei; Swain, Michael V

    2008-01-01

    Adhesive resin-based restorative materials have the potential to considerably strengthen teeth and offer more economically viable alternatives to traditional materials such as gold, amalgam or ceramics. Other advantages are direct and immediate placement and the elimination of the use of mercury. However, polymerization shrinkage during curing of an adhesive restoration and mismatch in mechanical properties can lead to the initiation and development of interfacial defects. These defects could have a detrimental effect on the longevity of the restored tooth. The current study is focused on some design issues of resin-based composites affecting the longevity of the tooth-restoration interface. The theoretical approach is based on self-consistent micromechanical modelling that takes into account the effect of the material properties, volume concentration of the dispersed particle phase as well as the shape of these particles on the overall thermomechanical properties of the composite. Results obtained for resin-based composites reinforced with spherical, disc and short fibre particles highlight the advantages of disc shaped and short fibre particles.

  17. Tribochemical Glass Ceramic Coating as a New Approach for Resin Adhesion to Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Fraga, Sara; Pozzobon, João Luiz; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; Foletto, Edson Luiz; May, Liliana Gressler; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    To investigate the effects of a novel tribochemical silica coating technique with powders made from feldspathic ceramic and leucite-based ceramic on the bond strength of zirconia to resin cement before and after aging. Zirconia blocks were divided into 3 groups according to the material used for airborne-particle abrasion: 1) SP (control): silica-coated alumina particles; 2) FP: feldspathic ceramic powder; 3) LP: leucite glass-ceramic powder. After silanization, composite resin cylinders were cemented on the zirconia surface using a dual-curing resin cement. Prior to the shear bond strength (SBS) test, half of the samples (n = 15) were stored in distilled water for 24 h; the other half (n = 15) were submitted to aging (10,000 thermocycles of 5°C to 55°C; 150 days of water storage). The bond strength data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction analysis were performed. The initial bond strengths did not differ significantly between the groups (p = 0.053). However, after aging procedures, airborne-particle abrasion with feldspathic ceramic powder (FP) resulted in higher values of bond strength (p = 0.0001). SEM and EDS indicated that all the treatments promoted silica deposition on the Y-TZP surface ceramic. Airborne-particle abrasion with FP and LP induced a lower percentage of the monoclinic phase. Airborne abrasion with fine feldspathic ceramic particles is a novel tribochemical technique and appears to be suitable for improving the bond strength between zirconia and resin cements.

  18. Ultrafine particle emissions from waterpipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monn, Ch; Kindler, Ph; Meile, A; Brändli, O

    2007-12-01

    Ultrafine particle emissions from waterpipes and their impact on human health have not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to characterise the inhalation pattern of waterpipe smokers, and (a) construct apparatus to simulate waterpipe smoking in the laboratory, and (b) characterise mainstream emissions from waterpipes under different smoking conditions. Real life waterpipe smoking patterns were first measured with a spirometer. The average smoking pattern was then mechanically simulated in apparatus. Total particle number concentrations were determined with a condensation particle counter (CPC) for particles between 0.02 microm and 1 microm (P-Trak UPC, Model 8525, TSI) and the particle size fraction was determined with a differential mobility analyser (DMA) for particles from 0.01 microm to 0.5 microm. This instrument was coupled with a laser particle spectrometer for particles between 0.35 microm and 10 microm (Wide Range Particle Spectrometer, Model 1000XP, MSC Corp). Carbon monoxide levels were determined with an electrochemical sensor (Q-Trak monitor, Model 8554, TSI). The tidal volume of an average waterpipe breath of 5 seconds was found to be 1 (SD 0.47) litre. The intervals between breaths on average were 25.5 (SD 10.2) seconds. Particle number concentrations of ultrafine particles in mainstream smoke during waterpipe smoking ranged up to 70 x 10(9) particles per litre. The median diameter of the particles in a full smoking set with charcoal, tobacco and water was 0.04 microm. Smoke from the heated tobacco contributed to particles in the size range between 0.01 microm and 0.2 microm. The glowing piece of charcoal only contributed to particles smaller than 0.05 microm. Waterpipe smoking emits large amounts of ultrafine particles. With regard to particle emissions, smoking waterpipes may carry similar health risks to smoking cigarettes.

  19. Melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin for bonding particleboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Feng Fu; Hui Pan

    2008-01-01

    For the development of a cost-effective melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin (MUF), the study evaluated the effects of reaction pH and melamine content on resin properties and bond performance of the MUF resin adhesive systems. Eight resins, each with three replicates, were prepared in a factorial experiment that included two formulation variables: two reaction...

  20. Traumatic resin ducts as indicators of bark beetle outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Justin DeRose; Matthew F. Bekker; James N. Long

    2017-01-01

    The formation of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs) represents an important induced defense in woody plants that enhances oleoresin production and flow in response to environmental perturbations. In some genera (Pinus), resin ducts are copious and conspicuous; however, in others (Picea), resin ducts are relatively rare. The occurrence and strength of resin ducts, in...

  1. Effect of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Tensile Strength of Dental Acrylic Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkavand, Saeed; Moslehifard, Elnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Adding further fillers to dental resins may enhance their physical characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of heat-curing acrylic resin reinforced by TiO2nanoparticles added into the resin matrix. Materials and methods. Commercially available TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained and characterized using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine their crystalline structure, particle size and morphology. TiO2-acrylic resin nanocomposite was prepared by mixing 0.5, 1 and 2 (wt%) of surface modified TiO2 nanoparticles in an amalgamator providing three groups of samples. Before curing, the obtained paste was packed into steel molds. After cur-ing, the specimens were removed from the molds. The tensile strength test samples were prepared according to ISO 1567. Results. Two crystalline phases were found in TiO2 nanoparticles including: (i) anatase as the major one, and (ii) rutile. The average particle size calculated according to the Scherrer equation was 20.4 nm, showing a normal size distribution. According to SEM images, the nanocomposite with 1wt% TiO2 nanoparticles had a better distribution compared to other groups. In addition, the group by 1wt% TiO2 exhibited higher tensile strength with a significant difference compared to other groups. ANOVA showed significant differences between the contents of TiO2 particles in acrylic resin (F = 22.19; P tensile strength was observed with titania NPs reinforcement agents in 1wt% by weight. Further increase of TiO2 nanoparticles decreased the tensile strength.

  2. In-depth disinfection of acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, V B; Saunders, T R; Pimsler, M; Elfring, D R

    1995-09-01

    This study demonstrated that bacteria penetrate three kinds of dental acrylic resin after a short time period. Samples of acrylic resin were contaminated with a variety of bacteria and were then placed in three different disinfecting solutions as directed by the manufacturers. After the specific dilution and immersion time, cultures were made from the resin samples. The only effective disinfectant was a 0.525% solution of sodium hypochlorite at a 10-minute immersion. It disinfected not only the surfaces but also the bacteria that penetrated the surfaces to a depth of 3 mm.

  3. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  4. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  5. Particle effects on fish gills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Cao; Kania, Per W.; Buchmann, Kurt

    2018-01-01

    Particles composed of inorganic, organic and/or biological materials occur in both natural water bodies and aquaculture facilities. They are expected to affect fish health through a direct chemical, mechanical and biological interaction with gills during ventilation but the nature of the reactions...... and the relative importance of mechanical versus chemical and biological stimulation are unknown. The present work presents an immune gene expression method for evaluation of gill disturbance and sets a baseline for the mechanical influence on fish gills of chemically inert spherical particles. The method may...... be applied to investigate particle impact at different combinations of temperature, fish size, water quality and particle composition. Spherical polystyrene particles (diameters 0.2 μm, 1 μm, 20 μm, 40 μm and 90 μm) were adopted as the particle model and the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fingerlings...

  6. Images and properties of individual nucleated particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Zoltán; Pósfai, Mihály; Nyirő-Kósa, Ilona; Aalto, Pasi; Kulmala, Markku; Salma, Imre

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected in Budapest, Hungary in April-June onto lacey Formvar substrates by using an electrostatic precipitator during the beginning phase of the particle growth process in ten nucleation and growth events. Median contribution of the nucleated particles - expressed as the concentration of particles with a diameter between 6 and 25 nm to the total particle number concentration - was 55%, and the median electrical mobility diameter of the particles was approximately 20 nm. The sample was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Major types of individual particles such as soot, sulphate/organic and tar ball particles were identified in the sample. In addition, particles with an optical diameter range of 10-30 nm were also observed. They clearly differed from the other particle types, showed homogeneous contrast in the bright-field TEM images, and evaporated within tens of seconds when exposed to the electron beam. They were interpreted as representatives of freshly nucleated particles.

  7. Shear bond strength of an autopolymerizing repair resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the shear bond strength of an autopolymerizing repair resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, a polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and a polycarbonate) were used in this study. The specimens were divided into eight groups according to the type of surface treatment given: (1) no treatment, (2) air abrasion with alumina, (3) dichloromethane, (4) ethyl acetate, (5) 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (6) alumina and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (7) tribochemical silica coating or (8) tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Half of the specimens in groups 1, 5, 6 and 8 were thermocycled for 10,000 cycles in water between 5-55°C with a dwell time of 1 min at each temperature. The shear bond strengths were determined. The shear bond strengths to the two polyamides treated with alumina, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate and no treatment were very low. The greatest post-thermocycling bond strengths to polyamides were recorded for the specimens treated with tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (PA12: 16.4 MPa, PACM12: 17.5 MPa). The greatest post-thermocycling bond strengths to polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and polycarbonate were recorded for the treatment with alumina and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (22.7 MPa, 20.8 MPa). Polyamide was exceedingly difficult to bond to an autopolymerizing repair resin; the shear bond strength improved using tribochemical silica coating followed by the application of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Both polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and polycarbonate were originally easy to bond to an autopolymerizing repair resin. However, with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, the bond was more secure.

  8. Magnetic ion-exchange resin treatment: Impact of water type and resin use

    OpenAIRE

    Mergen, Maxime Rodolphe Denis; Jefferson, Bruce; Parsons, Simon A.; Jarvis, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Three raw waters of fundamentally different natural organic matter (NOM) character were treated by magnetic resin using a bench-scale method designed to mimic how the resin is used in continuous operation. Increasing water hydrophobicity resulted in reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal with removal of 56%, 33% and 25% for waters containing 21%, 50% and 75% hydrophobic NOM, respectively. Study of consecutive resin uses showed that the NOM in the hydrophobic water ha...

  9. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  10. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  11. The Effect of Storage Environment on Dimensional Changes of Acrylic Resin Post Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Fallahtafti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare dimensional changes of two types of auto polymerizing acrylic resin patterns (APARPs in three different storing environments. Methods: 60 acrylic post and core patterns were made of two types of Duralay acrylic resins (Aria dent, Iran and Reliance, Dental Mfg. Co, USA using a canine model. Then coronal, apical diameter and coronoapical length of patterns were measured. Afterwards, they were divided into two categories of 30 for each type of Duralay acrylic resin type. Each category was divided into three groups of ten randomly to immerse in three storage environments (Deconex®53plus Borer ChemieAG, Switzerland, Unident ® Impre(USF Healthcare S.A, Sweitzerland and water. After one hour, three mentioned values were measured again. Data were analyzed by SPSS20 using t-test, paired t-test and ANOVA. Results: Results showed that there were no statistically difference (p value> 0.05 about all dimensions of auto polymerizing acrylic post and core patterns except apical diameter and coronoapical length of Dental Mfg. Co, USA in Deconex®53 plus. Conclusion: The best environment to store Duralay APARPs with minimal changes was water and for disinfection, Deconex®53plus and Unident ® Imprecan showed acceptable properties with both of Duralay types.

  12. Evaluation of sorption, solubility and staining of universal and silorane resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfe, T E de Almeida; Agra, C M; Vieira, G F

    2011-12-01

    Resin-based composite staining is a multifactoral phenomenon and can be caused by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The purpose of this study was to compare staining, sorption and solubility of silorane resin-based and universal resin-based composites. Five different resin-based composites (4 Seasons, Charisma, Filtek Silorane, Filtek Supreme and Grandio) were tested. Twenty five specimens were prepared (10 mm diameter and 1.5 mm thick). To staining test, the specimens were divided into 3 groups (n = 5): distilled water (control), coffee and red wine. The specimens were immersed in one of the solutions at 37 degrees C for 7 days. Using the values of L*, a*, b*, color variation (CIEDE2000) was determined. For sorption and solubility test, the specimens were divided into 2 groups (n = 5): with previous desiccation (Group 1) and with no previous desiccation (Group 2). The methodology used for sorption and solubility test was based on ISO 4049:2000. The results presented no significant difference in staining between composites. In sorption and solubility test, Filtek Silorane presented the smallest values, followed by Grandio. Under tested experimental conditions, it is not possible to assert the dependence of staining in sorption that composites are undergone. There was no significant correlation between colour change and sorption values.

  13. Resin strengthening of dental ceramics- the impact of surface texture and silane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Owen; Marquis, Peter M; Fleming, Garry J P

    2007-05-01

    To examine the effect of porcelain surface texture achieved utilising three clinically relevant surface preparation methods prior to silane and unfilled resin application on the flexure strength of a low fusing feldspathic porcelain. Five hundred and forty dentine disc-shaped specimens (15.0mm diameter and 0.9mm thickness) were condensed, fired and allocated to 18 groups. Six groups were stored as-fired, six were alumina abraded and six were acid-etched. Samples were coated with silane, unfilled resin or both prior to bi-axial flexure testing. Group means were compared utilising a three factor design general linear model and post hoc all paired Tukey tests at Presin application on the three surface texture investigated was observed (Presin coating resulted in no further significant increases in the mean bi-axial flexure strengths of the three surface textures. The as-fired surfaces had a low frequency of irregular amplitude defects, alumina abraded surfaces had an increased frequency of regular amplitude defects whilst the acid-etched surface consisted of an increased frequency of irregular amplitude defects. The strengthening mechanism whilst dependent on surface texture was independent of defect severity. No significant strengthening occurred following silane priming suggesting that, for the unfilled resin utilised, the strengthening mechanism was not enhanced by improved resin-ceramic adhesion.

  14. Influence of hematite nanorods on the mechanical properties of epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanović Gordana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of nanocomposites obtained by incorporation of fairly uniform hematite nanorods (α-Fe2O3 NRs into epoxy resin were studied as a function of the content of the inorganic phase. A thorough microstructural characterization of the α-Fe2O3 NRs and the nanocomposites was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The TEM measurements revealed rod-like morphology of the nanofiller with a uniform size distribution (8.5 nm×170 nm, diameter×length. High-magnification TEM and AFM measurements indicated agglomeration of α-Fe2O3 NRs embedded in the epoxy resin. Stress at break, strain at break, elastic modulus and tensile toughness of the nanocomposites were compared with the data obtained for pure epoxy resin. Significant influence of nanofiller on the mechanical properties of epoxy resin, as well as on the glass transition temperature, could be noticed for samples with low contents of the inorganic phase (up to 1 wt. %. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 45020

  15. Comparison of time-dependent changes in the surface hardness of different composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Suat; Yikilgan, Ihsan; Uctasli, Mine Betul; Bala, Oya; Kurklu, Zeliha Gonca Bek

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in surface hardness of silorane-based composite resin (Filtek Silorane) in time and compare the results with the surface hardness of two methacrylate-based resins (Filtek Supreme and Majesty Posterior). Materials and Methods: From each composite material, 18 wheel-shaped samples (5-mm diameter and 2-mm depth) were prepared. Top and bottom surface hardness of these samples was measured using a Vicker's hardness tester. The samples were then stored at 37°C and 100% humidity. After 24 h and 7, 30 and 90 days, the top and bottom surface hardness of the samples was measured. In each measurement, the rate between the hardness of the top and bottom surfaces were recorded as the hardness rate. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance, multiple comparisons by Tukey's test and binary comparisons by t-test with a significance level of P = 0.05. Results: The highest hardness values were obtained from each two surfaces of Majesty Posterior and the lowest from Filtek Silorane. Both the top and bottom surface hardness of the methacrylate based composite resins was high and there was a statistically significant difference between the top and bottom hardness values of only the silorane-based composite, Filtek Silorane (P composite resin Filtek Silorane showed adequate hardness ratio, the use of incremental technic during application is more important than methacrylate based composites. PMID:24966724

  16. Effect of energy drinks on the surface texture of nanoflled composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H

    2013-09-01

    To study the effect of three energy drinks on the surface roughness of nanoflled composite resins after different periods of aging time. Composite resin disks, 6 mm diameter, 3 mm thickness were prepared from Filtec Z350 XT, Tetric EvoCeram and Filtec Z250 XT. Specimens fr/8om each material were tested after aging with Red Bull, Bison and Power Horse energy drinks and distilled water as a control. Specimens were stored at 37°C in dark containers for 1, 3 and 6 months. Surface roughness Ra was assessed using a surface scanning interferometry before and after each storage period. Surface roughness differences ΔRa and Ra among specimens were measured. Mean values were statistically analyzed using multiple repeated measured (ANOVA), variance and multiple comparisons of the mean values were done with Bonferroni test, with p energy drinks was signifcantly different for all tested materials at all three times p Energy drinks used in this study had surface degradation effect on the tested composite resin materials. The surface roughness increased with aging time however, it was clinically acceptable in all test groups after 6 months. The effect of energy drinks solutions on the surface roughness parameter of resin composites depends on type of solution and its acidity contents.

  17. In vitro study of Streptococcus mutans adhesion on composite resin coated with three surface sealants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hye Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Although the coating of surface sealants to dental composite resin may potentially reduce bacterial adhesion, there seems to be little information regarding this issue. This preliminary in vitro study investigated the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans on the dental composite resins coated with three commercial surface sealants. Materials and Methods Composite resin (Filtek Z250 discs (8 mm in diameter, 1 mm in thickness were fabricated in a mold covered with a Mylar strip (control. In group PoGo, the surfaces were polished with PoGo. In groups PS, OG, and FP, the surfaces polished with PoGo were coated with the corresponding surface sealants (PermaSeal, PS; OptiGuard, OG; Fortify Plus, FP. The surfaces of the materials and S. mutans cells were characterized by various methods. S. mutans adhesion to the surfaces was quantitatively evaluated using flow cytometry (n = 9. Results Group OG achieved the lowest water contact angle among all groups tested (p 0.05 or significantly lower (group OG, p < 0.001 bacterial adhesion when compared with the control group. Conclusions The application of the surface sealants significantly reduced S. mutans adhesion to the composite resin polished with the PoGo.

  18. Comparison of Micro-Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Root Dentin of Bovine Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Dabili

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays resin cements are commonly used in operative dentistry but the strength of micro- shear bonds of these cements was different in various studies. The aim of this study was to compare the micro-shear bond strength of three resin cements with different mechanisms consisting of maxcem, variolink II and panavia F2.0 to bovine tooth dentin. Methods: Thirty nine longitudinal slices of bovine root dentin were prepared. Specimens were randomly divided into three equal groups. In each group one resin cement was used in cylinders with 1×2mm diameters on each slice. After setting of the cement, micro-shear bond strength was evaluated by a micro-tester device with 0.5mm/min cross head speed. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey and Bonferroni tests. Results: Micro-shear bond strength of Panavia F2.0, Maxcem and Variolink II was 15.07, 7.33 and 4.97Mpa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups. Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of total-Etch resin cements was lower than self-Etch ones.

  19. Effect of metal primers and tarnish treatment on bonding between dental alloys and veneer resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Seung-Sik; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Cho, Lee-Ra; Park, Chan-Jin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metal primers on the bonding of dental alloys and veneer resin. Polyvinylpyrrolidone solution's tarnish effect on bonding strength was also investigated. Disk-shape metal specimens (diameter 8 mm, thickness 1.5 mm) were made from 3 kinds of alloy (Co-Cr, Ti and Au-Ag-Pd alloy) and divided into 4 groups per each alloy. Half specimens (n=12 per group) in tarnished group were immersed into polyvinylpyrrolidone solution for 24 hours. In Co-Cr and Ti-alloy, Alloy Primer (MDP + VBATDT) and MAC-Bond II (MAC-10) were applied, while Alloy Primer and V-Primer (VBATDT) were applied to Au-Ag-Pd alloys. After surface treatment, veneering composite resin were applied and shear bond strength test were conducted. Alloy Primer showed higher shear bond strength than MAC-Bond II in Co-Cr alloys and Au-Ag-Pd alloy (PAg-Pd alloy surfaces presented significantly decreased shear bond strength. Combined use of MDP and VBATDT were effective in bonding of the resin to Co-Cr and Au-Ag-Pd alloy. Tarnish using polyvinylpyrrolidone solution negatively affected on the bonding of veneer resin to Co-Cr and Au-Ag-Pd alloys.

  20. The recycling of comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin from electronic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huabo; Jia, Weifeng; Li, Jinhui

    2010-05-01

    The reuse of comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin with various granularities gathered from printed circuit manufacturing residues was investigated. As fillers, these residues were converted into polymeric composite board by an extrusion and injection process using polypropylene as a bonding agent. The mechanical properties of the reproduced composite board were examined by considering the effects of mass fraction and glass-fiber distribution. Interfacial-layer micrograph analysis of the composite material fracture surface was used to study the fiber reinforcement mechanism. Results showed that using comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin as a filler material greatly enhanced the performance properties of the composite board. Although the length and diameter of filler varied, these variations had no appreciable effect on the mechanical properties of the processed board. Maximum values of 48.30 MPa for flexural strength, 31.34 MPa for tensile strength, and 31.34 J/m for impact strength were achieved from a composite board containing mass fractions of 30, 10, and 20% glass-fiber-reinforced resin waste, respectively. It was found that the maximum amount of recyclate that could be added to a composite board was 30% of weight. Beyond these percentages, the materials blend became unmanageable and the mixture less amenable to impregnation with fiber. Presented studies indicated that comminuted glass-fiber-reinforced resin waste-filled polypropylene composites are promising candidates for structural applications where high stiffness and fracture resistance are required.

  1. Microhardness of composite resins at different depths varying the post-irradiation time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Cristina Ciccone-Nogueira

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the microhardness of posterior composite resins at different depths varying the post-irradiation time. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For each composite resin [Solitaire 2 (SO - Heraus Kulzer, P60 (P - 3M, Prodigy Condesable (PC - Kerr, Surefil (S - Dentsply and Alert (A - Pentron], 6 specimens (3 mm in diameter; 4mm high were prepared using a black polyurethane cylindrical matrix. The resins were inserted in a bulk increment and light cured for 40 seconds. Microhardness was analyzed at different depths (top, 0.4 mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0mm, 3.0 mm and 4.0 mm and at two moments (20 minutes and 24 hours after light-curing. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Overall, microhardness means decreased significantly with the increase of depth, being lower in the first moment tested. P, S and PC showed the highest microhardness means. CONCLUSION: It may be concluded that the tested composite resins presented a gradual decrease of microhardness as depth increased and this drop was more accentuated for depths beyond 2 mm. For all materials, higher microhardness means were recorded 24 hours after light activation. P60 yielded the best results at the different depths evaluated.

  2. Epoxy Resins Toughened with Surface Modified Epoxidized Natural Rubber Fibers by One-Step Electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Ran; Kim, Jung J

    2017-04-27

    Epoxidized natural rubber fibers (ERFs) are developed through one-step electrospinning and directly deposited into epoxy resins without collecting and distributing of fibers. The shape of ERFs shows rough surface due to different evaporation rate of solvent mixture consisting of chloroform and dichloromethane and the average diameter of ERFs is 6.2 µm. The increase of ERFs loading from 0 to 20 wt % into the epoxy resin increases the fracture strain significantly from 1.2% to 13% and toughness from 0.3 MPa to 1.9 MPa by a factor of 7. However, the tensile strength and Young's modulus decrease about 34% from 58 MPa to 34 MPa and from 1.4 GPa to 0.9 GPa, respectively. Due to the crosslinking reactions between oxirane groups of ERFs and amine groups in the resin, surface roughness and the high aspect ratio of ERFs, ERFs result in more effective toughening effect with the minimum loss of tensile properties in epoxy resins.

  3. Epoxy Resins Toughened with Surface Modified Epoxidized Natural Rubber Fibers by One-Step Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Ran Kim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Epoxidized natural rubber fibers (ERFs are developed through one-step electrospinning and directly deposited into epoxy resins without collecting and distributing of fibers. The shape of ERFs shows rough surface due to different evaporation rate of solvent mixture consisting of chloroform and dichloromethane and the average diameter of ERFs is 6.2 µm. The increase of ERFs loading from 0 to 20 wt % into the epoxy resin increases the fracture strain significantly from 1.2% to 13% and toughness from 0.3 MPa to 1.9 MPa by a factor of 7. However, the tensile strength and Young’s modulus decrease about 34% from 58 MPa to 34 MPa and from 1.4 GPa to 0.9 GPa, respectively. Due to the crosslinking reactions between oxirane groups of ERFs and amine groups in the resin, surface roughness and the high aspect ratio of ERFs, ERFs result in more effective toughening effect with the minimum loss of tensile properties in epoxy resins.

  4. The strengthening of resin cemented dental ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to advance the understanding of the mechanism of resin-strengthening conferred to dental ceramic materials by resin-based composite materials. The investigation is presented as a series of manuscripts. In the first study (Manuscript 3.1), dental porcelain disc-shaped specimens were resin-coated with three resin-based composite materials with different flexural moduli at discrete resin thicknesses. The discs were loaded to failure in a biaxial flexure t...

  5. Pengaruh Sifat-Sifat Fisik Resin Akrilik Terhadap Basis Protesa

    OpenAIRE

    Amriani Syahfitri

    2008-01-01

    Saat ini resin akrilik banyak digunakan secara umum untuk konstruksi gigi tiruan. Sebagai bahan basis prothesa, penggunaan resin akrilik terutama resin heat cured adalah yang paling sering digunakan selain bernilai estetis, juga lebih ekonomis. Pada prothesa yang ideal memerlukan suatu basis yang kuat, Syarat- syarat basis protesa tidak semuanya dapat dipenuhi oleh basis resin akrilik. Sifat-sifat fisik resin akrilik mempunyai pengaruh terhadap basis protesa. Untuk menghindari k...

  6. Diameter limitation in growth of III-Sb-containing nanowire heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Martin; Borg, B Mattias; Johansson, Jonas; Dick, Kimberly A

    2013-04-23

    The nanowire geometry offers significant advantages for exploiting the potential of III-Sb materials. Strain due to lattice mismatch is efficiently accommodated, and carrier confinement effects can be utilized in tunneling and quantum devices for which the III-Sb materials are of particular interest. It has however proven difficult to grow thin (below a few tens of nanometers), epitaxial III-Sb nanowires, as commonly no growth is observed below some critical diameter. Here we explore the processes limiting the diameter of III-Sb nanowires in a model system, in order to develop procedures to control this effect. The InAs-GaSb heterostructure system was chosen due to its great potential for tunneling devices in future low-power electronics. We find that with increasing growth temperature or precursor partial pressures, the critical diameter for GaSb growth on InAs decreases. To explain this trend we propose a model where the Gibbs-Thomson effect limits the Sb supersaturation in the catalyst particle. This understanding enabled us to further reduce the nanowire diameter down to 32 nm for GaSb grown on 21 nm InAs stems. Finally, we show that growth conditions must be carefully optimized for these small diameters, since radial growth increases for increased precursor partial pressures beyond the critical values required for nucleation.

  7. Resin Flow Analysis in the Injection Cycle of a Resin Transfer Molded Radome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestanian, Hossein; Poursina, Mehrdad

    2007-04-01

    Resin flow analysis in the injection cycle of an RTM process was investigated. Fiberglass and carbon fiber mats were used as reinforcements with EPON 826 epoxy resin. Numerical models were developed in ANSYS finite element software to simulate resin flow behavior into a mold of conical shape. Resin flow into the woven fiber mats is modeled as flow through porous media. The injection time for fiberglass/epoxy composite is found to be 4407 seconds. Required injection time for the carbon/epoxy composite is 27022 seconds. Higher injection time for carbon/epoxy part is due to lower permeability value of the carbon fibers compared to glass fiber mat.

  8. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  9. Nanosilica Modification of Elastomer-Modified VARTM Epoxy Resins for Improved Resin and Composite Toughness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinette, Jason; Bujanda, Andres; DeSchepper, Daniel; Dibelka, Jessica; Costanzo, Philip; Jensen, Robert; McKnight, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Recent publications have reported a synergy between rubber and silica in modified epoxy resins that results in significantly improved fracture toughness without reductions in other material properties...

  10. The quantitative evaluation of intracranial pressure by optic nerve sheath diameter/eye diameter CT measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekerman, Inessa; Sigal, Tal; Kimiagar, Itzhak; Ben Ely, Anna; Vaiman, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The changes of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) have been used to assess changes of the intracranial pressure for 20 years. The aim of this research was to further quantify the technique of measuring the ONSD for this purpose. Retrospective study of computed tomographic (CT) data of 1766 adult patients with intracranial hypotension (n=134) or hypertension (n=1632) were analyzed. The eyeball transverse diameter (ETD) and ONSD were obtained bilaterally, and the ONSD/ETD ratio was calculated. The ratio was used to calculate the normal ONSD for patients and to estimate the intracranial pressure of the patients before and after the onset of the pathology. Correlation analysis was performed with invasively measured intracranial pressure, the presence or absence of papilledema, sex, and age. In hypotension cases, the ONSD by CT was 3.4±0.7 mm (P=.03 against normative 4.4±0.8 mm). In cases with hypertension, the diameter was 6.9±1.3 (P=.02, with a cutoff value ˃5.5 mm). The ONSD/ETD ratio was 0.29±0.04 against 0.19±0.02 in healthy adults (P=.01). The ONSD and the ONSD/ETD ratio can indicate low intracranial pressure, but quantification is impossible at intracranial pressure less than 13 mm Hg. In elevated intracranial pressure, the ONSD and the ratio provide readings that correspond to readings in millimeters of mercury. The ONSD method, reinforced with additional calculations, may help to indicate a raised intracranial pressure, evaluate its severity quantitatively, and establish quantitative goals for treatment of intracranial hypertension, but the limitations of the method are to be taken into account. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  12. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Materials and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age...... 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments...... up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Chlorotrifluoroethylene-1,1-difluoroethylene-tetrafluoroethylene co-polymer resins produced by copolymerization of..., Extrusion, and Coating Materials,” which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and...

  14. Liquid Resins With Low VOC Emissions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaScala, John J; Sands, James M; Palmese, Guiseppe R

    2004-01-01

    .... The polymer properties were similar to that of commercial resins, including Tg greater than 120 C, flex strength greater than 100 MPa, modulus of approximately 3 GPa, and fracture toughness greater than 200 J/m2...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... by osmotic pressure in monochlorobenzene; or (2) 1,1′-Sulfonylbis[4-chlorobenzene] polymer with 4,4... determined by osmotic pressure in dimethylformamide. (b) The basic polysulfone resins identified in paragraph...

  16. Can CAD/CAM resin blocks be considered as substitute for conventional resins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Badra; Thieu, Minh Khai Le; Johnsen, Gaute Floer; Reseland, Janne Elin; Haugen, Håvard J

    2017-12-01

    Dentists are facing a myriad of new CAD/CAM product for dental filling therapies. Are the new materials any worthwhile using? Are they succeeding the standard filling materials? Here we compare for the first time the new resin-composite blocks (RCBs) with conventional materials (Filtek Z250 and Tetric EvoCeram). The material were tested for residual monomer elution by HPLC, thermogravimetric analysis (TG) was used to determine the percentage of fillers by weight, hardness was evaluated by Vickers method, morphology of fillers and distribution in the matrix were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), elemental analysis for elemental determination of the filler particles was performed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) cytotoxicity using human gingival fibroblasts and an epithelial cell line. The RBC outperformed conventional composite regarding mechanical characteristics (hardness) and monomer eluation, but showed some worrisome results regarding cytotoxicity. The cost benefit is not in favour of RBCs in comparison to conventional composites, as the cytotoxicity was found higher for RBCs. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  18. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschueren, K.; Balwant Kaur

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  19. Damage evolution in a filled epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depoorter, Nicolas; Coutellier, Daniel; Muzic, Markus; Berg-Pollack, Antje; Cai Ye; Zimmermann, Andre

    2006-01-01

    A method is proposed for studying damage evolution in a filled epoxy resin submitted to low-cycle fatigue loading. Transmission electron microscopy analysis was performed, which indicates a damage mechanism that corresponds well to the decreasing slope of the stress-strain hysteresis observed in strain-controlled fatigue experiments. Also, the suggested damage model appears to be suitable for the simulation of strain-controlled cyclic tests and fits the damage evolution of the filled epoxy resin fairly well [de

  20. Effect of surface modifications on the bond strength of zirconia ceramic with resin cement resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Lubica; Ulmer, Peter; Lehmann, Frank; Wille, Sebastian; Polonskyi, Oleksander; Johannes, Martina; Köbel, Stefan; Trottenberg, Thomas; Bornholdt, Sven; Haase, Fabian; Kersten, Holger; Kern, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of surface modifications on the tensile bond strength between zirconia ceramic and resin. Zirconia ceramic surfaces were treated with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles, 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles, argon-ion bombardment, gas plasma, and piranha solution (H2SO4:H2O2=3:1). In addition, slip casting surfaces were examined. Untreated surfaces were used as the control group. Tensile bond strengths (TBS) were measured after water storage for 3 days or 150 days with additional 37,500 thermal cycling for artificial aging. Statistical analyses were performed with 1-way and 3-way ANOVA, followed by comparison of means with the Tukey HSD test. After storage in distilled water for three days at 37 °C, the highest mean tensile bond strengths (TBS) were observed for zirconia ceramic surfaces abraded with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles (TBS(AAP)=37.3 MPa, TBS(CAAP)=40.4 MPa), and 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles (TBS(AZP)=34.8 MPa, TBS(CAZP)=35.8 MPa). Also a high TBS was observed for specimens treated with argon-ion bombardment (TBS(BAI)=37.8 MPa). After 150 days of storage, specimens abraded with 150-μm abrasive alumina particles and 150-μm abrasive zirconia particles revealed high TBS (TBS(AAP)=37.6 MPa, TBS(CAAP)=33.0 MPa, TBS(AZP)=22.1 MPa and TBS(CAZP)=22.8 MPa). A high TBS was observed also for specimens prepared with slip casting (TBS(SC)=30.0 MPa). A decrease of TBS was observed for control specimens (TBS(UNT)=12.5 MPa, TBS(CUNT)=9.0 MPa), specimens treated with argon-ion bombardment (TBS(BAI)=10.3 MPa) and gas plasma (TBS(GP)=11.0 MPa). A decrease of TBS was observed also for specimens treated with piranha solution (TBS(PS)=3.9 MPa, TBS(CPS)=4.1 MPa). A significant difference in TBS after three days storage was observed for specimens treated with different methods (p0.05), CAAP(p>0.05) and SC(p>0.05). However, the failure patterns of debonded specimens prepared with 150-μm abrasive zirconia

  1. Effect of various surface conditioning methods on the adhesion of dual-cure resin cement with MDP functional monomer to zirconia after thermal aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Nijhuis, Henk; Felipe Valandro, Luiz

    This study evaluated the effect of chairside and laboratory types of surface conditioning methods on the adhesion of dual-cure resin cement with MDP functional monomer to zirconia ceramic after thermocycling. Disk-shaped (diameter: 10 mm, thickness: 2 mm) Y-TZP ceramics (Lava(TM), 3M ESPE) were used

  2. Development of a solid phantom prototype of Mo-99, Tc-99, and Co-57 in epoxy resins for evaluating of the uniformity in SPECT systems images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia D, O.C.; Cortes P, A.; Becerril V, A.; Garcia R, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    A manufacture method of solid phantoms prototype of resin with different radioisotopes is described. The phantom manufactured of molybdenum 99 has an uniformity of 96% determined with a Na(Tl) detector mono channel analyzer with a lead collimator of 1 cm diameter. (Author)

  3. Determination and Correlation of Depth of Cure of a New Composite Resin Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Barry M; Slaven; Phebus, Jeffrey G; Ragain, James C

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the depth of cure (DOC) of a composite resin system using two different testing criteria. The DOC testing employed two different experimental protocol: 1) Forty-eight previously extracted human molars were randomly assigned to four groups of twelve each (n = 12): Group 1 SonicFill composite resin system, shade A1; Group 2 SonicFill, shade A3; Group 3 Herculite Ultra composite resin, shade A1; Group 4 Herculite Ultra, shade A3. Cylindrical cavities (4.0 mm diameter and 10 mm depth) were prepared at the tooth CEJ, in a mesiodistal direction. The preparations were filled with each composite resin material in one bulk increment and polymerized with a LED light for 20 seconds. After 5 minutes, the occlusal surfaces of the teeth (specimens) were ground flat until the composite was exposed in a transverse plane. The uncured (soft) composite was scraped away, using a "modified" ISO 4049 DOC specification, and the remaining cured (hard) material was measured. Three measurements, at different positions of the specimen, were performed, for a total of thirty-six measurements per specimen group. The measurements were averaged and divided by fifty percent, arriving at the final DOC for each specimen. 2) A DOC testing protocol was performed using a two-piece (4.0 mm x 10.0 mm) custom-made Teflon device (mold). The groupings duplicated the previous experimental protocol. The mold was filled with each composite resin material in one bulk increment to a 10 mm length (depth). Excess composite material was removed, followed by placement of a Mylar strip over the external orifice. The composite resin specimen was light-polymerized for 20 seconds. Again, the uncured (soft) composite was scraped away, with the same measurement protocol followed as in method 1. Statistical analyses were conducted using ANOVA tests at a p resin. Also, significant differences were displayed between the Al compared to the A3 shades, with the A1 (lighter) shades exhibiting greater DOC. The prepped

  4. [Influence of primers ' chemical composition on shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagodzińska, Paulina; Bociong, Kinga; Dejak, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Resin cements establish a strong durable bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tissues of teeth. It is essential to use primers with proper chemical composition before cementation. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of primer's chemical composition on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to resin cements. 132 zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to four groups. There were four resin systems used. They included resin cement and respective primer, dedicated to zirconia: Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F2.0, Monobond Plus/Multilink Automix, AZ - Primer/ResiCem, Z - Prime Plus/Duo-Link. In each group the protocol of cementation was as follows: application of primer to the zirconia surface and application of the respective resin cement in cylindric mold (dimensions: 3.0 mm height and 3.0 mm diameter). Then, the shear bond strength was evaluated and the failure type was assessed in lupes (×2.5 magnification), also random specimens under SEM. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the data, the level of significance was α = 0.05. Finally, the known chemical composition of each primer was analysed in reference to probable chemical bonds, which may occure between primers and zirconia. The mean shear bond strength between resin cements and zirconia was the highest for Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link (8.24 ± 3,21 MPa) and lowest for Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 (4.60 ± 2.21 MPa). The analysis revealed significant difference between all groups, except pair Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem. The failure type in groups of Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem was mainly adhesive, in groups Monobond Plus/ /Multilink Automix and Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link mainly mixed. The chemical composition of primers affects different bond mechanisms between resin cements and zirconia. The highest shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia can be obtained for the primer composed of 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen

  5. Analysis of Gear Wheel-shaft Joint Characterized by Comparable Pitch Diameter and Mounting Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryś

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design procedure for a gear wheel-shaft direct frictional joint. The small difference between the operating pitch diameter of the gear and the mounting diameter of the frictional joint is the key feature of the connection. The contact surface of the frictional joint must be placed outside the bottom land of the gear, and the geometry of the joint is limited to the specific type of solutions.The strength analysis is based on the relation between the torque and statistical load intensity of the gear transmission. Several dimensionless parameters are introduced to simplify the calculations. Stress-strain verifying analysis with respect to combined loading, the condition of appropriate load-carrying capacity of the frictional joint and the fatigue strength of the shaft are applied to obtain the relations between the dimensions of the joint and other parameters. The final engineering solution may then be suggested. The approach is illustrated by a numerical example.The proposed procedure can be useful in design projects for small, high-powered modern reducers and new-generation geared motors, in particular when manufactured in various series of types.

  6. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive.

  7. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  8. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  9. Experimental analysis of particle sizes for PIV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Overbrüggen, Timo; Klaas, Michael; Soria, Julio; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    The right choice of seeding particles strongly influences the outcome of a particle-image velocimetry (PIV) measurement. Particles have to scatter enough light to be seen by cameras and follow the flow faithfully. As the flow following behavior depends on the inertia and therefore the size of the particle, smaller particles are desirable. Unfortunately, larger particles possess better light scattering behavior, which is especially important for volumetric PIV measurements. In this paper, the particle response of two exemplary solid particles to an oscillatory air flow created by a piston movement is analyzed and compared to analytic results by Hjelmfelt and Mockros (1966 Appl. Sci. Res. 16 149-61) concerning phase lag and amplitude ratio between particle movement and flow field. To achieve realistic experimental boundary conditions, polydispersed particles are used for the analysis. The analytic results show a strong dependence on the diameter. That is, using the volumetric mean diameter an overestimation of the phase lag of the particles is determined, whereas an underestimation of phase lag is computed for the number mean diameter. Hence, for polydispersed particles a more general analysis than that based on the particle mean diameter is required to determine in detail the particle following behavior.

  10. Experimental analysis of particle sizes for PIV measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Overbrüggen, Timo; Klaas, Michael; Schröder, Wolfgang; Soria, Julio

    2016-01-01

    The right choice of seeding particles strongly influences the outcome of a particle-image velocimetry (PIV) measurement. Particles have to scatter enough light to be seen by cameras and follow the flow faithfully. As the flow following behavior depends on the inertia and therefore the size of the particle, smaller particles are desirable. Unfortunately, larger particles possess better light scattering behavior, which is especially important for volumetric PIV measurements. In this paper, the particle response of two exemplary solid particles to an oscillatory air flow created by a piston movement is analyzed and compared to analytic results by Hjelmfelt and Mockros (1966 Appl. Sci. Res . 16 149–61) concerning phase lag and amplitude ratio between particle movement and flow field. To achieve realistic experimental boundary conditions, polydispersed particles are used for the analysis. The analytic results show a strong dependence on the diameter. That is, using the volumetric mean diameter an overestimation of the phase lag of the particles is determined, whereas an underestimation of phase lag is computed for the number mean diameter. Hence, for polydispersed particles a more general analysis than that based on the particle mean diameter is required to determine in detail the particle following behavior. (paper)

  11. Accurate particle speed prediction by improved particle speed measurement and 3-dimensional particle size and shape characterization technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cernuschi, Federico; Rothleitner, Christian; Clausen, Sønnik

    2017-01-01

    methods, e.g. laser light scattering, and velocity by the double disk (DD) method. In this article we present two novel techniques, which allow a more accurate measurement of mass, velocity and shape, and we later compare the experimentally obtained flow velocities of particles with a simulation that also...... are compared with detailed 3-dimensional CT measurements and a low angle laser light scattering (LALLS) measurement system for six different samples of particles. It is shown that the particle volume or mass is usually overestimated by 16–22% when using 2-dimensional methods or LALLS. For CT allows...... additionally the surface-equivalent diameter to be calculated by using 2-dimensional projections of each particle, these results can be used to correct particle diameters measured with the particle imaging method using a pulsed LED....

  12. Adhesion strength improvement of epoxy resin reinforced with nanoelastomeric copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoee, Sepideh; Hassani, Narges

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Elastomeric nanoparticle (ENP) was prepared via miniemulsion polymerization. → ENP was added to epoxy resin (ER) with different amounts. → The lap shear strength (LSS) of different ENP/ER was measured. → The fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Abstract: Nano-sized copoly(styrene-butylacrylate-ethylenglycoldimethacrylate) (St-BA-EGDMA) particles were added at different contents to improve the toughness of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resin (ER) using piperidine as a curing agent. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) proved that nanoelastomer was finely dispersed in the epoxy adhesive. To compare the adhesion strength of different adherents utilizing both modified and unmodified epoxy adhesive, the lap shear strength (LSS) test was measured as a function of elastomeric nanoparticles (ENP) amount. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FTIR were used to investigate the interface morphology and chemical composition of adherent and epoxy adhesive. The result indicated that the adhesion strength was increased dramatically by addition of nanoparticles compared with that of pure epoxy adhesive. The highest adhesion strength was obtained with 20 wt% elastomeric nanoparticles. It was found that reinforcement with nanoparticles improved the fracture toughness.

  13. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susila Anand, V. [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College, Saveetha University, Chennai 600077 (India); Balasubramanian, Venkatesh, E-mail: chanakya@iitm.ac.in [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm{sup 2} with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal

  14. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susila Anand, V.; Balasubramanian, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm 2 with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal–Wallis, Mann

  15. Cosmic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritszh, Harald; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Muenchen

    1986-01-01

    The paper on 'Cosmic particles' was presented at the conference on 'The early universe and its evolution', Erice, Italy 1986. The link between ideas in cosmology and in elementary particle physics is examined. The subject is discussed under the following topic headings: cosmic kinetics, cosmic dynamics and general relativity, dynamics of the dust universe, particle physics, unity of quarks and leptons, the hot universe and standard particle physics, creation of matter, and the inflation of the universe. (U.K.)

  16. Color Stability of the Bulk-Fill Composite Resins with Different Thickness in Response to Coffee/Water Immersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayna Shamszadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the color stability of bulk-fill and conventional composite resin with respect to thickness and storage media. Twenty specimens of a conventional composite resin (6 mm diameter and 2 mm thick and 40 specimens of the bulk-fill Tetric EvoCeram composite resin at two different thicknesses (6 mm diameter and 2 mm thick or 4 mm thick, n=20 were prepared. The specimens were stored in distilled water during the study period (28 d. Half of the specimens were remained in distilled water and the other half were immersed in coffee solution 20 min/d and kept in distilled water between the cycles. Color changes (ΔE were measured using the CIE L⁎a⁎b⁎ color space and a digital imaging system at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days of storage. Data were analyzed using Two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc test (P conventional; P<0.001. Coffee exhibited significantly more staining susceptibility than that of distilled water (P<0.001. There was greater color changes with increasing the increment thickness, which was significant at 14 (P<0.001 and 28 d (P<0.01. Color change of bulk-fill composite resin was greater than that of the conventional one after coffee staining and is also a function of increment thicknesses.

  17. Characterization of hydroxybenzoic acid chelating resins: equilibrium, kinetics, and isotherm profiles for Cd(II and Pb(II uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BHAVNA A. SHAH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chelating ion-exchange resins were synthesized by polycondensation of ortho/para hydroxybenzoic acid with resorcinol/catechol employing formaldehyde as cross-linking agent at 80±5 °C in DMF. The resins were characterized by FTIR and XRD. The uptake behaviour of synthesized resins for Cd(II and Pb(II ions have been studied depending on contact time, pH, metal ion concentration and temperature. The sorption data obtained at optimized conditions were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Experimental data of all metal–resin system were best represented by the Freundlich isotherm. The maximum obtained sorption capacity for cadmium was 69.53 mg g-1 and 169.32 mg g-1 for Lead. The adsorption process follows first order kinetics and the specific rate constant Kr was obtained by the application of the Lagergan equation. Thermodynamic parameters ∆Gads, ∆Sads and ∆Hads were calculated for the metal–resin systems. The external diffusion rate constant (KS and the intra-particle diffusion rate constant (Kid were calculated by the Spahn–Schlunder and Weber–Morris models, respectively. The sorption process was found to follow an intra-particle diffusion phenomenon.

  18. Polyoxometalate and Resin-Derived P-Doped Mo2C@N-Doped Carbon as a Highly Efficient Hydrogen-Evolution Reaction Catalyst at All pH Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gang; Feng, Xiaojia; Khan, Shifa Ullah; Xiao, Liguang; Xi, Wenguang; Tan, Huaqiao; Ma, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Lunan; Li, Yangguang

    2018-01-18

    A new type of P-doped Mo 2 C coated by N-doped carbon (P-Mo 2 C@NC) has been successfully prepared by calcining a mixture of H 3 [PMo 12 O 40 ] polyoxometalates (POMs) and urea-formaldehyde resin under an N 2 atmosphere. Urea-formaldehyde resin not only serves as the carbon source to ensure carbonization but also facilitates the uniform distribution of POM precursors, which efficiently avoid the aggregation of Mo 2 C particles at high temperatures. TEM analysis revealed that the average diameter of the Mo 2 C particles was about 10 nm, which is coated by a few-layer N-doped carbon sheet. The as-prepared P-Mo 2 C@NC displayed excellent hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) performance and long-term stability in all pH environments. To reach a current density of 10 mA cm -2 , only 109, 159, and 83 mV were needed for P-Mo 2 C@NC in 0.5 m H 2 SO 4 (pH 0), 0.1 m phosphate buffer (pH 7), and 1 m KOH (pH 14), respectively. This could provide a high-yield and low-cost method to prepare uniform nanosized molybdenum carbides with highly efficient and stable HER performance. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Strange particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinowsky, W.

    1989-01-01

    Work done in the mid 1950s at Brookhaven National Laboratory on strange particles is described. Experiments were done on the Cosmotron. The author describes his own and others' work on neutral kaons, lambda and theta particles and points out the theoretical gap between predictions and experimental findings. By the end of the decade, the theory of strange particles was better understood. (UK)

  20. Kinetics of ion exchange in the chelating resin Dowex A-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzuru, Hideo; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of ion exchanges of Ag + , Zn 2+ and Cr 3+ at extremely low concentrations on the chelating resin Dowex A-1 has been studied by means of finite volume method. The rate of exchanges for both Ag + and Zn 2+ is dependent on the ionic strength, particle size of the resin and reaction temperature. At higher ionic strength (0.1 - 0.05) the kinetics is controlled by particle diffusion, whereas at lower ionic one (0.01 - 0.001) film diffusion is predominant. The apparent activation energy obtained is 3.84 kcal/mol for Ag + and 3.91 kcal/mol for Zn 2+ . The exchange rate of Cr 3+ obeys a first-order rate equation independent of the ionic strength and particle size of the resin. The apparent activation energy is 15.5 kcal/mol. These results support the view that the rate-determining step of this reaction is chelate formation reaction. (auth.)