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Sample records for resin luting agent

  1. Electron beam radiation of resin luting agents - a cytotoxic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabin, S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cytotoxicity of three resin luting agents rely x luting cement, rely x luting 2 cement, and clearfil SA luting agent on human dental pulp cells before and after electron beam irradiation. Growth and maintenance of cell cultures of human pulp cells was done in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM). The test samples were divided into two categories based on radiation exposure, irradiated category and non-radiated category. Samples in Irradiated category were exposed to electron beam radiation after dose standardisation (Microtron, Electron Beam Accelerator, Microtron Centre, Mangalore University). The dose of radiation used was 200 Gy. Two subgroups of radiated category were made. In 1st sub-group (containing 18 samples), all the 3 luting cements will be placed in sterile packets and irradiated without mixing the two components. In 2nd sub-group (containing 18 samples), all the 3 luting cements will be mixed separately, placed in sterile packets and exposed to electron-beam radiations. Samples in non radiated category were also made 2 groups. In 1st sub-group (containing 18 samples), all the 3 luting cements will be placed in sterile teflon moulds and kept in a humid chamber at 37℃ without mixing the two components. In 2nd sub-group (containing 18 samples), all the 3 the luting cements will be mixed separately, placed in sterile teflon moulds and kept in a humid chamber at 37℃. All the samples were subjected to MTT assay and spectrophotometric analysis and their cytotoxicity was assessed. (author)

  2. Mechanical Properties of Dual-Cured Resin Luting Agents for Ceramic Restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Keiichi; Tsuo, Yukiko; Meng, Xiangfeng; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mechanical properties including surface hardness, flexural strength, and flexural modulus of two dual-cured resin luting agents (New Resin Cement [NRC] and Variolink II [VLII]) irradiated through four different thickness of leucite ceramics (0, 1, 2, and 3 mm) and their shear bond strength to zirconia ceramic (Cercon) using each ceramic primer. Materials and Methods: Knoop hardness was measured on a thin layer of resin luting agent on ...

  3. Mechanical properties of dual-cured resin luting agents for ceramic restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keiichi; Tsuo, Yukiko; Meng, Xiangfeng; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate mechanical properties, including surface hardness, flexural strength, and flexural modulus, of two dual-cured resin luting agents [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC) and Variolink II (VLII)] irradiated through four thicknesses of leucite ceramics (0, 1, 2, and 3 mm) and to evaluate their shear bond strength to zirconia ceramic (Cercon) using each ceramic primer. Knoop hardness was measured on a thin layer of resin luting agent on the ceramic surface. Three-point bending tests were performed after 24 hours of storage at 37 degrees C. Two differently shaped zirconia ceramic specimens with or without sandblasting with alumina were treated with each primer. The specimens were then cemented together with each resin luting agent. Half of the specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and the other half were thermocycled 5000 times. VLII revealed statistically higher Knoop hardness and flexural modulus than CEC for each thickness of ceramic. No significant differences in flexural strength were observed between VLII and CEC for each ceramic spacer. Reduction of the mechanical properties with increase of ceramic thickness varied for each property; however, these properties were similar in the two materials. Blasting with alumina was significantly effective for increasing shear bond strength of both resin luting agents before and after thermal cycling. The use of Clearfil Ceramic Primer showed the highest shear bond strength and maintained bond durability after 5000 thermocycles. Mechanical properties of CEC dual-cured resin luting agent appear adequate for ceramic restorations.

  4. Biocompatibility of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin used as a dental luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kaori; Saita, Makiko; Ikeda, Takayuki; Hirota, Makoto; Park, Wonhee; Lee, Masaichi Chang-Il; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2015-07-01

    The bonding and biological properties of currently used luting/cementing materials need to be improved. 4-Acryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride/methyl methacrylate-tri-n-butylborane (4-META/MMA-TBB) resin is primarily used for splinting mobile teeth or treating fractured teeth. It undergoes moisture-resistant polymerization and bonds strongly to dentin and metals. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the biological and biochemical properties META/MMA-TBB resin with those of conventional polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-MMA resin and other currently used luting materials in order to determine whether it may be a viable dental luting agent. The degree of polymerization of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, PMMA-MMA autopolymerizing resin, 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate-dimethacrylate (MDP-DMA) adhesive resin, and a glass ionomer cement was measured by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. Free radical production during setting was evaluated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Rat dental pulp cells cultured on these materials were examined for cell viability, attachment, proliferation, and functional phenotype. The degree of polymerization of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin was 82% thirty minutes after preparation, compared to 66% for PMMA-MMA autopolymerizing resin. ESR spectroscopy revealed free radical production from 4-META/MMA-TBB resin and glass ionomer cement was equivalent 24 hours after preparation, with no spike in radical generation observed. In contrast, free radical production from PMMA-MMA and MDP-DMA adhesive resins was rapid and sustained and 10 to 20 times greater than that from 4-META/MMA-TBB. The percentage of viable dental pulp cells 24 hours after seeding was considerably higher on MDP-DMA and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin than on glass ionomer cement. Cell number, proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity were highest on 4-META/MMA-TBB resin and lowest on the glass ionomer cement. 4-META/MMA-TBB resin is at least as biocompatible

  5. Bonding of resin-based luting cements to zirconia with and without the use of ceramic priming agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Nakayama, Daisuke; Komine, Futoshi; Blatz, Markus B; Matsumura, Hideo

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated and compared bonding characteristics of resin-based luting agents and special ceramic primers to zirconia. Disk specimens (n = 242) were fabricated from zirconium dioxide ceramics (Katana) and bonded with four resin-based luting agents without priming. In addition, zirconia was bonded with 7 bondingsystem combinations of three priming agents and three resin-based luting agents. Two of the resin-based luting agents and two ceramic priming agents contain an identical adhesive monomer, 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), either in the material itself or in the priming agent. Shear bond strength was determined after 20,000 cycles of thermocycling. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed for both pre- and post-thermocycling groups to evaluate the difference among primer and luting agent variations. On the basis of the Kruskal-Wallis test, Steel-Dwass multiple comparisons were further performed to compare the difference among four luting agents and seven conbinations of three primers and three luting agents for both pre- and post-thermocycling conditions. Within the four unprimed groups, Clearfil SA Cement (5.8 MPa) and Panavia F 2.0 (6.7 MPa) showed statistically higher post-thermocycling bond strength than the other materials (0.1 MPa) (p primed with Monobond Plus (4.0-4.6 MPa) (p priming agents containing the adhesive monomer MDP provide better bond strength to zirconia than do other systems.

  6. Resin-based luting agents and color stability of bonded ceramic veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Júlia R; Schmitt, Gabriela U; Kaizer, Marina R; Boscato, Noéli; Moraes, Rafael R

    2015-08-01

    The type of resin-based luting agent might influence the color stability of ceramic veneers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of resin-based agents and aging on the color stability of ceramic veneers bonded to enamel. Ceramic disks were cemented to bovine enamel disks with 4 resin-based luting agents (n=10): dual-polymerizing cement (RelyX ARC), light-polymerizing cement (RelyX Veneer), flowable composite resin (Filtek Z350 Flow), or composite resin preheated for 30 minutes at 60°C (Filtek Z350 XT). CIE L*, a*, and b* color coordinates were measured 24 hours after cementation (baseline) with a color spectrophotometer and reevaluated after 10,000 and 20,000 thermal cycles. Color variation was calculated by using CIELab (ΔE*(ab)) and CIEDE2000 (ΔE00) methods. Then 95% confidence intervals were calculated for color variation means between baseline and 10,000 thermal cycles and between 10,000 and 20,000 thermal cycles. The 95% confidence intervals were also calculated for the means of individual color coordinates (L*, a*, and b*). The dual-polymerizing cement had the highest color variation among all luting agents. No significant differences were found in color variation among the light-polymerizing materials. All agents showed ΔE*(ab)>3.46 and ΔE00>2.25 after 20,000 thermal cycles. Variations in L*, a*, and b* coordinates were material dependent. The dual-polymerizing agent was yellowish and reddish after aging. The dual-polymerizing cement had higher color variation than the light-polymerized materials when used for bonding ceramic veneers to enamel. Flowable and preheated composite resins had similar color stability to that of light-polymerizing resin-based cement. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of priming agents on shear bond strengths of resin-based luting agents to a translucent zirconia material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagawa, Shogo; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Kubochi, Kei; Kimura, Fumiaki; Matsumura, Hideo

    2017-09-19

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of priming agents and artificial aging with thermocycling on shear bond strengths of two resin-based luting agents to a translucent zirconia material. A total of 308 pairs of translucent zirconia disk specimens were divided into seven treatment groups: Alloy Primer (ALP), Clearfil Ceramic Primer Plus (CCP), Meta Fast Bonding Liner (MFB), MR. bond (MRB), Super-Bond PZ Primer Liquid B (PZB), V-Primer (VPR), and an unprimed group (UP). The specimens in each group were bonded with Panavia V5 Universal (UNI) and Opaque shade (OPA). Shear bond strengths (n=11 each) were tested before and after 5000 thermocycles. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Steel-Dwass test. For both 0 and 5000 thermocycles, the ALP (47.8 and 41.5MPa, respectively) and CCP (45.8 and 42.3MPa, respectively) groups showed significantly higher bond strengths than other groups in the UNI luting agent. For the OPA luting agent, CCP group (45.8MPa) exhibited the highest pre-thermocycling bond strength in all groups. The ALP (32.4MPa) and CCP (36.5MPa) groups had significantly higher post-thermocycling shear bond strengths than other groups. In several groups, the shear bond strengths of the UNI luting agent were significantly higher than those of the OPA luting agent before and after thermocycling. Application of priming agents containing hydrophobic phosphate monomer (MDP) yielded the durable bond strengths of resin-based luting agents to a translucent zirconia material. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of adhesive bonding of lithium disilicate ceramic material with duel cured resin luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambade, Dipti Pravin; Gundawar, Sham M; Radke, Usha M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the adhesive bonding of dual cured resin luting agents with lithium disilicate ceramic material. Porcelain laminate veneers were prepared with lithium disilicate ceramic material i.e. IPS Empress II( E-Max Press). These laminates were bonded with RelyX ARC, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, Duolink and Nexus NX3.The porcelain laminates were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (Pulpdent Corporation) for one minute, washed for 15 sec with three way syringe and dried for 15 sec with air syringe. The silane (Ultradent) was applied with the help of applicator tip in a single coat and kept undisturbed for one minute. The prepared surfaces of the premolars were treated with 37% phosphoric acid (Prime dent) for 15 sec, thoroughly rinsed and dried as per manufactures instructions. The shear bond test was carried out on all samples with the Universal testing machine (Instron U.S.A.) The scanning electron microscopic study was performed at the fractured interface of representative samples from each group of luting agents. In this study, the highest value of shear bond strength was obtained for NEXUS NX3 and the lowest for VARIOLINK II. The difference in bond strength can be interpreted as the difference in fracture resistance of luting agents, to which shearing load was applied during the shear bond strength test. It is inferred from this study that the composition of the luting agent determines the adhesive characteristics in addition to surface treatment and bonding surface area.

  9. Development of dental resin luting agents based on Bis-EMA4: bond strength evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of incorporating Bis-EMA4 monomer into experimental Bis-GMA/TEGDMA-based resin luting agents on the bond strength to dentin. Seven mixtures were prepared with the following ratios (wt% of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA/Bis-EMA4: 50/50/0, 50/30/20, 50/10/40, 50/0/50, 30/10/60, 10/10/80 and 0/0/100. Camphorquinone (0.4 wt%, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (0.8 wt% and hydroquinone (0.2 wt% were dissolved in each mixture, which was loaded with silanated strontium glass fillers to a constant content of 60 wt%. Bond strength was evaluated by microshear testing (n = 10 on bovine dentin. Data were submitted to Analysis of Variance (p<0.05. Modes of failure were classified under magnification (200×. Bond strength means (MPa, respective to each agent, were: 19.4, 19.8, 20.0, 19.1, 16.8, 18.7 and 17.8. No significant differences were detected among groups. Mixed failures were generally predominant for all materials. In conclusion, the addition of Bis-EMA4 presented no significant influence on the bond strength of the experimental resin luting agents to dentin.

  10. Ceramic strengthening by tuning the elastic moduli of resin-based luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spazzin, Aloísio O; Bacchi, Ataís; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Santos, Mateus B; Basso, Gabriela R; Griggs, Jason; Moraes, Rafael R

    2017-03-01

    Resin-based luting agents (RBLAs) with tuned elastic moduli (E) were prepared and their influence on the strengthening, reliability, and mode of failure of luted feldspar ceramic was investigated. RBLAs with low E (2.6GPa), intermediate E (6.6GPa), and high E (13.3GPa) were prepared and used to coat acid-etched ceramic disks. Positive (untreated ceramic) and negative (acid-etched ceramic) control groups were tested. The response variables (n=30) were biaxial flexural strength (σ bf , MPa), characteristic strength (σ 0 , MPa), and Weibull modulus at the ceramic surface (z=0) and luting agent surface (z=-t 2 ). A 3D finite element analysis simulated the biaxial flexural test. Fractographic analysis and morphology of the bonded interfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The RBLAs improved σ bf and σ 0 at z=0, particularly those with intermediate and high E, whereas the mechanical reliability was only affected in the negative control. At z=-t 2 , differences between all RBLAs were observed but the structural reliability was independent of the RBLA tested. Increasing E of the RBLA was associated with increased stress concentration at the RBLA and reduced stresses reaching the ceramic. Failures originated on the ceramic surface at the ceramic-cement interface. In the high E group, failure sometimes originated from the RBLA free surface. All RBLAs completely filled the ceramic irregularities. Increased E of the RBLA reduced the variability of strength, the stress reaching the ceramic structure, and sometimes altered the origin of failure. The use of high E RBLAs seems beneficial for luting feldspar ceramics. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of different bonding procedures on micro-tensile bond strength between a fiber post and resin-based luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-jie; Raffaelli, Ornella; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Ji-hua; Ferrari, Marco

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanization and light-irradiation on bonding between a fiber post and different resin-based luting agents. Sixty silicium fiber posts (Easy Post) were divided into 10 groups according to the type of resin-based luting agent employed, whether the post surface was silanized, whether the adhesive was light-irradiated, and whether Calibra luting agent was used. The micro-tensile bond strength and bonded interface of specimens in each group were evaluated. Specimens luted with Calibra or FluoroCore 2 resin-based luting agent systems were superior to those treated with Multilink or Variolink II, in terms of both bond strength and interfacial integrity. Application of silane, light-irradiation of the adhesive, or light-irradiation of the Calibra resin-based luting agent did not significantly increase the bond strength further. It can be concluded that Calibra or FluoroCore 2 resin-based luting agent systems are more suitable for luting prefabricated Easy Post in a clinical situation, while pre-silanization of the post surface and light-irradiation of XP Bond/SCA adhesive or resin-based luting agent may not be as important as hitherto considered.

  12. Efficacy of various cleansing techniques on dentin wettability and its influence on shear bond strength of a resin luting agent

    OpenAIRE

    Munirathinam, Dilipkumar; Mohanaj, Dhivya; Beganam, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the shear bond strength of resin luting agent to dentin surfaces cleansed with different agents like pumice, ultrasonic scaler with chlorhexidine gluconate, EDTA and the influence of these cleansing methods on wetting properties of the dentin by Axisymmetric drop Shape Analysis - Contact Diameter technique (ADSA-CD). MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty coronal portions of human third molar were prepared until dentin was exposed. Specimens were divided into two groups: Group A and ...

  13. Effect of mode of polymerization of bonding agent on shear bond strength of autocured resin composite luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Cecilia C S; McComb, Dorothy; Anderson, James D; Tam, Laura E

    2003-04-01

    There have been anecdotal reports of low bond strength with autocured resin composite materials, particularly when light-cured bonding agents that combine primer and adhesive in a 1-bottle preparation are used. The objective of this study was to determine if the mode of polymerization of the bonding agent influences the strength of the attachment of autocured resin composite luting cements to dentin. The shear bond strength of 2 resin luting cements, Calibra and RelyX ARC, polymerized by autocuring, in combination with 4 different bonding agents, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus, Prime & Bond NT, IntegraBond and Single Bond, polymerized to bovine dentin by light-curing, autocuring or dual-curing, was determined. The pH of each bonding agent and its components was measured. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test the effect of cement and adhesive on shear bond strength. For each bonding agent, the adhesive variable combined the factors product brand and mode of polymerization. With significant interaction among the above variables, the least square means of the 16 combinations of resin cement and adhesive were compared. There was no consistent relationship between shear bond strength and mode of polymerization of the bonding agent. Significant differences in bond strength were specific to the proprietary brand of bonding agent. The pH of the bonding agent depends on the manufacturer's formulation, and low pH may contribute to low bond strength. The low in vitro bond strength occurring with some combinations of bonding agent and resin cement could be clinically significant.

  14. Efficacy of various cleansing techniques on dentin wettability and its influence on shear bond strength of a resin luting agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanaj, Dhivya; Beganam, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the shear bond strength of resin luting agent to dentin surfaces cleansed with different agents like pumice, ultrasonic scaler with chlorhexidine gluconate, EDTA and the influence of these cleansing methods on wetting properties of the dentin by Axisymmetric drop Shape Analysis - Contact Diameter technique (ADSA-CD). MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty coronal portions of human third molar were prepared until dentin was exposed. Specimens were divided into two groups: Group A and Group B. Provisional restorations made with autopolymerizing resin were luted to dentin surface with zinc oxide eugenol in Group A and with freegenol cement in Group B. All specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hrs and provisional cements were mechanically removed with explorer and rinsed with water and cleansed using various methods (Control-air-water spray, Pumice prophylaxis, Ultrasonic scaler with 0.2% Chlorhexidine gluconate, 17% EDTA). Contact angle measurements were performed to assess wettability of various cleansing agents using the ADSA-CD technique. Bond strength of a resin luting agent bonded to the cleansed surface was assessed using Instron testing machine and the mode of failure noted. SEM was done to assess the surface cleanliness. Data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance with Tukey HSD tests (α=.05). RESULTS Specimens treated with EDTA showed the highest shear bond strength and the lowest contact angle for both groups. SEM showed that EDTA was the most effective solution to remove the smear layer. Also, mode of failure seen was predominantly cohesive for both EDTA and pumice prophylaxis. CONCLUSION EDTA was the most effective dentin cleansing agent among the compared groups. PMID:22977721

  15. Influence of Different Types of Resin Luting Agents on Color Stability of Ceramic Laminate Veneers Subjected to Accelerated Artificial Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Silami,Francisca Daniele Jardilino; Tonani,Rafaella; Alandia-Román,Carla Cecilia; Pires-de-Souza,Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated aging (AAA) on the color stability of resin cements for bonding ceramic laminate veneers of different thicknesses. The occlusal surfaces of 80 healthy human molars were flattened. Ceramic laminate veneers (IPS e-max Ceram) of two thicknesses (0.5 and 1.0 mm) were bonded with three types of luting agents: light-cured, conventional dual and self-adhesive dual cement. Teeth without restorations and cement samples (0.5 mm...

  16. Effect of an adhesive resin luting agent on the dowel-head retention of three different core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Gokhan; Cotert, H Serdar; Korkut, Levent

    2005-05-01

    A dowel-and-core restoration may fail due to failure at either the dowel-tooth or dowel head-core material interface. Long-term clinical success of a dowel-and-core restoration depends on retention of both the dowel to the tooth and the dowel head to the core material. Thus, strengthening of the dowel head-core interface is important. This study evaluated the retention between a prefabricated dowel and 3 different core materials with or without a dual-polymerized adhesive resin luting agent. Sixty prefabricated dowels (Gold Plated Anchorage Post) were divided into 3 groups (n=20) consisting of 1 of 3 core materials, amalgam (Standalloy F), light-polymerized resin composite (Clearfil Ray), or glass ionomer (Chelon-Silver). Each core group was divided into 2 subgroups (n=10), and a dual-polymerized adhesive resin luting agent (Panavia F) was applied to the dowel heads of 1 of these subgroups before application of the core material. The manufacturing procedure was standardized by using a plastic index (4.5-mm internal diameter and 5-mm height) and a custom-made dowel holder, which held the dowel head. Prepared specimens were stored in water at room temperature for 3 months and then loaded to fracture in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min until failure. Bond strengths were recorded (MPa). Data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) in a 2 x 3 factorial randomized design (alpha=.05). Afterward, core material differences were computed with 1-way ANOVA for both of the bonded and nonbonded groups. Post hoc multiple comparisons were made with the Dunnett C multiple range test. Dowel-head retention values (MPa) of the tested core materials (mean +/- SD) from the highest to the lowest were as follows: bonded amalgam core, 296.1 +/- 108; bonded composite core, 284.3 +/- 38.3; nonbonded composite core, 177.0 +/- 53.7; nonbonded amalgam core, 128.5 +/- 35.0; bonded glass-ionomer core (GIC), 128.0 +/- 24.5; nonbonded GIC, 61.8 +/- 13

  17. Influence of previous provisional cementation on the bond strength between two definitive resin-based luting and dentin bonding agents and human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkut, Selim; Küçükesmen, Hakki Cenker; Eminkahyagil, Neslihan; Imirzalioglu, Pervin; Karabulut, Erdem

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two different types of provisional luting agents (RelyX Temp E, eugenol-based; RelyX Temp NE, eugenol-free) on the shear bond strengths between human dentin and two different resin-based luting systems (RelyXARC-Single Bond and Duo Link-One Step) after cementation with two different techniques (dual bonding and conventional technique). One hundred human molars were trimmed parallel to the original long axis, to expose flat dentin surfaces, and were divided into three groups. After related surface treatments for each specimen, the resin-based luting agent was applied in a silicone cylindrical mold (3.5 x 4 mm), placed on the bonding-agent-treated dentin surfaces and polymerized. In the control group (n = 20), the specimens were further divided into two groups (n = 10), and two different resin-based luting systems were immediately applied following the manufacturer's protocols: RelyX ARC-Single Bond (Group I C) and Duo Link-One Step (Group II C). In the provisionalization group (n = 40), the specimens were further divided into four subgroups of 10 specimens each (Group I N, I E and Group II N, II E). In Groups I N and II N, eugenol-free (RelyX NE), and in groups I E and II E, eugenol-based (RelyX E) provisional luting agents (PLA), were applied on the dentin surface. The dentin surfaces were cleaned with a flour-free pumice, and the resin-based luting systems RelyX ARC (Group I N and E) and Duo Link (Group II N and E) were applied. In the Dual bonding groups (n = 40), the specimens were divided into four subgroups of 10 specimens each (Group I ND, ED and Group II ND, ED). The specimens were treated with Single Bond (Groups I ND and ED) or One Step (Groups II ND and ED). After the dentin bonding agent treatment, RelyX Temp NE was applied to Groups I ND and II ND, and RelyX Temp E was applied to Groups I ED and II ED. The dentin surfaces were then cleaned as described in the provisionalization group, and the resin-based luting systems

  18. Influence of Different Types of Resin Luting Agents on Color Stability of Ceramic Laminate Veneers Subjected to Accelerated Artificial Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silami, Francisca Daniele Jardilino; Tonani, Rafaella; Alandia-Román, Carla Cecilia; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated aging (AAA) on the color stability of resin cements for bonding ceramic laminate veneers of different thicknesses. The occlusal surfaces of 80 healthy human molars were flattened. Ceramic laminate veneers (IPS e-max Ceram) of two thicknesses (0.5 and 1.0 mm) were bonded with three types of luting agents: light-cured, conventional dual and self-adhesive dual cement. Teeth without restorations and cement samples (0.5 mm) were used as control. After initial color evaluations, the samples were subjected to AAA for 580 h. After this, new color readouts were made, and the color stability (ΔE) and luminosity (ΔL) data were analyzed. The greatest color changes (pveneers were fixed with light-cured cement and the lowest when 1.0 mm veneers were fixed with conventional dual cement. There was no influence of the restoration thickness when the self-adhesive dual cement was used. When veneers were compared with the control groups, it was verified that the cement samples presented the greatest alterations (p<0.05) in comparison with both substrates and restored teeth. Therefore, it was concluded that the thickness of the restoration influences color and luminosity changes for conventional dual and light-cured cements. The changes in self-adhesive cement do not depend on restoration thickness.

  19. Morphological analysis of glass, carbon and glass/carbon fiber posts and bonding to self or dual-cured resin luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spazzin, Aloísio Oro; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto; Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana Paula; Carlini-Júnior, Bruno; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphology of glass (GF), carbon (CF) and glass/carbon (G/CF) fiber posts and their bond strength to self or dual-cured resin luting agents. Morphological analysis of each post type was conducted under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Bond strength was evaluated by microtensile test after bisecting the posts and re-bonding the two halves with the luting agents. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). Failure modes were evaluated under optical microscopy and SEM. GF presented wider fibers and higher amount of matrix than CF, and G/CF presented carbon fibers surrounded by glass fibers, and both involved by matrix. For CF and GF, the dual-cured material presented significantly higher (p0.05), but higher than that of G/CF (p0.05) were detected, irrespective of the post type. For GF and G/CF, all failures were considered mixed, while a predominance of adhesive failures was detected for CF. The bonding between fiber posts and luting agents was affected by the type of fibers and polymerization mode of the cement. When no surface treatment of the post is performed, the bonding between glass fiber post and dual-cured agent seems to be more reliable.

  20. Effect of ceramic thickness and shade on mechanical properties of a resin luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Rizkalla, Amin S; Santos, Gildo Coelho

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of ceramic thickness and shade on the Knoop hardness and dynamic elastic modulus of a dual-cured resin cement. Six ceramic shades (Bleaching, A1, A2, A3, A3.5, B3) and two ceramic thicknesses (1 mm, 3 mm) were evaluated. Disk specimens (diameter: 7 mm; thickness: 2 mm) of the resin cement were light cured under a ceramic block. Light-cured specimens without the ceramic block at distances of 1 and 3 mm were also produced. The Knoop hardness number (KHN), density, and dynamic Young's moduli were determined. Statistical analysis was conducted using ANOVA and a Tukey B rank order test (p = 0.05). The bleaching 1-mm-thick group exhibited significantly higher dynamic Young's modulus. Lower dynamic Young's moduli were observed for the 3-mm-thick ceramic groups compared to bleaching 3-mm-thick group, and no difference was found among the other 3-mm groups. For the KHN, when A3.5 3-mm-thick was used, the KHN was significantly lower than bleaching and A1 1-mm-thick ceramic; however, no difference was exhibited between the thicknesses of the same shade. The dual-cured resin cement studied irradiated through the 1-mm-thick ceramic with the lightest shade (bleaching ceramic) exhibited a better elastic modulus, and there was no effect in KHN of the resin cement when light cured under different ceramic shades and thicknesses (1 and 3 mm), except when the A3.5 3-mm-thick ceramic was used. Variolink II irradiated through ceramic with the lowest chroma exhibited the highest elastic modulus; therefore, the light activation method might not be the same for all clinical situations. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Use of luting agents with an implant system: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, L C; Dixon, D L; Bogacki, M T; Tietge, J D

    1992-11-01

    When removal of the provisionally cemented superstructure from a cemented abutment becomes necessary, the retentive strengths of the abutment/fixture and superstructure/abutment luting agents become important considerations. This study compared the retentive strengths of castings cemented to machined titanium implant abutments and to a human premolar with three provisional luting agents. Also tested were the retentive strengths of cast noble metal implant abutments cemented into titanium fixtures with three permanent luting agents both dry and after storage in 0.9% physiologic saline for 30 days at 37 degrees C. No significant differences (alpha natural tooth. The Temp Bond zinc oxide-eugenol luting agent exhibited a lower mean retentive strength than the IRM reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol and Life calcium hydroxide luting agents. Ketac Cem glass-ionomer cemented abutments that were stored in saline exhibited a significantly higher mean retentive strength than abutments cemented with either Core Paste or Resiment resin luting agents. On the basis of results from this study, it may be concluded that superstructures provisionally cemented with Temp Bond, IRM, or Life luting agents may be removed from implant abutments without disturbing the abutment/fixture or implant bond.

  2. A Review of Luting Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis H. Pameijer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the availability of a large number of luting agents (dental cements proper selection can be a daunting task and is usually based on a practitioner’s reliance on experience and preference and less on in depth knowledge of materials that are used for the restoration and luting agent properties. This review aims at presenting an overview of current cements and discusses physical properties, biocompatibility and other properties that make a particular cement the preferred choice depending on the clinical indication. Tables are provided that outline the different properties of the generic classification of cements. It should be noted that no recommendations are made to use a particular commercial cement for a hypothetical clinical situation. The choice is solely the responsibility of the practitioner. The appendix is intended as a guide for the practitioner towards a recommended choice under commonly encountered clinical scenarios. Again, no commercial brands are recommended although the author recognizes that some have better properties than others. Please note that this flowchart strictly presents the author’s opinion and is based on research, clinical experience and the literature.

  3. Dynamic and static mechanical analysis of resin luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolidis, K; Papadogiannis, D; Papadogiannis, Y; Gerasimou, P

    2012-02-01

    Various types of indirect restorations are available for dental treatment and resin cements are commonly used as a luting medium. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of contemporary resin luting agents under different testing conditions and temperatures. The materials tested were Choice 2 (CH), Clearfil Esthetic Cement (EC), Resicem (RC) and RelyX Unicem (RX). Each material was examined after 24 h of storage at 21 °C dry and wet at 21, 37 and 50 °C under dynamic and static testing and parameters such as shear and flexural modulus, loss tangent, dynamic viscosity and Poisson's ratio were calculated. The resin cements were also subjected to creep testing under different constant loads for 3 h and a recovery time of 50 h. The material with the highest modulus was CH, while RX had the lowest. All resin cements were affected by the presence of water with RX being the least affected and by the increase of temperature, with RC being the least susceptible. None of the materials exhibited full recovery after creep testing and permanent deformation ranged from 0.43% to 5.53%. The resin cements tested in this study showed no major transitions under the different testing conditions. Their behavior was satisfactory for restorations that do not require increased mechanical properties. However, in the case of stress-bearing restorations the conditions in the oral cavity may affect the performance of these materials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dental luting agents: A review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstiel, S F; Land, M F; Crispin, B J

    1998-09-01

    The practice of fixed prosthodontic has changed dramatically with the introduction of innovative techniques and materials. Adhesive resin systems are examples of these changes that have led to the popularity of bonded ceramics and resin-retained fixed partial dentures. Today's dentist has the choice of a water-based luting agent (zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, or reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol) or a resin system with or without an adhesive. Recent formulations of glass ionomer luting agents include resin components (resin-modified glass ionomers), which are increasingly popular in clinical practice. This review summarizes the research on these systems with the goal of providing information that will help the reader choose the most suitable material. The scientific studies have been evaluated in relation to the following categories: (1) biocompatibility, (2) caries or plaque inhibition, (3) microleakage, (4) strength and other mechanical properties, (5) solubility, (6) water sorption, (7) adhesion, (8) setting stresses, (9) wear resistance, (10) color stability, (11) radiopacity, (12) film thickness or viscosity, and (13) working and setting times. In addition, guidelines on luting-agent manipulation are related to available literature and include: (1) temporary cement removal, (2) smear layer removal, (3) powder/liquid ratio, (4) mixing temperature and speed, (5) seating force and vibration, and (6) moisture control. Tables of available products and their properties are also presented together with current recommendations by the authors with a rationale.

  5. Effects of triazine dithione and hydrophobic phosphate monomers on bonding to Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy and titanium with a methacrylic resin-based luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Ishii, Takaya; Naito, Koji; Yoneyama, Takayuki; Tanoue, Naomi; Matsumura, Hideo

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effects of thione and phosphate functional monomers on bond strength and durability of a methacrylic resin luting agent joined to silver-palladium based alloy and titanium. Disk specimens of two different sizes (10 mm and 8 mm in diameter by 2.5 mm thickness) were prepared from silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au) alloy and titanium. The specimens were ground with abrasive paper, and divided into four groups based on the following conditions: 1) unprimed control; 2) priming with Alloy Primer (thione and phosphate); 3) priming with Estenia Opaque Primer (phosphate); and 4) priming with VPrimer (thione). The disks were bonded with tri-n-butylborane (TBB)-initiated resin, and shear bond strengths were determined both before and after thermocycling. The Alloy Primer and V-Primer agents containing a triazine dithione monomer (VTD) bonded the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy, whereas the Alloy Primer and Estenia Opaque Primer agents containing a hydrophobic phosphate monomer (MDP) bonded titanium. The reduction in bond strength after 20,000 thermocycles was not remarkable for the two groups (Alloy Primer and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy; V-Primer and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy). The thione monomer was effective in bonding the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy, whereas the phosphate monomer was useful for bonding titanium. The thione did not interfere with the bonding of MDP to titanium, and MDP did not negatively affect bonding of VTD to the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. The combinations of two thione primers and the Ag-Pd-Cu- Au alloy exhibited the best adhesive performance within the limitations of the current experiment.

  6. Effect of adhesive luting on the fracture resistance of zirconia compared to that of composite resin and lithium disilicate glass ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Jin Lim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adhesive luting on the fracture resistance of zirconia compared to that of a composite resin and a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Materials and Methods The specimens (dimension: 2 mm × 2 mm × 25 mm of the composite resin, lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP were prepared. These were then divided into nine groups: three non-luting groups, three non-adhesive luting groups, and three adhesive luting groups, for each restorative material. In the non-luting groups, specimens were placed on the bovine tooth without any luting agents. In the non-adhesive luting groups, only zinc phosphate cement was used for luting the specimen to the bovine tooth. In the adhesive luting groups, specimens were pretreated, and the adhesive luting procedure was performed using a self-adhesive resin cement. For all the groups, a flexural test was performed using universal testing machine, in which the fracture resistance was measured by recording the force at which the specimen was fractured. Results The fracture resistance after adhesive luting increased by approximately 29% in the case of the composite resin, 26% in the case of the lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and only 2% in the case of Y-TZP as compared to non-adhesive luting. Conclusions The fracture resistance of Y-TZP did not increased significantly after adhesive luting as compared to that of the composite resin and the lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

  7. Bond strength of overdenture locator posts cemented with seven luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleisa, Khalil

    2013-07-01

    Post retention is crucial factor in restoration survival. Posts are commonly failed due to loss of retention. It is unknown which luting agents would provide the maximum bond strength for Locator overdenture posts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond retentive strengths of Locator overdenture posts cemented with 7 luting agents. One hundred and five single rooted human teeth were decoronated and randomly assigned to 7 groups (n = 15). Post spaces were prepared with Locator post drills to the depth of 6 mm. The Locator posts were cemented with Variolink II, RelyX ARC, Multilink N, RelyX Unicem, ParaCore, or MultiCore Flow resin luting agents. Zinc phosphate cement was served as control group. Specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours. Each specimen was loaded in tension in an Instron universal testing machine. The maximum force required to dislodge each Locator post was recorded. Means and standard deviations were calculated and data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The highest mean bond strength value for Locator posts was recorded for MultiCore(®) Flow group (mean = 550.1 N), while the lowest mean value was for RelyX Unicem(™) resin cement group (mean = 216.8 N). A statistically significant difference in mean locator overdenture post bond strength was observed between the 7 cement types (p ParaCore(™) and MultiCore(®) Flow groups had significantly higher bond strength than all other groups, but they were not differed from each other. Bond strength of Locator overdenture posts were influenced by the type of luting agents. MultiCore Flow and ParaCore resin cements offered the greatest retention. The type of luting agents had a significant effect on the retention of Locator posts. The use of Core buildup resin cements as luting agent with Locator post demonstrated the greatest retention.

  8. In Vivo Disintegration of Four Different Luting Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Gemalmaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the disintegration of luting agents. An intraoral sample holder was made having four holes of 1.4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth. The holder was soldered onto the buccal surface of an orthodontic band, which was cemented to the first upper molar in 12 patients, average age 26 years. The holes were filled with a zinc phosphate (Phosphate Kulzer, a glass ionomer (Ketac Cem, a resin-modified-glass ionomer (Fuji Plus, and a resin cement (Calibra. Impressions were made at baseline, and 6, 12, and 18 months from which epoxy replicas were made, which were scanned with an optical scanner. Total volume loss was calculated. The rank order of mean volume loss was as follows: Phosphate cement > Ketac Cem = Fuji Plus = Calibra. Cement type and time had statistically significant effects on volume loss of cements (P<0.001. Under in vivo conditions, zinc phosphate cement disintegrated the most, whereas no significant difference was observed for glass ionomer and resin-based cements. As intraoral conditions are considerably less aggressive than experimental laboratory conditions, the erosion behavior of glass ionomer cement was found to be similar to the resin-based cements in contradiction to previous laboratory results.

  9. Cytotoxicity of resin-based luting cements to pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Elaine Cristina Voltolini; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto De Souza

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of components released from different types of luting cements to two cell lines obtained from pulp tissue. Three types of luting cements were evaluated, distributed into the following groups: G1--negative control (no treatment); G2--resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Rely X Luting 2); G3--self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X U200); and G4--conventional resin cement (Rely X ARC). Standardized cylindrical specimens (14 mm diameter and 1 mm thick) prepared with the dental materials were immersed in culture medium (DMEM) for 24 hours to obtain the extracts (DMEM + components released from the cements). Then, the extracts were applied to cultured odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells or human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). Finally, cell viability (MTT assay), cell death (Annexin/PI) (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 5%) and cell morphology (SEM) were assessed. Cements' components in contact with cells (SEM/EDS) and pH of the extracts were also evaluated. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (G2) caused the most intense toxic effect to the two cell lines; the cell viability reduction was around 95.8% and 89.4% for MDPC-23 cells and HDPCs, respectively, which was statistically significantly different compared with that of the negative control group (G1). Also, a high quantity of particles leached from this ionomeric cement was found on the cells, which showed intense morphological alterations. In the G2 group, 100% necrosis was observed for both cell lines, and an acidic pH was detected on the extract. Conversely, Rely X U200 (G3) and Rely X ARC (G4), which presented low solubility and no alteration in pH, caused only slight cytotoxicity to the cultured cells.

  10. Survival of Dicor glass-ceramic dental restorations over 16 years. Part III: effect of luting agent and tooth or tooth-substitute core structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malament, K A; Socransky, S S

    2001-11-01

    The influence of different types of restorative design features on the long-term survival of Dicor glass-ceramic restorations is only partially understood. This study examined the effect of different types of luting agents and preparation core structures on the survival of Dicor glass-ceramic restorations functioning in vivo. A total of 1444 Dicor glass-ceramic restorations were placed on the teeth of 417 adults. Failure was defined as a restoration that required remake because of material fracture. The survival of restorations of different types, with different luting agents and preparation core structures, was described with Kaplan-Meier survival functions. The significance of differences in survival between different tooth or tooth-substitute preparation core structures and different luting agents was determined with the log-rank test. The probability of survival of a typical acid-etched Dicor restoration luted to gold preparation core structures was 91% at 16 years compared with 75% for dentin preparation core structures (P<.01). The survival of acid-etched Dicor restorations luted to dentin preparations was significantly better than nonacid-etched restorations luted to dentin. Acid-etched Dicor restorations luted with resin composite exhibited a more favorable survival function than those luted with glass ionomer (P<.01) and zinc phosphate (P<.05). Differences between restorations luted with glass ionomer or zinc phosphate agents were not significant. Acid-etched Dicor restorations luted to gold preparation core structures exhibited significantly better intraoral survival than restorations luted to dentin. Acid-etched Dicor restorations survived better than nonacid-etched restorations when luted to dentin preparations. Acid-etched Dicor restorations luted with resin composite exhibited more favorable survivor functions than restorations luted with glass ionomer or zinc phosphate agents.

  11. Comparative evaluation of bond strength of all-metal crowns with different luting agents after undergoing various modes of surface treatments: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivam Singh Tomar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Among all types of surface treatments used in this study, maximum bond strength was yielded by sandblasting with 110 µm alumina + ultrasonic cleaning and the best luting agent was resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

  12. Simulated localized wear of resin luting cements for universal adhesive systems with different curing mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-29

    This study evaluated the simulated localized wear of resin luting cements for universal adhesive systems using different curing modes. Five resin luting cements for universal adhesive systems were evaluated and subsequently subjected to wear challenge in a Leinfelder-Suzuki wear simulation device. Overall, 20 specimens from each resin luting cement were photo-cured for 40 s (dual-cure group), and 20 specimens of each material were not photo-cured (chemical-cure group). Simulated localized wear was generated using a stainless steel ball-bearing antagonist in water slurry of polymethylmethacrylate beads. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of resin luting cements and wear facets were conducted. Significant differences in simulated wear and SEM observations of wear facets were evident among the materials in the dual- and chemical-cure groups. The simulated wear and SEM observations of wear facets of G-CEM LinkForce and Panavia V5 were not influenced by the curing mode. SEM observations of resin luting cements were material dependent. In most cases, dual curing appears to ensure greater wear resistance of resin luting cements than chemical curing alone. The wear resistance of some resin luting cements appears to be material dependent and is not influenced by the curing mode.

  13. Misfit and microleakage of implant-supported crown copings obtained by laser sintering and casting techniques, luted with glass-ionomer, resin cements and acrylic/urethane-based agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Lynch, Christopher D; Turrión, Andrés S; López-Lozano, José F; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Suárez-García, María-Jesús

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the marginal misfit and microleakage of cement-retained implant-supported crown copings. Single crown structures were constructed with: (1) laser-sintered Co-Cr (LS); (2) vacuum-cast Co-Cr (CC) and (3) vacuum-cast Ni-Cr-Ti (CN). Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion onto machined titanium abutments using: (1) GC Fuji PLUS (FP); (2) Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); (3) RelyX Unicem 2 Automix (RXU) and (4) DentoTemp (DT) (n=15 each). After 60 days of water ageing, vertical discrepancy was SEM-measured and cement microleakage was scored using a digital microscope. Misfit data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons tests. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests were run for microleakage analysis (α=0.05). Regardless of the cement type, LS samples exhibited the best fit, whilst CC and CN performed equally well. Despite the framework alloy and manufacturing technique, FP and DT provide comparably better fit and greater microleakage scores than did CEC and RXU, which showed no differences. DMLS of Co-Cr may be a reliable alternative to the casting of base metal alloys to obtain well-fitted implant-supported crowns, although all the groups tested were within the clinically acceptable range of vertical discrepancy. No strong correlations were found between misfit and microleakage. Notwithstanding the framework alloy, definitive resin-modified glass-ionomer (FP) and temporary acrylic/urethane-based (DT) cements demonstrated comparably better marginal fit and greater microleakage scores than did 10-methacryloxydecyl-dihydrogen phosphate-based (CEC) and self-adhesive (RXU) dual-cure resin agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Retention of Implant Supported Metal Crowns Cemented with Different Luting Agents: A Comparative Invitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Roohi; Singh, Kavipal; Kaur, Simrat; Arora, Aman

    2016-04-01

    To overcome limitations of screw-retained prostheses, cement-retained prostheses have become the restoration of choice now a days. Selection of the cement hence becomes very critical to maintain retrievability of the prostheses. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the retention of base metal crowns cemented to implant abutments with five different luting cements. Ten implant analogs were secured in five epoxy resin casts perpendicular to the plane of cast in right first molar and left first molar region and implant abutments were screwed. Total of 100 metal copings were fabricated and cemented. The cements used were zinc phosphate, resin modified glass ionomer cement, resin cement, non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement & non-eugenol temporary resin cement implant cement. Samples were subjected to a pull-out test using an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. The load required to de-cement each coping was recorded and mean values for each group calculated and put to statistical analysis. The results showed that resin cement has the highest retention value 581.075N followed by zinc phosphate luting cement 529.48N, resin modified glass ionomer cement 338.095 N, non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement 249.045 N and non-eugenol temporary resin implant cement 140.49N. Within the limitations of study, it was concluded that non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement and non-eugenol temporary resin implant cement allow for easy retrievability of the prosthesis in case of any failure in future. These are suitable for cement retained implant restorations. The results provide a possible preliminary ranking of luting agents based on their ability to retain an implant-supported prosthesis and facilitate easy retrieval.

  15. Retention of Implant Supported Metal Crowns Cemented with Different Luting Agents: A Comparative Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kavipal; Kaur, Simrat; Arora, Aman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To overcome limitations of screw-retained prostheses, cement-retained prostheses have become the restoration of choice now a days. Selection of the cement hence becomes very critical to maintain retrievability of the prostheses. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the retention of base metal crowns cemented to implant abutments with five different luting cements. Materials and Methods Ten implant analogs were secured in five epoxy resin casts perpendicular to the plane of cast in right first molar and left first molar region and implant abutments were screwed. Total of 100 metal copings were fabricated and cemented. The cements used were zinc phosphate, resin modified glass ionomer cement, resin cement, non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement & non-eugenol temporary resin cement implant cement. Samples were subjected to a pull-out test using an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. The load required to de-cement each coping was recorded and mean values for each group calculated and put to statistical analysis. Results The results showed that resin cement has the highest retention value 581.075N followed by zinc phosphate luting cement 529.48N, resin modified glass ionomer cement 338.095 N, non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement 249.045 N and non-eugenol temporary resin implant cement 140.49N. Conclusion Within the limitations of study, it was concluded that non-eugenol acrylic based temporary implant cement and non-eugenol temporary resin implant cement allow for easy retrievability of the prosthesis in case of any failure in future. These are suitable for cement retained implant restorations. The results provide a possible preliminary ranking of luting agents based on their ability to retain an implant-supported prosthesis and facilitate easy retrieval. PMID:27190954

  16. The comparison of provisional luting agents and abutment surface roughness on the retention of provisional implant-supported crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsik; Yamashita, Junro; Shotwell, Jeffrey L; Chong, Kok-Heng; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2006-06-01

    In immediate implant loading, it is important to keep provisional restorations in place during early-phase healing. Current luting agents for provisional restorations may provide inadequate retention, creating a clinical challenge. This study compared the retention of provisional autopolymerizing acrylic resin implant-supported single restorations with combinations of different implant abutment surface conditions and provisional luting agents. Thirty solid titanium implant abutments (ITI), 4 mm high, were divided into 3 groups. Ten abutments were unaltered, 10 were airborne-particle abraded with 50-microm aluminum oxide, and 10 were roughened with a medium-roughness diamond rotary cutting instrument. Thirty implant analogs (ITI) were mounted in autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks. A solid titanium implant abutment was placed in each implant analog and torqued to 35 N.cm. After fabrication of 4 provisional acrylic resin crowns for each abutment, provisional luting agents TempBond, TempBond NE, Life, and Zone were used to secure the provisional crowns to the respective abutments. All specimens were luted with one of the provisional luting agents for a given test. After ultrasonic cleaning of the abutments, another provisional crown was luted with another luting agent. All specimens were stored in 100% humidity environment for 1 day at 37 degrees C prior to testing. Each provisional acrylic resin crown was pulled from the abutment with a 500-kg load cell in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/minute, and tensile strength was recorded (N). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Scheffe test (alpha=.05). Tensile strength was significantly higher for Life and TempBond NE than for TempBond and Zone, regardless of the surface conditions (P=.0001). The result of the 2-way ANOVA indicated that a significant interaction existed between the provisional luting agents and surface conditions (P=.0039). TempBond NE showed

  17. Micromorphological characterization of the adhesive interface of self-adhesive resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Bittner, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Resin luting agents are used to lute indirect restorations to hard tooth tissues. The luting procedure consists mostly of several tooth pretreatment steps as etching, priming and application of adhesive and only at the very end applying of a resin luting agent. Such a multi-step luting procedure with separate adhesive system is quite time-consuming and technique sensitive. Therefore, constant inquiry from the practitioners for the resin luting agents with simplified application procedure, hav...

  18. Degree of conversion of luting resins around ceramic inlays in natural deep cavities: a micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbauer, Ulrich; Pelka, Matthias; Belli, Renan; Schmitt, Johannes; Mocker, Eike; Jandt, Klaus D; Müller, Frank A

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree of conversion (%DC) of luting agents around ceramic inlays placed in deep natural cavities. Thirty-six cylindrical Class I cavities (diameter = 4 mm, depth = 4 mm) were prepared in freshly extracted human teeth and randomly divided according to the luting materials used for luting CAD/CAM fabricated inlays (Empress CAD). The dual-cure resin cements Clearfil Esthetic Cement and Variolink II Low and the light-cure composites Grandio Flow and Grandio were luted using the total-etch technique. The self-adhesive dual-cure cements RelyX Unicem and Maxcem Elite were used as recommended by the manufacturer. All of the restorations were photo-activated using a quartz halogen unit (Elipar TriLight; 750 mW/cm2) for 40 seconds. After 24 hour dry-storage in the dark, all the teeth were vertically sectioned into two halves (n = 12 per group) using a slow-speed diamond-saw in the bucco-vestibular direction under constant water lubrication to avoid specimen heating. The DC of the luting materials was measured by vibrational spectroscopy using a micro-Raman spectrometer at depths of 1, 3 and 4 mm on each side of the tooth halves (n = 24). Disc-shaped samples were produced for measurement of the maximum %DC of each material. Two-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls post-hoc test were used in the statistical analysis (alpha = 0.05). All the materials showed no statistical differences in degree of conversion at all tested depths, except for Grandio Flow and Maxcem Elite. Dual-cure and light-cure luting materials showed polymerization homogeneity around ceramic inlays, although dual-cure conventional resin cements tended to show an overall higher conversion.

  19. Relationship Between Simulated Gap Wear and Generalized Wear of Resin Luting Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, A; Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Latta, M A; Miayazaki, M

    The relationship between the simulated gap wear and generalized wear of resin luting cements was investigated. Five resin luting cements, G-Cem LinkForce (GL), Multilink Automix (MA), NX3 Nexus, Panavia V5 (PV), and RelyX Ultimate were evaluated and subsequently subjected to a wear challenge in a Leinfelder-Suzuki (Alabama) wear simulation device. Half of the specimens from each resin luting cement were photo-cured for 40 seconds and the other half were not photo-cured. The simulated gap and generalized wear were generated using a flat-ended stainless steel antagonist. Wear testing was performed in a water slurry of polymethyl methacrylate beads, and the simulated gap and generalized wear were determined using a noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) in conjunction with the Proscan and AnSur 3D software. A strong relationship was found between the gap wear and generalized wear simulation models. The simulated gap wear and generalized wear of the resin luting cements followed similar trends in terms of both volume loss and mean depth of wear facets with each curing method. Unlike the simulated gap wear and generalized wear of GL and PV, those of MA, NX, and RU were influenced by the curing method. The results of this study indicate that simulated gap wear of resin luting cements is very similar to simulated generalized wear. In most cases, dual curing appears to ensure greater wear resistance of resin luting cements than chemical curing alone. The wear resistance of some resin luting cements appears to be material dependent and is not influenced by the curing method.

  20. Vertical misfit of laser-sintered and vacuum-cast implant-supported crown copings luted with definitive and temporary luting agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José F.; Albaladejo, Alberto; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Montero, Javier; Suárez-García, Maria J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to evaluate the vertical discrepancy of implant-supported crown structures constructed with vacuum-casting and Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technologies, and luted with different cement types. Study Design. Crown copings were fabricated using: (1) direct metal laser sintered Co-Cr (LS); (2) vacuum-cast Co-Cr (CC); and (3) vacuum-cast Ti (CT). Frameworks were luted onto machined implant abutments under constant seating pressure. Each alloy group was randomly divided into 5 subgroups (n = 10 each) according to the cement system utilized: Subgroup 1 (KC) used resin-modified glass-ionomer Ketac Cem Plus; Subgroup 2 (PF) used Panavia F 2.0 dual-cure resin cement; Subgroup 3 (RXU) used RelyX Unicem 2 Automix self-adhesive dual-cure resin cement; Subgroup 4 (PIC) used acrylic/urethane-based temporary Premier Implant Cement; and Subgroup 5 (DT) used acrylic/urethane-based temporary DentoTemp cement. Vertical misfit was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run to investigate the effect of alloy/fabrication technique, and cement type on vertical misfit. The statistical significance was set at α = 0.05. Results. The alloy/manufacturing technique and the luting cement affected the vertical discrepancy (p cement type, LS samples exhibited the best fit (p crown copings. The best marginal adaptation corresponded to laser sintered structures luted with glass-ionomer KC, or temporary PIC or DT cements. The highest discrepancies were recorded for Co-Cr and Ti cast frameworks bonded with PF or RXU resinous agents. All groups were within the clinically acceptable misfit range. Key words:Dental alloy, laser sintering, implant-supported prostheses, vertical discrepancy, vertical misfit. PMID:22322524

  1. Retention Strength after Compressive Cyclic Loading of Five Luting Agents Used in Implant-Supported Prostheses

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    Angel Alvarez-Arenal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the retention strength of five cement types commonly used in implant-retained fixed partial dentures, before and after compressive cyclic loading. In five solid abutments screwed to 5 implant analogs, 50 metal Cr-Ni alloy copings were cemented with five luting agents: resin-modified glass ionomer (RmGI, resin composite (RC, glass ionomer (GI, resin urethane-based (RUB, and compomer cement (CC. Two tensile tests were conducted with a universal testing machine, one after the first luting of the copings and the other after 100,000 cycles of 100 N loading at 0.72 Hz. The one way ANOVA test was applied for the statistical analysis using the post hoc Tukey test when required. Before and after applying the compressive load, RmGI and RC cement types showed the greatest retention strength. After compressive loading, RUB cement showed the highest percentage loss of retention (64.45%. GI cement recorded the lowest retention strength (50.35 N and the resin composite cement recorded the highest (352.02 N. The type of cement influences the retention loss. The clinician should give preference to lower retention strength cement (RUB, CC, and GI if he envisages any complications and a high retention strength one (RmGI, RC for a specific clinical situation.

  2. Correlation between margin fit and microleakage in complete crowns cemented with three luting agents

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    Paulo Henrique Orlato Rossetti

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Microleakage can be related to margin misfit. Also, traditional microleakage techniques are time-consuming. This study evaluated the existence of correlation between in vitro margin fit and a new microleakage technique for complete crowns cemented with 3 different luting agents. Thirty human premolars were prepared for full-coverage crowns with a convergence angle of 6 degrees, chamfer margin of 1.2 mm circumferentially, and occlusal reduction of 1.5 mm. Ni-Cr cast crowns were cemented with either zinc phosphate (ZP (S.S. White, resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI (Rely X Luting Cement or a resin-based luting agent (RC (Enforce. Margin fit (seating discrepancy and margin gap was evaluated according to criteria in the literature under microscope with 0.001 mm accuracy. After thermal cycling, crowns were longitudinally sectioned and microleakage scores at tooth-cement interface were obtained and recorded at ×100 magnification. Margin fit parameters were compared with the one-way ANOVA test and microleakage scores with Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests (alpha=0.05. Correlation between margin fit and microleakage was analyzed with the Spearman's test (alpha=0.05. Seating discrepancy and marginal gap values ranged from 81.82 µm to 137.22 µm (p=0.117, and from 75.42 µm to 78.49 µm (p=0.940, respectively. Marginal microleakage scores were ZP=3.02, RMGI=0.35 and RC=0.12 (p0.05. Conclusion: Margin fit parameters and microleakage showed no strong correlations; cast crowns cemented with RMGI and RC had lower microleakage scores than ZP cement.

  3. Correlation between margin fit and microleakage in complete crowns cemented with three luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato; do Valle, Accacio Lins; de Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; De Goes, Mario Fernando; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Microleakage can be related to margin misfit. Also, traditional microleakage techniques are time-consuming. This study evaluated the existence of correlation between in vitro margin fit and a new microleakage technique for complete crowns cemented with 3 different luting agents. Thirty human premolars were prepared for full-coverage crowns with a convergence angle of 6 degrees, chamfer margin of 1.2 mm circumferentially, and occlusal reduction of 1.5 mm. Ni-Cr cast crowns were cemented with either zinc phosphate (ZP) (S.S. White), resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) (Rely X Luting Cement) or a resin-based luting agent (RC) (Enforce). Margin fit (seating discrepancy and margin gap) was evaluated according to criteria in the literature under microscope with 0.001 mm accuracy. After thermal cycling, crowns were longitudinally sectioned and microleakage scores at tooth-cement interface were obtained and recorded at x100 magnification. Margin fit parameters were compared with the one-way ANOVA test and microleakage scores with Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests (alpha=0.05). Correlation between margin fit and microleakage was analyzed with the Spearman's test (alpha=0.05). Seating discrepancy and marginal gap values ranged from 81.82 microm to 137.22 microm (p=0.117), and from 75.42 microm to 78.49 microm (p=0.940), respectively. Marginal microleakage scores were ZP=3.02, RMGI=0.35 and RC=0.12 (p0.05). Margin fit parameters and microleakage showed no strong correlations; cast crowns cemented with RMGI and RC had lower microleakage scores than ZP cement.

  4. CORRELATION BETWEEN MARGIN FIT AND MICROLEAKAGE IN COMPLETE CROWNS CEMENTED WITH THREE LUTING AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato; do Valle, Accacio Lins; de Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Goes, Mario Fernando De; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Microleakage can be related to margin misfit. Also, traditional microleakage techniques are time-consuming. This study evaluated the existence of correlation between in vitro margin fit and a new microleakage technique for complete crowns cemented with 3 different luting agents. Thirty human premolars were prepared for full-coverage crowns with a convergence angle of 6 degrees, chamfer margin of 1.2 mm circumferentially, and occlusal reduction of 1.5 mm. Ni-Cr cast crowns were cemented with either zinc phosphate (ZP) (S.S. White), resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) (Rely X Luting Cement) or a resin-based luting agent (RC) (Enforce). Margin fit (seating discrepancy and margin gap) was evaluated according to criteria in the literature under microscope with 0.001 mm accuracy. After thermal cycling, crowns were longitudinally sectioned and microleakage scores at tooth-cement interface were obtained and recorded at x100 magnification. Margin fit parameters were compared with the one-way ANOVA test and microleakage scores with Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests (α=0.05). Correlation between margin fit and microleakage was analyzed with the Spearman's test (α=0.05). Seating discrepancy and marginal gap values ranged from 81.82 μm to 137.22 μm (p=0.117), and from 75.42 μm to 78.49 μm (p=0.940), respectively. Marginal microleakage scores were ZP=3.02, RMGI=0.35 and RC=0.12 (p0.05). Conclusion: Margin fit parameters and microleakage showed no strong correlations; cast crowns cemented with RMGI and RC had lower microleakage scores than ZP cement. PMID:19089292

  5. Retentiveness of implant-supported metal copings using different luting agents

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    Farahnaz Nejatidanesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With regard to potential retrievability of cement-retained implant restorations, the retentive strength of the luting agents is critical. The aim of this study was to evaluate the retention values of implant-supported metal copings using different luting agents. Materials and Methods: Twenty ITI implant analogs and solid abutments of 5.5-mm height were embedded vertically in autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks. Metal copings with a loop on the occlusal surface were fabricated using base metal alloy (Rexillium III. The copings were luted using eight cements with different retention mechanisms (Panavia F2.0, Fuji Plus, Fleck′s, Poly F, Fuji I, Temp Bond, GC-free eugenol, and TempSpan under static load of 5 kg (n=10. All specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 hours, conditioned in artificial saliva for 7 days and thermocycled for 5000 cycles (5-55°C. The dislodging force was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Statistical analyses were performed using Kruskal-Wallis (α=0.05 and Mann-Whitney tests with Bonferroni correction (α=0.001. Results: Fuji Plus and TempSpan had the highest and the least mean retentive strength, respectively (320.97±161.47, 3.39±2.33. There was no significant difference between Fuji Plus, Fleck′s, Ploy F, and Panavia F2.0. These cements were superior to provisional cements and Fuji I (P<0.001 which showed statistically same retentive strength. Conclusion: Within the conditions of this study, the resin modified glass ionomer, zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate, and Panavia F2.0 had statistically the same retentive quality and are recommended for definitive cementation of single implant-supported restorations. The provisional cements and glass ionomer may allow retrievability of these restorations.

  6. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of luting agents on the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleisa, Khalil; Al-Dwairi, Ziad N; Alghabban, Rawda; Goodacre, Charles J

    2013-09-01

    Fiber posts can fail because of loss of retention; and it is unknown which luting agent provides the highest bond strength. The purpose of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts luted to premolar teeth with 6 resin composite luting agents. Ninety-six single-rooted extracted human mandibular premolars were sectioned 2 mm coronal to the most incisal point of the cementoenamel junction. Root canals were instrumented and obturated with laterally condensed gutta percha and root canal sealer (AH26). Gutta percha was removed from the canals to a depth of 8 mm and diameter post spaces with a 1.5 mm were prepared. The specimens were divided into the following 6 groups according to the luting agent used (n=16): Group V, Variolink II; Group A, RelyX ARC; Group N, Multilink N; Group U, RelyX Unicem; Group P, ParaCore; Group F, MultiCore Flow. Each specimen was secured in a universal testing machine and a separating load was applied at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. The forces required to dislodge the posts were recorded. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to the mean retentive strengths of various cement materials (α=.05). Significant differences were recorded among the 6 cement types (PParacore, and MultiCore Flow) that were significantly greater than for the other 3 materials. Fiber posts luted with RelyX Unicem, Paracore, and MultiCore Flow demonstrated significantly higher bond strengths. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bond strength of three luting agents to zirconia ceramic - influence of surface treatment and thermocycling

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    Ahmed Attia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments, 3 luting agents and thermocycling on microtensile bond strength (µTBS to zirconia ceramic. Material and METHODS: A total of 18 blocks (5x5x4 mm were fabricated from zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkonia and duplicated into composite blocks (Alphadent. Ceramic blocks were divided into 3 groups (n=6 according to the following surface treatments: airborne-particle abrasion (AA, silica-coating, (SC (CoJet and silica coating followed by silane application (SCSI (ESPE Sil. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (n=2 according to the 3 luting agents used. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC, Ketac Cem Plus, self-adhesive resin cement (UN, RelyX Unicem and adhesive resin cement (ML, MultiLink Automix were used for bonding composite and zirconia blocks. Each bonding assembly was cut into microbars (10 mm long and 1±0.1 mm². Seven specimens of each subgroup were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 1 week. The other 7 specimens were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 30 days then thermocycled (TC for 7,500 cycles. µTBS values were recorded for each specimen using a universal testing machine. Statistical analyses were performed using a 3-way ANOVA model followed by serial 1-way ANOVAs. Comparison of means was performed with Tukey's HSD test at (α=0.05. RESULTS: µTBS ranged from 16.8 to 31.8 MPa after 1 week and from 7.3 to 16.4 MPa after 30 days of storage in water and thermocycling. Artificial aging significantly decreased µTBS (p<0.05. Considering surface treatment, SCSI significantly increased µTBS (p<0.05 compared to SC and AA. Resin cements (UN and ML demonstrated significantly higher µTBS (p<0.05 compared to RMGIC cement. CONCLUSIONS: Silica coating followed by silane application together with adhesive resin cements significantly increased µTBS, while thermocycling significantly decreased µTBS.

  9. Bond strength of three luting agents to zirconia ceramic - Influence of surface treatment and thermocycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATTIA, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Objective This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments, 3 luting agents and thermocycling on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to zirconia ceramic. Material and Methods A total of 18 blocks (5x5x4 mm) were fabricated from zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkonia) and duplicated into composite blocks (Alphadent). Ceramic blocks were divided into 3 groups (n=6) according to the following surface treatments: airborne-particle abrasion (AA), silica-coating, (SC) (CoJet) and silica coating followed by silane application (SCSI) (ESPE Sil). Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (n=2) according to the 3 luting agents used. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC, Ketac Cem Plus), self-adhesive resin cement (UN, RelyX Unicem) and adhesive resin cement (ML, MultiLink Automix) were used for bonding composite and zirconia blocks. Each bonding assembly was cut into microbars (10 mm long and 1±0.1 mm2). Seven specimens of each subgroup were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 1 week. The o ther 7 specimens were stored in water bath at 37ºC for 30 days then thermocycled (TC) for 7,500 cycles. µTBS values were recorded for each specimen using a universal testing machine. Statistical analyses were performed using a 3-way ANOVA model followed by serial 1-way ANOVAs. Comparison of means was performed with Tukey's HSD test at (α=0.05). Results µTBS ranged from 16.8 to 31.8 MPa after 1 week and from 7.3 to 16.4 MPa after 30 days of storage in water and thermocycling. Artificial aging significantly decreased µTBS (p<0.05). Considering surface treatment, SCSI significantly increased µTBS (p<0.05) compared to SC and AA. Resin cements (UN and ML) demonstrated significantly higher µTBS (p<0.05) compared to RMGIC cement. Conclusions Silica coating followed by silane application together with adhesive resin cements significantly increased µTBS, while thermocycling significantly decreased µTBS. PMID:21710091

  10. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Luting CAD/CAM Composite Resin Overlay Workpieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotakis, Emmanuel M; Stavridakis, Minos; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Ardu, Stefano; Krejci, Ivo

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on luting CAD/CAM composite resin workpieces. One-hundred eight (108) composite CAD/CAM block sections (Lava Ultimate) 3 mm in thickness were polished up to 4000 grit and then randomly assigned to 6 experimental groups according to the applied surface treatment (no treatment, sodium bicarbonate [NaHCO3], glycine, alumina [Al2O3], CoJet, and SilJet). After standardized sandblasting procedures, 2 block sections from each group were randomly chosen for the qualitative SEM evaluation of the sandblasted surfaces. The remaining 96 CAD/CAM block sections were luted in pairs using a bonding agent (Single Bond) and a restorative composite resin (Filtek Ultimate). Specimens were aged for 2 weeks in 37°C water with 3000 thermal cycles (5°C/55°C), the microtensile test was performed (n = 30), and the values were statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post-hoc test (p = 0.05). The qualitative SEM evaluation of the sandblasted surfaces showed that sodium bicarbonate and glycine had almost no conditioning effect on the CAD/CAM composite resin. In contrast, aluminum oxide, CoJet, and SilJet had a profound conditioning effect on the CAD/CAM composite resin. No treatment, sodium bicarbonate, and glycine specimens were debonded after thermal stressing (0 MPa), while aluminum oxide, CoJet, and SilJet showed high microtensile values (Al2O3: 104.45 ± 18.76 MPa; CoJet: 105.55 ± 11.88 MPa; SilJet: 105.02 ± 20.84 MPa), which were not statistically significantly different from each other. Aluminum oxide-based sandblasting powders are the best choice for the surface treatment of CAD/ CAM workpieces.

  11. Microhardness of dual-polymerizing resin cements and foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keiichi; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2014-06-01

    The optimal luting material for fiber-reinforced posts to ensure the longevity of foundation restorations remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements and 2 dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts by assessing their Knoop hardness number. Five specimens of dual-polymerizing resin cements (SA Cement Automix, G-Cem LincAce, and Panavia F2.0) and 5 specimens of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins (Clearfil DC Core Plus and Unifil Core EM) were polymerized from the top by irradiation for 40 seconds. Knoop hardness numbers were measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours and 7 days after irradiation. Data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey compromise post hoc test (α=.05). At both times after irradiation, the 5 resins materials showed the highest Knoop hardness numbers at the 0.5-mm depth. At 7 days after irradiation, the Knoop hardness numbers of the resin materials did not differ significantly between the 8.0-mm and 10.0-mm depths (P>.05). For all materials, the Knoop hardness numbers at 7 days after irradiation were significantly higher than those at 0.5 hours after irradiation at all depths (Presin materials were found to decrease in the following order: DC Core Plus, Unifil Core EM, Panavia F2.0, SA Cement Automix, and G-Cem LincAce (Pcomposite resins were higher than those of the 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements, notable differences were seen among the 5 materials at all depths and at both times after irradiation. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Accelerated Fatigue Resistance of Thick CAD/CAM Composite Resin Overlays Bonded with Light- and Dual-polymerizing Luting Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Jack; Güth, Jan-Frederik; Magne, Pascal

    To evaluate the accelerated fatigue resistance of thick CAD/CAM composite resin overlays luted with three different bonding methods. Forty-five sound human second mandibular molars were organized and distributed into three experimental groups. All teeth were restored with a 5-mm-thick CAD/CAM composite resin overlay. Group A: immediate dentin sealing (IDS) with Optibond FL and luted with light-polymerizing composite (Herculite XRV). Group B: IDS with Optibond FL and luted with dual-polymerizing composite (Nexus 3). Group C: direct luting with Optibond FL and dual-polymerizing composite (Nexus 3). Masticatory forces at a frequency of 5 Hz were simulated using closed-loop servo-hydraulics and forces starting with a load of 200 N for 5000 cycles, followed by steps of 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 N for a maximum of 30,000 cycles. Each step was applied through a flat steel cylinder at a 45-degree angle under submerged conditions. The fatigue test generated one failure in group A, three failures in group B, and no failures in group C. The survival table analysis for the fatigue test did not demonstrate any significant difference between the groups (p = 0.154). The specimens that survived the fatigue test were set up for the load-to-failure test with a limit of 4600 N. The survival table analysis for the load-to-failure test demonstrates an average failure load of 3495.20 N with survival of four specimens in group A, an average failure load of 4103.60 N with survival of six specimens in group B, and an average failure load of 4075.33 N with survival of nine specimens in group C. Pairwise comparisons revealed no significant differences (p composites in combination with IDS are not contraindicated with thick restorations.

  13. Comparison of effect of desensitizing agents on the retention of crowns cemented with luting agents: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalandar, Sonune Shital; Pandharinath, Dange Shankar; Arun, Khalikar; Smita, Vaidya

    2012-08-01

    Many dentists use desensitizing agents to prevent hypersensitivity. This study compared and evaluated the effect of two desensitizing agents on the retention of cast crowns when cemented with various luting agents. Ninety freshly extracted human molars were prepared with flat occlusal surface, 6 degree taper and approximately 4 mm axial length. The prepared specimens were divided into 3 groups and each group is further divided into 3 subgroups. Desensitizing agents used were GC Tooth Mousse and GLUMA® desensitizer. Cementing agents used were zinc phosphate, glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cement. Individual crowns with loop were made from base metal alloy. Desensitizing agents were applied before cementation of crowns except for control group. Under tensional force the crowns were removed using an automated universal testing machine. Statistical analysis included one-way ANOVA followed by Turkey-Kramer post hoc test at a preset alpha of 0.05. Resin modified glass ionomer cement exhibited the highest retentive strength and all dentin treatments resulted in significantly different retentive values (In Kg.): GLUMA (49.02 ± 3.32) > Control (48.61 ± 3.54) > Tooth mousse (48.34 ± 2.94). Retentive strength for glass ionomer cement were GLUMA (41.14 ± 2.42) > Tooth mousse (40.32 ± 3.89) > Control (39.09 ± 2.80). For zinc phosphate cement the retentive strength were lowest GLUMA (27.92 ± 3.20) > Control (27.69 ± 3.39) > Tooth mousse (25.27 ± 4.60). The use of GLUMA® desensitizer has no effect on crown retention. GC Tooth Mousse does not affect the retentive ability of glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cement, but it decreases the retentive ability of zinc phosphate cement.

  14. Microhardness of light- and dual-polymerizable luting resins polymerized through 7.5-mm-thick endocrowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Ladislav; Bouillaguet, Serge; Onisor, Ioana; Ardu, Stefano; Krejci, Ivo; Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso

    2014-10-01

    The complete polymerization of luting resins through thick indirect restorations is still questioned. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of polymerization of light- and dual-polymerizable luting resins under thick indirect composite resin and ceramic endocrowns by means of Vickers microhardness measurements. The Vickers microhardness measurements of a light-polymerizable microhybrid composite resin and a dual-polymerizable luting cement directly polymerized in a natural tooth mold for 40 seconds with a high-power light-emitting diode lamp (control) were compared with measurements after indirect irradiation through 7.5-mm-thick composite resin and ceramic endocrowns for 3 × 90 seconds. A test-to-control microhardness values ratio of 0.80 at a depth of 0.5 mm below the surface was assumed as the criterion for adequate conversion. For the Vickers microhardness measurements of a dual-polymerizable luting cement, no differences (P>.05) were found between Vickers microhardness control values and values reported after polymerization through composite resin and ceramic endocrowns. For The Vickers microhardness measurements (±SD) of a light-polymerizable microhybrid composite resin, control values were significantly (P.05). Under the conditions of this in vitro study, Vickers microhardness values of the dual-polymerizable resin cement and the light-polymerizable restorative composite resin irradiated for 3 × 90 seconds with a high irradiance light-emitting diode lamp through 7.5-mm-thick endocrowns reached at least 80% of the control Vickers microhardness values, which means that both materials can be adequately polymerized when they are used for luting thick indirect restorations. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A practice-based evaluation of the handling of a new self-adhesive universal resin luting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J Trevor; Crisp, Russell J; Richter, B

    2006-06-01

    Ease of handling of materials may be considered helpful to achieving good results. The handling properties of a new self-adhesive universal resin luting material were tested in clinical use. Thirteen practitioners were selected at random from the Product Research and Evaluation by Practitioners (PREP) Panel, a United Kingdom-based group of dental practitioners prepared to complete evaluations of new materials and techniques in the practice environment. Explanatory letters, questionnaires and packs of the luting material were sent to the evaluators. The practitioners were asked to use the material and return the questionnaire. 144 restorations were placed using the new self-adhesive resin luting material, which was rated higher by the evaluators for ease of use (4.7 on a visual analogue scale where 5 represented easy to use and 1 represented difficult to use) than both the pre-trial resin-based and 'conventional' luting materials (rated 3.7 and 4.4 respectively on the same scale). The presentation, instructions, convenience of dispensing and handling and viscosity also received high ratings. The new material achieved ratings for ease of use superior to the pre-study resin-based and conventional luting materials in the dental practices of 13 UK dental practitioners.

  16. Shear bond strength of four resin cements used to lute ceramic core material to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutayhan; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Usumez, Aslihan

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four resin cements on the shear bond strength of a ceramic core material to dentin. One hundred twenty molar teeth were embedded in a self-curing acrylic resin. The occlusal third of the crowns were sectioned under water cooling. All specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth each according to the resin cement used. One hundred twenty cylindrical-shaped, 2.7-mm wide, 3-mm high ceramic core materials were heat-pressed. The core cylinders were then luted with one of the four resin systems to dentin (Super-Bond C&B, Chemiace II, Variolink II, and Panavia F). Half of the specimens (n = 15) were tested after 24 hours; the other half (n = 15) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 day and then thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa, and the results were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the resin cement used (p 0.05). Significant interactions were present between resin cement and thermocycling (p 0.05). The increase in the shear bond strength values in the Panavia F (4.5 +/- 0.7 MPa) and Variolink II (5.5 +/- 2.1 MPa) groups after thermocycling was also not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Variolink II and Panavia F systems showed higher shear bond strength values than Chemiace II and Super-Bond C&B. They can be recommended for luting ceramic cores to dentin surfaces.

  17. Effect of reduced exposure times on the cytotoxicity of resin luting cements cured by high-power led

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfem Ergun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Applications of resin luting agents and high-power light-emitting diodes (LED light-curing units (LCUs have increased considerably over the last few years. However, it is not clear whether the effect of reduced exposure time on cytotoxicity of such products have adequate biocompatibility to meet clinical success. This study aimed at assessing the effect of reduced curing time of five resin luting cements (RLCs polymerized by high-power LED curing unit on the viability of a cell of L-929 fibroblast cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Disc-shaped samples were prepared in polytetrafluoroethylene moulds with cylindrical cavities. The samples were irradiated from the top through the ceramic discs and acetate strips using LED LCU for 20 s (50% of the manufacturer's recommended exposure time and 40 s (100% exposure time. After curing, the samples were transferred into a culture medium for 24 h. The eluates were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 fibroblast cultures (3x10(4 per well and incubated for evaluating after 24 h. Measurements were performed by dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium assay. Statistical significance was determined by two-way ANOVA and two independent samples were compared by t-test. RESULTS: Results showed that eluates of most of the materials polymerized for 20 s (except Rely X Unicem and Illusion reduced to a higher extent cell viability compared to samples of the same materials polymerized for 40 s. Illusion exhibited the least cytotoxicity for 20 s exposure time compared to the control (culture without samples followed by Rely X Unicem and Rely X ARC (90.81%, 88.90%, and 83.11%, respectively. For Rely X ARC, Duolink and Lute-It 40 s exposure time was better (t=-1.262 p=0,276; t=-9.399 p=0.001; and t=-20.418 p<0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that reduction of curing time significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of the studied resin cement materials, therefore compromising their clinical

  18. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

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    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  19. Effect of surface treatments of laboratory-fabricated composites on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement Efeito dos tratamentos de superfície de resinas compostas de laboratório na resistência a microtração de um agente de fixação resinoso

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    Carlos José Soares

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments on composite resin on the microtensile bond strength to a luting resin cement. Two laboratory composites for indirect restorations, Solidex and Targis, and a conventional composite, Filtek Z250, were tested. Forty-eight composite resin blocks (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm were incrementally manufactured, which were randomly divided into six groups, according to the surface treatments: 1- control, 600-grit SiC paper (C; 2- silane priming (SI; 3- sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 for 10s (SA; 4- etching with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 60 s (HF; 5- HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Composite blocks submitted to similar surface treatments were bonded together with the resin adhesive Single Bond and Rely X luting composite. A 500-g load was applied for 5 minutes and the samples were light-cured for 40s. The bonded blocks were serially sectioned into 3 slabs with 0.9mm of thickness perpendicularly to the bonded interface (n = 12. Slabs were trimmed to a dumbbell shape and tested in tension at 0.5mm/min. For all composites tested, the application of a silane primer after sandblasting provided the highest bond strength means.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a influência de diferentes tratamentos de superfície na resistência de união de resinas compostas a um agente de fixação resinoso. Dois compósitos de laboratório, Solidex e Targis, e um compósito convencional, Filtek Z250, foram testados. Quarenta e oito blocos de resina composta (5.0 x 5.0 x 5.0mm foram confeccionados através da técnica incremental, para cada compósito testado, e foram aleatoriamente divididos em 6 grupos. Os blocos foram submetidos a seis tratamentos de superfície: 1 - Controle, Lixa 600-SiC (C; 2 - Silanização (SI; 3 - Jateamento com Al2O3 50µm por 10 segundos (SA; 4 - Condicionamento com ácido fluorídrico por 60 segundos (HF; 5 - HF + SI; 6 - SA + SI. Blocos submetidos ao mesmo tratamento foram

  20. Influence of luting agents on time required for cast post removal by ultrasound: an in vitro study

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    Janir Alves Soares

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in vitro study evaluated the influence of luting agents on ultrasonic vibration time for intraradicular cast post removal. MATERIAL AND METHODS: After endodontic treatment, 30 roots of extracted human canines were embedded in resin cylinders. The post-holes were prepared at 10 mm depth and their impressions were taken using autopolymerizing acrylic resin. After casting procedures using a nickel-chromium alloy, the posts were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=10 according to the luting material: G1- zinc phosphate (SS White (control group, G2 - glass ionomer cement (Vidrion C; SS White, and G3- resin cement (C&B; Bisco. In G3, the adhesive procedure was performed before post cementation. After 24 h, the cement line was removed at the post/tooth interface using a fine diamond bur, and the ST-09 tip of an Enac ultrasound unit was applied at maximum power on all surfaces surrounding the posts. The application time was recorded with a chronometer until the post was completely dislodged and data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: The roots were removed from the acrylic resin and inspected to detect cracks and/or fractures. The means for G1, G2, and G3 were 168.5, 59.5, and 285 s, respectively, with statistically significant differences among them. Two G3 posts resisted removal, one of which developed a vertical fracture line. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, the cement type had a direct influence on the time required for ultrasonic post removal. Compared to the zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements, the resin cement required a longer ultrasonic vibration time.

  1. Polymerization of dual cure resin cements applied for luting tooth colored fiber posts

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    Ghavam M.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Insufficient polymerization of resin cements is of considerable clinical importance, because of mechanical deficiencies and biological side effects of uncured resin. Dual cure resin cements are getting popular in luting tooth colored posts and although their curing is claimed to proceed chemically, polymerization efficiency in deep areas of canal is uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate degree of polymerization of dual-cure resin cements used for luting translucent and opaque fiber posts in different distances from the light tip. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, degree of conversion of two dual cured resin cements, Rely X ARC (3M, ESPE and Nexus 2 (Kerr, USA were measured when used with DT-Light and DT-White posts (RTD, France. The light curing unit used was Optilux 501, with output of 650-700 mw/cm2 with emitting time of 60 seconds. Degree of conversion was measured in three different depths (4, 6, 8 mm by FTIR. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Post hoc tests. P0.05. Nexus used with DT-Light had lower DC% in 8 mm depth (P<0.05. Nexus used with DT-White showed lower DC% in 8 mm depth compared to 4 mm depth. The control groups of both cements showed significant increased DC% in 4 mm depth compared to 6 and 8 mm depths (P<0.05. DT-White caused decreased DC% in both cements in 4 mm. DT-Light caused increased DC% of Rely X in 6 mm depth compared to DT-White and control. DT-Light increased DC% of Nexus in 6 and 8 mm depths, compared to DT-White and control groups. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, application of translucent fiber posts has a significant effect on degree of polymerization in dual-cure resin cements, compared to opaque types. Their better light transmission to deep areas due to the effect of optical fibers, can lead to better results.

  2. Physical properties of dual-cured luting-agents correlated to early no interfacial-gap incidence with composite inlay restorations.

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    Irie, Masao; Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Watts, David C

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this investigation were to investigate dual-cured luting-agents as to whether their bond strength, dimensional change and flexural modulus influence no interfacial-gap incidence parameters of composite inlay restorations during the early stages. The correlations of interest were between: (a) their shear bond strength to dentin, (b) their dimensional change on setting, (c) their flexural modulus, and (d) no interfacial-gap incidence with indirect restorations. Seven dual-cured luting-agents, one self-adhesive resin cement, six resin cements and one resin-modified glass-ionomer for luting, were investigated with specimen sub-groups (n=10) for each property measured. The principal series of experiments were conducted in dentin cavities with interfacial polishing either immediately (3 min) after setting or after 1-day water-storage. After the finishing procedure, each tooth was sectioned in a buccolingual direction through the center of the restoration, and the presence or absence of interfacial-gaps was measured (and then summed for each cavity) at 14 points (each 0.5mm apart) along the composite inlay restoration interface (n=10 per group; total points measured=140), and was expressed by percentage of measured total points. The shear bond strengths to dentin, setting shrinkage-strain and flexural modulus were measured. To estimate the dimensional change of luting-agents, the maximum marginal gap-width and the opposing-width that occurred with luting-agents in a Teflon mold were measured. Moduli were measured in 3-point bending. For all composite inlay restorations, polished immediately after setting, an incidence of summed no-gaps of 69-88% was observed. For specimens polished after 1 day, a significantly (p0.05). There was a highly significant correlation between no interfacial-gap incidence and shear bond strength (r=0.702, p=0.002, n=16). As the dimensional change (shrinkage) within Teflon molds increased, the no interfacial-gap incidence of dentin

  3. Influence of Different Luting Agents on the Marginal Discrepancy of Procera® AllCeram Alumina Crown Copings – An Experimental Study

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    Shriharsha Pilathadka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Two maxillary first molars and two central incisor typhodont teeth were prepared with 0.8 mm chamfer, 2.0 mm occlusal reduction, and 6 degree taper. The prepared teeth were duplicated 9 times to obtain 36 die stone models and divided into three groups (n = 12. Luting agents tested were zinc phosphate, glass ionomer and resin cement. Procera®AllCeram 0.6 mm coping was fixed with a calibrated finger force of 50 N. The absolute marginal discrepancy was measured using the scanning electron microscope on four axial walls with 4 measurements on each wall to obtain a total of 16 readings for one tooth. Mann Whitney U test was applied to find significant differences between luting cements and Kruskal Wallis tests among groups. Results The absolute marginal discrepancies of cements were in reducing order zinc phosphate (AZ 53 μm; resin (AR 44.5 μm, glass ionomer (AG 29 μm. There was a significant difference among luting cements AG V/s AZ (p = 0.001 and AR V/s AG (p = 0.003, except AR V/s AZ (p = 0.213. All axial surfaces except mesial showed a significant difference. Conclusion The study concluded that different luting media have a definite effect over the final fit of AllCeram coping. Absolute marginal discrepancy was within the accepted level of 100 μm. Distal axial surface demonstrated a wider gap among all the luting agents.

  4. Influence of abutment height and surface roughness on in vitro retention of three luting agents.

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    Cano-Batalla, Jordi; Soliva-Garriga, Joan; Campillo-Funollet, Marc; Munoz-Viveros, Carlos A; Giner-Tarrida, Lluis

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of abutment height, airborne-particle abrasion, and type of cement on the tensile resistance to dislodgement of cement-retained implant restorations. Three groups of 12 standardized abutments each were prepared with different heights (4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm) using a milling machine. Crowns were cast in cobalt-chrome using the lost-wax technique, airborne particle-abraded using 50-Μm aluminum oxide, and cleaned with acetone. Restorations were cemented using a noneugenol acrylic urethane cement, a resin-modified glass ionomer, or a zinc oxide-noneugenol cement. A 5-kg load was applied for 10 minutes. Samples were kept at 37°C and 100% humidity overnight. A tensile force was applied to the crown using a testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute until failure occurred. Next, the abutments were airborne particle-abraded with 50-Μm aluminum oxide, and the cementation and testing procedures were repeated. The effects of cement, abutment height, and surface treatment were evaluated statistically. There were significant differences among the cements. The resin-modified glass ionomer provided the greatest retention in all the tested conditions, while the zinc oxide-noneugenol cement produced the lowest retention values. Significant differences were also detected between 4-mm and 6-mm abutments, with the 6-mm abutments being more retentive. No differences were found between 4-mm and 5-mm abutments or between 5-mm and 6-mm abutments. The effect of airborne-particle abrasion was also found to be significant. A maximum increase of 90 N in retention force was observed after airborne-particle abrasion for the 5-mm abutments cemented with the acrylic urethane cement. Cement, airborne-particle abrasion, and abutment height can significantly influence retention of implant-supported crowns. Different parameters, including those specific to the patient, should be considered in the selection of a luting agent.

  5. Influence of Two Desensitizer Agents on the Microleakage of Adhesively Luted Ceramic Inlays

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    Celik, Esra Uzer; Kumbaraci, Nazli; Cal, Ebru; Turkun, Murat

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of two different desensitizers (Hemaseal & Cide and Aqua Prep F) on the microleakage of ceramic inlay restorations luted with adhesive resin cement. Methods: Cylindrical Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of thirty extracted human third molars. One of the desensitizers (either Hemaseal&Cide, Advantage Dental Products Inc. or Aqua-Prep F, Bisco) was applied to the cavities. Ten samples were used as controls. Ceramic inlays were fabricated using the heat-pressed glass ceramic technique (IPS Empress II). Inlay restorations were luted using adhesive cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar-Vivadent). The restorations were properly finished, stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and subjected to 1000 thermal cycles. The microleakage scores were examined using a stereomicroscope at the 30x magnification after each sample was stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin. The data were analyzed using Kruskall Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests (P=0.05). Results: Aqua-Prep F samples showed significantly higher microleakage scores at the enamel margins than did the Hemaseal & Cide and control groups (Pinlay restorations luted with adhesive luting cement, while Aqua-Prep F increased the leakage scores at the enamel margins. PMID:21228958

  6. Effect of axial groove and resin luting cements on the retention of complete cast metal crowns

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    K Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The design of the tooth preparation and the cementing medium are important consid-erations in the retention of crowns and fixed partial dentures. The purpose of this invitro study was to determine the effect of axial groove on the retention of complete cast metal crowns using two resin luting cements. Methods: Forty freshly extracted intact human molar teeth were prepared in their long axis to receive complete cast metal crowns. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (one control and one study group. An axial groove of uniform size and shape was made on the prepared teeth under the study group. Axial surface area of prepared teeth specimens was measured. Complete cast metal crowns were fabricated for each specimen. Specimens of each group were divided into subgroups of 10 samples and were cemented with two resin luting cements, RelyX Unicem® and Calibra®, re-spectively. The cemented crowns were loaded in tension using a Universal Instron testing machine. The maximal tensile strength was recorded. Data were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.05. Results: No significant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 5.76±0.392 MPa and study (mean: 5.93±0.751 MPa groups cemented with RelyX Unicem. No sig-nificant differences in the tensile stress values were noted between the control (mean: 4.92±0.641 MPa and study (mean: 5.15 ±0.478 MPa groups cemented with Calibra. However, significant dif-ference in the tensile stress values was found between the two resin cements in the control and study groups. Conclusion: Axial groove placed in tooth preparations for resin bonded complete cast metal crowns had no statistically significant effect on retention. The use of (RelyX Unicem® yielded greater reten-tion values when compared to Calibra®.

  7. Comparative study on the tensile bond strength and marginal fit of complete veneer cast metal crowns using various luting agents: An in vitro study

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    B Devi Parameswari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several commercially available luting agents are used to cement the dental restorations such as intra-coronal, extra-coronal, and fixed partial dentures. Tensile bond strength (TBS and accurate marginal fit are the essential factors to determine the good clinical results in fixed prosthesis. The retentivity of the luting cements is assessed by their adhesive capacity over the tooth surface and metal surface. Generally, the adhesive ability has been evaluated with in vitro testing, with tensile bond tests. The failure of fixed prosthesis may be happened as a result of incomplete seating during cementation. Most research on cementation of crowns relates seating failure to the thickness of the cement film. Materials and Methods: The study is divided into four groups with 10 samples for each of the luting cement taken up for testing TBS and four groups with 5 samples for each luting agent chosen for assessing marginal fit. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: In this in vitro study, the TBS of luting cements, and marginal fit in relation to luting cements were tested by using appropriate testing devices. The TBS of cement is measured using universal testing machine, and the results are tabulated. The marginal gap that exists between the margin of the cast metal crown, and the finish line is measured using travelling microscope before and after cementation. The difference between these two values gives the discrepancy that is due to the film thickness of cement used for luting the restoration. Summary and Conclusion: The TBS value of zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cement were found to be almost same. The chemical adhesiveness of the glass ionomer with calcium ions of enamel and dentin may be the attributed reason (ionic bonding. In this study, the polycarboxylate is the one that showed low TBS, and it may be attributed to the weakness of the cement due to reduced film thickness, though this cement has

  8. Comparative study on the tensile bond strength and marginal fit of complete veneer cast metal crowns using various luting agents: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswari, B. Devi; Rajakumar, M.; Lambodaran, G.; Sundar, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several commercially available luting agents are used to cement the dental restorations such as intra-coronal, extra-coronal, and fixed partial dentures. Tensile bond strength (TBS) and accurate marginal fit are the essential factors to determine the good clinical results in fixed prosthesis. The retentivity of the luting cements is assessed by their adhesive capacity over the tooth surface and metal surface. Generally, the adhesive ability has been evaluated with in vitro testing, with tensile bond tests. The failure of fixed prosthesis may be happened as a result of incomplete seating during cementation. Most research on cementation of crowns relates seating failure to the thickness of the cement film. Materials and Methods: The study is divided into four groups with 10 samples for each of the luting cement taken up for testing TBS and four groups with 5 samples for each luting agent chosen for assessing marginal fit. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: In this in vitro study, the TBS of luting cements, and marginal fit in relation to luting cements were tested by using appropriate testing devices. The TBS of cement is measured using universal testing machine, and the results are tabulated. The marginal gap that exists between the margin of the cast metal crown, and the finish line is measured using travelling microscope before and after cementation. The difference between these two values gives the discrepancy that is due to the film thickness of cement used for luting the restoration. Summary and Conclusion: The TBS value of zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cement were found to be almost same. The chemical adhesiveness of the glass ionomer with calcium ions of enamel and dentin may be the attributed reason (ionic bonding). In this study, the polycarboxylate is the one that showed low TBS, and it may be attributed to the weakness of the cement due to reduced film thickness, though this cement has a chemical

  9. Effect of three endodontic sealers on the bond strength of prefabricated fiber posts luted with three resin cements.

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    Aleisa, Khalil; Alghabban, Rawda; Alwazzan, Khalid; Morgano, Steven M

    2012-05-01

    There is limited information in the literature regarding the effect of eugenol-based sealers on the bond strength of resin-bonded endodontic posts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 1 resin-based and 2 different eugenol-based endodontic sealers on the bond strength of prefabricated fiber posts luted with 3 different resin cements. One hundred thirty-five prefabricated fiber posts were luted into extracted single-rooted teeth with 1 of 3 composite resin cements (Rely X Unicem, Paracore, and Variolink II). Specimens were divided into 3 groups with 45 teeth each. The first 2 groups were obturated with gutta percha and 1 of 2 eugenol-based endodontic sealers (Endofil, Tubli-Seal). The third group was obturated with a resin-based root canal sealer (AH26). The forces required for dislodgment of posts from their prepared post spaces were recorded by using a universal testing machine. Data were collected and a 2-way ANOVA was applied to the mean retentive strengths of various combinations of sealer and cement. A Tukey multiple comparison test was performed to determine which groups were significantly different (α=.05). Endofil and Tubli-Seal (eugenol-based sealers) groups had significantly lower bond strengths for the posts than the AH26 group (PParacore and Variolink II resin cements when a eugenol sealer was used. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of luting agent on the load to failure and accelerated-fatigue resistance of lithium disilicate laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresnigt, Marco M M; Özcan, Mutlu; Carvalho, Marco; Lazari, Priscilla; Cune, Marco S; Razavi, Peywand; Magne, Pascal

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the luting agent on the application of laminate veneers (LVs) in an accelerated fatigue and load-to-failure test after thermo-cyclic aging. Sound maxillary central incisors (N=40) were randomly divided into four groups to receive LVs (Li 2 Si 2 O 5 ) that were adhesively bonded: Group CEMF: Adhesive cement (Variolink Esthetic LC), fatigue test; Group CEMLF: Adhesive cement, load-to-failure test; Group COMF: Resin composite (Enamel HFO), fatigue test; Group COMLF: Resin composite, load-to-failure test. The specimens were thermo-mechanically aged (1.2×10 6 cycles at 1.7Hz/50N, 8000 cycles 5-55°C) and then subjected to either accelerated fatigue (5Hz, 25N increasing after each 500 cycles) or load to failure (1mm/min). Failure types were classified and data analyzed using chi-square, Kaplan Meier survival, Log Rank (Mantel-Cox) and independent-samples t-test. After thermo-mechanical aging, fracture resistance (pveneer. The delivery of laminate veneers using a direct restorative composite rather than a resin cement resulted in significantly less chipping and fractures, higher fracture strength in both accelerated fatigue and load-to-failure. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Different Luting Agents on the Retention of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Crowns

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    Nicola Mobilio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available No studies are available that evaluate the retention of disilicate crowns according to different cementation procedures. The purpose of this study was to measure the retention of lithium disilicate crowns cemented using two different cementation systems. Twenty extracted mandibular premolars were prepared. Anatomic crowns were waxed and hot pressed using lithium disilicate ceramic. Teeth were divided into two groups (n = 10: (1 self-curing luting composite and (2 glass-ionomer cement (GIC. After cementation, the crowns were embedded in acrylic resin block with a screw base. Each specimen was pulled along the path of insertion in Universal Testing Machine. Failure load in Newtons (N and failure mode were recorded for each specimen. Failure mode was classified as decementation or fracture. Failure load data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Failure modes were compared using Pearson’s Chi-square test. Mean failure load was 306.6(±193.8 N for composite group and 94.7(±48.2 N for GIC group (p = 0.004. Disilicate crown cemented with luting composite most often failed by fracture; otherwise, crown cemented with glass-ionomer cement most often failed by decementation (p = 0.02. Disilicate full crown cemented with luting composite showed higher failure load compared with conventional cementation with glass-ionomer cement.

  12. Surface roughness average and scanning electron microscopic observations of resin luting agents Alteração de rugosidade superficial e observações em microscopia eletrônica de varredura de cimentos resinosos

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    Rafael Francisco Lia Mondelli

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the surface roughness changes of three current resin cements after tooth brushing simulation, as well as discuss its relation with scanning electron microscopic observations. The materials employed were Enforce Sure Cure (Dentsply, Rely X (3M-ESPE and Variolink II (Vivadent. They were subjected to brushing abrasion (100,000 strokes for each specimen and the surface roughness alterations (before and after strokes were detected. For each roughness test condition, specimens were coated with gold-palladium and observed on a DSM 900 Zeiss scanning electron microscope. Roughness changes values (Ra were statistically increased after brushing strokes. Based on the microscopic observations and roughness changes analysis, all cements studied became rougher after brushing strokes.O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar a alteração de rugosidade superficial de três cimentos resinosos após submetê-los a ciclos de escovação simulada e analisar qualitativamente a sua superfície através de observações microscópicas. Os materiais empregados neste estudo foram Enforce Sure Cure (Dentsply, Rely X (3M-ESPE e Variolink II (Vivadent. Estes foram submetidos à ciclos de escovação simulada (100.000 ciclos para cada espécime e a alteração de sua rugosidade superficial (antes e após escovação foi avaliada. Para cada material e condição de rugosidade, espécimes foram selecionados, metalizados e observados em microscopia eletrônica de varredura (DSM 900 Zeiss. Baseado nas observações microscópicas e nos valores de alteração de rugosidade, todos os materiais apresentaram aumento de rugosidade aritmética (Ra após ciclos de escovação simulada.

  13. Effects of silane application on luting fiber posts using self-adhesive resin cement.

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    Leme, Ariene Arcas; Pinho, André Luis; de Gonçalves, Luciano; Correr-Sobrinho, Lorenço; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of different glass-fiber post surface treatments on the bond strength to root dentin. Fifty bovine incisors were used in this study. After removing the crowns, the teeth were endodontically treated. The roots were randomly divided into five groups according to post surface treatment. The groups were as follows: CO (Control) - no treatment; G1 - RelyX Ceramic Primer (silane) only; G2 - silane and Solobond M; G3 - silane and Scotchbond Adhesive; G4 - silane and Excite. For post cementation, RelyX Unicem was used according to the manufacturer's recommendation and the roots were stored in a light-proof container with 100% relative humidity for 24 h. The specimens were transversally sectioned. Subsequently, the cervical, middle, and apical regions of the root were positioned in a push-out device and tested at 0.5 mm/min using a universal testing machine (Instron). The data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. The fractured specimens were then observed under a stereoscopic loupe at 60X magnification. No significant difference in bond strength was found among the groups that received a silane or silane plus an adhesive system (p > 0.05). However, the CO (no silane) showed the lowest bond strength. Regarding G1, G2, G3, and G4, the cervical region of the root canal attained better bond strengths than did the middle or apical regions. The most frequent failure mode occurred at the cement/dentin interface. Silane application may be necessary to improve the adhesion of fiber posts luted with the self-adhesive resin cement evaluated here. The application of an adhesive layer between the fiber post and resin cement did not have any influence on the bond strength when the silane coupling was previously used.

  14. Four-year clinical evaluation of a self-adhesive luting agent for ceramic inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Marleen; Voet, M; De Munck, J; Van Landuyt, K; Van Ende, A; Van Meerbeek, B

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the 4-year clinical performance of a self-adhesive resin cement, RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), used for cementation of ceramic inlays. In addition, the influence of selectively acid-etching enamel prior to luting on the clinical performance of the restorations was assessed. Sixty-two IPS Empress 2 inlays/onlays were placed in 31 patients by two experienced clinicians. The restorations were luted with RelyX Unicem with (=experimental group: E) or without (=control group: NE) prior enamel etching with phosphoric acid. At baseline, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 4 years after placement, the restorations were assessed by two calibrated investigators using modified USPHS criteria. Ten selected samples of each group were investigated under SEM regarding morphological changes at the cement-inlay interface. The recall rate at 4 years was 97%. Two restorations (1 E, 1 NE) were lost, and one (E) had to be replaced due to inlay and tooth fracture resulting in a survival rate of 95%. No significant differences between the experimental and control group were noticed regarding all criteria (McNemar, p inlays/onlays. Additional selective enamel etching does not improve the clinical performance of the restorations within the 4-year period. The self-adhesive resin composite RelyX Unicem showed acceptable clinical performance after 4 years of clinical service.

  15. Correlation between Microleakage and Absolute Marginal Discrepancy in Zirconia Crowns Cemented with Four Resin Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Cristian, Abad-Coronel; Jeanette, Li; Francisco, Martínez-Rus; Guillermo, Pradíes

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate microleakage and absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD) and to assess correlation between AMD and microleakage with four resin luting cements. Material and Methods. 20 extracted human third molars were prepared for full-coverage crowns. 20 zirconia copings were made (LAVA, 3M ESPE) and cemented. Specimens were randomly allocated for each used type of cement into 4 groups, RelyX® (Rx), Multilink® (Mk), PANAVIA 2.1® (P), and Maxcem® (Mx) and immersed in 10% safranin for 72 ...

  16. Sealing properties of three luting agents used for complete cast crowns: a bacterial leakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmener, O; Pameijer, C H; Rincon, S M H; Serrano, S A; Chaves, C

    2013-01-01

    To assess the sealing properties of three different luting materials used for cementation of full cast crowns on extracted human premolars. Thirty noncarious human premolars were prepared in a standardized fashion for full cast crown restorations. All margins were placed in dentin. After impressions of the preparations, stone dies were fabricated on which copings were waxed, which were cast in type III alloy using standardized laboratory methods. Teeth were randomly assigned to three groups of 10 samples each (n=10), for which the following cements were used: 1) a resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Rely X Luting Plus (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA); 2) a self-adhesive resin cement, Maxcem Elite (Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA); and 3) a glass ionomer cement, Ketac Cem (3M ESPE), the latter used as control. After cementation the samples were allowed to bench-set for 10 minutes, stored in water at 37°C, subjected to thermal cycling (2000×, between 5°C and 55°C, dwell time 35 seconds), and then stored in sterile phosphate buffer for seven days at 37°C. Subsequently, the occlusal surface was carefully reduced until the dentin was exposed. Finishing on wet sand paper removed the gold flash caused by grinding. After sterilization, the specimens were subjected to bacterial microleakage in a dual chamber apparatus for 60 days. Bacterial leakage was checked daily. Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survival test. Significant pairwise differences were analyzed using the log-rank test followed by Fisher exact test at a pcement displayed significantly lower microleakage scores than a self-adhesive resin-based and conventional glass ionomer cement.

  17. The effect of preparation height and luting agent on the resistance form of cemented cast crowns under load fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Elvin W J; Choon Tan, Keson Beng; Nicholls, Jack Ivan; Chua, Ee Kiam; Wong, Keng Mun; Neo, Jennifer Chiew Lian

    2009-09-01

    The minimum amount of resistance form required for the success of a clinical crown is unknown.There is little information on the fatigue performance of complete coverage restorations on natural tooth preparations cemented with different luting cements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth preparation height and luting agent on resistance form using unidirectional load fatigue testing. For a given tooth preparation with a clinically relevant total occlusal convergence (TOC), the adequacy of resistance form was investigated. Sixty-four human maxillary premolars were prepared with occlusal-cervical dimensions of 2, 3,4, or 5 mm and a TOC of 20 degrees. Complete metal crowns were cemented using either zinc phosphate cement (HY Bond;ZP groups) or resin cement (Panavia F; PF groups). Cyclic load fatigue testing was done with an applied load of 6.0 kg at 2.6 Hz. Load cycles to preliminary failure were detected with a strain gauge at the palatal crown-tooth interface. Results were subjected to the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Wilcoxon post-hoc rank sum test (alpha=.05). Groups ZP4, ZP5, PF2, PF3, PF4, and PF5 had the highest mean number of cycles to preliminary failure,while group ZP2 had the lowest mean number of cycles to failure. Group ZP2 was significantly different (Pcement exhibited a poorer fatigue performance compared to Panavia F. There was no significant difference in the number of cycles to failure for groups ZP4,ZP5, PF2, PF3, PF4, and PF5. For both cements, the number of cycles to failure increased with increasing resistance length. (J Prosthet Dent 2009;102:155-164)

  18. Clinical evaluation of 209 all-ceramic single crowns cemented on natural and implant-supported abutments with different luting agents: a 6-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Roberto; Galasso, Luigi; Tetè, Stefano; De Simone, Giorgio; Zarone, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    The Procera AllCeram™ system (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) is a valid alternative to metal-ceramic restorations. However, limited long-term data of its use for single crowns on natural and implant-supported abutments are available. The present study aimed at evaluating the clinical performances of Procera AllCeram single crowns in both anterior and posterior regions of the oral cavity either on natural tooth or implant abutments over a period of 6 years. Two hundred nine single crowns were fabricated and used in 112 patients. Zinc phosphate and resin luting agents were used to cement the restorations. The crowns were evaluated according to the California Dental Association's quality assessment system. Three crowns were lost at follow-up. Of the 206 restorations, which completed the 6-year follow-up, 9 crowns were affected by mechanical complications and 7 crowns failed. All surviving crowns were ranked as either excellent or acceptable. Cumulative survival and success rates of 95.2 and 90.9%, respectively, were recorded. Within the limitations of the present study, Procera AllCeram crowns proved to be a reliable clinical option to restore both anterior and posterior missing teeth either on natural or implant abutments. The resin cement used in the present study performed better than the zinc phosphate luting agent. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evaluation of the Bond Strength of Resin Cements Used to Lute Ceramics on Laser-Etched Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzdar, Lale; Oksuz, Mustafa; Tanboga, Ilknur

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two different adhesive resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin. Background data: Erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin, but results to date have been controversial, and its compatibility with existing adhesive resin cements has not been conclusively determined. Materials and methods: Two adhesive cements, one “etch-and-rinse” [Variolink II (V)] and one “self-etch” [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (C)] luting cement, were used to lute ceramic blocks (Vita Celay Blanks, Vita) onto dentin surfaces. In total, 80 dentin specimens were distributed randomly into eight experimental groups according to the dentin surface-etching technique used Er,Cr:YSGG laser and Er:YAG laser: (1) 37% orthophosphoric acid+V (control group), (2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V, (3) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+acid+V, (4) Er:YAG laser+V, (5) Er:YAG laser+acid+V, (6) C, (7) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C, and (8) Er:YAG laser+C. Following these applications, the ceramic discs were bonded to prepared surfaces and were shear loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. SBS was recorded for each group in MPa. Shear test values were evaluated statistically using the Mann–Whitney U test. Results: No statistically significant differences were evident between the control group and the other groups (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+A+V group demonstrated significantly higher SBS than did the Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V group (p=0.034). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C and Er:YAG laser+C groups demonstrated significantly lower SBS than did the C group (pceramic bond strengths, depending upon the adhesive cement used. PMID:24992276

  20. Metal-ceramic crowns cemented with two luting agents: short-term results of a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowarczyk, Andree; Schick, Karina; Lauer, Hans-Christoph

    2012-06-01

    A prospective, randomized, controlled, split-mouth trial was performed to evaluate the cementation modes for metal-ceramic crowns. A total of 40 fully veneered metal-ceramic crowns were delivered in the posterior jaw segments of 20 patients using either a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem Aplicap, 3M ESPE; n = 20) or a zinc oxide phosphate cement (Hoffmann's Cement, Hoffmann; n = 20). Thirteen parameters related to the abutment teeth and their periodontal status were evaluated. A visual analog scale was used to assess the sensitivity of the abutment teeth by patient-based outcomes. Data were statistically analyzed by a single-classification ANOVA (α = 0.05) and logistic regression analysis. The results presented were obtained after a mean observation period of 1.8 years. The dropout rate was 0%. None of the abutment teeth exhibited secondary caries at the restoration margins. No significant differences were demonstrated between the luting agents based on visual analog scale (p > 0.05), hypersensitivity (OR = 1.31), abutment mobility (p > 0.05), or probing depths (p > 0.05). Based on the sulcus fluid flow rates, a significantly greater mean difference was obtained with zinc oxide phosphate cement than with self-adhesive resin cement (9.2 units; p = 0.0006). Significant differences between the baseline examination and the follow-up examinations for sulcus bleeding index (p = 0.0013) and plaque index (p cement types showed scarcely any differences between the parameters investigated. The outcomes of cementing fully veneered metal-ceramic crowns were equally good with self-adhesive resin cement as with the clinically proven zinc oxide phosphate cement.

  1. Influence of alloy microstructure on the microshear bond strength of basic alloys to a resin luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José; Costa, José Ferreira; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Souza, Douglas Nesadal de; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of microstructure and composition of basic alloys on their microshear bond strength (µSBS) to resin luting cement. The alloys used were: Supreme Cast-V (SC), Tilite Star (TS), Wiron 99 (W9), VeraBond II (VBII), VeraBond (VB), Remanium (RM) and IPS d.SIGN 30 (IPS). Five wax patterns (13 mm in diameter and 4mm height) were invested, and cast in a centrifugal casting machine for each basic alloy. The specimens were embedded in resin, polished with a SiC paper and sandblasted. After cleaning the metal surfaces, six tygon tubes (0.5 mm height and 0.75 mm in diameter) were placed on each alloy surface, the resin cement (Panavia F) was inserted, and the excess was removed before light-curing. After storage (24 h/37°C), the specimens were subjected to µSBS testing (0.5 mm/min). The data were subjected to a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Turkey's test (α=0.05). After polishing, their microstructures were revealed with specific conditioners. The highest µSBS (mean/standard deviation in MPa) were observed in the alloys with dendritic structure, eutectic formation or precipitation: VB (30.6/1.7), TS (29.8/0.9), SC (30.6/1.7), with the exception of IPS (31.1/0.9) which showed high µSBS but no eutectic formation. The W9 (28.1/1.5), VBII (25.9/2.0) and RM (25.9/0.9) showed the lowest µSBS and no eutectic formation. It seems that alloys with eutectic formation provide the highest µSBS values when bonded to a light-cured resin luting cement.

  2. Two-year clinical evaluation of a self-adhesive luting agent for ceramic inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Marleen; De Munck, Jan; Van Landuyt, Kirsten; Poitevin, Andre; Lambrechts, Paul; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the 2-year clinical performance of a self-adhesive resin cement, RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), used for cementation of ceramic inlays. In addition, the influence of selectively acid etching enamel prior to luting on marginal integrity, inlay integrity, tooth integrity, sensitivity, and complications of the restored teeth was assessed. The hypothesis tested was that there was no significant difference in these criteria between restorations with (Etch) or without prior enamel acid etching (Non-etch). Sixty-two IPS Empress 2 inlays/onlays were placed in 31 patients by two experienced clinicians. The restorations were luted with RelyX Unicem with (=experimental group; Etch) or without (=control group; Non-etch) prior enamel etching with phosphoric acid. At baseline, 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after placement, the restorations were assessed by two calibrated investigators using modified USPHS criteria. The recall rate at 24 months was 96.6%. Two restorations were clinically unacceptable due to loss of retention, leading to a survival rate of 96.6% (Kaplan-Meier). No significant difference was noted between the experimental group and the control group regarding marginal integrity, inlay integrity, tooth integrity, complications and sensitivity (McNemar, p > 0.05). An obvious deterioration in marginal adaptation was observed after 24 months as only 21.7% (Etch = 23.4%; Non-etch = 20%) of the restorations exhibited an excellent marginal adaptation compared to 70.7% (Etch = 75%; Non-etch = 66.7%) at baseline. In 74.9% of the restorations, small, still clinically acceptable marginal deficiencies were observed (Etch = 76.6%; Non-etch = 73.2%). The self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem showed acceptable clinical behavior after two years of clinical service. Selective enamel etching prior to luting had no significant influence on marginal integrity, inlay integrity, tooth integrity, sensitivity or

  3. Evaluation of the onset of failure under mechanical and thermal stresses on luting agent for metal-ceramic and metal crowns by finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Agnihotri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term clinical failures of cemented prosthesis depend, to a large extent, on the integrity of the luting agent. The causative factors that lead to microfracture and, hence, failure of the luting agents are the stresses acting inside the oral cavity. Therefore, the present study was designed to develop an understanding of the relationship between stresses in the tooth and the failure potential of the luting agent. Two-dimensional finite element stress analysis was performed on the mandibular second premolar. The behavior of zinc-phosphate and glass-ionomer were studied under different crowns (metal-ceramic and metal crown and loading conditions (mechanical force of 450 N acting vertically over the occlusal surface, thermal loads of 60° and 0°C. It was observed from the study that failure threshold of the luting agent was influenced both by the elastic modulus of the luting agent and by the type of the crown.

  4. Transmitted irradiance through ceramics: effect on the mechanical properties of a luting resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Nicoleta

    2017-05-01

    The study aims to characterise the curing behaviour of a light-curing luting composite (Variolink® Aesthetic LC, Ivoclar Vivadent) polymerised at different exposure times (10 s, 20 s) through different ceramics (IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) and ceramic thicknesses (no ceramic, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 mm). Curing units' (Bluephase Style, Ivoclar Vivadent) variation in irradiance delivered up to 10-mm exposure distance as well as the incident and transmitted irradiance and radiant exposure up to 6-mm ceramic thickness were assessed on a laboratory-grade spectrometer. A total of 216 (18 groups, n = 12) thin and flat luting composite specimens of 500-μm thickness were prepared and stored after curing in a saturated vapour atmosphere for 24 h at 37 °C. Micro-mechanical properties (Vickers hardness, HV and indentation modulus, Y HU ) were determined by means of an automatic micro-hardness indenter. Within the study design, the radiant exposure received by the luting composite varied from 2.56 to 24.75 J/cm 2 , showing a high impact on the measured properties. Comparing the effect of the parameters exposure time, ceramic thickness and type, the highest influence on the micro-mechanical parameters was identified for exposure time, while this influence was stronger on HV (p CAD up to a ceramic thickness of 3 mm (p mechanical properties of the luting composite. The radiant exposure reaching the luting composite is determined by the incident irradiance, exposure time, ceramic type and ceramic thickness. At the analysed incident irradiance, exposure time was the most consistent parameter affecting the micro-mechanical properties of the luting composite, and this effect was strongly reflected in the more translucent ceramic Empress CAD. Within the curing conditions, an exposure time of 20 s is recommended.

  5. Controlled, prospective, randomized, clinical split-mouth evaluation of partial ceramic crowns luted with a new, universal adhesive system/resin cement: results after 18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Vanessa; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Federlin, Marianne; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2016-12-01

    A new universal adhesive with corresponding luting composite was recently marketed which can be used both, in a self-etch or in an etch-and-rinse mode. In this study, the clinical performance of partial ceramic crowns (PCCs) inserted with this adhesive and the corresponding luting material used in a self-etch or selective etch approach was compared with a self-adhesive universal luting material. Three PCCs were placed in a split-mouth design in 50 patients. Two PCCs were luted with a combination of a universal adhesive/resin cement (Scotchbond Universal/RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE) with (SB+E)/without (SB-E) selective enamel etching. Another PCC was luted with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2, 3M ESPE). Forty-eight patients were evaluated clinically according to FDI criteria at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months. For statistical analyses, the chi-square test (α = 0.05) and Kaplan-Meier analysis were applied. Clinically, no statistically significant differences between groups were detected over time. Within groups, clinically significant increase for criterion "marginal staining" was detected for SB-E over 18 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed significantly higher retention rates for SB+E (97.8 %) and SB-E (95.6 %) in comparison to RXU2 (75.6 %). The 18-month clinical performance of a new universal adhesive/composite combination showed no differences with respect to bonding strategy and may be recommended for luting PCCs. Longer-term evaluation is needed to confirm superiority of SB+E over SB-E. At 18 months, the new multi-mode adhesive, Scotchbond Universal, showed clinically reliable results when used for luting PCCs.

  6. Hall versus conventional stainless steel crown techniques: in vitro investigation of marginal fit and microleakage using three different luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemci, Zeynep Yalçınkaya; Cehreli, S Burçak; Tirali, R Ebru

    2014-01-01

    This study's purpose was to investigate microleakage and marginal discrepancies in stainless steel crowns (SSCs) placed using conventional and Hall techniques and cemented with three different luting agents. Seventy-eight human primary maxillary second molars were randomly assigned to two groups (N=39), and SSCs were applied either with the Hall or conventional technique. These two groups were further subgrouped according to the material used for crown cementation (N=13 per group). Two specimens in each group were processed for scanning electron microscopy investigation. The extent of microleakage and marginal fit was quantified in millimeters on digitally photographed sections using image analysis software. The data were compared with a two-way independent and a two-way mixed analysis of variance (P=.05). The scores in the Hall group were significantly worse than those in the conventional technique group (Pcement displayed the lowest extent of microleakage, followed by glass ionomer and polycarboxylate cements (Pcrowns applied using the Hall technique displayed higher microleakage scores than those applied using the conventional technique, regardless of the cementation material. When the interaction of the material and technique was assessed, resin cement presented as the best choice for minimizing microleakage in both techniques.

  7. Resistance against bacterial leakage of four luting agents used for cementation of complete cast crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmener, Osvaldo; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Hernández, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    To assess the sealing properties of four luting materials used for cementation of full cast crowns. 40 human premolars were prepared with a chamfer finish line. Stone dies were fabricated and copings were waxed, invested and cast in gold. Ten samples (n = 10) were randomly assigned to four groups. In two groups, resin modified glass-ionomer cements were used, ACTIVA BioACTIVE-CEMENT/BASE/LINER and FujiCem2; the third group received the self-adhesive resin cement Embrace WetBond, while the fourth group served as control with a zinc phosphate cement. After cementation, excess cement was removed followed by bench-set for 10 minutes. All samples were stored in water at 37 degrees C and subjected to thermal cycling (x2000 between 5 and 55 degrees C). Subsequently the occlusal surface was reduced exposing the dentin. After sterilization the specimens were subjected to bacterial microleakage with E. faecalis in a dual chamber apparatus for a period of 60 days. Bacterial leakage was checked daily. Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meyer survival test. Significant pairwise differences were analyzed using the Log Rank test and the Fishers' exact test at P CEMENT/BASE/LINER, FujiCem2 and Embrace WetBond showed the lowest microleakage scores and differed statistically significantly (P cement.

  8. Evaluation of hypersensitivity after the placement of metal-ceramic crowns cemented with two luting agents: Long-term results of a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozmacs, Carla; Schaper, Katharina; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2017-09-01

    Different luting materials are available for the cementation of fixed dental prostheses. Postcementation hypersensitivity is an occasional complication in the definitive delivery. How the choice of luting agent affects long-term postcementation sensitivity is unknown. The purpose of this prospective, randomized, controlled, split-mouth clinical trial was to compare the hypersensitivity of 2 cementation methods for metal-ceramic crowns. The primary endpoint was the evaluation of differences in hypersensitivity between the study groups over a study period of 5 years. The study investigated 20 participants with 40 metal-ceramic crowns cemented with either zinc phosphate cement or a self-adhesive resin cement, each in nonantagonistic contralateral quadrants (observation period of 5 years). The data regarding postcementation hypersensitivity included continuous patient-related outcome variables assessed using a visual analog scale (sign test; primary endpoint, level of significance α/3=.0167; secondary endpoint, level of significance, α=.05) and categorical variables represented by yes/no replies (absolute and relative frequencies). The sensitivity of teeth was controlled in relation to mastication, air streams, and hot and cold temperatures. The observation period was 5 years, with a dropout rate of 12.5% in the last 2 years. The results indicated no significant differences between the cement groups for patient- and clinical-related outcomes at any of the observed time points. As no differences were found between the 2 different cementation modes with respect to developing hypersensitivity after 5 years, the choice of a luting agent remains an individual practitioner decision. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of luting agent on the load to failure and accelerated-fatigue resistance of lithium disilicate laminate veneers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Carualho, Marco; Lazari, Priscilla; Cune, Marco S.; Razavi, Peywand; Magne, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the luting agent on the application of laminate veneers (LVs) in an accelerated fatigue and load-to-failure test after thermo-cyclic aging. Methods. Sound maxillary central incisors (N = 40) were randomly divided into four groups

  10. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Menezes de MENDONÇA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. Objectives: To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein, used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin, after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Material and Methods: Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10 according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal and R (resin- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5 were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Results: Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231. Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (p<0.001 and the Tukey test revealed that microhardness was significantly lower when crowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007. Conclusion: The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the

  11. The Effect of Accelerated Aging on the Colour Stability of Composite Resin Luting Cements using Different Bonding Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Alfaifi, Mohammed; Almuaddi, Abdulmajeed; Al-Yazeedi, Mazen; Al-Ahmari, Abdulmajeed

    2017-04-01

    The main criterion of successful aesthetic restoration is to match the colour of the adjacent teeth. Porcelain laminate veneer is widely practiced indirect restoration in the contemporary aesthetic dentistry. The underlying luting cement colour influences the final outcome of the thin, translucent veneer shade. Hence, colour stability of luting cement is important criteria during their selection. The objective of the study was to assess the colour stability of the different dentin bonding techniques in composite resin luting cements. A total of forty intact, non carious teeth were prepared to receive Porcelain Laminate Veneers (PLV). The lithium disilicate PLV were fabricated, and fitting surface was conditioned with 5% hydrofluoric acid and silane application. According to the bonding technique employed for the cementation of the PLV, the teeth samples were randomly divided into the four groups of ten each. The Group I and Group II samples were conditioned with etch and wash; the polymerization of resin was accomplished with the dual cure for Group I and light cure for Group II. The Group III and Group IV samples were conditioned with self-etch and self-adhesive technique correspondingly. The teeth shade was recorded in similar locations with a spectrophotometer before and after subjecting them to the accelerated ageing process. The ageing process included the thermocycling process in water between 5°C and 55°C for 5000 cycles followed by 100 hours xenon light exposure. The data were analysed with SPSS 19.0 by ANOVA and LSD post-hoc comparison. The higher mean colour change was observed in Group I sample (etch washdual cure) with a ∆E value of 2.491. The ∆E value for Group II (etch wash-light cure) and Group III (selfetch) was 1.110 and 2.357 respectively. The lowest mean colour change was observed in Group IV (self-adhesive) with ∆E at 0.614. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between Group IV and Group I; Group IV and Group III with

  12. Effect of post space treatment with adhesives on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Can Okay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of fiber posts used in the restoration of endodontically-treated teeth with extreme material loss, luted with two different self-adhesive resin cements alone or with the combination of an adhesive. Materials and Method: The post spaces of 80 extracted mandibular first premolar roots were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups according to fiber post (RelyX Fiber Post luting material. Group 1 was luted with RelyX Unicem, Group 2 was luted with RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One, Group 3 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement, and Group 4 was luted with Clearfil SA Cement + S3 Bond. After 24 h and 1 month, horizontal sections of 1 mm thickness were made from the coronal, middle and apical root parts of the fiber posts, and push-out tests were performed. Groups were compared by using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc tests and storage periods were compared by using independent samples t-test (α=0.05. Results: For both evaluation time periods, RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One showed the highest bond strength. Regarding the 24 h period, the lowest bond strength values were found for the apical sections followed by middle and coronal sections. One month results revealed similar bond strength values for the middle and apical sections (p>0.05 which were significantly lower than the values found for the coronal sections (p<0.05. RelyX Unicem + Adper Easy One exhibited greater push-out bonding strength compared to other groups in the middle and apical sections (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of this in vitro study it can be concluded that, using an adhesive system in combination with a self-adhesive resin cement during post cementation may improve the bond strength.

  13. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Luana Menezes de; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando; Lanza, Marcos Daniel Septímio; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins de

    2014-01-01

    Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin), after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10) according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal) and R (resin)- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5) were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231). Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (presin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007). The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the cement properties.

  14. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Poggio; Marco Pigozzo; Matteo Ceci; Andrea Scribante; Riccardo Beltrami; Marco Chiesa

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin nanoceramic (RNC) material to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 disks were milled from RNC blocks (Lava Ultimate/3M ESPE) with CAD/CAM technology. The disks were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 recently extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors. The...

  15. Effect of Selected Luting Agents on the Retention of CAD/CAM Zirconia Crowns under Cyclic Environmental Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Leyla Sadighpour; Farideh Geramipanah; Akbar Fazel; Mahdi Allahdadi; Mohamad Javad KharaziFard

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the retention strength of zirconia crowns luted with two types of resin cement under environmental pressure changes.Materials and Methods: Thirty zirconia crowns were fabricated by using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and were cemented by Panavia F2.0 (PAN), hand-mixed RelyX Unicem (UNH), or auto-mix RelyX Unicem Aplicap (UNA) cements on the corresponding extracted human molars. The samples were randomly di...

  16. Influence of the color of composite resin foundation and luting cement on the final color of lithium disilicate ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Sahin, Onur; Özdemir, Oğuz Süleyman; Yilmaz, Burak; Celik, Ersan; Köroğlu, AySegül

    2017-01-01

    Lithium disilicate restorations are commonly used, particularly in the anterior region. The color of the underlying composite resin foundation (CRF) and luting cement may negatively affect the color of lithium disilicate ceramic restorations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of CRF and resin cement materials on the color of lithium disilicate ceramics in 2 different translucencies. Twenty disks (11×1.5 mm, shade A2) were fabricated from medium-opacity (mo) (n=10) and high-translucency (ht) (n=10) lithium disilicate (Lds) blocks (IPS e.max Press). Five CRF disks (11×3 mm) were fabricated in 5 different shades (A1, A2, A3, B2, C2) and 30 resin cement disks (11×0.2 mm) in the shades of translucent (Tr), universal (Un=A2), and white-opaque (Wo). Ceramic specimens were placed on each CRF, and the resin cement combination and color was measured with a spectrophotometer. CIELAB color coordinates were recorded, and the color coordinates of both ceramics on the shades of the A2 CRF and resin cement were saved as the control. Color differences (ΔE 00 ) between the control and test groups were calculated. Data were analyzed with 3-way analysis ANOVA and compared with the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The ΔE 00 values were influenced by the shades of the CRF, resin cement materials, and also their interactions (Pceramic type. The ΔE 00 values of the Wo cement groups (1.73 to 2.96) were significantly higher than those of the other cement shades (0.88 to 1.29) for each ceramic type and CRF shade (Pceramics in 2 different translucencies were similarly influenced by the color of the underlying cement and CRF. When translucent and universal cement shades were used, the core shade did not affect the final color of the ceramics. White opaque cement caused clinically unacceptable color changes in both ceramics on all shades of CRFs except the C2 CRF and when high translucency ceramic was used on the A2 CRF. These changes were clinically acceptable

  17. Effect of composite surface treatment and aging on the bond strength between a core build-up composite and a luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotes, Caroline; Cardoso, Mayra; Melo, Renata Marques de; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between composite core and resin cement. Eighty blocks (8×8×4 mm) were prepared with core build-up composite. The cementation surface was roughened with 120-grit carbide paper and the blocks were thermocycled (5,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a 30 s dwell time in each bath). A layer of temporary luting agent was applied. After 24 h, the layer was removed, and the blocks were divided into five groups, according to surface treatment: (NT) No treatment (control); (SP) Grinding with 120-grit carbide paper; (AC) Etching with 37% phosphoric acid; (SC) Sandblasting with 30 mm SiO2 particles, silane application; (AO) Sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 particles, silane application. Two composite blocks were cemented to each other (n=8) and sectioned into sticks. Half of the specimens from each block were immediately tested for microtensile bond strength (µTBS), while the other half was subjected to storage for 6 months, thermocycling (12,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 s in each bath) and µTBS test in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05). The µTBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (p=0.007) and thermocycling (p=0.000). Before aging, the SP group presented higher bond strength when compared to NT and AC groups, whereas all the other groups were statistically similar. After aging, all the groups were statistically similar. SP submitted to thermocycling showed lower bond strength than SP without thermocycling. Core composites should be roughened with a diamond bur before the luting process. Thermocycling tends to reduce the bond strength between composite and resin cement.

  18. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dalby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS, with dentin bonding agents (DBAs applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go! that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent using RXU following the manufacturer’s instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (0.05 in the SBS between the test groups (A–D or the control (group E. Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (>0.05 affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  19. The Effect Of Gamma Radiation On The Shear Bond Strength And Micro-Hardness Of Zirconia Ceramic Using Three Types Of Luting Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Rahman, R.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    . Therefore, GICs are important restorative materials for these patients. Resin cements are widely used as luting materials used for cementation of restoration to tooth structure as they provide superior retention and improve resistance to fracture. There are several factors that influence the retention strength in cement retained restorations including the properties of luting agent, surface area of crown, surface roughness, height of abutment, cementation technique, variation in cement viscosity and convergence. The ability of resin cement to bond to restorative material is critical for maximal crown retention.

  20. Comparison of 3 luting agents on retention of implant-supported crowns on 2 different abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güncü, M Bariş; Cakan, Umut; Canay, Senay

    2011-10-01

    For fixed prostheses, retention is one of the most important factors for clinical success. It is unknown whether grooves that increase surface area of implant abutment while retaining the diameter and wall height provide greater uniaxial retention force. The purpose of this study was to determine the retention of 3 different cements on 2 implant abutments with different surface configurations. Thirty samples on 2 different abutments (a total of 60 crowns) with different margin and axial walls configuration and surface area were used. Metal crowns were fabricated on the abutment and cemented with 3 different (zinc-phosphate [ZP], glass ionomer [GI], or eugenol-free zinc oxide [ZO]) cements. After cementation, implant-abutment-casting assemblies were thermal cycled 1000 times with 1-minute dwell-time between 5°C and 55°C then subjected to tensile test with universal testing machine until decementation occurred. The mean force required to dislodge castings from abutment was determined. The luting agents influenced retention of castings on implant abutments, whereas different surface configurations and total surface area of the abutments did not influence the uniaxial retention forces. Among the cements tested, ZP exhibited higher values of retention, followed by GI and eugenol-free ZO. The increase in surface area of abutment did not result in improved retention. The present results suggest using ZP rather than GI and eugenol-free ZO in implant-supported crowns to provide higher retention.

  1. Antibacterial Properties of Dental Luting Agents: Potential to Hinder the Development of Secondary Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Unosson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified direct contact test was used to evaluate the antibacterial properties of four commercially available dental luting agents (RelyX Unicem, Ketac Cem, Ceramir Crown & Bridge and Harvard Cement and two reference materials (glass-ionomer cement and calcium aluminate cement compared to a negative-control material (PMMA. Streptococcus mutans bacteria were placed in direct contact with specimens that had been aged for 10 min, 1 day, and 7 days, in order to test the antibacterial properties of the materials. A metabolic assay containing resazurin was used to quantify the amount of viable bacteria remaining after the direct contact tests. The effects of pH and fluoride on bacteria proliferation were also evaluated. Strongest antibacterial properties were found for calcium aluminate cement, followed by Ceramir Crown & Bridge and RelyX Unicem. Ketac Cem, Harvard Cement, and the reference glass-ionomer cement showed bacteria content either higher than or not significantly different from the PMMA control in all instances. pH levels below 6.3 and above 9.0 were found to have negative effects on bacterial proliferation. No correlation between either acidic materials or fluoride release and antibacterial properties could be seen; rather, basic materials showed stronger antibacterial properties.

  2. Correlation between Microleakage and Absolute Marginal Discrepancy in Zirconia Crowns Cemented with Four Resin Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad-Coronel Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate microleakage and absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD and to assess correlation between AMD and microleakage with four resin luting cements. Material and Methods. 20 extracted human third molars were prepared for full-coverage crowns. 20 zirconia copings were made (LAVA, 3M ESPE and cemented. Specimens were randomly allocated for each used type of cement into 4 groups, RelyX® (Rx, Multilink® (Mk, PANAVIA 2.1® (P, and Maxcem® (Mx and immersed in 10% safranin for 72 hours. 20x magnification lenses were used to observe microleakage areas (μm2 and images software was used to measure AMD areas (μm. Discrepancy and microleakage between the cements were compared with one-way ANOVA test with confidence interval of 95%. Results. Rx Group showed microleakage has lowest value and AMD has highest value. P Group showed microleakage has the highest value and Mk Group presented AMD has lowest value. There were no significative differences between the cements. There were no linear correlations between microleakage and AMD; however a complex regression statistical model obtained allowed formulating an association between both variables (microleakage = AMD0,896. Conclusions. No significative differences were found among 4 types of cements. No linear correlations between AMD and microleakage were found. Clinical Significance. AMD is not easily related to microleakage. Characteristics of cements are fundamental to decreasing of microleakage values.

  3. The Influence of Sonic and Ultrasonic Vibration on the Shear Bond Strength of a Selected Resin Luting Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchan, Shivaughn M; White, Daniel; Smith, William; Dhuru, Virendra

    2015-03-01

    This study determined the effect of sonic and ultrasonic instrumentation on the shear bond strengths of Panavia 21, a popular cement for the luting of resin-bonded restorations. 84 Ni-Cr cylinders were cemented to randomly selected resin composite substrates using Panavia 21 following the manufacturer's instructions. The Ni-Cr-composite specimens were divided into 7 groups of 12 specimens each based upon the procedure used for removing the excess cement. For Group 1 (Co) specimens the excess cement was removed with microbrushes immediately after cementation. Groups 2 through 7 were based on the use of vibrating instrument and the time period after which the excess material was removed. These included the cement, Panavia 21, three vibrating instruments, Sonic with a universal tip (So), Piezoelectric ultrasonic with a USPIS tip (Pu), Magnetorestrive ultrasonic with a FS1-100 tip (Mu) and two different time periods, soon after cementation (9m) and one hour after cementation (1h). Once excess cement REMOVAL WAS COMPLETED, THE SPECIMENS WERE SUBJECTED TO SHEAR TESTING. Mean Shear Bond strengths ranged from 16.03 MPa (Co) to 19.91 MPa (So 1h). Statistical analysis demonstrated that interaction of the main effects were significant (F = 4.27, p = 0.042). Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that the effect of timing was significant in all the instrumented groups. The majority of the tested specimens failed cohesively compared to mainly adhesive failures for the control group. The effect of type of instrumentation immediately following polymerization setting had no effect on the shear bond strengths however a delay of 1 hour for all types of instrumentation had a beneficial effect of improving observed shear bond strengths.

  4. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended to be painted...

  5. Microleakage of inlay ceramic systems luted with self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag, Bulent; Yucedag, Elif; Sahin, Volkan

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the microleakage of Cerec 3, IPS e.max Press, and Turkom-Cera inlays cemented with three self-adhesive resin cements. Ninety standardized class III MOD cavities were prepared in intact human mandibular third molars. Ceramic inlays were fabricated according to the manufacturer's instructions and were cemented using three self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Smartcem 2, and SpeedCEM). The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and subjected to 1000 thermocycles in water between 5°C and 55°C with a dwell time of 30 s. Subsequently, the specimens were subjected to 100,000 cycles of mechanical loading of 50 N at 1.6 Hz in 37°C water. The specimens were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine for 24 h and were sectioned using a low-speed diamond blade. The percentage of dye leakage at the tooth/restoration interface was measured and compared by Kruskal-Wallis tests with Bonferonni correction and Mann-Whitney U-tests at a significance level of pinlays (p<0.05). Regardless of the ceramic system and self-adhesive resin cement used, dentin margins were associated with higher microleakage than enamel margins.

  6. Evaluating the effect of ceramic veneer thickness on degree of conversion in three luting resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Elmamooz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available compare the effect of different ceramic thicknesses on degree of conversion (DC of 3 light-cured resin cements. Methods: In this experimental in-vitro study, the degree of conversion of three light-cured resin cements, Variolink Veneer (Ivoclar, Liechtenstein, RelyX Veneer (3M ESPE, USA and Choice2 (Bisco, USA were evaluated beneath feldespatic ceramic discs (Vita VMK Master with a same shade,  2m2, in different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 2 and3 mm using FTIR. The light curing unit used was Optilux 501, with an intensity of 600 mW/cm2 and exposure duration of 40 seconds. Three specimens of each cement group were examined in each condition. The obtained data was submitted to Kolmogorov-Smirnov and also checked for absence of skewness and kurtosis for normal distribution. After that, ANOVA test was used for comparison between experimental groups (Tukey HSD. Results: In all the three used cements, DC decreased as ceramic thickness increased. This reduction was not significant when using 0.5 and 1 mm ceramic discs, however, it was significant between 1, 2, and 3mm discs(p

  7. Effect of type of luting agents on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants supporting a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis: 3D finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Ehsan; Abedian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Pedram; Khazaei, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration of dental implants is influenced by many biomechanical factors that may be related to stress distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of type of luting agent on stress distribution in the bone surrounding implants, which support a three-unit fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) using finite element (FE) analysis. Materials and Methods: A 3D FE model of a three-unit FDP was designed replacing the maxillary first molar with maxillary second premolar and second molar as the abutments using CATIA V5R18 software and analyzed with ABAQUS/CAE 6.6 version. The model was consisted of 465108 nodes and 86296 elements and the luting agent thickness was considered 25 μm. Three load conditions were applied on eight points in each functional cusp in horizontal (57.0 N), vertical (200.0 N) and oblique (400.0 N, θ = 120°) directions. Five different luting agents were evaluated. All materials were assumed to be linear elastic, homogeneous, time independent and isotropic. Results: For all luting agent types, the stress distribution pattern in the cortical bone, connectors, implant and abutment regions was almost uniform among the three loads. Furthermore, the maximum von Mises stress of the cortical bone was at the palatal side of second premolar. Likewise, the maximum von Mises stress in the connector region was in the top and bottom of this part. Conclusion: Luting agents transfer the load to cortical bone and different types of luting agents do not affect the pattern of load transfer. PMID:25709676

  8. Early resin luting material damage around a circular fiber post in a root canal treated premolar by using micro-computerized tomographic and finite element sub-modeling analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Hao; Lin, Chun-Li

    2015-11-01

    This study utilizes micro-computerized tomographic (micro-CT) and finite element (FE) sub-modeling analyses to investigate the micro-mechanical behavior associated with voids/bubbles stress behavior at the luting material layer to understand the early damage in a root canal treated premolar. 3-dimensional finite element (FE) models of a macro-root canal treated premolar and two sub-models at the luting material layer to provide the void/bubble distribution and dimensions were constructed from micro-CT images and simulated to receive axial and lateral forces. The boundary conditions for the sub-models were determined from the macro-premolar model results and applied in sub-modeling analysis. The first principal stresses for the dentin, luting material layer and post in macro-premolar model and for luting material void/bubble in sub-models were recorded. The simulated results revealed that the macro-premolar model dramatically underestimated the luting material stress because the voids/bubbles at the adhesive layer cannot be captured due to coarse mesh and high stress gradient and the variations between sub- and macro-models ranging from 2.65 to 4.5 folds under lateral load at the mapping location. Stress concentrations were found at the edge of the voids/bubbles and values over 20 MPa in sub-modeling analysis immediately caused the luting material failure/micro-crack. This study establishes that micro-CT and FE sub-modeling techniques can be used to simulate the stress pattern at the micro-scale luting material layer in a root canal treated premolar, suggesting that attention must be paid to resin luting material initial failure/debonding when large voids/bubbles are generated during luting procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30× magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. © 2013.

  10. Effect of composite surface treatment and aging on the bond strength between a core build-up composite and a luting agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    COTES, Caroline; CARDOSO, Mayra; de MELO, Renata Marques; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe; BOTTINO, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between composite core and resin cement. Material and Methods Eighty blocks (8×8×4 mm) were prepared with core build-up composite. The cementation surface was roughened with 120-grit carbide paper and the blocks were thermocycled (5,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a 30 s dwell time in each bath). A layer of temporary luting agent was applied. After 24 h, the layer was removed, and the blocks were divided into five groups, according to surface treatment: (NT) No treatment (control); (SP) Grinding with 120-grit carbide paper; (AC) Etching with 37% phosphoric acid; (SC) Sandblasting with 30 mm SiO2 particles, silane application; (AO) Sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 particles, silane application. Two composite blocks were cemented to each other (n=8) and sectioned into sticks. Half of the specimens from each block were immediately tested for microtensile bond strength (µTBS), while the other half was subjected to storage for 6 months, thermocycling (12,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 s in each bath) and µTBS test in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05). Results The µTBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (p=0.007) and thermocycling (p=0.000). Before aging, the SP group presented higher bond strength when compared to NT and AC groups, whereas all the other groups were statistically similar. After aging, all the groups were statistically similar. SP submitted to thermocycling showed lower bond strength than SP without thermocycling. Conclusion Core composites should be roughened with a diamond bur before the luting process. Thermocycling tends to reduce the bond strength between composite and resin cement. PMID:25760269

  11. Effect of composite surface treatment and aging on the bond strength between a core build-up composite and a luting agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline COTES

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between composite core and resin cement. Material and Methods Eighty blocks (8×8×4 mm were prepared with core build-up composite. The cementation surface was roughened with 120-grit carbide paper and the blocks were thermocycled (5,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a 30 s dwell time in each bath. A layer of temporary luting agent was applied. After 24 h, the layer was removed, and the blocks were divided into five groups, according to surface treatment: (NT No treatment (control; (SP Grinding with 120-grit carbide paper; (AC Etching with 37% phosphoric acid; (SC Sandblasting with 30 mm SiO2 particles, silane application; (AO Sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 particles, silane application. Two composite blocks were cemented to each other (n=8 and sectioned into sticks. Half of the specimens from each block were immediately tested for microtensile bond strength (µTBS, while the other half was subjected to storage for 6 months, thermocycling (12,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 s in each bath and µTBS test in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05. Results The µTBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (p=0.007 and thermocycling (p=0.000. Before aging, the SP group presented higher bond strength when compared to NT and AC groups, whereas all the other groups were statistically similar. After aging, all the groups were statistically similar. SP submitted to thermocycling showed lower bond strength than SP without thermocycling. Conclusion Core composites should be roughened with a diamond bur before the luting process. Thermocycling tends to reduce the bond strength between composite and resin cement.

  12. Retention force of secondary crowns to copings after temporary cementation: the effect of crown material and luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Torsten; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Golecki, Gudrun; Schwahn, Christian; Biffar, Reiner

    2010-12-01

    Tooth-implant supported restorations can be temporarily cemented if the natural abutments are protected by permanently cemented copings. This in vitro study investigated the retention forces of pure titanium crowns to milled titanium alloy copings and of cobalt-chromium crowns to copings made of electroplated gold after cementation with different luting agents. Five specimens per group were cemented with acrylic-urethane cement (inner crown surface preisolated with petroleum jelly) and provisional zinc oxide cement. The retention was measured using a universal testing machine and a dental device for crown removal. The differences between groups were compared using analysis of variance. The pull-off forces for the cobalt-chromium secondary crowns cemented on gold copings using zinc oxide cement were significantly higher (mean=144.5 N) than the other crown-cement combinations (32.2-54.4 N), which showed no significant differences in the retention force. The impulse number and magnitude of the dental device was usually low and showed no substantial differences between the crown-cement combinations. It can be concluded that the results of the clinical removal method for prostheses differ from the results of the pull-off test. The question which luting agent is the better choice for retrievable restorations remains unanswered without further clinical and laboratory studies.

  13. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan; Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30 × magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. - Highlights: • Understanding the dominant mechanism of bonding

  14. Effects of surface treatment on bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradabadi, Ashkan [Department of Electrochemistry, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Roudsari, Sareh Esmaeily Sabet [Department of Optoelectonics, Universität Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Yekta, Bijan Eftekhari [School of Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahbar, Nima, E-mail: nrahbar@wpi.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study to understand the dominant mechanism in bond strength between dental resin agent and zirconia ceramic by investigating the effects of different surface treatments. Effects of two major mechanisms of chemical and micromechanical adhesion were evaluated on bond strength of zirconia to luting agent. Specimens of yttrium-oxide-partially-stabilized zirconia blocks were fabricated. Seven groups of specimens with different surface treatment were prepared. 1) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion (SZ), 2) zirconia specimens after etching (ZH), 3) zirconia specimens after airborne particle abrasion and simultaneous etching (HSZ), 4) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of a Fluorapatite-Leucite glaze (GZ), 5) GZ specimens with additional acid etching (HGZ), 6) zirconia specimens coated with a layer of salt glaze (SGZ) and 7) SGZ specimens after etching with 2% HCl (HSGZ). Composite cylinders were bonded to airborne-particle-abraded surfaces of ZirkonZahn specimens with Panavia F2 resin luting agent. Failure modes were examined under 30 × magnification and the effect of surface treatments was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SZ and HSZ groups had the highest and GZ and SGZ groups had the lowest mean shear bond strengths among all groups. Mean shear bond strengths were significantly decreased by applying a glaze layer on zirconia surfaces in GZ and SGZ groups. However, bond strengths were improved after etching process. Airborne particle abrasion resulted in higher shear bond strengths compared to etching treatment. Modes of failure varied among different groups. Finally, it is concluded that micromechanical adhesion was a more effective mechanism than chemical adhesion and airborne particle abrasion significantly increased mean shear bond strengths compared with another surface treatments. - Highlights: • Understanding the dominant mechanism of bonding

  15. Effect of Different Luting Agents on the Retention of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Mobilio, Nicola; Fasiol, Alberto; Mollica, Francesco; Catapano, Santo

    2015-01-01

    No studies are available that evaluate the retention of disilicate crowns according to different cementation procedures. The purpose of this study was to measure the retention of lithium disilicate crowns cemented using two different cementation systems. Twenty extracted mandibular premolars were prepared. Anatomic crowns were waxed and hot pressed using lithium disilicate ceramic. Teeth were divided into two groups (n = 10): (1) self-curing luting composite and (2) glass-ionomer cement (GIC)...

  16. Coronal leakage in endodontically treated teeth restored with posts and complete crowns using different luting agent combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, Joseph; Rosner, Ofir; Gross, Ora; Pilo, Raphael; Lin, Shaul

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of different cement combinations on coronal microleakage in restored endodontically treated teeth using dye penetration. Human, noncarious single-rooted extracted premolars (n = 60) were divided into four experimental groups (each n = 15). After endodontic treatment, different combinations of cements were used to lute prefabricated posts and complete crown restorations: zinc phosphate cement applied on posts and cast crowns (Z) or on zinc phosphate cement posts and resin cement applied on cast crowns (ZR); resin cement applied on posts and zinc phosphate cement applied on cast crowns (RZ); and resin cement applied on posts and cast crowns (R). After artificial aging through thermal cycling (5°C to 55°C) for 2,000 cycles at 38 seconds for each cycle and 15 seconds of dwell time, specimens were immersed for 72 hours in basic fuchsin at 37°C. A buccolingual section was made through the vertical axis of specimens. A Toolmaker's microscope (Mitutoyo) was used to measure (um) dye penetration. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test was used to determine intergroup difference. A nonparametric Mann-Whitney test compared each group regarding its maximal linear penetration depths on the mesial and distal aspects of each specimen (a = 0.05). Dye staining was evident to some degree in all specimens. Among groups Z, ZR, and RZ, no significant difference was shown in dye-penetration depths (mean penetration scores 1,518 to 1,807 um). However, dyepenetration depth was significantly lower in group R compared to the other groups (mean penetration score 1,073 um) (P cement combination offering the best coronal sealing was the one using only resin cement for both posts and crown restorations.

  17. A clinically focused discussion of luting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E E; Lott, J

    2011-06-01

    A luting agent's primary function is to fill the minute void between an indirect restoration (definitive or provisional) and tooth (or implant abutment) and mechanically lock the restoration in place to prevent dislodgement during function. The purpose of this paper is to provide a clinically focused discussion on the broad spectrum of luting materials currently available to help the general practitioner make appropriate choices. Resins are typically formulated for a specific function or restoration and offer strength, aesthetics, flexible working times, and very low solubility yet are technique sensitive, expensive and often hard to clean-up. Glass-ionomers offer good strength and optical properties plus the potential for fluoride release/recharge but may have short working times, are sensitive to moisture or dehydration early on, and take time to fully set. Resin-modified glass-ionomers are hybrid, dual-phase materials which are manipulated like glass-ionomer but set quicker and are stronger. Zinc phosphate cement, used successfully for over a century to lute well-fitting metal and metal-ceramic definitive restorations, is a very inexpensive, rigid material which displays very high early compressive strength yet acidity and solubility can be problems. Polycarboxylate cement (a hybrid of zinc phosphate) has lower compressive strength but high tensile strength and may be less injurious to the pulp. Zinc oxide eugenol and zinc oxide non-eugenol cements typically have good sealing abilities but their relatively low compressive and tensile strengths, inherent brittleness, and high solubility limit usage to provisional restorations or implant supported crowns. Claims for multi-purpose or universal use by manufacturers can be somewhat confusing and overwhelming. Even so, the busy general practitioner must have sufficient knowledge to help choose an appropriate luting agent for each unique clinical situation. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Pigozzo, Marco; Ceci, Matteo; Scribante, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin nanoceramic (RNC) material to dentin. In this in vitro study, 30 disks were milled from RNC blocks (Lava Ultimate/3M ESPE) with CAD/CAM technology. The disks were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 recently extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors. The specimens were randomly assigned into 3 groups of 10 teeth each. In Group 1, disks were cemented using a total-etch protocol (Scotchbond™ Universal Etchant phosphoric acid + Scotchbond Universal Adhesive + RelyX™ Ultimate conventional resin cement); in Group 2, disks were cemented using a self-etch protocol (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive + RelyX™ Ultimate conventional resin cement); in Group 3, disks were cemented using a self-adhesive protocol (RelyX™ Unicem 2 Automix self-adhesive resin cement). All cemented specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Instron Universal Testing Machine 3343) and submitted to a shear bond strength test to check the strength of adhesion between the two substrates, dentin, and RNC disks. Specimens were stressed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey's test at a level of significance of 0.05. Post-hoc Tukey testing showed that the highest shear strength values (P resin cements (coupled with etch and rinse or self-etch adhesives) showed better shear strength values compared to self-adhesive resin cements. Furthermore, conventional resin cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values of adhesion.

  19. A castor oil-containing dental luting agent: effects of cyclic loading and storage time on flexural strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derceli, Juliana Dos Reis; Fais, Laiza Maria Grassi; Pinelli, Lígia Antunes Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Favorable results in the use of castor oil polyurethane (COP) as pulp capping, membrane material, sealer, mouthwash and in bone repair, associated with the fact that Ricinus communis is not derived from petroleum and it is abundant in Brazil, encourage researches in the development of luting agents. Objectives This study compared the flexural strength (FS) of a castor oil-containing dental luting agent with a weight percentage of 10% (wt%) of calcium carbonate (COP10) with RelyX ARC (RX) after mechanical cycling (MC) and distilled water storage. Material and Methods Sixty-four specimens (25x2x2 mm) were fabricated and divided into two groups, COP10 and RX (control). Each group was divided into 4 subgroups (n=8) according to the storage time, 24 hours (24 h) or 60 days (60 d), and the performance (MC+FS) or not (only FS) of the mechanical cycling test. The FS (10 kN; 0.5 mm/min) and MC tests (10,000 cycles, 5 Hz, 0.5 mm/min) were carried out using an MTS-810 machine. The data were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Results The obtained FS (MPa) values were: COP10 24h- 19.04±2.41; COP10 60d- 17.92±3.54; RX 24h- 75.19±3.43; RX 60d- 88.77±6.89. All the RX specimens submitted to MC fractured, while the values for COP10 after MC were as follows: COP10 24h- 17.90±1.87 and COP10 60d- 18.60±1.60. Conclusions A castor oil-containing dental luting agent with a weight percentage of 10% (wt%) of calcium carbonate is resistant to mechanical cycling without decreases in flexural strength. However, mean COP10 showed only about 25% of the RelyX ARC mean flexural strength.

  20. Effect of Selected Luting Agents on the Retention of CAD/CAM Zirconia Crowns under Cyclic Environmental Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Sadighpour

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the retention strength of zirconia crowns luted with two types of resin cement under environmental pressure changes.Materials and Methods: Thirty zirconia crowns were fabricated by using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM system and were cemented by Panavia F2.0 (PAN, hand-mixed RelyX Unicem (UNH, or auto-mix RelyX Unicem Aplicap (UNA cements on the corresponding extracted human molars. The samples were randomly divided into three groups according to the cement type. After 3000 thermal cycles, the cemented crowns were subjected to 24 pressure cycles (0 to 5 atmospheres. The retention force (N of the specimens was measured in a universal testing machine. To normalize the retentive force, the recorded force was divided by the surface area of each tooth for measuring the retentive strength (MPa. The mean retention strengths (and forces of the groups were compared by using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey’s honest significant difference (HSD test (α=0.05. The failure modes were also examined by using a stereomicroscope.Results: The retention values related to the evaluated resin cements were significantly different; the UNA group showed the highest retention strength (6.45±0.35 MPa followed by the UNH (4.99±0.47 MPa and PAN (4.45±0.39 MPa, P<0.001 groups. The adhesive failure mode was predominant in all the groups.Conclusions: The choice of resin cements and their mixing methods, which lead to differences in porosity, may affect the retention strength of zirconia crowns.

  1. Effect of selective enamel etching on clinical performance of CAD/CAM partial ceramic crowns luted with a self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federlin, Marianne; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2014-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate a self-adhesive resin luting cement [RelyX Unicem 3MESPE-RXU] for luting partial ceramic crowns (PCCs) with and without selective enamel etching in a prospective, randomized clinical trial. Thirty-four patients had received the intended treatment. Two PCCs (Vita Mark II; Cerec 3D; Sirona) had been placed in a split-mouth design: one with RXU without enamel etching (RXU), the other with RXU with selective enamel etching (RXU + E). Restorations were evaluated at baseline (BL) and after 12, 24, and 36 months (USPHS criteria). For statistical analysis, the Chi-square test was applied (α = 0.05). Clinical survival of all restorations (n = 68) after 3 years was determined using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Twenty three patients (12 male/11 female) were available for clinical evaluation after 3 years. 19 RXU-PCCs were placed in molars, four in premolars, 18 RXU + E-PCCs in molars, five in premolars. Concerning clinical changes, no significant differences were found between luting strategies RXU/RXU + E at all recalls. Statistically significant changes over time were observed for marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration between BL and 36 m for RXU and RXU + E. For RXU + E, postoperative hypersensitivities decreased significantly from BL (n = 6) to 36 m (n = 0). Of the 68 restorations originally included, eight RXU and four RXU + E restorations failed. At 3 years, Kaplan-Meier survival of RXU was 72.9 %, that of RXU + E 87.6 %. Survival rates were not statistically significant different. Although clinical survival of RXU + E is slightly better at 3 years, restorations of both groups perform similar with respect to clinical changes over time as evaluated by modified USPHS criteria. The self-adhesive resin cement RXU can be used in conjunction with selective enamel etching, because survival rates of PCCs in the RXU + E group were not lower but, as a trend, even better than without enamel

  2. Epoxy foams using multiple resins and curing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russick, Edward M.; Rand, Peter B.

    2000-01-01

    An epoxy foam comprising a plurality of resins, a plurality of curing agents, at least one blowing agent, at least one surfactant and optionally at least one filler and the process for making. Preferred is an epoxy foam comprising two resins of different reactivities, two curing agents, a blowing agent, a surfactant, and a filler. According to the present invention, an epoxy foam is prepared with tailorable reactivity, exotherm, and pore size by a process of admixing a plurality of resins with a plurality of curing agents, a surfactant and blowing agent, whereby a foamable mixture is formed and heating said foamable mixture at a temperature greater than the boiling temperature of the blowing agent whereby said mixture is foamed and cured.

  3. Evaluation of resin adhesion to zirconia ceramic using some organosilanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Heikkinen, Mo; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    Objectives. This study evaluated and compared the effect of three trialkoxysilane coupling agents on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA-based unfilled resin and a dimethacrylate-based resin composite luting cement to a zirconia ceramics (Procera(R) AllZircon, Nobel Biocare, Goteborg, Sweden). Methods.

  4. Infiltração marginal de agentes cimentantes em coroas metálicas fundidas Marginal microleakage of cast metal crowns luting agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomie Nakakuki de CAMPOS

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Um dos principais objetivos do cimento, que fixa a restauração protética ao dente, é o selamento da fenda existente entre os mesmos. Para avaliar a infiltração marginal, foram feitos preparos cavitários padronizados, em 20 dentes naturais extraídos. As coroas totais foram fundidas em NiCr, sendo 10 cimentadas com cimento de fosfato de zinco e 10 com cimento resinoso Panavia 21. As amostras foram submetidas à ciclagem térmica e em seguida foram colocadas em solução de azul de metileno a 0,5%. Após o seccionamento vestíbulo-lingual, os corpos-de-prova foram examinados com lupa de aumento. Houve diferença significante entre os dois cimentos testados, sendo que 100% das amostras cimentadas com cimento de fosfato de zinco apresentaram infiltração atingindo dentina e polpa e 100% das amostras cimentadas com Panavia 21 não sofreram qualquer tipo de infiltração. Conclui-se que: o cimento resinoso Panavia 21 apresentou melhores resultados, quanto ao grau de infiltração, quando comparado com o cimento de fosfato de zinco, na cimentação de coroas metálicas fundidas em NiCr.One of the main goals of the luting agent, which bonds the cast restoration to the prepared tooth, is to seal the gap between them. Standardized preparations were made on 20 extracted teeth in order to evaluate microleakage. The crowns were made in NiCr, and in one group of 10 crowns zinc phosphate was used as the luting agent; in the other 10, Panavia 21 was used. The samples were thermocycled and then put into methylene blue solution (0.5%. After buccolingual sectioning of the cemented crowns, the samples were examined with a magnifier. There was a significant difference between the two groups: 100% of the zinc phosphate cemented crowns presented microleakage reaching the dentin and the pulp and 100% of the samples with Panavia 21 did not suffer any microleakage. So, as to the marginal microleakage with cast metal crowns in NiCr, the Panavia 21 luting agent

  5. Effect of surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber-reinforced composite post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaghy, Amr M; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin. Seventy-five single-rooted human teeth were prepared to receive a glass fiber post (Reblida). The posts were divided into five groups according to the surface treatment: Gr C (control; no treatment), Gr S (silanization for 60 s), Gr AP (airborne-particle abrasion), Gr HF (etching with 9 % hydrofluoric acid for 1 min), and Gr M10 (etching with CH2Cl2 for 10 min). Dual-cure self-adhesive luting agent (Rely X Unicem) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion using micropush-out test. Failure types were examined with stereomicroscope and surface morphology of the posts was characterized using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties of posts were assessed using a three-point bending test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Statistical significance was set at the 0.05 probability level. Groups treated with M10 showed significantly higher bond strength than those obtained with other surface treatments (P C > S > AP > HF. Most failure modes were adhesive type of failures between dentin and luting agent (48.2%). SEM analysis revealed that the fiber post surfaces were modified after surface treatments. The surface treatments did not compromise the flexural properties of fiber posts. Application of M10 to the fiber post surfaces enhanced the adhesion to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

  6. Effect of a fluoride varnish on the margin leakage and retention of luted provisional crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Fuhrer, Nitzan; Ganor, Yehuda

    2003-01-01

    Provisional crowns cemented with provisional luting agents are susceptible to washout, margin leakage, and secondary caries when placed for a prolonged period. This study was conducted to determine the effect of combining a varnish containing 2.26% NaF with 2 provisional luting agents on the margin leakage and retention of provisional crowns. Acrylic resin provisional crowns were fabricated for 8 shoulder-prepared molars. The eight provisional (N=24) crowns were luted individually with Temp-Bond (TB), Freegenol (FG), or Duraphat (DU). Specimens were thermocycled 500 times (5 degrees and 60 degrees C) with a 1-minute dwell time, stored in 100% relative humidity at 37 degrees C for 6 days, and then immersed in a 0.5% Gentian violet solution for 24 hours. Seven days after cementation, a removal test of the crowns (shear retention test) was conducted with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Retention was determined as the maximum recorded force needed for crown dislodgment. DU varnish was applied to the inner surface of the dislodged crowns with no removal of the cement layer TB, FG (N=16). The crowns were relined with a 0.5-mm layer of acrylic resin and luted with a combination of luting agent and DU (TB, FG) N=16. No luting agent (NC) served as the control (N=8). Results were analyzed with the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Leakage at the margins was assessed with a 4-level dye penetration scale, and statistical differences were identified with a chi(2) test. All hypothesis testing was conducted at the 95% level of confidence. The mean 7-day retention forces were as follows: 44.5 N (Temp-Bond), 51.6 N (Freegenol), and 35.9 N (Duraphat). There were no significant differences among these values. Duraphat combined with Freegenol decreased the retention of provisional crowns, but Duraphat combined with Temp-Bond increased the retention of provisional crowns by 69-145%. Duraphat alone and in combination with both provisional luting

  7. Use of zinc phosphate cement as a luting agent for Denzir™ copings: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondragon Eduardo

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical success rate with zinc phosphate cemented Procera crowns is high. The objective with this study was to determine whether CADCAM processed and zinc phosphate cemented Denzir copings would perform as well as zinc phosphate cemented Procera copings when tested in vitro in tension. Methods Twelve Procera copings and twenty-four Denzir copings were made. After the copings had been made, twelve of the Denzir copings were sandblasted on their internal surfaces. All copings were then cemented with zinc phosphate cement to carbon steel dies and transferred to water or artificial saliva. Two weeks after cementation, half of the samples were tested. The remaining samples were tested after one year in the storage medium. All tests were done in tension and evaluated with an ANOVA. Results Sandblasted and un-sandblasted Denzir copings performed as well as Procera copings. Storage in water or artificial saliva up to one year did not decrease the force needed to dislodge any of the coping groups. Three copings fractured during testing and one coping developed a crack during testing. The three complete fractures occurred in Procera copings, while the partly cracked coping was a Denzir coping. Conclusion No significant differences existed between the different material groups, and the retentive force increased rather than decreased with time. Fewer fractures occurred in Denzir copings, explained by the higher fracture toughness of the Denzir material. Based on good clinical results with zinc phosphate cemented Procera crowns, we foresee that zinc phosphate cement luted Denzir copings are likely to perform well clinically.

  8. Evaluation of two thione primers and composite luting agents used for bonding a silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M; Tanoue, N

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the bond strength and durability of two metal adhesive systems bonded to a silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd) alloy. Disk specimens were cast from an Ag-Pd alloy (Castwell M.C. 12), air-abraded with 50 micro m grain-sized alumina, and they were bonded with two primer-cement bonding systems (Alloy Primer and Panavia Fluoro Cement; Metaltite and Bistite II). For each cement, unprimed specimens were also prepared as experimental controls. Shear bond strengths were determined both before and after thermocycling (4-60 degrees C, 1 min each, 100 000 cycles). The average post-thermocycling bond strengths in MPa (n=8) were: 39.0 for the Metaltite-Bistite II system, 32.2 for the Alloy Primer-Panavia Fluoro Cement system, 23.1 for the Bistite II material and 21.0 for the Panavia Fluoro Cement material. The use of proprietary primers, both of which contain thione functional monomer, enhanced the post-thermocycling bond strengths of both cements (P 0.05). It is concluded that the combined use of the thione primer and the luting agent is necessary for bonding the Ag-Pd alloy examined.

  9. Long-term performance of posterior InCeram Alumina crowns cemented with different luting agents: a prospective, randomized clinical split-mouth study over 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selz, Christian F; Strub, Joerg R; Vach, Kirstin; Guess, Petra C

    2014-07-01

    This prospective, randomized clinical split-mouth study investigated the 5-year performance of InCeram Alumina posterior crowns cemented with three different luting cements. 4-META- and MDP-based cements were used for adhesive luting. Glass ionomer cement served as control. Sixty patients were treated with 149 (n = 62 Panavia F/MDP; n = 59 SuperBond-C&B/4-META; n = 28 Ketac Cem/glass ionomer) InCeram Alumina crowns on vital molars and premolars in a comparable position. Follow-up examinations were performed annually up to 5 years after crown placement using the modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis comprised secondary caries, clinically unacceptable fractures, root canal treatment and debonding. Kaplan-Meier success rate included restorations with minimal crevices, tolerable color deviations (cement types showed significant marginal deterioration over time (p crowns showed acceptable long-term survival and success rates independent of luting agent used. Ceramic fractures, endodontical treatments and secondary caries were the most frequent failures. Glass-infiltrated Alumina crowns in combination with adhesive as well as conventional cementation can be considered as a reliable treatment option in posterior teeth.

  10. The effect of several dentin desensitizers on shear bond strength of adhesive resin luting cement using self-etching primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jung-Bo; Kim, Jee-Hwan; Chung, Moon-Kyu; Lee, Ho-Yong; Choi, Yong-Geun; Shim, June-Sung

    2008-12-01

    Dentin desensitizers can inhibit the bonding between dentin and resin cements. This study examined the effect of the previous application of desensitizers on the shear bond strength of one resin cement using self-etching primer to dentin. One hundred and twenty-five dentin exposed teeth were randomly assigned to four experimental groups and one control group of 25 teeth each. Four dentin desensitizers were applied to the four experimental groups, respectively. The dentin desensitizers used were SuperSeal (Phoenix Dental, Inc., USA), MS-Coat (Sun Medical Co. Ltd, Japan), Gluma (Heraeus Kulzer, Germany), and Copalite Varnish (Cooley & Cooley Ltd, USA). Panavia F (Kuraray Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan) was attached to the top of each experimental and control group teeth using an Ultradent testing jig (Ultradent Product, Inc., Utah, USA), and the shear bond strength was measured using a Universal testing machine (Model 6022, Instron Co., Canton, MA, USA). The tooth surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, JSM-T2000, JEOL, Tokyo, Japan). The control group showed the greatest shear bond strength (14.74 MPa) followed by SuperSeal (12.33 MPa), Gluma (5.28 MPa), MS-Coat (4.44 MPa) and Copalite Varnishtrade mark (3.14 MPa). There was no significant difference in shear bond strength between the control group and the experimental group treated with Superseal. The shear bond strength in the other experimental groups treated with Gluma, Varnish, and MS-Coat was similar to each other but significantly lower than control or Superseal. SEM showed revealed resin tags in most of the dentinal tubules in the experimental group treated with the Superseal. Among the four dentin desensitizers, Superseal was the only one that did not interfere with the process of resin bonding. The other dentin desensitizers that contained a resin ingredient interfered with resin retention.

  11. Effects of three luting agents and cyclic impact loading on shear bond strengths to zirconia with tribochemical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Kawai

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: After 106 compressive cyclic impact loading, the highest bond to zirconia was obtained with 10-methacryloxydecyl-dihydrogenphosphate containing a luting system (Panavia Fluoro Cement. After applying tribochemical treatment to zirconia, all cements used in this study survived more than 106 shear or compressive cyclic impact loading at 10 kg.

  12. Effect of post length and type of luting agent on the dislodging time of metallic prefabricated posts by using ultrasonic vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi Dastgurdi, Maziar; Khabiri, Masud; Khademi, Abbasali; Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Hosseini Dastnaei, Peimaneh

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the times needed to dislodge prefabricated titanium posts of different luting lengths with various cements. Eighty-one intact extracted, single-canal human teeth were selected and endodontically treated. Specimens were randomly divided into 9 groups, which were arranged according to the post space length (5, 7, and 9 mm) and cement type (zinc phosphate, glass ionomer, and resin cement). Titanium posts were cemented into the post spaces, and after 1 week of storage they were subjected to ultrasonic vibration. The dislodging times were recorded and analyzed by using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (P ultrasonic device. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Laser Etching on the Shear Bond Strength of Crowns Cemented with Two Different Luting Agents: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Ankur; Gandhi, Paresh; Baba, Nadim Z

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of crowns cemented on natural teeth after surface treatment of the enamel with an erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Crown preparation was done for 40 full-metal crowns, and wax patterns with loops were cast in a cobalt-chromium alloy. The Er:YAG laser was used for surface treatment of some teeth, and teeth without surface treatment acted as the control. Glass-ionomer and self-adhesive resin luting cements were used for cementation. Shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine, and statistical analysis was done using paired t test. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was also carried out to study alterations of the enamel and dentin surfaces. Significant increase in shear strength was noted after laser etching the teeth with Er:YAG laser for both types of cement (P crowns.

  14. Effect of dentin-cleaning techniques on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M J M C; Bapoo, H; Rizkalla, A S; Santos, G C

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the influence of different cleansing techniques on the bond strength of self-adhesive cement to dentin. A total of 33 noncarious human molars were sectioned mesiodistally and embedded in chemically cured resin with the buccal or lingual surfaces facing upward. Superficial dentin was exposed and resin disk provisional restorations were cemented to the dentin surfaces with noneugenol provisional cement and were stored in distilled water at 37°C. After seven days, the provisional restorations were removed and 13 specimens were randomly assigned to each of the five groups (n=13), according to the following cleansing treatments: G1-excavator (control); G2-0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate; G3-40% polyacrylic acid; G4-mixture of flour pumice and water; and G5-sandblasting with 50 μm aluminum oxide particles at a pressure of 87 psi. Resin composite disks (Filtek Supreme Plus, 3M ESPE Dental Products, St Paul, MN, USA) 4.7 (±0.1) mm in diameter and 3.0 (±0.5) mm in height were cemented with self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE), photocured, and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength testing was conducted using a universal test machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-B rank order test. Sandblasting with aluminum oxide (11.32 ± 1.70 MPa) produced significantly higher shear bond strength values compared with any other treatment groups (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between G1-control (7.74 ± 1.72 MPa), G2-chlorhexidine (6.37 ± 1.47 MPa), and G4-pumice (7.33 ± 2.85 MPa) (p<0.05).

  15. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem KiLiC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p0.05. Conclusions Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination.

  16. Invitro genotoxicity, assessment of cytotoxicity and of Rely X luting cement on human lymphocyte cells before and after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, Shilpa S.; Hegde, Mithra N.; Shabin; Hegde, Nidarsh D.; Suchetha Kumari; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    In dentistry, a luting agent is a viscous material placed between tooth structure and a prosthesis that by polymerization firmly attach the prosthesis to the tooth structure. Luting agents contact a large area of dentin when used for crown cementation. There is little information on biocompatibility tests, especially on the effect of electron beam irradiation on cytotoxicity for luting resin cements. To determine the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Rely X luting cement on human lymphocyte cells before and after irradiation. Rely X luting cement was obtained commercially. Samples were prepared as per the ISO standard size of 25x2x2 mm using polytetrafluoroethylene teflon mould and divided into two groups - non irradiated and irradiated groups. The samples in irradiated category were exposed to 200 Gy of electron beam irradiation at Microtron Centre, Mangalore University, Mangalore, India. For hemolysis the samples were immersed in phosphate buffer saline and incubated at 370℃ for 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days. 200 μl of 24 hr material extract was mixed with human peripheral blood lymphocyte tested for comet assay by single cell DNA comet assay. Hemolytic activity of non irradiated Rely X luting cement after 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days was 54.78±1.48, 69.91±2.41 and 43.21±0.92 respectively whereas hemolytic activity of irradiated Rely X luting cement after 24 hrs, 7 days and 14 days was 91.8±8.29, 56.95±19.7 and 41.34±12.30. The irradiation of Rely X luting cement with 200 Gy dose of electron beam irradiation caused an increase in the frequency of DNA damage when compared to that of the non-irradiated group. Based on the experimental condition, it is concluded that incomplete polymerization of the dental luting cements has resulted in the elution of the resin components which are responsible for the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Rely X luting cement on human lymphocyte cells. (author)

  17. Effects of laboratory disinfecting agents on color stability of denture acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeme, S J; von Gonten, A S; Woolsey, G D

    1991-07-01

    This study determined the effects of chemical disinfecting agents on denture acrylic resins. Tested resins included the products CH Lucitone, Triad VLC, and Truliner. The disinfecting agents were sodium hypochlorite, Exspor, Cidex, and Wescodyne-D. Acrylic resin samples were placed in the various disinfecting agents and then evaluated for color changes at time intervals ranging from 15 minutes to 72 hours. No observable color change of any acrylic resin was seen before 2 hours. Both 1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% Cidex disinfectants produced the least discoloration of the acrylic resins, and Wescodyne-D disinfectant produced the most acrylic resin discoloration. Truliner resin discolored more than Triad VLC resin, and both underwent more color change than CH Lucitone resin. If manufacturers' recommended disinfecting times are followed, clinical and laboratory disinfection of acrylic resin dentures should cause no observable color change.

  18. Evaluating the effect of different conditioning agents on the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namith Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: This study aims to evaluate the effects three different conditioning agents on the shear bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomers to human dentin. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty recently extracted, caries-free premolars and molars will be cleaned of debris and disinfected in a 0.5% solution of sodium hypochlorite and sterile water for 30 min. The occlusal surface of each tooth will be reduced using conventional model trimmer with water to produce the dentin surface. Then, three different resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs were triturated and mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions, 10 specimens will be made of each group. The excess restorative material will be removed from matrix band dentin interface with a sharp number 25 bard parker blade. Samples were shear tested with Instron universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. A shearing bar beveled to a 1 mm thick contact surface area will be placed at the junction of dentin and plastic band matrix. The load required for the failure will be recorded in pounds and converted to megapascals. Results: Statistical analysis was done with analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Ketac primer as conditioning agent along with Fuji II LC as restorative material had the highest shear bond value whereas intact smear layer which was unmodified dentin had the least value. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that surface conditioning of dentin resulted significantly higher bond strength than unconditioned dentin surfaces. Clinical Significance: Resin-modified glass ionomers have several advantages compared to chemically cured GICs. The advantages include command cure, ease of handling, improved physical properties, and esthetics. Resin-modified glass ionomers have been marketed as direct restorative materials for Class V lesions as well as liners, bases, and luting agents. Several conditioning

  19. In vitro tensile strength of luting cements on metallic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara A; Varoli, Fernando K; Pieroni, Carlos H P; Ferreira, Marly C C G; Borie, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the tensile strength of crowns cemented on metallic substrate with four different types of luting agents. Twenty human maxillary molars with similar diameters were selected and prepared to receive metallic core castings (Cu-Al). After cementation and preparation the cores were measured and the area of crown's portion was calculated. The teeth were divided into four groups based on the luting agent used to cement the crowns: zinc phosphate cement; glass ionomer cement; resin cement Rely X; and resin cement Panavia F. The teeth with the crowns cemented were subjected to thermocycling and later to the tensile strength test using universal testing machine with a load cell of 200 kgf and a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The load required to dislodge the crowns was recorded and converted to MPa/mm(2). Data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis analysis with a significance level of 1%. Panavia F showed significantly higher retention in core casts (3.067 MPa/mm(2)), when compared with the other cements. Rely X showed a mean retention value of 1.877 MPa/mm(2) and the zinc phosphate cement with 1.155 MPa/mm(2). Glass ionomer cement (0.884 MPa/mm(2)) exhibited the lowest tensile strength value. Crowns cemented with Panavia F on cast metallic posts and cores presented higher tensile strength. The glass ionomer cement showed the lowest tensile strength among all the cements studied.

  20. Effects of curing protocol and storage time on the micro-hardness of resin cements used to lute fiber-reinforced resin posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAMOS, Marcelo Barbosa; PEGORARO, Thiago Amadei; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando; CARVALHO, Ricardo Marins

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the micro-hardness profile of two dual cure resin cements (RelyX - U100®, 3M-ESPE and Panavia F 2.0®, Kuraray) used for cementing fiber-reinforced resin posts (Fibrekor® - Jeneric Pentron) under three different curing protocols and two water storage times. Material and methods Sixty 16mm long bovine incisor roots were endodontically treated and prepared for cementation of the Fibrekor posts. The cements were mixed as instructed, dispensed in the canal, the posts were seated and the curing performed as follows: a) no light activation; b) light-activation immediately after seating the post, and; c) light-activation delayed 5 minutes after seating the post. The teeth were stored in water and retrieved for analysis after 7 days and 3 months. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and the microhardness was determined at the cervical, middle and apical regions along the cement line. The data was analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (curing mode, storage time and thirds) for each cement. The Tukey test was used for the post-hoc analysis. Results Light-activation resulted in a significant increase in the microhardness. This was more evident for the cervical region and for the Panavia cement. Storage in water for 3 months caused a reduction of the micro-hardness for both cements. The U100 cement showed less variation in the micro-hardness regardless of the curing protocol and storage time. Conclusions The micro-hardness of the cements was affected by the curing and storage variables and were material-dependent. PMID:23138743

  1. The selection criteria of temporary or permanent luting agents in implant-supported prostheses: in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Brizuela-Velasco, Aritza; Ellacuria-Echebarria, Joseba

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The use of temporary or permanent cements in fixed implant-supported prostheses is under discussion. The objective was to compare the retentiveness of one temporary and two permanent cements after cyclic compressive loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS The working model was five solid abutments screwed to five implant analogs. Thirty Cr-Ni alloy copings were randomized and cemented to the abutments with one temporary (resin urethane-based) or two permanent (resin-modified glass ionomer, resin-composite) cements. The retention strength was measured twice: once after the copings were cemented and again after a compressive cyclic loading of 100 N at 0.72 Hz (100,000 cycles). RESULTS Before loading, the retention strength of resin composite was 75% higher than the resin-modified glass ionomer and 2.5 times higher than resin urethanebased cement. After loading, the retentiveness of the three cements decreased in a non-uniform manner. The greatest percentage of retention loss was shown by the temporary cement and the lowest by the permanent resin composite. However, the two permanent cements consistently show high retention values. CONCLUSION The higher the initial retention of each cement, the lower the percentage of retention loss after compressive cyclic loading. After loading, the resin urethane-based cement was the most favourable cement for retrieving the crowns and resin composite was the most favourable cement to keep them in place. PMID:27141259

  2. Effect of Curing Agent and Temperature on the Rheological Behavior of Epoxy Resin Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Zhao; Chenhui Zhao; Guangcheng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The effect of curing agent (6610) content and temperature on the rheological behavior of the epoxy resin CYD-128 was studied by DSC analysis and viscosity experiments. The results show that the resin system meets the requirements of processing technology. A complete reaction occurs when the curing agent content (40 parts per hundred resin, phr) is a little higher than the theoretical value (33.33 phr), while the degree of reaction of the resin system is reduced when the curing agent content i...

  3. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    bonding agents on the bond strength of dual-cure resin cements to dentin. One hundred forty extracted human third molars were mounted in dental stone...Force Postgraduate Dental School (AFPDS) 4. Phone: 210-671-9822 5. Type of clearance: _x_Paper _Article _ Book _Poster _Presentation _Other 6. Title...34Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents" Materials Repaired with Composite Resin" 7. Intended publication

  4. Eco-friendly Crosslinking Agent for Acid Functional Acrylic Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Shah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil from J. multifida was extracted and it was first converted into N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl Jatropha fatty amide (HEJFA. HEJFA has been synthesized by reaction between Jatropha oil and diethanol amine in presence of zinc oxide as a catalyst. The reaction is relatively rapid and proceeded to high yield at 200±5 OC. The resulting HEJFA was used to formulate thermosetting coating compositions. Films were cured at ambient (air drying and elevated (stove drying temperatures using N, N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl Jatropha fatty amide (HEJFA as eco-friendly crosslinking agent for acrylic resin. The coating performance of the various compositions was tested by measurement of scratch hardness, impact strength and chemical resistance. The results show better performance of the HEJFA based compositions compared to butylated melamine formaldehyde (MF based compositions.

  5. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, conventional resin cements (coupled with etch and rinse or self-etch adhesives showed better shear strength values compared to self-adhesive resin cements. Furthermore, conventional resin cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values of adhesion.

  6. Effectiveness of bleaching agent on composite resin discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih Sampoerno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The discoloration of teeth, especially anterior teeth, is one of aesthetic problems. The use of tooth bleaching agents for discolored natural teeth is becoming increasingly popular. Many dentists, however, get many problems when they conduct bleaching process since there is much composite filling on patient’s anterior teeth. Although many research have focused on the discoloration of composite resin after bleaching process, the problem still becomes debatable. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of the discoloration between hybrid composite and nano composite before and after the application of tooth bleaching agent, 38% hydrogen peroxide. Methods: Eighteen disk-shaped specimens (5 mm of each of two composite resins, hybrid and nano filler, were prepared. The each group was treated 3 times and the specimens were divided into two groups consisted of 9 specimens for each, and then immersed in black tea solutions for 72 hours. Next, after having staining and bleaching processes, the color of the specimens was measured with a optic spectrophotometer by using photo with type BPY-47 and digital microvolt. The differences of the light intensity among three measurements were then calculated. Afterwards, GLM MANOVA Repeated Measure and parametric analysis (Independent t-test and Paired t-test were then used to analyze the data. Results: After staining process, it is then known that the nano composite had more discoloration and more affected by the black tea solution than the hybrid one. Conclusion: After bleaching, the discoloration was finally removed completely from both hybride and nano filler composite resins and became brighter from the baseline color.Latar belakang: Salah satu problem estetik adalah adanya perubahan warna pada gigi anterior. Peningkatan pemakaian bahan bleaching semakin popular. Banyak dokter gigi mempunyai problem ketika mereka akan melakukan proses bleaching dan ditemukan banyak

  7. Clinical performance of cements as luting agents for telescopic double crown-retained removable partial and complete overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Michael; Kolbeck, Carola; Lang, Reinhold; Hahnel, Sebastian; Dirschl, Lisa; Handel, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the survival rates and technical failures of removable prostheses (RPs) supported by telescopic double crown (TDC)-retained abutment teeth luted with zinc-phosphate or glass-ionomer cement. Clinical records of 577 patients (288 women, 289 men) who received 577 TDC-retained RPs supported by 1,807 abutments at the Department of Prosthodontics of the University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany, between 1984 and 2007 were analyzed. The 577 prostheses included 200 attached to telescopic crowns with friction fit (FFs), 62 to conical crowns (CCs), and 315 to parallel-sided telescopic crowns with clearance fit (CFs). Survival probabilities were evaluated for the RPs, loss of cementation of the inner copings, secondary caries, and abutment teeth that required endodontic treatment using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis determined the impact of covariates such as sex, denture location (maxilla/mandible), Eichner classification, number of abutment teeth, and the type of double crown system used. The 10-year survival probability was 98.8% +/- 0.09% for FFs, 92.9% +/- 0.41% for CCs, and 86.6% +/- 0.05% for CFs. During the observation period, loss of cementation was frequently observed (FFs: 32%, CCs: 53.2%, CFs: 21.3%). After 15 years, more than 75% of patients had experienced at least one "loss of cementation" event. In this respect, zinc-oxide phosphate and glass-ionomer cements did not show any significant difference. The long-term successful outcome of the RP experience was not compromised, although numerous clinical visits were required for maintenance. The predominant maintenance procedure was the need for recementation of the inner copings.

  8. Effect of sealant agents on the color stability and surface roughness of nanohybrid composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Şahin, Onur; Koroglu, Aysegül; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of nanohybrid composite resins is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of 4 nanohybrid composite resin materials. Forty disks (10×2 mm) were fabricated for each nanohybrid composite resin material (Z-550, Tetric EvoCeram, Clearfill Majesty, Ice) (N=160) and divided into 4 surface treatment groups: 1 conventional polishing (control) and 3 different sealant agent (Palaseal, Optiglaze, BisCover) coupling groups (n=10). The specimens were thermocycled, and surface roughness (Ra) values were obtained with a profilometer. Scanning electron microscope images were also recorded. CIELab color parameters of each specimen were measured with a spectrophotometer before and after 7 days of storage in a coffee solution. Color differences were calculated by the CIEDE 2000 (ΔE00) formula. The data were statistically analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The surface treatment technique significantly affected the Ra values of the composite resins tested (Pcomposite resin material was also significant for ΔE00 values (Pcomposite resin groups, significant decreases in Ra were observed only for the Palaseal agent coupled composite resin groups (except Ice) compared with the control groups (Pcomposite resin group, except for BisCover applied Clearfill Majesty (Pcomposite resin groups, significant differences were observed between the color change seen with BisCover and other sealants for Clearfill Majesty composite resin (Pcomposite resins except for Ice produced smoother surfaces. All surface sealant agents provided less discoloration of nanohybrid composite resins after coffee staining compared with conventional polishing except for BisCover applied Clearfill Majesty composite resin. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  9. Effect of siloxane quantity and ph of silane coupling agents and contact angle of resin bonding agent on bond durability of resin cements to machinable ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Yoshida, Keiichi; Taira, Yohsuke; Kamada, Kohji; Luo, Xiaoping

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to measure siloxane quantity, pH value, and resin wettability on ceramics silanized by five silane coupling agents, and to test the correlation of these parameters of silane coupling agents with bond durability between a machinable glass ceramic and resin cements. 1.5-mm-thick ceramic plates (ProCAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) were polished, cleaned, and bonded with ten combinations of five silane coupling agents (Monobond S [Ivoclar Vivadent], Rely X Ceramic Primer [3M], Clearfil Ceramic Primer [Kuraray], GC Ceramic Primer [GC], Porcelain Liner M [Sun Medical]) and two dual-curing resin cements (VariolinkII [VLII, Ivoclar Vivadent], Linkmax HV [LMHV, GC]). Their microshear bond strength was measured after 0, 10,000, and 30,000 thermal cycles. Siloxane quantity, pH value of silane coupling agents and contact angle of Heliobond (Ivoclar Vivadent) to silanized ceramic were measured using a FTIR spectrophotometer, pH-indicator strips, and a contact-angle meter, respectively. Bond strength data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA. For each cement, Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze possible correlation between bond strength under different thermocycling conditions and absorbance peak of siloxane, pH value of silane coupling agents, and contact angle of resin to the silanized ceramic surface. The bond strength of ceramic was significantly influenced by the silane coupling agent and thermal cycles, not by resin cement. For both cements, only a negative correlation was found to be significant between the contact angle of resin to silanized ceramic surfaces and bond strength after 30,000 thermal cycles. The better the wettability of resin on different silanized ceramic surfaces could improve their bond durability.

  10. [Effect of bleaching agents on the color of indirect and direct composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wenzhong; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Yining

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of bleaching agents on the color of indirect and direct composite resins. Five resin composite materials were tested in this in vitro study. The five composites were as follow: two indirect composite resins (Adoro SR, Ceramage) and three direct composite resins (Filtek Z350, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic, and Gradia Direct Anterior). For each material, twenty disk-shaped specimens were prepared and randomly divided into five groups according to the color parameters of specimens before bleaching treatment. The composite resin specimens were treated by one of five sample solutions which were at-home bleaching agents (10% and 15% carbarmide peroxide), in- office bleaching agents (38% H(2)O(2) and 35%H(2)O(2)) and deionized water (control group). The color parameters of specimens were measured by spectrophotometer at baseline and after bleaching treatments. The color differences (ΔE values) between baseline and post-treatments were calculated. The data of color differences were evaluated statistically using two-way analysis with a significance level of 0.05. The color changes of the resin composites were less than 2.0 after bleaching agent treatment, therefore were not perceptible. Slight increase of L(*) values and decrease of C(*)ab values in color parameters of specimens were observed. There were statistically significant differences in ΔE values for different bleaching treatments and resin materials (P = 0.001). The bleaching agents did not affect the color of indirect and direct composite resins tested.

  11. Natural resins and bioactive natural products thereof as potential antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termentzi, Aikaterini; Fokialakis, Nikolas; Skaltsounis, Alexios Leandros

    2011-01-01

    Natural products and their derivatives have historically been invaluable as a source of therapeutic agents and have contributed to the discovery of antimicrobial agents. However, today with the development of drug-resistant strains, new scaffolds and new sources of bioactive compounds are needed. To this end, plant derived natural resins are reviewed for their potential application as antimicrobial agents. Natural gums, extracts of the whole resins, as well as specific extracts, fractions, essential oils and isolated compounds from the above resins are discussed in terms of their antifungal, antibacterial, and antiprotozoal activity.

  12. Health Problems of Epoxy Resins and Amine-curing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.; Alberman, K. B.

    1959-01-01

    Epoxy resins were first introduced about 10 years ago. Toxic effects, particularly dermatitis, have been frequently described. An investigation into the possible causes of pathological sequelae following the use of epoxy resin/amine mixtures has been undertaken. The cause of most cases of dermatitis and sensitization appears to be uncombined amine which is present in recent mixtures and persists in hardened resin for long periods. The results of experiments with two of the most commonly used resin/amine mixtures confirm this. Cold-cured resins are more dangerous and remain so even when hardened. A simple theory is suggested for the mechanism of the reaction between epoxy resins, amines, and biological systems. This theory leads logically to the handling precautions outlined. Images PMID:13651551

  13. Effect of in-office bleaching agents on physical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourouzis, Petros; Koulaouzidou, Elisabeth A; Helvatjoglu-Antoniades, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of dental restorative materials have a crucial effect on the longevity of restorations and moreover on the esthetic demands of patients, but they may be compromised by bleaching treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office bleaching agents on the physical properties of three composite resin restorative materials. The bleaching agents used were hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide at high concentrations. Specimens of each material were prepared, cured, and polished. Measurements of color difference, microhardness, and surface roughness were recorded before and after bleaching and data were examined statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD post-hoc test at P composite resin altered after the bleaching procedure (P composite resins tested (P > .05). The silorane-based composite resin tested showed some color alteration after bleaching procedures. The bleaching procedure did not alter the microhardness and the surface roughness of all composite resins tested.

  14. The effects of post-core and crown material and luting agents on stress distribution in tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyar, Perihan

    2014-08-01

    Cement microfracture, post-and-core dislodgement, and tooth fracture are related to the mechanical properties and deformation of restorations. The purpose of this study was to determine which combinations of post-and-core cements provide the most favorable stress distribution upon loading. Three-dimensional models of teeth were created with the ANSYS program to simulate the different materials used for metal ceramic crowns (nickel-chromium, gold-palladium), posts and cores (Ti, Ni-Cr, Au-Pd), and cement (glass ionomer, composite resin, zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, Panavia). Models were divided into 2 groups according to the alloys used in the crown restorations. A simulated masticatory force of 400 N was applied to the occlusal surface at a 45-degree inclination in the linguolabial direction to the long axis of the tooth, and von Mises equivalent stress values were calculated. The Ni-Cr metal ceramic crown/Au-Pd post-and-core/glass ionomer cement had the highest residual root von Mises equivalent stress value, whereas the Ni-Cr metal ceramic crown/Ni-Cr post-and-core/glass ionomer cement had the highest post stress value and the Ni-Cr metal ceramic crown/Au-Pd post-and-core/zinc phosphate cement had the highest cement stress value. For each post-and-core alloy, the stress values in the post and core were higher with Au-Pd metal ceramic crowns than with Ni-Cr metal ceramic crowns. The post-and-core material affected the amount of deformation. The use of a post-and-core material with a lower elastic modulus and a cement with a higher elastic modulus led to a reduction in deformation in the residual root, cement, and post and core, and a reduction in stress in the post and core. The Ni-Cr metal ceramic crown/Au-Pd post-and-core/zinc phosphate cement or Panavia may therefore be favorable for post-and-core restorations. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of intermediate agents and pre-heating of repairing resin on composite-repair bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacchini, Federica; Magni, Elisa; Radovic, Ivana; Mazzitelli, Claudia; Monticellia, Francesca; Goracci, Cecilia; Polimeni, Antonella; Ferrari, Marco

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the composite-to-composite microtensile bond strength and interfacial quality after using different combinations of intermediate agents and pre-curing temperatures of repairing resin. Forty-five composite discs (8x4 mm) of Gradia Direct Anterior (GC Corp), stored in a saline solution at 37 degrees C for one month, were sandblasted (50 microm aluminum oxide), cleaned (35% phosphoric acid) and randomly divided into three groups (n=15) according to the intermediate agent applied: (1) no treatment; (2) unfilled resin (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Adhesive, 3M ESPE); (3) flowable composite (Gradia LoFlo, GC Corp). Each disc was incrementally repaired (8x8 mm) with the same resin as the substrate. For each group, three subgroups (n=5) were created, depending on the pre-curing temperature of the repairing resin-4 degrees C, 23 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Two bonded specimens per group were prepared to evaluate the composite-to-composite interfacial quality via scanning electron microscope. Microtensile bond strength measurements were performed with the remaining three specimens and failure mode was examined by stereomicroscopy. Two-way ANOVA revealed that temperature (p resin in groups where intermediate agents were used. The highest bond strengths were recorded when flowable composite was used as an intermediate agent under each of the three temperature conditions. Interfacial quality improved by raising the resin temperature from 4 degrees C to 37 degrees C.

  16. Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers as Bonding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    Vandewalle, Kraig Civ 59 DTS/ 59 DG/ SGDTG WHASC f. 9 h. I I 1 CERTIFY ANY HUMAN OR ANIMAL RESEARCH RELATED STUDIES WERE APPROVED AND PERFORMED IN STRICT...strength of composite to dentin using resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGI) as bonding agents. Methods: Sixty extracted human third molars were...59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 2 MAR 20 16 l. Your paper, entitl ed Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin

  17. Influence of fluorescent whitening agent on the fluorescent emission of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Young; Lee, Yong-Keun; Lim, Bum-Soon

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the fluorescent emission of experimental resin composites after addition of a fluorescent whitening agent in varied concentrations. The effects of thermocycling and composition of resin matrix on the fluorescent emission were also determined. An experimental light curing resin matrix was made by mixing Bis-GMA, UDMA and TEGDMA in the ratio of 1:1:1 by weight, and silane coated glass filler was added in the ratio of 50 wt.% of resin composite. A fluorescent whitening agent [FWA, 1,4-double-(benzoxazole-group-2-group)naphthalene] was added with the concentration of 0.01-0.1%. To determine the difference by the resin matrix, two resin composites (60 wt.% Bis-GMA or UDMA with 40 wt.% TEGDMA) with the same filler content were made, and the FWA was added. Five specimens of 2mm in thickness were made for each group. Spectral reflectance was measured relative to the illuminant D65 on a reflection spectrophotometer. From the spectral reflectance values, the difference in reflectance (fluorescence spectra) by the inclusion or exclusion of UV component was calculated. After the baseline measurement, thermocycling was performed for 500 and 1000 cycles, and the fluorescent emission was measured again. The concentration of FWA influenced the fluorescent peak heights and areas (presin matrix, but peak height and area were influenced by the resin matrix (presin composites.

  18. Modified Castor Oil as an Epoxy Resin Curing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Patel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A castor oil, an agricultural product, is an unsaturated material. Hence the castor oil is brominated by bromine liquid. The brominated castor oil (BCO was then reacted with excess of aliphatic diamines viz; ethylene diamine, 1,3-propane diamine and 1,6-hexane diamine. The resultant amino functionalized castor oil (ACO samples were then characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectral study and number of amino groups. All the three ACO samples were then employed for the curing of commercial Brominated epoxy resin. The curing of epoxy resin by ACO was monitored on differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and based on the DSC study their glass fibre reinforced composites (GRC were fabricated. The cured samples (i.e. unreinforced were also subjected to thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA. The chemical, mechanical and electrical properties of the glass fibre reinforced composites (GRC were also evaluated.

  19. Effect of Curing Agent and Temperature on the Rheological Behavior of Epoxy Resin Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of curing agent (6610 content and temperature on the rheological behavior of the epoxy resin CYD-128 was studied by DSC analysis and viscosity experiments. The results show that the resin system meets the requirements of processing technology. A complete reaction occurs when the curing agent content (40 parts per hundred resin, phr is a little higher than the theoretical value (33.33 phr, while the degree of reaction of the resin system is reduced when the curing agent content is lower (25.00 phr than theoretical value. However, excessive curing agent (50.00 phr results in a lower reaction rate. Curing agent content has little influence on gel time when curing agent content exceeded 33.33 phr and the temperature was less than 70 °C. The isothermal viscosity-time curves shift towards the –x axis when the temperature rises from 50 °C to 80 °C. Meanwhile, higher temperature results in higher reaction rates.

  20. Effect of curing agent and temperature on the rheological behavior of epoxy resin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenhui; Zhang, Guangcheng; Zhao, Lei

    2012-07-17

    The effect of curing agent (6610) content and temperature on the rheological behavior of the epoxy resin CYD-128 was studied by DSC analysis and viscosity experiments. The results show that the resin system meets the requirements of processing technology. A complete reaction occurs when the curing agent content (40 parts per hundred resin, phr) is a little higher than the theoretical value (33.33 phr), while the degree of reaction of the resin system is reduced when the curing agent content is lower (25.00 phr) than theoretical value. However, excessive curing agent (50.00 phr) results in a lower reaction rate. Curing agent content has little influence on gel time when curing agent content exceeded 33.33 phr and the temperature was less than 70 °C. The isothermal viscosity-time curves shift towards the -x axis when the temperature rises from 50 °C to 80 °C. Meanwhile, higher temperature results in higher reaction rates.

  1. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C-O-C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P-O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  2. Honeycomb core material for sandwich construction - with common hexagonal walls bonded by thermoplastic resin and free walls carrying layer of resin and masking agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Undetermined, U.

    1991-01-01

    Abstract of NL 8902116 (A) In a honeycomb core material for a sandwich construction, the common hexagonal walls are bonded together by a thermoplastic resin, and the free hexagonal walls carry a layer of the same resin and also a masking agent. - A number of plates of raw material are given strips

  3. Retention of radicular posts varying the application technique of the adhesive system and luting agent Retenção de pinos radiculares variando-se a técnica de aplicação do sistema adesivo e do agente cimentante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabajara Sabbag Fonseca

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated in vitro the retention of intracanal cast posts cemented with dual-cure resin varying the application method of the primer/adhesive solution and luting agent in the prosthetic space prepared to receive the posts. Sixty endodontically treated maxillary canines had their crowns discarded, and their roots were embedded in acrylic resin. The prosthetic spaces were prepared with Largo burs mounted on a low-speed handpiece coupled to a parallelometer in order to maintain length and diameter of intraradicular posts constant and to guarantee that the preparations were parallel after casting. Two groups (n = 30 were randomly formed according to the device used to apply the adhesive system: microbrush or standard bristle brush (control. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10 according to the technique used to place the luting agent into the root canal: using only a lentulo spiral before setting the post, applying it onto the post surface, or combining both methods. After 72 hours, the tensile force required to dislodge each post was determined by a universal testing machine (Instron 4444 set at a speed of 1 mm/min. The results indicated that the use of the microbrush yielded higher bond strength values (0.1740 ± 0.04 kN than those recorded for the bristle brush tip (0.1369 ± 0.04 kN, p O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar in vitro a retenção de pinos intra-radiculares variando-se a técnica de aplicação do agente adesivo e do cimento resinoso dual no espaço protético preparado para a recepção do pino. Sessenta caninos superiores tratados endodonticamente tiveram as coroas descartadas e as raízes incluídas em resina acrílica. Os espaços protéticos foram preparados com broca de Largo acionada por micromotor acoplado a um paralelômetro, a fim de manter constantes o comprimento e diâmetro dos pinos intra-radiculares e o paralelismo dos preparos após a fundição. Os pinos foram divididos aleatoriamente em 2

  4. The effects of three different desensitizing agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Erdemir, Ali; Ercan, Ertugrul; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi; Kalaycioglu, Baris; Ulker, Mustafa

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three desensitizing agents on the shear bond strengths of four different bonding agents used to bond composite resin to dentin. A total of 160 extracted human molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal plane under water cooling, polished and randomly divided into 4 groups of 40. Each group was treated with a different desensitizing agent (Tooth Mousse, Ultra-EZ, Cervitec Plus), except for an untreated control group. Each group was then randomly subdivided into 4 groups of 10, and a different dentin bonding agent (XP Bond, AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-pop, GBond) was applied to each group in order to bond the specimens to a resin composite (Gradia Direct) built up using a plastic apparatus. A Universal Testing Machine was used to measure the shear bond strength of each specimen. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. With the exception of the Control/AdheSE and Ultra-EZ/XP Bond groups, no statistically significant differences were found in the shear bond strength values of the groups tested. These findings suggest that the use of different desensitizing agents does not affect the shear bond strength of various adhesive systems used to bond resin composite to dentin. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Luting of CAD/CAM ceramic inlays: direct composite versus dual-cure luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Bonroy, Kim; Elsen, Caroline; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Suyama, Yuji; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bonding effectiveness in direct restorations. A two-step self-etch adhesive and a light-cure resin composite was compared with luting with a conventional dual-cure resin cement and a two-step etch and rinse adhesive. Class-I box-type cavities were prepared. Identical ceramic inlays were designed and fabricated with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. The inlays were seated with Clearfil SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical) or ExciTE F DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), each by two operators (five teeth per group). The inlays were stored in water for one week at 37°C, whereafter micro-tensile bond strength testing was conducted. The micro-tensile bond strength of the direct composite was significantly higher than that from conventional luting, and was independent of the operator (P<0.0001). Pre-testing failures were only observed with the conventional method. High-power light-curing of a direct composite may be a viable alternative to luting lithium disilicate glass-ceramic CAD/CAM restorations.

  6. Masculinization on tilapia (Oreochromis sp. by natural hormone steroid agent from bee resin through artificial diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinar Tri Soelistyowati

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Masculinization on tilapia ( Oreochromis sp. has been done with approach of natural hormone steroid agent  from bee resin  through artificial diet before sexual differentiation. This research aim to increase male sex ratio and production performance. Treatment of bee resin dose is 0.6; 1.2; 1.8; 2.4; 3.0 feed ml/kg compared to Control (0 ml/kg diet were given  during 28 days at larva age 7 day in aquarium, then transferred to the farm ground until age 12 weeks. Average of masculine phenotype percentage increased significantly (PKeywords: bee resin, masculinization, masculine sex ratio, Oreochromis sp. ABSTRAKMaskulinisasi pada ikan nila  (Oreochromis sp. telah dilakukan dengan pendekatan hormonal menggunakan bahan aktif steroid alami yang berasal dari resin lebah melalui pakan buatan sebelum diferensiasi kelamin. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan meliputi kelangsungan hidup, nisbah kelamin jantan, laju pertambahan bobot, dan konversi pakan (FCR.  Perlakuan yang diuji terdiri dari 5 dosis resin lebah  (0,6; 1,2; 1,8; 2,4; 3,0 mL/kg pakan dan Kontrol, diberikan selama 28 hari pada larva berumur 7 hari di akuarium, kemudian ikan dipelihara di kolam tanah sampai umur 12 minggu. Rata-rata persentase fenotipe jantan meningkat secara nyata (PKata kunci: Oreochromis sp, maskulinisasi, nisbah kelamin jantan, resin lebah.

  7. The effect of dentin-cleaning agents on resin cement bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Duygu; Bulucu, Bilinc; Saraç, Y Sinasi; Kulunk, Safak

    2008-06-01

    Provisional cement remnants on dentin affect the bond strength of resin cements to dentin. The authors investigated the effects of dentin-cleaning agents and etching systems on the bond strength of adhesive resin cement. The authors removed the provisional cement from the dentin surfaces of the specimens and then cleaned the surfaces with the dentin-cleaning agents Sikko Tim (VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany), Cavity Cleanser (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.) or Consepsis Scrub (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They used adhesive resin cement after applying the different etching adhesive systems. Then they examined the dentin surfaces by using scanning electron microscopy. The authors analyzed data by means of a two-way analysis of variance with Tukey honestly significant difference tests (alpha= .05). They found that specimens cleaned with Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub had higher shear bond strength values than did those in the no-treatment control group or the group cleaned with Cavity Cleanser. The specimens treated with the total-etching adhesive system had higher shear bond strength than did those treated with the self-etching adhesive systems. Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub were effective in removing provisional cement. Adhesive resin cement showed higher bond strength when used in conjunction with the total-etching adhesive system. The use of an effective dentin cleaner before cementation with resin cement can increase bond strength.

  8. Guitars and Lutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Caldersmith, Graham

    Lute-type instruments have a long history. Various types of necked chordophones were in use in ancient Egyptian, Hittite, Greek, Roman, Turkish, Chinese, and other cultures. In the ninth century, Moors brought the oud (or ud) to Spain. In the fifteenth century, the vihuela became popular in Spain and Portugal. About the same time guitars with four double-strings became popular, and Italy became the center of the guitar world.

  9. Factors affecting use of fluorescent agents in identification of resin-based polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpino, Paulo H P; Pereira, José C; Svizero, Nádia R; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Pashley, David H

    2006-10-01

    The present study is a compilation of methodologies developed in order to evaluate the effects of addition of a fluorescent agent, rhodamine B, to resin-based materials. The intent of the work was to develop a systematic methodology that accounts for variables not shown to be of concern in past testing, but may significantly affect interpretation of the resulting images and material properties. Different methodologies were specifically developed to evaluate factors affecting the use of the fluorescent agent rhodamine B in the identification of resin-based materials. The influence of dye concentration was evaluated with respect to adhesive polymerization reaction kinetics and bond strength of the resin into which the dye is added. The pH of the dye-solvent solution was also considered. Additionally, the mass and percentage of rhodamine B leached into different media over time was determined. It was demonstrated that a specific dye must be used with caution, and the concentration of a fluorescent agent is important with respect to both the conversion and bond strength of the resin to which the dye is added. An alcohol-based dye solution also produced an extremely high amount of dye leaching from polymerized specimens. The adhesive pH was not altered. The standardized methodology developed here to analyze restoration interfaces using a fluorescent dye can lessen the impact of variables when interpreting results.

  10. Effect of phenol formaldehyde resin as vulcanizing agent on flow behavior of HDPE/PB blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moayad N. Khalaf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic elastomer (TPE based on High density polyethylene (HDPE/polybutadiene (HDPE/PB = 70/30 parts blends containing 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 wt.% of dimethylol phenolic resin as a vulcanizing agent in the presence of SnCl2 as catalyst was prepared. The dimethylol phenolic resin was prepared in our laboratory. The blends were compounded in mixer-60 attached to a Haake rheochord meter-90. The rheological properties were measured at temperatures 140, 160, 180 and 200 °C. The linearity of the flow curve appeared for 5% of the vulcanizing agent. The shear stress and shear viscosity have increased upon increasing the shear rate over a range of loading levels of vulcanizing agent of 1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 10%. This may be attributed to the increased vulcanization between polyethylene and the rubber blend. The flow behavior index of the system shows a pseudo plastic nature behavior (since n < 1. The consistency index (K increased with the increase in the phenol formaldehyde resin content and the temperature. Hence, the increase in the value of the consistency index (K of the polymer melts refers to more viscous materials prepared. The activation energy for the TPE blends fluctuated indicating that there is phase separation; where each polymer behaved separately. This study showed that HDPE/PB blends are characterized with good rheological properties, which can be recommended to be processed with the injection molding technique.

  11. Effect of fluoride-containing desensitizing agents on the bond strength of resin-based cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Saraç

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO was used. The shear bond strength (MPa was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05. The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001. PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05.

  12. Adhesive luting of all-ceramic restorations--the impact of cementation variables and short-term water storage on the strength of a feldspathic dental ceramic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the impact of resin cement luting variables and short-term water storage on the strength of an adhesively luted all-ceramic restorative material. An understanding of the strengthening mechanisms will result in optimisation of operative techniques and materials selection criteria.

  13. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

    Primary diamines are prepared for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and preimpregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses a room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  14. The Effect of Different Disinfecting Agents on Bond Strength of Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohammed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different disinfectant agents on bond strength of two types of resin composite materials. Methods. A total of 80 sound posterior teeth were used. They were divided into four groups (n=20 according to the dentin surface pretreatment (no treatment, chlorhexidine gluconate 2%, sodium hypochlorite 4%, and EDTA 19%. Each group was divided into two subgroups according to the type of adhesive (prime and bond 2.1 and Adper easy one. Each subgroup was further divided into two subgroups according to the type of resin composite (TPH spectrum and Tetric EvoCeram. Shear bond strength between dentin and resin composite was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Data collected were statistically analyzed by t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Results. It was found that dentin treated with EDTA recorded the highest shear bond strength values followed by sodium hypochlorite and then chlorhexidine groups while the control group showed the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusions. The surface treatment of dentin before bonding application has a great effect on shear bond strength between resin composite and dentin surface.

  15. Influence of curing time, overlay material and thickness on three light-curing composites used for luting indirect composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; De Angelis, Francesco; Vadini, Mirco; Carluccio, Fabio; Vitalone, Laura Merla; D'Amario, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    .13). In the SAR group, acceptable hardness values were only achieved with 2-mm-thick overlays after 120 or 80 s curing time (VH 39.81 and 29.78, respectively). In the EST-X group, acceptable hardness values were only achieved with 3-mm or thinner overlays, after 120 or 80 s curing time (VH 36.20 and 36.03, respectively). Curing time, restoration thickness, and overlay material significantly influenced the microhardness of the tested resin composites employed as luting agents. The clinician should carefully keep these factors under control.

  16. Effect of in-office bleaching agents on the color changes of stained ceromers and direct composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wenzhong; Jiang, Tao; Liang, Shanshan; Sa, Yue; Wang, Zhejun; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Yining

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of two in-office bleaching agents on the color changes of two ceromers (Ceramage and Adoro SR) and one direct composite resin (Gradia Direct Anterior) after staining by tea and coffee. Twenty-four disk-shaped specimens were fabricated for each resin material and randomly divided into three groups (n = 8). The specimens were immersed in tea, coffee or deionized water, respectively, for 7 days. Each group was then equally divided into two sub-groups (n = 4), which were subjected to two in-office bleaching agents (BEYOND and Opalescence Boost), respectively. The color of the specimens was measured by a spectrophotometer at baseline, after staining and after bleaching. The color differences (ΔE values) between baseline and after treatments were calculated. Statistical analysis indicated that the staining solution had significant influence on the color change of resin composites tested (p 2.0). There was no statistically significant difference between BEYOND and Opalescence Boost in stains removal from discolored resins (p = 0.550). The color changes in ΔE value between baseline and after bleaching were less than 2.0 for all resin composite groups. Tea solution produces severe discoloration of three resin composites tested. The two in-office bleaching agents can effectively remove the stains from two ceromers and one direct composite resin tested in this study.

  17. Bond strength between fiber posts and composite resin core: influence of temperature on silane coupling agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Simamotos Júnior, Paulo Cézar; Rontani, Regina Maria Puppin; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Soares, Carlos José

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of air drying temperature and different silane coupling agents on the bond strength between glass fiber posts and composite resin core. The post surface was cleaned with alcohol and treated with different silane coupling agents, being three prehydrolyzed silanes [Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE)] and one two-component silane [Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply)]. Two post-silanization air drying temperatures, 23ºC and 60ºC, were applied. A cylindrical plastic matrix was placed around the silanized post and filled with composite resin. Each bonded post provided 7 slices for push-out testing. Each slice was loaded to failure under compression at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Scott-Knott tests (α=0.05). Dunnett's test was used to compare the mean of the control group with that of each experimental group. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the interface of the fractured slices. For the 23ºC air drying temperature, the use of RelyX Ceramic Primer resulted in significantly lower bond strength than the other silane coupling agents, while the bond strength with Silane Coupling Agent was the highest of all groups. Only with Silane Coupling Agent, the bond strength for the 23ºC air drying temperature was significantly higher than that for 60ºC air drying. In conclusion, the use of warm air drying after silane application produced no increase in the bond strength between the fiber-reinforced composite post and the composite core. The two-component silane produced higher bond strength than all prehydrolyzed silanes when it was used with air drying at room temperature.

  18. Indirect composite restorations luted with two different procedures: A ten years follow up clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Alessandro; Vano, Michele; Derchi, Giacomo; Mangani, Francesco; Cerutti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate posterior indirect composite resin restoration ten years after placement luted with two different procedures. Study Design: In 23 patients 22 inlays/onlays (Group A) were luted using a dual-cured resin composite cement and 26 inlays/onlays (Group B) were luted using a light cured resin composite for a total of 48 Class I and Class II indirect composite resin inlays and onlays. The restorations were evaluated at 2 time points: 1) one week after placement (baseline evaluation) and 2) ten years after placement using the modified USPHS criteria. The Mann-Whitney and the Wilcoxon tests were used to examine the difference between the results of the baseline and 10 years evaluation for each criteria. Results: Numerical but not statistically significant differences were noted on any of the recorded clinical parameters (p>0.05) between the inlay/onlays of Group A and Group B. 91% and 94 % of Group A and B respectively were rated as clinically acceptable in all the evaluated criteria ten years after clinical function. Conclusions: Within the limits of the study the results showed after ten years of function a comparable clinical performance of indirect composite resin inlays/onlays placed with a light cure or dual cure luting procedures. Key words:Light curing composite, dual curing composite, indirect composite restoration, inlays/onlays, clinical trial. PMID:25810842

  19. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  20. Assessment and comparison of retention of zirconia copings luted with different cements onto zirconia and titanium abutments: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Neelima Sreekumar Menon; G P Surendra Kumar; K R Jnanadev; C L Satish Babu; Shilpa Shetty

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess and compare the retention of zirconia copings luted with different luting agents onto zirconia and titanium abutments. Materials and Methods: Titanium and zirconia abutments were torqued at 35 N/cm onto implant analogs. The samples were divided into two groups: Group A consisted of four titanium abutments and 32 zirconia copings and Group B consisted of four zirconia abutments and 32 zirconia copings and four luting agents were used. T...

  1. The role of the epoxy resin: Curing agent ratio in composite interfacial strength by single fibre microbond test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minty, Ross; Thomason, James L.; Petersen, Helga Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on an investigation into the role of the epoxy resin: curing agent ratio in composite interfacial shear strength of glass fibre composites. The procedure involved changing the percentage of curing agent (Triethylenetetramine [TETA]) used in the mixture with several different...... percentages used, ranging from 4% up to 30%, including the stoichiometric ratio. It was found by using the microbond test, that there may exist a relationship between the epoxy resin to curing agent ratio and the level of adhesion between the reinforcing fibre and the polymer matrix of the composite....

  2. Microleakage of adhesive and nonadhesive luting cements for stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Mesbahi, Maryam; Rezvani, Gita; Rahimi, Mehran

    2011-01-01

    This study's purpose was to compare the ability of 5 luting cements to reduce microleakage at stainless steel crown (SSC) margins on primary molar teeth. Standard preparations were performed on 100 extracted primary molar teeth for SSC restoration. After fitting SSCs, samples were randomly divided into 5 groups of 20 teeth each, which were cemented with nonadhesive cement consisting of polycarboxylate (PC) or zinc phosphate (ZP), or with adhesive cement consisting of glass ionomer (GIC), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), or RMGIC with a bonding agent (RMGIC+DBA). After aging and thermocycling, the specimens were placed in 1% methylene blue, sectioned, and evaluated under a digital microscope. The data were compared between groups with the t test, analysis of variance, and the least significant difference test. Microleakage with adhesive cements was significantly lower than with nonadhesive cements (Pcements were statistically significant at Pcement showed the greatest microleakage. Adhesive cements were more effective in reducing microleakage in stainless steel crowns than nonadhesive cements. Use of a bonding agent with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement yielded better results than using the latter alone.

  3. Meta-analysis of dragon’s blood resin extract as radio-protective agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subaika Mahmood

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In health sciences, much efforts had been made in past years to explore the radio-protective agents from natural resources due to rapid exposure of radiations to environment such as space traveling, radiotherapy and largely growing telecommunication industry. It becomes crucial to find natural sources for radio-protection. In correspondence, dragon’s blood (DB is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant that possesses great medicinal values due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. For a long time, DB has been used in treatment of blood stasis, inflammation, oxidative stress, immune suppression and tumors, but recently it has been extensively used as radio-protective agent. There is no comprehensive review on radio- protective characterization of DB resin extract in literature. In our review, an attempt has been made to highlight unique and inherent radio-protection in liver, brain, kidney, lung, spleen and cerebrum. This review will help people in exploring the radioactive protectants from natural resources.

  4. Marginal adaptation, fracture load and macroscopic failure mode of adhesively luted PMMA-based CAD/CAM inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Andreas; Bienz, Stefan; Mörmann, Werner; Mehl, Albert; Attin, Thomas; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate marginal adaptation, fracture load and failure types of CAD/CAM polymeric inlays. Standardized prepared human molars (48) were divided into four groups (n=12): (A) PCG (positive control group); adhesively luted glass-ceramic inlays, (B) TRX; CAD/CAM polymeric inlays luted using a self-adhesive resin cement, (C) TAC; CAD/CAM polymeric inlays luted using a conventional resin cement, and (D) NCG (negative control group); direct-filled resin-based composite restorations. All specimens were subjected to a chewing simulator. Before and after chewing fatigue, marginal adaptation was assessed at two interfaces: (1) between dental hard tissues and luting cement and (2) between luting cement and restoration. Thereafter, the specimens were loaded and the fracture loads, as well as the failure types, were determined. The data were analysed using three- and one-way ANOVA with post hoc Scheffé test, two sample Student's t-test (pinlays showed similar marginal adaptation and fracture load values compared to adhesively luted glass-ceramic inlays. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Retentive strength of luting cements for stainless steel crowns: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Priya; Kondae, Sapna; Gupta, Kamal Kishore

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the retentive strength of three luting cements. A total of forty five freshly extracted human primary molars were used in this study. The teeth were prepared to receive stainless steel crowns. They were then randomly divided into three groups, of fifteen teeth each, so as to receive the three different luting cements: conventional glass ionomer resin modified glass ionomer and adhesive resin. The teeth were then stored in artificial saliva for twenty four hours. The retentive strength of the crowns was determined by using a specially designed Instron Universal Testing Machine (Model 1011). The data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA to evaluate retentive strength for each cement and Tukey test for pair wise comparison. It was concluded that retentive strength of adhesive resin cement and resin modified glass ionomer cement was significantly higher than that of the conventional glass ionomer cement.

  6. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinde, James A. [Livermore, CA; Newey, Herbert A. [Lafayette, CA

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines of the formula ##STR1## wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzo methane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  7. DESENSITIZING BIOACTIVE AGENTS IMPROVES BOND STRENGTH OF INDIRECT RESIN-CEMENTED RESTORATIONS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires-De-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; de Marco, Fabíola Fiorezi; Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Panzeri, Heitor

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. Materials and Method: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5): Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply); Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®)+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita); Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer) cylinders (6x10mm) were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dualcure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply). After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37oC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC) with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence). Results: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05). Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05) than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. Conclusion: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems. PMID:19089114

  8. Desensitizing bioactive agents improves bond strength of indirect resin-cemented restorations: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5: Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply; Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita; Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer cylinders (6x10mm were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dual-cure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply. After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37ºC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence. RESULTS: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05. Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05 than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. CONCLUSION: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems.

  9. Effect of a home bleaching agent on the fracture toughness of resin composites, using short rod design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, R; Fani, M; Barfi Ghasrodashti, Ar; Nouri Yadkouri, N; Mousavi, Sm

    2014-06-01

    Resin composites are brittle materials and their major shortcomings are manifested in their sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been described, few studies are available on assessing the effect of bleaching agents on resin composites using the short rod design. To place various resin composites into distilled water at 37°C for 21 days and determine the effect of immersion time in distilled water, with and without exposure to 10% carbamide peroxide by employing short rod design fracture toughness test. Specimens were prepared from three resin composites; Rok (SDI), Esthet (Dentsply), and Estelite (Tokuyama). For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared using a custom-made mould. Specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups of 8 and conditioned in 37°C distilled water for either 24 hours, or 21 days. 21 day specimens were tested both with and without applying bleaching agent; Polanight (SDI). Study group specimens were bleached for 21 days, 2 hours a day. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The maximum load at specimen failure was recorded and the KIc (MPa. M (0.5)) was calculated. Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between material and time (ptest showed that after 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Rok revealed the highest KIc followed by Esthet and Estelite. The bleaching agent significantly improved the fracture toughness values of Esthet while it decreased that of Estelite. The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and distilled water. In comparison with Rok and Estelite, fracture toughness of Esthet was increased due to aging and application of bleaching agent.

  10. Resin penetration in artificial enamel carious lesions after using sodium hypochlorite as a deproteinization agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Ss; Bravo, P; Morales, R; Romero, A; Oyarzún, A

    2014-01-01

    To study the degree of penetration of an adhesive resin in artificial enamel carious lesions after using sodium hypochlorite as deproteinization agent. Twenty included human third-molars, extracted for surgical indication, were used. Artificial lesions were created in the buccal and lingual sides of each specimen through a cycle of demineralization-remineralization. Samples were then incubated in human saliva for 7 days at 37 ° C. After surface cleaning, lesions and the peripheral sound enamel were etched with 37% orthophosphoric acid for 20 seconds. One lesion of each specimen was treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for one minute. The other lesion of each specimen was used as a control. Experimental and control lesions were sealed with a fluid resin marked with Rhodamine B. Lesions were sectioned for microscopic observation by epifluorescence and polarized light. The images obtained were analyzed morphometrically. The micrometer measurements were made with ImageJ ® software. The level of significance was assessed at penamel carious lesions.

  11. Effect of curing agent type, cure treatment and organophilic clay on thermal properties of epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, A.S.C.; Araujo, C.J. de; Silva, S.M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of curing agent kind, curing conditions, and the incorporation of small amount of organoclay on the thermal properties of DGEBA epoxy resin was evaluated in order to develop an epoxy system for application as matrix in active composites (composites whose dispersed phase consists of shape memory alloy wires).The DGEBA resin was prepared using three amine derivatives as hardeners (TETA, DETA and DDS) under varied curing conditions, in the absence and presence of organoclay. Epoxy systems were characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis, optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. According to results, the cured epoxy systems at elevated temperatures (DETA and DDS) showed higher glass transition temperature (T g ) and thermal stability values than the system cured at low temperature (TETA). In addition, when the post-cure treatment was used, the increases were superior. When 1 phr of organoclay was incorporated in DETA and DDS cured epoxy systems and post-cured, either the increase in the T g or thermal stability values were more significant, especially for the system cured with DDS. Hence, the epoxy/DDS/organoclay system (exfoliated nanocomposite) is the most appropriate to be used as matrix in the preparation of active composites since this matrix is thermally stable in the Ni-Ti shape memory alloy working range whose phase transformation occurs between 70-80 deg C. (author)

  12. Marginal integrity of low-shrinkage and methacrylate-based composite resins: Effect of three different hemostatic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sahraneshin-Samani, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Background Moisture control is very important in restorative procedures in dentistry. Use of hemostatic agents helps control moisture; however, they might result in changes on enamel and dentin surfaces, affecting composite resin bond quality. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal microleakage of two different composite resins with the use of three different hemostatic agents. Material and Methods Standardized Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 48 premolars with cervical margins 1 mm apical to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). The samples were randomly divided into 8 groups. In groups 1 to 4, an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond) was applied as the bonding system, followed by exposure to different hemostatic agent: group 1: no hemostatic agent (control); group 2: ViscoStat; group 3: ViscoStat Clear; and group 4: trichloracetic acid, as hemostatic agents. The cavities were restored with Z-250 composite resin. In group 5 to 8 Silorane System Adhesive (Filtek P90 Adhesive) was applied as a bonding agent, followed by exposure to different hemostatic agents in a manner similar to that in groups 1to 4. The cavities were restored with Filtek P90, a low-shrinkage composite resin. The samples in each group were evaluated for dye penetration under a stereomicroscope at ×36 after 24 hours and a 500-round thermocycling procedure at enamel and dentin margins. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results Z-250 composite resin exhibited significantly higher dentin microleakage scores compared to Filtek P90 (P = 0.004). Trichloracetic acid increased dentin microleakage with Filtek P90 (P=0.033). Conclusions Under the limitations of this in vitro study, application of hemostatic agents did not affect microleakage of the two tested composite resins except for trichloracetic acid that increased marginal microleakage when used with Filtek P90. Key words

  13. Surface Hardness of Dental Composite Resin Restorations in Response to Preventive Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H

    2016-12-01

    To assess the impact of using preventive mouthwash agents on the surface hardness of various resins composites. Hundred specimens were prepared from five types of composite resin material in a Teflon mold. Five specimens from each type of restorative materials (Herculite XRV Ultra, Estelite Σ Quick, Z Hermack, Versa Comp Sultan, and Empress Direct IPS) were evaluated posttreatment with immersion in four types of preventive mouthwashes gels and rinses - group 1: Flocare gel (0.4% stannous fluoride), group 2: Pascal gel (topical APF fluoride), group 3: Pro-relief mouthwash (Na fluoride), and group 4: Plax Soin mouthwash (Na fluoride) - at 37°C in a dark glass container at 24, 48, and 72 hours. Surface hardness measurement was made for each tested material. Statistically, we analyzed the mean values with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test, with significance level of p surface hardness with the time elapsed (24, 48, and 72 hours) postimmersion in the preventive mouthwashes and gels except the Herculite XRV Ultra and Versa Comp Sultan materials. Flocare gel group showed increase in the surface hardness after 48 hours of immersion than the other periods and in Estelite Σ Quick after 72 hours. There was significant differences in all materials tested with the immersion in the preventive mouthwashes and gels, such as Flocare gel (0.4% stannous fluoride), Pro-relief mouthwash (Na fluoride), and Plax Soin mouthwash (Na fluoride) except Pascal gel (topical APF fluoride) (p > 0.05), at time intervals mentioned earlier (p surface hardness with the time elapse of immersion for all materials except the Flocare gel group, which contains 0.4% stannous fluoride as a preventive ingredient increases the surface hardness after 48 h for Herculite XRV Ultra and Versa Comp Sultan and Estelite Σ Quick after 72 hours. The preventive agents in the form of mouthwash and gel are used to prevent oral diseases that affect the surface hardness of composite resin, and this

  14. [Effect of amount of silane coupling agent on flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with aluminium borate whisker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming-yi; Zhang, Xiu-yin

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of amount of silane coupling agent on flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with aluminium borate whisker (ABW). ABW was surface-treated with 0%, 1%, 2%, 3% and 4% silan coupling agent (γ-MPS), and mixed with resin matrix to synthesize 5 groups of composite resins. After heat-cured at 120 degrees centigrade for 1 h, specimens were tested in three-point flexure to measure strength according to ISO-4049. One specimen was selected randomly from each group and observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The data was analyzed with SAS 9.2 software package. The flexural strength (117.93±11.9 Mpa) of the group treated with 2% silane coupling agent was the highest, and significantly different from that of the other 4 groups (α=0.01). The amount of silane coupling agent has impact on the flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with whiskers; The flexual strength will be reduced whenever the amount is higher or lower than the threshold. Supported by Research Fund of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (08DZ2271100).

  15. Evaluation Of The Shear Bond Strength Between Dentin And Dental Luting Cement Following Dentin Surface Treatment By 980 Nm Diode Laser And Desensitizing Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, T.; Gheith, M.

    2011-09-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is described clinically as an exaggerated response to non-noxious sensory stimuli. Current treatment is concentrating on two approaches; to occlude the dentinal tubules or to block neural transmission. This is achieved through using dentin desensitizers and low power lasers. Forty eight freshly extracted human molar teeth were used in this study and divided equally into three groups. Group 1) control group, group 2) laser treated dentin surface group, and group 3) desensitizing agent dentin surface group. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of laser treated group showed melted globules, no carbonization, recrystalization and crystal growth of the apatite in some areas. In diode laser dentin surface treated group showed the highest shear bond strength mean value.

  16. Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of Conventional Resin Cement and Self-adhesive Resin Cement bonded to Lithium Disilicate: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anip K; Mohan, Dennis; Sunith, M; Mandokar, Rashmi B; Suprasidh, S; Rajan, Soumya

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the shear bond strengths of conventional resin cement and self-adhesive resin cement bonded to lithium disilicate. A total of 40 extracted human molar teeth were mounted in self-cure acrylic resin. Teeth were prepared to obtain flat occlusal surface. About 40 lithium disilicate specimens of dimension-10 mm in diameter and thickness of 2 mm-were fabricated using lost wax technique. The samples were divided into four groups: Groups I, II, III, and IV (n = 10). The specimens were surface treated with Monobond S silane coupling agent. Self-etching primer and bonding agent were applied on the bonding surface of the teeth in groups I and III. The specimens were bonded to the primed teeth with the Multilink N resin cement and subjected to the universal testing machine. The specimens were light-cured. Specimens in groups II and IV were luted to teeth using self-adhesive cement RelyX U100. The same force was applied over the specimen as mentioned above. Excess cement was removed, and light curing was done. The specimens in groups III and IV were subjected to thermocycling for 10,000 cycles at temperatures altering between 5°C and 55°C. The shear bond strengths of conventional resin cement and self-adhesive resin cement with lithium disilicate were tested before and after thermocycling. Results indicated that thermocycling has no significant effect on the bond strengths of conventional or self-adhesive resin cement. However, from the study, it is seen that conventional resin cement had a higher shear bond strength value than the self-adhesive resin cement. There was a significant difference between the average shear bond strength values of conventional resin cement (Multilink N) and self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100) when bonded to lithium disilicate disks, and thermocycling had no significant effect on the bond strength of conventional or self-adhesive resin cements. Among all-ceramic systems available, lithium disilicate materials

  17. Adhesive performance of silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy and component metals bonded with organic sulfur-based priming agents and a tri-n-butylborane initiated luting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Miyuki; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Ishii, Takaya; Nakayama, Daisuke; Oba, Yusuke; Matsumura, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of thione-based metal priming agents on the adhesive behavior of a Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy and component metals bonded with an acrylic resin. Disk specimens (10 mm in diameter by 3 mm thick) were prepared from a silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au) alloy (Castwell M.C.12), high-purity silver, palladium, copper and gold. Four single-liquid priming agents containing organic sulfur compound (Alloy Primer, Metaltite, M.L. Primer and V-Primer) and three acidic priming agents (All Bond II Primer B, Estenia Opaque Primer and Super-Bond Liquid) were assessed. The metal specimens were flat-ground with abrasive papers, primed with one of the agents and bonded with a tri-n-butylborane initiated resin. The shear bond strengths were determined both before and after repeated thermocycling (5°C and 55°C, 1 min each, 20,000 cycles). The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure (p = 0.05 level). The post-thermocycling bond strengths in MPa (median; n = 11) associated with the Alloy Primer, Metaltite, M.L. Primer and V-Primer materials were, respectively, 20.8, 22.8, 17.8 and 18.4 for the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy; 19.6, 21.9, 14.4 and 20.1 for silver; 5.4, 4.5, 12.8 and 5.3 for palladium; 17.1, 19.2, 0.7 and 6.6 for copper; and 18.5, 17.7, 22.8 and 15.4 for gold. It can be concluded that the use of the four priming agents, which are based on organic sulfur compounds, effectively enhanced bonding to the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy and the component metals, although the bonding performance varied among the priming agents and metal elements. The priming agents appeared to have more of an effect on the alloy, silver and gold than on the palladium and copper.

  18. Effect of resin cements and aging on cuspal deflection and fracture resistance of teeth restored with composite resin inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaverry, Aurélio; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Burnett Júnior, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of resin cements and aging on cuspal deflection, fracture resistance, and mode of failure of endodontically treated teeth restored with composite resin inlays. Seventy-two maxillary premolars were divided into 6 groups: 1: sound teeth as control (C); 2: preparations without restoration (WR); 3: inlays luted with RelyX ARC (ARC); 4: inlays luted with RelyX Unicem (RLXU); 5: inlays luted with Maxcem Elite (MCE); 6: inlays luted with SeT (ST). Groups 2 to 6 received mesio-occlusal-distal preparations and endodontic treatment. Stone casts were made for groups 3 to 6. Composite resin inlays were built over each cast and luted with the resin cements. A 200-N load was applied on the occlusal aspect and the cuspal deflection was measured using a micrometer before and after 500,000 cycles of fatigue loading (200 N; 500,000 cycles). The specimens were then submitted to an axial load until failure. The median cuspal deflection (µm) and median fracture resistance (N) were calculated and statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (p inlays luted with RelyX ARC maintained cuspal deflection stability and showed higher fracture resistance of the teeth than did inlays luted with the other cements tested.

  19. Synthesis of a Novel Phosphorus-Containing Flame Retardant Curing Agent and Its Application in Epoxy Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongkun; Xu, Miaojun; Li, Bin

    2016-03-01

    A novel phosphorus-containing compound diphenyl-(2,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-phosphine oxide defined as DPDHPPO was synthesized and used as flame retardant and curing agent for epoxy resins (EP). The chemical structure was well characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, 1H, 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance. The flame retardant properties, combusting performances and thermal degradation behaviors of the cured epoxy resins were investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning tests (UL-94), cone calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests. The morphologies and chemical compositions of char residues for cured epoxy resins were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The water resistant properties were evaluated by putting the samples into distilled water at 70 degrees C for 168 h. The results revealed that the EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets successfully passed UL-94 V-0 flammability rating and the LOI value was as high as 31.9%. The cone tests results revealed that the incorporation of DPDHPPO efficiently reduced the combustion parameters of epoxy resins thermosets, such as heat release rate (HRR), total heat release (THR) and so on. The TGA results indicated that the introduction of DPDHPPO promoted epoxy resins matrix decomposed ahead of time compared with that of pure EP and led to a higher char yield and thermal stability at high temperature. The morphological structures and analysis of XPS of char residues revealed that DPDHPPO benefited to the formation of a sufficient, compact and homogeneous char layer with rich flame retardant elements on the epoxy resins materials surface during combustion. After water resistance tests, EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets still remained excellent flame retardancy, the moisture absorption of epoxy resins thermosets decreased with the increase of DPDHPPO contents in the thermosets due to the existing

  20. Long-term bond of glass ceramic and resin cement: evaluation of titanium tetrafluoride as an alternative etching agent for lithium disilicate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosa, Karsten; Boesch, Ineke; Kern, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate in vitro the effect of using titanium tetrafluoride as an alternative etchant prior to the silanization of the bonding surface on the long-term resin bond strength to lithium disilicate ceramic. Disk-shaped specimens made of lithium disilicate ceramic were ground with abrasive paper, then etched with aqueous solutions (2.5% and 5%) of titanium tetrafluoride for 60 s, 120 s and 240 s. Positive control specimens were etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid for 20 s and negative control specimens were not etched. Afterwards, bonding surfaces of all specimens were silanized. Plexiglas tubes filled with a composite resin were bonded to the specimens using an alignment apparatus and a composite luting resin. After storage in 37°C tap water for three days (n = 8) and after storage in 37°C tap water for 150 days interrupted by 5 x 7500 thermal cycles (n = 8), tensile bond strength (TBS) was measured in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. After artificial aging, all specimens etched with titanium tetrafluoride debonded spontaneously resulting in a TBS of 0 MPa. Therefore, statistical analysis revealed a highly significant difference between the positive control and the test groups after 150 days storage. Etching the bonding surface of lithium disilicate ceramic restorations with hydrofluoric acid is still a "gold standard" and cannot be replaced by titanium tetrafluoride.

  1. Resin elasticity and the strengthening of all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, O; Marquis, P M; Fleming, G J P

    2007-06-01

    Resin luting of all-ceramic restorations results in increased performance; however, the strengthening mechanism and the role of the mechanical properties of the resin are not fully understood. The hypothesis tested is that ceramic strength enhancement is dependent on the elastic modulus of the resin. Three-point flexural moduli of a flowable, luting, and hybrid composite resin were characterized. Two hundred forty porcelain discs were air-abraded. One group acted as a control, and 3 additional groups were coated with 120 +/- 20 microm of each resin prior to bi-axial flexure testing. All resins significantly increased in mean strength, and the associated strength increase was related to the elastic modulus of the resin (R(2) = 0.9885), so the hypothesis was accepted. The combination of Poisson constraint and the creation of a resin-inter-penetrating layer sensitive to the elastic modulus of the resin may provide an explanation of the strengthening mechanism.

  2. Preparation of polymer nanocomposite materials based on unsaturated polyester resin and nanosilica A200. Part II - Structural and properties of polymer nanocomposite materials based on unsaturated polyester resin and nanosilica A200 with coupling agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh Minh Dat; Bui Chuong; Bach Trong Phuc; Dinh Van Kai; Luu Van Khue

    2012-01-01

    Effects of coupling agent on the structures and properties of nanocomposite materials based on unsaturated polyester resin and A200 silica nanoparticles were investigated. The viscosity of the resin/A200 silica mixtures increased with increasing coupling agent content because of forming core-shell structures and the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites generally were better than those without coupling agent and appeared a maximum in mechanical properties at 4.0 wt% coupling agent content. IR analyze indicated that the coupling agent had reacted with unsaturated polyester resin and A200 silica nanoparticles. SEM, Fe-SEM and TG-SDC demonstrated more homogeneous dispersion of A200 silica nanoparticles in the polymer matrix and accompanied by lower glass transition temperature and melt temperature. Furthermore, it was also found that the best dispersion route involved a methanol dispersion technique. (author)

  3. Halohydrination of epoxy resins using sodium halides as cationizing agents in MALDI-MS and DIOS-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takehiro; Kawasaki, Hideya; Kimoto, Takashi; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2008-12-01

    Halohydrination of epoxy resins using sodium halides as cationizing agents in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and desorption ionization on porous silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) were investigated. Different mass spectra were observed when NaClO(4) and NaI were used as the cationizing agents at the highest concentration of 10.0 mM, which is much higher than that normally used in MALDI-MS. MALDI mass spectra of epoxy resins using NaI revealed iodohydrination to occur as epoxy functions of the polymers. The halohydrination also occurred using NaBr, but not NaCl, due to the differences in their nucleophilicities. On the basis of the results of experiments using deuterated CD(3)OD as the solvent, the hydrogen atom source was probably ambient water or residual solvent, rather than being derived from matrices. Halohydrination also occurred with DIOS-MS in which no organic matrix was used; in addition, reduction of epoxy functions was observed with DIOS. NaI is a useful cationizing agent for changing the chemical form of epoxy resins due to iodohydrination and, thus, for identifying the presence of epoxy functions. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The effect of home bleaching agents on the surface roughness of five different composite resins: A SEM evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Esra; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Ulusoy, Nuran; Deniz, Sule Tugba; Yuksel-Devrim, Ece

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) and carbamide peroxide (CP) on the surface roughness of five different composite resins using profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thirty-six specimens (1 mm thick, 10 mm in diameter) of five composite resins were fabricated. Each composite group was equally divided into three subgroups as control, CP and HP. In control group, specimens were stored in daily refreshed distilled water during the 14-day testing period. In other groups, 10% HP (Opalescence Treswhite) and 10% CP (Opalescence PF) were applied and surface roughness values (Ra) of each specimen were measured with a profilometer at the end of 14 days. Additionally, SEM analysis was performed to evaluate the surface deformations of composite resins. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Ra values of composite groups exposed to bleaching agents were statistically higher than control group (p composite group while SEM micrographs showed higher surface alterations at HP group compared to CP. Among the composite resins tested, Ceram-X Mono revealed the lowest Ra values after CP and HP applications as seen at SEM images. Home bleaching agents increased the surface roughness of all composites. Except CP applied Ceram-X mono specimens, Ra values of all composite resins evaluated in this study exceeded the critical limit of 0.2 μm. Ceram-X mono was the least affected composite material after bleaching application. SCANNING 38:277-283, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Bond strength of a dental leucite-based glass ceramic to a resin cement using different silane coupling agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Keshvad, Alireza; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Zamani, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of different types of novel silane coupling agents with two concentrations on the micro-tensile bond strength of a dental glass ceramic with leucite crystals to a dual-cured resin cement using an optimized method of silane application. Leucite-reinforced feldspathic ceramic blocks were fabricated, wet ground and cleansed. The bonding ceramic surfaces were treated with different organosilane solutions as follows: Control silane: Monobond S; methacryloxypropyltrimethoxy silane and experimental silanes with two concentrations (1.0 and 2.5 vol%): amino, isocyanate, styryl, and acrylate silanes. The silane application method consisted of brush application, hot air drying followed by rinsing with hot water and drying. Then a thin layer of an unfilled resin and a dual-cured resin cement was light-cured on the ceramic surfaces. The resin-ceramic blocks were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and sectioned to produce beam specimens (n=17) with a 1.0 mm(2) cross-sectional area. Specimens were then subjected to thermocycling and tested in a micro-tensile tester device. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tamhane post-hoc test. The mean micro-tensile bond strength value for the styryl silane was significantly higher (P0.05). The micro-tensile bond strength of the leucite-based dental glass ceramic to a resin cement was affected by the type of silane coupling agent and not by the concentration of silane solutions. The best bond strength overall was achieved by methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane and experimental styryl silane solutions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Improving Gold Recovery from Artificial Preg-Robbing Ore by Pre-treatment using Blinding Agent and Resin-in-Leach

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Zaki Mubarok; Prasetyo Sandha Irianto

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, the effectiveness of the use of blinding agents, ionic exchanger resins and the combination of them in improving gold extraction from simulated preg-robbing ore is discussed. The blinding agents used were kerosene, diesel oil and pine oil, while the ion exchange resins used were Lewatit Monoplus MP 800, Lewatit AF 5 and guanidine. Preg-robbing conditions were simulated by blending fine activated carbon with ore sample. The investigation results show that the presence of ...

  7. Evaluation of Compressive Strength and Sorption/Solubility of Four Luting Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ms, Tavangar; D, Jafarpur; R, Bagheri

    2017-06-01

    Compressive strength (CS) and sorption/solubility of the luting cements are two associated factors. Searching a correlation between sorption/solubility and compressive strength of various luting cements is required. To measure the water sorption/solubility, and compressive strength of three resin-based and one conventional glass ionomer (CGI) luting cement after 1 and 24 h of immersion in distilled water and to determine if there is any correlation between those properties found. Four luting cements were investigated. For each material, 10 disc shaped specimens were prepared for measuring the sorption/solubility. The specimens were cured according to the manufacturer's instructions, and the sorption/solubility were measured in accordance with the ISO 4049's. For testing the compression strength, for each material 16 cylindrical specimens were prepared by insertion of cements into a stainless steel split mould. The specimens were cured, divided into groups of 8, and then stored in distilled water at (37 ± 1)°C for 1 and 24 h. The test was performed using the universal testing machine, the maximum load was recorded and CS was calculated. The data were analysed using SPSS software version 18. One-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey's test and Pearson's correlation coefficient were performed. G-CEM had the highest mean CS (153.60± 25.15) and CGI luting had the lowest CS (21.36±5.37) ( p 0.05). The lowest mean sorption/solubility value was for RelyX TM U200 and Panavia F, and the highest for CGI luting (all p compressive strength of all cements did not necessarily increase after 24 h and varied depending on the materials. There was a strong reverse correlation between sorption and CS values after both 1 and 24 h immersion. It may be practical for clinician to use those cements with the less sorption / solubility and more stable compression strength over time.

  8. Tensile bond strength of composite luting cements to metal alloys after various surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denizoglu Saip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the effects of two different surface treatments and bonding agents on tensile bond strength between a Co-Cr and a Ni-Cr cast alloy and two resin-luting cements. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty alloy samples were cast and subjected to surface treatments such as sandblasting, chemical etching, and sandblasting plus chemical etching. Panavia F and CandB cement were used as cementing mediums. The etching qualities were examined by a stereooptic microscope. Failure surfaces were examined throughout scanning electron microscopy. The data were evaluated using statistical methods, namely analysis of variance and multiple comparison test (Tukey HSD. Results: Significant differences were found in the bonding provided by the various cements (P < 0.001 and also type of surface treatments (P < 0.001. For all groups, sandblasted surfaces showed the highest bond strength values. There was no significant difference between the Cr-Co and the Cr-Ni alloys (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Panavia F showed higher tensile strength and the sandblasted samples possessed higher tensile strength.

  9. Preparation of hyperbranched poly (amidoamine)-grafted graphene nanolayers as a composite and curing agent for epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour-Mahmoudalilou, Meysam; Roghani-Mamaqani, Hossein; Azimi, Reza; Abdollahi, Amin

    2018-01-01

    Thermal properties of epoxy resin were improved by preparation of a curing agent of poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-grafted graphene oxide (GO). Hyperbranched PAMAM-modified GO (GD) was prepared by a divergent dendrimer synthesis methodology. Modification of GO with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), Michael addition of methacrylic acid, and amidation reaction with ethylenediamine results in the curing agent of GD. Then, epoxy resin was cured in the presence of different amounts of GD and the final products were compared with ethylenediamine-cured epoxy resin (E) in their thermal degradation temperature and char contents. Functionalization of GO with APTES and hyperbranched dendrimer formation at the surface of GO were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results. TGA results showed that the weight loss associated with chemical moieties in GONH2, GOMA, and GD is estimated to be 10.1, 12.2, and 14.1%, respectively. Covalent attachment of dendrimer at the surface of GO increases its thermal stability. TGA also showed that decomposition temperature and char content are higher for composites compared with E. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies show that flat and smooth graphene nanolayers are wrinkled in GO and re-stacking and flattening of nanolayers is observed in GD.

  10. The Role of Home Bleaching Agent on the Fracture Toughness of Resin Composites Using Four-Point Bending Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazvini Ferooz M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Resin composites are a common type of tooth coloured restorative materials. These materials are brittle and their major shortcomings are sensitivity to flaws and defects, low tensile strength, and susceptibility to catastrophic failure.The role of home bleaching agents on the fracture toughness of resin composites using four-point bending test is scanty. Objectives: To compare the fracture toughness (KIc of resin composites on a fourpoint bending test and to assess the effect of distilled water and a home bleaching agent on the resistance of the materials to fracture. Materials and Methods: seventy-two bar-shaped specimens were prepared from three materials: Rok (SDI, Estelite (Tokuyama, and Vit-l-escence (Ultradent and divided into three groups. Two groups were assigned as “control” and conditioned in distilled water at 37oC for 24 hours or 21 days, respectively. The specimens in the third group (treatment were stored in distilled water for 21 days and bleached using Polanight (SDI for 2 hours daily. For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared and after each time interval loaded in a four-point bending test using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/m. The maximum load to specimen failure was recorded and the KIc was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between materials and treatment (P<0.05. Tukey’s test showed that after 24 hours of immersion in distilled water, KIc was not significantly different between materials; Rok revealed the highest value followed by Estelite and Vit-l-escence. The bleaching agent significantly decreased the KIc values of Estelite and Rok while it did not affect that of Vita-l-escence. Immersion in distilled water for all resin composites caused a significant decrease in KIc. Conclusion: The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and 21day

  11. Bonding of Resin Cement to Zirconia with High Pressure Primer Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-jie; Jiao, Kai; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Li-juan; Fang, Ming; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiang; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of air-drying pressure during ceramic primer coating on zirconia/resin bonding and the surface characteristics of the primed zirconia. Methods Two ceramic primers (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, CCP, Kuraray Medical Inc. and Z-Prime Plus, ZPP, Bisco Inc.) were applied on the surface of air-abraded zirconia (Katana zirconia, Noritake) and dried at 4 different air pressures (0.1–0.4 MPa). The primed zirconia ceramic specimens were bonded with a resin-based luting agent (SA Luting Cement, Kuraray). Micro-shear bond strengths of the bonded specimens were tested after 3 days of water storage or 5,000× thermocycling (n = 12). Failure modes of the fractured specimens were examined with scanning electron miscopy. The effects of air pressure on the thickness of the primer layers and the surface roughness (Sa) of primed zirconia were evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry (n = 6), optical profilometry and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (n = 6), respectively. Results Clearfil Ceramic Primer air-dried at 0.3 and 0.4 MPa, yielding significantly higher µSBS than gentle air-drying subgroups (pzirconia bond strength and durability significantly. Higher air-drying pressure (0.3-0.4 MPa) for CCP and intermediate pressure (0.2 MPa) for ZPP are recommended to produce strong, durable bonds between resin cement and zirconia ceramics. PMID:24992678

  12. Immobilization of simulated reducing agent at the surface of SiO2 fillers in dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Satoki; Hirata, Isao; Nomura, Yuji; Shirai, Kenichi; Fujitani, Morioki; Shintani, Hideaki; Okazaki, Masayuki

    2007-07-01

    To reduce the leachability of reducing agents from composite resins, immobilization of a simulated reducing agent at the surface of SiO2 fillers was examined. SiO2 plates were immersed in 2% 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane/ethanol solution, and then immersed in dimethyl sulfoxide with 0.25 wt% 4-dimethyl amino benzoic acid (DMABA), 2.0 wt% 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, and 0.5 wt% N-hydroxysuccinimide. Wide-scan spectrum of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy did not detect carbon contamination. However, narrow scan detected an O=C-N peak at 399.8 eV, suggesting that DMABA could be immobilized on silane-coupled SiO2 plates. Further, surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated the adsorption of MMA at the surface of reducing agent-immobilized plate.

  13. Effect of the amount of 3-methacyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent on physical properties of dental resin nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Karabela, Maria M

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the amount of 3-methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (gamma-MPS) coupling agent on some physical-mechanical properties of an experimental resin composite for understanding the optimum amount of silanization. Silica nanoparticles (Aerosil OX 50) used as filler were silanized with 5 different amounts of gamma-MPS 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 wt% relative to silica. The silanizated silica nanoparticles were identified by FT-IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Then the silanized nanoparticles (60 wt%) were mixed with a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 wt/wt) matrix. Degree of conversion of light cured composites was determined by FT-IR analysis. The static flexural strength and flexural modulus were measured using a three-point bending set up. The dynamic thermomechanical properties were determined by DMA analyzer. Sorption, solubility and volumetric change were determined after storage of composites in water or ethanol/water solution. Thermogravimetric analysis was performed in air and in nitrogen atmosphere from 50 to 800 degrees C. At lower silane amounts used (1.0, 2.5 wt%) the silane molecules must have a parallel orientation relative to the silica surface. At higher silane amounts (>2.5 wt%) silane molecules form a layer around the filler particles which now have to occupy a random, parallel and perpendicularly orientation relative to the silica surface. No significant statistic difference was found to exist between the flexural strength and flexural modulus values of composites with different silane contents. Dynamic elastic modulus E' showed a maximum value for the composite contained 5 wt% silane. The composites with the higher amounts of silane showed the lower values for the tandelta at the T(g) revealing that these composites have better interfacial adhesion between filler and matrix. The amount of silane used for the silanization of silica particles affect the orientation of the silane molecules

  14. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of historical varnishes of ancient Italian lutes and violin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echard, J P; Benoit, C; Peris-Vicente, J; Malecki, V; Gimeno-Adelantado, J V; Vaiedelich, S

    2007-02-12

    The organic constituents of historical vanishes from two ancient Italian lutes and a Stradivari violin, kept in the Musée de la musique in Paris, have been characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results have been compared with the chromatograms and mass spectra of recent as well as old naturally aged reference materials. The three historical varnishes analyzed have been shown to be oil varnishes, probably mixtures of linseed oil with resins. Identification of diterpenoids and triterpenoids compounds, and of the resins that may have been ingredients of the varnishes, are discussed in this paper.

  15. Shear bond strength of dual-cured and self-cured resin composites to dentin using different bonding agents and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leevailoj, C; Ua-wutthikrerk, P; Poolthong, S

    2007-01-01

    This study determined the effects of bonding agents on the shear bond strength of dual- and self-cured resin composites to dentin. Two light-cured dentin bonding agents (Excite and One-Step) and a dual-cured bonding agent (Excite DSC) were compared. Light activation of the bonding agents prior to placement of the resin composites was also evaluated. This in vitro study was performed on 120 extracted non-carious human third molars. The occlusal part of the crowns was removed to expose a flat dentin surface. The teeth were then randomly divided into three major groups for Excite, One-Step and Excite DSC as bonding agents. The specimens in each adhesive group were divided into four subgroups: with and without light activation of the bonding agent and with dual-cured (Luxacore Dualcure, DMG, Hamburg, Germany) or light-cured resin (Luxacore, DMG, Hamburg, Germany) composites. After placing the restorations, the specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours before being tested for shear bond strength on an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results showed that the shear bond strength of dual-cured resin composite to dentin was significantly higher than that of self-cured resin composite (p = 0.017). Light activation of the bonding agents prior to applying the resin composites led to a significantly higher shear bond strength of the resin composites to dentin, compared to no light activation (p < 0.05).

  16. Effects of erosive challenge on the morphology and surface properties of luting cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenna Louise Cavalcanti GONDIM

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Few studies investigated the surface properties of luting cements after erosive challenge. Objective To evaluate the surface roughness (Ra, Vickers hardness (VHN and morphology of 4 luting cements after erosive challenge. Material and method Twenty specimens of each cement were prepared (4×2mm and divided into experimental (erosive challenge and control (artificial saliva groups (n=10: Rely X U200 (U200; Rely X ARC (ARC; Ketac Cem Easy Mix (Ketac and Zinc phosphate (ZnP. The erosive challenge was performed by four daily erosive cycles (90s in a cola drink and 2 h in artificial saliva over 7 days. Ra and VHN readings were performed before and after erosion. The percentage of hardness loss (%VHN was obtained after erosion. The surface morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. ANOVA, Tukey and Student-T tests were used (α=0.05. Result After erosion, all luting cements had increase in Ra values and U200 and ZnP groups had the highest %VHN. After saliva immersion, only U200 and ZnP groups had significant increases in Ra values and there were no significant differences among the groups in %VHN. SEM analysis showed that Ketac and ZnP groups had rough and porous surfaces, and U200 group had higher resin matrix degradation than ARC group. Conclusion Erosive challenge with a cola drink affected the surface properties of all luting cements.

  17. Comparison of Flexural Strength of Resin Cements After Storing in Different Media and Bleaching Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geramipanah, Farideh; Rezaei, Susan Mir Mohammad; Jafary, Maryam; Sadighpour, Leyla

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different storage media and bleaching treatments on the flexural strength of two resin cements (Panavia and BisCem). One hundred rectangular-shaped specimens were prepared with two resin cements and were stored in five media types (n = 10): distilled water (DW), lactic acid (LA), sodium hydroxide (NH), in-office bleaching (OB) and home bleaching (HB). There was significant interaction between the solutions and cements (p except Panavia in OB) (p exception of in-office bleaching.

  18. Analysis by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) of the gamma radiation effect on epoxy resin, used as solidification agent of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.H.; Riella, H.G.; Guedes, S.M.L.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on Epoxy resin, used as solidification agent of radioactive wastes, were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). The spectra showed no significant modifications on Epoxy resin functional groups (irradiated with dose from 0 to 1 MGy). Up to 1 MGy Epoxy resin did not oxidize, confirming the Epoxy good radiation strength. The presence of aromatic chain and amine group, mainly tertiary amine, give good radiolytic stability to the Epoxy, increasing the interest to use this material in nuclear facilities. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs

  19. The effect of temperature on compressive and tensile strengths of commonly used luting cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Suneel G; Sajjan, Mc Suresh; Patil, Rekha

    2015-02-01

    The luting cements must withstand masticatory and parafunctional stresses in the warm and wet oral environment. Mouth temperature and the temperature of the ingested foods may induce thermal variation and plastic deformation within the cements and might affect the strength properties. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of temperature on the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of two polycarboxylate, a conventional glass ionomer and a resin modified glass ionomer luting cements and, to compare the compressive strength and the diametral tensile strength of the selected luting cements at varying temperatures. In this study, standardized specimens were prepared. The temperature of the specimens was regulated prior to testing them using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Six specimens each were tested at 23°C, 37°C and 50°C for both the compressive and diametral tensile strengths, for all the luting cements. All the luting cements showed a marginal reduction in their compressive and diametral tensile strengths at raised temperatures. Fuji Plus was strongest in compression, followed by Fuji I > Poly F > Liv Carbo. Fuji Plus had the highest diametral tensile strength values, followed by Poly F = Fuji I = Liv Carbo, at all temperatures. An increase in the temperature caused no significant reduction in the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the cements evaluated. The compressive strength of the luting cements differed significantly from one another at all temperatures. The diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomers differed considerably from the other cements, whereas there was no significant difference between the other cements, at all the temperatures.

  20. Preparation of carbon fiber unsaturated sizing agent for enhancing interfacial strength of carbon fiber/vinyl ester resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Weiwei; Cai, Yemeng; Liu, Wenbo; Yang, Fan; Jiang, Long; Jiao, Weicheng; Wang, Rongguo

    2018-05-01

    The practical application of carbon fiber (CF) reinforced vinyl ester resin (VE) composite was hampered seriously by the poor interfacial adhesion property. In this work, a novel unsaturated sizing agent was designed and prepared to improve the interfacial strength by covalently bonding CF with VE matrix. The main component of the sizing agent, N-(4‧4-diaminodiphenyl methane)-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (DMHM), was synthesized and confirmed by FTIR and NMR. XPS results of sized carbon fiber (SCF) showed that DMHM has adhered to desized fiber surface and reacted with some active functional groups on the surface. The SCF was characterized by high surface roughness and surface energy (especially the polar component), which means better wettability by VE. As a result, the interface shear strength and interlaminar shear strength of SCF/VE composite were enhanced by 96.56% and 66.07% respectively compared with CF/VE composite, benefited mainly from the strong and tough interphase.

  1. Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Luting Cements to Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Abo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to compare the bond strengths of the self-adhesive luting cements between ceramics and resin cores and examine their relation to the cement thickness. Three self-adhesive luting cements (Smartcem, Maxcem, and G-CEM and a resin cement (Panavia F 2.0 for control were used in the paper. The thickness of the cements was controlled in approximately 25, 50, 100, or 200 μm. Each 10 specimens were made according to the manufacturers’ instructions and stored in water at 37°C. After 24 hours, microtensile bond strength (μTBS was measured. There were significant differences in cements. Three self-adhesive cements showed significantly lower μTBSs than control that required both etching and priming before cementation (Tukey, <0.05. The cement thickness of 50 or 100 μm tended to induce the highest μTBSs for each self-adhesive luting cements though no difference was found.

  2. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sheen Juneja; Arora, Aman; Upadhyaya, Viram; Jain, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    Background or Statement of Problem: As, the longevity of provisional restorations is related to, a perfect adaptation and a strong, long-term union between restoration and teeth structures, therefore, evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional restorative materials luted with cements using the standardized procedures is essential. Aims and Objectives: To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from Autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and bisphenol A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BIS-GMA) resin crowns. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and BIS-GMA resin crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin (SC-10) crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from BIS-GMA resin crowns (Protemp 4) cemented with different temporary luting cements. Methodology: Freshly extracted 60 maxillary premolars of approximately similar dimensions were mounted in dental plaster. Tooth reduction with shoulder margin was planned to use a customized handpiece-holding jig. Provisional crowns were prepared using the wax pattern fabricated from computer aided designing/computer aided manufacturing milling machine following the tooth preparation. Sixty provisional crowns were made, thirty each of SC-10 and Protemp 4 and were then cemented with three different luting cements. Specimens were thermocycled, submerged in a 2% methylene blue solution, then sectioned and observed under a stereomicroscope for the evaluation of marginal microleakage. A five-level scale was used to score dye penetration in the tooth/cement interface and the results of this study was analyzed using the Chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, Kruskal–Wallis H-test and the results were statistically significant P crowns

  3. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sheen Juneja; Arora, Aman; Upadhyaya, Viram; Jain, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    As, the longevity of provisional restorations is related to, a perfect adaptation and a strong, long-term union between restoration and teeth structures, therefore, evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional restorative materials luted with cements using the standardized procedures is essential. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from Autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and bisphenol A-glycidyl dimethacrylate (BIS-GMA) resin crowns. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and BIS-GMA resin crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from autopolymerizing acrylic resin (SC-10) crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements. To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from BIS-GMA resin crowns (Protemp 4) cemented with different temporary luting cements. Freshly extracted 60 maxillary premolars of approximately similar dimensions were mounted in dental plaster. Tooth reduction with shoulder margin was planned to use a customized handpiece-holding jig. Provisional crowns were prepared using the wax pattern fabricated from computer aided designing/computer aided manufacturing milling machine following the tooth preparation. Sixty provisional crowns were made, thirty each of SC-10 and Protemp 4 and were then cemented with three different luting cements. Specimens were thermocycled, submerged in a 2% methylene blue solution, then sectioned and observed under a stereomicroscope for the evaluation of marginal microleakage. A five-level scale was used to score dye penetration in the tooth/cement interface and the results of this study was analyzed using the Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis H-test and the results were statistically significant P provisional crowns cemented with three different luting cements along the axial walls of

  4. Retention of gold alloy crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Lilliam M; Frey, Gary N; Winkler, Mark M; Tate, William H; Burgess, John O; Powers, John M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure in vitro retention of cast gold crowns cemented with traditional and resin cements. Forty-eight human molars were prepared on a lathe to produce complete crown preparations with a consistent taper and split into six groups, eight crowns in each group. Crowns were cast in a high-gold alloy and then cemented. After 24 hours, the retention force (N) was recorded and mean values were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Fisher post-hoc least significant difference (PLSD) multiple comparisons test (a = .05). Failure sites were examined under 3100 magnification and recorded. Mean values (SD) for each group in increasing order of retention force were: Harvard Cement: 43 N (27), TempoCem: 59 N (16), PermaCem Dual: 130 N (42), RelyX Luting Cement: 279 N (26), Contax and PermaCem Dual: 286 N (38), and TempoCem with Contax and PermaCem Dual: 340 N (14). The Fisher PLSD interval (P = .05) for comparing cements was 29 N. Zinc-phosphate cement and provisional resin cements had the lowest retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent and the hybrid-ionomer cement had similar retention forces. Resin cement with a bonding agent applied after use of a provisional resin cement had a significantly higher retention force than the other cements tested.

  5. Effect of thermocycling on the bond strength of a glass-infiltrated ceramic and a resin luting cement Efeito da ciclagem térmica sobre a resistência de união entre uma cerâmica infiltrada com vidro e um cimento resinoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Daniel Andreatta Filho

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of thermocycling on the bond strength between the surface of the glass-infiltrated alumina ceramic In-Ceram (VITA and the Panavia F resin cement (Kuraray CO.. Four 5x6x6mm In-Ceram blocks were obtained. One of the 6x6mm faces of each block was conditioned with Cojet - System (tribochemical silica coating, ESPE-3M and then luted under a constant 750g pressure with Panavia F cement to another identical face of a resin composit block (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray obtained by reproduction of the ceramic one from Express (3M addition curing silicone impressions. The four sets so formed by ceramic, luting cement and resin have been each one serially sectioned in 20 sticks so that the adhesive surface in each presented 1mm² of area. The samples were divided in 2 groups (n=10: G1- stored for 7 days in deionized water at 36 ± 2ºC; G2 - thermocycled 1500 times between 5 and 55ºC dwell times. The microtensile tests were accomplished in an universal testing machine (EMIC at a crosshead speed of 0,5 mm/min. The results showed that the mean tensile bond strength values (MPa for the group G2: (22,815 ± 5,254 had not statistically differ of the values of group G1: (25,628 ± 3,353 (t = 1,427; gl = 18; p-value = 0,171, at the level of a= 5%. It can be concluded that the thermocycling technique used in the present experiment had not produced statistically significant differences between the bond strength results of the specimens obtained by the two used techniques.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito da ciclagem térmica sobre a resistência de adesão entre a superfície da cerâmica In-Ceram Alumina (VITA e o cimento resinoso Panavia F (Kuraray. Foram confeccionados quatro blocos de cerâmica In-Ceram com dimensões de 5x6x6mm. Uma das faces com 6x6mm de cada bloco cerâmico, após condicionamento com o sistema Cojet (ESPE-3M (jateamento com óxido de alumínio/jateamento com óxido de s

  6. Effects of tributylborane-activated adhesive and two silane agents on bonding computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Ayano; Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of an experimental adhesive agent [methyl methacrylate-tributylborane liquid (MT)] and two adhesive agents containing silane on the bonding between a resin composite block of a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and a light-curing resin composite veneering material. The surfaces of CAD/CAM resin composite specimens were ground with silicon-carbide paper, treated with phosphoric acid, and then primed with either one of the two silane agents [Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SC) and GC Ceramic Primer II (GC)], no adhesive control (Cont), or one of three combinations (MT/SC, MT/GC, and MT/Cont). A light-curing resin composite was veneered on the primed CAD/CAM resin composite surface. The veneered specimens were subjected to thermocycling between 4 and 60 °C for 10,000 cycles, and the shear bond strengths were determined. All data were analyzed using analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey-Kramer HSD test (α = 0.05, n = 8). MT/SC (38.7 MPa) exhibited the highest mean bond strengths, followed by MT/GC (30.4 MPa), SC (27.9 MPa), and MT/Cont (25.7 MPa), while Cont (12.9 MPa) and GC (12.3 MPa) resulted in the lowest bond strengths. The use of MT in conjunction with a silane agent significantly improved the bond strength. Surface treatment with appropriate adhesive agents was confirmed as a prerequisite for veneering CAD/CAM resin composite restorations.

  7. Epoxy Resin Modified Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agent Sulfur Mustard Vapor Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra BUNKAR

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An epoxy resin polymer coated quartz crystal microbalance (PC-QCM is used for detection of sulfur mustard vapor (SM. When SM vapor is exposed to PC-QCM sensor frequency shift is observed. The response of the sensor in ambient condition is 554 Hz with ±10 % variation upon exposure of 155 ppm of the SM concentration. The observed response loss is nearly 40 % over the period of 15 months. The response of the sensor is higher for SM than compare to structurally similar chloroethyl ether (CEE and other interferences.

  8. Scanning electron microscopic study of teeth restored with fiber posts and composite resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Sridhara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the thickness of resin dentin interface zones (RDIZ obtained by luting carbon fiber post to intra-radicular dentin, either with All-Bond 2 bonding agent and C and B composite cement or Panavia F dentin-bonding system and Panavia F resin cement. Materials and Methods: Twenty single rooted mandibular premolars of similar sizes were prepared for the carbon fiber post after biomechanical preparation and obturation. They were divided into two groups, Group 1 and 2 of 10 samples each. Carbon fiber posts used for Group 1 samples were luted using All-Bond 2 and C and B cement. For Group 2 carbon fiber posts were luted using Panavia F dentin-bonding system and Panavia F resin cement. All the 20 samples were sectioned longitudinally and marked at three points on the length of the tooth from the dentin-core interface to the apex at 2 mm, 5 mm, and 8 mm to get coronal, middle, and apical areas, respectively. The formation and thickness (width of the RDIZ at the marked areas was evaluated by scanning electron microscope using ×1000 magnification. The results were statistical analyzed. Results: Irrespective of the adhesive systems used all specimens showed a RDIZ formation. Microscopic examination of Group 1 showed significantly higher percentage of RDIZ (P < 0.05 than Group 2. RDIZ morphology was easily detectable at coronal and middle areas of all specimens. Conclusion: All-Bond 2 showed denser and wider RDIZ compared with the Panavia F.

  9. Effects of benzoxazine resin on property enhancement of shape memory epoxy: A dual function of benzoxazine resin as a curing agent and a stable network segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tanpitaksit

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An ability of bisphenol-A/aniline based benzoxazine resin (BA-a to simultaneously acts as a curing agent and a stable or rigid network segment for shape memory epoxy, i.e. a two component system, is demonstrated. This significantly simplifies a formulation of present shape memory epoxy systems, i.e. a three or four component system. A suitable content of BA-a in the aliphatic epoxy (NGDE/polybenzoxazine (PBA-a samples for good shape memory performance is in a range of 30 to 50 mol%. The storage modulus of the obtained NGDE/PBA-a shape memory polymers (SMPs was increased from 3.57 GPa for 30 mol% BA-a content to 4.50 GPa for 50 mol% BA-a content. Glass transition temperature of the sample was also substantially increased with increasing BA-a fraction, i.e. from 51°C to 140°C. Flexural modulus and strength at room temperature of the samples at 50 mol% BA-a were found to be as high as 3.97 GPa and 132 MPa compared to the maximum values of 2.54 GPa and 100 MPa of SMP based on cyanate ester-epoxy. All samples exhibited a high value of shape fixity close to 100%. A presence of the BA-a in the samples also imparted a greater recovery stress ranging from 0.25 to 1.59 MPa. Consequently, the obtained NGDE/PBA-a copolymers are highly attractive for shape memory materials to be used in a broader range of applications particularly at elevated temperature and a higher recovery stress value.

  10. Comparative evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with different temporary luting cements: In vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Sheen Juneja Arora; Aman Arora; Viram Upadhyaya; Shilpi Jain

    2016-01-01

    Background or Statement of Problem: As, the longevity of provisional restorations is related to, a perfect adaptation and a strong, long-term union between restoration and teeth structures, therefore, evaluation of marginal leakage of provisional restorative materials luted with cements using the standardized procedures is essential. Aims and Objectives: To compare the marginal leakage of the provisional crowns fabricated from Autopolymerizing acrylic resin crowns and bisphenol A-glycidyl dim...

  11. Adhesively luted, metal-free composite crowns after five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Franziska; Spiegl, Katrin; Eickemeyer, Grit; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The effect of location and preparation design of abutment teeth and of preparation design on the survival and complication rate of metal-free, adhesively luted composite crowns (Artglass, Heraeus Kulzer) and their clinical performance was investigated in this controlled, randomized, prospective clinical study. After randomization, 114 single crowns (68 posterior, 46 anterior) were prepared either with a 0.5 mm chamfer finishing line or with a 0.5 mm shoulder combined with occlusal reduction of at least 1.5 mm. Buildups were made with a composite material, using the corresponding dentin adhesive. Crowns were manufactured on stone dies and intraorally adhesively luted with resin cement. Follow-up examinations were conducted after 1 month and 1, 2, 3, and 5 years. Documentation included failures and complications, occlusal contacts, plaque accumulation and patients' rating of esthetics and functionality. After 5 years, data for 83 single crowns had been obtained. Within an observation period of 5 years, 18 complications occurred, including 13 major failures which resulted in replacement of the crowns, and 5 minor complications which could be repaired. All loosened crowns (n = 2) were successfully re-cemented. The Cox Regression did not reveal any effect of location or preparation design on complication rate. Calculation of the Kaplan-Meier survival curve on the basis of major failures indicated a probability of survival of 96% after 3 years and 88.5% after 5 years. Four Artglass crowns had no contact in static occlusion after 5 years and plaque accumulation was significantly higher than for control teeth. esthetic and functional evaluation by patients revealed that acceptance was high. Metal-free composite crowns may be recommended for long-term temporary use. However, the complication rate and the increased plaque accumulation restrict the indication for permanent restorations.

  12. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs.

  13. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's ''Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs

  14. Novel Multifunctional Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Curing Agent with High Flame-Retardant Efficiency for Epoxy Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yi; Shao, Zhu-Bao; Chen, Xue-Fang; Long, Jia-Wei; Chen, Li; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-08-19

    A novel multifunctional organic-inorganic hybrid was designed and prepared based on ammonium polyphosphate (APP) by cation exchange with diethylenetriamine (DETA), abbreviated as DETA-APP. Then DETA-APP was used as flame-retardant curing agent for epoxy resin (EP). Curing behavior, including the curing kinetic parameters, was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The flame retardance and burning behavior of DETA-APP cured EP were also evaluated. The limiting oxygen index (LOI) value of DETA-APP/EP was enhanced to 30.5% with only 15 wt % of DETA-APP incorporated; and the UL-94 V-0 rating could be easily passed through with only 10 wt % of the hybrid. Compared with DETA/EP, the peak-heat release rate (PHRR), total heat release (THR), total smoke production (TSP), and peak-smoke production release (SPR) of DETA-APP/EP (15 wt % addition), obtained from cone calorimetry, were dropped by 68.3, 79.3, 79.0, and 30.0%, respectively, suggesting excellent flame-retardant and smoke suppression efficiency. The flame-retardant mechanism of DETA-APP/EP has been investigated comprehensively. The results of all the aforementioned studies distinctly confirmed that DETA-APP was an effective flame-retardant curing agent for EP.

  15. Metal (2) 4,4',4",4'" phthalocyanine tetraamines as curing agents for epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achar, B. N.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Metal, preferably divalent copper, cobalt or nickel, phthalocyanine tetraamines are used as curing agents for epoxides. The resulting copolymers have high thermal and chemical resistance and are homogeneous. They are useful as binders for laminates, e.g., graphite cloth laminate.

  16. Improving Gold Recovery from Artificial Preg-Robbing Ore by Pre-treatment using Blinding Agent and Resin-in-Leach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zaki Mubarok

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the effectiveness of the use of blinding agents, ionic exchanger resins and the combination of them in improving gold extraction from simulated preg-robbing ore is discussed. The blinding agents used were kerosene, diesel oil and pine oil, while the ion exchange resins used were Lewatit Monoplus MP 800, Lewatit AF 5 and guanidine. Preg-robbing conditions were simulated by blending fine activated carbon with ore sample. The investigation results show that the presence of artificial carbonaceous materials at 2% (w/w in the gold ore significantly reduces gold recovery. Pretreatment of artificial preg-robbing ore prior to cyanidation by mixing with kerosene, diesel oil and pine oil for 0.5h improved gold recovery up to 25.4%. A combination of pre-treatment using blinding agent and a resin in leach (RIL test using Lewatit MP 800 resin demonstrated a synergistic effect that improves gold recovery up to a level of 99.5%,which is significantly higher than using activated carbon and without pretreatment.

  17. Evaluation of Compressive Strength and Sorption/Solubility of Four Luting Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavangar MS

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Statement of Problem: Compressive strength (CS and sorption/solubility of the luting cements are two associated factors. Searching a correlation between sorption/solubility and compressive strength of various luting cements is required. Objectives: To measure the water sorption/solubility, and compressive strength of three resin-based and one conventional glass ionomer (CGI luting cement after 1 and 24 h of immersion in distilled water and to determine if there is any correlation between those properties found. Materials and Methods: Four luting cements were investigated. For each material, 10 disc shaped specimens were prepared for measuring the sorption/solubility. The specimens were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions, and the sorption/solubility were measured in accordance with the ISO 4049’s. For testing the compression strength, for each material 16 cylindrical specimens were prepared by insertion of cements into a stainless steel split mould. The specimens were cured, divided into groups of 8, and then stored in distilled water at (37 ± 1°C for 1 and 24 h. The test was performed using the universal testing machine, the maximum load was recorded and CS was calculated. The data were analysed using SPSS software version 18. One-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey’s test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient were performed. Results: G-CEM had the highest mean CS (153.60± 25.15 and CGI luting had the lowest CS (21.36±5.37 (p 0.05. The lowest mean sorption/solubility value was for RelyXTM U200 and Panavia F, and the highest for CGI luting (all p < 0.001. Conclusions: The compressive strength of all cements did not necessarily increase after 24 h and varied depending on the materials. There was a strong reverse correlation between sorption and CS values after both 1 and 24 h immersion. It may be practical for clinician to use those cements with the less sorption / solubility and more stable compression strength over

  18. Effect of chemical cleaning agents on the flexural strength of acrylic and hard denture line resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sabrina Alessandra; Nunez Pantoja, Juliana Maria Costa; Takahashi, Jessica Mie Ferreira Koyama; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2013-07-01

    This study sought to evaluate the disinfectants, Efferdent (EF) and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite (SH), and their effects on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of the hard denture liners, Kooliner (K) and New Truliner (NT), and a thermoacrylic resin, QC-20. Ninety specimens were made (50 mm x 10 mm x 3 mm) and divided into 9 groups (n = 10). The 3 control groups were Group 1: QC-20 without disinfection cycles, Group 2: K, and Group 3: NT. The 6 experimental groups were Group 4: QC-20 in EF, Group 5: K in EF, Group 6: NT in EF, Group 7: QC-20 in SH, Group 8: K in SH, and Group 9: NT in SH. Specimens were subjected to 360 cycles of disinfection involving 35-minute cycles of immersion in cleaning solutions. The materials' flexural strength and modulus of elasticity were determined using a universal testing machine at a 5 mm/minute speed of compression. The data were subjected to ANOVA, Tukey, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (α = 0.05). Regardless of the disinfection method used, the NT hard denture liner showed the lowest flexural strength values (P < 0.05) and modulus of elasticity (P < 0.0001) compared to K and QC-20. However, flexural strength values increased after applying SH and EF (P < 0.05). QC-20 showed a higher modulus of elasticity (P < 0.033), which increased after EF was applied (P = 0.005). It can be concluded that the disinfection methods changed the mechanical properties of the tested materials.

  19. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  20. Radiation hardening lacquer binding agent based on a polyester resin with at least 3.5 double links pr. 1000 molecular weight units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crimlisk, D.J.; Wright, A.; Groves, T.E.

    1976-01-01

    The binding agent is suitable for hardening by electrons with an energy of between 100,000 and 500,000eV. It consists mainly of a solution of a polyester resin with at least 3.5 double links per 1000 mol, in an olefine-unsaturated monomer. The molecular weight of the polyester is between 800 and 1100 and the ratio of the number of double links in the monomer to that in the resin (degree of unsaturation) is in the range 0.75-2.0, or more specifically, between 1 and 1.5. Cellulose acetate/butyrate (CAB) and/or a butylated melamine/formaldehyde resin may be added to improve the surface properties. Likewise from 0.1 to 0.5% polyethylene wax may be added to give a better surface finish and hardness. (JIW)

  1. Impact of a novel phosphorus-nitrogen flame retardant curing agent on the properties of epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Liang, Bing

    2017-12-01

    A phosphorus-nitrogen flame retardant curing agent diethyl phosphonic p-Phenylenediamine diamide (DEPPPD) was synthesized. The chemical structure of the obtained compound was identified by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1HNMR), and mass spectroscopies. A series of t hermosetting systems were prepared by conventional epoxy resins (E-44) and DEPPPD. The effects of DEPPPD on flame retardancy, thermal degradation behavior, mechanical properties and the morphologies of char residues of EP/DEPPPD thermosets were investigated. The results demonstrated that when the phosphorus content of 2.88 wt%, EP-3 successfully passed UL-94 V-0 flammability rating, the LOI value was as high as 31.1%, the impact strength and tensile strength of it was 6.50 KJ m-2 and 48.21 MPa, the adhesive strength could reach 14.61 MPa, respectively. The TGA results indicated that the introduction of DEPPPD promoted EP matrix decomposed at a lower temperature, the rate of the thermal decomposition also decreased compared with EP-0. The residual char ratio of 800 °C was increased whether in nitrogen or in the air. The morphological structures of char residue were more compact and homogeneous which could prevent the heat transmission and diffusion, limit the production of combustible gases and reduced the heat release rate.

  2. The curing behavior and properties of phthalonitrile resins using ionic liquids as a new class of curing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Cheng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Binary blends composed of 1,3-bis (3,4-dicyanophenoxy benzene (3BOCN and ionic liquids (ILs with different molecular structures were prepared. The curing behavior of these 3BOCN/ILs blends were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and rheological analysis. The study suggested that the blends possessed a wide processing window and the structures of ILs (anion, cation and alkyl chain length at cation had an effect on curing behavior. The 3BOCN/[EPy]BF4 resins were prepared at elevated temperature. IR spectra of the resins showed that there were triazine and isoindoline formed in curing process. The TGA and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA revealed that the resins have excellent thermal stability together with high storage modulus and high glass transition temperature (Tg. Dielectric properties, long term oxidative aging and water uptake measurements of the resins suggested the IL brought some unique properties to the resins.

  3. Evaluation of antimicrobial and physical properties of orthodontic composite resin modified by addition of antimicrobial agents--an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Vikas; Shetty, V Surendra; Mogra, Subraya; Bhat, Gopalkrishna; Eipe, Montu; Jacob, Shery; Prabu, Laxman

    2007-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial and physical properties of orthodontic composite resin modified by the addition of antimicrobial agents. Unite bonding adhesive (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif), a chemically cured composite resin, modified by the addition of benzalkonium chloride (BAC), chlorhexidine, and triclosan in concentrations of 0.1 wt%, 0.2 wt%, and 0.3 wt%, respectively, was formed into tablets for testing. The tablets of each group and a control group were subjected to the agar plate diffusion test to measure the zone of bacterial inhibition. In addition, they were incubated for 24 hours in tryptic soy broth inoculated with Streptococcus mutans and examined for bacterial growth. A total of 80 extracted premolars were collected and divided into 2 sets of 40 teeth each. Stainless steel Begg brackets were bonded by using control and experimental composites. A universal testing machine was used to determine shear bond strength. The first set of teeth was tested after 24 hours and the second set after 25 days of storage in distilled water. Time-dependent release of antimicrobial agents from the modified composites was monitored spectrophotometrically. The findings indicated that (1) addition of BAC to the orthodontic composite resin enhanced its antimicrobial properties, (2) there was no significant difference in the bond strengths of the control and the experimental resin tested after 24 hours and 25 days, and (3) maximum release of BAC from the modified resin was higher than that of chlorhexidine or triclosan, and was much higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration level.

  4. Interfacial fracture toughness of different resin cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Rostami, Golriz; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Keshvad, Alireza; van Noort, Richard

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of HF acid etching and silane treatment on the interfacial fracture toughness of a self-adhesive and two conventional resin-based cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Lithium disilicate glass ceramic discs were prepared with two different surface preparations consisting of gritblasted with aluminium oxide, and gritblasted and etched with hydrofluoric acid. Ceramic surfaces with a chevron shaped circular hole were treated by an optimized silane treatment followed by an unfilled resin and then three different resin cements (Variolink II, Panavia F2, and Multilink Sprint). Specimens were kept in distilled water at 37°C for 24h and then subjected to thermocycling. The interfacial fracture toughness was measured and mode of failures was also examined. Data were analysed using analysis of variance followed by T-test analysis. No statistically significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between the gritblasted and gritblasted and etched surfaces for Variolink II resin cement was found (P>0.05). For the gritblasted ceramic surfaces, no significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between Panavia F2 and Variolink II was observed (P>0.05). For the gritblasted and etched ceramic surfaces, a significantly higher fracture toughness for Panavia F2 than the other cements was found (Pceramic system was affected by the surface treatment and the type of luting agent. Dual-cured resin cements demonstrated a better bonding efficacy to the lithium disilicate glass ceramic compared to the self-adhesive resin cement. The lithium disilicate glass ceramic surfaces should be gritblasted and etched to get the best bond when used with Panavia F2 and Multilink Sprint resin cements, whereas for the Variolink II only gritblasting is required. The best bond overall is achieved with Panavia F2. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fracture resistance of metal- and galvano-ceramic crowns cemented with different luting cements: in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazy, Mohamed H; Madina, Manal M Abo

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the fracture resistance of galvano-ceramic crowns with metal-ceramic crowns cemented to natural premolar teeth with different luting cements. Sixty intact maxillary premolars were prepared to receive full-coverage crown restorations and were divided into 2 equal groups (n = 30): galvano-ceramic crowns and metal-ceramic crowns. Each group was further subdivided into 3 equal subgroups (n = 10) according to the luting cement used: zinc-phosphate, glass-ionomer, or adhesive-resin cement. The specimens were then compressively loaded until failure in a universal testing machine. The metal-ceramic crowns exhibited higher resistance to fracture compared to galvano-ceramic crowns, but both exceeded the normal documented values of occlusal masticatory forces.

  6. The effect of salivary pH on diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement coated with coating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismayanti, D.; Triaminingsih, S.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of artificial saliva with different acidities on the diametral tensile strength of Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) coated with varnish and nanofilled coating agent. The specimens coated with coating agents were immersed in artificial saliva with pH of 4.5, 5.5, and 7 for 24 hours in an incubatorat 37°C. The diametral tensile strength of the specimens was tested with Universal Testing Machine. There were no significant differences on the diametral tensile strength of all specimens that were put into groups based on the acidity of the saliva and the type of coating agent (p>0.05). Both varnish and nanofilled coating agent stayed on the RMGIC in the acidic condition that simulated the true condition of oral cavity in people with high caries risk for the 24 hours of maturation.

  7. Comparison of Hypersensitivity in Metal Ceramic Crowns cemented with Zinc Phosphate and Self-adhesive Resin: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Thatapudi; Garhnayak, Mirna; Garhnayak, Lokanath; Dhal, Angurbala; Kar, Aswini K

    2017-10-01

    Luting agents used to fix artificial prostheses, such as fixed partial denture (FPD) to tooth are basically viscous in nature and show chemical reaction for fixation. Postcementation hypersensitivity is a frequent complaint of patients. The present study was conducted to compare postcementation hypersensitivity with zinc phosphate and self-adhesive resin in complete coverage crown. This study included 30 patients in which 60 porcelein fused to metal crowns was placed. Two metal crowns were placed in each patient in nonantagonis-tic contralateral quadrants. First crown was cemented with zinc phosphate cement, while the other was cemented with self-adhesive resin. Hypersensitivity was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS) score and by clinical test. For clinical evaluation of sensitivity, hot and cold water was applied to the cervical margin of restoration for 5 seconds and response was recorded. This study consisted of 30 patients in which 60 crowns were given. There was no statistical difference in VAS score of mastication in zinc phosphate cement recorded at baseline, 1 week, 4 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years (p > 0.05). Cold response also did not show a significant difference at six time points. Warm response showed slight decrease in subsequent time points but was nonsignificant (p > 0.05). Similarly, with self-adhesive resin cement, VAS score during mastication, hot and cold response was statistically nonsignificant (p > 0.05). Postcementation hypersensitivity is a frequent complaint that patient may experience. However, we found no statistically significant difference in both cements tested. Postcementation hypersensitivity is an unpleasant sensation experienced by patients. This may affect the success of any prosthesis. Thus, selection of luting agent for cementation plays an important role to eliminate this symptom.

  8. Effects of primer containing silane and thiophosphate monomers on bonding resin to a leucite-reinforced ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yohsuke; Sakai, Miyuki; Sawase, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    Silane primers are commonly used for bonding between resin-based luting agents and ceramic restorations. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of nine silane primers on the bond strength of resin to a leucite-reinforced ceramic. The commercially available dental primers used were five silane primers (GC Ceramic Primer, GP; Clearfil Ceramic Primer, CP; Tokuso Ceramic Primer, TP; Porcelain Liner M, PM; and Monobond Plus, MB). Four experimental primers (MDS, MTS, MDS/MPII, and MTS/MPII) and two control primers (MMA and MMA/MPII) were also prepared. The ceramic specimen was ground with silicon carbide paper, primed, and then bonded to a resin composite disc using a dual-curing luting agent. After a 24-h immersion in water, the shear bond strengths were determined. Shear bond testing revealed that the bond strength was significantly improved with the use of a MTS/MPII primer when compared to MDS, MTS, MMA, MDS/MPII and MMA/MPII. Although no significant differences were detected between GP, CP, PM, and MB, the primers CP, TP, PM, and MTS/MPII exhibited the highest bond strengths, followed by GP and MB, whilst the no-primer control resulted in the lowest values. The maximum bond strengths were obtained with CP, TP, PM, and MTS/MPII. It was suggested that the thiophosphate monomer accelerated the role of the silane monomer. When selecting a primer to bond ceramic restorations, clinicians should be aware that not only the silane monomer but also additional components of the primer considerably affect the bond strength. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparison of the survival of fibre posts cemented with two different composite resin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S B; Millar, B J

    2008-12-13

    To evaluate the outcomes of a fibre post cemented with two different luting agents. A single type of tooth coloured fibre post (Fibre-White Parapost, Coltene Whaledent) was used along with two different types of luting cement. A total of 129 teeth were treated in this retrospective audit: 79 treated were luted with Calibra Aesthetic Dental Resin Cement (Dentsply) and 50 with Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray). All teeth were treated by the same operator and had a minimum ferrule of 2 mm and a ParaCore (Coltene Whaledent) composite core placed over the post. Where Calibra Aesthetic Dental Resin Cement was used, all the restorations were undertaken between June 2002 and October 2003 and were reviewed for a period of 38 to 54 months. Where Panavia had been used, all restorations were placed between February 2004 and December 2005 and reviewed for a period of 28 to 50 months. The results for the Calibra cemented posts were: 64 returned for recall and of these 23 were classed as failed. The causes were: root fracture (2), decementation (3), fracture at post-core interface (6), endodontic failure (8) and marginal caries (4). The results for the Panavia cemented posts were: 44 returned for recall and 9 were classed as failed; the causes of failure were fracture at post-core interface (6), endodontic failure (1) and marginal caries (2). For posts cemented with Calibra, a success rate of 64.1% was determined over a period of 38 to 54 months. The use of Panavia resulted in fewer post failures with a reported success rate of 79.5% over an evaluation period of 28 to 50 months. Mechanical failures by means of fractures occurring anywhere along the length of the post-core complex were the major cause of lack of success. Significantly higher failure rates were observed to occur in partially dentate patients, in those with parafunctional habits and also amongst anterior teeth. While the majority of the mechanical failures were amenable to repair, the latter mode of failure appears to be a

  10. The influence of long term water immersion on shear bond strength of amalgam repaired by resin composite and mediated by adhesives or resin modified glass ionomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, R; Nissan, J; Shafir, H; Shapira, G; Alter, E; Brosh, T

    2012-07-01

    To assess the shear bond strength between amalgam and resin composite mediated by either multipurpose adhesive systems or RMGI when subjected to long term immersion in saline. Part I: Cylindrical specimens (6 mm × 6 mm) composed of equal parts of sandblasted set amalgam (Oralloy) and composite (Z-100), with a thin layer of either Scotchbond Multipurpose, All Bond 2, Amalgam Bond Plus, High Q Bond Plus or Vitrebond in between were fabricated (n = 100 × 5). Each group was divided into 3 subgroups, immersed in saline at 37 °C for either 48 h, 3 or 6 months, followed by thermocycling (5000; 5/55 °C) and shear bond strength testing (SBS). Part II: Identical specimens were fabricated with intermediary of either Ketac Cem, Fuji Lining LC, Rely X Luting, Fuji Plus or Meron Plus (n = 100 × 5). Immersion periods, followed by thermocycling and SBS testing as in Part I. Two representative specimens from each subgroup were sectioned and inspected under SEM. The two classes of intermediary agents yielded SBS which differed mainly in the 6 months incubation period. While multipurpose adhesives provided SBS values of ~9-10 MPa RMGI provided higher SBS of ~16 MPa. All Bond 2 and Amalgam Bond Plus exhibited deterioration of SBS during the 6 month period as well as Rely X Luting. Gap sizes between 0.5 and 3 μm exist between all intermediaries and the amalgam; on the other hand all intermediaries exhibit gap-free interfaces between the adhesives/RMGI and the composite. Vitrebond in particular and RMGIs in general can serve as an excellent coupler of resin composite to amalgam, providing a durable bond. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Green Preparation of Epoxy/Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites Using a Glycidylamine Epoxy Resin as the Surface Modifier and Phase Transfer Agent of Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinlei; Zhou, Yang; Peng, Mao

    2016-01-27

    In studies of epoxy/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites, organic solvents are commonly used to disperse GO, and vigorous mechanical processes and complicated modification of GO are usually required, increasing the cost and hindering the development and application of epoxy nanocomposites. Here, we report a green, facile, and efficient method of preparing epoxy/GO nanocomposites. When triglycidyl para-aminophenol (TGPAP), a commercially available glycidyl amine epoxy resin with one tertiary amine group per molecule, is used as both the surface modifier and phase transfer agent of GO, GO can be directly and rapidly transferred from water to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and other types of epoxy resins by manual stirring under ambient conditions, whereas GO cannot be transferred to these epoxy resins in the absence of TGPAP. The interaction between TGPAP and GO and the effect of the TGPAP content on the dispersion of GO in the epoxy matrix were investigated systematically. Superior dispersion and exfoliation of GO nanosheets and remarkably improved mechanical properties, including tensile and flexural properties, toughness, storage modulus, and microhardness, of the epoxy/GO nanocomposites with a suitable amount of TGPAP were demonstrated. This method is organic-solvent-free and technically feasible for large-scale preparation of high-performance nanocomposites; it opens up new opportunities for exploiting the unique properties of graphene or even other nanofillers for a wide range of applications.

  12. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  13. Evaluation of the bond strength of different adhesive agents to a resin-modified calcium silicate material (TheraCal LC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadas, Muhammed; Cantekin, Kenan; Gumus, Husniye; Ateş, Sabit Melih; Duymuş, Zeynep Yesil

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of different adhesive agents to TheraCal LC and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and examined the morphologic changes of these materials with different surface treatments. A total of 120 specimens, 60 of MTA Angelus (AMTA), and 60 of TheraCal LC, were prepared and divided into six subgroups according to the adhesive agent used; these agents included Scotchbond Multipurpose, Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil Protect Bond, Clearfil S 3 Bond, OptiBond All-in-One, and G-aenial Bond. After application of adhesive agents, Filtek Z250 composite resin was placed onto the specimens. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, followed by examination of the fractured surfaces. The surface changes of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance. Although no significant differences were found among the bond strengths of different adhesives to AMTA (p = 0.69), a significant difference was found in terms of bond strengths of different adhesives to the TheraCal LC surface (p TheraCal LC compared to the bond with other adhesives. TheraCal LC bonded significantly more strongly than AMTA regardless of the adhesive agents tested. Resin-modified calcium silicate showed higher bond strength than AMTA in terms of the composite bond to these materials with different bonding systems. On the other hand, the highest shear bond-strength values were found for composite bonds with the combination of TheraCal LC and the total-etch adhesive system. SCANNING 38:403-411, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evaluation of Apical Sealing Ability of a Dentin Bonding Agent and Epoxy Resin used as Root Canal Sealer - An In Vitro Dye Leakage Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinidhi Surya Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Total obliteration of the canal space and perfect sealing of the apical foramen with an inert, dimensionally stable and biologically compatible material are the goals for successful endodontic treatment. A microscopic layer of debris is formed during bio-mechanical preparation of the canal called Smear layer. This interferes with adhesion and penetration of canal sealers and its removal is necessary. Dentin bonding agents have been studied extensively for their adhesive properties in restorative dentistry and recently as root canal sealers. Microleakage studies of their sealing abilities are few. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated sealing efficacy of a dentin bonding agent when used as root canal sealer along with AH26, an epoxy resin sealer and the effect of the smear layer on the sealing ability. 60 extracted maxillary anterior teeth were taken, sectioned at the Cemento enamel junction, cleaned and shaped with 2% K files. They were divided into 4 groups, GroupsAandBwithoutEDTApre-treatment and GroupsCandDwithEDTApre-treatment. GroupsAandCwere obturated withAH26 and Groups B and D were obturated with dentin bonding agent Polibond andAH26 with gutta percha and lateral condensation method. Apical dye penetration was measured using 2% Methylene Blue and evaluated with stereo microscope. Results were tabulated and statistical analysis done. Results: The chemically cured bonding agent Polibond used with AH26 showed significantly less apical leakage when smear layer was removed before obturation. Conclusion: Use of dentin bonding agents and resin sealers in root canal obturations achieves effective apical sealing when used with gutta percha. This improves the success of endodontic therapy.

  15. Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of three resin systems for a Base Metal Alloy bonded to

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jlali H

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures (F.P.D can be used for conservative treatment of partially edentulous"npatients. There are numerous studies regarding the strength of resin composite bond to base meta! alloys. Shear bond"nstrength of three resin systems were invistigated. In this study these systems consisted of: Panavia Ex, Mirage FLC and"nMarathon V. Thirty base metal specimens were prepared from rexillium III alloy and divided into three groups. Then each"ngroup was bonded to enamel of human extracted molar teeth with these systems. All of specimens were stored in water at"n37ac for 48 hours. A shear force was applied to each specimen by the instron universal testing machine. A statistical"nevaluation of the data using one-way analysis of variance showed that there was highly significant difference (P<0.01"nbetween the bond strengths of these three groups."nThe base metal specimens bonded with panavia Ex luting agent, exhibited the highest mean bond strength. Shear bond"nstrength of the specimens bonded to enamel with Mirage F1C showed lower bond strenght than panavia EX. However, the"nlowest bond strength was obtained by the specimens bonded with Marathon V.

  16. Effects of Laboratory Disinfecting Agents on Dimensional Stability of Three Commercially Available Heat-Cured Denture Acrylic Resins in India: An In-Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavanna, Jayaprakash Mugur; Jujare, Ravikanth Haridas; Varghese, Rana Kalappattil; Singh, Vishwa Deepak; Gaurav, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Dental professionals are exposed to a wide variety of microorganisms which calls for use of effective infection control procedures in the dental office and laboratories that can prevent cross-contamination that could extend to dentists, dental office staff, dental technicians as well as patients. This concern has led to a renewed interest in denture sterilization and disinfection. Heat polymerized dentures exhibit dimensional change during disinfection procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different types of widely used laboratory disinfecting agents on the dimensional stability of heat-cured denture acrylic resins and to compare the dimensional stability of three commercially available heat-cured denture acrylic resins in India. Twelve specimens of uniform dimension each of three different brands namely Stellon, Trevalon and Acralyn-H were prepared using circular metal disc. Chemical disinfectants namely 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde, 1% povidone-iodine, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite and water as control group were used. Diameter of each specimen was measured before immersion and after immersion with time interval of 1 hour and 12 hours. The data was evaluated statistically using one way analysis of variance. All the specimens in three disinfectants and in water exhibited very small amount of linear expansion. Among three disinfectants, specimens in 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde exhibited least(0.005mm) and water showed highest (0.009mm) amount of dimensional change. Among resins, Trevalon showed least (0.067mm) and Acralyn-H exhibited highest (0.110mm) amount of dimensional change. Although, all the specimens of three different brands of heat-cured denture acrylic resins exhibited increase in linear dimensional change in all the disinfectants and water, they were found to be statistically insignificant.

  17. Tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with different cements Resistência à tração de pinos de fibra de vidro cimentados com diferentes materiais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Bonfante

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Proper selection of the luting agent is fundamental to avoid failure due to lack of retention in post-retained crowns. The objective of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength and failure mode of glass fiber posts luted with different cements. Glass fiber posts were luted in 40 mandibular premolars, divided into 4 groups (n = 10: Group 1 - resin-modified glass ionomer RelyX Luting; Group 2 - resin-modified glass ionomer Fuji Plus; Group 3 - resin cement RelyX ARC; Group 4 - resin cement Enforce. Specimens were assessed by tensile strength testing and light microscopy analysis for observation of failure mode. The tensile bond strength values of each group were compared by ANOVA and Tukey test. The significance level was set at 5%. The failure modes were described as percentages. The following tensile strength values were obtained: Group 1 - 247.6 N; Group 2 - 256.7 N; Group 3 - 502.1 N; Group 4 - 477.3 N. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups 1 and 2 or between Groups 3 and 4, yet the resin cements presented significantly higher tensile bond strength values than those presented by the glass ionomer cements. Group 1 displayed 70% of cohesive failures, whereas Groups 2, 3 and 4 exhibited 70% to 80% of adhesive failures at the dentin-cement interface. We concluded that resin cements and glass ionomer cements are able to provide clinically sufficient retention of glass fiber posts, and that glass ionomer cements may be especially indicated when the application of adhesive techniques is difficult.A seleção adequada do agente cimentante é essencial para evitar falhas por perda de retenção em coroas retidas por núcleos. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a resistência à tração e o tipo de falha de pinos de fibra de vidro cimentados com diferentes materiais. Cimentaram-se pinos de fibra de vidro em 40 pré-molares inferiores, divididos em 4 grupos (n = 10: Grupo 1 - ionômero de vidro modificado

  18. Bonded indirect restorations for posterior teeth: the luting appointment

    OpenAIRE

    Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Krejci, Ivo

    2007-01-01

    Classic bonded indirect restorations are laboratory fabricated and require 2 appointments: one for provisionalization and one for luting. This article describes the adhesive luting procedure, from try-in of the workpiece to finishing and polishing after the adhesive cementation, and it represents the second part of an updated technique for bonded inlays and onlays. The clinical sequence is described step by step with 2 cases. Particular attention is given to the adhesive treatment of the rest...

  19. Effect of proximal box elevation with resin composite on marginal quality of resin composite inlays in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggendorf, Matthias J; Krämer, Norbert; Dippold, Christoph; Vosen, Vera E; Naumann, Michael; Jablonski-Momeni, Anahita; Frankenberger, Roland

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate marginal quality and resin-resin transition of lab made resin composite inlays in deep proximal cavities with and without 3 mm proximal box elevation (PBE) using resin composites before and after thermo-mechanical loading (TML). MOD cavities with one proximal box beneath the cementoenamel junction were prepared in 40 extracted human third molars. Proximal boxes ending in dentine were elevated 3 mm with different resin composites (G-Cem, Maxcem Elite as self-adhesive resin cements and Clearfil Majesty Posterior as restorative resin composite in one or three layers bonded with AdheSE), or left untreated. Clearfil Majesty Posterior inlays were luted with Syntac and Variolink II (n = 8). Marginal quality as well as the PBE-composite inlay interface was analyzed under an SEM using epoxy resin replicas before and after thermomechanical loading (100,000 × 50 N and 2500 thermocylces between +5 °C and +55 °C). Bonding resin composite inlays directly to dentine showed similar amounts of gap-free margins in dentine compared to PBE applied in three consecutive layers (p > 0.05). The groups with self-adhesive resin cements for PBE exhibited significantly more gaps in dentine (p < 0.05). With layered resin composite, PBE is effective in indirect resin composite bonding to deep proximal boxes. Self-adhesive resin cements are not suitable for this indication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Live cell imaging reveals different modes of cytotoxic action of extracts derived from commonly used luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpaitė-Vanagienė, Rita; Čebatariūnienė, Alina; Tunaitis, Virginijus; Pūrienė, Alina; Pivoriūnas, Augustas

    2018-02-01

    To compare cytotoxicity of extracts derived from commonly used luting cements: Hoffmann's Zinc Phosphate (ZPC), GC Fuji Plus Resin Modified Glass Ionomer (RMGIC) and 3M ESPE RelyX Unicem Resin Cement (RC) on primary human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). HGFs were exposed to different concentrations of the ZPC, RMGIC and RC extracts. The cytotoxicity was assessed with the PrestoBlue Cell Viability Reagent and viable cells were counted by a haemocytometer using the trypan blue exclusion test. In order to determine the primary mechanism of the cell death induced by extracts from different luting cements, the real-time monitoring of caspase-3/-7 activity and membrane integrity of cells was employed. The extracts from the RMGIC and ZPC decreased the metabolic activity and numbers of viable cells. Unexpectedly, the extracts from the RC evoked only small effects on the metabolic activity of HGFs with a decreasing number of viable cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner. The live cell imaging revealed that the apoptosis was the primary mechanism of a cell death induced by the extracts derived from the RMGIC, whereas the extracts from the RC and ZPC induced a cell death through a necrotic and caspase-independent pathway. The apoptosis was the primary mechanism of the cell death induced by the extracts derived from the RMGIC, whereas the extracts from the RC and ZPC induced a cell death via a necrotic pathway. We suggest that metabolic assays commonly used to assess the cytotoxicity of luting cements should be validated by alternative methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro microleakage of luting cements and crown foundation material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, T J; Connolly, J

    2001-03-01

    Microleakage is a concern for the long-term prognosis of a cemented crown and foundation. The aims of this investigation were, first, to evaluate microleakage of zinc phosphate cement and resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement under ideal (dry) versus contaminated (wet) conditions, and second, to compare 3 foundations under both ideal and contaminated conditions. One hundred forty extracted molar teeth were cleaned and mounted. Tooth preparations for complete veneer cast crowns were completed with a chamfer finish line. A mesial surface class II cavity preparation 4 mm wide buccolingually and 2 mm deep was made in each tooth. Seven restorative groups were formed: amalgam/cavity varnish, amalgam/dentinal bonding agent, and composite/dentinal bonding agent, each with dry and contaminated groups, and a seventh group of class II cavity preparations without foundations. Finish lines for crown margins were refined 1.5 mm gingival to the restoration. Artificial crowns were cast in type III gold. Treatment groups were divided into 4 cement groups: dry and contaminated zinc phosphate cement and dry and contaminated resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement. The specimens were thermocycled and immersed in erythrosine B solution for 24 hours. Subsequently, they were rinsed, and their coronal portions were embedded in clear resin. Teeth were sectioned mesiodistally, and standard photomicrographs were made. The microleakage of each restoration and crown was measured. The least foundation microleakage was recorded for amalgam/dentinal bonding agents (ideal group) and composite/dentinal bonding agents (ideal group). The most microleakage was observed within the group without a foundation. In cement groups, the control and experiment sides were evaluated separately but displayed the same order of finding. The least leakage was recorded with resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (ideal group); the most microleakage was noted with zinc phosphate cement (ideal group). An interaction was

  2. Fracture resistance of aluminium oxide and lithium disilicate-based crowns using different luting cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wahadni, Ahed M; Hussey, David L; Grey, Nicholas; Hatamleh, Muhanad M

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fracture resistance of two types of ceramic crowns cemented with two different cements. Forty premolar crowns were fabricated using lithium-disilicate (IPS Empress-2) and glass-infiltrated aluminium-oxide (In-Ceram) ceramic systems. The crowns were divided into four groups (n=10) with Group 1 (IPS Empress-2) and Group 2 (In-Ceram) cemented with glass ionomer cement. Group 3 (IPS Empress-2) and Group 4 (In-Ceram) were cemented with resin cement. Crowns were tested in a universal testing machine at a compressive-load speed of 10 mm/min. Fracture modes were grouped into five categories. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni post-hoc tests were used to detect statistical significances (pcement type had no statistical significant effect (p>0.05) on fracture resistance within each ceramic system tested. In-Ceram crowns cemented with either glass ionomer or resin cements exhibited a statistically significantly higher fracture-resistance than IPS Empress-2 crowns (pcrowns was the common mode exhibited. Fracture resistance of IPS Empress-2 and In-Ceram crowns was not affected by the type of cement used for luting. Both In-Ceram and IPS Empress-2 crowns can be successfully luted with the cements tested with In-Ceram exhibiting higher fracture resistance than IPS Empress-2.

  3. The effects of endodontic substances and naturally reducing agents on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealer to root dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana Paula; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine (CHX), and two naturally derived reducing agents on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealer to root dentin. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 single-rooted human teeth were prepared using ProTaper (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Johnson City, TN, USA) and an irrigation protocol including 5% NaOCl or 2% CHX gel, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), for smear layer removal. The following subgroups (n = 10) were also assessed according to the naturally derived reducing agent used: no agent (control group); grape seed extract (GSE); and green tea. Root canals were filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany). Bond strength was measured using the push-out test, and statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA; failure patterns (modes) were classified as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed. The types of failure modes were evaluated using the Chi-squared test at α =0.05. Results: The irrigation protocols demonstrated similar bond strength values (P > 0.05). However, the Chi-squared test revealed significant differences in failure mode among the groups (P sealer to dentin; however, improvement was evident in the adhesion quality of AH Plus to NaOCl-treated root dentin, due to the prevalence of cohesive failure. PMID:29386775

  4. Catalyzed Synthesis and Characterization of a Novel Lignin-Based Curing Agent for the Curing of High-Performance Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Nikafshar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, lignin, an aromatic compound from the forestry industry, was used as a renewable material to synthesize a new aromatic amine curing agent for epoxy resin. Firstly, lignin was separated from black liquor and hydroxyl groups were converted to tosyl groups as leaving groups. Then, primary amination was conducted using an ammonia solution at high pressure and temperature, in the presence of a nano-alumina-based catalyst. The structure of the nanocatalyst was confirmed by FT-IR, ICP, SEM, and XPS analyses. According to the FT-IR spectra, a demethylation reaction, the substitution of hydroxyl groups with tosyl groups, and then an amination reaction were successfully performed on lignin, which was further confirmed by the 13C NMR and CHNS analyses. The active hydrogen equivalent of aminated lignin was determined and three samples with 9.9 wt %, 12.9 wt %, and 15.9 wt % of aminated lignin, as curing agents, were prepared for curing the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA. The thermal characteristics of the curing process of these epoxy samples were determined by DSC and TGA analyses. Moreover, the mechanical performance of the cured epoxy systems, e.g., the tensile strength and Izod impact strength, were measured, showing that in the presence of 12.9 wt % aminated lignin, the mechanical properties of the aminated lignin-epoxy system exhibited the best performance, which was competitive, compared to the epoxy systems cured by commercial aromatic curing agents.

  5. Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5 with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence, 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma, and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem. Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37℃, the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05. Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016. The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin.

  6. Evaluation of fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary premolars, restored with ceromer or heat-pressed ceramic inlays and fixed with dual-resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, V L; Pegoraro, L F; Conti, P C R; do Valle, A L; Bonfante, G

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically maxillary premolars restored with mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) inlays made with ceramic (IPS-Empress 2) and ceromer (Targis) and luted with three different dual-cured resin cements (Enforce, Variolink II, Panavia F). Sixty maxillary premolars were randomly distributed into six groups, according to their mesio-distal and facio-lingual dimensions. The teeth were endodontically treated and MOD cavities prepared. After the restorations were cemented, the samples were thermocycled and submitted to an axial compressive load by the action of a rounded end steel cylinder contacting the incline planes of occlusal surfaces of the teeth. The mode of fracture was analysed with a microscope. The best results were found with the combinations (cement/restorative material) Enforce/Targis (107.57 kgf) and Enforce/Empress (90.21 kgf) followed by Variolink II/Targis (86.44 kgf)-Variolink II/Empress (84.07 kgf) and Panavia F/Targis (82.43 kgf)-Panavia F/Empress (76.73 kgf). Analysis of variance (P < 0.05) showed a significant difference between Enforce and Panavia cements regardless of the restorative material. Considering the same luting agent there was no statistically significant difference between the restorative materials. Fracture of lingual cusps occurred in 55 of the 60 teeth and most of them were of the cohesive type.

  7. Changes on degree of conversion of dual-cure luting light-cured with blue LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandéca, M. C.; El-Mowafy, O.; Saade, E. G.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2009-05-01

    The indirect adhesive procedures constitute recently a substantial portion of contemporary esthetic restorative treatments. The resin cements have been used to bond tooth substrate and restorative materials. Due to recently introduction of the self-bonding resin luting cement based on a new monomer, filler and initiation technology has become important to study the degree of conversion of these new materials. In the present work the polymerization reaction and the filler content of dual-cured dental resin cements were studied by means of infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry (TG). Twenty specimens were made in a metallic mold (8 mm diameter × 1 mm thick) from each of 2 cements, Panavia® F2.0 (Kuraray) and RelyX™ Unicem Applicap (3M/ESPE). Each specimen was cured with blue LED with power density of 500 mW/cm2 for 30 s. Immediately after curing, 24 and 48 h, and 7 days DC was determined. For each time interval 5 specimens were pulverized, pressed with KBr and analyzed with FT-IR. The TG measurements were performed in Netzsch TG 209 under oxygen atmosphere and heating rate of 10°C/min from 25 to 700°C. A two-way ANOVA showed DC (%) mean values statistically significance differences between two cements ( p cements ( p > 0.05). The Relx-Y™ Unicem mean values were significantly higher than Panavia® F 2.0. The degree of conversion means values increasing with the storage time and the filler content showed similar for both resin cements.

  8. Effect of a resin-based desensitizing agent and a self-etching dentin adhesive on marginal leakage of amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Alavi, Mohammad; Alavi, Samin

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal leakage of Class II amalgam restorations whose preparations were lined with a resin-based desensitizing agent, a self-etching adhesive system, and copal varnish. Fifty-six freshly extracted human premolar teeth were divided into four groups. A Class II preparation was prepared with only a proximal box on the mesial and distal surfaces of each tooth. The cavities in one group were lined with a desensitizing agent (VivaSens) and a second group with an adhesive (Clearfil S3 Bond). A third group was lined with copal varnish (Copalite) and a fourth group was used as the control without any cavity liner. Spherical high copper amalgam was hand-condensed into each preparation, specimens were thermocycled, stained, and sectioned. Microleakage was graded using a stereomicroscope. Microleakage scores were calculated and analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis and the Mann-Whitney tests (alpha=0.05). Less microleakage was indicated with the VivaSens liner when compared with the other groups (P0.05). VivaSens reduced the microleakage of Class II high copper amalgam restorations significantly more than the Clearfil S3 Bond and copal varnish.

  9. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace DE SOUZA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractResin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  10. In vitro evaluation of failure loads of nonmetal cantilevered resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalen, Andy; Feilzer, Albert J; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber reinforcement on the failure loads of resin composite beams, simulating cantilevered two-unit resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses, and compare the results with similarly obtained failure loads of ZrO2 and CoCr beams of a comparable design. Peel tests were performed using resin composite, fiber-reinforced resin composite, and zirconia beams, simulating two-unit cantilevered resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses, luted with Panavia F2.0 onto flat-ground buccal surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors. The recorded failure loads were compared with those of CoCr beams of a similar size and design from earlier research. Finite element analysis revealed the stress concentrations within the cement layers at failure. The failure loads (N) of the peel tests, depending on the beam type and including the type of failure, were statistically analyzed. The highest failure values were obtained with the fiber-reinforced resin composite beams, which were luted with the exposed fibers directly on the bovine enamel. Finite element analysis showed that peak stress locations depend on the beam type and facilitate the explanation of the different failure modes. Fiber-reinforcement of simulated two-unit cantilevered resin composite resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses does not necessarily lead to higher failure loads. This study identified significant differences in peel failure loads between identical specimens, depending on whether or not the fiber reinforcement was exposed on the luting surface. Further research needs to be carried out regarding the combination of resin composite and fiber reinforcement.

  11. Effect of adhesive resin cements on bond strength of ceramic core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, M; Aladag, L I

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements on the shear bond strength of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin. Extracted, caries-free, human central maxillary incisor teeth were selected, and the vestibule surfaces were cut flat to obtain dentin surfaces. Ceramic core materials (IPS e.max Press and Prettau Zirconia) were luted to the dentin surfaces using three self-etch adhesive systems (Duo-Link, Panavia F 2.0, and RelyX Ultimate Clicker) and two self-adhesive resin systems (RelyX U200 Automix and Maxcem Elite). A shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine. Failure modes were observed under a stereomicroscope, and bonding interfaces between the adhesive resin cements and the teeth were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The type of adhesive resin cement significantly affected the shear bond strengths of ceramic core materials bonded to dentin (P materials when the specimens were luted with self-adhesive resin cements (P resin cements exhibited better shear bond strength than the self-adhesive resin cements, except for Panavia cement in the IPS e.max Press group. However, shear bond strengths of the self-adhesive resin cements were dependent on the nature of the ceramic core materials.

  12. Use of water as displacing agent in ion exchange chromatographic separation of isotope of boron using weak base ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Mohanakrishnan, G.; Anand Babu, C.; Krishna Prabhu, R.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to study the feasibility of using weakly basic anion exchange resin for enrichment of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography and water as eluent. The results of experiments carried out to determine total chloride capacity (TCC), strong base capacity (SBC) of the resin at different concentrations of boric acid and enrichment profiles are reported in this paper. (author)

  13. Effect of etching time and resin bond on the flexural strength of IPS e.max Press glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoping, Luo; Dongfeng, Ren; Silikas, Nick

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching time and resin cement bond on the flexural strength of IPS e.max(®) Press glass ceramic. Two hundred and ten bars, 25mm×3mm×2mm, were made from IPS e.max(®) Press ingots through lost-wax, hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology and randomly divided into five groups with forty-two per group after polishing. The ceramic surfaces of different groups were etched by 9.5% hydrofluoric acid gel for 0, 20, 40, 60 and 120s respectively. Two specimens of each group were selected randomly to examine the surface roughness and 3-dimensional topography with atomic force microscope (AFM), and microstructure was analyzed by the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Then each group were subdivided into two subgroups (n=20). One subgroup of this material was selected to receive a thin (approximately 0.1mm) layer of resin luting agent (Variolink N) whereas the other subgroup remained unaltered. Half of subgroup's specimens were thermocycled 10,000 times before a 3-point bending test in order to determine the flexural strength. Interface between resin cement and ceramic was examined with field emission scanning electronic microscope. Roughness values increased with increasing etching time. The mean flexural strength values of group 0s, 20s, 40s, 60s and 120s were 384±33, 347±43, 330±53, 327±67 and 317±41MPa respectively. Increasing HF etching times reduced the mean flexural strength (pglass ceramic, but resin cement bonding to appropriately etched surface would strengthen the dental ceramic. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of disinfectants containing glutaraldehyde on bonding of a tri-n-butylborane initiated resin to dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, N; Taira, Y; Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of disinfectants on the bond strength of resin to dentine. The surface of bovine dentine was exposed to formaldehyde (FA) aqueous solutions, glutaraldehyde (GA) aqueous solutions, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate aqueous solutions (HEMA), a commercially available dentine primer (Gluma CPS desensitizer, GLUMA), isotonic sodium chloride solution (IS), and distilled water (DW), and placed in a humidor (HU) at 37 degrees C, or non-stored (baseline). All dentine surfaces were conditioned with a 10% citric acid and 3% ferric chloride solution (10-3 liquid), and then bonded to an acrylic rod with a self-curing adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B). The mean tensile bond strengths determined 24 h after bonding were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's protected LSD test (n=5, P disinfectant pre-treatment with 5% GA or GLUMA stabilizes the bonding of tri-n-butylborane (TBB) initiated luting agent to bovine dentine conditioned with 10-3 liquid.

  15. Survival of anterior cantilevered all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses made from zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Martin; Kern, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the clinical outcome of all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs) with a cantilevered single-retainer design made from zirconia ceramic. Forty-two anterior RBFDPs with a cantilevered single-retainer design were made from yttrium oxide-stabilized zirconium oxide ceramic. RBFDPs were inserted using Panavia 21 TC as luting agent after air-abrasion of the ceramic bonding surface. During a mean observation time of 61.8 months two debondings occurred. Both RBFDPs were rebonded using Panavia 21 TC and are still in function. A caries lesion was detected at one abutment tooth during recall and was treated with a composite filling. Therefore, the overall six-year failure-free rate according to Kaplan-Meier was 91.1%. If only debonding was defined as failure the survival rate increased to 95.2%. Since all RBFDPs are still in function the overall survival rate was 100% after six years. Cantilevered zirconia ceramic RBFDPs showed promising results within the observation period. Single-retainer resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses made from zirconia ceramic show very good mid-term clinical survival rates. They should therefore be considered as a viable treatment alternative for the replacement of single missing anterior teeth especially as compared to an implant therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Comparative Study of the Retentive Strengths of Commercial and Indigenously Developed Luting Cements using Both Lathe-cut and Clinically Simulated Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Joe; Kurian, Byju P; Philip, Biju; Mohammed, Sunil; Menon, Preetha; Raj, Rajan S

    2016-08-01

    Superior adhesive strength in luting agents is of paramount significance in fixed partial denture success. In this in vitro study five cements were tested for retentive qualities, using both lathe-cut and hand-prepared specimens. A total of 104 freshly extracted tooth specimens were prepared. Seventy of them were lathe-cut and 30 specimens were hand-prepared to simulate clinical conditions. Five different cements were tested, which included a compomer, a composite, a zinc phosphate, and 2 glass-ionomer luting cements. Of the 5, 2 trial cements were indigenously developed by Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology (SCTIMST), Trivandrum, India - a glass-ionomer cement (Chitra GIC) and a chemical-cure composite (Chitra CCC). All cements were compared within each group and between groups (lathe-prepared and hand-prepared). GC Fuji 1 (GC America) exhibited superior retentive strengths in both lathe-cut and hand-prepared specimens, whereas the compomer cement displayed the lowest values when tested. In lathe-cut specimens, statistical analysis showed no significant difference between GC Fuji 1 and indigenously developed Chitra CCC. Both Chitra CCC and GC Fuji 1 have comparable strengths in lathe-cut samples, making Chitra CCC a potential luting agent. Statistical analysis reveals that all cements, except GC Fuji 1, exhibited a significant decrease in strength due to the change in design uniformity. The chemical bonding of GC Fuji 1 proves to be quite strong irrespective of shape and precision of the tooth crown. The indigenously developed Chitra GIC and Chitra CCC showed promising results to be used as a potential luting agent.

  17. Effect of a self-etching primer and phosphoric acid etching on the bond strength of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Saiki, Osamu; Hiraba, Haruto; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human enamel. A self-etching primer that contained 4-META (Teeth Primer, TP) and 35-45% or 60-65% concentrations of phosphoric acid (K-Etchant Gel, KE, and Super Bond C&B Red Activator, RA) were used as the surface treatment agents. A methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based self-polymerizing resin (Super-Bond C&B) was used as a luting agent. The shear bond strength was determined both pre and post thermocycling. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The post-thermocycling shear bond strength of the TP group was significantly higher than that of other groups, and that of the KE group was significantly higher compared with the RA group. These results demonstrated that 4-META was effective. Furthermore, when the degree of tooth demineralization was compared, surface treatment with less demineralization using TP was the most effective treatment.

  18. Dual-cure luting composites: Part I: Filler particle distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, S; Willems, G; Van Meerbeek, B; Lambrechts, P; Braem, M; Vanherle, G

    1993-03-01

    Fourteen dual-cure luting composites were analyzed for their filler particle shape, predominant and maximum filler size, and filler weight in function of their clinical use. Polished surfaces were etched with an argon ion beam and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. The type of filler particles, either inorganic or prepolymerized, could clearly be recognized. Their shapes were angular, rounded or spherical, depending on the product. The maximum filler size varied extremely from less than 1 micron to 250 microns. A particle-size distribution analyser disclosed a bell-shaped filler-size distribution. The predominant filler size for all the products was much smaller than the maximum filler size. The filler weight varied from 36 to 77%. After ion etching, some products showed small areas with a low degree of filler loading. A classification of the luting composites based on the maximum filler size is proposed. Since the particle size varies widely within the group of products analyzed, a standard specification for luting composites is urgently needed.

  19. The influence of temporary cements on dental adhesive systems for luting cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José C V; Coelho, Paulo G; Janal, Malvin N; Silva, Nelson R F A; Monteiro, André J; Fernandes, Carlos A O

    2011-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that bond strength of total- and self-etching adhesive systems to dentine is not affected by the presence of remnants from either eugenol-containing (EC) or eugenol-free (EF) temporary cements after standardized cleaning procedures. Thirty non-carious human third molars were polished flat to expose dentine surfaces. Provisional acrylic plates were fabricated and cemented either with EC, EF or no temporary cements. All specimens were incubated for 7 days in water at 37°C. The restorations were then taken out and the remnants of temporary cements were mechanically removed with a dental instrument. The dentine surfaces were cleaned with pumice and treated with either total-etching (TE) or self-etching (SE) dental adhesive systems. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the presence of remnants of temporary cements before and after dentine cleaning procedures. Composite resin build-ups were fabricated and cemented to the bonded dentine surfaces with a resin luting cement. The specimens were then sectioned to obtain 0.9mm(2) beams for microtensile bond strength testing. Fractographic analysis was performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. ANOVA showed lower mean microtensile bond strength in groups of specimens treated with EC temporary cement than in groups treated with either no cement or an EF cement (p<0.05). Mean microtensile bond strength was lower in groups employing the SE rather than the TE adhesive system (p<0.001). SE samples were also more likely to fail during initial processing of the samples. There was no evidence of interaction between cement and adhesive system effects on tensile strength. Fractographic analysis indicated different primary failure modes for SE and TE bonding systems, at the dentine-adhesive interface and at the resin cement-resin composite interface, respectively. The use of eugenol-containing temporary cements prior to indirect bonding restorations reduce, to a statistically similar

  20. Evaluation of bond strength between leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based ceramics to dentin after cementation with conventional and self-adhesive resin agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigolin, Fernando J; Miranda, Milton E; Flório, Flávia M; Basting, Roberta T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two heat-pressed ceramics (leucite-based--IPS Empress Esthetic/Ivoclar Vivadent, and lithium disilicate-based --IPS e.max Press/Ivoclar Vivadent) to dentin with the use of conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. The occlusal surface of 60 intact human molars was removed and the dentin was exposed. Ceramic blocks were cemented randomly with regard to the cementation systems (n = 10): conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II/Ivoclar Vivadent), conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink/Ivoclar Vivadent), and dual self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100/3M ESPE). The dual cementation systems were photoactivated with a LED light device (Radii Cal, SDI) for 40 seconds. The specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of approximately 1 mm2 for microtensile tests on a universal testing machine (EMIC). The type of fracture was analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) showed that there was no difference between types of ceramic. Average microtensile bond strength was higher for the conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and the self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U100), despite greater prevalence of premature loss of the sticks with the latter. Average bond strength was lower when the conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink) was used. Leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based cements present similar bond strength to the dentin with conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and a dual self-adhesive cement (RelyX U100).

  1. Cement selection for implant-supported crowns fabricated with different luting space settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultekin, Pinar; Gultekin, B Alper; Aydin, Murat; Yalcin, Serdar

    2013-02-01

    To measure and compare the retentive strength of cements specifically formulated for luting restorations onto implant abutments and to investigate the effect of varying cement gap on retention strength of implant-supported crowns. Standard titanium abutments were scanned by means of a 3D digital laser scanner. One hundred and sixty standard metal copings were designed by a Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system with two cement gap values (20 and 40 μm). The copings were cemented to the abutments using the following eight cements with one being the control, zinc oxide temporary cement, while the other seven were specifically formulated implant cements (n = 10): Premier Implant Cement, ImProv, Multilink Implant, EsTemp Implant, Cem-Implant, ImplaTemp, MIS Crown Set, and TempBond NE. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity for 24 hours, and subjected to a pull-out test using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The test results were analyzed with two-way ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, post hoc Tamhane' s T2, and student's t-tests at a significance level of 0.05. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in retention strength across the cement groups (p cements showed significantly higher decementation loads than a noneugenol zinc oxide provisional cement (TempBond NE) (p Crown Set, ImProv, Premier Implant Cement, EsTemp Implant, and ImplaTemp. Increasing the cement gap from 20 to 40 μm improved retention significantly for the higher strength cements: Multilink Implant, Premier Implant Cement, ImProv, Cem-Implant, and MIS Crown Set (p cements: EsTemp Implant, ImplaTemp, and TempBond NE (p > 0.05). Resin cements specifically formulated for implant-supported restorations demonstrated significant differences in retention strength. The ranking of cements presented in the study is meant to be an arbitrary guide for the clinician in deciding the appropriate cement selection for CAD/CAM-fabricated metal copings onto

  2. Tensile bond strength of dual curing resin-based cements to commercially pure titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Rafael; de Goes, Mario Fernando; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Chan, Daniel C N

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of dual curing luting resin cements to commercially pure titanium at 10 min and 24h after removal of the oxide layer. One hundred and twenty titanium discs were obtained by casting and polishing with silicon carbide papers. The titanium discs were sandblasted with 50 microm aluminum oxide, ultrasonic cleaned and bonded in pairs with the resin-based cements Panavia F and Rely X ARC at 10 min and 24h after the sandblasting. The tensile test was performed with a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min in an Instron Universal testing machine. The Rely X ARC reached the highest tensile strength value at 24h after sandblasting (18.27 MPa), but there was no statistically significant difference between the two dual curing resin cements for both times tested. All specimens showed a mixture of cohesive fracture in the resin cement and adhesive failure. However, the predominant failure mode for Panavia F was cohesive in resin cement, and the Rely X ARC exhibited a greater proportion of specimens with adhesive failure between the alloy and resin luting cement at 10 min and 24h. Both cements had, statistically, the same tensile bond strength. But in the fracture mode analysis, the adhesive predominant fracture mode of Rely X ARC cement indicates a premature clinical adhesive failure. On the other hand, the cohesive predominant fracture mode of Panavia F indicates a longer clinical adhesive bond with titanium.

  3. Adhesion procedure for CAD/CAM resin crown bonding: Reduction of bond strengths due to artificial saliva contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi-Uemura, Asuka; Mine, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Mariko; Tajiri, Yuko; Higashi, Mami; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Hagino, Ryosuke; Imai, Dai; Minamino, Takuya; Miura, Jiro; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2017-09-12

    The present study aimed to elucidate how saliva contamination affects microtensile bond strength of resin cement to CAD/CAM resin blocks and identify a decontamination method that can restore original bond strength. The KATANA AVENCIA block (Kuraray Noritake Dental) was sandblasted on the adherend surface (P-Co group). Then, the block was contaminated with artificial saliva (Saliveht Aerosol, Teijin). Air dry (N-Co), sandblasting (Sb) and phosphate acid cleaning (AT) groups were prepared. After silane treatment, PANAVIA V5 (Kuraray Noritake Dental) was built up and microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was measured after immersion in water (n=24 per group). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, surface roughness and contact angle measurement of each surface were performed. The P-Co group showed the highest μTBS value, and bond strength was significantly lower in the N-Co group than the other groups (P<0.001). In all groups, decreased bond strength resulted from long-term water storage. In the N-Co group, a contaminated layer was observed on the surface by SEM and the contact angle was significantly smaller than the other groups (P<0.001). In Sb and AT groups, μTBS values that were reduced by artificial saliva contamination significantly increased but did not recover to P-Co group values (P<0.001). SEM showed no morphological difference between P-Co, Sb and AT groups. The Sb group showed increased surface roughness. The long-term durability of bonds between CAD/CAM resin blocks and luting agent cement was significantly reduced by artificial saliva contamination. However, sandblasting or phosphoric acid cleaning can recover bonding effectiveness by 75-85%. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A bioactive dental luting cement--its retentive properties and 3-year clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Steven R; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Appleby, David C; Boston, Daniel; Lööf, Jesper

    2013-02-01

    -year recall. After periodic recalls up to 3 years, Ceramir C&B thus far has performed quite favorably as a luting agent for permanent cementation of permanent restorations. In-vitro crown-coping retention studies were also conducted using this cement and various control cementation materials. Mean laboratory retentive forces measured for Ceramir C&B were comparable to other currently available luting agents for both metal and all-ceramic indirect restorative materials.

  5. Evaluation of Resin-Resin Interface in Direct Composite Restoration Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Iovan, G.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resin-resin interface when a universal bonding agent was used in two different strategies in direct restoration repair. Two composite resins (a micro-filled hybrid and a nano-filled hybrid) as old restorations that have to be repair, a universal bonding agent and a micro-filled hybrid composite resin (different then that aged) as new material for repair were chosen for the study. Non-aged samples were used as control and aged samples were used as study groups. The universal bonding agent was applied in etch-and-rinse and in self-etch strategies. The interface between old and new composite resins was evaluated by SEM and the microleakage was assessed by scoring the dye penetration. Very good adaptation of the two different composite resins placed in direct contact in non-aged samples was recorded. No gaps or defects were visible and strong resin-resin contact was observed. After aging, enlargement of resin-resin junction were observed in most of the samples and a increased dye penetration was recorded irrespective of the strategy (etch-and-rinse or self-etch) used for bonding agent application.

  6. Relined fiberglass post: an ex vivo study of the resin cement thickness and dentin-resin interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niélli Caetano de SOUZA

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the thickness of resin cements in the root thirds when using conventional fiberglass posts (CP and relined fiberglass posts (RP in weakened roots and to evaluate the morphological characteristics of the dentin-resin interface. Forty human maxillary anterior teeth had the crown sectioned below the cemento-enamel junction. The canals were endodontically treated and weakened with diamond burs. Teeth were divided into four groups (n = 10: Group 1 – CP + RelyX ARC; Group 2 – CP + RelyX U200; Group 3 – RP + RelyX ARC; and Group 4 – RP + RelyX U200. Prior to luting, 0.1% Fluorescein and 0.1% Rhodamine B dyes were added to an adhesive and resin cement, respectively. Slices were obtained from the apical, middle, and cervical thirds of the root. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images were recorded in four areas (buccal, lingual, mesial, distal of each third. In each area, four equidistant measures of the resin cement were made and the mean value was calculated. The interface morphology was observed. The data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05. The interaction between fiberglass posts, resin cement, and root thirds was significant (p < 0.0001. The resin cement thicknesses were significantly lower for RP in comparison with CP, except in the apical third. There was no significant difference between the resin cements for RP. There was formation of resin cement tags and adhesive tags along the root for RP. RP favored the formation of thin and uniform resin cement films and resin tags in weakened roots.

  7. Relined fiberglass post: an ex vivo study of the resin cement thickness and dentin-resin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Niélli Caetano de; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Breda, Ricardo Vaz; Weber, João Batista Blessmann; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2016-08-18

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the thickness of resin cements in the root thirds when using conventional fiberglass posts (CP) and relined fiberglass posts (RP) in weakened roots and to evaluate the morphological characteristics of the dentin-resin interface. Forty human maxillary anterior teeth had the crown sectioned below the cemento-enamel junction. The canals were endodontically treated and weakened with diamond burs. Teeth were divided into four groups (n = 10): Group 1 - CP + RelyX ARC; Group 2 - CP + RelyX U200; Group 3 - RP + RelyX ARC; and Group 4 - RP + RelyX U200. Prior to luting, 0.1% Fluorescein and 0.1% Rhodamine B dyes were added to an adhesive and resin cement, respectively. Slices were obtained from the apical, middle, and cervical thirds of the root. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images were recorded in four areas (buccal, lingual, mesial, distal) of each third. In each area, four equidistant measures of the resin cement were made and the mean value was calculated. The interface morphology was observed. The data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The interaction between fiberglass posts, resin cement, and root thirds was significant (p < 0.0001). The resin cement thicknesses were significantly lower for RP in comparison with CP, except in the apical third. There was no significant difference between the resin cements for RP. There was formation of resin cement tags and adhesive tags along the root for RP. RP favored the formation of thin and uniform resin cement films and resin tags in weakened roots.

  8. Effect of pre-heated dual-cured resin cements on the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Morais

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of resin luting agents (LA polymerized using increased temperature on the in vitro microtensile bond strength (mTBS of indirect restorations to dentin. The occlusal dentin surfaces of 40 human third molars were exposed and flattened. The teeth were assigned to 8 groups (n = 5 according to the LA temperature (25°C o r 50°C, curing mode (dual- or self-curing mode, and product (Excite DSC/Variolink II [VII] and XP Bond/Calibra [Cal]. The bonding agents were applied to the dentin surfaces according to manufacturers' instructions. For preheated groups, the LAs were heated to 50°C, subsequently mixed on a heated stirrer surface, and applied to the previously heated pre-polymerized resin discs (2 mm thickness, TPH-Spectrum. The discs were bonded to the dentin surfaces, and the LAs were either exposed to a curing light according to manufacturers' instructions or allowed to self-cure. Specimens were stored in relative humidity at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were mesio-distally and bucco-lingually sectioned to obtain multiple bonded beams with a 1-mm² cross-sectional area for mTBS testing. Data (MPa were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (a = 5% for each product. Specimen failure patterns were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope. VII groups showed higher mTBS at 50°C than at 25°C regardless of curing mode (p = 0.05. Cal groups showed similar mTBS at 25°C and 50°C in all activation modes. The use of some dual-polymerizing LAs at 50°C may improve the mTBS of indirect restorations to dentin.

  9. Influence of proximal box elevation technique on marginal integrity of adhesively luted Cerec inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Veronika; Friedl, Karl-Heinz; Friedl, Katrin; Hahnel, Sebastian; Handel, Gerhard; Lang, Reinhold

    2017-03-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the marginal quality of Lava Ultimate inlays in deep proximal cavities with and without proximal box elevation (PBE) before and after thermomechanical loading (TML). Mesio-occluso-distal cavities with proximal boxes beneath the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) were prepared in 24 human molars. Then, one of the proximal boxes was elevated with Filtek Supreme above the CEJ. The specimens were divided into three groups (n = 8). The inlays of group A were adhesively luted to the cavities with Scotchbond Universal and Rely X Ultimate, the inlays of group B with Monobond Plus, Syntac, and Variolink II, and the inlays of group C with Clearfil Ceramic Primer and Panavia SA Cement. Epoxy resin replicas were taken before and after thermomechanical loading (1,200,000 cycles, 55 °C/5 °C, max. load 50 N). Marginal integrity at the different interfaces tooth/PBE, tooth/dentine, inlay/PBE, inlay/dentine was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (×200). The percentage of continuous margin (% of total proximal margin length) was compared between the groups before and after TML. Mann-Whitney U test (p = 0.05). No significant differences (p > 0.05) before and after TML were found between the three groups for bonding the inlay to dentine or to PBE composite. The marginal integrities of bonding inlays directly to dentine are not different from bonding inlays to a proximal box, which has been elevated by a composite filling material. For deep proximal cavities, the PBE technique could be an alternative technique to conventional methods. Clinical research is needed to confirm.

  10. Aspects of adhesion tests on resin-glass ceramic bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrew Chi Ho; Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit Hon; Burrow, Michael Francis; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to compare and contrast two resin-ceramic bond strength tests, the tensile bond strength and the four-point bending tests. The effects of hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching time and storage condition on bond strength were also studied. Ceramic beams (N=480) with the dimensions of 2.00×2.00×12.45mm 3 were sectioned from lithium disilicate ceramic ingots (IPS e.max CAD), then polished and fired for final crystallization. The joint surfaces were etched with HF gel (IPS Ceramic etching gel) for 20s, 40s, or 60s of each group (n=160). Then, a silane coupling agent (Vitasil ® ) was applied in a single application on the HF etched surfaces, left for 60s before air-drying. Two beams were bonded together with resin composite cement (Variolink II ® ) in a tailored-mold (2.00×2.00×25.00mm 3 ) to control cement thickness to 0.10mm and then light cured on both sides. The bonded specimens were further divided into two groups (n=40): (1) tested one day after luting (dry); and (2) tested after storage in 37°C distilled water for 4 weeks. Two mechanical tests were used (n=20): the tensile bond strength and four-point bending tests. Bond strength results were subjected to two-way AoV, and Weibull statistics with α=0.05. Fracture surfaces were examined visually and verified using light microscopy. The four-point bending test showed a higher consistency than the tensile bond strength test using Weibull statistics (p0.05) and the influence of the storage time was marginally significant (p<0.05). More than 75% of specimens failed adhesively in the four-point bend test while a mixture of adhesive, cohesive and mixed failures was observed in the tensile bond test. The four-point bending test might be a better approach to evaluate bond strengths. Increased HF etching time and a longer storage period resulted in a decrease in the flexural bond strength. However, both HF etching time and storage time had no significant effect on the tensile bond strengths. Copyright

  11. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  12. [Delayed asthma bronchiale due to epoxy resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authried, Georg; Al-Asadi, Haifaa; Møller, Ulla; Sherson, David Lee

    2013-10-28

    Epoxy resin is a low molecular weight agent, which can cause both acute and delayed allergic reactions. However, it is known causing skin reactions with direct or airborne contact. Rarely it can cause airway reactions like asthma bronchiale. We describe a case of a windmill worker who developed delayed asthma bronchiale due to airborne contact with epoxy resin.

  13. [Comparative research for micro-push-out bond strengths of glass fiber posts treated by poly-dopamine or silane coupling agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Su, Yong-liang; Cai, Qing; Bai, Yun-yang; Su, Jing; Wang, Xin-zhi

    2015-12-18

    To evaluate the micro-push-out bond strengths of prefabricated glass fiber posts with poly-dopamine functionalized to root dentin using resin cements, contrasted with silane treatment. In the study, 30 glass fiber posts were randomly divided into 3 groups (10 posts in each group) for different surface treatments. Group 1, treated with poly-dopa; Group 2, treated with silane coupling agent for 60s; Group 3, no surface treatment (Control group). The 30 extracted human, single-rooted teeth were endodontically treated and a 9 mm post space was prepared in each tooth with post drills provided by the manufacturer. Following post cementation, the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 7 days. The micro-push-out bond strengths were tested using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min), and the failure modes were examined with a stereomicroscope. The data of the three groups were statistically analyzed using the one-way ANOVA test(α= 0.05). The bond strengths were (7.909 ± 1.987) MPa for Group 1, (5.906 ± 0.620) MPa for Group 2, and 4.678 ± 0.910 MPa for Group 3. The bond strength of poly-dopamine group was significantly higher than that of the silane group (Psilane treatment, surface poly-dopamine functionalization was confirmed to be a more reliable method for improving the bond strength of resin luting agents to fiber posts.

  14. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  15. A Comparison of Tensile Bond Strength Between Low Translucency and High Translucency Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Using Two Different Resin Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Computer animated design of a veneered dental restoration 2 Figure 2: Computer animated design of a cementable dental implant restoration using a...Hill, E. E. (2007). Dental cements for definitive luting: a review and practical clinical considerations. Dental Clinics of North America, 51(3), 643-58...A COMPARISON OF TENSILE BOND STRENGTH BETWEEN LOW TRANSLUCENCY AND HIGH TRANSLUCENCY LITHIUM DISILICATE CERAMICS USING TWO DIFFERENT RESIN CEMENTS

  16. Galileo's Lute and the Law of Falling Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mark

    2008-05-01

    Galileo's Lute and the Law of Falling Bodies is an excerpt from Galileo 1610. Galileo 1610 is a dramatic, musical and intellectual odyssey back to the life and times of Galileo Galilei, the famous 17th century Italian scientist and philosopher. It commemorates the 400th anniversary of Galileo's discoveries with his telescope in 1610. Dressed in authentic Renaissance attire as Galileo, the author-- a cantorial soloist and amateur astronomer-- tells the fascinating story of "The Father of Modern Science,” drawing from the actual correspondence and writings of Galileo, as well as those of his many biographers. Through his dialogue with the audience on a wide range of discoveries and opinions, "Galileo” shares his wisdom and his life experiences with pathos, wit and humor, lacing his narration with entertaining lute songs from the late Renaissance period, some of which were actually composed by Galileo's father, Vincenzo. Bridging the past to the present, the author breathes life into "Galileo” as he once again frolics and struggles among us. In bringing forth some of life's great issues, we learn something about our own inquisitive nature, as well as that of science and music. The author has appeared as Galileo for over a decade on radio, at community theatres and libraries, public schools, colleges and universities throughout the country. He has performed for civic organizations, astronomy association conventions, marketing and outreach programs as well as private events and parties. Galileo 1610 is suitable for a variety of educational and entertainment programs, for both children and adults. All presentations are tailored to fit the interest, experience and size of the audience.

  17. Effects of primers containing thiouracil and phosphate monomers on bonding of resin to Ag-Pd-Au alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yohsuke; Kamada, Kohji; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of four experimental primers on bond strength between a self-curing luting agent and silver-palladium-gold alloy. The experimental primers were in mixed solutions of a thiouracil primer (Metaltite) and a phosphate primer (Epricord, PM, PE, or PP), which were designated as Metaltite/Epricord, Metaltite/PM, Metaltite/PE, and Metaltite/PP respectively. Three primers (Metal Primer II, V-Primer, and Alloy Primer) were also prepared as controls. Alumina-blasted metal alloys were bonded with acrylic rods. After 5,000 thermocycles, the maximum shear bond strength was obtained with Metaltite/PE (27.8+/-2.4 MPa) and Metaltite/Epricord (27.6+/-5.9 MPa), followed by Metaltite/PP, Alloy Primer, Metaltite, Metaltite/PM, Metal Primer II, V-Primer, and Epricord. PE, PM, and PP showed the lowest bond strength. Results of this study revealed that the combined use of a thiouracil monomer and a phosphate monomer improved adhesive bonding. In this light, clinicians should pay attention to the types of functional monomers dissolved in a primer when fabricating resin-bonded prostheses.

  18. [Research on bond durability among different core materials and zirconia ceramic cemented by self-adhesive resin cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinyu, Luo; Xiangfeng, Meng

    2017-02-01

    This research estimated shear bond durability of zirconia and different substrates cemented by two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100) before and after aging conditioning. Machined zirconia ceramic discs were cemented with four kinds of core material (cobalt-chromium alloy, flowable composite resin core material, packable composite resin, and dentin) with two self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA Luting and RelyX U100). All specimens were divided into eight test groups, and each test group was divided into two subgroups. Each subgroup was subjected to shear test before and after 10 000 thermal cycles. All factors (core materials, cements, and thermal cycle) significantly influenced bond durability of zirconia ceramic (P0.05); observed shear bond strength was significantly higher than those of other substrates (Presin core material, and packable composite resin than that of RelyX U100 (P0.05). Different core materials and self-adhesive resin cements can significantly affect bond durability of zirconia ceramic. 
.

  19. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  20. Comparison of the Effect of Dentin Bonding, Dentin Sealing Agents on the Microleakage of Provisional Crowns Fabricated with Direct and Indirect Technique-An Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, B; Kumar, M Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative sensitivity after temporization is a common complaint in Fixed Partial Denture patients. It is caused by weak and ill fitting temporary restorations which results in microleakage. This can be controlled by providing good temporary restorations and by coating the exposed dentinal tubules of the prepared tooth with dentin bonding agent or dental varnish. Aim The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of dentin-bonding, dentin sealing agents on the microleakage of temporary crowns made by tooth colored auto polymerizing resin fabricated with direct and indirect technique. Materials and Methods Thirty premolar and molar human teeth were collected which were extracted recently was used for the study. The teeth were marked and divided into 3 groups each containing 10 nos. They were individually mounted with self-cure acrylic resin. It was then mounted on a milling machine and crown preparations done. Temporary crowns were fabricated by direct and indirect method with two types of materials. In group A (Control group), the temporary crowns fabricated with both direct and indirect method were cemented directly with temporary luting cement. In group B dentine-bonding agent (solobond M) was applied once to the prepared surface of each tooth specimen before the cementation of temporary crowns where as in case of group C a single layer of dental varnish is applied prior to crown cementation. The entire specimens were immersed in 1% methylene blue and allowed to undergo thermal treatment. It was then sectioned in a hard tissue microtome. Each section was evaluated for dye penetration into the dentin tubules by comparing it with a visual scale. Statistical Analysis SPSS Version 13 software was used for non-parametric data analysis by a qualified statistician. P-values less than 0.05 (p-valuecemented with crowns fabricated in direct technique showed the least amount of microleakage when compared with group A and group C. Group C (Dental Varnish

  1. Comparison of the Effect of Dentin Bonding, Dentin Sealing Agents on the Microleakage of Provisional Crowns Fabricated with Direct and Indirect Technique-An Invitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Peter; Muthukumar, B; Kumar, M Vasantha

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative sensitivity after temporization is a common complaint in Fixed Partial Denture patients. It is caused by weak and ill fitting temporary restorations which results in microleakage. This can be controlled by providing good temporary restorations and by coating the exposed dentinal tubules of the prepared tooth with dentin bonding agent or dental varnish. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of dentin-bonding, dentin sealing agents on the microleakage of temporary crowns made by tooth colored auto polymerizing resin fabricated with direct and indirect technique. Thirty premolar and molar human teeth were collected which were extracted recently was used for the study. The teeth were marked and divided into 3 groups each containing 10 nos. They were individually mounted with self-cure acrylic resin. It was then mounted on a milling machine and crown preparations done. Temporary crowns were fabricated by direct and indirect method with two types of materials. In group A (Control group), the temporary crowns fabricated with both direct and indirect method were cemented directly with temporary luting cement. In group B dentine-bonding agent (solobond M) was applied once to the prepared surface of each tooth specimen before the cementation of temporary crowns where as in case of group C a single layer of dental varnish is applied prior to crown cementation. The entire specimens were immersed in 1% methylene blue and allowed to undergo thermal treatment. It was then sectioned in a hard tissue microtome. Each section was evaluated for dye penetration into the dentin tubules by comparing it with a visual scale. SPSS Version 13 software was used for non-parametric data analysis by a qualified statistician. P-values less than 0.05 (p-valuecrowns fabricated in direct technique showed the least amount of microleakage when compared with group A and group C. Group C (Dental Varnish) specimen showed comparatively more amount of microleakage than that of

  2. In vitro shear bond strength of Y-TZP ceramics to different core materials with the use of three primer/resin cement systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Ayad, Neveen M; Khan, Zahid A; Mahrous, Amr A; Morgano, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Durability of the bond between different core materials and zirconia retainers is an important predictor of the success of a dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, because of its polycrystalline structure, zirconia cannot be etched and bonded to a conventional resin cement. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effects of 3 metal primer/resin cement systems on the shear bond strength (SBS) of 3 core materials bonded to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic retainers. Zirconia ceramic (Cercon) disks (5×3 mm) were airborne-particle abraded, rinsed, and air-dried. Disk-shaped core specimens (7×7 mm) that were prepared of composite resin, Ni-Cr, and zirconia were bonded to the zirconia ceramic disks by using one of 3 metal primer/cement systems: (Z-Prime Plus/BisCem, Zirconia Primer/Multilink Automix, or Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Clearfil SA). SBS was tested in a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopy was used to evaluate the failure mode of debonded specimens. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis using the Scheffe procedure (α=.05). Clearfil SA/Clearfil Ceramic Primer system with an Ni-Cr core yielded the highest SBS value (19.03 MPa), whereas the lowest SBS value was obtained when Multilink Automix/Zirconia Primer system was used with the zirconia core group (4.09 MPa). Differences in mean SBS values among the cement/primer groups were statistically significant, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem with both composite resin and zirconia cores. Differences in mean SBS values among the core subgroups were not statistically significant, except for zirconia core with BisCem, Multilink, and Clearfil SA. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, except for Clearfil SA and BisCem luting agents with composite resin cores, which displayed cohesive failure, and Multilink Automix with a composite resin, core as well as Clearfil SA with Ni-Cr cores, where the debonded specimens of each group displayed a mixed

  3. [Morphological and failure mode study of different fiber posts luted with different adhesive systems to root dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Jin-Le; Hao, Liang

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the correlation of morphological characteristics and failure modes of two types of glass-fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cement and etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Thirty-six intact single-rooted premolars were collected and removed the crown. After root canal therapy, teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group A: Self-adhesive with POPO fiber post. Group B: Etch-and-rinse with POPO fiber posts. Group C: Self-adhesive with Para Post. Group D: Etch-and-rinse with Para Post. Each root was sectioned into six 1 mm-thick serial slices and a push-out test was performed. The dentin-cement-post adhesive interface of each specimen and failure modes after fracture were evaluated by stereomicroscope observation. Interface morphology observe indicated that voids present in group B (64.2%) and D (66.7%) were significantly higher than group A (5.8%) and C (13.7%) (P adhesive interface were discrepant with failure modes in different root region. There were interaction between adhesive systems and fiber posts.

  4. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  5. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001). All eight experimental means (MPa) were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05) and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3); Tyrian-One Step Plus/Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6); Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9); Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5); Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8) Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2); Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5); Xeno III/Variolink II/ 90 d (33.0±8.9). Conclusions: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  6. Bond strength durability of self-etching adhesives and resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Andrade Lima Chaves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar within a short (24 h and long period of evaluation (90 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y, producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm² cross-sectional area, which were subjected to µTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The µTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05. RESULTS: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001. All eight experimental means (MPa were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05 and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3; Tyrian-One Step Plus /Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6; Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9; Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5; Tyrian-One Step Plus /C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8 Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2; Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5; Xeno III/Variolink II/90 d (33.0±8.9. CONCLUSIONS: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water.

  7. Effect of thermocycling with or without 1 year of water storage on retentive strengths of luting cements for zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Vicky; Kampf, Gabriel; Stender, Elmar; Willershausen, Brita; Ernst, Claus-Peter

    2015-06-01

    Bond stability between zirconia crowns and luting cement and between cement and dentin is a main concern; however, only limited evidence is available as to its longevity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the retentive strengths of 7 self-adhesive cements (RelyX Unicem Aplicap, RelyX Unicem Clicker, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, iCEM, Maxcem Elite, Bifix SE, SpeedCem), 2 adhesive cements with self-etch primers (Panavia 21, SEcure), 1 glass ionomer cement (Ketac Cem), 1 resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Meron Plus), and 1 zinc phosphate cement for luting zirconia crowns (LAVA) to extracted teeth after thermocycling with or without 1 year of water storage. Two-hundred-forty extracted human molars (2 treatments; n=10 per cement) were prepared in a standardized manner. All cements were used according to the manufacturers' recommendations. The intaglios of the crowns were treated with airborne-particle abrasion. After thermocycling (×5000, 5°C/55°C) with or without 1 year of water storage, the cemented ceramic crowns were removed by using a Zwick universal testing device. Statistical analyses were done with the Wilcoxon rank sum and the 2-independent-samples Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Median retentive strengths [MPa] for specimens thermocycled only/thermocycled with 1 year of water storage were as follows: Panavia 21: 1.7/2.5, SEcure: 3.0/3.0, RelyX Unicem Aplicap: 3.1/3.4, RelyX Unicem Clicker: 4.1/4.2, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix: 3.8/3.1, iCEM: 2.3/2.7, Maxcem Elite: 3.0/3.2, Bifix SE: 1.7/1.7, SpeedCem: 1.3/1.6, Meron Plus: 3.1/2.7, Ketac Cem: 1.4/1.4, and zinc phosphate cement: 1.1/1.6. Statistically significant differences were found only among specimens thermocycled only or thermocycled with 1-year water storage (P<.001). Significant differences in retentive strengths were observed among cements after thermocycling only or thermocycling with 1 year of water storage, but not for the effect of the additional 1 year of water storage. Copyright © 2015

  8. Highly stable microwave susceptible agents via encapsulation of Ti-mineral superfine powders in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules for tumor hyperthermia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Dan; Mao, Jingsong; Liu, Tianlong; Fu, Changhui; Tan, Longfei; Ren, Xiangling; Shi, Haitang; Su, Hongying; Ren, Jun; Meng, Xianwei

    2016-05-01

    In this study, Ti-mineral superfine powders (Ti-MSP) encapsulated in urea-formaldehyde resin microcapsules (Ti-MSP@UF-MC) were successfully prepared via a one-step microemulsion method for the first time. Because of the strong confinement effects, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC possessed perfect microwave heating effects. The temperature was 9.3 °C higher than that of the saline solution, superior to UF-MC (no significant microwave heating effect, 0 °C) and Ti-MSP (5.1 °C). The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed low toxicity and good biocompatibility via a series of studies, including a hemolysis study and the MTT assay in vitro and in vivo. When the concentration was below 1000 μg mL-1, the hemolysis rate was lower than 5% (hemolysis study). When the concentration was below 400 μg mL-1, the cell activity was higher than 80% (MTT assay). Moreover, the Ti-MSP@UF-MC exhibited an ideal CT imaging effect in vivo owing to the large molecular weight of Ti-MSP. The Ti-MSP@UF-MC showed a favorable microwave therapy effect in vivo. Using mice bearing H22 tumor cells as an animal model, the tumor suppression rate could reach 100%.

  9. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Raquel; Castillo-de Oyagüe, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al₂O₃-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al₂O₃-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pretreated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm² sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p Resin-ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or sandblasted alumina showed the most stable interfaces. CAL experimented spontaneous debonding in all tested groups.

  10. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Ng; Jimmy C. M. Hsiao; Keith C. T. Tong; Harry Kim; Yanjie Mai; Keith H. S. Chan

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin ...

  11. Effect of sulfuric acid etching of polyetheretherketone on the shear bond strength to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproesser, Oliver; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-10-01

    To examine the influence of etching duration on the bond strength of PEEK substrate in combination with different resin composite cements. In total, 448 PEEK specimens were fabricated, etched with sulfuric acid for 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 300 s and then luted with two conventional resin cements (RelyX ARC and Variolink II) and one self-adhesive resin cement (Clearfil SA Cement) (n = 18/subgroup). Non-etched specimens served as the control group. Specimens were stored in distilled water for 28 days at 37°C and shear bond strengths were measured. Data were analyzed nonparametrically using Kruskal-Wallis-H (p sulfuric acid seems to be suitable and effective for PEEK surface pre-treatment, further investigations are required to examine the effect of other adhesive systems and cements.

  12. Resin Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    to see plastic deformation of the surface. 8.1.4.3 Density: Density using the Archimedes principle (ASTM D 792). 8.1.4.4 Density as a Function of...the cure and postcure, quickly cool the sample to 0 °C or lower the temperature to quench the reaction, and then ramp the temperature at 5 °C/min to...prepared by pouring 10 g of resin into a 30-mL screw-cap scintillation vial and adding appropriate amounts of initiator, catalyst, and inhibitor

  13. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Biodentine, Resin Modified GIC and Hybrid Composite Resin as a Core Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, Dayalan; Shoba, Krishnamma; Aman, Shibu; Bharkavi, Srinivasan Kumar Indu; Nimmi, Vijayan; Abhilash, Radhakrishnan

    2017-09-01

    The restoration of a severely damaged tooth usually needs a post and core as a part of treatment procedure to provide a corono - radicular stabilization. Biodentine is a class of dental material which possess high mechanical properties with excellent biocompatibility and bioactive behaviour. The sealing ability coupled with optimum physical properties could make Biodentine an excellent option as a core material. The aim of the study was to determine the fracture resistance of Biodentine as a core material in comparison with resin modified glass ionomer and composite resin. Freshly extracted 30 human permanent maxillary central incisors were selected. After endodontic treatment followed by post space preparation and luting of Glass fibre post (Reforpost, Angelus), the samples were divided in to three groups based on the type of core material. The core build-up used in Group I was Biodentine (Septodont, France), Group II was Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (GC, Japan) and Group III was Hybrid Composite Resin (TeEconom plus, Ivoclar vivadent). The specimens were subjected to fracture toughness using Universal testing machine (1474, Zwick/Roell, Germany) and results were compared using One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's Post hoc test. The results showed that there was significant difference between groups in terms of fracture load. Also, composite resin exhibited highest mean fracture load (1039.9 N), whereas teeth restored with Biodentine demonstrated the lowest mean fracture load (176.66 N). Resin modified glass ionomer exhibited intermediate fracture load (612.07 N). The primary mode of failure in Group I and Group II was favourable (100%) while unfavourable fracture was seen in Group III (30%). Biodentine, does not satisfy the requirements to be used as an ideal core material. The uses of RMGIC's as a core build-up material should be limited to non-stress bearing areas. Composite resin is still the best core build-up material owing to its high fracture

  14. Acidity of conventional luting cements and their diffusion through bovine dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraishi, N; Kitasako, Y; Nikaido, T; Foxton, R M; Tagami, J; Nomura, S

    2003-09-01

    To examine the changes in pH of luting cements and acid diffusion of luting cements through bovine dentine using a pH-imaging microscope (SCHEM-100; Horiba Ltd, Kyoto, Japan). The pH of the surface of three conventional luting cements, glass-ionomer, zinc phosphate and zinc polycarboxylate was measured with SCHEM-100 for 1 month. The acid diffusion from the three luting cements through bovine dentine was investigated by measuring pH changes during the application of each luting cement on the bovine dentine surface. Coronal bovine dentine disks were prepared to thicknesses of 0.50 and 0.25 mm. Each luting cement was placed on the labial dentine surface, and the pH change of the pulpal surface was observed every 3 min for 30 min with SCHEM-100. Glass-ionomer showed the lowest pH values for longer times. Neutralization proceeded furthest in zinc polycarboxylate. The 0.5-mm-thick dentine disks showed no pH change on the pulpal side with all the three cements. The 0.25-mm-thick disks revealed evidence of acid diffusion on the pulpal side of the cemented dentine and significantly lower pH when cemented with glass-ionomer and zinc phosphate than with zinc polycarboxylates. This study demonstrated that glass-ionomer exhibited a lower setting pH than zinc phosphate and zinc polycarboxylate, and acid diffusions from glass-ionomer and zinc phosphate cements were observed when placed on 0.25-mm-thick dentine disks.

  15. Effect of EDTA with various surface active agents on the bond strength of an epoxy resin-based sealer to dentin: ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Burak Güneşer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of addition of various surface-modifying agents to EDTA solution on the bond strength of an epoxy-based sealer to the root canal dentin. Materials and Method: Sixty single-rooted human mandibular premolars were decoronated and instrumented using rotary system. The specimens were then randomly divided into four groups (n=15 according to irrigation with different EDTA solution (Wizard, Rehber Kimya, Istanbul, Turkey combinations as follows: Group 1: 17% EDTA + 0.1% benzalkonium chloride; Group 2: 17% EDTA + 0.1% Tween 80; Group 3: 17% EDTA + 0.1% Triton X-100 and control group: 17% EDTA without any surface-modifying agents. Surface tensions of the EDTA solutions were controlled with a tensiometer. Final irrigation was with 5 mL of 5% sodium hypochlorite (Wizard for 1 min, followed by 5 mL of the mentioned EDTA solution for another minute. Roots were obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany using cold lateral compaction technique. Horizontal root sections were obtained, and push-out test was used to measure the bond strength between the root canal dentin and sealer. Data were analyzed using the two-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey tests (p<0.05. Results: The bond strength of sealer in groups irrigated with EDTA in combination with surface modifying agents did not differ from that of the control (p=0.106. The coronal and middle third in all groups exhibited significantly greater bond strength values when compared with the apical third (p=0.004 and p=0.002, respectively. There was no statistical significant difference between the coronal and the middle thirds (p=0.979. Conclusion: The addition of surface modifying agents to EDTA solution did not affect the bond strength of the epoxy resin–based sealer.

  16. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to glass-ionomer cement using self-etching bonding agents with different pH: In vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Rajan, Karunamoorthy Jeyavel; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Porkodi, Ilango

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the bonding ability of composite to unset glass-ionomer cement (GIC) using different self-etching bonding systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred samples of composite bonded to unset GIC were prepared and were divided into four groups. In Group A, composite was bonded to unset GIC employing a strong (pH 1) self-etch primer was used. In Group B, intermediary strong (pH 1.4) self-etch primer was employed. In Group C and D, mild (pH 2) and (pH 2.2) self-etch primer was employed. Shear bond strength analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: Statistical analysis performed with one way analysis of variance and Tukey's test showed that the bond strength of composite to unset GIC was significantly higher for the mild self-etch primer group. In addition, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis was used to determine the composition of various structural phases identified by FE-SEM along the GIC-bonding agent interfaces. Conclusion: Hence this present study concludes that clinically the use of mild self-etching bonding agent over unset GIC has improved bond strength compared to the use of strong and intermediate self-etching bonding agent. PMID:22368331

  17. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  18. Uso da luteína em dietas para cães

    OpenAIRE

    Alarça, Lais Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    Resumo: Carotenóides são pigmentos naturais que proporcionam efeitos benéficos específicos ao organismo, como melhora da resposta imune e saúde intestinal. Dentre estes, a luteína vem chamando atenção pelos seus efeitos imunomoduladores, atuando principalmente sobre os linfócitos T do sangue. Em cães, pesquisas comprovaram que estes animais podem absorver a luteína da dieta. Devido à alta relação entre a nutrição e a imunidade, foi conduzido um experimento objetivando avaliar a digestibilidad...

  19. The impact of resin-coating on sub-critical crack extension in a porcelain laminate veneer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xu; Fleming, Garry J P; Addison, Owen

    2017-05-01

    Characterisation of the interaction between crack extension, crack stabilisation and stress/strain relaxation in the polymeric matrix, the interplay between stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical response of a resin-based luting adhesive within a surface defect population could extend PLV restoration longevity by optimising cementation protocols. The aim was to investigate the influence of stress corrosion cracking and the viscoelastic behaviour of a resin-based luting adhesive independently by controlling the environmental conditions operative during test specimen fabrication. The effects of stress corrosion at ceramic crack tips and potential viscoelastic responses to loading of the resin-coated impregnating cracks were isolated. Resin-coated feldspathic ceramic test specimens were fabricated in ambient humidity or following moisture exclusion. Bi-axial flexure strengths of groups (n = 20) were determined at constant loading rates of 2.5, 10, 40, 160 or 640 N/min and data was compared with uncoated controls. Fractographic analyses were performed on all fractured test specimens. Resin-cement coating resulted in significant ceramic strengthening in all conditions tested (p resin- coating significantly increased mean BFS (ptests identified that moisture exclusion resulted in significant increases in BFS values only at intermediate loading rates with no significant differences observed at either the fastest or slowest loading rates (640 and 2.5 N/min, respectively). Mechanical reinforcement of PLV materials by resin-cement systems is yet to be optimized. The viscoelastic behavior of the resin-cement itself can influence the magnitude of reinforcement observed and sub-critical crack growth. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of proximal box elevation with resin composite on marginal quality of ceramic inlays in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberger, Roland; Hehn, Julia; Hajtó, Jan; Krämer, Norbert; Naumann, Michael; Koch, Andreas; Roggendorf, Matthias J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the marginal quality and resin-resin transition of milled CAD/CAM glass-ceramic inlays in deep proximal cavities with and without 3-mm proximal box elevation (PBE) using resin composites before and after thermomechanical loading. MOD cavities with one proximal box beneath the cementoenamel junction were prepared in 48 extracted human third molars. Proximal boxes ending in dentin were elevated for 3 mm with different resin composites (RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, and Maxcem Elite as self-adhesive resin cements and Clearfil Majesty Posterior as restorative resin composite in one or three layers bonded with AdheSE) or left untreated. IPS Empress CAD inlays were luted with Syntac and Variolink II (n = 8). Marginal quality as well as the PBE-ceramic interface were analyzed under an SEM using epoxy resin replicas before and after thermomechanical loading (100,000 × 50 N and 2,500 thermocycles between +5°C and +55°C). Bonding glass-ceramic directly to dentin showed the highest amounts of gap-free margins in dentin (92%, p resin composite applied in three layers achieved 84% gap-free margins in dentin; PBE with self-adhesive resin cements exhibited significantly more gaps in dentin (p resin composite, PBE may be an alternative to ceramic bonding to dentin. Self-adhesive resin cements seem not suitable for this indication. For deep proximal boxes ending in dentin, a PBE may be an alternative to conventional techniques.

  1. Effect of Amount of 3-Methacryloxy Propyl Thrimethoxysilane Coupling Agent and Nano Filling Structure on Physic-Mechanical Properties of Dental Resin Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farbod Tondnevis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers in the field of dental polymeric base nano composite investigated the effect filling morphology and filling material content on mechanical and physical properties of construction after setting reaction. Our present study concentrated on the effect of ϒ metacryloxy propyloxt tri metoxy silane (ϒ MPS content as coupling agent (orgnic material on physical and mechanical performance of nano composite material. It was shown that despite of contraction after setting reaction, all this properties improved and efficient silanization can efficiently affect structural integrity of dental filling nano composite

  2. Comparison of Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Ariadent and Harvard Polycarboxylate Cement and Vitremer Resin Modified Glass Ionomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadian Khoshemehr Leila

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Luting agents are used to attach indirect restoration into or on the tooth. Poor mechanical properties of cement may be a cause of fracture of this layer and lead to caries and restoration removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the elastic modulus and compressive strength of Ariadent (A Poly and Harvard polycarboxylate (H Poly cements and Vitremer resin modified glass ionomer (RGl.Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 15 specimens were prepared form each experimental cement in Laboratory of Tehran Oil Refining Company. The cylindrical specimens were compressed in Instron machine after 24 hours. Elastic modulus and compressive strength were calculated from stress/strain curve of each specimen. One way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis and P values<0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Results: The mean elastic modulus and mean compressive strength were 2.2 GPa and 87.8MPa in H poly, 2.4 GPa and 56.5 MPa in A Poly, and 0.8GPa and 105.6 MPa in RGI, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that compressive strength and elastic modulus of both polycarboxylate cements were significantly different from hybrid ionomer (P<0.05, but the difference between elastic modulus of two types of polycarboxilate cements was not statistically significant. Compressive strength of two polycarboxilate cements were significantly different (P<0.05. Conclusion: An ideal lutting agent must have the best mechanical properties. Between the tested luttins RGl cement had the lowest elastic modulus and the highest compressive strength, but the A poly cement had the highest elastic modulus and the lowest compressive strength. Therefore none of them was the best.

  3. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  4. A comparison of tensile bond strengths of resin-retained prostheses made using five alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubo, J H; Pegoraro, L F; Ferreira, P M

    1996-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of metal frameworks cast using Ni-Cr, Ni-Cr-Be, Cu-Al, type IV gold, and noble metal ceramic alloy with and without tin electroplating. The castings were luted to human teeth using Panavia Ex resin. It was found that tin electroplating had a negative effect for the Cu-Al and type IV gold alloys and a positive effect for gold for metal ceramic restorations. The best results were obtained using the Ni-Cr alloy.

  5. Effect of Resin-modified Glass Ionomer Cement Dispensing/Mixing Methods on Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, T A; Abdulmajeed, A A; Altitinchi, A; Ahmed, S N; Donovan, T E

    2018-03-23

    Resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGIs) are often used for luting indirect restorations. Hand-mixing traditional cements demands significant time and may be technique sensitive. Efforts have been made by manufacturers to introduce the same cement using different dispensing/mixing methods. It is not known what effects these changes may have on the mechanical properties of the dental cement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties (diametral tensile strength [DTS], compressive strength [CS], and fracture toughness [FT]) of RMGIs with different dispensing/mixing systems. The RMGI specimens (n=14)-RelyX Luting (hand mix), RelyX Luting Plus (clicker-hand mix), RelyX Luting Plus (automix) (3M ESPE), GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix), and GC FujiCEM 2 (automix) (GC)-were prepared for each mechanical test and examined after thermocycling (n=7/subgroup) for 20,000 cycles to the following: DTS, CS (ISO 9917-1) and FT (ISO standard 6872; Single-edge V-notched beam method). Specimens were mounted and loaded with a universal testing machine until failure occurred. Two-/one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey honestly significantly different post hoc test was used to analyze data for statistical significance ( p<0.05). The interaction effect of both dispensing/mixing method and thermocycling was significant only for the CS test of the GC group ( p<0.05). The different dispensing/mixing methods had no effect on the DTS of the tested cements. The CS of GC Fuji PLUS was significantly higher than that of the automix version ( p<0.05). The FT decreased significantly when switching from RelyX (hand mix) to RelyX Luting Plus (clicker-hand mix) and to RelyX Luting Plus (automix) ( p<0.05). Except in the case of the DTS of the GC group and the CS of GC Fuji PLUS, thermocycling had a significant effect reducing the mechanical properties of the RMGI cements ( p<0.05). Introducing alternative dispensing/mixing methods for mixing RMGIs to reduce time and

  6. Biocompatibility Evaluation of Dental Luting Cements Using Cytokine Released from Human Oral Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sung Kwon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental luting cements are commonly used in dentistry for cementation of prosthetic restoration. Many previous studies focused on the measurement of the cell viability as the method of cytotoxicity evaluation during biocompatibility study for the material. In this study, the biocompatibility of various dental luting cements were evaluated using the new method of cytokine release measurement in order to better simulate inflammatory reactions in animal or clinical model using two different oral cells; immortalized human gingival fibroblast and immortalized human oral keratinocytes. Cells were exposed to extractions of various commercially available dental luting cements for different durations. Cytokines of IL-1α and IL-8 were measured from the supernatants of the cells and the results were then compared to the conventional MTT viability test. The result from the conventional cell viability study showed a relatively simple and straight forward indication that only one of the dental luting cements tested in this study was cytotoxic with increasing duration of exposure for both cells. Meanwhile, the result from the cytokine measurement study was much more complex at the time point they were measured, type of cells used for the study and the type of cytokines measured, all of which influenced the interpretation of the results. Hence, the better understanding of the cytokine release would be required for the application in biocompatibility evaluation.

  7. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of luting cement to ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Özcan, Mutlu; Vallittu, Pekka K.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of a Bis-GMA based luting cement to six commercial dental ceramics. Methods. Six disc shaped ceramic specimens (glass ceramics, glass infiltrated alumina, glass infiltrated zirconium

  8. Microscopic evaluation of the human dental pulp after full crown cementation with resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Luiz C.; Pegoraro, Luiz F.; Consolaro, Alberto; Valle, Accácio L. do; Bonfante, Gerson

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated microscopically the dental pulp reactions in human premolars prepared for metaloceramic crowns cemented with different luting agents and also measured the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) of the prepared teeth. Twenty-five teeth were selected from patients that needed exodontia for orthodontic reasons and were randomly divided in three groups: group 1- five teeth were not prepared to serve as a positive control group; groups - 2, and 3 the teeth were prepared for metaloce...

  9. Effect of resin shades on opacity of ceramic veneers and polymerization efficiency through ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Elif; Chiang, Yu-Chih; Coşgun, Erdal; Bolay, Şükran; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different resin cement shades on the opacity and color difference of ceramics and to determine the polymerization efficiency of the resin cement at different shades after curing through ceramics. Two different ceramics (IPS e.max Press and IPS Empress(®)CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) were used for this study. A light-cured veneer luting resin (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent) in four different shades of HV+1, HV+3, LV-1, and LV-3 was used for the colorimetric measurements. The color and spectral reflectance of the ceramics were measured according to the CIELab color scale relative to the standard illuminant D65 on a reflection spectrophotometer (ColorEye7000A, USA). Color differences (ΔE values) and the contrast ratios (CR) of the different groups of samples were calculated. In order to analyse the polymerization efficiency of the resin cements, the micromechanical properties of the resins were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). The results were analysed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc tests (SPSS 18.0). The one-way ANOVA test showed that the values of ΔE and CR of the different specimen groups were significantly different (p<0.05). Group 1 (20.7 ± 0.5) (IPS-CAD without resin cement) exhibited the highest and group 10 (14.8 ± 0.5) (e.max:HV+3) exhibited the lowest ΔE value. Significant differences in the micromechanical properties were identified among the tested resin cements in different shades (p<0.05). Resin cement shade is an important factor for the opacity of a restoration. Furthermore, the resin shade affects the micromechanical properties of the underlying resin cement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Study on Synthesis of Thoreau-modified 3, 5-Dimethyl-Thioltoluenediamine Used as Epoxy Resin Curing Agent and Its Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yongli; Xiao, Wenzheng

    2017-06-01

    A novel curing agent Thoreau modified 3, 5-Dimethyl-thioltoluenediamine was synthesized and its molecular structure was characterized by FTIR and DSC. The curing kinetics of a high toughness and low volume shrinkage ratio epoxy system (modified DMTDA/DGEBA) was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under noni so thermal conditions. The data were fitted to an order model and autocatalytic model respectively. The results indicate that in order model deviates significantly from experimental data. Malik’s method was used to prove that the curing kinetics of the system concerned follow single-step autocatalytic model, and a “single-point model-free” approach was employed to calculate meaningful kinetic parameters. The DSC curves derived from autocatalytic model gave satisfactory agreement with that of experiment in the range 5K/min∼25K/min. As the heating rate increased, the predicted DSC curves deviated from experimental curves, and the total exothermic enthalpy declined owing to the transition of competition relationship between kinetics control and diffusion control.

  11. Effect of 2 Bleaching Agents with a Content of High Concentrated Hydrogen Peroxide on Stained 2 CAD/CAM Blocks and a Nanohybrid Composite Resin: An AFM Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İzgen Karakaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate color stability of 3 restorative materials, discoloration ability of different solutions, efficacy of 2 office bleaching agents, and surface roughness and topography. Sixty specimens for Clearfil Majesty Esthetic (CME, Lava Ultimate (LU, and Vita Enamic (VE were prepared. They were immersed into 3 staining solutions for 2 weeks and then they were bleached. According to the measured L⁎, a⁎, and b⁎ parameters described by CIELAB system, color changes (ΔE00, translucency parameters (TP, whiteness index values (W⁎, and changes in closeness to pure white (ΔW⁎ were calculated. Then 3 specimens from each group were scanned with an atomic force microscope for surface analysis. After staining, CME groups and control groups of LU and VE showed clinically acceptable color changes (ΔE00<1,8. After bleaching, while a reverse effect on color was observed, VE showed the furthest color values to pure white. There was no statistically significant difference between whiteness index values of LU and CME. LU was the most translucent material during the study and TP values of materials showed minimal differences. Most of the VE groups and a control group of LU showed surface roughness (Ra values higher than critical value for biofilm accumulation (0,2 μm.

  12. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Ng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  13. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith H. S.; Mai, Yanjie; Kim, Harry; Tong, Keith C. T.; Ng, Desmond; Hsiao, Jimmy C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  14. Evaluation of Two Olibanum Resins as Rate Controlling Matrix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olibanum is an oleo-gum resin which is economically and culturally valuable product obtained from several species of the genus Boswellia. In this study, the resins extracted from local olibanum: Boswellia papyrifera (Tigray type) and Boswellia rivae (Ogaden type) were evaluated as matrix forming agents in sustained ...

  15. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  16. Zinc and resin bonded NdFeB magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonowicz, M.; Kaszuwara, W.

    2002-01-01

    Zinc and resin bonded NdFeB magnets were processed. Basic magnetic parameters as well as compressive strength were evaluated versus annealing temperature and volume fraction of the bonding agent. For the zinc bonded magnets phase composition was investigated. The additional NdZn 5 phase was found in the Zn bonded magnets after annealing. Comparison of the Zn and resin bonded magnets reveals higher remanence for the former and higher coercivity for the latter. For the Zn and resin bonded magnets, 15 wt.% Zn / 370 o C and 7-10 wt.% resin were chosen as the optimal processing parameters. (author)

  17. Water Sorption and Solubility of Different Luting and Restorative Dental Cements

    OpenAIRE

    KEYF, Filiz; TUNA, S. Hakan; ŞEN, Murat; SAFRANY, Agnes

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the water sorption and solubility of four provisional, three permanent luting cements and five restorative cements. Methods: A split ring mould was fabricated for the preparation of specimen discs which were 15.0 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm thick. All specimens were manipulated according to the manufacturer's instructions and then subjected to water sorption and solubility tests. Data were analysed with Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test. Scannin...

  18. Effect of Resin Cement Mixing Method on the Retention Strength of a CAD/CAM Zirconia Crowns

    OpenAIRE

    Sadighpour, Leyla; Fazel, Akbar; Geramipanah, Farideh; Allahdadi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Several treatments have been suggested to improve the retention of zirconia-based restorations luted with different cements. Resin cements are believed to improve crown retention under certain circumstances. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of three cements with different mixing methods on the retention of CAD/CAM zirconia crowns. Thirty extracted human molars were randomly divided into three groups and prepared for all-ceramic crowns (6° taper, 4-mm height and a 1.2 mm ...

  19. Luting of ceramic crowns with a self-adhesive cement: effect of contamination on marginal adaptation and fracture strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavcheva, Slavena; Krejci, Ivo; Bortolotto, Tissiana

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluated the percentages of continuous margins (%CM) and fracture strength (FS) of crowns made out from blocs of leucite-reinforced ceramic (IPS Empress CAD) and luted with a representative self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem) under four contaminating agents: saliva, water, blood, a haemostatic solution containing aluminium chloride (pH= 0.8) and a control group with no contamination. %CM at both tooth-cement (TC) and cement-crown (CC) interfaces were determined before and after a fatigue test consisting of 600'000 chewing loads and 1'500 temperature cycles changing from 5⁰ C to 50⁰ C. Load to fracture was recorded on fatigued specimens. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare %CM and FS between the five groups with a level of confidence of 95%. At the TC interface, no significant differences in marginal adaptation before loading could be detected between groups. After loading, a significant marginal degradation was observed in the group contaminated with aluminium chloride (52 ± 22 %CM) in respect to the other groups. No significant differences in %CM could be detected between the groups contaminated with saliva, water, blood and the control. At the CC interface, no significant differences in marginal adaptation were observed between the groups. The FS on loaded specimens was around 1637N, with no significant differences between groups as well. An adverse interaction of the highly acidic haemostatic agent with either dentin or the self-adhesive cement could explain the specimens' marginal degradation. The self-adhesive cement tested in this study was no sensitive to moisture contamination either with saliva, water or blood.

  20. Method of heat decomposition for chemical decontaminating resin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To make resin wastes into non-deleterious state, discharge them into a resin waste storage tank of existent radioactive waste processing facility and store and dispose them. Constitution: In the processing of chemical decontaminating resin wastes, iron exchange resins adsorbing chemical decontaminating agents comprising a solution of citric acid, oxalic acid, formic acid and EDTA alone or as a mixture of them are heated to dry, thermally decomposed and then separated from the ion exchange resins. That is, the main ingredients of the chemical decontaminating agents are heat-decomposed when heated and dried at about 250 deg C in air and converted into non-toxic gases such as CO, CO 2 , NO, NO 2 or H 2 O. Further, since combustion or carbonization of the basic materials for the resin is not caused at such a level of temperature, the resin wastes removed with organic acid and chelating agents are transferred to an existent resin waste storage tank and stored therein. In this way, facility cost and radiation exposure can remarkably be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Physical Properties, Film Thickness, and Bond Strengths of Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements According to Their Delivery Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Taiseer A; Abdulmajeed, Awab A; Altitinchi, Ali; Ahmed, Sumitha N; Donovan, Terence E

    2018-03-05

    To determine the effect of changing the dispensing or mixing method of resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cements on their water sorption, solubility, film thickness, and shear bond strength. Disc-shaped specimens of RMGI cements (RelyX: Luting [handmix], Luting Plus [clicker-handmix], Luting Plus [automix], GC: Fuji PLUS [capsule-automix], FujiCEM 2 [automix], [n = 10]) were prepared according to ISO standard 4049 for water sorption and solubility tests. Furthermore, the percentage of mass change, percentage of solubility, and percentage of water absorbed was also determined. Film thickness was measured according to ISO standard 9917-2; the mean of 5 measurements for each cement was calculated. Shear bond strength for each cement was determined according to ISO standard 29022 before and after thermocycling at 20,000 cycles, temperatures 5 to 55°C with a 15-second dwell time (n = 10/subgroup). Two- and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze data for statistical significance (p 0.05). RelyX Luting Plus (clicker-handmix) displayed lower solubility than its handmix and automix counterparts (p < 0.05). Film thickness of RelyX cements was significantly different (p < 0.05). RelyX Luting Plus (automix) had the lowest film thickness (19 μm) compared to its handmix (48 μm) and clicker-handmix (117 μm) counterparts (p < 0.05). GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix, 22 μm) was significantly lower than the automix version (GC FujiCEM 2, 127 μm) (p < 0.05). Shear bond strength of RelyX Luting Plus (automix) was significantly lower than its handmix and clicker-handmix versions (p < 0.05). GC Fuji PLUS (capsule-automix) was significantly higher than GC FujiCEM 2 (automix) (p < 0.05). The binary interaction of the two independent variables (dispensing/mixing method and thermocycling) was significant for the shear bond strengths of the GC cements only (p < 0.05). Change in the dispensing/mixing method of RMGI cement from the same brand may have an effect on its physical properties

  2. The Influence of Abutment Surface Treatment and the Type of Luting Cement on Shear Bond Strength between Titanium/Cement/Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Śmielak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength of zirconia cylinders on a modified titanium surface using different luting cement types. Material and Methods. Eighty titanium disks were divided into two groups (n=40, which were treated with either grinding or a combination of sandblasting and grinding. Then, each group was subdivided into 4 groups (n=10 and the disks were bonded to disks of sintered zirconia using one of four cement types (permanent: composite cement; temporary: polycarboxylate cement, zinc-oxide-eugenol cement, and resin cement. Shear bond strength (SBS was measured in a universal testing machine. Fracture pattern and site characteristic were recorded. A fractographic analysis was performed with SEM. The chemical analysis of the composition of the fractures was performed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The results of the experiment were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test. Results. The highest mean values of SBS were achieved when grinding was combined with sandblasting and when composite cement was used (18.18 MPa. In the temporary cement group, the highest mean values of SBS were for polycarboxylate cement after grinding (3.57 MPa. Conclusion. The choice of cement has a crucial influence on the titanium-cement-zirconia interface quality.

  3. Comparative evaluation of fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with glass fiber posts, intracanal composite resin, and experimental dentine posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jha, Padmanabh; Aggarwal, Akarshak

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with gutta-percha, glass fiber posts (GFP), experimental dentine posts (DP) or Intracanal composite Resin (ICR). Fifty maxillary canines were decoronated, standardized and enlarged until, number 5 Peeso reamers were allowed to simulate immature teeth. After placement of 5 mm of MTA, the canals were divided into 5 groups and filled as follows: Group 1: AH Plus + gutta-percha, lateral compaction; Group 2: GFP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 3: DP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 4: PARACORE dual cure resin. A standardized core was built in all groups except in Group 5. Each of the specimens was tested for fracture resistance by universal testing machine. The mean fracture resistance were 817 ± 27.753, 1164.6 ± 21.624, 994.4 ± 96.8747, 873.8 ± 105.446 and 493.7 ± 6.945 newtons for Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 respectively. Independent "t" test revealed statistically significant discrepancies, in the fracture resistance among the 4 groups except Group 1 and Group 4 (P < 0.05). This study suggests that GFP and DP may be preferred for additional reinforcement of immature teeth.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Simulated Immature Teeth Restored with Glass Fiber Posts, Intracanal Composite Resin, and Experimental Dentine Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeta Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with gutta-percha, glass fiber posts (GFP, experimental dentine posts (DP or Intracanal composite Resin (ICR. Materials and Methods. Fifty maxillary canines were decoronated, standardized and enlarged until, number 5 Peeso reamers were allowed to simulate immature teeth. After placement of 5 mm of MTA, the canals were divided into 5 groups and filled as follows: Group 1: AH Plus + gutta-percha, lateral compaction; Group 2: GFP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 3: DP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 4: PARACORE dual cure resin. A standardized core was built in all groups except in Group 5. Each of the specimens was tested for fracture resistance by universal testing machine. Results. The mean fracture resistance were 817 ± 27.753, 1164.6 ± 21.624, 994.4 ± 96.8747, 873.8 ± 105.446 and 493.7 ± 6.945 newtons for Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 respectively. Independent “t” test revealed statistically significant discrepancies, in the fracture resistance among the 4 groups except Group 1 and Group 4 (P<0.05. Conclusions. This study suggests that GFP and DP may be preferred for additional reinforcement of immature teeth.

  5. The solidification of spent resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiao, S. J.; Tsai, C. M.; Shyu, Y. H.

    1991-01-01

    A quasi-steady apparatus was applied to measure the thermal conductivity of solids ranging in size for 0.3 to 200 L, and temperature distributions in the solids were recorded during the curing, and theoretical equation for conduction in a cylindrical form with uniform energy generation was established to define the thermal state of reaction. The heat of reaction calculated from the theoretical equation with experimental values for the maximum temperature and thermal conductivity agrees very well with the data reported. The relationships among heat of reaction and amount of curing agent, retardant, loading of spent resin, and water were established

  6. Clinical and scanning electron microscopic assessments of porcelain and ceromer resin veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Pankaj; Prakash, Hari; Shah, Nassem

    2003-01-01

    Recently available Ceromer resin materials are promising for fabrication of esthetic anterior laminates and provices an alternative, cost effective treament modality to porcelain laminates for discolored anterior anterior teeth. It was proposed to study the esthetic quality and surface finish of veneers fbricated from ceromer resin and compare it with the standard porcelain veneers, both clinically as well as by scanning electron microscope (SEM) at baseline and at 12 months. If found comparable, ceromer resin veneer could provide an alternative to porcelain veneers which is an expensive technique for a developing country like India. Seventy-two veneers, 36 porcelain and 36 ceromer were placed in 12 subjects who were studied at 0, 6 and 12 months for clinical acceptability, and at 0 and 12 months for SEM assessment. The restorations were luted with Opal luting composite and Scotchbond multipurpose system; polyvinyl siloxane was used as the impression material. The clinical assessment was made using modified United Public Health Services criteria, whereas the SEM assessment was made by quantitative analysis of the marginal fit and surface characteristics of the two veneering materials. Ceromer exhibited good anatomical form during the study period, but depicted changes in color, surface appearance, marginal adaptation, increased marginal discoloration, and tissue response. Inability to achieve a good finish with high gloss was a major drawback of the ceromer. Porcelain exhibited better esthetics, marginal adaptation, finish qualities, and tissue response. The SEM showed good to excellent marginal fit at baselinne in ceromer and porcelain veneers, but loss of luting resin at the margins was evident in both the materials after 12 months, leading to visible gaps in a number of veneer restorations. Ceromer veneers exhibited poor surface characteristics in several restorations, which further degraded in an oral conditions over 12 months. Veneering is an effective mode of

  7. Microshear bond strength of composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates utilizing unfilled versus filled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Siamak; Ghasemi, Amir; Kotick, Philip G

    2014-11-01

    Failures such as marginal discoloration and composite chipping are still the problems of tooth-colored restorations on the substrate of enamel and porcelain, which some of these problems are consequently as a result of failures in the bonding layer. Using filled resin has been recently introduced to increase the bond strength of this layer. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins to enamel incubated in periods of 24 h and 9 months and porcelain with unfilled resin and flowable composites (filled resin). In this in vitro study, two groups of 75 enamel samples with different storage times (24 h and 9 months) and a group of 75 porcelain samples were used. They were divided into 5 experimental groups of 15 samples in each. Composite cylinders in tygon tubes were bonded on the surface of acid-etched enamel and pretreated porcelain. Wave, Wave MV, Wave HV, Grandioflow and Margin Bond were used as bonding agents. The μ-SBS was measured at the speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bond strengths were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey test. P composites (filled resins) can be used instead of unfilled resins in bonding composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates.

  8. A comparison of stresses in molar teeth restored with inlays and direct restorations, including polymerization shrinkage of composite resin and tooth loading during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejak, Beata; Młotkowski, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of composites is one of the main causes of leakage around dental restorations. Despite the large numbers of studies there is no consensus, what kind of teeth reconstruction--direct or indirect composite restorations are the most beneficial and the most durable. The aim was to compare equivalent stresses and contact adhesive stresses in molar teeth with class II MOD cavities, which were restored with inlays and direct restorations (taking into account polymerization shrinkage of composite resin) during simulated mastication. The study was conducted using the finite elements method with the application of contact elements. Three 3D models of first molars were created: model A was an intact tooth; model B--a tooth with a composite inlay, and model C--a tooth with a direct composite restoration. Polymerization linear shrinkage 0.7% of a direct composite restoration and resin luting cement was simulated (load 1). A computer simulation of mastication was performed (load 2). In these 2 situations, equivalent stresses according to the modified von Mises criterion (mvM) in the materials of mandibular first molar models with different restorations were calculated and compared. Contact stresses in the luting cement-tooth tissue adhesive interface around the restorations were also assessed and analyzed. Equivalent stresses in a tooth with a direct composite restoration (the entire volume of which was affected by polymerization shrinkage) were many times higher than in the tooth restored with a composite inlay (where shrinkage was present only in a thin layer of the luting cement). In dentin and enamel the stress values were 8-14 times higher, and were 13 times higher in the direct restoration than in the inlay. Likewise, contact stresses in the adhesive bond around the direct restoration were 6.5-7.7 times higher compared to an extraorally cured restoration. In the masticatory simulation, shear contact stresses in the adhesive bond around the direct

  9. Effect of pre-heating composites on film thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Goulart, Marcelo; Damin, Deisi Fátima; Melara, Rafael; Conceição, Andréa de Azevedo Brito

    2013-01-01

    Resin composite has been suggested as a luting material for aesthetic indirect restorations and temperature affects material viscosity. Reports of film thickness from new composites are important. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of pre-heating two resin composites on its film thickness in order to use it as a luting agent for indirect restorations (inlays and onlays). Three materials were divided into 5 groups. Two resin composites, nanofilled (Z350 XT/3MESPE) and microhybr...

  10. Variations in powder/liquid ratio of a restorative and luting glass ionomer cement in dental clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Kefi; Islam, Sana Adeba; Ahmad, Iqbal; Asmat, Maria; Aminuddin, Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    A survey was conducted to ascertain the variations practiced in powder/liquid (P/L) ratio of Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) used as restorative and luting material in dental clinics of Karachi. It has been observed that in the use of GIC brands, 33% (Fuji 2) and 36% (Gold Label 2) of the dentists, did not follow the recommended P/L ratios for restorative purposes. Similarly, 67% (Fuji 1) and 29% (Gold Label 1) did not follow the recommended ratios for luting purposes. The wide variations practiced in P/L mixing ratios against the recommended ratio for restorative purpose (approximately 1:2) and that for luting purpose (~1:1 to 2:1) may affect the performance characteristics of the material.

  11. Antibacterial force of the luting-type of glass ionomer cement toward Lactobacillus species and Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Warna Aju Fatmawati

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Rigid restoration is attached within oral cavity using adhesive cement layer. The hardening adhesive cement fills and tights the rough tooth surface with reciprocal opposing restorations. The luting type of glass ionomer cement was mostly used in the clinic for crown cementation as well as poured restoration. We can be taken a problem how strong is antibacterial effect of the luting type of glass ionomer cement to Lactobacillus species and Streptococcus Mutans. The purpose of the research was to know the antibacterial force of the luting-type of glass ionomer cement toward Lactobacillus species and Streptococcus mutans. This research was a laboratory experiment. The samples of the research were divided into two groups, treated-group (Fuji and Shofu and controlled-group. The numbers of samples in each group consisted of 7 pieces. Taking 0,5 ml of artificial saliva in which the sample of the luting-type of glass ionomer cement (5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick had been immersed and storing it into Petri dish containing warm MRSA and 0,1 ml Lactobacillus sp. using poured technique. The mixture was subsequently incubated, and the colony was counted on the observation of 1st day, 7th day, and 14th day. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and LSD. The result of the research showed that the greatest mean value of the bacterial colony presented in the controlled-group and the smallest was in the group of Shofu. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference (p < 0.05. The released fluoride from glass ionomer cement occurred in the damaging phase caused by polyacrylate that released H+ ion from carboxyl group (COOH. The fluoride influenced the growth of bacteria by decelerating the activity of gycolytic enolase enzyme. The luting-type of glass ionomer cement had antibacterial force toward Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus sp. The luting-type of glass ionomer cement of Shofu possessed greater antibacterial force than Fuji and controlledgroup.

  12. Investigations of toughening mechanisms of epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, T.

    1986-01-01

    Composite material technology was applied to the solid rocket booster by the development of a carbon filament-epoxy resin case which yields a net increase of 4000 lbs. in payload in the shuttle. The question of reusability of the new composite tanks has not yet been answered and will depend on the toughness of the matrix resin. The present study was aimed at providing conditions whereby test specimens of the epoxy resin (EPON/85) and curing agents of systematically varied structures could be produced in a controlled manner. Three sets of conditions were found that might allow the isolation of the structural effects on toughness from the cure effects. The kinetic methods leading to the determination of these conditions are described.

  13. Effect of ultrasonic vibration time on the retention of prefabricated posts luted with two different cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastnaei Peimaneh Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: In case of nonsurgical endodontic re-treatment or replacing a restoration, one of the best methods for removing post from the canal is using an ultrasonic vibration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic vibration time on the retention of post luted with zinc phosphate or glass ionmer cements.   Materials and Methods: 96 sound extracted lower premolars were selected. The coronal section of specimen was removed and the roots were endodontically treated. A 9-mm post space was prepared in each specimens and a stainless steel Parapost XP was cemented into the post space. Half of the specimens were cemented with the Zinc phosphate cement and the other by g lass ionomer cement. After 7 days of storage, both groups were equally divided into 4 subgroups of 12 teeth. Control group did not receive any treatment. The other subgroups subjected to ultrasonic vibration for 4, 8 or 12 minutes. The retention of all specimens was evaluated and data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests.   Results: In control (no ultrasonic group and 4 minute ultrasonic group, the retention of posts luted with Zinc phosphate cement were not significantly differen t from those luted with g lass ionomer cement. (P=0.372. On the other hand , applying of ultrasonic vibration for 8 and 12 minutes in zinc phosphate and 12 minutes in g lass ionomer caused a significant reduction in the retention of posts (P=0.01.   Conclusion: Although, the initial retention of two cements was not different, the ultrasonic vibration had more catastrophic effect on zinc phosphate in comparison to glass ionomer.

  14. Restoring Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors Using Zirconia-Based Resin Bonded Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Antigoni; Liu, Perng-Ru; O'Neal, Sandra J; Essig, Milton E

    2016-01-01

    This clinical report describes an alternative treatment modality for the replacement of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors in a 17-year-old patient. Zirconia-based resin-bonded fixed partial dentures (RBFPDs) were selected as a viable and conservative treatment option in a young individual with highly aesthetic expectations. Fabrication of all-ceramic RBFPDs followed specific preparation design and features to accommodate two retainers. The zirconia frameworks with bilateral wings were digitally designed and then milled by a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-controlled milling machine. Zirconia surface was treated with a two-step chairside tribochemical silica-coating/silane coupling surface treatment protocol, and adhesive resin luting cement was used to achieve micromechanical and chemical bonding. Completion of the treatment resulted in a functional and aesthetic successful outcome and a 17-month follow-up presented uneventful. Contemporary adhesive techniques involving resin-bonded zirconia-based prostheses can be utilized successfully and predictably in young patients with single missing teeth when implant therapy is currently not a treatment of choice and a less invasive approach is desired. The zirconia-based resin-bonded prosthesis constitutes a viable and conservative treatment modality for the replacement of missing teeth either congenitally or from another etiology in young patients in which implant therapy and a fixed partial denture are currently contraindicated. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Bonding Effectiveness of Luting Composites to Different CAD/CAM Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Marleen; Valjakova, Emilija Bajraktarova; De Munck, Jan; Mishevska, Cece Bajraktarova; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments of six novel CAD/CAM materials on the bonding effectiveness of two luting composites. Six different CAD/CAM materials were tested: four ceramics - Vita Mark II; IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; Celtra Duo - one hybrid ceramic, Vita Enamic, and one composite CAD/CAM block, Lava Ultimate. A total of 60 blocks (10 per material) received various mechanical surface treatments: 1. 600-grit SiC paper; 2. sandblasting with 30-μm Al2O3; 3. tribochemical silica coating (CoJet). Subsequent chemical surface treatments involved either no further treatment (control), HF acid etching (HF), silanization (S, or HF acid etching followed by silanization (HF+S). Two specimens with the same surface treatment were bonded together using two dual-curing luting composites: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (self-etching) or Panavia SA Cement (self-adhesive). After 1 week of water storage, the microtensile bond strength of the sectioned microspecimens was measured and the failure mode was evaluated. The bonding performance of the six CAD/CAM materials was significantly influenced by surface treatment (linear mixed models, p CAD (p = 0.0115), and Lava Ultimate (p CAD/CAM materials: Vita Mark II and IPS Empress CAD: S, HF+S; Celtra Duo: HF, HF+S; IPS e.max CAD: HF+S; Vita Enamic: HF+S, S. For Lava Ultimate, the highest bond strengths were obtained with HF, S, HF+S. Failure analysis showed a relation between bond strength and failure type: more mixed failures were observed with higher bond strengths. Mainly adhesive failures were noticed if no further surface treatment was done. The percentage of adhesive failures was higher for CAD/CAM materials with higher flexural strength (Celtra Duo, IPS e.max CAD, and Lava Ultimate). The bond strength of luting composites to novel CAD/CAM materials is influenced by surface treatment. For each luting composite, an adhesive cementation protocol can be specified in order to obtain the highest bond to the

  16. Effect of ceramic material and resin cement systems on the color stability of laminate veneers after accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Min; Choi, Yu-Sung

    2018-01-05

    Laminate veneers are susceptible to color change during clinical service. Studies that compare the effects of different ceramic and resin cement systems on color stability are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the color stability of laminate veneers after accelerated aging using different ceramic and resin cement systems. Ceramic specimens (N=168; shade A1; thickness, 0.50 ±0.05 mm; diameter, 10.00 ±0.10 mm) were prepared using nanofluorapatite and lithium disilicate (high translucency [HT] to low translucency [LT]) ceramics. Light-polymerizing (LP) cements were classified by brightness (high or low). Dual-polymerizing cements were classified by composition (base-only [DB] or base-catalyst [DC]) for comparison of color stability on the basis of polymerization type. DB cement was light-polymerizing, whereas DC cement was dual-polymerizing. They were further classified by shade (transparent, white, or yellow [n=7, each]). Color difference (ΔE) values were obtained by spectrophotometric quantification of L* (lightness), a* (green-red), and b* (blue-yellow) values before and after aging. The Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon signed rank, and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used for statistical analysis. After specimens were subjected to accelerated aging, HT ceramic specimens luted with yellow-shade DC cement exhibited the greatest color change (ΔE=2.11), whereas HT and LT ceramic specimens luted with low-brightness LP cement exhibited the least color change (ΔE=1.37). In HT ceramic specimens, which exhibited the greatest color change of the 3 ceramic types, transparent shade cement exhibited significantly lower ΔE values than the other shades with DB (Pceramics. The ΔE values of DB cement were not always lower than those of DC cement. For all specimens, the aging of laminate veneers decreased the L* values and increased the a* and b* values. Ceramic and resin-cement systems affected the color stability of laminate veneers

  17. Bond strength of resin composite to light activated bleached enamel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-02

    Sep 2, 2015 ... Conclusion: The various irradiation treatments following the application of the whiteness HP bleaching agent to enamel did not significantly reduce the µTBS within a 14‑day period. Key words: Bleaching agents, lasers, lasers neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet, resin bonding, tooth bleaching. Date of ...

  18. Preparation and characterization of antibacterial orthodontic resin containing silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Min; Lee, Donghyun; Han, Seungheui; Moon, Ji-Hoi; Lim, Ho-Nam; Kwon, Il Keun

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we developed a hybrid dental resin containing silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) to eliminate periodontal disease causing bacteria such as streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and streptococcus sobrinus (S. sobrinus). The silver nanoparticles enables the resin to prevent oral pathogen growth during orthodontic therapy. First, AgNPs were directly synthesized in dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent with a capping agent. Second, pure orthodontic primer was mixed with the synthesized AgNPs solvent-slurry followed by photocuring. The resultant material was characterized by physicochemical characterization. Finally, an in vitro antimicrobial test was carried out. The results showed that the AgNPs were fully synthesized and clearly embedded in dental resin. In the bacterial test, the dental resin containing AgNPs showed potent antimicrobial activity against two kinds of bacteria. In conclusion, our methodology may allow for the generation of a wide range of dental resin and composite products which inhibit periodontitis causing bacteria.

  19. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, M.; Brzostowski, A.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt was made to decrease the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin, taking place during radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified with cinnamic and acrylic acids. A composition of 90 parts of polyester resin, 10 parts of epoxy resin modified with cinnamic acid, and 150 parts of a silica filler showed a volume shrinkage of 1.2%. (author)

  20. Influence of Er,Cr: YSGG laser on bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the bond strength of fiber post previously laser treated root canals. Forty single-rooted bovine teeth were endodontically treated, randomly and equally divided into two main groups according to the type of pretreatment: G1: 2.5% NaOCl (control group; and G2: Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Each group was further subdivided into 2 groups based on the category of adhesive systems/ luting materials used: a: an etch-and-rinse resin cement (Single Bond/RelyX ARC; 3M ESPE, and b: a self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X Unicem; 3M ESPE. Three 1.5 mm thick slabs were obtained per root and the push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Analysis of variance showed no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05 among the groups G1a (25.44 ± 2.35 and G1b (23.62 ± 3.48, G2a (11.77 ± 2.67 and G2b (9.93 ± 3.37. Fractures were observed at the interface between the dentin and the resin in all groups. The Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation did not influence on the bond strength of the resin cements and the etch-and-rinse resin cement had better results on bond strength than self-adhesive resin cement.

  1. A Geometrical Method for Sound-Hole Size and Location Enhancement in Lute Family Musical Instruments: The Golden Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Jafari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new analytical approach, the Golden Method, to enhance sound-hole size and location in musical instruments of the lute family in order to obtain better sound damping characteristics based on the concept of the golden ratio and the instrument geometry. The main objective of the paper is to increase the capability of lute family musical instruments in keeping a note for a certain time at a certain level to enhance the instruments’ orchestral characteristics. For this purpose, a geometry-based analytical method, the Golden Method is first described in detail in an itemized feature. A new musical instrument is then developed and tested to confirm the ability of the Golden Method in optimizing the acoustical characteristics of musical instruments from a damping point of view by designing the modified sound-hole. Finally, the new-developed instrument is tested, and the obtained results are compared with those of two well-known instruments to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method. The experimental results show that the suggested method is able to increase the sound damping time by at least 2.4% without affecting the frequency response function and other acoustic characteristics of the instrument. This methodology could be used as the first step in future studies on design, optimization and evaluation of musical instruments of the lute family (e.g., lute, oud, barbat, mandolin, setar, and etc..

  2. Rheology of Polyaniline Dispersions in Acrylic Resin

    OpenAIRE

    PLESU, Nicoleta; LIESCU, Smaranda; ILIA, Gheorghe

    2006-01-01

    Acrylic dispersions based on polyaniline were obtained and characterised. The polyaniline was obtained by chemical polymerisation of aniline in different organic acid containing phosphorous, in the presence of ammonium-peroxidisulphate as oxidant agent. The blends were obtained by mechanical dispersion of polyaniline in commercially available acrylic resin. The flow behaviour of these dispersions at different shear rates was studied. Furthermore, the resulting acrylic dispersions w...

  3. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000?). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  4. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, A; Nandlal, B

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown. The study samples consisted of 30 primary anterior stainless steel crowns (Unitek TM, size R4), embedded in resin blocks with crown, in test groups of 15 samples each. Mounting of the crown was done using resin block with one crown each. Sandblasting was done and the bonding agent Prime and Bond NT (Dentsply) was applied on the labial surface of the primary anterior sandblasted crown. The composite resin and nanocomposite resin were placed into the well of Teflon jig and bonded to Stainless Steel Crowns. The cured samples were placed in distilled water and stored in incubator at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. Shear bond strength was measured using universal testing machine (Hounsefield U.K. Model, with a capacity of 50 KN). Independent sample 't' test revealed a nonsignificant (P resin and nanocomposite resin had statistically similar mean shear bond strength, with nanocomposite having little more strength compared to conventional composite.

  5. Effects of 35% Carbamide Peroxide Gel on Surface Roughness and Hardness of Composite Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sharafeddin, F.; Jamalipour, GR.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Bleaching agents may not be safe for dental materials. The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the effects of Opalescent Quick ?in-office bleaching gel? containing 35% carbamide peroxide on the surface roughness and hardness of microfilled (Heliomolar) and hybride (Spectrum TPH) composite resins. Materials and Methods: Twenty specimens of Spectrum TPH composite resins and twenty Heliomolar composite resins were fabricated using a metallic ring (6.5 mm diameter and 2.5 mm...

  6. Water sorption and water solubility of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, Aikaterini; Vrochari, Areti D; Hellwig, Elmar; Stampf, Susanne; Polydorou, Olga

    2015-11-01

    The long-term success of indirect restorations depends on the clinical behavior of luting cements. In the oral environment, properties such as water sorption and solubility negatively affect the cements' clinical performance over time, jeopardizing the restoration's longevity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the water sorption and solubility characteristics of self-etching, self-adhesive, and conventional resin cements. One conventional (Calibra), 1 self-etching (Panavia F), and 2 self-adhesive (Clearfil SA, G-Cem Automix) dual-polymerized resin cements were used. Fourteen disks of each material were prepared. Water sorption and solubility were calculated according to International Organization for Standards (ISO) specification 4049:2009. According to the water sorption test, all materials were found to interact with water. No statistically significant differences were found between the water sorption of Panavia F and Clearfil SA (P=.911). These cements exhibited higher water sorption values than the other materials (Psolubility (Psolubility values than the other materials. G-Cem Automix and Calibra exhibited negative solubility. However, all water sorption and solubility values were below the threshold values proposed by the ISO standard. Within the limitations of the present in vitro study, the interaction of resin cements with water is not type-related (conventional, self-etching, or self-adhesive). Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of transmitted Er:YAG laser energy through a dental ceramic on different types of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Onjen; Sari, Tugrul; Arslan Malkoç, Meral; Altintas, Subutayhan; Usumez, Aslihan; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2015-07-06

    The laser debonding procedure of adhesively luted all-ceramic restorations is based on the ablation of resin cement due to the transmitted laser energy through the ceramic. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation transmitted through a dental ceramic on five different resin cements. Five different resin cements were evaluated in this study: G-Cem LinkAce, Multilink Automix, Variolink II, Panavia F, and Rely X Unicem U100. Disc shaped resin cement specimens (n = 10) were fabricated for each group. A ceramic disc was placed between the resin cement discs and the tip of the handpiece of Er:YAG laser device. The resin cement discs were irradiated through the ceramic and the volume of the resin cement discs were measured using a micro-CT system before and after Er:YAG laser irradiation. The volume loss of the resin cement discs was calculated and analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD tests. The highest volume loss was determined in G-Cem (1.1 ± 0.6 mm 3 ) and Multilink (1.3 ± 0.1 mm 3 ) (P < 0.05) groups, and the lowest volume loss was determined in Rely X (0.3 ± 0.07 mm 3 ), Variolink (0.4 ± 0.2 mm 3 ), and Panavia (0.6 ± 0.2 mm 3 ) groups (P < 0.05). All resin cements were affected by the laser irradiation resulting in the volume loss of the cement; however, there are significant differences among different resin cements. All the resin cements tested in this study were effected by the Er:YAG laser irradiation and there were significant differences among the resin cements with regard to ablation volume. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. In vitro enamel remineralization capacity of composite resins containing sodium trimetaphosphate and fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiveron, Adelisa Rodolfo Ferreira; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Gaban, Gabriel; Sassaki, Kikue Takebayashi; Pedrini, Denise

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro enamel remineralization capacity of experimental composite resins containing sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP) combined or not with fluoride (F). Bovine enamel slabs were selected upon analysis of initial surface hardness (SH1) and after induction of artificial carious lesions (SH2). Experimental resins were as follows: resin C (control—no sodium fluoride (NaF) or TMP), resin F (with 1.6% NaF), resin TMP (with 14.1% TMP), and resin TMP/F (with NaF and TMP). Resin samples were made and attached to enamel slabs (n = 12 slabs per material). Those specimens (resin/enamel slab) were subjected to pH cycling to promote remineralization, and then final surface hardness (SH3) was measured to calculate the percentage of surface hardness recovery (%SH). The integrated recovery of subsurface hardness (ΔKHN) and F concentration in enamel were also determined. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test (p Resins F and TMP/F showed similar SH3 values (p = 0.478) and %SH (p = 0.336) and differed significantly from the other resins (p resin TMP/F presented the lowest area of lesion (p resins (p = 0.042), but higher than in the other resins (p composite resin enhanced its capacity for remineralization of enamel in vitro. The combination of two agents with action on enamel favored remineralization, suggesting that composite resins containing sodium trimetaphosphate and fluoride could be indicated for clinical procedures in situations with higher cariogenic challenges.

  9. [Influence of retainer design on fixation strength of resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed cantilever dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrikas, O A; Voroshilin, Iu G; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) have become an accepted part of the restorative dentist's armamentarium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass FRC-FPDs. Four retainer designs were tested: a dual wing, a dual wing + horizontal groove, a dual wing + occlusal rest and a step-box. Of each design on 7 human mandibular molars, FRC-FPDs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin Revolution (Kerr) impregnated glass fibers (GlasSpan, GlasSpan) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Charisma, Kulzer). Revolution (Kerr) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FPDs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FPDs (step-box: 172±11 N) compared to wing-retained FPDs (poptimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FPDs.

  10. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    to epoxy resin remained stable over the study period. Of the patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test, 71% returned a questionnaire; 95 patients had worked with epoxy resin in the occupational setting, and, of these, one-third did not use protective gloves and only 50.5% (48) had participated...

  11. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  12. Chairside vs. labside ceramic inlays: effect of temporary restoration and adhesive luting on enamel cracks and marginal integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberger, Roland; Krämer, Norbert; Appelt, Andreas; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Naumann, Michael; Roggendorf, Matthias J

    2011-09-01

    To assess the influence of different temporary restorations and luting techniques of labside and chairside ceramic inlays on enamel defects and marginal integrity. 120 extracted human third molars received MOD preparations with one proximal box each limited in either enamel or dentin. 64 Cerec 2 inlays and 56 IPS Empress I inlays were randomly assigned to the following groups (fabrication mode: chairside (CS)=no temporary restoration (TR), labside (LS)=TR with Luxatemp (L) inserted with TempBond NE, or Systemp.inlay (SI) without temporary cement), luting technique: SV=Syntac/Variolink II, RX=RelyX Unicem: A: Cerec inlays were luted with (1) CS/SV. (2) CS/SV/Heliobond separately light-cured. (3) CS/RX. (4) LS/L/SV. (5) LS/L/RX. (6) LS/SI/SV. (7) LS/SI/RX. (8) LS/SI/RX with selective enamel etching. B: Empress. (9) L/SV. (10) L/SV/Heliobond separately light-cured. (11) L/RX. (12) SI/SV. (13) SI/SV, Heliobond separately lightcured. (14) SI/RX. (15) SI/RX after selective enamel etching. Before and after thermomechanical loading (TML: loading time of TR 1000×50N+25 thermocycles (TC) between +5°C and +55°C; clinical simulation: 100,000×50N+2500 TC) luting gaps, enamel cracks, and marginal adaptation to enamel and dentin were determined under an SEM microscope (200×) using replicas. Loading time of temporary restorations negatively affected enamel integrity and enamel chipping (pinlay (p0.05). Temporary cement negatively affected dentin margins when RelyX Unicem was used (pinlays reduce the risk of enamel cracks and marginal enamel chipping due to omitted temporary restorations. Syntac/Variolink revealed a significantly better performance than RelyX Unicem. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microleakage of composite crowns luted on CAD/CAM-milled human molars: a new method for standardized in vitro tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenz, Maximiliane Amelie; Schmidt, Alexander; Rehmann, Peter; Niem, Thomas; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2018-04-24

    To investigate debonding of full crowns made of CAD/CAM composites, CAD/CAM technology was applied to manufacture standardized test abutments to increase the reproducibility of human teeth used in in vitro studies. A virtual test abutment and the corresponding virtual crown were designed and two STL data sets were generated. Sixty-four human third molars and CAD/CAM blocks were milled using a CNC machine. Crowns of four different composite blocks (Lava Ultimate (LU), Brilliant Crios (BC), Cerasmart (CS), Experimental (EX)) were adhesively bonded with their corresponding luting system (LU: Scotchbond Universal/RelyX Ultimate; BC: One Coat 7 Universal/DuoCem; CS: G-PremioBond/G-Cem LinkForce; EX: Experimental-Bond/Experimental-Luting-Cement). Half of the specimens were chemical-cured (CC) and the others were light-cured (LC). Afterwards, specimens were artificially aged in a chewing simulator (WL-tec, 1 million cycles, 50-500 N, 2 Hz, 37 °C). Finally, a dye penetration test was used to detect debonding. For inspection, the specimens were sliced, and penetration depth was measured with a digital microscope. Data were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test. No cases of total debonding were observed after cyclic loading. However, the LC specimens showed a significantly lower amount of leakage than the CC ones (p CAD/CAM technology in highly standardized test abutments for in vitro testing. For CAD/CAM composites, light curing should be performed. The success of a restoration depends on the long-term sealing ability of the luting materials, which avoids debonding along with microleakage. For CAD/CAM composites, separate light curing of the adhesive and luting composite is highly recommended.

  14. Enhancement of adhesion between resin coating materials and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoaki; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Weerasinghe, Dinesh S; Harada, Naoko; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-07-01

    Resin coating technique is a unique method that improves the dentin bond strength of resin cements in indirect restorations. However, the weak link of a specimen bonded using the resin coating technique was reported to be the bonded interface between the resin coating material and resin cement. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to enhance the bonding performance between a resin coating material and a resin cement. Two light-cured flowable composites, Protect Liner F and Clearfil Flow FX, were used as coating materials, and two dual-cure composite materials, Panavia F 2.0 and Clearfil DC Core Automix, were used as resin cements. The ultimate tensile strength of each material and the microtensile bond strengths of the bonded specimens of resin coating material and resin cement were measured using a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Three-way ANOVA (p=0.05) revealed that the highest microtensile bond strength was obtained using a combination of Clearfil Flow FX and Clearfil DC Core Automix, and when the surface of the coating material was treated with ED Primer II. It was strongly suggested that materials with a higher ultimate tensile strength, when used in both resin coating and cementation, could enhance the bond strength between the two.

  15. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  16. Polyphenolic resin synthesis: optimizing plantain peel biomass as heavy metal adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Cordero

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPolyphenolic resol resins were obtained from an ethanolic extraction of green plantain peels (Musa paradisiaca grown in Colombia. A synthesis was then performed by polycondensation in an alkaline pH solution in order to perform research on phenolic resin production with high mechanical performance. The polymers were characterized by DSC and TGA analyses and the resins showed a melting point of 94 °C and the typical properties of resol resins. Moreover, the synthesis was controlled using the infrared technique (FTIR where different organic functional groups present in the polymers obtained are observed. The obtained resins were used as heavy metal adsorbents in which the content of those toxic agents is measured by Atomic Absorption Analysis (AA indicating that these resins have a high retention affinity to Pb+2, Ni+2 and Cr+3 (79.01%, 98.48%, 94.14%, respectively as determined by Freundlich isotherms.

  17. Effect of curing mode on the micro-mechanical properties of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Simon, Alexander

    2012-04-01

    Light supplying to luting resin cements is impeded in several clinical situations, causing us to question whether materials can properly be cured to achieve adequately (or adequate) mechanical properties. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse the effect of light on the micro-mechanical properties of eight popular dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements by comparing them with two conventional, also dual-cured, resin cements. Four different curing procedures were applied: auto-polymerisation (dark curing) and light curing (LED unit, Freelight 2, 20 s) by applying the unit directly on the samples' surface, at a distance of 5 and 10 mm. Twenty minutes after curing, the samples were stored for 1 week at 37°C in a water-saturated atmosphere. The micro-mechanical properties-Vickers hardness, modulus of elasticity, creep and elastic/plastic deformation-were measured. Data were analysed with multivariate ANOVA followed by Tukey's test and partial eta-squared statistics (p micro-mechanical properties was measured, whereas the influence of the curing procedure and type of cement-conventional or self-adhesive-was generally low. The influence of light on the polymerisation process was material dependent, with four different behaviour patterns to be distinguished. As a material category, significantly higher micro-mechanical properties were measured for the conventional compared to the self-adhesive resin cements, although this difference was low. Within the self-adhesive resin cements group, the variation in micro-mechanical properties was high. The selection of suitable resin cements should be done by considering, besides its adhesive properties, its micro-mechanical properties and curing behaviour also.

  18. Immobilization of ion exchange radioactive resins of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia M, H.; Emeterio H, M.; Canizal S, C.

    1999-01-01

    This work has the objective to develop the process and to define the agglutinating material which allows the immobilization of the ion exchange radioactive resins coming from the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor contaminated with Ba-133, Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-152, and Mn-54 through the behavior analysis of different immobilization agents such as: bitumens, cement and polyester resin. According to the International Standardization the archetype samples were observed with the following tests: determination of free liquid, leaching, charge resistance, biodegradation, irradiation, thermal cycle, burned resistance. Generally all the tests were satisfactorily achieved, for each agent. Therefore, the polyester resin could be considered as the main immobilizing. (Author)

  19. Finite element analysis of strength and adhesion of cast posts compared to glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts in anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejak, Beata; Młotkowski, Andrzej

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies on the strength of teeth restored with posts have not resolved the controversy as to which post systems provide the greatest strength and longevity. The purpose of this study was to compare the strength of teeth restored using cast posts with those restored using glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts and to evaluate the bond strength of the posts to dentin. The investigation was conducted by using finite element analysis, combined with the application of contact elements. Three-dimensional (3-D) models of the maxillary central incisors were generated: IT, an intact tooth; CC, a tooth with a ceramic crown; FP, a tooth restored with an FRC (glass fiber-reinforced composite resin) post; CPAu, a tooth restored with a gold alloy cast post; and CPNi, a tooth restored with an NiCr (nickel chromium alloy) cast post. Each model was subjected to vertical and oblique loads with a force of 100 N. To evaluate the strength of the restored tooth, ceramics, and composite resin, the modified von Mises failure criterion was used, the Tsai-Wu criterion for FRC, and the von Mises criterion for gold and NiCr alloy. The equivalent stresses found in the tested models were compared with the tensile strength of the respective materials. Contact stresses in the luting cement-dentin interface were calculated. The maximum mvM (modified von Mises failure criterion) stresses in the dentin of the teeth restored with FRC posts were reduced by 21%, and in those restored with cast NiCr posts, stresses were reduced by 25% when compared to the stresses in the intact tooth. The equivalent stresses in metal posts were several times higher than in FRC posts, but did not exceed the tensile strength of the materials. The highest mvM stress in the luting resin cement around the FRC post was 55% higher than in the luting resin cement around the metal post, under an oblique load. In the ceramic crown, which covered the composite resin post and core, the highest mvM stress was 30.7 MPa

  20. Solidifying process and flame retardancy of epoxy resin cured with boron-containing phenolic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peng; Shi, Yan; Liu, Yuansen; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Qi

    2018-01-01

    For the sake of improving the charring performance and flame retardancy of epoxy resin (EP), boron-containing phenolic resin (BPR) instead of a conventional curing agent, linear phenolic resin (LPR) was employed to cure EP. Of several possible chemical structures for BPR, the existence of benzyl hydroxy groups in BPR chains has been confirmed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The resonance of these groups may reasonably explain the higher curing reactivity of BPR-cured EP than that of LPR-cured EP. Thermogravimetric analysis, observation of the morphologies of the char residues and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic were performed to characterize the charring process. Due to the presence of B2O3 produced on the char surface from decomposition of phenyl borates and the facile high self-crosslinking reaction of BPR, a more continuous and stronger char barrier was formed for BPR-cured EP compared to that for the LPR-cured EP system. Therefore the former exhibited much better flame retardancy. In addition, BPR-cured EP also displayed better dynamic mechanical properties, than those observed for LPR-cured EP. It is not subject to the significant lowering the glass transition temperature of the polymer which accompanies curing with LPR. This suggests that BPR cured resin may meet the requirement for utilization at high temperature.

  1. Optical emission behavior and radiation resistance of epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, Shunichi; Udagawa, Akira; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1987-11-01

    To make clear a mechanism of radiation resistance of epoxy resin systems, a role of energy trapping site induced in bisphenol A type epoxy resins cured with 4 kinds of aromatic amines (Φ N ) was studied in comparison with the case of aliphatic amine curing system through a measurement of optical emission. In the system of the epoxy resin cured with DETA, the optical emission from an excited state of bisphenol A unit of epoxy resin and a charge transfer complex was observed. On the other hand, the optical emission from Φ N was observed in the aromatic amine curing system. Their excitation spectrum consists of peaks of absorption spectrum of BA and those of Φ N , showing that the excited state of Φ N is formed through the excitation of both BA and Φ N . Therefore, the excited energy of BA transfers to the excited state of Φ N . Emission intensity of Φ N band was 20 ∼ 100 times as large as that of BA. These results indicate that the radiation energy is effectively released as an optical emission from excited state of Φ N in the epoxy resin when cured with aromatic amine. It can be concluded from the above results that aromatic amine hardeners contribute to enhancement of the radiation resistance of epoxy resin by acting as an energy transfer agent. (author)

  2. Epoxy resin systems for FGD units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brytus, V.; Puglisi, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses ongoing research work which is directed towards epoxy resins and curing agents which are designed to withstand aggressive environments. This work includes not only a chemical description of the materials involved, but the application testing necessary to verify the usefulness of these systems. It demonstrates that new high performance epoxy systems are superior to those which traditionally come to mind when one thinks epoxy. Finally, it discusses the results of testing designed specifically to screen candidates for use in FGD units

  3. Bismaleimide Copolymer Matrix Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John A.; Heimbuch, Alvin H.; Hsu, Ming-Ta S.; Chen, Timothy S.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite composites, prepared from 1:1 copolymer of two new bismaleimides based on N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have mechanical properties superior to those prepared from other bismaleimide-type resins. New heat-resistant composites replace metal in some structural applications. Monomers used to form copolymers with superior mechanical properties prepared by reaction of MMAB with maleic or citraconic anhydride.

  4. Effect of Luting Cement Space on the Strain Response of Gold Crowns Under Static Compressive Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbia, S; Ibbetson, R; Reuben, B

    2015-03-01

    The aim the work was to investigate the effect of varying degrees of luting cement thickness on the strain of the cemented gold alloy crowns under compression. Five dies with their corresponding crowns were fabricated using a lost wax technique. Three gold crowns for each die were fabricated under the control of specific die spacer layers to provide a space of 40 µm (10 layers of die-spacer thickness) and 80 µm (20 layers of die-spacer thickness). The crowns were subsequently cemented using zinc phosphate cement. The crowns were subjected to gradual static compressive loading between 10N to 250N (Newton) and the strain measured simultaneously. The results were statistically analysed using Independent t-test for the different die-spacer thickness at the 95% confidence interval (p = 0.05). It was found that a significant relationship in the three thicknesses. It was concluded that the absence of die-spacer significantly reduced strain response, whereas a very little change in the strain recorded as the die spacer layers has increased. Clinically, decreasing the number of die-spacer layers is advantageous as it provides a lower strain response under static compressive loading that would improve the longevity of the cemented full crowns inside the patient's mouth.

  5. Hardness of resin cement cured under different thickness of lithium disilicate-based ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Fu

    2011-11-01

    The lithium disilicate-based ceramic is a newly developed all-ceramic material, which is lithium disilicate-based and could be used for fabricating almost all kinds of restorations. The extent of light attenuation by ceramic material was material-dependent. Ceramic materials with different crystal composition or crystalline content would exhibit distinct light-absorbing characteristics. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of ceramic thickness and light-curing time on the polymerization of a dual-curing resin luting material with a lithium disilicate-based ceramic. A lithium disilicate-based ceramic was used in this study. The light attenuation caused by ceramic with different thickness was determined using a spectral radiometer. The commercial dual-cured resin cement was light-cured directly or through ceramic discs with different thickness (1, 2 and 3 mm, respectively) for different times (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 seconds, respectively). The polymerization efficiency of resin cement was expressed in terms as Vickers hardness (VHN) measured after 24 hours storage. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD tests were used to determine differences. Intensity of polymerizing light transmitted through ceramic discs was reduced from 584 mW/cm(2) to about 216 mW/cm(2)2, 80 mW/cm(2) and 52 mW/cm(2) at thicknesses of 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm, respectively. Resin cement specimens self-cured alone showed significantly lower hardness values. When resin cement was light-cured through ceramic discs with a thickness of 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm, no further increasing in hardness values was observed when light-curing time was more than 30 seconds, 40 seconds and 60 seconds, respectively. Within the limitation of the present study, ceramic thickness and light-curing time had remarkable influence on the polymerization of dual-cured resin cement. When resin cement is light-cured beneath a lithium disilicate ceramic with different thickness, prolonging light

  6. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the

  7. Retentive strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts with composite resin cores: Effect of remaining coronal structure and root canal dentin conditioning protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Samah; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-12-01

    The prognosis of a fixed dental prosthesis cemented to endodontically treated teeth is primarily determined by the presence of a ferrule on the tooth. Adhesion of the post in the root canal, conditioning methods for the canal and the amount of coronal structure could also be decisive on survival of reconstructions cemented on endodontically treated teeth. The purpose of this in vitro study was to test the effect of remaining coronal structure on the retention of airborne-particle abraded fiber-reinforced composite resin posts built up with composite resin cores after the treatment of root canal dentin with different conditioning protocols. One hundred and fifty extracted human teeth with single root canal space were endodontically treated and divided into 3 groups as follows: group CEJ: the teeth were sectioned at the level of cementoenamel junction (CEJ); group CEJ1: the teeth were sectioned 1 mm above the CEJ; group CEJ2: the teeth were sectioned 2 mm above the CEJ. Each group was further divided into 5 subgroups (n=10 per group) according to the root canal treatments as follows: group C: no conditioning (control); group PH: conditioning with 37% phosphoric acid gel for 15 seconds; group E: conditioning with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for 60 seconds; group CHX: conditioning with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) for 60 seconds; group Q: conditioning with combination of 2% CHX with 17% EDTA and a surfactant solution for 60 seconds. Glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts were airborne-particle abraded and luted to the root canal dentin with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem). The retentive force was tested by applying a tensile load parallel to the long axis of these posts at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD post hoc test were used to analyze the data. The highest retention (N) was obtained with the CHX-EDTA conditioned group (374.7 ±29.8) followed by 17% EDTA (367.9 ±33.3) conditioning when 2 mm remaining

  8. Comparative Shear-Bond Strength of Six Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements to Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared shear bond strength (SBS of six self-adhesive resin cements (SARC and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC to zirconia before and after thermocycling. The cylinder shape (Φ 2.35 mm × 3 mm of six SARCs (G-CEM LinkAce (GLA, Maxcem Elite (MAX, Clearfil SA Luting (CSL, PermaCem 2.0 (PM2, Rely-X U200 (RXU, Smartcem 2 (SC2 were bonded to the top surface of the zirconia specimens with light-curing. RMGIC (Fujicem (FJC was bonded to the specimens with self-curing. The shear bond strength of all cemented specimens was measured with universal testing machine. Half of the specimens were thermocycled 5000 times before shear bonding strength testing. Fractured surfaces were examined with a field-emission SEM (10,000× and analyzed by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. MAX, PM2, SC2 group without thermocycling and GLA, MAX, PM2 group with thermocycling showed adhesive failure, but GLA, CSL, RXU, FJC group without thermocycling and SLC, RXU, SC2, FJC group with thermocycling indicated cohesive failure. Within the limitation of this study, All of SARCs except MAX demonstrated higher bond strength than that of RMGIC regardless of thermocycling. Also, SARC containing MDP monomers (CSL retained better bonds than other cements.

  9. In vitro wear gap formation of self-adhesive resin cements: a CLSM evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Pelka, Matthias; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the depth of wear gaps of new self-adhesive cements after toothbrush abrasion and ACTA wear test. Luting spaces (325+/-25 microm width, 2mm depth) were produced in Empress 2 ceramic blocks with a diamond saw to obtain flat substrate segments for toothbrush abrasion (n=24) and ACTA wear (n=27). After etching and silanization, the slits were filled with 8 self-adhesive cements, 2 conventional resin cements and 1 flowable composite, stored for 2 weeks in distilled water at 37 degrees C and planished to the cement level. Toothbrush abrasion was carried out in a toothbrush simulator (Willytec, Germany) for 20,000 cycles (load 1N) using an abrasive slurry based on a commercial toothpaste (Elmex, Gaba, Germany, RDA=77). The ACTA wear experiment was performed following the ACTA protocol in millet seed slurry for 400,000 cycles (Willytec). The gap replicas were measured for vertical wear loss under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and a mod-LSD test at pGrandio Flow. Grandio Flow and AllCem showed to be the most resistant to the ACTA wear test, while SpeedCem the least resistant. No correlation was found between the two wear test experiments. Self-adhesive cements have good wear resistance to toothbrush abrasion but most of them wear more rapidly under higher loads in the ACTA test than conventional resin cements and flowable composites.

  10. Kinetics and equilibrium studies for sorption of Cu (II) and Cr (VI) ions onto polymeric composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zahhhar, A.A.; Abdel-Aziz, H.M.; Siyam, T.

    2005-01-01

    The sorption behavior of Cu (II) and Cr (VI) ions from aqueous solutions was studied using polymeric composite resins. Batch sorption experiments were performed as a function of hydrogen ion concentration, complexing agent concentration, resin weight and ionic strength. Kinetic parameters as a function of initial ion concentration were determined to predict the sorption behavior of Cu (II) and Cr (VI) onto polymeric composite resins. The equilibrium data could be fitted by the frendlich adsorption isotherm equation

  11. Biokompatibilitas Gelas Ionomer Modifikasi Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Rotua Lestari M

    2008-01-01

    Saat ini banyak berkembang material baru dalam dunia kedokteran gigi diantaranya adalah Gelas ionomer modifikasi resin yang dikembangkan untuk mengatasi kekurangan-kekurangan dari gelas ionomer konvensional. Adanya penambahan monomer resin daIam bentuk 2-hydroxyethylmetacylate (HEMA) telah meningkatkan kekuatan dari bahan ini. Gelas ionomer modifikasi resin mempunyai sifat-sifat fisis dan mekanis yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan gelas ionomer konvensional. Gelas ionomer modifikasi ...

  12. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  13. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  14. Mechanical and antibacterial properties of benzothiazole-based dental resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Lao, Chonghui; Luo, Shuzhen; Liu, Fang; Huang, Qiting; He, Jingwei; Lin, Zhengmei

    2018-04-01

    A synthesized benzothiazole containing mono-methacrylate monomer BTTMA was incorporated into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resin system with a series of mass concentration from 5 to 30 wt.% as an antibacterial agent. The influence of BTTMA on physicochemical properties of dental resin system, such as double bond conversion (DC), volumetric shrinkage (VS), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL) were investigated. Direct contact testing and agar diffusion testing were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of BTTMA containing dental resin. The results showed that BTTMA could endow dental resin with significant antibacterial activity when its concentration reached a certain amount (20 wt.%), and the antibacterial activity of BTTMA containing dental resin was mainly attributed to the immobilized BTTMA instead of the unreacted leachable BTTMA. BTTMA had no negative effect on physicochemical properties of dental resin, and even some BTTMA containing dental resins had advantages like higher DC, lower VS and WS when compared with control resin. Therefore, BTTMA could be considered as a suitable antibacterial agent in dental material, but much more researches concerned about biocompatibility should be done in future to prove whether it could be applied in clinic.

  15. Evaluation of tensile retention of Y-TZP crowns cemented on resin composite cores: effect of the cement and Y-TZP surface conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, M P; Amaral, R; Oliveira, F S; Cesar, P F; Scotti, R; Valandro, L F; Bottino, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the cement type (adhesive resin, self-adhesive, glass ionomer, and zinc phosphate) on the retention of crowns made of yttria-stabilized polycrystalline tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP). Therefore, 108 freshly extracted molars were embedded in acrylic resin, perpendicular to their long axis, and prepared for full crowns: the crown preparations were removed and reconstructed using composite resin plus fiber posts with dimensions identical to the prepared dentin. The preparations were impressed using addition silicone, and Y-TZP copings were produced, which presented a special setup for the tensile testing. Cementation was performed with two adhesive resin cements (Multilink Automix, Ivoclar-Vivadent; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE), one glass ionomer based cement (RelyX Luting, 3M ESPE), and one zinc phosphate cement (Cimento de Zinco, SS White, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). For the resin cement groups, the inner surfaces of the crowns were subjected to three surface treatments: cleaning with isopropyl alcohol, tribochemical silica coating, or application of a thin low-fusing glass porcelain layer plus silanization. After 24 hours, all groups were subjected to thermocycling (6000 cycles) and included in a special device for tensile testing in a universal testing machine to test the retention of the infrastructure. After testing, the failure modes of all samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the surface treatment and cement type (α=0.05) affected the tensile retention results. The Multilink cement presented the highest tensile retention values, but that result was not statistically different from RelyX ARC. The surface treatment was statistically relevant only for the Multilink cement. The cement choice was shown to be more important than the crown surface treatment for cementation of a Y-TZP crown to a composite resin substrate.

  16. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized.

  17. One-bottle silane coupling agent containing 4-META.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Nobuya; Itoh, Kazuo; Kusunoki, Mizuho; Oikawa, Misa; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of commercial and experimental silane coupling agents was evaluated by measuring their shear bond strengths to a ceramic disk. Experimental one-bottle silane coupling agents were prepared using 3-MPTS, 4-META, and resin monomers. The surfaces of two ceramic disks (IPS e-max, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Lichtenstein) were treated by a silane coupling agent to bond them to each other; this bonding was mediated by a commercial flowable resin composite (Clearfil Majesty LV, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan). A commercial silane coupling agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan) modified by adding 4-META exhibited a significantly higher bond strength than the unmodified commercial one-bottle silane coupling agent. Among the tested materials, two experimental one-bottle silane coupling agents composed of 5% 4-META, 45% 3-MPTS, and 50% resin monomers exhibited statistically highest bond strengths.

  18. Joy, sorrow and love complaints in the Cervantine sonorous imagery: the guitar, the lute and the vihuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Labrador López de Azcona

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of music in Cervantes’ works has, beyond the characterization of the different situations in which it appears, an important significance: that of the musical instruments and of their particular sonority. In the case of the guitar, all of its appearances in Cervantes’ works are presented here, as well as the context that the instrument evokes, very different from that of the lute and vihuela. Music and musical instruments with very clear roles and qualities, both of which reflect the differences between popular culture and that of the elites.

  19. Properties of the Carboxylate ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Bert; Dario, Maarten; Boren, Hans; Torstenfelt, Boerje; Puigdomenech, Ignasi; Johansson, Claes

    2002-09-01

    Weakly acidic, carboxylic resin has been selected, together with strong base anion resins, for water purification at the Forsmark 1 and 2 reactors. For the strong (but not the weak) ion exchange resin the Nuclear Power Inspectorate has given permission to dispose the spent resins in the SFR 1 (the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste). This report gives a review of the carboxylic resins and comes to the conclusion that the resins are very stable and that there should not exist any risks for increased leaching of radionuclides from SFR 1 if these resins are disposed (compared to the strong resins)

  20. Method of separating radioactive nuclides from ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Saikoku, Masami; Taneta, Daisuke; Yagi, Takuro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to safely process radioactive nuclides from spent ion exchange resins by using existent processing facilities. Method: Ion exchange resins in aqueous medium are at first placed to the ultrasonic wave irradiation site and put into such a state where clads and resins are easily separatable from each other by weakening the bonding force between them. Since the clads are magnetic material such as Fe 3 O 4 or NiFe 2 O 4 , the clads can be collected in the direction of the magnetic force by exerting the magnetic field simultaneously. The collected clads are transported by means of the aqueous medium to a collecting tank by removing the effect of magnetic field, for example, by interrupting the current supply to the electromagnet. Finally, they were subjected to stabilization and fixation into inorganic hardening agent such as cement hardener. Thus, processions can be made safely by using existent facilities. (Takahashi, M.)

  1. Cement application techniques in luting implant-supported crowns: a quantitative and qualitative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Hess, Timothy; Piñeyro, Alfonso; Opler, Richard; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2012-01-01

    To investigate different techniques used by dentists when luting an implant-supported crown and to evaluate the application of cement quantitatively and qualitatively. Participants were given a bag containing cement sachet, mixing pad, spatula, a variety of application instruments, and a polycarbonate crown form. The participants were instructed with a standardized audio-video presentation to proportion the cement, mix it, and apply it to the intaglio of the crown as they would if they were to cement it onto an implant abutment in a clinical situation. The crowns were weighed, first unfilled and then again once the applied cement had set. The mean weights of fully-loaded crowns (n = 10) were used as a control group. The patterns of cement loading were recorded. The weights of collected cement-loaded crowns were compared to those of the control group and analyzed statistically. Four hundred and one dentists in several different geographic locations were surveyed. Three distinct cement loading patterns were observed: gross application (GA), brush-on application (BA), and margin application (MA). The mean weights for each cement loading pattern were 242.2 mg for the GA group, 59.9 mg for the BA group, and 59.0 mg for the MA group. The weight of cement in the GA group was significantly higher than that in the other groups. No statistically significant difference between groups BA and MA was seen. The diversity of the cement loading patterns disclosed in this study indicates that there is a lack of uniformity and precision in methods and a lack of consensus in the dental community regarding the appropriate quantity of cement and placement method for a cement-retained implant crown.

  2. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: an in vitro and finite element analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulemans, Filip; De Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Four retainer designs were tested: a proximal box, a step-box, a dual wing, and a step-box-wing. Of each design on 8 human mandibular molars, FRC-FDPs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin impregnated unidirectional glass fibers (Estenia C&B EG Fiber, Kuraray) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Estenia C&B, Kuraray). Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FDPs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test were used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FDPs (proximal box: 300 +/- 65 N; step-box: 309 +/- 37 N) compared to wing-retained FDPs (p optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FDPs.

  3. Separation and characterization of resins and asphaltenes coming from Castilla crude Evaluation of their molecular interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Lina; Alvarez, Mario; Grosso, Jorge Luis; Navarro, Uriel

    2004-01-01

    The study of resins and asphaltenes, the heaviest fractions of oil, has become an area of interest due to the abundance of heavy crude oils in Colombia and Latin America. We studied the chemical composition of the heavy fractions of Castilla crude oil, evaluated some of its molecular parameters and found evidence of the interaction between the resins extracted from the crude with the asphaltenes of the original crude. With this objective, we carried out at the pilot plant level precipitation of the resin-asphaltene (R-A) aggregate by adding and mixing under controlled conditions, a paraffin solvent, from the Apiay refinery, called Apiasol. By extracting Soxhlet with the same solvent, resin 1 of aggregate R-A was separated. Resin ll defined as the soluble fraction that is part of the maltenes, was separated from the deasphalted crude by open column chromatography, using alumina as support, according to the SAR method (Saturated, Aromatics, Resins). The fractions of resins and the asphaltenes obtained, were characterized by: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), FT-lR, DRX, elementary analysis (C, H, N, S), metal content (Ni and V), distribution of molecular weight by GPC, and average molecular weight by VPO. The results obtained show evidence that resin l which is part of the aggregate has less average molecular weight than resin ll which is present in the fraction of maltenes. In addition, some changes were found in the elementary analysis of among the resins. On the one hand, and taking into account the existing theories of molecular interactions among these fractions, it was found that the resins l separated from the R-A aggregate, when added to the crude, they stabilize their asphaltenes. This evaluation was carried out by analyzing the flocculation point of the crude and its mixtures with 1,9% and 3,8% of resin l, when they are titrated with a precipitating agent in an NIR cell that works with high pressure and temperature

  4. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  5. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  6. UV curing silicon-containing epoxy resin and its glass cloth reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guang; Tang Zhuo; Huang Pengcheng

    2007-01-01

    A UV-curable cationic silicon-containing epoxy resin formulation was developed. The gel conversion of the cured resin after 10-min UV irradiation reached 80% in the presence of 5% diaryliodonium salt photoinitiator and 5.5% polyol chain transfer agent by cationic ring-opening polymerization. The glass cloth-reinforced composites were fabricated with the silicon-containing epoxy resin using the wet lay-up technique and UV irradiation. The mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated. Compared with glass cloth reinforced bisphenol A epoxy resin matrix composites, the silicon-containing epoxy resin matrix composites possessed higher tensile strength and interlayer shear strength which was 158.5MPa and 9.9MPa respectively while other mechanical properties such as flexural property and tensile modulus were similar. (authors)

  7. A randomized controlled 30 years follow up of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this 30 year randomized controlled study was to evaluate, by intrain-dividual comparisons, the durability of three conventional resin composites in Class IIrestorations. Methods. Each of 30 participants, 21 female and 9 male (mean age 30 years, range 20–43),received at least...... three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate size.After cavity preparation, the three cavities were chosen at random to be restored with twochemical-cured (P10, Miradapt) and one light-cured resin composite (P30). A chemical-curedenamel bonding agent was applied after etching...... resin composites (p = 0.45).The variables tooth type, cavity size, age, and gender of the participants did not significantlyaffect the probability of failure. Significance. The three conventional resin composites showed good clinical performance dur-ing the 30 year evaluation. The chemical cured resin...

  8. Development of production methods of volume source by the resinous solution which has hardening

    CERN Document Server

    Motoki, R

    2002-01-01

    Volume sources is used for standard sources by radioactive measurement using Ge semiconductor detector of environmental sample, e.g. water, soil and etc. that require large volume. The commercial volume source used in measurement of the water sample is made of agar-agar, and that used in measurement of the soil sample is made of alumina powder. When the plastic receptacles of this two kinds of volume sources were damaged, the leakage contents cause contamination. Moreover, if hermetically sealing performance of volume source made of agar-agar fell, volume decrease due to an evaporation off moisture gives an error to radioactive measurement. Therefore, we developed the two type methods using unsaturated polyester resin, vinilester resin, their hardening agent and acrylicresin. The first type is due to dispersing the hydrochloric acid solution included the radioisotopes uniformly in each resin and hardening the resin. The second is due to dispersing the alumina powder absorbed the radioisotopes in each resin an...

  9. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of the steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise-Flow versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and  bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise

  10. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise™Flow Self-Adhering Flowable Composite, Kerr Dental, USA versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self

  11. Silicone Resin Applications for Ceramic Precursors and Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Narisawa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the applications of silicone resins as ceramic precursors. The historical background of silicone synthesis chemistry is introduced to explain the production costs and supply availability of various silicones. Thermal degradation processes of silicones are classified in terms of the main chain structure and cyclic oligomer expulsion process, which determine the resulting ceramic yield and the chemical composition. The high temperature decomposition of Si-O-C beyond 1,400 °C in an inert atmosphere and formation of a protective silica layer on material surfaces beyond 1,200 °C in an oxidative atmosphere are discussed from the viewpoints of the wide chemical composition of the Si-O-C materials. Applications of the resins for binding agents, as starting materials for porous ceramics, matrix sources with impregnation, fiber spinning and ceramic adhesions are introduced. The recent development of the process of filler or cross-linking agent additions to resin compounds is also introduced. Such resin compounds are useful for obtaining thick coatings, MEMS parts and bulk ceramics, which are difficult to obtain by pyrolysis of simple organometallic precursors without additives.

  12. Separation of rare earth by column chromatography using organic resins XAD/DEPHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zini, J.; Ferreira, J.C.; Bergamaschi, V.S.; Santos, I.; Carvalho, F.M.S., E-mail: jcferrei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CCCH/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Celulas a Combustivel e Hidrogenio

    2013-07-01

    The designation of light and heavy rare earth was used the fractionation used in separation processes. In this study the process of separation of rare earth, in groups, by chromatographic column consisting in fixing of cations these elements in an organic resin Amberlite XAD16 functionalized with the extracting agent DEPHA and another portion functionalized with a mixture of extractors DEPHA/TOP. The preparation of these resins was performed in two forms, one directly as the extracting agent to the resin and the other to be used in ethyl alcohol. Conditioned resins were introduced in chromatographic columns in separation of groups, light and heavy, using a standard solution of cerium nitrate and standard solution of holmium nitrate groups to represent light and heavy respectively. The characterization technique used to identify the rare earth elements was Spectrometry X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). The results using the technique of chromatography were satisfactory, obtaining 100% separation of the elements. (author)

  13. Retentive strength of different intracanal posts in restorations of anterior primary teeth: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Memarpour

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To determine the retentive strength and failure mode of undercut composite post, glass fiber post and polyethylene fiber post luted with flowable composite resin and resin-cement. Materials and Methods Coronal parts of 120 primary canine teeth were sectioned and specimens were treated endodontically. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 20. Prepared root canals received intracanal retainers with a short composite post, undercut composite post, glass fiber post luted with flowable resin or resin-cement, and polyethylene fiber post luted with flowable resin or resin-cement. After crown reconstruction, samples were tested for retentive strength and failure mode. Statistical analysis was done with one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p < 0.05. Results There were statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.001. Mean bond strength in the undercut group was significantly greater than in the short composite post (p = 0.030, and the glass fiber post (p = 0.001 and the polyethylene fiber post group luted with resin-cement (p = 0.008. However, the differences between the undercut group and the groups with flowable composite as the luting agent were not significant (p = 0.068, p = 0.557. Adhesive failure was more frequent in the fiber post groups. Conclusions Although the composite post with undercutting showed the greatest resistance to dislodgement, fiber posts cemented with flowable composite resin provided acceptable results in terms of retentive strength and fracture mode.

  14. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  15. Effects of the addition of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on mechanical properties of luting and lining glass ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heravi, Farzin; Bagheri, Hossein; Rangrazi, Abdolrasoul; Mojtaba Zebarjad, Seyed

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the addition of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into glass ionomer cements (GICs) has attracted interest due to its remineralization of teeth and its antibacterial effects. However, it should be investigated to ensure that the incorporation of CPP-ACP does not have significant adverse effects on its mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the addition of CPP-ACP on the mechanical properties of luting and lining GIC. The first step was to synthesize the CPP-ACP. Then the CPP-ACP at concentrations of 1%, 1.56% and 2% of CPP-ACP was added into a luting and lining GIC. GIC without CPP-ACP was used as a control group. The results revealed that the incorporation of CPP-ACP up to 1.56%(w/w) increased the flexural strength (29%), diametral tensile strength (36%) and microhardness (18%), followed by a reduction in these mechanical properties at 2%(w/w) CPP-ACP. The wear rate was significantly decreased (23%) in 1.56%(w/w) concentration of CPP-ACP and it was increased in 2%(w/w). Accordingly, the addition of 1.56%(w/w) CPP-ACP into luting and lining GIC had no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of luting and lining GIC and could be used in clinical practice.

  16. Acid Etching as Surface Treatment Method for Luting of Glass-Ceramic Restorations, part 1: Acids, Application Protocol and Etching Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilija Barjaktarova-Valjakova

    2018-03-01

    CONCLUSION: Acid etching of the bonding surface of glass - ceramic restorations is considered as the most effective treatment method that provides a reliable bond with composite cement. Selective removing of the glassy matrix of silicate ceramics results in a micromorphological three-dimensional porous surface that allows micromechanical interlocking of the luting composite.

  17. Chromatography resin support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  18. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin applicator. 872.3140 Section 872.3140 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of...

  19. Concentration and separation of trace metals with an arsonic acid resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, J S; Moyers, E M

    1976-08-01

    Macroporeus arsonic acid resins with different pore sizes and surface areas were prepared and the properties compared. One of the resins was used for concentration of trace metal ions from dimineralized water, tap-water, and sea-water. The effect of pH and complexing agents on the recovery of metal ions was studied. A method for separation of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) from each other and from other metal ions was developed.

  20. Effect of Porcelain Surface Pretreatments on Composite Resin-Porcelain Shear Bond Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    compared shear bond strengths between mechanically retained, silicoated, and sputter coated orthodontic brackets cemented with three different cements...between composite resin and porcelain, it is thought that thermocycling accelerates the hydrolysis induced degradation of the composite resin-porcelain bond...Bonding Orthodontic Attachments to Porcelain Teeth Using a Silane Coupling Agent, Am J Orthod 77: 233. Jones, D. W. (1985): Low Fusing Porcelains. In

  1. IN VITRO ANTIFUNGAL ACTION OF DIFFERENT SUBSTANCES OVER MICROWAVED-CURED ACRYLIC RESINS

    OpenAIRE

    Montagner, Henrique; Montagner, Francisco; Braun, Katia Olmedo; Peres, Paulo Edelvar Correa; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The presence of Candida albicans on the surfaces of denture-base acrylic resins is strongly related to the development of oral stomatitis. This study evaluated the antifungal action of different agents over microwave-cured acrylic resin without polishing specimens previously contaminated with Candida albicans. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty specimens were immersed in BHI broth previously inoculated with the yeast and stored for 3 h at 37ºC. They were divided into 5 experimental groups...

  2. Effect of MDP-Based Silane and Different Surface Conditioner Methods on Bonding of Resin Cements to Zirconium Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Hatice; Yanikoğlu, Nuran; Sağsöz, Nurdan

    2017-07-24

    To determine the shear bond strength (SBS) between zirconium framework and resin cements after different surface conditioner methods and after application of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) based silane and a bonding agent mix. 128 disc-shaped zirconium-oxide specimens were prepared. Specimens were placed in autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The bonding surface of specimens was smoothed consecutively with 600-, 800-, and 1200-grit silicon carbide papers under water cooling. Eight groups were prepared: CJ, Co-Jet; N, Nd-YAG laser; E, Er-YAG laser; NS, Nd-YAG laser + silane; ES, Er-YAG laser + silane; CJB, Co-Jet + bonding agent; NSB, Nd-YAG laser + silane + bonding agent; ESB, Er-YAG laser + silane + bonding agent. SEM analysis was performed under 2000× magnification. Dual- and self-cured resin cements were bonded to specimens, and shear force was applied. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test (p MDP-based silane and bonding agent mix increased SBS values of each cement belonging to each group. SB values of dual-cure resin cement were higher than those of self-cure resin cements. Different surface conditioner methods exhibit an important effect on the SBS of resin cements to zirconium. The application of MDP-based silane and bonding agent mix enhanced SB values. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Influence of brush type as a carrier of adhesive solutions and paper points as an adhesive-excess remover on the resin bond to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rodrigo O A; Lombardo, Geraldo H L; Michida, Silvia M A; Galhano, Graziela; Bottino, Marco Antônio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of the brush type as a carrier of priming adhesive solutions and the use of paper points as a remover of the excess of these solutions on the push-out bond strength of resin cement to bovine root dentin. The null hypotheses were that brush type and the use of paper points do not affect the bond strength. The canals of 80 single-root bovine roots (16 mm in length) were prepared at 12 mm using the preparation drill (FRC Postec Plus, Ivoclar). Half of each root was embedded in acrylic resin and the specimens were divided into 8 groups, considering the factors "brush type" (4 levels) and "paper point" (2 levels) (n = 10): Gr 1: small microbrush (Cavi-Tip, SDI); Gr 2: Microbrush (Dentsply); Gr 3: Endobrush (Bisco); Gr 4: conventional brush (Bisco); Gr 5: Cavi-Tip (SDI) + paper points; Gr 6: Microbrush (Dentsply) + paper points; Gr 7: Endobrush (Bisco) + paper points; Gr 8: conventional brush (Bisco) + paper points. The root dentin was treated with a multistep total-etch adhesive system (All Bond 2). The adhesive system was applied using each microbrush, with and without using paper points. One fiber post was molded with addition silicon and 80 posts were made of resin cement (Duolink). The resin posts were luted (Duolink resin cement), and the specimens were stored for 24 h in water at 37 degrees C. Each specimen was cut into 4 disk-shaped samples (1.8 mm in thickness), which were submitted to the push-out test. The brush type (p microbrush = endobrush = conventional brush) and the use of paper points (p = 0.0001) (with > without) influenced the bond strength significantly (two-way ANOVA). The null hypotheses were rejected. The smallest brush (Cavi-Tip) and the use of paper points significantly improved the resin bond to bovine root dentin.

  4. Temperature rise during polymerization of different cavity liners and composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Ozcan; Turel, Verda; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thermal insulating properties of different light curing cavity liners and composite resins during light emitting diode (LED) curing. Sixty-four dentin discs, 1 mm thick and 8 mm in diameter, were prepared. Specimens were divided into four groups. Calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2), resin-modified glass ionomer cement, flowable composite and adhesive systems were applied to dentin discs according to the manufacturers' instructions. The rise in temperature during polymerization with a LED curing unit (LCU) was measured using a K-type thermocouple connected to a data logger. Subsequently, all specimens were randomly divided into one of two groups. A silorane-based composite resin and a methacrylate-based composite resin were applied to the specimens. Temperature rise during polymerization of composite resins with LCU were then measured again. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey analyses. There were significant differences in temperature rise among the liners, adhesives, and composite resins (P < 0.05). Silorane-based composite resin exhibited significantly greater temperature rises than methacrylate-based resin (P < 0.05). The smallest temperature rises were observed in Ca(OH)2 specimens. Thermal insulating properties of different restorative materials are important factors in pulp health. Bonding agents alone are not sufficient to protect pulp from thermal stimuli throughout curing.

  5. Wet oxidative destruction of spent ion-exchange resins using hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, C.; Ramaswamy, M.; Theyyunni, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Spent organic ion exchange resins are generated in large quantities during the operation of nuclear facilities. Wet oxidation as a mode of treatment of these gel-type ion exchange resins was investigated using H 2 O 2 as oxidant in the presence of CuSO 4 as catalyst. Experiments using commercial samples were conducted at 95-100 deg C under reflux conditions at atmospheric pressure. It was found that the reaction of cation resin with H 2 O 2 was instantaneous whereas with anion resin, there was a lag time. For efficient utilization of the oxidant, low rate of addition of H 2 O 2 , 0.01M concentration of CuSO 4 and neutral pH in mixed resin reactions, were found to be useful. Foaming was noted during reactions involving anion resins. This could be controlled by silicone-based agents. The residual solution left after resin oxidation is aqueous in nature and is expected to contain all the radioactivity originally present in the resin. Preliminary experiments showed that it could be efficiently trapped using available inorganic sorbents. Wet oxidation system offers a simple method of converting organic waste into environmentally acceptable inorganic products. (author). 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Measurement of water diffusion in epoxy and polyester resins with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozisek, M.

    1976-01-01

    A brief characteristic is given of diffusion processes in polymers and their importance in the corrosion of plastics and synthetic resins. The method and equipment are described for the application of radionuclides in measuring the diffusion of water in epoxy and polyester resins. The desorption of water labelled with tritium and the diffusion coefficients of water molecules were investigated in five samples of resins. The experimental results show that there are evident differences between the individual evaluated synthetic resins in the diffusion rate of water molecules at temperatures within the region of 15 to 55 degC. Of the epoxy resins, the smallest diffusion rate of water was found for ChS Epoxifurol EFF hardened with the EFF 33 setting agent, and for ChS Epoxi 110 Bg 15. The ChS Epoxifurol EFF 33 type set by adding 20% aminoamide has a higher diffusion rate probably due to the presence of polar functional groups. The epoxy resin Eprosin E 26 containing a considerable amount of inorganic filler has a substantially higher diffusion rate for water molecules than the other types of evaluated resins. The polyester resin ChS Polyester 221 has the lowest rate of water diffusion. (J.B.)

  7. Positron lifetime study of electron-irradiated epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; Wojnarovits, L.; Foeldiak, G.; Liszkai, L.; Kajcsos, Zs.

    1990-01-01

    Two bisphenol-A type epoxy resins were irradiated by electron beam and studied afterwards by positron lifetime spectroscopy. An interesting result is that despite of the considerable amount of free-radicals, no inhibition of positronium formation was observed in the two epoxies. Nevertheless, several serious differences were detected between the studied polymers. The results suggest that the radiation-resistant properties of epoxies depend strongly on the amount of the curing agent. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  8. Fixation of metallic sulfosalicylate complexes on an anionic exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahuzac, S.

    1969-06-01

    Since sulfosalicylate ions have acid-base properties, sulfosalicylate complexes have an apparent stability which varies with the ph. As a result, the fixation of sulfo-salicylates on an anionic exchange resin depends on the ph of the solution in equilibrium with the resin. This research has been aimed at studying the influence of the ph on the fixation on an anionic exchange resin (Dowex 1 x 4) of sulfosalicylate anions on the one hand, and of metallic sulfosalicylate complexes on the other hand. In the first part of this work, a determination has been made, by frontal analysis of the distribution of sulfosalicylate ions in the resin according to the total sulfosalicylate I concentration in the aqueous solution in equilibrium with the resin. The exchange constants of these ions between the resin and the solution have been calculated. In the second part, a study has been made of the fixation of anionic sulfosalicylate complexes of Fe(III), Al(III), Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II), Mn(II), Cd(II), Fe(II) and UO 2 2+ . By measuring the partition coefficients of these different elements between the resin and the solution it has been possible to give interpretation for the modes of fixation of the metallic ions, and to calculate their exchange constant between the resin and the solution. The relationship has been established for each metallic element studied, between its partition coefficient, the ph and the total concentration of the complexing agent in solution. Such a relationship makes it possible to predict, for given conditions, the nature of the species in solution and in the resin, as well as the partition coefficient of a metallic, element. Finally, in the third part of the work, use has been made of results obtained previously, to carry out some separations (Ni 2+ - Co 2+ ; Ni 2+ - Co 2+ - Cu 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Fe 3+ ; UO 2 2+ - Cr 3+ ; UO 2 2+ - Cu 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Ni 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Co 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Mn 2+ and UO 2 2+ - Cd 2+ ), as well as the purification

  9. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  10. and phenol–formaldehyde resin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    formaldehyde resin (PFR) modified with tetraethylorthosilicate are investigated in detail. The chemical synthesis of PFR, its modification with nanometer- sized SiO2 particles created by sol–gel method and subsequent coating, enables a preparation of ...

  11. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  12. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  13. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (presin cement, Panavia SA, yielded the strongest bond to Y-TZP ceramic when compared to adhesive (RelyX Ultimate) or esthetic (Calibra) resin cements. Air

  14. Antimicrobial activity of resin acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savluchinske-Feio, Sonia; Curto, Maria João Marcelo; Gigante, Bárbara; Roseiro, J Carlos

    2006-09-01

    The wide potential of resin acids as bioactive agents gave rise to a growing effort in the search for new applications of the natural forms and their derivatives. In some of these compounds, the antimicrobial activity is associated to the presence in the molecules of functional groups such as the hydroxyl, aldehyde, and ketone or to their cis or trans configurations. The resin acid family covers a spectrum of antimicrobial activities against several microorganisms, from bacteria to fungi, in which the mode of action was studied by electron microscopy. The morphological alterations are consistent with an unspecific mode of action causing inhibition of the fungal growth or damaging the fungal cells in parallel with a mechanism of resistance based on the retention of the compound by the lipid accumulation. The sterol composition of phytopathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea and Lophodermium seditiosum treated with methyl cis-7-oxo-deisopropyldehydroabietate revealed the presence of ergosterol (M+ 396) and dihydroergosterol (M+ 398) in both cultures showing that this compound did not interfere with the ergosterol metabolic pathway of both fungi.

  15. Resin Glycosides from the Morning Glory Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Castañeda-Gómez, Jhon

    Resin glycosides are part of a very extensive family of secondary metabolites known as glycolipids or lipo-oligosaccharides and are constituents of complex resins (glycoresins) (1) unique to the morning glory family, Convolvulaceae (2). These active principles are responsible for the drastic purgative action of all the important Convolvulaceous species used in traditional medicine throughout the world since ancient times. Several commercial purgative crude drugs can be prepared from the roots of different species of Mexican morning glories. Their incorporation as therapeutic agents in Europe is an outstanding example of the assimilation of botanical drugs from the Americas as substitutes for traditional Old World remedies (3). Even though phytochemical investigations on the constituents of these drugs were initiated during the second half of the nineteenth century, the structure of their active ingredients still remains poorly known for some examples of these purgative roots. During the last two decades, the higher resolution capabilities of modern analytical isolation techniques used in conjunction with powerful spectroscopic methods have facilitated the elucidation of the active principles of these relevant herbal products.

  16. Resin glycosides from Porana duclouxii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wen-Bing; Zhang, Dai-Gui; Liu, Chun-Jie; Li, Guan-Hua; Li, You-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    A new intact resin glycoside (3) and two glycosidic acids (1 and 2), all having a common trisaccharide moiety and (11S)-hydroxytetradecanoic acid or (3S,11S)-dihydroxytetradecanoic acid as the aglycone, were obtained from the roots of Porana duclouxii. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and chemical correlations. These compounds represent the first examples of resin glycosides from the genus Porana.

  17. Karakteristik Komposit Resin Berkemampuan Mengalir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Irawan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of resin composites as posterior restoratives has markedly increased over the past decade. The patients demand for better esthetics, concerns related to possible mercury toxicity from amalgam and improvements in resin composite materials have significantly contributed the popularity of these materials. Early problems related to composites included excessive wear, less of anatomic form, post operative sensitivity, secondary caries and marginal leakage. Marginal adaptation still remains an unavoidable problem for composite restoration, especially at the gingival wall of cervical or Class II restoration. In an attempt to improve marginal sealing, many techniques and lining materials have been designed. To reduce stress generated by polymerization shrinkage, applying and curing of resin composites in layers is often recommended. Using a thick adhesive layer or low-viscosity resin may, due to its elastic properties, serve as a flexible intermediate layer and compensate for the polymerization stress created in resin composite. Flowable composites were created by retaining the same small particle size of traditional hybrid composite but reducing the filler content and allowing the increased resin to reduce the viscosity of the mixture. Flowable composites were introduced in 1996 as liners, fissure sealants and also in tunnel preparations. They have been suggested for Class I, II, III and V cavity restorations, preventive resin restorations and composite, porcelain and amalgam repairing. Their usage as a liner under high filled resins in posterior restorations has been shown to improve the adaptation of composites and effectively achieve clinically acceptable results. This article attempts to give a broad characteristics of different types of flowable composites. 

  18. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  19. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Tetsurou (Nitto Denko Corp., Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)); Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu

    1989-09-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author).

  20. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tetsurou; Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu.

    1989-01-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author)

  1. Curing of epoxy resins with 1-DI(2-chloroethoxyphosphinyl) methyl-2,4 and -2,6-diaminobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Fire resistant compositions were prepared using 1-di(2-chloroethoxy-phosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene (DCEPD) as a curing agent for typical epoxy resins such as EPON 828 (Shell), XD 7342 (Dow), and My 720 (Ciba Geigy). In addition, compositions of these three epoxy resins with common curing agents such as m-phenylenediamine (MPD) or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) were studied to compare their reactions with those of DCEPD. The reactivity of the three curing agents toward the epoxy resins, measured by differential calorimetry (DSC), was of the order MPD DCEPD DDS. The relatively lower reactivity of DCEPD toward epoxy resins was attributed to electronic effects.

  2. Curing of epoxy resins with 1-/di(2-chloroethoxyphosphinyl)methyl/-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Fire resistant compositions were prepared using 1-di(2-chloroethoxy-phosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene (DCEPD) as a curing agent for typical epoxy resins such as EPON 828 (Shell), XD 7342 (Dow), and My 720 (Ciba Geigy). In addition, compositions of these three epoxy resins with common curing agents such as m-phenylenediamine (MPD) or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) were studied to compare their reactions with those of DCEPD. The reactivity of the three curing agents toward the epoxy resins, measured by differential calorimetry (DSC), was of the order MPD DCEPD DDS. The relatively lower reactivity of DCEPD toward epoxy resins was attributed to electronic effects.

  3. Effects of different cavity disinfectants on shear bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Soley; Yazici, A Ruya; Gorucu, Jale; Ertan, Atilla; Pala, Kansad; Ustun, Yakup; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E

    2011-07-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of different cavity disinfection agents on bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite. Thirty-six caries-free human third mandibular molars sectioned in mesio-distal direction were mounted in acrylic resin with their flat dentin surfaces exposed. After the dentin surfaces were wet ground with # 600 silicon carbide paper, the teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups of 12 each according to the cavity disinfection agents; chlorhexidine (CHX); sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), propolis, ozone, Er,Cr:YSGG laser and no treatment (control). After treatment of dentin surfaces with one of these cavity disinfection agents, Filtek Silorane adhesive system was applied. The silorane-based resin composite, Filtek Silorane was condensed into a mold and polymerized. After storage at 37°C for 24 hours, the specimens were tested in shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. No statistically significant difference was observed between the groups (p>0.05). The use of the tested cavity disinfection agents, chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite, propolis, ozone and Er,Cr:YSGG laser did not significantly affect the dentin bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite, filtek supreme. Cavity disinfectant applications did not affect the dentin bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite.

  4. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Tulga, Ayça

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) ( P CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials.

  5. Compatibility between dental adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-Luc; MacKenzie, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    Information is lacking about incompatibilities between certain types of adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins, and universal adhesives have yet to be tested with these resins. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the bonding outcome of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins by using different categories of adhesive solutions and to determine whether incompatibilities were present. One hundred and eighty caries-free, extracted third molar teeth were allocated to 9 groups (n=20), in which 3 different bonding agents (Single Bond Plus [SB]), Scotchbond Multi-purpose [MP], and Scotchbond Universal [SU]) were used to bond 3 different composite resins (CompCore AF [CC], Core Paste XP [CP], and Filtek Supreme Ultra [FS]). After restorations had been fabricated using an Ultradent device, the specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours. The specimens were tested under shear force at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and post hoc pairwise comparisons (α=.05). All 3 composite resins produced comparable shear bond strengths when used with MP (P=.076). However, when either SB or SU was used, the light-polymerized composite resin (FS) and 1 dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CC) bonded significantly better than the other dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CP) (Pcomposite resins can obtain equally good bond strengths as light-polymerizing alternatives. However, not all dual-polymerizing composite resins perform well with all bonding systems; some incompatibilities exist between different products. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation and characterization of (St-DVB-MAA) ion exchange resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanquan; Sun, Xiangwei; Ling, Lixing; Wang, Shumin; Wu, Wufeng; Cheng, Shihong; Hu, Yue; Zhong, Chunyan

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, used polyvinyl alcohol as dispersing agent, Benzoyl peroxide as initiator of polymerization, Divinyl benzene as cross-linking agent, Styrene and 2-Methylpropenoic acid as monomer, ion exchange resin (copolymer of St-DVB-MAA)were prepared by suspension polymerization on 80°C. The structures, components and properties of the prepared composite micro gels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The experiment of ion exchange was conducted by resin to deal with copper ions in the solution. The result showed that performance of the ion exchange capacity was excellent, which impacted by pH.

  7. Study on direct-chain diacid modified phenolic resin for Al-alloy casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yundong JI

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Resin coated sand (RCS with phenolic resin matrix can hardly be collapsed when it is used in Al-alloy casting. Adding collapsing agent and reducing the concentration of resin are solutions adopted by workers, but these methods tend to reduce the initial strength of RCS. Synthesis of modified phenolic resin with direct-chain diacid DAn (/JS=6, where n means carbon amount was studied here. The effects of the addition of modifying agent on molecular weight, gel time and softening point were investigated. Optimal addition of DAn (10% phenol was obtained by testing the initial and retained flexural strengths of the modified resin. FT-IR spectra showed that carbonyl shifts to higher wave number. With the use of TG, SEM and strength loss curves, the relation between initial and retained strengths was analysed. Tests on the heated deformation curve, before and after resin modification, show that PF-DA10 has the characteristic of higher initial and retained strengths together.

  8. Resin technologies: construction and staining of resin TMA's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howat, William J; Wilson, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    The traditional formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, and therefore the tissue microarrays created from it, provide good morphology but with a compromised antigenicity when compared to frozen tissue. In contrast, while solving the issue of antigenicity, frozen tissue suffers from a lack of morphology. We have demonstrated that tissue microarrays constructed in glycol methacrylate resin, when combined with a cold acetone fixation step, have been able to combine the superior morphology of resin-embedded sections with the superior antigenicity of frozen tissue for prospectively collected material.

  9. Flexural Strength of Preheated Resin Composites and Bonding Properties to Glass-Ceramic and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Richard Kramer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the impact of preheating (25, 37, 54, or 68 °C of TetricEvoCeram (TEC, FiltekSupremeXT (FSXT, and Venus (V on flexural strength (FS, shear bond strength (SBS and interfacial tension (IFT. FS was tested with TEC and FSXT. For SBS, glass-ceramic and human dentin substrate were fabricated and luted with the preheated resin composite (RC. SBSs of 1500 thermal cycled specimens were measured. For IFT, glass slides covered with the non-polymerized RC were prepared and contact angles were measured. Data were analyzed using 2/1-way ANOVA with Scheffé-test, and t-test (p < 0.05. Preheated TEC (37–68 °C showed higher FS compared to the control-group (25 °C (p < 0.001. FSXT presented higher FS than TEC (p < 0.001. For SBS to dentin higher values for FSXT than TEC were found. The preheating temperature showed no impact on SBS to dentin. SBS to glass-ceramic revealed a positive influence of temperature for TEC 25–68 °C (p = 0.015. TEC showed higher values than V and FSXT (p < 0.001. IFT values increased with the preheating temperature. A significant difference could be observed in every RC group between 25 and 68 °C (p < 0.001.

  10. Clinical study of indirect composite resin inlays in posterior stress-bearing cavities placed by dental students: results after 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Karin Christine; Chen, Hong Yan; Mehl, Albert; Hickel, Reinhard; Manhart, Juergen

    2011-07-01

    This longitudinal randomized controlled clinical trial evaluated the longevity of composite resin inlays in single- or multi-surface cavities up to 4 years. 21 dental students placed 75 Artglass and 80 Charisma composite resin inlays in class I and II cavities in posterior teeth (89 adult patients) luted with dual-curing resin cements. Clinical evaluation was performed up to 4 years using modified USPHS criteria. 87.2% of Artglass and 76.6% of Charisma inlays were assessed to be clinically excellent or acceptable. Up to the 4-year recall 5 Artglass and 11 Charisma inlays failed mainly because of postoperative symptoms, bulk fracture, and loss of marginal integrity. No significant differences between both composite resin materials could be detected at 4 years for all clinical criteria (Mann-Whitney U-test, p>0.05). The comparison of restoration performance with time yielded a significant increase in marginal discolouration and postoperative symptoms (pinlay systems. However, the changes were mainly effects of scoring shifts from alfa to bravo. Small inlays compared to large inlays and premolar restorations compared to molar restorations showed significant better outcome for some of the tested clinical parameters for the Artglass inlays (pinlays no such influences were revealed. Clinical assessment of Artglass and Charisma composite resin inlays exhibited an annual failure rate of 3.2% and 5.9% that is within the range of published data. Within the limitations of this study indirect composite inlays are a competitive restorative procedure in stress-bearing preparations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis of hemicellulose-acrylic acid graft copolymer super water absorbent resin by ultrasonic irradiation technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang LIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The hemicellulose super water absorbent resin is prepared by using ultrasonic irradiation technology, with the waste liquid produced during the preparation of viscose fiber which contains a large amount of hemicellulose as raw material, acrylic acid as graft monomer, N,N’-methylene bis acrylamide (NMBA as cross linking agent, and (NH42S2O8-NaHSO3 as the redox initiation system. The synthesis conditions, structure and water absorption ability of resin are discussed. The results indicate that water absorbency of the resin is 311 g/g, the tap water absorbency is 102 g/g, the normal saline absorbency is 55 g/g, and the artificial urine absorbency is 31 g/g under the optimal synthesis conditions, so the resin has great water absorption rate and water retaining capacity. The FT-IR and SEM analysis shows that the resin with honeycomb network structure is prepared. The successfully synthesized of the resin means that the hemicellulose waste liquid can be highly effectively recycled, and it provides a kind of new raw material for the synthesis of super water absorbent resin.

  12. Epoxy Resins in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Henry

    1960-01-01

    A method of embedding biological specimens in araldite 502 (Ciba) has been developed for materials available in the United States. Araldite-embedded tissues are suitable for electron microscopy, but the cutting qualities of the resin necessitates more than routine attention during microtomy. The rather high viscosity of araldite 502 also seems to be an unnecessary handicap. The less viscous epoxy epon 812 (Shell) produces specimens with improved cutting qualities, and has several features—low shrinkage and absence of specimen damage during cure, minimal compression of sections, relative absence of electron beam-induced section damage, etc.—which recommends it as a routine embedding material. The hardness of the cured resin can be easily adjusted by several methods to suit the materials embedded in it. Several problems and advantages of working with sections of epoxy resins are also discussed. PMID:13822825

  13. Process for Molding Nonreinforced (Neat) Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Void free moldings obtained for neat, condensation, thermosetting resins. Thermally and mechanically treat resin prior to molding to reduce amount of volatiles. With volatiles reduced molding temperature and pressure are applied in way to drive out remaining volatiles during molding.

  14. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used...

  15. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship between chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)

  16. Sorption of Pu(IV) from nitric acid by bifunctional anion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, R.A.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Elshani, S.; Zhao, W.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Barr, M.E.; Marsh, S.F.; Chamberlin, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Anion exchange is attractive for separating plutonium because the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is very strongly sorbed and few other metal ions form competing anionic nitrate complexes. The major disadvantage of this process has been the unusually slow rate at which the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is sorbed by the resin. The paper summarizes the concept of bifunctional anion-exchange resins, proposed mechanism for Pu(IV) sorption, synthesis of the alkylating agent, calculation of K d values from Pu(IV) sorption results, and conclusions from the study of Pu(IV) sorption from 7M nitric acid by macroporous anion-exchange resins including level of crosslinking, level of alkylation, length of spacer, and bifunctional vs. monofunctional anion-exchange resins

  17. Preparation of alkyd resins containing PEG unit and their dispersing effects of inorganic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chill Won; Gong, Myoung Seon [Dept. of Chemistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea); Kim, Chang Bae [Dept. of Chemistry, Dankook University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol)-containing alkyd resins were prepared for the dispersing agent and binder by reacting the carboxy-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) with 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane monostearate obtained from 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane and stearic acid. Dispersing properties of titanium dioxide and talc were compared by measuring transmittance of the dispersing solutions, and rate of the sedimentation in 1,1,1-trichloroethane. These alkyd resins, which contained both hydrophilic and lipophilic parts, showed a good dispersion of the polar inorganic particles in the non-polar solvent. The dispersing effect of the PEG-containing alkyd resins showed its maximum when the molecular weights of hydrophilic and lipophilic parts were almost the same. This happened when the alkyd resin was prepared from PEG 1000, which turned out to agree well with HLB value 10.25. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Influence of activation mode of resin cement on the shade of porcelain veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Ana Paula Rodrigues; Cardoso, Paula de Carvalho; de Souza, João Batista; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; Lopez, Lawrence Gonzaga

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of resin luting cement's activation mode in the final shade of porcelain veneers after accelerated artificial aging (AAA). Porcelain veneers (IPS Empress Esthetic) were produced using a standardized shade (ET1) and thickness (0.6 mm). Twenty bovine teeth were collected, prepared, and divided into two groups: group I (n = 10)-light-cured group, only base paste was applied to the veneers; group II (n = 10)-dual-cured group, in which the same base paste used in group I and a transparent catalyst were proportionally mixed for 20 seconds and then applied to the veneers. The specimens were light-cured for 60 seconds each and were next subjected to AAA. They were submitted to color readings with a spectrophotometer in three instances: in the tooth surface (only the substrate), after the cementation and polymerization of the veneers, and after the AAA. The values of L*, a*, and b* were obtained and the total color change was calculated (∆E*). Values obtained were subjected to statistical analysis, with a significance of 0.05. There were no significant differences between dual- and light-cured modes considering ∆E*, L*, a*, and b* values obtained after aging (p > 0.05). Within the dual-cured mode there were no significant differences in ∆E*, L*, a*, and b* values (p > 0.05). No relevant differences were found between the two activation modes in color change. When submitted to aging, dual- and light-cured modes of the resin cement showed visually perceptible (∆E* > 1.0) color changes; however, within the threshold of clinical acceptance (∆E* > 3.3). © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Method for loading resin beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Rainey, R.H.; Greene, C.W.; Shockley, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145 to 200 0 C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145 0 C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO 3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate

  20. Uranium sorption by tannin resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares Rieumont, S.; Martinez Luzardo, J.; Torres Hernandez, J.; Lima Cazorla, D. de la Rosa.

    1998-01-01

    The sorption of uranium by immobilised Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. and Lysiloma latisiliqua L tannins was investigated. Immobilization condition were analyzed. These resins resulted suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. At pH 5.5 maximum in sorption capacity is registered. The presence of appreciable amount of sodium chloride do not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these that could be found in sea water and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. Tannin resins can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity

  1. Influence of curing agents on gelation and exotherm behaviour of an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A judicious choice of curing agents such as initiator and promoter and their ratio to the resin can avoid reduced gel-time and shortened exothermic reactions in applications such as liquid compositemoulding processes. In this study, effects of different ratio of initiator and promoter to the unsaturated polyester resin on curing ...

  2. Improvements to hydroxymethylated resorcinol coupling agent for durable bonding to wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred W. Christiansen; E. Arnold Okkonen

    2003-01-01

    Improving the exterior quality bonding of wood to epoxy adhesive resins is important for bonding glass-fiber-reinforced vinyl ester resin laminae to glulam structural members, as well as for repairing glulam members in exterior applications on site. The coupling agent for these applications, hydroxymethylated resorcinol (HMR), was recently improved by using a novolak...

  3. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  4. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  5. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  6. Physical aging of linear and network epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, E. S.-W.; Wilkes, G. L.; Mcgrath, J. E.; Banthia, A. K.; Mohajer, Y.; Tant, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    Network and linear epoxy resins principally based on the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A and its oligomers are prepared and studied using diamine and anhydride crosslinking agents. Rubber modified epoxies and a carbon fiber reinforced composite are also investigated. All materials display time-dependent changes when stored at temperatures below the glass transition temperature after quench