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Sample records for resin composite show

  1. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  2. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Ng; Jimmy C. M. Hsiao; Keith C. T. Tong; Harry Kim; Yanjie Mai; Keith H. S. Chan

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin ...

  3. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Ng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  4. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith H. S.; Mai, Yanjie; Kim, Harry; Tong, Keith C. T.; Ng, Desmond; Hsiao, Jimmy C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  5. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornavoi, Denise Cremonezzi; Agnelli, José Augusto Marcondes; Panzeri, Heitor; Dos Reis, Andréa Cândido

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated artificial aging (AAA) on the color change of composite resins used in dentistry. Three composite resins were evaluated: Two microhybrids and one hybrid of higher viscosity, with different amounts and sizes of filler particles, shades C2 and B2. A total of 54 specimens were obtained (18 for each composite resin), made of a Teflon matrix (15 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height). The color measurements were obtained with a Spectrophotometer, (PCB 6807 BYK Gardner) before and after AAA. Data were submitted to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (α >0.05), ANOVA and Tukey test (α composite resins with the same shades was analyzed. All composite resins showed unacceptable color changes after AAA (ΔE > 3). Considering the variable ∆E, it was observed that the color tone C2 was already statistically different for the microhybrid composite resin prior to AAA (P composite resins (P composite resin group, before aging the composite resin hybrid of higher viscosity B2 showed the highest color variation rate and microhybrid with zirconium/silica C2 showed the lowest. All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2) and after (B2). It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  6. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  7. Effect of proximal box elevation with resin composite on marginal quality of resin composite inlays in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggendorf, Matthias J; Krämer, Norbert; Dippold, Christoph; Vosen, Vera E; Naumann, Michael; Jablonski-Momeni, Anahita; Frankenberger, Roland

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate marginal quality and resin-resin transition of lab made resin composite inlays in deep proximal cavities with and without 3 mm proximal box elevation (PBE) using resin composites before and after thermo-mechanical loading (TML). MOD cavities with one proximal box beneath the cementoenamel junction were prepared in 40 extracted human third molars. Proximal boxes ending in dentine were elevated 3 mm with different resin composites (G-Cem, Maxcem Elite as self-adhesive resin cements and Clearfil Majesty Posterior as restorative resin composite in one or three layers bonded with AdheSE), or left untreated. Clearfil Majesty Posterior inlays were luted with Syntac and Variolink II (n = 8). Marginal quality as well as the PBE-composite inlay interface was analyzed under an SEM using epoxy resin replicas before and after thermomechanical loading (100,000 × 50 N and 2500 thermocylces between +5 °C and +55 °C). Bonding resin composite inlays directly to dentine showed similar amounts of gap-free margins in dentine compared to PBE applied in three consecutive layers (p > 0.05). The groups with self-adhesive resin cements for PBE exhibited significantly more gaps in dentine (p < 0.05). With layered resin composite, PBE is effective in indirect resin composite bonding to deep proximal boxes. Self-adhesive resin cements are not suitable for this indication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  9. In vitro two-body wear of inlay-onlay composite resin restoratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, A R; Nicholls, J I; Brudvik, J S

    1991-02-01

    Inlay-onlay composite resin restorations have been introduced to the profession as alternatives to amalgam and direct composite resins. Two-body wear testing was performed on three inlay-onlay resins and one direct composite resins using a machine designed to produce sliding wear. The composite resins were opposed by human enamel, type III gold alloy, and porcelain. Of the investigated materials, the homogeneously microfilled inlay-onlay material showed significantly less wear. The direct composite resin showed significantly the greatest wear. The hybrid inlay-onlay resins showed intermediate wear. The hybrid inlay-onlay resins and the direct composite (small particle, heavily filled) resin created wear tracks in the opposing surfaces while the homogeneous microfill inlay-onlay resin did not. The depth of the observed wear tracks in the opposing surface was sufficiently substantial to warrant further investigation into the wear of materials that oppose composite resin restorations.

  10. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000?). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  11. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Nagem Filho, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill ...

  12. Effect of various teas on color stability of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç Ata, Gül; Gokay, Osman; Müjdeci, Arzu; Kivrak, Tugba Congara; Mokhtari Tavana, Armin

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of various teas on color stability of resin composites. Two methacrylate-based (Arabesk Top, Grandio) and a silorane-based (Filtek Silorane) resin composites were used. 110 cylindrical samples of each resin composite were prepared (2 mm thickness and 8 mm diameter), polished and stored in distilled water (37°C for 24 hours). They were randomly divided into 11 groups (n= 10) and color measurements were taken. Then the samples were immersed in tap water (control), a black tea, a green tea or one of the eight herbal-fruit teas (37°C for 1 week) and subsequently subjected to the final color measurements. The color change of samples (ΔE*) was calculated, data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests. Teas, resin composites and their interactions were significant (P= 0.000). All the teas and control caused color changes in all three resin composites. Rosehip tea caused the most color changes, while tap water showed the least in all resin composites. Arabesk Top had the most staining potential in all the teas and control, whereas Filtek Silorane was the most stain resistant except Grandio immersed in sage tea. Color stability of all resin composites used were affected from both structure of resin materials and constituents of teas used. All resin composites were susceptible to staining by all teas especially rosehip tea. Arabesk Top composite showed the greatest color susceptibility in all teas and Filtek Silorane the least with one exception. Color of resin composites can be negatively affected from teas consumed. Clinicians should advise patients that drinking different kind of teas could intensify surface staining of resin based restorations.

  13. Abrasive wear and surface roughness of contemporary dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Zhang, Hongyu; Choe, Hyo-Sun; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Hong, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear and surface roughness of 20 currently available commercial dental composite resins, including nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, nanohybrid and microhybrid composite resins. The volume loss, maximum vertical loss, surface roughness (R(a)) and surface morphology [Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] were determined after wear. The inorganic filler content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The result showed that the volume loss and vertical loss varied among the materials. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) of wear volume loss and filler content (wt%) was 0.283. SEM micrographs revealed nanofilled composites displayed a relatively uniform wear surfaces with nanoclusters protrusion, while the performance of nanohybrid composites varied. The abrasive wear resistance of contemporary dental composite resins is material-dependent and cannot be deduced from its category, filler loading and composite matrix; The abrasive wear resistance of some flowable composites is comparable to the universal/posterior composite resins.

  14. Metameric effect between dental porcelain and porcelain repairing resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Lee, Yong-Keun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Rhee, Sang-Hoon; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2007-03-01

    The objectives were to evaluate the metameric color and hue angle (degrees) changes between dental porcelain and porcelain repairing resin composites. Color of three shades (A2, A3, A3.5) of one brand of dental porcelain and three original shades (A2, A3, A3.5) and three combinations (A2-A3, A3-3.5, A2-A3.5) of three brands of porcelain repairing resin composites (ABT, FSP, TCR) were measured relative to the three standard illuminants (D65, A and F2). Specimen was 2mm in thickness, and 1mm of each shade was layered to make combined shades. Color differences (DeltaEab*) between each shade of dental porcelain and repairing resin composites relative to the three illuminants were calculated, and the ratios of color difference (modified metamerism index) by the change of illuminant were calculated. The ratios of hue angle changes were also compared. Differences in modified metamerism index and the ratio of hue angle changes were influenced by the porcelain shade, brand of resin composites and shade of resin composites. In all three brands of resin composites, A3.5 shade showed the smallest values in modified metamerism index regardless of the shade of porcelain. The average ratio of hue angle changes between each porcelain shade and all the shades of each resin composites showed similar trend when illuminant was changed from D65 to F2. Metameric effect between dental porcelain and repairing resin composites varied depending on the shade of porcelain, brand of resin composite and the illuminant. Therefore, shade matching between porcelain and repairing resin composite should be performed carefully. This study confirmed that shades should be matched under the light corresponding to that of use.

  15. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  16. Nanomechanical properties of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Akhtar, R; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2012-12-01

    To determine by nanoindentation the hardness and elastic modulus of resin-composites, including a series with systematically varied filler loading, plus other representative materials that fall into the categories of flowable, bulk-fill and conventional nano-hybrid types. Ten dental resin-composites: three flowable, three bulk-fill and four conventional were investigated using nanoindentation. Disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material using a metallic mold. Specimens were irradiated in the mold at top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points (40s each) with light curing unit at 650mW/cm(2). Specimens were then mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. After grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were investigated using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius). Each specimen was loaded at one loading rate and three different unloading rates (at room temperature) with thirty indentations, per unloading rate. The maximum load applied by the nanoindenter to examine the specimens was 10mN. Dependent on the type of the resin-composite material, the mean values ranged from 0.73GPa to 1.60GPa for nanohardness and from 14.44GPa to 24.07GPa for elastic modulus. There was a significant positive non-linear correlation between elastic modulus and nanohardness (r(2)=0.88). Nonlinear regression revealed a significant positive correlation (r(2)=0.62) between elastic moduli and filler loading and a non-significant correlation (r(2)=0.50) between nanohardness and filler loading of the studied materials. Varying the unloading rates showed no consistent effect on the elastic modulus and nanohardness of the studied materials. For a specific resin matrix, both elastic moduli and nanohardness correlated positively with filler loading. For the resin-composites investigated, the group-average elastic

  17. SEM and elemental analysis of composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoda, H.; Yamada, T.; Inokoshi, S.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four chemically cured, 21 light-cured anterior, three light-cured anterior/posterior, and 18 light-cured posterior composite resins were examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the elemental composition of their filler particles was analyzed with an energy dispersive electron probe microanalyzer. According to the results obtained, the composite resins were divided into five groups (traditional, microfilled type, submicrofilled type, hybrid type, and semihybrid), with two additional hypothetical categories (microfilled and hybrid). Characteristics of each type were described with clinical indications for selective guidance of respective composite resins for clinical use

  18. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  20. Subsurface degradation of resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Rafat; Tyas, Martin J; Burrow, Michael F

    2007-08-01

    To determine the depth of a degraded subsurface layer produced in dental composites as a result of exposure to lactic acid or NaOH, by observing the penetration of AgNO(3) solution. Specimens were prepared from four resin composites; Point 4 (Kerr), Premise (Kerr), Filtek Supreme (3M/ESPE), Ceram X (Dentsply), and two polyacid-modified resin composites; Dyract (Dentsply) and F2000 (3M/ESPE). The specimens were immersed in distilled water for 1 week, transferred to one of three aqueous media at 60 degrees C for 2 weeks; distilled water, 0.01mol/L lactic acid or 0.1N NaOH, washed and immersed in 50% (w/w) aqueous silver nitrate for 10 days at 60 degrees C and placed in a photodeveloper solution. After reduction of the silver, specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned and polished, coated with carbon, and examined by backscattered mode scanning electron microscopy. The depth of silver penetration into the degraded area was measured from the SEM micrographs. Energy dispersive analysis X-ray (EDAX) was used to confirm the presence of silver. NaOH produced the greatest depth of degradation and lactic acid the least. Premise showed the greatest depth of silver penetration when subjected to NaOH, and Filtek Supreme the second with peeling of the surface and cracking, whereas F2000 and Point 4 showed the least in NaOH and lactic acid. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that the depth of silver penetration was material and solution dependent, and the differences were significant for most of the materials (P<0.05).

  1. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Materials and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age...... 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments...... up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using...

  2. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin and Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1998-03-01

    Cyanate ester (or polycyanate) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14A polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. Process trials, tests and analyses were conducted in order to gain insight into factors that can affect final properties of the cured cyanate ester resin and its composites. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to cure is also crucial as it affects the T{sub g} of the resin and composite. Recommendations for reducing moisture contact with the resin during wet-winding are presented. High fiber volume fraction ({approximately}80%) composites wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent hoop tensile strengths (660 to 670 ksi average with individual rings failing above 700 ksi), which are believed to be the highest recorded strengths for this class of materials. The measured transverse properties were also exceptional for these high fiber fraction composites. Based on the available data, this cyanate ester resin system and its composites are recommended for space and vacuum applications only. Further testing is required before these materials can be recommended for long term use at elevated temperatures in an ambient air environment. The results of all analyses and tests performed as part of this study are presented as well as baseline process for fabricating thick, stage-cured composites. The manufacture of a 1 in. thick composite cylinder made with this process is also described.

  3. Post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, A.U.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin using a digital microhardness tester. Change in hardness of these materials over a period of 6 months was compared to that of conventional glass ionomer cements and a composite resin. With the exception of the composite resin, all materials showed a significant increase in hardness over 24 h after their initial set. Dual-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed decreased hardness with increased storage time in saline at 37 o C. Results suggest that the addition of resins to glass ionomer cements does not improve initial hardness and does not negate the acid-base reaction of conventional cements. Resin addition may, however, lead to increased water sorption and decreased hardness. (author)

  4. Relationship between Color and Translucency of Multishaded Dental Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homan Naeimi Akbar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the translucency of different shades of two highly aesthetic multilayered restorative composite resins. In total nine shades from Esthet.X and ten shades from Filtek Supreme composite resins were chosen. Discs of each shade were prepared (N=3 and light-cured. Total and diffuse transmittance values for each sample were measured. Statistical analysis showed that the opaque dentine shades of both composites were the least translucent and the enamel shades had the highest translucency. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2 to C2 of regular body shades and also from A4 to C4 of opaque dentine shades of Esthet.X composite resin. Grey enamel shade had a significantly higher diffuse translucency compared to clear and yellow enamel shades. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2B to D2B and also in diffuse translucency from A4D to C6D shades of Filtek Supreme composite resin. It can be concluded that the color of the composite resins tested in this study had a significant effect on their translucency. Information on the translucency of different shades of composite resins can be very useful for the clinicians in achieving optimal esthetic restorative outcome.

  5. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L*a*b* system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab*) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested. PMID:23559921

  6. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet·X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram·X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO, after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h, for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco. The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE LFNx01aFNx01bFNx01 system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DE abFNx01 between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  7. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab(*)) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  8. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  9. Marginal adaptation of composite resins under two adhesive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dačić, Stefan; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolić, Marija; Cenić, Milica; Dačić-Simonović, Dragica

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, different adhesive techniques were used to set up fillings with composite resins. After the application of etch and rinse or self etch adhesive technique, marginal adaptation of composite fillings was estimated by the length of margins without gaps, and by the microretention of resin in enamel and dentin. The study material consisted of 40 extracted teeth. Twenty Class V cavities were treated with 35% phosphorous acid and restored after rinsing by Adper Single Bond 2 and Filtek Ultimate-ASB/FU 3M ESPE composite system. The remaining 20 cavities were restored by Adper Easy One-AEO/FU 3M ESPE composite system. Marginal adaptation of composite fillings was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The etch and rinse adhesive technique showed a significantly higher percentage of margin length without gaps (in enamel: 92.5%, in dentin: 57.3%), compared with the self-etch technique with lower percentage of margin length without gaps, in enamel 70.4% (p resin tugs in interprismatic spaces of enamel, while the dentin microretention was composed of adhesive and hybrid layers with resin tugs in dentin canals. In the second technique, resin tugs were rarely seen and a microgap was dominant along the border of restoration margins. The SEM analysis showed a better marginal adaptation of composite resin to enamel and dentin with better microretention when the etch and rinse adhesive procedure was applied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effect of configuration factor on gap formation in hybrid composite resin, low-shrinkage composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Parvin M; Mousavinasab, Sayyed M; Hasanli, Elham

    2015-05-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is one of the important factors in creation of gap between dental structure and composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of configuration factor (C-factor) on gap formation in a hybrid composite resin, a low shrinkage composite resin and a resin modified glass ionomer restorative material. Cylindrical dentin cavities with 5.0 mm diameter and three different depths (1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mm) were prepared on the occlusal surface of 99 human molars and the cavities assigned into three groups (each of 33). Each group contained three subgroups depend on the different depths and then cavities restored using resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC Improved) and two type composite resins (Filtek P90 and Filtek Z250). Then the restorations were cut into two sections in a mesiodistal direction in the middle of restorations. Gaps were measured on mesial, distal and pulpal floor of the cavities, using a stereomicroscope. Data analyses using Kruskal-Wallist and Mann-Whitney tests. Increasing C-factor from 1.8 to 3.4 had no effect on the gap formation in two type composite resins, but Fuji II LC Improved showed significant effect of increasing C-factor on gap formation. Taken together, when C-factor increased from 1.8 up to 3.4 had no significant effect on gap formation in two tested resin composites. Although, Filtek P90 restorations showed smaller gap formation in cavities walls compared to Filtek Z250 restorations. High C-factor values generated the largest gap formation. Silorane-based composite was more efficient for cavity sealing than methacrylate-based composites and resin modified glass ionomer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Studying Room Temperature Curing of Phenolic Resin and their Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Beheshty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic resins are synthetic low molecular weight thermoset resins which are polymerized and cured to higher molecular weights by condensation method. These resins have high weathering resistance, high oxidative thermal properties and good chemical resistance. Phenolic resins can be cured thermally or by acid curing. The most common method of curing phenolic resin is by thermal curing that takes place in the range of 130-180oC. At room temperature, however, phenolic resins are cured by acid catalysts. In this paper, room temperature curing of resol phenolic resin by para toluene sulphonic acid has been investigated. The acid quantity has been determined for room temperature curing of two types of resols to achieve a reasonable hardness and gelation time. Temperature curing and thermal stability of respective resins have been investigated by DSC and TGA, respectively. A glass-phenolic composite plate has been prepared and cured by these two methods. The results show that the optimum amount of acid is 20% by weight. Optimum mechanical properties, chemical resistance and thermal properties have been achieved for acid cured system. The hot cured resin, however, has better properties.

  12. Effects of abrasive and fiber components in medium on wear of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Ogura, Hideo

    2008-09-01

    Effects of abrasive and fiber components in a medium on the wear behavior of composite resins were evaluated. Calcium diphosphate and methyl cellulose were included in the medium as abrasive and fiber components respectively. A range of 0, 4, or 8% abrasive- or fiber-containing media were applied on a composite resin specimen during a simulated occlusal wear test. Four composite resins, Clearfil AP-X, Z100 Restorative, SOLARE P, and SOLIDEX F, were tested to evaluate the effects of these components in the medium. Presence of abrasive material in the medium increased the wear of composite resins significantly, but its effect differed among the composite resins. Presence of fiber material in the medium significantly decreased the wear of two composite resins, whereas the other two composites showed no significant differences. Nonetheless, presence of fiber in the medium generally tended to prevent the wear of composite resins.

  13. Differences in color, translucency and fluorescence between flowable and universal resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the optical properties such as color, translucency and fluorescence of flowable resin composites, and compare them with the corresponding shade universal resin composites of the same brand. Four brands of flowable and universal resin composites of the same shade designation (A2) were investigated. Color of specimens (2mm in thickness) was measured after polymerization on a reflection spectrophotometer over background of white, black and each corresponding composite material itself. Color differences (DeltaE(ab)(*)) between each combination of resin composites were determined. Translucency parameter (TP) and color difference by the fluorescent emission (DeltaE(ab)(*)-FL) of materials were also calculated. Differences in the optical properties of flowable and universal resin composites were analyzed with one-way ANOVA. DeltaE(ab)(*) between the flowable and the corresponding universal resin composites was in the range of 1.0-6.0 DeltaE(ab)(*) units, which was perceptible (DeltaE(ab)(*)>2.6) in three brands. Flowable resin composites revealed lower TP values in two of the four brands. DeltaE(ab)(*) between flowable and the corresponding universal resin composites was influenced by their difference in translucency. All the four universal resin composites and two flowable resin composites showed fluorescent peak, and the range of DeltaE(ab)(*)-FL was 0.3-2.3 DeltaE(ab)(*) units. Optical properties of flowable and universal resin composites was significantly different (presin composites should be considered for clinically acceptable color matching.

  14. Fluorinated Alkyl Ether Epoxy Resin Compositions and Applications Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Gardner, John M. (Inventor); Palmieri, Frank M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy resin compositions prepared using amino terminated fluoro alkyl ethers. The epoxy resin compositions exhibit low surface adhesion properties making them useful as coatings, paints, moldings, adhesives, and fiber reinforced composites.

  15. Fiber reinforced silicon-containing arylacetylene resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A silicon-containing arylacetylene resin (SAR, a poly(dimethylsilyleneethynylene phenyleneethynylene (PMSEPE, was synthesized. The PMSEPE is a solid resin at ambient temperature with a softening temperature about 60°C and soluble in some solvents like tetrahydrofuran. The melt viscosity of the PMSEPE resin is less than 1 Pa•s. The resin could cure at the temperature of lower than 200°C. Fiber reinforced PMSEPE composites were prepared from prepregs which were made by the impregnation of fibers in PMSEPE resin solution. The composites exhibit good mechanical properties at room temperature and 250°C. The observation on fracture surfaces of the composites reinforced by glass fibers and carbon fibers demonstrates that the adhesion between the fibers and resin is good. The results from an oxyacetylene flame test show that the composites have good ablation performance and XRD analyses indicate that SiC forms in the residues during the ablation of the composites.

  16. Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Resin Composites with Resin Modified Glass Ionomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha NA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are controversial reports regarding physical and mechanical properties of resin composites and glass ionomer cements. Some revealed higher strength and hardness for resin composites while others showed a comparable value for glass ionomer cements. Evaluation of mechanical properties of different types of resin composites in comparison with resin modified glass ionomers is not widely studied. Objectives: To measure and compare the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of three resin composites and two resins modified glass ionomer cements before and after ageing. Materials and Methods: Three resin composites, i.e. Filtek Supreme XTE (3M ESPE, Ice (SDI, Gradia (GC, and two resins modified glass ionomers, i.e. Fuji II LC (GC and Riva Light Cure (SDI, were selected. Ten barshaped specimens were prepared for each material and cured using LED curing light. After 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37oC, the specimens were randomly divided into two equal groups (n=5. The first group was tested as a baseline and the second group was restored at 37oC for another 29 days. Flexural strength was performed by four-point bending test using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min, and the maximum load at failure was recorded. The specimen’s halves were used for evaluating Vickers hardness, using a Digital Hardness Tester (300 g/15 sec and the Vickers hardness number (VHN was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s and student’s t-test. Results: After 24 hours of immersion, the highest hardness number was found for Filtek Supreme and Ice and the highest flexural strength was obtained for Gradia. After 30 days of storage, hardness of Fuji II LC and Gradia showed a significant decrease; flexural strength of Ice and Fuji II LC revealed a significant increase while Gradia and Filtek Supreme showed a significant decrease. Conclusions: Resin modified glass ionomers showed

  17. Restoration of traumatized teeth with resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2018-01-01

    For a long time, the primary choice for initial restoration of a crown-fractured front tooth has been resin composite material. The restoration can in most cases be performed immediately after injury if there is no sign of periodontal injury. The method’s adhesive character is conservative to tooth......-structure and with minimal risk of pulpal complication. In addition, it offers an aesthetic solution to the patient immediately after an injury, which may bring a little comfort in a sad situation. The resin composite build-up is often changed or repaired a couple of times, before the tooth is restored with a porcelain...... present an aesthetic problem due to exposure of un-aesthetic crown-margins. The invasive permanent crown restorations are therefore often not suc-cessful on a long-term scale. On the other hand, a conservative direct restoration of an extensively fractured incisor crown with resin composite may...

  18. Analysis of surface hardness of artificially aged resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of artificially accelerated aging (AAA on the surface hardness of eight composite resins: Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, 4 Seasons, Herculite, P60, Tetric Ceram, Charisma, and Filtek Z100. Sixteen specimens were made from the test piece of each material, using an 8.0 × 2.0 mm teflon matrix. After 24 hours, eight specimens from each material were submitted to three surface hardness readings using a Shimadzu Microhardness Tester for 5 seconds at a load of 50 gf. The other eight specimens remained in the artificially accelerated aging machine for 382 hours and were submitted to the same surface hardness analysis. The means of each test specimen were submitted to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (p > 0.05, ANOVA and Tukey test (p < 0.05. With regard to hardness (F = 86.74, p < 0.0001 the analysis showed significant differences among the resin composite brands. But aging did not influence the hardness of any of the resin composites (F = 0.39, p = 0.53. In this study, there was interaction between the resin composite brand and the aging factors (F = 4.51, p < 0.0002. It was concluded that notwithstanding the type of resin, AAA did not influence surface hardness. However, with regard to hardness there was a significant difference among the resin brands.

  19. Composite resin fillings and inlays: An 11-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, U.; Qvist, V.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth......Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth...

  20. Extended Resin Composite Restorations: Techniques and Procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Hilton, T.

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the state of the art of different restorative treatment procedures and techniques needed for placing extended posterior resin composite restorations. Clinical aspects related to the procedure are discussed and reviewed based on the current literature, such as the

  1. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  2. New bismaleimide matrix resins for graphite fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M.-T. S.; Chen, T. S.; Parker, J. A.; Heimbuch, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Two new bismaleimide resins based on the N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have been synthesized and characterized. The mixtures of the two resins gave better handling, processing, mechanical, and thermal properties in graphite composites than did the individual resins. The mechanical strength of the cured graphite composites prepared from the 1:1 copolymer of the two bismaleimide resins was excellent at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The physical and mechanical properties of the composites from the new bismaleimide matrix resin systems are compared with conventional composites based on epoxy and other bismaleimide systems. The copolymer system provides another method for improving bismaleimide resins.

  3. Polishing and toothbrushing alters the surface roughness and gloss of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Kanehira, Masafumi; Finger, Werner J

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the surface roughness and gloss of composite resins after using two polishing systems and toothbrushing. Six composite resins (Durafill VS, Filtek Z250, Filtek Z350 XT, Kalore, Venus Diamond, and Venus Pearl) were evaluated after polishing with two polishing systems (Sof-Lex, Venus Supra) and after toothbrushing up to 40,000 cycles. Surface roughness (Ra) and gloss were determined for each composite resin group (n=6) after silicon carbide paper grinding, polishing, and toothbrushing. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant differences in both Ra and gloss between measuring stages for the composite resins tested, except Venus Pearl, which showed significant differences only in gloss. After polishing, the Filtek Z350 XT, Kalore, and Venus Diamond showed significant increases in Ra, while all composite resin groups except the Filtek Z350 XT and Durafill VS with Sof-Lex showed increases in gloss. After toothbrushing, all composite resin demonstrated increases in Ra and decreases in gloss.

  4. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2 and after (B2. It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  5. Benzoxazine resin/carbon nanotube nanostructured composite's degradation kinetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untem, Flávia O; Botelho, Edson C; Rezende, Mirabel C; Costa, Michelle Leali

    2014-07-01

    In the last decades a new class of thermoset phenolic resin is emerging as a substitute of the traditional epoxy and phenolic resins in the aircraft industry. This new class is called polybenzoxazines and its associates the epoxy resin's mechanical properties and phenolic resin's thermal and flame retardant properties, resulting in a resin with superior properties when analyzed with the others singly. The introduction of carbon nanotubes in low concentration into polymeric matrices can produce nanostructured materials with good properties. Thus, in this study, nanostructured composites of benzoxazine resin were processed with different concentration of carbon nanotubes (0.1%, 0.5% and 1.0% w/w). In order to evaluate the thermostability of the benzoxazine resin and its nanostructured composites, it was performed a degradation kinetic study using the thermogravimetric technique. For that, the analysis have been done with the temperature ranging from 25 degrees C to 1000 degrees C at nitrogen atmosphere (100 mL x min(-1)) and in different heating rates (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 20 degrees C x min(-1)), in order to obtain the kinetic parameters (activation energy, E(a), and pre-exponential factor, A), based on Ozawa-Wall-Flynn model. The results showed excellent agreement between the thermogravimetric curves obtained and the Ozawa-Wall-Flynn method. The degradation kinetic study showed that the introduction of carbon nanotubes in the benzoxazine matrix does not change the thermostability of the resin, so that it does not have a significant influence in the shelf life of the material.

  6. Bonding of glass ceramic and indirect composite to non-aged and aged resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Özcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-02-01

    Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged resin composite to an indirect resin composite and pressed glass ceramic using two resin cements. Disk-shaped specimens (diameter: 3.5, thickness: 3 mm) (N = 160) produced from a microhybrid resin composite (Quadrant Anterior Shine) were randomly divided into eight groups. While half of the specimens were kept dry at 37°C for 24 h, the other half was aged by means of thermocycling (6000 times, 5°C to 55°C). The non-aged and aged resin composites were bonded to a highly filled indirect composite (Estenia) and a pressed glass ceramic (IPS Empress II) using either a photopolymerizing (Variolink Veneer) or a dual-polymerizing (Panavia F2.0) resin cement. While cementation surfaces of both the direct and indirect composite materials were silica coated (30 µm SiO2, CoJet-Sand) and silanized (ESPE-Sil), ceramic surfaces were conditioned with hydrofluoric acid (20 s), neutralized, and silanized prior to cementation. All specimens were cemented under a load of 750 g. Shear force was applied to the adhesive interface in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure types of the specimens were identified after debonding. Significant effects of aging (p ceramic in combination with both cements showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Both indirect composite (24.3 ± 5.1 MPa) and glass ceramic in combination with Variolink (22 ± 9 MPa) showed the highest results on non-aged composites, but were not significantly different from one another (p > 0.05). On the aged composites, indirect composite and glass ceramic showed no significant difference in bond strength within each material group (p > 0.05), with both Panavia (17.2 ± 6 and 15 ± 5.5 MPa, respectively) and Variolink (19 ± 8

  7. Retention of cast crowns cemented to amalgam and composite resin cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormati, A A; Denehy, G E

    1981-05-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to determine the tensile bond strength of complete cast gold restorations cemented with zinc phosphate cement on composite resin and amalgam crown cores. The samples were thermocycled and tested at 1-week, 1-month, and 3-month intervals. Results of the study showed that: (1) the amalgam core provides more retention for the cast gold crown than does the composite resin core and (2) the composite resin core provides increasing retention over a longer time period.

  8. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembish, Fatma A; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N; Thompson, Van P; Opdam, Niek J; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n=24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n=24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electron microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450N. Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3-4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fatigue Resistance of CAD/CAM Resin Composite Molar Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembish, Fatma A.; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N.; Thompson, Van P.; Opdam, Niek J.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Methods Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n = 24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n = 24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electronic microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. Results The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700 N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450 N. Significance Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3 – 4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. PMID:26777092

  10. Depth of cure of bulk-fill flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedalino, Inaam; Hartup, Grant R; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, manufacturers have introduced flowable composite resins that reportedly can be placed in increments of 4 mm or greater. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the depth of cure of bulk-fill flowable composite resins (SureFil SDR Flow, Grandio Flow, and Venus Bulk Fill) and a conventional flowable composite resin (Revolution Formula 2). Depth of cure was measured in terms of bottom-maximum Knoop hardness number (KHN) ratios and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4049 scrape technique. Shades A2 and A3 of SureFil SDR Flow, Grandio Flow, and Revolution Formula 2 were tested. Venus Bulk Fill was tested in its only available shade (universal). Specimens in thicknesses of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm were polymerized for 20 or 40 seconds, and a hardness tester was used to determine the hardness ratios for each shade at each thickness. For the scraping technique, after specimens were exposed to the curing light, unpolymerized composite resin was removed with a plastic instrument, the polymerized composite was measured, and the length was divided by 2 per ISO guidelines. According to the KHN ratios and the scrape test, Venus Bulk Fill predictably exceeded the manufacturer's claim of a 4-mm depth of cure at both 20 and 40 seconds of curing time. The overall results for depth of cure showed that Venus Bulk Fill ≥ SureFil SDR Flow ≥ Grandio Flow ≥ Revolution Formula 2.

  11. Microwave absorption properties of graphite flakes-phenolic resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Jyoti P.; Gogoi, Pragyan J.; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, microwave absorption properties of a conductor back single layer designed on graphite flakes (GF)-novolac phenolic resin (NPR) composites is studied. The complex permittivity of the developed composite enhance for higher GF percentages. The reflection loss(RL) measured using E8362C VNA shows a maximum RL values -25 dB at 9.8 GHz for 7 wt. % composition with -10 dB bandwidth of 0.3 GHz. The developed composites are being light weight and cost effective shows potential to be used as dielectric absorber.

  12. Polymerization Behavior and Mechanical Properties of High-Viscosity Bulk Fill and Low Shrinkage Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, S; Takamizawa, T; Nojiri, K; Imai, A; Tsujimoto, A; Endo, H; Suzuki, S; Suda, S; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    The present study determined the mechanical properties and volumetric polymerization shrinkage of different categories of resin composite. Three high viscosity bulk fill resin composites were tested: Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TB, Ivoclar Vivadent), Filtek Bulk Fill posterior restorative (FB, 3M ESPE), and Sonic Fill (SF, Kerr Corp). Two low-shrinkage resin composites, Kalore (KL, GC Corp) and Filtek LS Posterior (LS, 3M ESPE), were used. Three conventional resin composites, Herculite Ultra (HU, Kerr Corp), Estelite ∑ Quick (EQ, Tokuyama Dental), and Filtek Supreme Ultra (SU, 3M ESPE), were used as comparison materials. Following ISO Specification 4049, six specimens for each resin composite were used to determine flexural strength, elastic modulus, and resilience. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage was determined using a water-filled dilatometer. Data were evaluated using analysis of variance followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference test (α=0.05). The flexural strength of the resin composites ranged from 115.4 to 148.1 MPa, the elastic modulus ranged from 5.6 to 13.4 GPa, and the resilience ranged from 0.70 to 1.0 MJ/m 3 . There were significant differences in flexural properties between the materials but no clear outliers. Volumetric changes as a function of time over a duration of 180 seconds depended on the type of resin composite. However, for all the resin composites, apart from LS, volumetric shrinkage began soon after the start of light irradiation, and a rapid decrease in volume during light irradiation followed by a slower decrease was observed. The low shrinkage resin composites KL and LS showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested materials at the measuring point of 180 seconds. In contrast, the three bulk fill resin composites showed higher volumetric change than the other resin composites. The findings from this study provide clinicians with valuable information regarding the mechanical properties and

  13. A study on the compatibility between one-bottle dentin adhesives and composite resins using micro-shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minju; Shin, Yooseok; Park, Jeong-Won; Roh, Byoung-Duck

    2015-02-01

    This study was performed to determine whether the combined use of one-bottle self-etch adhesives and composite resins from same manufacturers have better bond strengths than combinations of adhesive and resins from different manufacturers. 25 experimental micro-shear bond test groups were made from combinations of five dentin adhesives and five composite resins with extracted human molars stored in saline for 24 hr. Testing was performed using the wire-loop method and a universal testing machine. Bond strength data was statistically analyzed using two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test. Two way ANOVA revealed significant differences for the factors of dentin adhesives and composite resins, and significant interaction effect (p composite resin (p composite resin than other manufacturer's composite resin. Not all combinations of adhesive and composite resin by same manufacturers failed to show significantly higher bond strengths than mixed manufacturer combinations.

  14. Surface roughness comparison of methacrylate and silorane-based composite resins after 40% hydrogen peroxide application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rori Sasmita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The change of the tooth colour could be restored with bleaching. The tooth bleaching will affects the surface roughness of the composite resins. Recently, the material basis for composite resins has developed, among others are methacrylate-based and silorane based composite resins. The objective of this study was to distinguish the surface roughness value of methacrylate-based composite resin and silorane based composite resins. This research was quasi-experimental. The sample used in this study were methacrylate and silorane based composite resins in discs form, with the size of 6 mm and the thickness of 3 mm, manufactured into 20 specimens and divided into 2 groups. The control group was immersed in the artificial saliva, and the treatment group was applied with 40% hydrogen peroxide. The result of the experiment analyzed using unpaired sample t-test showed significant differences in the average value of the surface roughness after the application of 40% hydrogen peroxide. The average value of methacrylate and silorane based composite resins were 2.744 μm and 3.417 μm, respectively. There was a difference in the surface roughness of methacrylate and silorane based composite resin compounds after the application of 40% hydrogen peroxide. The surface roughness value of the silorane-based composite resin was higher than the methacrylate-based.

  15. Characterization of selected LDEF polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composite materials which received 5 years and 10 months of exposure to the LEO environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. Resin loss and a decrease in mechanical performance as well as dramatic visual effects were observed. However, chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymeric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure. The potential effect of a silicon-containing molecular contamination of these specimens is addressed.

  16. Boron/aluminum graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fabrication feasibility and potential of an adhesively bonded metal and resin matrix fiber-composite hybrid are determined as an advanced material for aerospace and other structural applications. The results show that using this hybrid concept makes possible a composite design which, when compared with nonhybrid composites, has greater transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for predicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  17. ADHESIVE SYSTEM AFFECTS REPAIR BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür IRMAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Adhesive type and aging significantly affected the repair bond strengths (p<0.0001. No statistical difference was found in aged composite groups repaired with two-step self- etch or two-step total-etch adhesive. One-step self-etch adhesive showed lower bond strength values in aged composite repair (p<0.0001. Conclusion: In the repair of aged resin composite, two-step self-etch and two-step total-etch adhesives exhibited higher shear bond strength values than that of one-step self-etch adhesive.

  18. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS Resin with Polyester Resin in Composite Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Ugoamadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural resins can compete effectively with the synthetic ones in composite development. In this research, cashew nuts were picked and processed for the extraction of the resin content. The resin (natural resin so obtained was mixed with cobalt amine (accelerator, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (catalyst to develop two sets of composite specimens – specimens without fibres and specimens reinforced with glass fibres. This method of sample specimen development was repeated with polyester (synthetic resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate compressive strength of 55MPa compared to that of polyester resin with an ultimate strength of 68MPa. The result of tensile strength proved cashew nut shell liquid resin (with ultimate strength of 44MPa to be better than polyester resin with 39MPa as ultimate tensile strength. This means that natural resins could be a better substitute for the synthetic ones when the required quantities of fibers (reinforcements and fillers are used in the fibre-reinforced plastic composite developments.

  19. Ten-year Clinical Performance of Posterior Resin Composite Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Norbert; Reinelt, Christian; Frankenberger, Roland

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the clinical behavior of two different resin-based restorative systems in Class II cavities in a controlled prospective split-mouth study over 10 years. Thirty patients received 68 resin composite restorations (Solobond M + Grandio: n = 36; Syntac + Tetric Ceram: n = 32) by one dentist in a private practice. 35% of cavities revealed no enamel at the bottom of the proximal box, 48% of cavities provided Grandio restoration suffered marginal fracture with exposed dentin and one Tetric Ceram restoration failed due to cusp fracture. After 10 years, Grandio showed higher surface roughness (p = 0.03) and less color match (p = 0.024; Mann-Whitney U-test). Molar restorations performed worse than premolar fillings regarding marginal integrity (4 and 10 years), filling integrity (4, 8, and 10 years), and tooth integrity (4, 8, and 10 years). The main reasons for degradation of resin composites were chipping and cracks in molar restorations after 8 years. Beyond the 4-year recall, marginal staining increased (43% bravo for stained margins at four years, 52% at 8 years, and 71% at 10 years). Tooth integrity deteriorated significantly due to more enamel cracks and chipping over time (9% at baseline and 89% after 10 years (p<0.05). Direct resin composite restorations performed satisfactorily over 10 years of clinical service.

  20. Versatile composite resins simplifying the practice of restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margeas, Robert

    2014-01-01

    After decades of technical development and refinement, composite resins continue to simplify the practice of restorative dentistry, offering clinicians versatility, predictability, and enhanced physical properties. With a wide range of products available today, composite resins are a reliable, conservative, multi-functional restorative material option. As manufacturers strive to improve such properties as compression strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, water sorption, and wear resistance, several classification systems of composite resins have been developed.

  1. Color of bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutcigil, Çağatay; Barutcigil, Kubilay; Özarslan, Mehmet Mustafa; Dündar, Ayşe; Yilmaz, Burak

    2017-09-28

    To evaluate the color stability of novel bulk-fill composite resins. Color measurements of a nanohybrid composite resin (Z550) and 3 bulk-fill composite resins (BLK, AFX, XTF; n = 45) were performed before polymerization. After polymerization, color measurements were repeated and specimens were immersed in distilled water or red wine, or coffee. Color change [CIEDE2000 (ΔE 00 )] was calculated after 24 h, 1 and 3 weeks. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests (α = 0.05). Color changes observed after polymerization were significant for all groups. Color changes observed in distilled water for Z550 and AFX were significant. Color changes after stored in red wine and coffee were significant for all groups. Bulk-fill composite resin color change increased over time for all groups in red wine and coffee (P composite resin and bulk-fill composite resins. AFX had the highest color change in distilled water. The color of tested bulk-fill composite resins significantly changed after immersion in beverages and over time. Color change observed with the nanohybrid composite resin after 1 week was stable. Clinicians should keep in mind that tested composite resins may change color when exposed to water and significantly change color immediately after they are polymerized. In addition, the color change continues over time should the patient is a coffee and/or red wine consumer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Bacterial adhesion on direct and indirect dental restorative composite resins: An in vitro study on a natural biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derchi, Giacomo; Vano, Michele; Barone, Antonio; Covani, Ugo; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Both direct and indirect techniques are used for dental restorations. Which technique should be preferred or whether they are equivalent with respect to bacterial adhesion is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the affinity of bacterial biofilm to dental restorative composite resins placed directly and indirectly. Five direct composite resins for restorations (Venus Diamond, Adonis, Optifil, Enamel Plus HRi, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic) and 3 indirect composite resins (Gradia, Estenia, Signum) were selected. The materials were incubated in unstimulated whole saliva for 1 day. The biofilms grown were collected and their bacterial cells counted. In parallel, the composite resin surface morphology was analyzed with atomic force microscopy. Both bacterial cell count and surface topography parameters were subjected to statistical analysis (α=.05). Indirect composite resins showed significantly lower levels than direct composite resins for bacterial cell adhesion, (Pcomposite resins (P>.05). However, within the indirect composite resins a significantly lower level was found for Gradia than Estenia or Signum (Pcomposite resin roughness and bacterial adhesion when the second and particularly the third-order statistical moments of the composite resin height distributions were considered. Indirect dental restorative composite resins were found to be less prone to biofilm adhesion than direct composite resins. A correlation of bacterial adhesion to surface morphology exists that is described by kurtosis; thus, advanced data analysis is required to discover possible insights into the biologic effects of morphology. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Method for curing alkyd resin compositions by applying ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Murata, K.; Maruyama, T.

    1975-01-01

    An alkyd resin composition is prepared by dissolving a polymerizable alkyd resin having from 10 to 50 percent of oil length into a vinyl monomer. The polymerizable alkyd resin is obtained by a half-esterification reaction of an acid anhydride having a polymerizable unsaturated group and an alkyd resin modified with conjugated unsaturated oil having at least one reactive hydroxyl group per one molecule. The alkyd resin composition thus obtained is coated on an article, and ionizing radiation is applied on the article to cure the coated film thereon. (U.S.)

  4. Does the light source affect the repairability of composite resins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Emel; Gönülol, Nihan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the light source on the microshear bond strength of different composite resins repaired with the same substrate. Thirty cylindrical specimens of each composite resin--Filtek Silorane, Filtek Z550 (3M ESPE), Gradia Direct Anterior (GC), and Aelite Posterior (BISCO)--were prepared and light-cured with a QTH light curing unit (LCU). The specimens were aged by thermal cycling and divided into three subgroups according to the light source used--QTH, LED, or PAC (n = 10). They were repaired with the same substrate and a Clearfil Repair Kit (Kuraray). The specimens were light-cured and aged for 1 week in distilled water at 37 °C. The microshear bond strength and failure modes were assessed. There was no significant difference in the microshear bond strength values among the composite resins, except for the Filtek Silorane group that showed significantly lower bond strength values when polymerized with the PAC unit compared to the QTH or LED unit. In conclusion, previously placed dimethacrylate-based composites can be repaired with different light sources; however, if the composite to be repaired is silorane-based, then using a QTH or LED device may be the best option.

  5. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  6. Evaluation of Resin-Resin Interface in Direct Composite Restoration Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Iovan, G.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resin-resin interface when a universal bonding agent was used in two different strategies in direct restoration repair. Two composite resins (a micro-filled hybrid and a nano-filled hybrid) as old restorations that have to be repair, a universal bonding agent and a micro-filled hybrid composite resin (different then that aged) as new material for repair were chosen for the study. Non-aged samples were used as control and aged samples were used as study groups. The universal bonding agent was applied in etch-and-rinse and in self-etch strategies. The interface between old and new composite resins was evaluated by SEM and the microleakage was assessed by scoring the dye penetration. Very good adaptation of the two different composite resins placed in direct contact in non-aged samples was recorded. No gaps or defects were visible and strong resin-resin contact was observed. After aging, enlargement of resin-resin junction were observed in most of the samples and a increased dye penetration was recorded irrespective of the strategy (etch-and-rinse or self-etch) used for bonding agent application.

  7. Study on thermal conductive BN/novolac resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shasha; Qi, Shuhua; Liu, Nailiang; Cao, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Boron nitride (BN) particles were used to modify novolac resin. → BN particles were pretreated by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. → The thermal conductivity trend of composite almost agrees with the predicted data from the Maxwell-Eucken model. → At BN concentration of 80 wt.%, thermal conductivity value of composite is 4.5 times that of pure novolac resin. → Combined use of the larger and smaller particles with a mass ratio of 1:2 provides the composites with the maximum thermal conductivity among the testing systems. → The composite thermal property also increases with an increase in the BN concentration. - Abstract: In this study, γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane-treated boron nitride (BN) particles were used to modify novolac resin. The effect of varying the BN concentration, particle size, and hybrid BN fillers with the binary particle size distribution on the thermal conductivity of the composites was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed homogeneously dispersed treated BN particles in the matrix. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity increased as the BN concentration was increased. This behavior was also observed when the filler size was increased. Experimentally obtained thermal conductivity values agree with the predicted data from the Maxwell-Eucken model well at less than 70 wt.% BN loading. A larger particle size BN-filled novolac resin exhibits a higher thermal conductivity than a smaller particle size BN-filled one. The combined use of 0.5 and 15 μm particles with a mass ratio of 2:1 achieved the maximum thermal conductivity among the testing systems. The thermal resistance properties of the composites were also studied.

  8. Characterization of Composite Fan Case Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoracek, Charlene M.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of commercial turbine engines that power today s aircraft use a large fan driven by the engine core to generate thrust which dramatically increases the engine s efficiency. However, if one of these fan blades fails during flight, it becomes high energy shrapnel, potentially impacting the engine or puncturing the aircraft itself and thus risking the lives of passengers. To solve this problem, the fan case must be capable of containing a fan blade should it break off during flight. Currently, all commercial fan cases are made of either just a thick metal barrier or a thinner metal wall surrounded by Kevlar-an ultra strong fiber that elastically catches the blade. My summer 2004 project was to characterize the resins for a composite fan case that will be lighter and more efficient than the current metal. The composite fan case is created by braiding carbon fibers and injecting a polymer resin into the braid. The resin holds the fibers together, so at first using the strongest polymer appears to logically lead to the strongest fan case. Unfortunately, the stronger polymers are too viscous when melted. This makes the manufacturing process more difficult because the polymer does not flow as freely through the braid, and the final product is less dense. With all of this in mind, it is important to remember that the strength of the polymer is still imperative; the case must still contain blades with high impact energy. The research identified which polymer had the right balance of properties, including ease of fabrication, toughness, and ability to transfer the load to the carbon fibers. Resin deformation was studied to better understand the composite response during high speed impact. My role in this research was the testing of polymers using dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile, compression, and torsion testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis examines the response of materials under cyclic loading. Two techniques were used for dynamic mechanical analysis

  9. In vitro enamel remineralization capacity of composite resins containing sodium trimetaphosphate and fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiveron, Adelisa Rodolfo Ferreira; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Gaban, Gabriel; Sassaki, Kikue Takebayashi; Pedrini, Denise

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro enamel remineralization capacity of experimental composite resins containing sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP) combined or not with fluoride (F). Bovine enamel slabs were selected upon analysis of initial surface hardness (SH1) and after induction of artificial carious lesions (SH2). Experimental resins were as follows: resin C (control—no sodium fluoride (NaF) or TMP), resin F (with 1.6% NaF), resin TMP (with 14.1% TMP), and resin TMP/F (with NaF and TMP). Resin samples were made and attached to enamel slabs (n = 12 slabs per material). Those specimens (resin/enamel slab) were subjected to pH cycling to promote remineralization, and then final surface hardness (SH3) was measured to calculate the percentage of surface hardness recovery (%SH). The integrated recovery of subsurface hardness (ΔKHN) and F concentration in enamel were also determined. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test (p Resins F and TMP/F showed similar SH3 values (p = 0.478) and %SH (p = 0.336) and differed significantly from the other resins (p resin TMP/F presented the lowest area of lesion (p resins (p = 0.042), but higher than in the other resins (p composite resin enhanced its capacity for remineralization of enamel in vitro. The combination of two agents with action on enamel favored remineralization, suggesting that composite resins containing sodium trimetaphosphate and fluoride could be indicated for clinical procedures in situations with higher cariogenic challenges.

  10. Shade distribution of commercial resin composites and color difference with shade guide tabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-Kook; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2007-10-01

    To determine the shade distribution of varied shades of contemporary resin composites, and to measure the color difference (deltaE*ab) between individual shades of resin composites and the nearest shade tabs, which showed the smallest color difference with each shade of resin composite, in the VITA shade guide. Eight light-curing resin composites, with a total of 41 shades, were studied. Color of specimens was measured on a reflection spectrophotometer over a white background. Ranges and distributions of CIE L*, C*ab, a* and b* values of each brand of resin composites were determined. Color difference between each shade of resin composites and each shade of the shade guide tabs were calculated, and the nearest shade guide tab was selected. The range of CIE L* value for eight brands of resin composites was 3.2-9.0, that of C*ab was 2.5-11.6, that of CIE a* value was 1.1-5.8, and that of CIE b* value was 5.9-11.5. Color differences (deltaE*ab) between each shade of resin composites and the nearest shade tab of the shade guide was 0.9-12.8.

  11. Effect of in-office bleaching agents on physical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourouzis, Petros; Koulaouzidou, Elisabeth A; Helvatjoglu-Antoniades, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of dental restorative materials have a crucial effect on the longevity of restorations and moreover on the esthetic demands of patients, but they may be compromised by bleaching treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office bleaching agents on the physical properties of three composite resin restorative materials. The bleaching agents used were hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide at high concentrations. Specimens of each material were prepared, cured, and polished. Measurements of color difference, microhardness, and surface roughness were recorded before and after bleaching and data were examined statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD post-hoc test at P composite resin altered after the bleaching procedure (P composite resins tested (P > .05). The silorane-based composite resin tested showed some color alteration after bleaching procedures. The bleaching procedure did not alter the microhardness and the surface roughness of all composite resins tested.

  12. Has resin-based composite replaced amalgam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gordon J; Child, Paul L

    2010-02-01

    The major health organizations in the world continue to accept amalgam use, but the "amalgam war" of the 1800s is still going on. The end is not in sight. There is little disagreement that amalgam serves well and, although controversial, it appears to have minimal to no health hazards. There is a wide variation in the relative amount of amalgam placed in developed countries, and many dentists in North America do not use it. However, amalgam is still being used at least some of the time by the majority of practitioners in North America, and most of those practitioners also place resin-based composite in Class II locations. The evolution from amalgam to tooth-colored restorations has been a slow and tumultuous journey. The acceptability of resin-based composite in Class II locations continues to be a question for some dentists, while others have concluded that amalgam is "dead." It would be highly desirable if some of dentists using the alleged poisonous properties of amalgam as a "practice building" ploy would find more legitimate methods to increase their practice activity.

  13. Profile of Fluoride Release from a Nanohybrid Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Assed Bezerra Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the amount and profile of fluoride release from a fluoride-containing nanohybrid composite resin (Tetric® N-Ceram by direct potentiometry. Thirty specimens (5 mm diameter x 3 mm high; n=10/material were made of Tetric® N-Ceram, Vitremer® resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (positive control or Filtek® Z350 nanofill composite resin (negative control. The specimens were stored individually in plastic tubes containing 1 mL of artificial saliva at 37°C, which was daily renewed during 15 days. At each renewal of saliva, the amount of fluoride ions released in the solution was measured using a fluoride ion-selective electrode with ion analyzer, and the values obtained in mV were converted to ppm (µg/mL. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test at a significance level of 5%. The results showed that the resins Tetric® N-Ceram and Filtek® Z350 did not release significant amounts of fluoride during the whole period of evaluation (p>0.05. Only Vitremer® released significant amounts of fluoride ions during the 15 days of the experiment, with greater release in first 2 days (p0.05. In conclusion, the nanohybrid composite resin Tetric® N-Ceram did not present in vitro fluoride-releasing capacity throughout the 15 days of study.

  14. Effects of resin content and preparing conditions on the properties of polyphenylene sulfide resin/graphite composite for bipolar plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Li-gang; Li, Ai-ju; Yin, Qiang [Key Laboratory for Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Shandong Key Laboratory of Engineering Ceramics, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang, Wei-qiang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Lin, Heng; Zhao, Yi-bo [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2008-03-15

    In the paper, a kind of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) resin/graphite (G) composite for bipolar plate was prepared by using the PPS resin as adhesive and simple hot pressing. The influences of the resin content, the molding temperature and holding time on the conductivity and the bending strength of the PPS/G composite bipolar plate were investigated firstly and then the optimum content and the preparing conditions of the composite were obtained. The experimental results show that the electrical conductivity decreases and the bending strength reveals a serrated variation with increase in PPS resin content; when the holding time is certain, the conductivity decreases and the bending strength increases with the molding temperature increasing. The experimental results further show that the effect of the holding time on the properties of the composite is different at different molding temperatures. The PPS/G composite with 20% PPS resin content has electrical conductivity of 118.9 S cm{sup -1} and bending strength of 52.4 MPa when it molded at 380 C for 30 min, and has electrical conductivity of 105 S cm{sup -1}, bending strength of 55.7 MPa when it molded at 390 C for 30 min. The properties of the composites can meet the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE). (author)

  15. Alternative methods for determining shrinkage in restorative resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Monteiro, Gabriela Queiroz; Montes, Marcos Antonio Japiassú Resende; Rolim, Tiago Vieira; de Oliveira Mota, Cláudia Cristina Brainer; de Barros Correia Kyotoku, Bernardo; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage of resin composites using a coordinate measuring machine, optical coherence tomography and a more widely known method, such as Archimedes Principle. Two null hypothesis were tested: (1) there are no differences between the materials tested; (2) there are no differences between the methods used for polymerization shrinkage measurements. Polymerization shrinkage of seven resin-based dental composites (Filtek Z250™, Filtek Z350™, Filtek P90™/3M ESPE, Esthet-X™, TPH Spectrum™/Dentsply 4 Seasons™, Tetric Ceram™/Ivoclar-Vivadent) was measured. For coordinate measuring machine measurements, composites were applied to a cylindrical Teflon mold (7 mm × 2 mm), polymerized and removed from the mold. The difference between the volume of the mold and the volume of the specimen was calculated as a percentage. Optical coherence tomography was also used for linear shrinkage evaluations. The thickness of the specimens was measured before and after photoactivation. Polymerization shrinkage was also measured using Archimedes Principle of buoyancy (n=5). Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Games-Howell test. The results show that polymerization shrinkage values vary with the method used. Despite numerical differences the ranking of the resins was very similar with Filtek P90 presenting the lowest shrinkage values. Because of the variations in the results, reported values could only be used to compare materials within the same method. However, it is possible rank composites for polymerization shrinkage and to relate these data from different test methods. Independently of the method used, reduced polymerization shrinkage was found for silorane resin-based composite. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CURING OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES USING MICROWAVE RESIN TRANSFER MOULDING (RTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. YUSOFF

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to compare the difference between microwave heating and conventional thermal heating in fabricating carbon/epoxy composites. Two types of epoxy resin systems were used as matrices, LY5052-HY5052 and DGEBA-HY917-DY073. All composite samples were fabricated using resin transfer moulding (RTM technique. The curing of the LY5052-HY5052-carbon and the DGEBA-HY917-DY073-carbon composite systems, were carried out at 100 °C and 120 °C, respectively. Microwave heating showed better temperature control than conventional heating, however, the heating rate of the microwave cured samples were slower than the conventionally cured samples. This was attributed to the lower power (250 W used when heating with microwaves compared to 2000 W used in conventional heating. Study of thermal characteristics as curing progressed showed that the polymerisation reaction occurred at a faster rate during microwave curing than in conventional curing for both the DGEBA and the LY/HY5052 carbon composite systems. The actual cure cycle was reduced from 60 minutes to 40 minutes when using microwaves for curing DGEBA-carbon composites. As for LY/HY5052-carbon composites, the actual cure cycle was reduced from 3 hours to 40 minutes. Both conventional and microwave heating yielded similar glass transition temperatures (120 °C for DGEBA systems and 130 °C for LY/HY5052 systems. Microwave cured composites had higher void contents than conventionally cured composites (2.2-2.8% and 1.8-2.4% for DGEBA and LY/HY5052 microwave cured composites, respectively, compared to 0.2-0.4% for both DGEBA and LY/HY5052 thermally cured composites. C-scan traces showed that all composites, regardless of methods of curing, had minimal defects.

  17. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  18. Evaluation of inorganic particles of composite resins with nanofiller content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Hörlle, Lucas; Oshima, Hugo Mitsuo; Hirakata, Luciana Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were evaluate by energy dispersed X-ray (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the inorganic particles of three nanofilled composite resins, comparing particles sizes, shape and composition, and the filler weight content by thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA). Three composite resins classified as nanofilled were selected to this study: Esthet-X; Grandio; Filtek Supreme XT. The shade was standardized (A2) for enamel (E) or dentin (D). Ten samples with 20 mg (±10 mg) of each composite resin were submitted to thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) in order to record the filler weight content (wt%). The amount of inorganic phase ranged from 75.75 to 87 wt%, to Esthet-X (D) and Grandio (D), respectively. The filler composition was analyzed by energy dispersed X-ray (EDS), and the size and shape were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The filler average size (µm) obtained by SEM were: Esthet-X (E) 1.16; Esthet-X (D) 1.39; Filtek Supreme XT (E) 0.6 (nanocluster); Filtek Supreme XT (D) 1.14 (nanocluster); Grandio (E) 2.05 and Grandio (D) 3.1. Silica (SiO2), Ba and Al were observed through EDS. The shape of Esthet-X and Grandio fillers showed similar characteristics with high quantity of irregular inorganic particles and heterogeneous filler. However, Filtek Supreme XT showed spherical and regular particles with homogeneous distribution and sizes. Based in the analysis of nanofilled composites inorganic phase, inconsistencies of weight content, composition, shape and size can be stated between the literature and manufacturer's instructions.

  19. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shembish, F.A.; Tong, H.; Kaizer, M.; Janal, M.N.; Thompson, V.P.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. METHODS: Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava

  20. Effect of photoactivation on the reduction of composite resin contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauletti, Natalia A; Girotto, Luiza P S; Leite, Françoise H S; Mario, Débora N

    2017-06-01

    Composite resins are predominantly marketed in developing countries in tube form, and the contents of the tube may be used in numerous procedures for different patients. This represents a problem because of the risk of cross-contamination. This study aimed to evaluate contamination in vitro of the internal contents of composite resin tubes in the dental clinics of a higher-education institution, as well as the effect of photoactivation on the level of contamination. Twenty-five tubes containing composite resin were randomly chosen (by lottery). From each tube, two samples of approximately 2 mm of composite resin were removed, and then one sample, but not the other, was photoactivated. These samples were plated on Brain-Heart Infusion (BHI), Sabouraud and MacConkey agars, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 24-48 h. Colony counting and Gram staining were performed for subsequent microscopic identification of fungi and bacteria. The non-photoactivated composite resin group presented significantly higher microbial contamination in relation to the photoactivated composite resin group. The photoactivation of camphorquinone present in composite resin produces reactive oxygen species, which might promote cell death of contaminant microorganisms. Thus, although the same tube of composite resin may be used for a number of different patients in the dental clinics of developing countries, the photoactivation process potentially reduces the risk of cross-contamination. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  1. Boswellia gum resin/chitosan polymer composites: Controlled delivery vehicles for aceclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Sougata; Laha, Bibek; Maiti, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of Boswellia gum resin on the properties of glutaraldehyde (GA) crosslinked chitosan polymer composites and their potential as oral delivery vehicles for a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, aceclofenac. The incorporation of resinous material caused a significant improvement in drug entrapment efficiency (∼40%) of the polymer composites. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the formation of chitosan-gum resin composites and did not show any evidence of drug-polymer chemical interaction. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) suggested the formation of particulate polymer composites up to chitosan:gum resin mass ratio of 1:3. Only 8-17% drug was released into HCl solution (pH 1.2) in 2h. The drug release rate of polymer composites was faster in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8). The composites released ∼60-68% drug load in 7h. In same duration, the drug release rate suddenly boosted up to 92% as the concentration of gum resin in the composites was raised to 80%. The drug release mechanism deviated from non-Fickian to case-II type with increasing resin concentration in the composites. Hence, GA-treated Boswellia resin-chitosan composites could be considered as alternative vehicles for oral delivery of aceclofenac. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A randomized controlled 30 years follow up of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this 30 year randomized controlled study was to evaluate, by intrain-dividual comparisons, the durability of three conventional resin composites in Class IIrestorations. Methods. Each of 30 participants, 21 female and 9 male (mean age 30 years, range 20–43),received at least...... three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate size.After cavity preparation, the three cavities were chosen at random to be restored with twochemical-cured (P10, Miradapt) and one light-cured resin composite (P30). A chemical-curedenamel bonding agent was applied after etching...... resin composites (p = 0.45).The variables tooth type, cavity size, age, and gender of the participants did not significantlyaffect the probability of failure. Significance. The three conventional resin composites showed good clinical performance dur-ing the 30 year evaluation. The chemical cured resin...

  3. Vickers microhardness comparison of 4 composite resins with different types of filler.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René García-Contreras

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Composite resins are the material of choice to restore minimal invasive cavities; conversely, it is important to explore the mechanical properties of commercially available dental materials. Objective: To compare the Vickers microhardness (VHN of four available commercial composite resins using standardized samples and methods. Methodology: Composite cylinders were manufactured in a Teflon mould. We used the follow composite resins (n=4/gp: Microhybrid resins [Feeling Lux (Viarden and Amelogen Plus (Ultradent], Hybrid resin [Te-Econom Plus (Ivoclar] and Nanohybrid resin [Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE]. All samples were incubated in distilled water at 37ºC for five days. The test was carried out with microhardness indenter at 10 N, and a dwelling time of 10 s for 9 indentations across the specimens resulting in a total of 36 indentations for each group. Data were subjected to Kolmogorov-Smirnov normality test and ANOVA (post-hoc Tukey test. Results: The VHN mean values ranged from harder to softer as follows: Filtek Z350 (71.96±6.44 (p Amelogen Plus (59.90±4.40 (p Feeling lux (53.52±5.72> Te-Econom Plus (53.26±5.19. Conclusion: According to our results, the microhardness of the evaluated conventional composite resins can withstand the masticatory forces; however nanohybrid composite resins showed better Vickers microhardness and therefore are a more clinically suitable option for minimal invasion treatments.

  4. Synthesis of a magnetic composite resin and its cobalt removal characteristics in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Kyun; Lee, Kun Jai

    2001-01-01

    A series of stepwise procedures to prepare a new organic-inorganic composite magnetic resin with phenolsulphonic-formaldehyde and freshly formed iron ferrite was established, based upon wet-and-neutralization method for synthesizing iron ferrite and pearl-polymerization method for synthesizing rigid bead-type composite resin. The ion exchange and sorption characteristics of the composite resin prepared by the above method at various conditions were experimentally disclosed. The composite resin prepared shows stably high removal efficiency to Co(II) species in aqueous solution in a wide range of solution pH. The overall isotherm is qualitatively explained by the generalized adsorption isotherm concept proposed by McKinley. The standard enthalpy change derived from van't Hoff equation conforms to the typical range for chemisorption or ion exchange. The selectivity of the PSF-F (phenolsulphonic formaldehyde-iron ferrite) composite resin to Co(II) species and other competing chemicals (i.e. Na 2 EDTA, Ca(II) and Na) was compared. It is anticipated that the composite resin can also be used for column-operation with process-control by applying external magnetic field, since the rigid bead-type composite resin shows magnetic-susceptibility due to its paramagnetic inorganic constituent (i.e. iron ferrite). (author)

  5. Microshear bond strength of composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates utilizing unfilled versus filled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Siamak; Ghasemi, Amir; Kotick, Philip G

    2014-11-01

    Failures such as marginal discoloration and composite chipping are still the problems of tooth-colored restorations on the substrate of enamel and porcelain, which some of these problems are consequently as a result of failures in the bonding layer. Using filled resin has been recently introduced to increase the bond strength of this layer. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins to enamel incubated in periods of 24 h and 9 months and porcelain with unfilled resin and flowable composites (filled resin). In this in vitro study, two groups of 75 enamel samples with different storage times (24 h and 9 months) and a group of 75 porcelain samples were used. They were divided into 5 experimental groups of 15 samples in each. Composite cylinders in tygon tubes were bonded on the surface of acid-etched enamel and pretreated porcelain. Wave, Wave MV, Wave HV, Grandioflow and Margin Bond were used as bonding agents. The μ-SBS was measured at the speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bond strengths were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey test. P composites (filled resins) can be used instead of unfilled resins in bonding composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates.

  6. Influence of colorant solutions in properties of indirect resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; De Paula, Adrielle Mendes; Bonatto, Liliane da Rocha; Da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Moreno, Amália; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of colorant solutions on color stability and surface roughness of indirect resin composites submitted to prior immersion in mouthwashes. Five brands of indirect resin composites were assessed: Adoro, Resilab, Cristobal, Sinfony and Epricord. The specimens were immersed in five different solutions (n = 10): four mouthwashes (Listerine, Oral-B, Plax, Periogard) and artificial saliva (control). 60 hours after immersion in mouthwashes, the specimens were exposed to coffee solution. Shade stability and surface roughness were tested by a spectrophotometer and by a profilometer, respectively. A three-way repeated-measures ANOVA was performed. Differences between the values were compared by the Tukey-Kramer test (P color change. Greater color change was observed after immersion in coffee, except for Cristobal. The color change was even higher for specimens previously immersed in mouthwashes. The Epricord resin showed the lowest roughness value and the Cristobal showed the highest value, regardless of the period. The highest roughness change occurred after immersion in Listerine.

  7. Properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber-particulate-reinforced resin composites with two different fiber length distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiting; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lin, Zhengmei; He, Jingwei; Qin, Wei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the reinforcing efficiency and light curing properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber-particulate reinforced resin composite and to examine length distribution of discontinuous S2-glass fibers after a mixing process into resin composite. Experimental S2-glass fiber-particulate reinforced resin composites were prepared by mixing 10wt% of discontinuous S2-glass fibers, which had been manually cut into two different lengths (1.5 and 3.0mm), with various weight ratios of dimethacrylate based resin matrix and silaned BaAlSiO 2 filler particulates. The resin composite made with 25wt% of UDMA/SR833s resin system and 75wt% of silaned BaAlSiO 2 filler particulates was used as control composite which had similar composition as the commonly used resin composites. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM) and work of fracture (WOF) were measured. Fractured specimens were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Double bond conversion (DC) and fiber length distribution were also studied. Reinforcement of resin composites with discontinuous S2-glass fibers can significantly increase the FS, FM and WOF of resin composites over the control. The fibers from the mixed resin composites showed great variation in final fiber length. The mean aspect ratio of experimental composites containing 62.5wt% of particulate fillers and 10wt% of 1.5 or 3.0mm cutting S2-glass fibers was 70 and 132, respectively. No difference was found in DC between resin composites containing S2-glass fibers with two different cutting lengths. Discontinuous S2-glass fibers can effectively reinforce the particulate-filled resin composite and thus may be potential to manufacture resin composites for high-stress bearing application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  9. Preparation and Characterizations of Composite Material Based on Carbon Fiber and Two Thermoset Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Fouda Hany; Guo Lin; Elsharkawy Karim

    2017-01-01

    In the present investigation, we used two types of thermoset resins (epoxy resin and phenol formaldehyde resin) with carbon fiber (CF) to produce composite materials. CF/epoxy resin composite and CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite were fabricated and compared between their mechanical properties as compression, tension and flexural. it was found that mechanical properties of CF/epoxy composite higher than mechanical properties of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite such as flexural strength...

  10. Color Stability of IDM Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Discoloration of composite resins is considered to be a major factor in esthetic restoration"nfailures. The aim of this study was to evaluate color stability of IDM composite (both light and self cure"nsamples namely IL and IS, and to compare it with a self-cure composite (Degufill named DS and a light"ncure ormocer composite (Definite, called DL in the Report. 60 disk shaped samples of each composite"nwere prepared, according to ISO-7491. The samples were divided into 3 groups and aged as follows:"nA- (Control 7 days in dark 37°c chamber"nB- Foil covered and kept in 100% humidity, and 37°c in xenotest chamber for 24 hours, then transferred"nto a dark 37°c chamber for 6 more days."nC- Kept in 37°c, 100% humidity under the emission of xiiion lamp of xenotest chamber for 24 hours,"nand then transferred to 37°c dark chamber for 6 more days"nThe lightness and chromaticity values of samples were measured both before and after aging using a"nspectrophotometer (Data Flash. The total color changes as well as changes in lightness and chromaticity"nvalues were measured in the CIE L * a * b * scale, and analyzed. Color change was recorded to be"nsignificant in all samples after aging. The maximum change belonged to IL, which was significantly"ndifferent from DL and DS. It seems, in order to have a durable esthetic restoration using IDM, more"nscientific and professional consideration is needed in the production process.

  11. Preparation and Characterizations of Composite Material Based on Carbon Fiber and Two Thermoset Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouda Hany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, we used two types of thermoset resins (epoxy resin and phenol formaldehyde resin with carbon fiber (CF to produce composite materials. CF/epoxy resin composite and CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite were fabricated and compared between their mechanical properties as compression, tension and flexural. it was found that mechanical properties of CF/epoxy composite higher than mechanical properties of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite such as flexural strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 30 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite, tensile strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 11.4 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin and axial compression strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 14.5 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin.

  12. Radiopacity Of Glass-ionomer/composite Resin Hybrid Materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Hara A.T.; Serra M.C.; Rodrigues Junior A.L.

    2001-01-01

    This study visually compared the radiopacity of seven restorative materials (3 resin-modified glass-ionomer cements, 3 polyacid-modified composite resins, and 1 conventional glass-ionomer cement) to a sound tooth structure sample, and an aluminium stepwedge. All hybrid materials were more radiopaque, except for one resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, than both the tooth structure and conventional glass-ionomer cement.

  13. Anterior makeover on fractured teeth by simple composite resin restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Priyo Prasetyo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In daily practice dentists usually treat tooth fractures with more invasive treatments such as crown, veneer and bridges which preparation require more tooth structure removal. While currently there is trend toward minimal invasive dentistry which conserves more tooth structure. This is enhanced with the vast supply of dental materials and equipment in the market, including restorative materials. Provided with these supporting materials and equipment and greater patient’s demand for esthetic treatment, dentists must aware of the esthetics and basic principle of conserving tooth which should retain tooth longevity. Purpose: This article showed that a simple and less invasive composite resin restoration can successfully restore anterior esthetic and function of fractured teeth which generally treated with more invasive treatment options. Case: A 19 year-old female patient came with fracture on 21 and 22. This patient had a previous history of dental trauma about nine years before and was brought to a local dentist for debridement and was given analgesic, the involved teeth were not given any restorative treatment. Case management: The fractured 21 and 22 were conventionally restored with simple composite resin restoration. Conclusion: Fracture anterior teeth would certainly disturbs patient’s appearance, but these teeth could be managed conservatively and economically by simple composite resin restoration.Latar belakang: Dalam praktek sehari-hari pada umumnya dokter gigi merawat fraktur dengan restorasi invasif seperti mahkota, veneer dan jembatan yang semuanya memerlukan pengambilan jaringan gigi lebih banyak, sedangkan saat ini trend perawatan gigi lebih menuju kearah invasif minimal yang mempertahankan jaringan gigi sebanyak mungkin. Keadaan ini ditunjang oleh tersedianya berbagai macam bahan dan peralatan kedokteran gigi di pasaran, termasuk bahan restorasi. Dengan tersedianya bahan dan peralatan yang mendukung serta tingginya

  14. Does the light source affect the repairability of composite resins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel KARAMAN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the light source on the microshear bond strength of different composite resins repaired with the same substrate. Thirty cylindrical specimens of each composite resin—Filtek Silorane, Filtek Z550 (3M ESPE, Gradia Direct Anterior (GC, and Aelite Posterior (BISCO—were prepared and light-cured with a QTH light curing unit (LCU. The specimens were aged by thermal cycling and divided into three subgroups according to the light source used—QTH, LED, or PAC (n = 10. They were repaired with the same substrate and a Clearfil Repair Kit (Kuraray. The specimens were light-cured and aged for 1 week in distilled water at 37 °C. The microshear bond strength and failure modes were assessed. There was no significant difference in the microshear bond strength values among the composite resins, except for the Filtek Silorane group that showed significantly lower bond strength values when polymerized with the PAC unit compared to the QTH or LED unit. In conclusion, previously placed dimethacrylate-based composites can be repaired with different light sources; however, if the composite to be repaired is silorane-based, then using a QTH or LED device may be the best option.

  15. Resin composite for sealing and its use in a solar cell. Fushiyo jushi soseibutsu oyobi sore wo mochiita taiyo denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, H.; Mimura, T.; Takehara, N.

    1994-01-28

    This invention presents resin composites for sealing of a solar cell composed of a hardening resin and a thermoplastic resin which has a number average molecular weight larger than that of the hardening resin and is soluble in the hardening resin, and the invention affords a solar cell to endure a long-term stable operation and to give a good performance. The hardening resin includes unsaturated polyester resin, phenolic resin, alkyd resin, unsaturated acrylic resin, epoxy resin, polyurethane resin, melamine resin, diallyl phthalate resin, their oligomers and their modifications. The thermoplastic resin includes saturated polyester resin, phenolic resin, acrylic resin, styrene resin, epoxy resin, polyurethane resin, polyvinyl acetate resin, polyvinyl chloride resin, polyvinyl alcohol resin, polyacetal resin, their modifications and their copolymer resin. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Restorative service patterns in Australia: amalgam, composite resin and glass ionomer restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, D S; Spencer, A J

    2003-12-01

    To examine the provision of amalgam, composite resin and glass ionomer restorations, and to assess whether these main restorative services varied by patient, visit and oral health characteristics. A cross-sectional survey incorporating a log of service items provided on a typical day. Australian private general practice. Data on services and patients were collected by a mailed survey from a random sample of dentists from each State/Territory in Australia in 1998-99 with a response rate of 71%. Rates per visit of amalgam, composite resin and glass ionomer restorations among dentate adults who had received a restoration. Analysis showed older patients had lower amalgam rates but higher glass ionomer rates, composite resin rates were lower at emergency visits, capital city patients had higher amalgam rates but lower composite resin rates, patients with decayed teeth had higher amalgam and composite resin rates, and use of restorative materials varied by clinical problem. Despite widespread use of alternative materials, amalgam rates remained high in circumstances such as replacement restorations and restorations involving more than one surface. Other restorative materials also had specific applications. Both amalgam and composite resins were provided at higher rates to patients with active caries but composite resins were also used at higher rates for aesthetic problems. Glass ionomer restorations were used at higher rates for initial and one-surface restorations, and for conditions such as root caries and dentinal sensitivity.

  17. Properties of Graphene Oxide/Epoxy Resin Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jijun Tang; Haijun Zhou; Yunxia Liang; Xinlan Shi; Xin Yang; Jiaoxia Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The graphene oxide (GO) was obtained by pressurized oxidation method using natural graphite as raw materials. Then the GO/epoxy resin composites were prepared by casting. The mechanical and damping properties of composites were studied. As a result, the impact intensity of GO/epoxy resin composites was prominently improved with the content of the graphene oxide increasing. The glass transition temperature decreased and the damping capacity is improved.

  18. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Effect of proximal box elevation with resin composite on marginal quality of ceramic inlays in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberger, Roland; Hehn, Julia; Hajtó, Jan; Krämer, Norbert; Naumann, Michael; Koch, Andreas; Roggendorf, Matthias J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the marginal quality and resin-resin transition of milled CAD/CAM glass-ceramic inlays in deep proximal cavities with and without 3-mm proximal box elevation (PBE) using resin composites before and after thermomechanical loading. MOD cavities with one proximal box beneath the cementoenamel junction were prepared in 48 extracted human third molars. Proximal boxes ending in dentin were elevated for 3 mm with different resin composites (RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, and Maxcem Elite as self-adhesive resin cements and Clearfil Majesty Posterior as restorative resin composite in one or three layers bonded with AdheSE) or left untreated. IPS Empress CAD inlays were luted with Syntac and Variolink II (n = 8). Marginal quality as well as the PBE-ceramic interface were analyzed under an SEM using epoxy resin replicas before and after thermomechanical loading (100,000 × 50 N and 2,500 thermocycles between +5°C and +55°C). Bonding glass-ceramic directly to dentin showed the highest amounts of gap-free margins in dentin (92%, p resin composite applied in three layers achieved 84% gap-free margins in dentin; PBE with self-adhesive resin cements exhibited significantly more gaps in dentin (p resin composite, PBE may be an alternative to ceramic bonding to dentin. Self-adhesive resin cements seem not suitable for this indication. For deep proximal boxes ending in dentin, a PBE may be an alternative to conventional techniques.

  20. Aerospace Composite Materials Delivery Order 0003: Nanocomposite Polymeric Resin Enhancements for Improved Composite Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Chenggang

    2002-01-01

    .... The addition of clays does not significantly alter the viscosity or cure kinetics so that the modified resin will still be suitable for liquid composite molding techniques such as resin transfer molding...

  1. Moisture diffusion parameter characteristics for epoxy composites and neat resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The moisture absorption characteristics of two graphite/epoxy composites and their corresponding cured neat resins were studied in high humidity and water immersion environments at elevated temperatures. Moisture absorption parameters, such as equilibrium moisture content and diffusion coefficient derived from data taken on samples exposed to high humidity and water soak environments, were compared. Composite swelling in a water immersion environment was measured. Tensile strengths of cured neat resin were measured as a function of their equilibrium moisture content after exposure to different moisture environments. The effects of intermittent moderate tensile loads on the moisture absorption parameters of composite and cured neat resin samples were determined.

  2. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phenolic resin; nanometric silicon carbide; nanocomposites; friction coefficient. 1. Introduction. Phenolic resin composites have their applications in a wide range of fields ... Curing time and temperature as well as mold materials influence the resulting homogeneity, glass transition temperature and mechanical properties.

  3. The measurement of polymerization shrinkage of composite resins with ESPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Guo Biao

    2008-09-01

    In the current study, we used the method of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) to measure polymerization shrinkage of composite resins. Standardized cavities were prepared and placed into the ESPI apparatus before the cavities were filled with composites (n=2) .The ESPI apparatus was constructed to measure the out-of-plane displacement of the resins surface during the polymerization. Experiments demonstrated that the ESPI technique was a viable method to measure the deformation of composite resins. It was responsive and sensitive to dimensional changes. We found that cavity shape, size and C- factor influenced the date of resins shrinkage. And the tooth deformation in response to polymerization of resins was measured by the ESPI too. We concluded that ESPI was a feasible method for assessing resins deformation induced by its polymerization shrinkage when it was bonded in tooth cavities. And the results were greatly influenced by the dimensions of cavities , or interface adhesive and so on. It could also measure the tooth deformation induced by shrinkage of bonded composite resins. We found that resins polymerization shrinkage date may overestimate shrinkage-induced tooth deformation.

  4. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland) embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland).

  5. Synthesis of nanosized barium titanate/epoxy resin composites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Barium titanate/epoxy resin composites have been synthesized and tested for microwave absorption/ transmission. Nanocrystalline barium titanate (BaTiO3 or BT) ... Anechoic chamber; barium titanate; electromagnetic interference and compatibility; epoxy resin ..... electromagnetic waves, the two port calibrations have been.

  6. Inhibitory effect on Streptococcus mutans and mechanical properties of the chitosan containing composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Sun Kim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the antibacterial effect and mechanical properties of composite resins (LCR, MCR, HCR incorporating chitosan with three different molecular weights (L, Low; M, Medium; H, High. Materials and Methods Streptococcus (S. mutans 100 mL and each chitosan powder were inoculated in sterilized 10 mL Brain-Heart Infusion (BHI solution, and was centrifuged for 12 hr. Absorbance of the supernatent was measured at OD660 to estimate the antibacterial activities of chitosan. After S. mutans was inoculated in the disc shaped chitosan-containing composite resins, the disc was cleansed with BHI and diluted with serial dilution method. S. mutans was spread on Mitis-salivarius bacitracin agar. After then, colony forming unit (CFU was measured to verify the inhibitory effect on S. mutans biofilm. To ascertain the effect on the mechanical properties of composite resin, 3-point bending and Vickers hardness tests were done after 1 and 3 wk water storage, respectively. Using 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Scheffe test, statistical analysis was done with 95% significance level. Results All chitosan powder showed inhibition effect against S. mutans. CFU number in chitosan-containing composite resins was smaller than that of control resin without chitosan. The chitosan containing composite resins did not show any significant difference in flexural strength and Vickers hardness in comparison with the control resin. However, the composite resin, MCR showed a slightly decreased flexural strength and the maximum load than those of control and the other composite resins HCR and LCR. Conclusions LCR and HCR would be recommended as a feasible antibacterial restorative due to its antibacterial nature and mechanical properties.

  7. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Biodentine, Resin Modified GIC and Hybrid Composite Resin as a Core Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, Dayalan; Shoba, Krishnamma; Aman, Shibu; Bharkavi, Srinivasan Kumar Indu; Nimmi, Vijayan; Abhilash, Radhakrishnan

    2017-09-01

    The restoration of a severely damaged tooth usually needs a post and core as a part of treatment procedure to provide a corono - radicular stabilization. Biodentine is a class of dental material which possess high mechanical properties with excellent biocompatibility and bioactive behaviour. The sealing ability coupled with optimum physical properties could make Biodentine an excellent option as a core material. The aim of the study was to determine the fracture resistance of Biodentine as a core material in comparison with resin modified glass ionomer and composite resin. Freshly extracted 30 human permanent maxillary central incisors were selected. After endodontic treatment followed by post space preparation and luting of Glass fibre post (Reforpost, Angelus), the samples were divided in to three groups based on the type of core material. The core build-up used in Group I was Biodentine (Septodont, France), Group II was Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (GC, Japan) and Group III was Hybrid Composite Resin (TeEconom plus, Ivoclar vivadent). The specimens were subjected to fracture toughness using Universal testing machine (1474, Zwick/Roell, Germany) and results were compared using One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's Post hoc test. The results showed that there was significant difference between groups in terms of fracture load. Also, composite resin exhibited highest mean fracture load (1039.9 N), whereas teeth restored with Biodentine demonstrated the lowest mean fracture load (176.66 N). Resin modified glass ionomer exhibited intermediate fracture load (612.07 N). The primary mode of failure in Group I and Group II was favourable (100%) while unfavourable fracture was seen in Group III (30%). Biodentine, does not satisfy the requirements to be used as an ideal core material. The uses of RMGIC's as a core build-up material should be limited to non-stress bearing areas. Composite resin is still the best core build-up material owing to its high fracture

  8. A Study on Tensile Behavior and Water Uptake of Wood Powder-Composites Based on Epoxy and Unsaturated Polyester Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Amir hossein Pirayeshfar; M.Mahdi Jalili; Yahya Musavi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, two kinds of epoxy resins (i.e. high-viscosity and low-viscosity) as well as one polyester resin (orthophthalic grade) were selected and examined as pure resins and also as a polymeric matrix for producing wood-composites. In this study, tensile properties, water uptake, and degradation of samples in water were also investigated. The results show that addition of wood particles to the thermoset resins strongly impresses on their tensile behavior and water uptake. Tensile studie...

  9. Thermal Cyclic Resistance Polyester Resin Composites Reinforce Fiber Nut Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Hendriwan

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of study is to determine the effect of fiber length and thermal cyclic of the bending strength of polyester resin composite reinforced by fibers nut shell. The materials used in this study is a nut shell fibers with fiber length of 1 cm, 2 cm and 3 cm and polyester resin with composition 70-30%wt. Fiber nut shell treated soaking in NaOH 30% for 30 minutes, then rinse with clean water so that the fiber free of alkali and then dried. Furthermore, the composite is heated in an oven to a temperature of 100°C for 1 hour and then cooled in the open with a variety of thermal cyclic 30, 40, and 50 times. Bending properties of composites known through the testing process using a three-point bending test equipment universal testing machine. The test results show that the bending strength bending highest in fiber length of 3 cm with 30 treatment cycles of thermal to the value of 53.325 MPa, while the lowest occurred in bending strength fiber length of 1 cm with no cycles of thermal treatment to the value of 30.675 MPa.

  10. Surface roughness of etched composite resin in light of composite repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Cardoso, M.V.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Munck, J. De; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Meerbeek, B. Van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In search for clinically effective composite repair protocols, the effect of various etching protocols on the surface roughness of composite resins with different filler composition were investigated. METHODS: Of two composite resins (hybrid-filled Clearfil AP-X; nano-filled Filtek

  11. Stain susceptibility of composite and ceramic CAD/CAM blocks versus direct resin composites with different resinous matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Amal; Ardu, Stefano; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Krejci, Ivo

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the stain susceptibility of CAD/CAM blocks and direct composite after long term exposure to various staining agents. 40 disk-shaped samples were fabricated from each of nine materials; six CAD/CAM (Vitablocs Mark II, Paradigm MZ100, Experimental Vita Hybrid Ceramic, Vita Enamic, Experimental Kerr and Lava Ultimate) and three direct composites (Filtek Supreme, Venus Diamond and Filtek Silorane). Samples were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8) according to different staining solutions (distilled water, tea, red wine, coffee and artificial saliva). Initial L*a*b* values were assessed using a calibrated digital spectrophotometer. Specimens were immersed in staining solutions and stored in an incubator at 37 °C for 120 days. L*a*b* values were assessed again and color change (∆E) was calculated as difference between recorded L*a*b* values. ANOVA, and Duncan test were used to identify differences between groups (α = 0.05). Significant differences in ∆E values were detected between materials (p = 0.000). Among all staining solutions, the highest ∆E value was observed with red wine. The new CAD/CAM blocks (Vita Enamic, Vita Hybrid Ceramic and Lava Ultimate) showed the highest resistance to staining compared to the MZ100 composite resin blocks. Filtek Silorane, a direct composite, showed high stain resistance values compared to CAD/CAM materials and other direct composites. Ceramic and composite CAD/CAM blocks had lower staining susceptibility than methacrylate based direct composite. Staining susceptibility of the new resin based CAD/CAM materials Vita Enamic and Lava Ultimate was comparable to feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vitablocs Mark II). Filtek Silorane showed promising results that were comparable to some CAD/CAM blocks.

  12. Microhardness of dual-polymerizing resin cements and foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keiichi; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2014-06-01

    The optimal luting material for fiber-reinforced posts to ensure the longevity of foundation restorations remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements and 2 dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts by assessing their Knoop hardness number. Five specimens of dual-polymerizing resin cements (SA Cement Automix, G-Cem LincAce, and Panavia F2.0) and 5 specimens of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins (Clearfil DC Core Plus and Unifil Core EM) were polymerized from the top by irradiation for 40 seconds. Knoop hardness numbers were measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours and 7 days after irradiation. Data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey compromise post hoc test (α=.05). At both times after irradiation, the 5 resins materials showed the highest Knoop hardness numbers at the 0.5-mm depth. At 7 days after irradiation, the Knoop hardness numbers of the resin materials did not differ significantly between the 8.0-mm and 10.0-mm depths (P>.05). For all materials, the Knoop hardness numbers at 7 days after irradiation were significantly higher than those at 0.5 hours after irradiation at all depths (Presin materials were found to decrease in the following order: DC Core Plus, Unifil Core EM, Panavia F2.0, SA Cement Automix, and G-Cem LincAce (Pcomposite resins were higher than those of the 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements, notable differences were seen among the 5 materials at all depths and at both times after irradiation. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of soda immersion on nano hybrid composite resin discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chair Effendi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Composite resin is the tooth-colored restorative material which most of the people are fond of due to their aesthetic value. The composite resin discoloration may happen because of the intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Soda water is one of the beverages which can cause the composite resin discoloration. Purpose: The study was aimed to determine the effect of soda immersion on nano hybrid composite resin discoloration. Methods: The study was an experimental laboratory study using 100 shade A3 nano hybrid composite resin specimens with the diameter of 5 mm and density of 2mm. The samples were divided into 5 groups, each group was immersed in different beverages. The beverages were mineral water; lemon-flavored soda; strawberry-flavored soda; fruit punch-flavored soda; and orange-flavored soda for 3, 7, 14 and 21 days respectively, in the temperature of 37o C. The discoloration measurement utilizes Spectrophotometer, Vita Easy Shade, and uses CIEL*a*b* method. Results: The result showed that the duration of immersion in soda had an effect on the Nano hybrid composite resin discoloration. Strawberry and fruit punch- flavored soda were the most influential components toward the discoloration. Nevertheless, the generally-occurred discoloration was clinically acceptable (∆E ≤ 3,3. Conclusion: The study suggested that the soda immersion duration has effect on Nano hybrid composite resin discoloration.Latar belakang: Resin komposit adalah material sewarna gigi yang diminati masyarakat karena memiliki nilai estetik yang baik. Perubahan warna resin komposit dapat terjadi karena faktor intrinsik dan ekstrinsik. Minuman soda merupakan salah satu minuman yang dapat menyebabkan perubahan warna pada resin komposit. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penelitian ini untuk meneliti perubahan warna resin komposit nanohibrida akibat perendaman dalam minuman soda. Metode: Metode yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah eksperimental laboratorik dengan menggunakan

  14. Resin flow/fiber deformation model for composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutowski, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a resin flow/fiber deformation model that can be used to predict the behavior of composites during the molding cycle. The model can take into account time varying pressure and viscosity and output the time history of the fiber volume fraction. With this known, the composite thickness, resin pressure, and fiber pressure can all be determined as a function of time. The results of this model are in good agreement with experimentally measured values. 10 references, 9 figures

  15. Durability of a low shrinkage TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this randomized controlled prospective trial was to evaluate the durability of a low shrinkage and TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in posterior restorations in a 6-year follow up. Material and methods: 139 Class II restorations were placed in 67 patients...... with a mean age of 53 years (range 29-82). Each participant received at random two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations. In the first cavity of each pair the TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system was placed with its 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (cmf-els). In the second cavity a 1-step HEMA...... for failure were fracture followed by recurrent caries. Most fractures and all caries lesions were found in high risk participants. Significance: The tested Class II resin composite restorations performed with the new TEGDMA/HEMA-free low shrinkage resin composite system showed good durability over six years....

  16. The effect of light-cured nanofilled composite resin shades on their under-surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanum, U. A.; Herda, E.; Indrani, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the effect of shades of light-cured nanofilled composite resins on their under-surface temperature. Resin composites specimens of shades bright, medium, and dark shade were obtained from a cylindrical mold. While polymerizing using a curing unit, the under-surface temperature was determined at the bottom of the specimens using a thermocouple wire 20 sec after the start. Results showed that the under-surface temperature of the darker shade specimens were relatively higher that those of the brighter shades with significant diffferences between the resin composites of different shades. To conlude, the under-surface temperature of the light-cured nanofilled resin composites raised from the brighter to the darker shades.

  17. Physicochemical properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber reinforced resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiting; Qin, Wei; Garoushi, Sufyan; He, Jingwei; Lin, Zhengmei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2018-01-30

    The objective of this study was to investigate several physicochemical properties of an experimental discontinuous S2-glass fiber-reinforced resin composite. The experimental composite was prepared by mixing 10 wt% of discontinuous S2-glass fibers with 27.5 wt% of resin matrix and 62.5 wt% of particulate fillers. Flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), fracture toughness (FT), work of fracture (WOF), double bond conversion (DC), Vickers hardness, volume shrinkage (VS) and fiber length distribution were determined. These were compared with two commercial resin composites. The experimental composite showed the highest FS, WOF and FT compared with two control composites. The DC of the experimental composite was comparable with controls. No significant difference was observed in VS between the three tested composites. The use of discontinuous glass fiber fillers with polymer matrix and particulate fillers yielded improved physical properties and substantial improvement was associated with the use of S2-glass fiber.

  18. Hardness Evaluation of Composite Resins Cured with QTH and LED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Esmaeili

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Today light cured composites are widely used. Physical and mechanical properties of composites are related to the degree of conversion. Light curing unit (LCU is an important factor for composite polymerization. Aim of this study is evaluation of composite resins hardness using halogen and LED light curing units. Materials and methods. In this study, 30 samples of Filtek Z250 and C-Fill composite resins were provided. Samples were light cured with Ultralume2, Valo and Astralis7. Vickers hardness number (VHN was measured in 0, 1, 2 mm depth. Statistical analysis used: Data were analysed by SPSS software and compared with each other by T-test, one-way and twoway ANOVA and Post-hoc Tukey test. Results. In Filtek Z250, at top surface, VHN of Ultralume2 was higher than VHN of Valo (P = 0.02 and Astralis7 (P = 0.04, but in depth of 1, 2 mm, VHN of Ultralume2 and Astralis7 were almost the same and both LCUs were more than Valo which the difference between Ultralume2 and Valo was significant in depth of 1mm (0.05 and 2mm (0.02. In C-Fill composite, at top surface, Astralis7 showed higher VHN, but in depth of 2 mm, performance of all devices were rather similar. Conclusion. In Z250, which contains camphorquinone initiator, light cure LED Ultra-lume2 with narrow wavelength showed higher hardness number than Valo. In C-fill, in top surface, Astralis7 with more exposure time, resulted higher VHN. But In depth of 2 mm, various light curing devices had rather similar hardness number.

  19. Effect of bench time polymerization on depth of cure of dental composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, K.; Yudhit, A.; Sari, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of bench time before light cured polymerization on the depth of cure of dental composite resin. Nanofiller composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT,3M, ESPE,China) was used in this study. Sixty samples of nanofiller composite resin were made and divided into control and test groups with bench time for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. For the test group, composite resins were stored in refrigerator with 4°C temperatures. Meanwhile, for the control groups, the composite resin was stored at room temperature. The samples were prepared using metal mould with size diameter of 6 mm and 4 mm in thickness. Samples were cured for 20 s by using visible blue light curing unit. Part of samples that unpolymerized were removed by using a plastic spatula. The remaining parts of samples were measured by digital caliper and noted as depth of cure (mm). Data were analyzed to one-way ANOVA and LSD tests (p≤0.05). Results showed there was no significance differences between test groups (p=0.5). A 60 minutes bench time group showed the highest depth of cure value among test group, and it was almost similar with control group value. It can be concluded that longer bench time can increase the depth of cure of composite resin.

  20. Direct composite resin layering techniques for creating lifelike CAD/CAM-fabricated composite resin veneers and crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeSage, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Direct composite resin layering techniques preserve sound tooth structure and improve function and esthetics. However, intraoral placement techniques present challenges involving isolation, contamination, individual patient characteristics, and the predictability of restorative outcomes. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) restorations enable dentists to better handle these variables and provide durable restorations in an efficient and timely manner; however, milled restorations may appear monochromatic and lack proper esthetic characteristics. For these reasons, an uncomplicated composite resin layering restoration technique can be used to combine the benefits of minimally invasive direct restorations and the ease and precision of indirect CAD/CAM restorations. Because most dentists are familiar with and skilled at composite resin layering, the use of such a technique can provide predictable and highly esthetic results. This article describes the layered composite resin restoration technique. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of polymerization contraction stress of three composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadenaro, M.; Biasotto, M.; Scuor, N.; Breschi, L.; Davidson, C.L.; Di Lenarda, R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure the development of contraction stress of three composite resin restorative materials during photo-polymerization: a micro-hybrid composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA); a nano-filled composite (Filtek Supreme, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN,

  2. Toothbrushing alters the surface roughness and gloss of composite resin CAD/CAM blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Lauvahutanon, Sasipin; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the surface roughness and gloss of composite resin CAD/CAM blocks after toothbrushing. Five composite resin blocks (Block HC, Cerasmart, Gradia Block, KZR-CAD Hybrid Resin Block, and Lava Ultimate), one hybrid ceramic (Vita Enamic), one feldspar ceramic (Vitablocs Mark II), one PMMA block (Telio CAD), and one conventional composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT) were evaluated. Surface roughness (Ra) and gloss were determined for each group of materials (n=6) after silicon carbide paper (P4000) grinding, 10k, 20k, and 40k toothbrushing cycles. One-way repeated measures ANOVA indicated significant differences in the Ra and gloss of each material except for the Ra of GRA. After 40k toothbrushing cycles, the Ra of BLO and TEL showed significant increases, while CER, KZR, ULT, and Z350 showed significant decreases. GRA, ENA, and VIT maintained their Ra. All of the materials tested, except CER, demonstrated significant decreases in gloss after 40k toothbrushing cycles.

  3. Radiation processed composite materials of wood and elastic polyester resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapolcai, I.; Czvikovszky, T.

    1983-01-01

    The radiation polymerization of multifunctional unsaturated polyester-monomer mixtures in wood forms interpenetrating network system. The mechanical resistance (compression, abrasion, hardness, etc.) of these composite materials are generally well over the original wood, however the impact strength is almost the same or even reduced, in comparison to the wood itself. An attempt is made using elastic polyester resins to produced wood-polyester composite materials with improved modulus of elasticity and impact properties. For the impregnation of European beech wood two types of elastic unsaturated polyester resins were used. The exothermic effect of radiation copolymerization of these resins in wood has been measured and the dose rate effects as well as hardening dose was determined. Felxural strength and impact properties were examined. Elastic unsaturated polyester resins improved the impact strength of wood composite materials. (author)

  4. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bonding of experimental composite resin artificial teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyaga-Rendon, Paola G; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Reza, Fazal

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate how ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation using an ordinary UV sterilizer would affect the bonding of experimental composite resins to an autopolymerizing acrylic resin. To this end, three composite resins and one unfilled resin--of which the compositions were similar to commercial composite resin artificial teeth--were prepared as repair composites. Their shear bond strengths after UV irradiation for one to 60 minutes were significantly greater than those before UV irradiation regardless of composite resin type. Failure mode after UV irradiation for one to 60 minutes was mainly cohesive failure of the composite resins, but that before UV irradiation and after 24 hours' irradiation was mainly adhesive failure. These results thus suggested that a short period of UV irradiation on composite resin teeth would improve the bonding efficacy of composite resin artificial teeth to autopolymerizing resin.

  5. Composition of asphaltenes and resins of west Siberian petroleums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, I.V.; Babicheva, T.A.; Bodak, A.N.; Nemirovskaya, G.B.; Mashigorov, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    ESR and X-ray diffraction analysis was used to examine asphaltene and resin samples of West Siberia. Experiments were carried out to simulate the effect of catagenesis on resin and asphaltene composition. Processes of thermocatalytic transformations of crude oil in the deposit were found to have no marked effect on asphaltene and resin composition. Transformation of the organic input at sedimentation was assumed to be the main factor determining the qualitative and quantitative composition of crude oil resins and asphaltenes of West Siberia. Petroleums formed from organic matter, accumulating under reducing conditions, contain more asphaltenes and resins, they include much tetravalent vanadium and the asphaltenes have abundant paramagnetic centres. Petroleums formed from oxidized organic matter contain very little asphaltene low concentrations of paramagnetic centers, and little tetravalent vanadium. Resins of these petroleums are rich in oxygen. High levels of asphalt-resin matter in petroleums is related to the presence in the initial organic progenitors of polyunsaturated fatty acids and various nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  6. Clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite with and without an intermediate layer of flowable resin composite: a 7-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite.......The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite....

  7. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre surface resin-rich/graphite fibre composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide were fabricated allowing the resin to accumulate at the composite surface. These surface resin-rich composites were then bonded together and tested for lap shear strength both before and after thermal aging. Lap shear strength did not appear to show a significant improvement over that previously recorded for resin-poor samples and was shown to decrease with increasing aging time and temperature.

  8. Antimicrobial and mechanical properties of dental resin composite containing bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Emre; Torlak, Emrah; Altunsoy, Mustafa

    2016-07-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy and mechanical properties of dental resin composites containing different amounts of microparticulate bioactive glass (BAG). Experimental resin composites were prepared by mixing resin matrix (70% BisGMA and 30% TEGDMA) and inorganic filler with various fractions of BAG to achieve final BAG concentrations of 5, 10 and 30 wt%. Antimicrobial efficacy was assessed in aqueous suspension against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans and in biofilm against S. mutans. The effect of incorporation of BAG on the mechanical properties of resin composite was evaluated by measuring the surface roughness, compressive strength and flexural strength. Under the dynamic contact condition, viable counts of E. coli, S. aureus and S. mutans in suspensions were reduced up to 78%, 57% and 50%, respectively, after 90 minutes of exposure to disc-shaped composite specimens, depending on the BAG contents. In 2-day-old S. mutans biofilm, incorporation of BAG into composite at ratios of 10% and 30% resulted in 0.8 and 1.4 log reductions in the viable cell counts compared with the BAG-free composite, respectively. The surface roughness values of composite specimens did not show any significant difference (p>0.05) at any concentration of BAG. However, compressive and flexural strengths of composite were decreased significantly with addition of 30% BAG (p<0.05). The results demonstrated the successful utilization of BAG as a promising biomaterial in resin composites to provide antimicrobial function.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Hybrid CF/MWCNTS/Epoxy Resin Composite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Hany; Guo, Lin; Yue, Yonghai; Chen, Ke; Elsharkawy, Karim

    2017-07-01

    In the present investigation, two methods were used for addition multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) into carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy resin composite system. The mechanical properties of the prepared samples were compared to show the best method for addition of MWCNTS from point of view of mechanical properties. The introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into fiber reinforced polymer composites has been achieved mainly via two routes: mixing CNTs entirely throughout the matrix (matrix modification) or attaching CNTs onto reinforcing fibers (interface modification). In all previous references the addition of CNTs occur through one route from the two routes but in this research, we introduced MWCNTS into CF/epoxy resin composite through the two routes at the same time. Three CF composite samples were prepared CF/epoxy resin composite (C1), CF/1wt% MWCNTS /epoxy resin composite (C2) in which MWCNTS added via one route (epoxy resin system) and the third sample was CF/1wt% MWCNTS / epoxy resin composite (C3) in which MWCNTS added via two routes (epoxy resin and CF fabric). The result shows that the mechanical properties of C3>C2>C1, for example, the flexural strength of C3 higher than C2 by 19% and C2 higher than C1 by 51% respectively. This is because addition MWCNTS via two routes increase the ability of good mixing of CNTS with epoxy resin and good dispersion of CNTs into the CF fabric surface and this leads to improve the interface bonding between the CF and epoxy so improve the mechanical properties.

  10. The interaction between lining materials and composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, G L; Davies, E H; Von Fraunhofer, J A

    1981-03-01

    The effects of four lining materials, Dycal, Procal, Cavitec and Poly F cement on Adaptic and Concise have been investigated in vitro. The parameters studied were surface roughness, hardness and colour both with and without an intermediate (or bonding) resin being present between the restorative material and the liner. The effects of the four liners on the composites varied both between the lining materials themselves and with the composite resin. Two materials, Procal and Dycal, had little interaction with the composites, provided an intermediate resin was used with the latter. Cavitec appeared to have an adverse reaction with the composites and Poly F, whilst having no effect on the colour of the composites, did increase surface roughness. The adverse effects of linig materials were ascribed to minor constituents, particularly methyl salicylate, present in the formulation.

  11. Effects of Excess Cu Addition on Photochromic Properties of AgCl-Urethane Resin Composite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Miyazaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AgCl-resin photochromic composite films were prepared using AgNO3, HCl-EtOH, CuCl2 ethanol solutions, and a urethane resin as starting materials. The AgCl particle size in the composite films, which was confirmed via TEM observations, was 23–43 nm. The AgCl composite films showed photochromic properties: coloring induced by UV-vis irradiation and bleaching induced by cessation of UV-vis irradiation. The coloring and bleaching speed of the composite film increases with increasing CuCl2 mixing ratio.

  12. Novel matrix resins for composites for aircraft primary structures, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Edmund P.; Puckett, P. M.; Maynard, S.; Bishop, M. T.; Bruza, K. J.; Godschalx, J. P.; Mullins, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the contract is the development of matrix resins with improved processability and properties for composites for primarily aircraft structures. To this end, several resins/systems were identified for subsonic and supersonic applications. For subsonic aircraft, a series of epoxy resins suitable for RTM and powder prepreg was shown to give composites with about 40 ksi compressive strength after impact (CAI) and 200 F/wet mechanical performance. For supersonic applications, a thermoplastic toughened cyanate prepreg system has demonstrated excellent resistance to heat aging at 360 F for 4000 hours, 40 ksi CAI and useful mechanical properties at greater than or equal to 310 F. An AB-BCB-maleimide resin was identified as a leading candidate for the HSCT. Composite panels fabricated by RTM show CAI of approximately 50 ksi, 350 F/wet performance and excellent retention of mechanical properties after aging at 400 F for 4000 hours.

  13. Modeling and mechanical performance of carbon nanotube/epoxy resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Vijay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The MWCNT fillers are uniformly dispersed in the epoxy resin, which improved the mechanical properties of epoxy resin. ► Modified Halpin–Tsai model is useful to calculate the Young’s modulus of MWCNT/epoxy resin composite. ► The experimental moduli are within the variation of 27% with the theoretical values. -- Abstract: The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) addition on mechanical properties of epoxy resin was investigated to obtain the tensile strength, compressive strength and Young’s modulus from load versus displacement graphs. The result shows that the tensile strength, compressive strength and Young’s modulus of epoxy resin were increased with the addition of MWCNT fillers. The significant improvements in tensile strength, compressive strength and Young’s modulus were obtained due to the excellent dispersion of MWCNT fillers in the epoxy resin. The dispersion of MWCNT fillers in epoxy resin was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Also, Halpin–Tsai model was modified by considering the average diameter of internal/external of multi-walled nanotube and orientation factor (α) to calculate the Young’s modulus of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/epoxy resin composite. There was a good correlation between the experimentally obtained Young’s modulus and modified Halpin–Tsai model.

  14. Characterization of Bis-Acryl Composite Resins for Provisional Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwantz, Júlia K; Oliveira-Ogliari, Aline; Meereis, Carine T; Leal, Fernanda B; Ogliari, Fabrício A; Moraes, Rafael R

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the in vitro performance of the commercial bis-acryl composite resins Systemp C&B II (SYS, Ivoclar Vivadent), Protemp 4 (PT4, 3M ESPE), Structur 2C (ST2, Voco) and ProviPlast (PVP, Biodinamica). Characterization involved optical (color stability, translucency parameter, fluorescence), surface (roughness, morphology and elemental composition), physical-chemical (viscosity, polymerization kinetics) and mechanical analyses (Poisson ratio, biaxial flexural strength, flexural modulus). Most tests were carried out after 24 h, but optical and mechanical analyses were carried out after storage in water at 37 °C for 1, 15, and 30 days. Data were statistically analyzed (a=0.05). Most results were material dependent. SYS and PT4 showed stability in color and translucency over time. All materials had similar or higher fluorescence than human enamel. SC2 and PVP showed rougher surfaces than the other bis-acryl composites. Smaller filler particles were observed on the surface of PT4 and PVP compared with the coarser particles from ST2 and SYS. Viscosity readings indicated a thixotropic behavior for all tested materials. SYS had the lowest and PT4 the highest degree of C=C conversion after 10 min. In the polymerization kinetics, PT4 had the highest maximum polymerization rate and reached earlier the transition between polymerization autoacceleration and autodeceleration. PT4 and SYS had significantly higher flexural strength and modulus than ST2 and PVP for most storage times. Results for Poisson ratio varied between materials. Longer storage periods were generally associated with higher frequency of catastrophic failures in the flexural tests. In conclusion, the performance of bis-acryl composite resins varied largely among materials.

  15. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  16. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the

  17. Single color attribute index for shade conformity judgment of dental resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Keun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Commercial dental resin composites under the same shade designations show color discrepancies by brand. Moreover, three Commission Internationale de l′Eclairage (CIE color coordinates show significant variations by measurement method; therefore, direct comparisons of the color coordinates based on different methods are meaningless. This study aimed to assess a hypothesis that a new color attribute index (CAI, which could reduce the color coordinate variations by measurement method, was applicable for the shade conformity judgment of dental resin composites. The Hypothesis: CAI is applicable in the shade conformity judgment of commercial dental resin composites. Using the CIE color coordinates of shade guide tabs and resin composites, combined color indices such as Wa = CIE aFNx01 × DEFNx01 ab /C ab FNx01 and Wb = CIE bFNx01 × DEFNx01 ab /C ab FNx01 were defined, in which DEFNx01 ab was the color difference with a standard white tile. Ratio of Wa/Wb to that of an arbitrary reference shade (A2 in the same brand and measurement was defined as the CAI. The CAI values were significantly different by the shade designation and showed a logical trend by the shade designation number. The CAI of commercial resin composites and the keyed shade guide tabs showed overlaps. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The CAI might be used to judge the shade conformity of resin composites using the values based on different measurement methods. The application of the CAI, instead of conventional three-color coordinates, could efficiently simplify the shade conformity judgment of commercial resin composites. Although the hypothesis of the present study was partially confirmed, further studies for the practical application of this index are highly recommended.

  18. Adhesive system affects repair bond strength of resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Irmak, Ozgur; Celiksoz, Ozge; Yilmaz, Begum; Yaman, Batu Can

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed stat...

  19. Synthesis of nanosized barium titanate/epoxy resin composites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anechoic chamber; barium titanate; electromagnetic interference and compatibility; epoxy resin composites; microwave absorbers; radio frequency absorbers. ... The reflection loss (RL) and transmission loss (TL) of the composite materials were measured by the reflection/transmission method using a vector network ...

  20. Direct restoration of severely damaged incisors using short fiber-reinforced composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the static load-bearing capacity and the failure mode of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with complete crowns made of experimental composite resin (FC) with short fiber fillers, with and without root canal posts. Further aim was to evaluate the effect of fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) on the failure mode of the restoration. The experimental composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt.% of short E-glass fibers (3mm in length) and 22.5 wt.% of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) resin with 55 wt.% of silane treated silica fillers. The clinical crowns of 30 human extracted maxillary incisors were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction. Five groups of direct complete crowns were fabricated (n=6); Group A: made from particulate filler composite resin (PFC) (Grandio Caps, VOCO, control), Group B: PFC with fiber post (everStick, StickTeck), Group C: made from PFC with everStick fiber post and FRC-substructure, Group D: made from FC, Group E: made from FC with FRC-substructure. The root canals were prepared and posts were cemented with resin cement (ParaCem Universal). All restored teeth were stored in water at room temperature for 24h before they were statically loaded with speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p=0.05). Failure modes were visually examined. ANOVA revealed that restorations made from experimental fiber composite resin had higher load-bearing capacity (349N) (p0.05). Restorations made from short glass fiber containing composite resin with IPN-polymer matrix showed better load-bearing capacity than those made with either plain PFC or PFC reinforced with fiber post.

  1. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vieira Caixeta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED. Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10 followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa were submitted to Student’s t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x. Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites.

  2. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise™Flow Self-Adhering Flowable Composite, Kerr Dental, USA versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self

  3. Bisphenol A Release: Survey of the Composition of Dental Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Elisabeth; Fron-Chabouis, Hélène; Attal, Jean-Pierre; Raskin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor with potential toxicity. Composite resins may not contain pure BPA, but its derivatives are widely used. Several studies found doses of BPA or its derivatives in saliva or urine of patients after composite resin placement. The aims of this study were to establish an exhaustive list of composite resins marketed in Europe and their composition, and to assess the extent of BPA derivatives used. A research on manufacturers' websites was performed to reference all composite resins marketed in Europe, then their composition was determined from both material safety data sheets and a standardized questionnaire sent to manufacturers. Manufacturers had to indicate whether their product contained the monomers listed, add other monomers if necessary, or indicate "not disclosed". 160 composite resins were identified from 31 manufacturers and 23 manufacturers (74.2%) responded to the survey. From the survey and websites, the composition of 130 composite resins (81.2%) was: 112 (86.2%) based on BPA derivatives, 97 (74.7%) on bis-GMA, 17 (13.1%) without monomer derived from BPA (UDMA, sometimes with TEGDMA) and 6 (4.6%) with UDMA (only); 1 (0.8%) did not contain a BPA derivative or UDMA or TEGDMA. Pure BPA was never reported. This work has established a list of 18 composite resins that contain no BPA derivative. Manufacturers should be required to report the exact composition of their products as it often remains unclear or incomplete.

  4. Mechanical properties of dental resin composites by co-filling diatomite and nanosized silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hua; Zhu Meifang; Li Yaogang; Zhang Qinghong; Wang Hongzhi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical property effects of co-filling dental resin composites with porous diatomite and nanosized silica particles (OX-50). The purification of raw diatomite by acid-leaching was conducted in a hot 5 M HCl solution at 80 deg. C for 12 h. Both diatomite and nanosized SiO 2 were silanized with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The silanized inorganic particles were mixed into a dimethacrylate resin. Purified diatomite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherm. Silanized inorganic particles were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a thermogravimetric analysis. The mechanical properties of the composites were tested by three-point bending, compression and Vicker's microhardness. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show the cross-section morphologies of the composites. Silanization of diatomite and nanosized silica positively reinforced interactions between the resin matrix and the inorganic particles. The mechanical properties of the resin composites gradually increased with the addition of modified diatomite (m-diatomite). The fracture surfaces of the composites exhibited large fracture steps with the addition of m-diatomite. However, when the mass fraction of m-diatomite was greater than 21 wt.% with respect to modified nanosized silica (mOX-50) and constituted 70% of the resin composite by weight, the mechanical properties of the resin composites started to decline. Thus, the porous structure of diatomite appears to be a crucial factor to improve mechanical properties of resin composites.

  5. Preparation and properties studies of UV-curable silicone modified epoxy resin composite system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhouhui; Cui, Aiyong; Zhao, Peizhong; Wei, Huakai; Hu, Fangyou

    2018-01-01

    Modified epoxy suitable for ultraviolet (UV) curing is prepared by using organic silicon toughening. The curing kinetics of the composite are studied by dielectric analysis (DEA), and the two-phase compatibility of the composite is studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The tensile properties, heat resistance, and humidity resistance of the cured product are explored by changing the composition ratio of the silicone and the epoxy resin. SEM of silicone/epoxy resin shows that the degree of cross-linking of the composites decreases with an increase of silicone resin content. Differential thermal analysis indicates that the glass transition temperature and the thermal stability of the composites decrease gradually with an increase of silicone resin content. The thermal degradation rate in the high temperature region, however, first decreases and then increases. In general, after adding just 10%-15% of the silicone resin and exposing to light for 15 min, the composite can still achieve a better curing effect. Under such conditions, the heat resistance of the cured product decreases a little. The tensile strength is kept constant so that elongation at breakage is apparently improved. The change rate after immersion in distilled water at 60°C for seven days is small, which shows excellent humidity resistance.

  6. Color stability of visible light cured composite resin after soft drink immersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizatul Khairani Hasan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Composite resin is a tooth-colored filling material containing Bis-GMA which exhibits water sorption properties. People tend to consume soft drink with various colors. Water sorption properties can alter the color stability of composite resin purpose. Purpose: This study was to determine the influence of immersion durations of composite resin in soft drink on color stability. Methods: The visible-light cured hybrid composite resin and soft drink were used. Ten disk specimens (2.5 mm thickness and 15 mm diameter of composite resin were prepared and light cured for 20 seconds, then stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37° C. The initial color of specimens were measured by Chromameter. After that, each specimen was immersed in 30 ml of soft drink up to 48, 72, and 96 hours at 37° C. The specimens’ color were measured again after each immersion. The color changes were calculated by CIE L*a*b* system formula. The data was analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and LSD (α = 0.05. Result: The ANOVA showed that the immersion durations of composite resin in soft drinks had significant influence on the color stability (p < 0.05. The LSD0.05 tests showed significant differences among all groups. The least color change was detected from the group of 48 hours immersion, while the greatest color change was from the group of 96 hours immersion. Conclusions: The immersion of composite resin in soft drinks influenced the color stability (began after 48 hours immersion.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, Andréa Cândido; de Castro, Denise Tornavoi; Schiavon, Marco Antônio; da Silva, Leandro Jardel; Agnelli, José Augusto Marcondes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of accelerated artificial aging (AAA) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, 4 Seasons, Herculite, P60, Tetric Ceram, Charisma and Filtek Z100. composite resins. The composites were characterized by Fourier-transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal analyses (Differential Scanning Calorimetry - DSC and Thermogravimetry - TG). The microstructure of the materials was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Surface hardness and compressive strength data of the resins were recorded and the mean values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The results showed significant differences among the commercial brands for surface hardness (F=86.74, pcomposite resins. FTIR, DSC and TG analyses showed that resin polymerization was complete, and there were no differences between the spectra and thermal curve profiles of the materials obtained before and after AAA. TG confirmed the absence of volatile compounds and evidenced good thermal stability up to 200 °C, and similar amounts of residues were found in all resins evaluated before and after AAA. The AAA treatment did not significantly affect resin surface. Therefore, regardless of the resin brand, AAA did not influence the microstructure or the mechanical properties.

  8. A Randomized 10-year Prospective Follow-up of Class II Nanohybrid and Conventional Hybrid Resin Composite Restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan Wv; Pallesen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the 10-year durability of a nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations in a randomized controlled intraindividual comparison with its conventional hybrid resin composite predecessor. Materials and Methods: Each of 52 participants received at least two Class II...... restorations that were as similar as possible. The cavities were chosen at random to be restored with a nanohybrid resin composite (Excite/Tetric EvoCeram (TEC); n = 61) and a conventional hybrid (Excite/Tetric Ceram (TC); n = 61). The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS criteria...... investigated resin composites. Conclusion: The nanohybrid and the conventional hybrid resin composite showed good clinical effectiveness in extensive Class II restorations during the 10-year study....

  9. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira; Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I.; Domb, Abraham J.

    2010-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  10. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel); Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry (Israel); Domb, Abraham J., E-mail: avid@ekmd.huji.ac.i [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel)

    2010-02-15

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  11. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  12. Improvement in char formability of phenolic resin for development of Carbon/Carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajhosseini, M.; Payami, A.; Ghaffarian, S. R.; Rezadoust, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In the processing of carbon/carbon composites using polymer resin as the matrix precursor, it is inevitable that a porous structure was formed after carbonization. As a result, densification by liquid phase impregnation followed by recarbonization is required to obtain a densified composite. Consequently, the char formability of resin is an important factor in reducing the number of densification cycles and hence the processing cost. In this study, a novel approach is adopted to improve the densification of carbon/carbon composites by using a new phenolic resin modified by pitch. For this purpose, soluble part of pitch was extracted and dispersed in resol type phenolic resin. The polymerization reaction was performed in presence of para-formaldehyde and a resol-pitch compound was obtained. The second compound was prepared by mixing novolac-furfural in 55:45 weight ratio containing 9% by weight hexamethylene tetramine. This compound was added to resol-pitch compound in 10,20,50 and 80 w %. The microstructure of carbonized resin was investigated by X-ray diffraction and char yield, and the linear and volumetric shrinkage were obtained. Results show that in 80:20 ratio of resol-pitch to novolac-furfural , the char yield would be maximized by 71% and volumetric shrinkage would be minimized at 16.4%. At the same time, XRD results indicate that the resin has a strong ability to graphitize carbon/carbon composites matrix as a necessary step for its processing

  13. Preparation and Electrochemical Properties of Graphene/Epoxy Resin Composite Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zijun; Zhang, Tianchi; Qiao, Sen; Zhang, Luyihang

    2017-11-01

    The multilayer graphene powder as filler, epoxy modified silicone resin as film-forming agent, anticorrosion composite coating has been created using sand dispersion method, the electrochemical performance was compared with different content of graphene composite coating and pure epoxy resin coating. The open circuit potential (OCP), potentiodynamic polarization curves (Tafel Plot) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were tested. The test results showed that the anti-corrosion performance of multilayer graphene added has improved greatly, and the content of the 5% best corrosion performance of graphene composite coating.

  14. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of the steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise-Flow versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and  bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise

  15. Class II composite resin restorations: faster, easier, predictable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R D

    2016-11-18

    Composite resin continues to displace amalgam as the preferred direct restorative material in developed countries. Even though composite materials have evolved to include nanoparticles with high physical properties and low shrinkage stress, dentists have been challenged to efficiently create quality, long lasting, predictable restorations. Unlike amalgam, composite resin cannot be condensed making the establishment of a predictable, proper contact more difficult. In addition, composite requires an understanding of adhesives and an appreciation for their exacting application. These facts combined with the precise adaptation and light-curing of multiple layers makes placement of quality Class II composite restorations tedious and time-consuming. For private practicing dentists, it can also have an effect on economic productivity. Clinicians have always wanted an easier, efficient placement technique for posterior composite restorations that rivals that for amalgam. It appears that advances in instrumentation, materials and technology have finally delivered it.

  16. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    : four seconds in circular motion). After conditioning protocols, the repair resin was adhered to the substrate surfaces using transparent polyethylene molds (diameter: 3.6 mm) incrementally and photo-polymerized. The substrate-adherend combinations were as follows: AS-AS, G-G, AS-G. Shear force was applied to the adhesive interface in a Universal Testing Machine (crosshead speed: 1 mm/min). The types of failures were further evaluated and categorized as follows: 1) cohesive in the composite substrate and 2) adhesive at the interface. Bond strength values (MPa) were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and least significant difference post hoc tests (α=0.05). Significant effects of the adhesion strategy (p=0.006) and the composite type (p=0.000) were found. Interaction terms were not significant (p=0.292). Regardless of the substrate-adherend combination, protocol 1 (17-22 MPa) showed significantly higher results than did protocols 2 (15-17 MPa) and 3 (11-17 MPa) (p=0.028, p=0.002, respectively). The highest results were obtained from the G-G combination after all three protocols (17-22 MPa). The incidence of cohesive failures was more common when the substrate and the adherend were the same composite type (AS-AS: 87.5%, 87.5%, 75%; G-G: 100%, 75%, 50% for protocols 1, 2, and 3, respectively). When substrate and adherend were used interchangeably, adhesive failures were more frequent (25%, 50%, and 100% for protocol 1, 2, and 3, respectively). When the substrate and the adherend are of the same type, greater repair strength could be expected. In the repair of composites next to the dentin, depending on the composite type, conditioning the composite with silica coating and silanization after etching the dentin adds to the repair strength compared to the results obtained with silane application only.

  17. Fracture strength testing of crowns made of CAD/CAM composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ryota; Asakura, Masaki; Ando, Akihiro; Kumano, Hirokazu; Ban, Seiji; Kawai, Tatsushi; Takebe, Jun

    2018-03-28

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) composite resin crowns have sufficient strength to withstand the bite force of the molar teeth. The null hypothesis was that the fracture strength of CAD/CAM composite resin crowns is lower than the average maximum bite force of the molar tooth. The crowns, which shape is the right maxillary first molar, were fabricated using four CAD/CAM blanks made of composite resins (Block HC: HC, KZR-CAD HR: HR, KZR-CAD HR2: HR2, Avencia Block: AVE) and one CAD/CAM blank made of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max CAD: IPS), which was used as a control. Fracture strength of fabricated crowns bonded to metal abutment and biaxial flexural strength of the materials were evaluated. The results of fracture strength test and biaxial flexural strength test showed different tendencies. The fracture strength of CAD/CAM composite resin crowns except HC ranged from 3.3kN to 3.9kN, and was similar to that of IPS (3.3kN). In contrast, biaxial flexural strength of CAD/CAM composite resins ranged from 175MPa to 247MPa, and was significantly lower than that of IPS (360MPa). All CAD/CAM composite resin crowns studied presented about 3-4 times higher fracture strength than the average maximum bite force of the molar tooth (700-900N), which result leads to the conclusion that CAD/CAM composite resin crowns would have sufficient strength to withstand the bite force of the molar teeth. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultraviolet light and ultraviolet light-activated composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, G.A.; Yates, J.L.; Newman, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a comparison of the UV light--activated composite resins, Estilux was polymerized to a significantly greater depth than the other composite resins. In general, Lee-fill polymerized the least. When comparing the UV light sources, the Lee light and the Duralux light did not significantly differ from each other, but both polymerized the materials tested to a significantly greater depth than the other light sources. Of the two time exposures, 60-second exposure provided a significantly greater depth of polymerization than 20 seconds for each light with each material

  19. Graphene Oxide and Thermally Exfoliated Graphene Cyanate Ester Resin Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    arranged in a honey -comb lattice, its high surface to volume ratio allows property improvements at lower weight fractions than other composite fillers...Resin Composites 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Josiah T. Reams, Kevin R. Lamison...materials for space and propulsion applications have brought attention to the need for high temperature composite materials with improved stiffness

  20. Cytotoxicity Evaluation of Two Bis-Acryl Composite Resins Using Human Gingival Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Fabiano Palmeira; Alves, Gutemberg; Guimarães, Vladi Oliveira; Gallito, Marco Antônio; Oliveira, Felipe; Scelza, Míriam Zaccaro

    2016-01-01

    Bis-acryl resins are used for temporary dental restorations and have shown advantages over other materials. The aim of this work was to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity of two bis-acryl composite resins (Protemp 4 and Luxatemp Star), obtained at 1, 7 and 40 days after mixing the resin components, using a standardized assay employing human primary cells closely related to oral tissues. Human gingival fibroblast cell cultures were exposed for 24 h to either bis-acryl composite resins, polystyrene beads (negative control) and latex (positive control) extracts obtained after incubation by the different periods, at 37 °C under 5% CO2. Cell viability was evaluated using a multiparametric procedure involving sequential assessment (using the same cells) of mitochondrial activity (XTT assay), membrane integrity (neutral red test) and total cell density (crystal violet dye exclusion test). The cells exposed to the resin extracts showed cell viability indexes exceeding 75% after 24 h. Even when cells were exposed to extracts prepared with longer conditioning times, the bis-acryl composite resins showed no significant cytotoxic effects (p>0.05), compared to the control group or in relation to the first 24 h of contact with the products. There were no differences among the results obtained for the bis-acryl composite resins evaluated 24 h, 7 days and 40 days after mixing. It may be concluded that the bis-acryl resins Protemp 4 and Luxatemp Star were cytocompatible with human gingival fibroblasts, suggesting that both materials are suitable for use in contact with human tissues.

  1. Analysis of the microstructure and mechanical performance of composite resins after accelerated artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira Daltoé, M; Lepri, C Penazzo; Wiezel, J Guilherme G; Tornavoi, D Cremonezzi; Agnelli, J A Marcondes; Reis, A Cândido Dos

    2013-03-01

    Researches that assess the behavior of dental materials are important for scientific and industrial development especially when they are tested under conditions that simulate the oral environment, so this work analyzed the compressive strength and microstructure of three composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging (AAA). Three composites resins of 3M (P90, P60 and Z100) were analyzed and were obtained 16 specimens for each type (N.=48). Half of each type were subjected to UV-C system AAA and then were analyzed the surfaces of three aged specimens and three not aged of each type through the scanning electron microscope (SEM). After, eight specimens of each resin, aged and not aged, were subjected to compression test. After statistical analysis of compressive strength values, it was found that there was difference between groups (α resin specimens aged P60 presented lower values of compressive strength statistically significant when compared to the not subject to the AAA. For the other composite resins, there was no difference, regardless of aging, a fact confirmed by SEM. The results showed that the AAA influenced the compressive strength of the resin aged P60; confirmed by surface analysis by SEM, which showed greater structural disarrangement on surface material.

  2. Tensile bond strength of an aged resin composite repaired with different protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Esra Uzer; Ergücü, Zeynep; Türkün, L Sebnem; Ercan, Utku Kürșat

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments and bonding procedures on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin composites repaired 6 months after polymerization. Resin composite sticks were aged in distilled water at 37°C for 6 months. They were divided into 12 groups (n = 10) according to the combination of surface treatment/bonding procedures [none, only bur treatment, XP Bond (XPB/Dentsply/DeTrey) with/without bur, AdheSE (A-SE/Ivoclar/Vivadent) with/without bur, Composite Primer (CP/GC) with/without bur, CP after bur and acid-etching, XPB after acid etching and CP with bur, A-SE after bur and CP]. The ultimate tensile bond strength (UTS) of the resin composites was tested in intact but aged specimens. Tensile bond strengths were tested with a universal testing machine (Shimadzu). Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan Multiple Comparisons tests (p < 0.05). All repaired groups showed significantly higher TBS than the group without any sureface treatment (p < 0.05). Four groups resulted in TBS similar to those of intact resin composite UTS: A-SE, A-SE with bur, A-SE after CP with bur, and XPB after acid etching+CP with bur. Bur treatment, silane primer or etch-and-rinse adhesive application alone were not successful in the repair process of aged resin composite, whereas self-etching adhesive alone showed similar performance to the intact specimens. Combined procedures generally showed better performance: A-SE with bur, A-SE after CP with bur, and XPB after acid etching +CP with bur showed TBS similar to those of the intact specimens. It was concluded that bur roughening of the surfaces and rebonding procedures were essential for repairing aged resin composites.

  3. Effect of resin cements and aging on cuspal deflection and fracture resistance of teeth restored with composite resin inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaverry, Aurélio; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Burnett Júnior, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of resin cements and aging on cuspal deflection, fracture resistance, and mode of failure of endodontically treated teeth restored with composite resin inlays. Seventy-two maxillary premolars were divided into 6 groups: 1: sound teeth as control (C); 2: preparations without restoration (WR); 3: inlays luted with RelyX ARC (ARC); 4: inlays luted with RelyX Unicem (RLXU); 5: inlays luted with Maxcem Elite (MCE); 6: inlays luted with SeT (ST). Groups 2 to 6 received mesio-occlusal-distal preparations and endodontic treatment. Stone casts were made for groups 3 to 6. Composite resin inlays were built over each cast and luted with the resin cements. A 200-N load was applied on the occlusal aspect and the cuspal deflection was measured using a micrometer before and after 500,000 cycles of fatigue loading (200 N; 500,000 cycles). The specimens were then submitted to an axial load until failure. The median cuspal deflection (µm) and median fracture resistance (N) were calculated and statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (p inlays luted with RelyX ARC maintained cuspal deflection stability and showed higher fracture resistance of the teeth than did inlays luted with the other cements tested.

  4. Trifunctional Epoxy Resin Composites Modified by Soluble Electrospun Veils: Effect on the Viscoelastic and Morphological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Ognibene

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun veils from copolyethersulfones (coPES were prepared as soluble interlaminar veils for carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Neat, resin samples were impregnated into coPES veils with unmodified resin, while dry carbon fabrics were covered with electrospun veils and then infused with the unmodified epoxy resin to prepare reinforced laminates. The thermoplastic content varied from 10 wt% to 20 wt%. TGAP epoxy monomer showed improved and fast dissolution for all the temperatures tested. The unreinforced samples were cured first at 180 °C for 2 h and then were post-cured at 220 °C for 3 h. These sample showed a high dependence on the curing cycle. Carbon reinforced samples showed significant differences compared to the neat resin samples in terms of both viscoelastic and morphological properties.

  5. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susila Anand, V. [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College, Saveetha University, Chennai 600077 (India); Balasubramanian, Venkatesh, E-mail: chanakya@iitm.ac.in [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm{sup 2} with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal

  6. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susila Anand, V.; Balasubramanian, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm 2 with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal–Wallis, Mann

  7. Interactions of self-etch adhesives with resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Rie; Finger, Werner J; Hoffmann, Marcus; Endo, Tatsuo; Kanehira, Masafumi; Komatsu, Masashi; Manabe, Atsufumi

    2007-12-01

    Aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the correlation of shear bond strength and marginal cavity adaptation, together with polymerization shrinkage and contraction stress, using the combination of four self-etch adhesives and three resin composites. Interactions were studied between one two-step and three one-step adhesives, and the hybrid-type resin composites, Beautifil (BEU, Shofu) and Venus (VEN, Heraeus), and an experimental nano-hybrid resin composite NEUN (NEU, Heraeus). For all 12 combinations shear bond strengths (SBS) were determined on human dentin. Marginal adaptation (MGW) was assessed in cylindrical butt-joint dentin cavities. Further, polymerization contraction and contraction stress of the resin restoratives were measured. Significant determinants of SBSs on dentin were time of testing (10min or 24h) and adhesives (presin composite used was a highly significant determinant of cavity adaptation. Polymerization shrinkage after 5min was 2.58, 2.74, and 1.53% for BEU, VEN, and NEU, respectively. Polymerization contraction stresses were largest for BEU, less for VEN, and smallest for NEU (presin composites were identified as important determinants of marginal cavity adaptation.

  8. Effect of Ingested Liquids on Color Change of Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek Afzali, Beheshteh; Ghasemi, Amir; Mirani, Asrin; Abdolazimi, Zahra; Akbarzade Baghban, Alireza; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-08-01

    Color change of composite restorations is well known to dentists. However, the effect of commonly consumed drinks on discoloration of composite resins has yet to be determined. This study sought to assess the color change of a nanofilled (Premise) and a flowable composite resin (Premise flowable) following simulated consumption of tea, cola, iron drops and multivitamin syrup. Forty disk-shaped specimens (7 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were fabricated from each composite resin. The baseline color values were measured according to the CIE L*a*b* system using digital imaging. The specimens of each restorative material were randomly divided into five groups (eight each) according to the storage media namely tea, cola, iron drops, multivitamin syrup or distilled water (control). The specimens were immersed in staining solutions for three hours daily over a 40-day test period. Following this, the color change values (ΔE*) were calculated. For statistical analyses, the color differences were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (Pcomposite resins (P>0.05). In both composite materials, the difference among the solutions was not significant (P>0.05). Under the tested experimental conditions, both restorative materials were susceptible to discoloration by all four staining solutions. The color change values were not related to the solution or the type of material used.

  9. Rheological properties of flowable resin composites and pit and fissure sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beun, Sébastien; Bailly, Christian; Devaux, Jacques; Leloup, Gaëtane

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the viscoelastic properties of commercially available flowable resin composites and resin-based pit and fissure sealants. The weight percentage of filler particles and the morphology of the filler particles were also investigated. Eight flowable resin composites (Admira Flow, Filtek Flow, FlowLine, Grandio Flow, Point-4 Flowable, Revolution Formula 2, Tetric Flow and X-Flow) and four pit and fissure sealants (Clinpro, Delton FS+, Estiseal F and Guardian Seal) were tested. Rheological measurements were performed using a dynamic oscillation rheometer. The filler weight content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the morphology of the particles was investigated by scanning-electron microscopy (SEM). Flowable resin composites are non-Newtonian, shear-thinning materials. As the shear rate increased, the complex viscosity decreased drastically. They all showed elasticity even at the lowest frequencies. They also all showed thixotropy. Pit and fissure sealants are non-Newtonian, very low-viscosity fluids. No correlation was found between the rheological properties and the filler weight content or the particles' shape. Huge differences are observed in the viscosity and flow characteristics of flowable resin composites that can have a potential influence on their clinical behavior during handling and thus on their clinical indications. Pit and fissure sealants show very different rheological properties from one another.

  10. Are resin composites suitable replacements for amalgam? A study of two-body wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridou, Dimitra; Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Wear resistance is an important property of the dental materials, particularly for large restorations in the posterior regions and for the patients suffering from parafunctional activities. Additionally, the wear resistance of flowable composite resin materials is a clinical concern, although they are popular among dentists because of their easy handling. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the wear resistance of nine composite resins both condensable (G-aenial posterior, Venus, GrandioSO, Tetric EvoCeram, Ceram X duo, Filtek Supreme XTE) and new-generation flowable resin composites (G-aenial Universal Flo, GrandioSO Flow and GrandioSO Heavy Flow) and to compare these results with amalgam. Eight specimens of each material were subjected to two-body wear tests, using a chewing simulator. The wear region of each material was examined under profilometer, measuring the vertical loss (μm) and the volume loss (mm(3)) of the materials. Additionally, SEM analysis was performed to assess surfaces irregularities. The results showed significant difference of the vertical loss and the volume loss of the examined materials (p amalgam had the best wear resistance, two condensable resin composites (GrandioSO, Ceram X duo) and all flowable materials had no significant difference with amalgam. GrandioSO had the highest wear resistance and Filtek Supreme XTE the lowest wear resistance. The majority of resin composites had good wear resistance and similar to amalgam. Based on the in vitro measurements of two-body wear resistance, the new resin composites could replace amalgam for restorations placed in occlusal stress-bearing regions. New-generation flowable resin materials may also be used in occlusal contact restorations.

  11. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Porcelain Using Different Bonding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yassini

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Ceramics as in ceramo-metallic and all ceramic tooth restorations have grown popular owing to their high tissue compatibility and esthetic advantages. Such restorations have the capability to deliver valuable services over a long period of time; however, failures under intraoral conditions are not unanticipated.Purpose: The purpose of this in-vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of composite resin to porcelain using different bonding system materials.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study forty porcelain blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four equal groups. The porcelain surfaces were then etched with HF for 2 minutes, washed with water for 2 minutes and treated with a silane layer. The silane treated porcelain surfaces were left for one minute and then the specimens were bonded to composite resin as follow:Group 1 (control group, hybrid composite Z100 was applied and light cured from four directions for 20 seconds. Group 2, flowable composite was applied and light cured for 20 seconds. Group 3, unfilled resin was used and photo cured for 20 seconds. Group 4,(Dentin bonding agent adhesive resin was used followed by 20 seconds photo curing.Hybrid composite resin Z100 was subsequently applied on all porcelain surfaces of groups 2, 3 and 4, and light cured for 20 seconds from four directions. Specimens were then subjected to thermocycling 1000 times. Shear bond strength was determined by a Universal testing machine. The data obtained was subjected to a one-way ANOVA test.Results: The results indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between adhesive group and the other three groups of hybrid, flowable and unfilled resin (P<0.05.Conclusion: The results from this study showed that the shear bond strength of composite resin to porcelain was significantly higher for porcelain bonded surfaces using a dentin bonding agent than that of other materials tested.

  12. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  13. Polymerization shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements - What do we need to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos José; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Rodrigues, Monise de Paula; Vilela, Andomar Bruno Fernandes; Pfeifer, Carmem Silvia; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2017-08-28

    Polymerization shrinkage stress of resin-based materials have been related to several unwanted clinical consequences, such as enamel crack propagation, cusp deflection, marginal and internal gaps, and decreased bond strength. Despite the absence of strong evidence relating polymerization shrinkage to secondary caries or fracture of posterior teeth, shrinkage stress has been associated with post-operative sensitivity and marginal stain. The latter is often erroneously used as a criterion for replacement of composite restorations. Therefore, an indirect correlation can emerge between shrinkage stress and the longevity of composite restorations or resin-bonded ceramic restorations. The relationship between shrinkage and stress can be best studied in laboratory experiments and a combination of various methodologies. The objective of this review article is to discuss the concept and consequences of polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements. Literature relating to polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress generation, research methodologies, and contributing factors are selected and reviewed. Clinical techniques that could reduce shrinkage stress and new developments on low-shrink dental materials are also discussed.

  14. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (Presin composite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations.

  15. Flexural properties of experimental nanofiber reinforced composite are affected by resin composition and nanofiber/resin ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotti, Hugo A; Manso, Adriana P; Leung, Victor; do Valle, Accácio L; Ko, Frank; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of different resin blends concentrations and nanofibers mass ratio on flexural properties of experimental Poliacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers reinforced composites. Poliacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers mats were produced by electrospinning and characterized by tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental resin-fiber composite beams were manufactured by infiltrating PAN nanofiber mats with varied concentrations of BisGMA-TEGDMA resin blends (BisGMA/TEGDMA: 30/70, 50/50 and 70/30weight%). The mass ratio of fiber to resin varied from 0% to 8%. Beams were cured and stored in water at 37°C. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM) and work of fracture (WF) were evaluated by three-point bending test after 24h storage. The tensile properties of the PAN nanofibers indicated an anisotropic behavior being always higher when tested in a direction perpendicular to the rotation of the collector drum. Except for WF, the other flexural properties (FS and FM) were always higher as the ratio of BisGMA to TEGDMA increased in the neat resin beams. The addition of different ratios of PAN fibers did not affect FS and FM of the composite beams as compared to neat resin beams (p>0.05). However, the addition of fibers significantly increased the WF of the composite beams, and this was more evident for the blends with higher TEGDMA ratios (presin blends did not negatively affect the properties of the composite and resulted in an increase in toughness that is a desirable property for a candidate material for prosthodontics application. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Composite Resin – A Versatile Restorative Tool | Koleoso | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the use of composite resin restorations as a treatment option in several situations where conventional aesthetic restorations such as porcelain veneers, crowns and cream-metal crown could otherwise be placed. Methods and Materials: Patients who presented with restoration aesthetic challenges over a six months period ...

  17. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  18. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  19. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and

  20. Repair of Defective Composite Resin Restoration: Current Trend ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Repair of defective composite resins restorations is being increasingly recognized as a viable alternative to replacement. there is however no consensus yet on the treatment protocol. Objective: To determine the views and practice of specialists in Conservative Dentistry in Nigeria as regard to repair procedure ...

  1. Fracture strength of cusp replacing resin composite restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuys, R.H.; Fennis, W.M.M.; Kreulen, C.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Burgersdijk, R.C.W.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the influence of an additional shoulder preparation on the fracture strength of a cusp-replacing direct resin composite restoration in a premolar that previously had an amalgam MOD restoration followed by fracture of a cusp. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two preparation designs were

  2. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  3. Chemical composition and palaeobotanical origin of Miocene resins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The terpenoid composition of resins from the Miocene lignite horizons from the Kerala –Konkan Coast,western India was analyzed by Curie-point pyrolysis –gas chromatography –mass spectrometry (Cupy –GC –MS).The major pyrolysates were cadalene-based bicyclic sesquiterpenoids including some C30-C31 ...

  4. Chemical composition and palaeobotanical origin of Miocene resins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The terpenoid composition of resins from the Miocene lignite horizons from the Kerala –Konkan Coast,western India was analyzed by Curie-point pyrolysis –gas ... These sesquiterpenoids which are commonly detected in many SE Asian crude oils may be utilised as useful biomarkers for petroleum exploration in the ...

  5. Degradation of dental resin composites during intra-oral wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yulianto, Heribertus Dedy Kusuma

    2017-01-01

    Dental resin composites have become an integral part of modern dentistry and used worldwide to restore missing tooth structures, to modify tooth color and anatomical contour, and to enhance aesthetics and function. The dentist should be aware that, the aggressive complexity of the oral environment

  6. New acrylic resin composite with improved thermal diffusivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messersmith, P B; Obrez, A; Lindberg, S

    1998-03-01

    Studies have shown that physical characteristics of denture base materials may affect patient acceptance of denture prostheses by altering sensory experience of food during mastication. Thermal diffusivity is one material property that has been cited as being important in determining gustatory response, with denture base acrylic resins having low thermal diffusivity compared with denture base metal alloys. This study prepared and characterized experimental acrylic resin composite material with increased thermal diffusivity. Sapphire (Al2O3) whiskers were added to conventional denture base acrylic resin during processing to achieve loadings of 9.35% and 15% by volume. Cylindrical test specimens containing an embedded thermocouple were used to determine thermal diffusivity over a physiologic temperature range (0 degree to 70 degrees C). Thermal diffusivities of the sapphire containing composites were found to be significantly higher than the unmodified acrylic resin. Thermal diffusivity was found to increase in proportion to the volume percentage of sapphire filler, which suggested that the high aspect ratio ceramic particles formed a pathway for heat conduction through the insulating polymer matrix. The thermal diffusivity of denture base acrylic resin was increased by the addition of thermally conducting sapphire whiskers.

  7. Comparative evaluation of mechanical characteristics of nanofiller containing resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidekazu; Finger, Werner J; Endo, Tatsuo; Kanehira, Masafumi; Koottathape, Natthavoot; Komatsu, Masashi; Balkenhol, Markus

    2011-10-01

    To determine basic mechanical characteristics of six commercially available nanofiller containing resin composites compared to a microhybrid and a microfilled reference material. The tested hypothesis was that there are no differences in mechanical properties between the materials. Durafill VS (DUR) and Filtek Z250 (Z250) were used as microfilled and microhybrid references. The nanofiller containing products were: Filtek Supreme XT (FIL), Grandio (GRA), Kalore (KAL), MI Flow (MIF), Tetric EvoCeram (TET), and Venus Diamond (VED). The following material characteristics were determined after 24 hours water storage (n = 6): Flexural strength and modulus (FM), yield stress (0.02%), tensile strength and modulus (TM), diametral tensile strength, Knoop hardness (KHN), and fracture toughness (KIC). The microfilled composite DUR consistently showed the lowest values for each property investigated. The group of nanofiller containing products could be subdivided into two groups: the nanohybrid products GRA and VED and the nanofilled FIL with higher values, on the one hand, and the flowable MIF, and the prepolymer containing composites KAL and TET, on the other. The mechanical performance of the microhybrid reference material Z250 was overall slightly better or in line with the nanohybrid and nanofilled materials. Stringent linear relationships were found between KHN and the moduli FM and TM, respectively (r > 0.95). Linear relations between the other materialvalues investigated were moderate to high.

  8. Color and Gloss of Nano-Filled Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers and Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Marc; Lawson, Nathaniel C; Rupal, Manpreet; Beck, Preston; Burgess, John O

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to compare in vitro stain resistance, color stability, gloss, and gloss retention of a nano-filled resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs) to a traditional RMGI and resin-based composites (RBCs). Specimens (N = 20) were fabricated from a nano-filled RBC (Filtek Supreme Plus, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), a nanohybrid RBC (Clearfil Majesty Esthetic, Kuraray; Tokyo, Japan), a nano-filled RMGI (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), and traditional RMGI (Fuji II LC, GC America, Chicago, IL, USA). L*a*b* values were recorded with a spectrophotometer, and gloss was measured with a glossmeter. For each material, 10 specimens were stored in distilled water in darkness for 1 week and 10 specimens were placed in a staining solution for 1 week. After storage, specimens were cleaned and L*a*b* and gloss measurements were remeasured. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey analyses. Regarding color change, materials ranked: Ketac = Fuji > Filtek > Clearfil in water, and Ketac > Fuji > Filtek > Clearfil in staining solution. Prior to storage, the initial gloss of the materials ranked: Filtek ≥ Clearfil ≥ Ketac > Fuji. After storage, the materials ranked: Filtek = Clearfil > Ketac > Fuji in water, and Filtek > Clearfil > Ketac > Fuji in staining solution. Gloss retention was similar for all materials in water and gloss retention ranked: Filtek = Clearfil > Ketac = Fuji in staining solution. The nano-RMGI showed less stain resistance but higher gloss than the traditional RMGI. Both RMGIs had more color change, less stain resistance, lower gloss and less gloss retention than the RBCs. The clinician should be aware that the use of a nano-RMGI may improve the gloss of an RMGI restoration; however, color change will likely occur, particularly if the patient consumes a staining diet. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. In vitro fracture resistance of composite-resin-veneered zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peampring, Chaimongkon; Aksornmuang, Juthatip; Sanohkan, Sasiwimol

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the fracture load to failure and damage mode of the composite resin-veneered zirconia crowns preparing with two different zirconia surface treatments compared conventional porcelain-veneered zirconia crowns. Metallic molar-shape dies prepared with 10° convergence angle a 1.5 mm deep chamfer finish line were used. Two groups of composite-resin-veneered zirconia crowns were prepared using different surface treatment (Group A - sandblasting and Group B - glaze-on technique). Group C (conventional porcelain-veneered zirconia crowns) was served as control. Load to failure test was performed to evaluate the fracture resistance of the crowns using a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the differences of mean values ( P zirconia coping exposed. Group B and C showed significant higher load to failure than Group A. Four specimens of Group A revealed the delamination of composite resin veneering.

  10. A randomized controlled 27 years follow up of three resin composites in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the durability of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations during 27 years. Methods: Thirty participants, 25 female and 5 male (mean age 38.2 years, range 25–63), received at least three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate...... size. The three cavities were chosen at random to be restored with a chemical-cured (Clearfil Posterior) and two visible light-cured resin composites (Adaptic II, Occlusin). A chemical-cured enamel bonding agent (Clearfil New Bond) was applied after Ca(OH)2 covering of dentin and enamel etch. Marginal......: Class II restorations of the three conventional resin composites showed an acceptable success rate during the 27 year evaluation....

  11. Microleakage of four composite resin systems in class II restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, A; Osman, Y I; Al-Omari, T

    2009-11-01

    To compare the microleakage at the enamel and dentine/cementum margins of three nanocomposites and a microhybrid composite in Class II restorations. Four light-cured dental resin restorative materials in combination with their respective bonding agents were investigated. Eighty non-carious, extracted human molars were divided into 4 groups of 20 teeth each. The apices of the teeth were sealed with a resin modified glass ionomer cement. Standardized Class II slot cavities were prepared on the proximal surfaces of each tooth. Each group had an equal number of cavities with gingival margins on enamel and on dentine/cementum. Restorations were placed as indicated: Group 1 (G1): Ceram-X mono/Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply), G2: Premise/ OptiBond Solo Plus (Kerr), G3: Grandio/Admira Bond (VOCO), G4: Z100/Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (3M ESPE). After thermocycling and immersion in 0.5% methylene blue dye solution, the teeth were sectioned and dye penetration was scored on a scale of 0 to 3 on both the enamel and dentine/cementum margins. The data were analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis one way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test of ranks (significance at p Grandio/Admira Bond showed significantly lower microleakage when compared to the other materials tested while Z100/Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose showed the largest microleakage (p Grandio/Admira Bond showing the least microleakage when compared to the other three materials tested. At the enamel margins, all materials tested performed reasonably well.

  12. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  13. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  14. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Faughnan, Patrick D.; Batterson, Lawrence M.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Engineers today are presented with the opportunity to design and build the next generation of space vehicles out of the lightest, strongest, and most durable materials available. Composites offer excellent structural characteristics and outstanding reliability in many forms that will be utilized in future aerospace applications including the Commercial Crew and Cargo Program and the Orion space capsule. NASA's Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project researches the various methods of manufacturing composite materials of different fiber characteristics while using proven infusion methods of different resin compositions. Development and testing on these different material combinations will provide engineers the opportunity to produce optimal material compounds for multidisciplinary applications. Through the CoEx project, engineers pursue the opportunity to research and develop repair patch procedures for damaged spacecraft. Working in conjunction with Raptor Resins Inc., NASA engineers are utilizing high flow liquid infusion molding practices to manufacture high-temperature composite parts comprised of intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) carbon fiber material. IM7 is a continuous, high-tensile strength composite with outstanding structural qualities such as high shear strength, tensile strength and modulus as well as excellent corrosion, creep, and fatigue resistance. IM7 carbon fiber, combined with existing thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems, can provide improvements in material strength reinforcement and deformation-resistant properties for high-temperature applications. Void analysis of the different layups of the IM7 material discovered the largest total void composition within the [ +45 , 90 , 90 , -45 ] composite panel. Tensile and compressional testing proved the highest mechanical strength was found in the [0 4] layup. This paper further investigates the infusion procedure of a low-cost/high-performance BMI resin into an IM7 carbon fiber material and the

  15. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  16. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Asefi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow, Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists. A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2 and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm2of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  17. Direct spectrometry: a new alternative for measuring the fluorescence of composite resins and dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Tm; de Oliveira, Hpm; Severino, D; Balducci, I; Huhtala, Mfrl; Gonçalves, Sep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluorescence intensity of different composite resins and compare those values with the fluorescence intensity of dental tissues. Different composite resins were used to make 10 discs (2 mm in depth and 4 mm in diameter) of each brand, divided into groups: 1) Z (Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE), 2) ES (Esthet-X, Dentsply), 3) A (Amelogen Plus, Ultradent), 4) DVS (Durafill-VS, Heraeus Kulzer) with 2 mm composite resin for enamel (A2), 5) OES ([Esthet-X] opaque-OA [1 mm] + enamel-A2 [1 mm]); 6) ODVSI ([Charisma-Opal/Durafill-VSI], opaque-OM (1 mm) + translucent [1mm]), and 7) DVSI ([Durafill- VSI] translucent [2 mm]). Dental tissue specimens were obtained from human anterior teeth cut in a mesiodistal direction to obtain enamel, dentin, and enamel/dentin samples (2 mm). The fluorescence intensity of specimens was directly measured using an optic fiber associated with a spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB 4000) and recorded in graphic form (Origin 8.0 program). Data were submitted to statistical analysis using Dunnet, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests. Light absorption of the composite resins was obtained in a spectral range from 250 to 450 nm, and that of dental tissues was between 250 and 300 nm. All composite resins were excited at 398 nm and exhibited maximum emissions of around 485 nm. Fluorescence intensity values for all of the resins showed statistically significant differences (measured in arbitrary units [AUs]), with the exception of groups Z and DVS. Group DVSI had the highest fluorescence intensity values (13539 AU), followed by ODVS (10440 AU), DVS (10146 AU), ES (3946 AU), OES (3841 AU), A (3540 AU), and Z (1146 AU). The fluorescence intensity values for the composite resins differed statistically from those of dental tissues (E=1380 AU; D=6262 AU; E/D=3251 AU). The opacity interfered with fluorescence intensity, and group Z demonstrated fluorescence intensity values closest to that of tooth enamel. It is concluded that the

  18. Characterization of water sorption, solubility, and roughness of silorane- and methacrylate-based composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, M; Di Francescantonio, M; Pacheco, R R; Cidreira Boaro, L C; Braga, R R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness (SR), water sorption (WS), and solubility (SO) of four composite resins after finishing/polishing and after one year of water storage. Two low-shrinkage composites (Filtek Silorane [3M ESPE] and Aelite LS [Bisco Inc]) and two composites of conventional formulations (Heliomolar and Tetric N-Ceram [Ivoclar Vivadent]) were tested. Their respective finishing and polishing systems (Sof-Lex Discs, 3M ESPE; Finishing Discs Kit, Bisco Inc; and Astropol F, P, HP, Ivoclar Vivadent) were used according to the manufacturers' instructions. Ten disc-shaped specimens of each composite resin were made for each evaluation. Polished surfaces were analyzed using a profilometer after 24 hours and one year. For the WS and SO, the discs were stored in desiccators until constant mass was achieved. Specimens were then stored in water for seven days or one year, at which time the mass of each specimen was measured. The specimens were dried again and dried specimen mass determined. The WS and SO were calculated from these measurements. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (α=0.05). Filtek Silorane showed the lowest SR, WS, and SO means. Water storage for one year increased the WS means for all composite resins tested. The silorane-based composite resin results were better than those obtained for methacrylate-based resins. One-year water storage did not change the SR and SO properties in any of the composite resins.

  19. Seasonal variation and resin composition in the Andean tree Austrocedrus chilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olate, Verónica Rachel; Soto, Alex; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2014-05-21

    Little is known about the changes in resin composition in South American gymnosperms associated with the different seasons of the year. The diterpene composition of 44 resin samples from seven Austrocedrus chilensis (Cupressaceae) trees, including male and female individuals, was investigated in three different seasons of the year (February, June and November). Twelve main diterpenes were isolated by chromatographic means and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The diterpene composition was submitted to multivariate analysis to find possible associations between chemical composition and season of the year. The principal component analysis showed a clear relation between diterpene composition and season. The most characteristic compounds in resins collected in summer were Z-communic acid (9) and 12-oxo-labda-8(17),13E-dien-19 oic acid methyl ester (10) for male trees and 8(17),12,14-labdatriene (7) for female trees. For the winter samples, a clear correlation of female trees with torulosic acid (6) was observed. In spring, E-communic acid (8) and Z-communic acid (9) were correlated with female trees and 18-hydroxy isopimar-15-ene (1) with male tree resin. A comparison between percent diterpene composition and collection time showed p < 0.05 for isopimara-8(9),15-diene (2), sandaracopimaric acid (4), compound (7) and ferruginol (11).

  20. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Tahereh-Sadat; Erfan, Mohammad; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Masaeli, Reza; Rezaei, Yashar; Bagheri, Hossein; Erfan, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm). Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length) were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan) was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm) surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness.

  1. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh-Sadat Jafarzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm. Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness.

  2. Correlations of norbornenyl crosslinked polyimide resin structures with resin thermo-oxidative stability, resin glass transition temperature and composite initial mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, William B.

    1988-01-01

    PMR (polymerization of monomeric reactants) methodology was used to prepare 70 different polyimide oligomeric resins and 30 different unidirectional graphite fiber/polyimide composites. Monomeric composition as well as chain length between sites of crosslinks were varied to examine their effects on resin thermo-oxidative stability and glass transition temperature (Tg) of the cured/postcured resins. A linear correlation of decreasing 316 C resin weight loss/surface area versus (1) decreasing aliphatic content, or (2) increasing benzylic/aliphatic content stoichiometry ratio over a wide range of resin compositions was observed. An almost linear correlation of Tg versus molecular distance between the crosslinks was also observed. An attempt was made to correlate Tg with initial composite mechanical properties (flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength). However, the scatter in mechanical strength data prevented obtaining a clear correlation. Instead, only a range of composite mechanical properties was obtained at 25, 288, and 316 C. Perhaps more importantly, what did become apparent during the correlation study was (1) the PMR methodology could be used to prepare composites from resins containing a wide variety of monomer modifications, (2) that these composites almost invariably provided satisfactory initial mechanical properties as long as the resins formulated exhibited satisfactory processing flow, and (3) that PMR resins exhibited predictable rates of 316 C weight loss/surface area based on their benzylic/aliphatic stoichiometery ratio.

  3. Resin composite repair for implant-supported crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante, Estevam A; Suzuki, Marcelo; Hirata, Ronaldo; Bonfante, Gerson; Fardin, Vinicius P; Coelho, Paulo G

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the reliability of implant-supported crowns repaired with resin composites. Fifty-four titanium abutments were divided in three groups (n = 18 each) to support resin nanoceramic molar crowns, as follows: (LU) (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE); LU repaired with either a direct or an indirect resin composite. Samples were subjected to mouth-motion accelerated-life testing in water (n = 18). Cumulative damage with a use stress of 300 N was used to plot Weibull curves for group comparison. Reliability was calculated for a mission of 100,000 cycles at 400 N load. Beta values were 0.83 for LU, 0.31 and 0.27 for LU repaired with Filtek and Ceramage, respectively. Weibull modulus for LU was 9.5 and η = 1047 N, m = 6.85, and η = 1002 N for LU repaired with Ceramage, and m = 4.65 and η = 766 N for LU repaired with Filtek (p material, and detailed fractography is presented. The performance of resin nanoceramic material repaired with an indirect composite was maintained after accelerated-life testing compared to unrepaired controls. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1481-1489, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparative analysis of the shrinkage stress of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Aparecida Pereira

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the shrinkage stress of composite resins by three methods. In the first method, composites were inserted between two stainless steel plates. One of the plates was connected to a 20 kgf load cell of a universal testing machine (EMIC-DL-500. In the second method, disk-shaped cavities were prepared in 2-mm-thick Teflon molds and filled with the different composites. Gaps between the composites and molds formed after polymerization were evaluated microscopically. In the third method, the wall-to-wall shrinkage stress of the resins that were placed in bovine dentin cavities was evaluated. The gaps were measured microscopically. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: Grandio = 12.18 ± 0.428N; Filtek Z 250 = 11.80 ± 0.760N; Filtek Supreme = 11.80 ± 0.707 N; and Admira = 11.89 ± 0.647 N. The gaps obtained between composites and Teflon molds were: Filtek Z 250 = 0.51 ± 0.0357%; Filtek Supreme = 0.36 ± 0.0438%; Admira = 0.25 ± 0.0346% and Grandio = 0.16 ± 0.008%. The gaps obtained in wall-to-wall contraction were: Filtek Z 250 = 11.33 ± 2.160 µm; Filtek Supreme = 10.66 ± 1.211µm; Admira = 11.16 ± 2.041 µm and Grandio = 10.50 ± 1.224 µm. There were no significant differences among the composite resins obtained with the first (shrinkage stress generated during polymerization and third method (wall-to-wall shrinkage. The composite resins obtained with the second method (Teflon method differed significantly regarding gap formation.

  5. Comparative analysis of the shrinkage stress of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; Araujo, Paulo Amarante de; Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shrinkage stress of composite resins by three methods. In the first method, composites were inserted between two stainless steel plates. One of the plates was connected to a 20 kgf load cell of a universal testing machine (EMIC-DL-500). In the second method, disk-shaped cavities were prepared in 2-mm-thick Teflon molds and filled with the different composites. Gaps between the composites and molds formed after polymerization were evaluated microscopically. In the third method, the wall-to-wall shrinkage stress of the resins that were placed in bovine dentin cavities was evaluated. The gaps were measured microscopically. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). The obtained contraction forces were: Grandio = 12.18 +/- 0.428N; Filtek Z 250 = 11.80 +/- 0.760N; Filtek Supreme = 11.80 +/- 0.707 N; and Admira = 11.89 +/- 0.647 N. The gaps obtained between composites and Teflon molds were: Filtek Z 250 = 0.51 +/- 0.0357%; Filtek Supreme = 0.36 +/- 0.0438%; Admira = 0.25 +/- 0.0346% and Grandio = 0.16 +/- 0.008%. The gaps obtained in wall-to-wall contraction were: Filtek Z 250 = 11.33 +/- 2.160 microm; Filtek Supreme = 10.66 +/- 1.211 microm; Admira = 11.16 +/- 2.041 microm and Grandio = 10.50 +/- 1.224 microm. There were no significant differences among the composite resins obtained with the first (shrinkage stress generated during polymerization) and third method (wall-to-wall shrinkage). The composite resins obtained with the second method (Teflon method) differed significantly regarding gap formation.

  6. Effect of LED and Argon Laser on Degree of Conversion and Temperature Rise of Hybrid and Low Shrinkage Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Ayob; Tabatabaei, Masumeh Hasani; Arami, Sakineh; Valizadeh, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Different light curing units are used for polymerization of composite resins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) and temperature rise in hybrid and low shrinkage composite resins cured by LED and Argon Laser curing lights. DC was measured using FTIR spectroscopy. For measuring temperature rise, composite resin samples were placed in Teflon molds and cured from the top. The thermocouple under samples recorded the temperature rise. After initial radiation and specimens reaching the ambient temperature, reirradiation was done and temperature was recorded again. Both temperature rise and DC data submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD tests (5% significance). The obtained results revealed that DC was not significantly different between the understudy composite resins or curing units. Low shrinkage composite resin showed a significantly higher temperature rise than hybrid composite resin. Argon laser caused the lowest temperature rise among the curing units. Energy density of light curing units was correlated with the DC. Type of composite resin and light curing unit had a significant effect on temperature rise due to polymerization and curing unit, respectively.

  7. Development of new addition-type composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kray, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The most promising of a number of new addition type polyimides and polyaromatic melamine (NCNS) resins for use in high performance composite materials. Three different cure temperature ranges were of interest: 530-560 K (500-550 F), 475-530 K (400-500 F), and 450 K (350 F). Examined were a wide variety of polyimide precursors terminated with 5 norbornene groups and addition polymerized at 560 K similar to PMR-15 and LARC-160 polyimides. In addition, a number of lower curing cinnamal end capped polyimides and a bismaleimide were investigated but were not found promising. A group of NCNS resins were investigated and some were found to be superior to current epoxy resins in moisture resistance, oxidative aging and flame and smoke properties.

  8. Impact of filler size and distribution on roughness and wear of composite resin after simulated toothbrushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gabriela Ulian de; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Charantola Rodrigues, Marcela; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Wang, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Nanofilled composite resins are claimed to provide superior mechanical properties compared with microhybrid resins. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare nanofilled with microhybrid composite resins. The null hypothesis was that the size and the distribution of fillers do not influence the mechanical properties of surface roughness and wear after simulated toothbrushing test. Ten rectangular specimens (15 mm x 5 mm x 4 mm) of Filtek Z250 (FZ2), Admira (A), TPH3 (T),Esthet-X (EX), estelite sigma (ES), concept advanced (C), Grandio (G) and Filtek Z350 (F) were prepared according to manufacturer's instructions. Half of each top surface was protected with nail polish as control surface (not brushed) while the other half was assessed with five random readings using a roughness tester (Ra). Following, the specimens were abraded by simulated toothbrushing with soft toothbrushes and slurry comprised of 2:1 water and dentifrice (w/w). 100,000 strokes were performed and the brushed surfaces were reanalyzed. Nail polish layers were removed from the specimens so that the roughness (Ra) and the wear could be assessed with three random readings (µm). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α=0.05). Overall outcomes indicated that composite resins showed a significant increase in roughness after simulated toothbrushing, except for Grandio, which presented a smoother surface. Generally, wear of nanofilled resins was significantly lower compared with microhybrid resins. As restorative materials suffer alterations under mechanical challenges, such as toothbrushing, the use of nanofilled materials seem to be more resistant than microhybrid composite resins, being less prone to be rougher and worn.

  9. Impact of filler size and distribution on roughness and wear of composite resin after simulated toothbrushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ulian de Oliveira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Nanofilled composite resins are claimed to provide superior mechanical properties compared with microhybrid resins. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare nanofilled with microhybrid composite resins. The null hypothesis was that the size and the distribution of fillers do not influence the mechanical properties of surface roughness and wear after simulated toothbrushing test. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten rectangular specimens (15 mm x 5 mm x 4 mm of Filtek Z250 (FZ2, Admira (A, TPH3 (T,Esthet-X (EX, Estelite Sigma (ES, Concept Advanced (C, Grandio (G and Filtek Z350 (F were prepared according to manufacturer's instructions. Half of each top surface was protected with nail polish as control surface (not brushed while the other half was assessed with five random readings using a roughness tester (Ra. Following, the specimens were abraded by simulated toothbrushing with soft toothbrushes and slurry comprised of 2:1 water and dentifrice (w/w. 100,000 strokes were performed and the brushed surfaces were reanalyzed. Nail polish layers were removed from the specimens so that the roughness (Ra and the wear could be assessed with three random readings (µm. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α=0.05. RESULTS: Overall outcomes indicated that composite resins showed a significant increase in roughness after simulated toothbrushing, except for Grandio, which presented a smoother surface. Generally, wear ofnanofilled resins was significantly lower compared with microhybrid resins. CONCLUSIONS: As restorative materials suffer alterations under mechanical challenges, such as toothbrushing, the use of nanofilled materials seem to be more resistant than microhybrid composite resins, being less prone to be rougher and worn.

  10. Repair Strength in Simulated Restorations of Methacrylate- or Silorane-Based Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Marinho, Tatiane; Bacchi, Atais; Caldas, Ricardo Armini; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; Pfeifer, Carmem Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The study verified the bond strength in simulated dental restorations of silorane- or methacrylate-based composites repaired with methacrylate-based composite. Methacrylate- (P60) or silorane-based (P90) composites were used associated with adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2). Twenty-four hemi-hourglass-shaped samples were repaired with each composite (n=12). Samples were divided according to groups: G1= P60 + Adper Single Bond 2+ P60; G2= P60 + Adper Single Bond 2 + P60 + thermocycling; G3= P90 + Adper Single Bond 2 + P60; and G4= P90 + Adper Single Bond 2 + P60 + thermocycling. G1 and G3 were submitted to tensile test 24 h after repair procedure, and G2 and G4 after submitted to 5,000 thermocycles at 5 and 55 ?#61616;C for 30 s in each bath. Tensile bond strength test was accomplished in an universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data (MPa) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). Sample failure pattern (adhesive, cohesive in resin or mixed) was evaluated by stereomicroscope at 30?#61655; and images were obtained in SEM. Bond strength values of methacrylate-based composite samples repaired with methacrylate-based composite (G1 and G2) were greater than for silorane-based samples (G3 and G4). Thermocycling decreased the bond strength values for both composites. All groups showed predominance of adhesive failures and no cohesive failure in composite resin was observed. In conclusion, higher bond strength values were observed in methacrylate-based resin samples and greater percentage of adhesive failures in silorane-based resin samples, both composites repaired with methacrylate-based resin.

  11. Shear bond strength of the amalgam-resin composite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Camilo; Sanchez, Eliana; Alapati, Satish; Seghi, Robert; Johnston, William

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the initial and one year shear bond strengths (SBS) of resin composite bonded to amalgam using Amalgambond-Plus. Resin composite cylinders (Point 4, Kerr Corporation) were bonded to either etched-enamel (A), 50% etched enamel-50% polished amalgam (B), airborne-particle abraded amalgam (C), carbide bur prepared amalgam (D) and airborne-particle abraded 50% amalgam-50% etched-enamel (E). Shear bond strengths were determined using a standardized testing device (Ultradent Products) in a universal testing machine (Instron model 4204). The failed interfaces were evaluated with SEM to obtain visual evidence of the failure mode. ANOVA indicated significant differences among the groups (p composite masking has the strongest, most durable SBS on airborne-particle abraded amalgam and airborne-particle abraded enamel-amalgam surfaces and could be used as a method to improve the esthetics of amalgam restorations.

  12. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octarina Octarina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV is obtained using multi-step (MS resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups: IRCV without sandblasting (n=20 and with sandblasting for 10 seconds (n=20 and then bonded to enamel using MS (n=10 and SADRC (n=10, respectively. After 24h SBS of specimens were tested using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. Results: The average SBS value of IRCV without SB and bonded with MS was 18.95+7.80MPa and MS with SB was 19.30+ SB (4.85+2.12MPa and SADRC with SB (9.57+3.45MPa(p<0.05. Conclusion: increased SBS VIRK to enamel using MS resin cement than SADRC.  

  13. Radiopacity of 28 Composite Resins for Teeth Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitz, Ricardo; Moruzzi, Patrizia Dubinskas; Vieira, Glauco; Fenyo-Pereira, Marlene

    2016-02-01

    Radiopacity is a fundamental requisite to check marginal adaptation of restorations. Our objective was to assess the radiopacity of 28 brands of light-cured composite resins and compare their radiopacity with that of enamel, dentin, and aluminum of equivalent thickness. Composite resin disks (0.2, 0.5, and 1 mm) were radiographed by the digital method, together with an aluminum penetrometer and a human tooth equivalent tooth section. The degree of radiopacity of each image was quantified using digital image processing. Wilcoxon nonparametric test was used for comparison of the mean thickness of each material. All of the materials tested had an equal or greater radiopacity than that of aluminum of equivalent thickness. Similar results for enamel were found with the exception of Durafill, which was less radiopaque than enamel (p composite resins comply with specification #27 of the American Dental Association. The radiopacity of Amelogen Plus, Aph, Brilhiante, Charisma, Concept Advanced, Evolux X, Exthet X, Inten S, Llis, Master Fill, Natural Look, Opallis, P60, Tetric, Tph, Z100, and Z250 was significantly higher than that of enamel (p composites, it is possible to observe the boundaries between restoration and tooth structure, thus allowing clinicians to establish the presence of microleakage or restoration gap. Suitable radiopacity is an essential requisite for good-quality esthetic restorative materials. We demonstrate that only some composites have the sufficient radiopacity to observe the boundaries between restoration and tooth structure, which is the main cause of restoration failure.

  14. Comparison of time-dependent changes in the surface hardness of different composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Suat; Yikilgan, Ihsan; Uctasli, Mine Betul; Bala, Oya; Kurklu, Zeliha Gonca Bek

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in surface hardness of silorane-based composite resin (Filtek Silorane) in time and compare the results with the surface hardness of two methacrylate-based resins (Filtek Supreme and Majesty Posterior). Materials and Methods: From each composite material, 18 wheel-shaped samples (5-mm diameter and 2-mm depth) were prepared. Top and bottom surface hardness of these samples was measured using a Vicker's hardness tester. The samples were then stored at 37°C and 100% humidity. After 24 h and 7, 30 and 90 days, the top and bottom surface hardness of the samples was measured. In each measurement, the rate between the hardness of the top and bottom surfaces were recorded as the hardness rate. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance, multiple comparisons by Tukey's test and binary comparisons by t-test with a significance level of P = 0.05. Results: The highest hardness values were obtained from each two surfaces of Majesty Posterior and the lowest from Filtek Silorane. Both the top and bottom surface hardness of the methacrylate based composite resins was high and there was a statistically significant difference between the top and bottom hardness values of only the silorane-based composite, Filtek Silorane (P composite resin Filtek Silorane showed adequate hardness ratio, the use of incremental technic during application is more important than methacrylate based composites. PMID:24966724

  15. An in vitro quantitative antibacterial analysis of amalgam and composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J; Weiss, Ervin I

    2007-03-01

    Antibacterial properties of restorative dental materials such as amalgam and composite resins may improve the restorative treatment outcome. This study evaluates the antibacterial properties of three composite resins: Z250, Tetric Ceram, P60 and a dental amalgam in vitro. Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus served as test microorganisms. Three quantitative microtiter spectrophotometric assays were used to evaluate the effect of the restorative materials on: (i) early-stage biofilm using a direct contact test (DCT); (ii) planktonic bacterial growth; (iii) bacterial growth in the materials' elute. For comparison purposes, agar diffusion test (ADT) was also performed. The effect of the composite resins on bacterial growth was minimal and limited to a few days only. One-week-aged composites promoted growth of S. mutans and A. viscosus. The antibacterial properties in direct contact were more potent than in planktonic bacterial growth. Amalgam showed complete inhibition of both bacteria in all phases, and the effect lasted for at least 1 week. The materials' elute had no effect on both bacterial growth with the exception of complete inhibition of S. mutans in amalgam. The later results correlated with the ADT. The present findings demonstrate potent and lasting antibacterial properties of amalgam, which are lacking in composite resins. This may explain the clinical observation of biofilm accumulated more on composites compared to amalgams. It follows that the assessment of antibacterial properties of poorly-soluble materials has to employ more than one assay.

  16. The effect of home-bleaching application on the color and translucency of five resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Cengiz, Esra; Ulusoy, Nuran; Ozak, Sule Tugba; Yuksel, Ece

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of home bleaching agents on the color and translucency of resin composites. Thirty disc shaped specimens (1mm thick) were fabricated from each resin composite (Reflexions, Grandio, Gradia Direct, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic, Ceram-X Mono) and divided into 3 subgroups as carbamide peroxide (CP, Opalescence 10% PF), hydrogen peroxide (HP, 10% Opalescence Treswhite Supreme) and control group (n=10). Baseline CIE L*a*b* color coordinates were measured with spectrophotometer and translucency parameters (TP) were calculated. CP and HP groups were treated with bleaching agents according to manufacturers' instructions and control group was stored in distilled water (DW) for 14 days. Color and translucency measurements were repeated and color differences were calculated, ΔE values>3.3 were considered as clinically unacceptable. Clinically unacceptable color change was detected for all resin composites exposed to bleaching agents and there was significant color difference between the control group and bleached specimens (P<0.05). However no significant color difference was found between CP and HP groups. Intragroup comparison revealed that Ceram-X Mono showed the highest color change but there was no significant difference among the other tested materials for both CP and HP groups. Intergroup comparison of TP values of CP, HP and control groups at the end of 14th day revealed that there was no statistical significant translucency difference among the groups. Application of CP and HP resulted in clinically unacceptable color change for all resin composites. Translucencies of the resin composites were not affected by bleaching procedure. The results of this in vitro study suggest that patients should be informed regarding a potential color change of existing resin composite restorations with the use of home bleaching agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with extensive composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Buono, Laura; Grande, Nicola M; Lamorgese, Vincenzo; Somma, Francesco

    2008-03-01

    When cuspal coverage is required, there is no evidence that indirect composite resin restorations are superior to direct restorations in terms of biomechanical behavior. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the fracture resistance of cusp-replacing direct and indirect composite resin restorations in endodontically treated molars. Forty-five human mandibular molars were selected and divided into 3 groups (n=15): DIR specimens, restored with direct composite resin (Estelite Sigma) restorations; IND specimens, restored with indirect composite resin (Estelite Sigma) restorations, and control specimens, which remained intact. Endodontic treatment was performed using NiTi ProTaper rotary instruments, and teeth were filled using lateral condensation of gutta-percha and sealer. Extensive Class II MO cavities were prepared, and the 2 mesial cusps were reduced, allowing a 2-mm layer of composite resin. All teeth were prepared to the same dimensions, considering reasonable human variation. Specimens were loaded to failure and the fracture loads were recorded (N). The mode of fracture was determined using a stereomicroscope and classified as favorable or unfavorable failure. The data were subjected to a Kruskal-Wallis test, multiple-comparison Mann-Whitney test, and a chi-square test (alpha=.05). Significant differences (P<.001) were observed between the control group and both DIR and IND groups. However, no significant difference was found between the DIR and IND groups. The chi-square test did not show a significant difference in the frequencies of favorable/unfavorable failure modes among the 3 groups (P=.981). No significant difference was observed in the fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored to original contours with an extensive cusp-replacing direct or indirect composite resin restoration.

  18. Effect of filler size and filler loading on wear of experimental flowable resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Shinkai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The relationship between wear resistance and filler size or filler loading was clarified for the universal resin composite; however, their relationship in flowable resin composites has not been clarified. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of filler size and filler loading on wear of experimental flowable resin composites by using a cyclic loading device. Material and Methods: Nine experimental flowable resin composites consisting of three different sizes (70, 200 and 400 nm and loading (50, 55 and 60 wt% of filler were prepared. Bowl-shaped cavities were prepared on a flat surface of ceramic blocks using a No. 149 regular cut diamond point. The cavities were treated with a silane coupling agent and an all-in-one adhesive and then filled with each experimental flowable resin composite. The restored surfaces were finished and polished with a 1500-grit silicon carbide paper. The specimens were subjected to an in vitro two-body wear test using a cyclic loading device. The localized worn surfaces were evaluated at 10,000, 20,000, 30,000, and 40,000 cycles using a computer-controlled three-dimensional measuring microscope (n=5. The volumetric wear loss of the materials was calculated automatically by the equipment. Data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey test. Results: Two-way ANOVA showed that the filler size significantly influenced wear volume (p0.05. A post hoc Tukey test detected significant differences in filler size between 70 nm and 400 nm, and 200 nm and 400 nm (p<0.007. Conclusion: The experimental flowable resin composite containing a mean filler size of 400 nm exhibited significantly lower wear resistance in two-body wear compared with those containing mean filler sizes of 200 nm or 70 nm.

  19. Comparison of Microleakage of Composite Resin Veneering Systems at the Alloy Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    technique that there is leakage around resin veneers in gold crowns. Microleakage studies have been used primarily for the evaluation of direct...investigation is to evaluate the bond between veneering composite resin and metal substructure. Measurement of microleakage at the composite resin-alloy...34OVERPRINT" COMPARISON OF MICROLEAKAGE OF COMPOSITE RESIN VENEERING SYSTEMS AT THE ALLOY INTERFACE A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of The University

  20. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43...

  1. Influence of polymerization time and depth of cure of resin composites determined by Vickers hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lombardini

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Among the materials tested, the nanofilled and the nanohybrid resin composites were rather insensible to thickness variations. Miicrohybrid composites, instead, had features different from one another.

  2. Effect of organic solvents compared to sandblasting on the repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Rafael Torres; Vieira, Sergio; Freire, Andrea; Mazur, Rui Fernando; De Souza, Evelise Machado; Rached, Rodrigo Nunes

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the repair bond strength of nanohybrid (Empress Direct) and nanofilled (Filtek Z350 XT) composite resins. A total of 120 specimens of each material (7.5 x 4.5 x 3 mm) were prepared and polished with SiC paper. Half of the specimens were kept in water for seven days and the other half for six months; they were then divided into six groups according to the type of surface treatment: negative control (no treatment), Al2O3sandblasted, liquid acetone, acetone gel, liquid alcohol and alcohol gel. Following application of the silane coupling agent and the adhesive system, composite resin cylinders were fabricated on the specimens and light cured (20 seconds). The same composite resins were used for the repair. Additionally, ten intact specimens of each composite resin (without repair) were prepared (positive control). The specimens were then loaded to failure in the microshear mode. Three additional specimens were fabricated in each group, and the surface treatments were analyzed by atomic force microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nanofilled composite resin showed higher cohesive strength and repair bond strength than the nanohybrid composite resin. The aging process affected the repair bond strength of the nanofilled composite resin. Al2O3sandblasting was more efficient for the nanofilled composite resin and promoted greater surface roughness in both materials. The solvents demonstrated higher efficacy for the nanohybrid composite resin. The strengths resulting from the solvents were material dependent, and Al2O3sandblasting resulted in superior repair bond strength in both materials.

  3. Effect of nanofiller on wear resistance and surface roughness of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian Min; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Shinya, Akiyoshi; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akikazu; Lin, Jie

    2012-01-01

    To compare the wear resistance and surface roughness of nanofiller-containing composites and microhybrid composites after simulated wear. Five microhybrid composites and five nanofiller-containing resin composites were included in the study. Six cylindrical specimens with a diameter of 10 mm and a thickness of 6 mm for each material were prepared. The volume loss, vertical loss and the surface roughness (Ra) were determined after 800 cycles of simulated chewing motion. One specimen of each material was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to compare the morphology of the wear surfaces. The microhybrid composites group and nanofiller-containing composites group were tested using the Mann-Whitney U test with a significance level of α = 0.05. For all microhybrid composites, the average wear volume loss and vertical loss were 56.44 mm3 and 730.6 µm, respectively, while the average wear losses of nanofiller-containing composites were 40.15 mm3 and 528.17 µm, respectively. The nanofiller containing composite GNH400N showed the least roughness (Ra = 0.346 ± 0.076 µm), while the conventional microhybrid composite Ceramage showed the highest roughness (Ra = 0.699 ± 0.214 µm). However, wear resistance and surface roughness for the two groups showed no statistical difference. SEM micrographs of the nanofiller-containing composites after wear testing showed smoother and more uniform wear surfaces than for the microhybrid composites. Nanofillers did not significantly influence the wear resistance of resin composites, but might improve the surface roughness of resin composites.

  4. Dynamic thermo-mechanical properties of various flowable resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balthazard, Rémy; Vincent, Marin; Dahoun, Abdessellam; Mortier, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared the storage modulus (E’), the loss modulus (E’’) and the loss tangent (tan δ) of various flowable resin composites. Material and Methods Grandio Flow (GRF), GrandioSo Heavy Flow (GHF), Filtek Supreme XTE (XTE) and Filtek Bulk Fill (BUL) flowable resins and Clinpro Sealant (CLI) ultra-flowable pit and fissure sealant resin were used. 25 samples were tested using a dynamical mechanical thermal analysis system in bending mode. Measurements were taken within a temperature range of 10 to 55°C. The results were statistically analyzed using mixed-effect and repeated-measure analysis of variance followed by paired multiple comparisons. Results For all the materials, the E’ values decrease with temperature, whereas the tan δ values increase. Irrespective of the temperature, GHF and GRF present E’ and E’’ values significantly higher than all the other materials and CLI presents values significantly lower than all the other materials. Observation of the values for all the materials reveals a linear progression of the tan δ values with temperature. Conclusions A variation in temperature within a physiological range generates modifications in mechanical properties without damaging the material, however. Filler content in volume terms appears to be the crucial parameter in the mechanical behavior of tested materials. Key words:Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, elastic modulus, filler content, flowable resin composites, loss modulus, loss tangent. PMID:27957266

  5. Silicone Resin Applications for Ceramic Precursors and Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Narisawa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the applications of silicone resins as ceramic precursors. The historical background of silicone synthesis chemistry is introduced to explain the production costs and supply availability of various silicones. Thermal degradation processes of silicones are classified in terms of the main chain structure and cyclic oligomer expulsion process, which determine the resulting ceramic yield and the chemical composition. The high temperature decomposition of Si-O-C beyond 1,400 °C in an inert atmosphere and formation of a protective silica layer on material surfaces beyond 1,200 °C in an oxidative atmosphere are discussed from the viewpoints of the wide chemical composition of the Si-O-C materials. Applications of the resins for binding agents, as starting materials for porous ceramics, matrix sources with impregnation, fiber spinning and ceramic adhesions are introduced. The recent development of the process of filler or cross-linking agent additions to resin compounds is also introduced. Such resin compounds are useful for obtaining thick coatings, MEMS parts and bulk ceramics, which are difficult to obtain by pyrolysis of simple organometallic precursors without additives.

  6. [Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junling, Wu; Qiang, Zhang; Ruinan, Sun; Ting, Zhu; Jianhua, Ge; Chuanjian, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt, and to measure its effect on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. A novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt was synthesized according to methods introduced in previous research. Samples of the novel nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers were modified by a coupling agent and then added into resin composite at 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% or 20% mass fractions; 0% composite was used as control. A flexural test was used to measure resin composite mechanical properties. Results showed that a dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was formed. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, lactic acid production, and live/dead assay of biofilm on the resin composite were calculated to test the effect of the resin composite on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. The incorporation of nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers with as much as 15% concentration into the resin composite showed no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resin composite (P > 0.05). Resin composite containing 5% or more nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers significantly inhibited the metabolic activity of dental plaque microcosm biofilm, suggesting its strong antibacterial potency (P < 0.05). This novel resin composite exhibited a strong antibacterial property upon the addition of up to 5% nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers, thereby leading to effective caries inhibition in dental application.

  7. Resin infusion of layered metal/composite hybrid and resulting metal/composite hybrid laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of fabricating a metal/composite hybrid laminate is provided. One or more layered arrangements are stacked on a solid base to form a layered structure. Each layered arrangement is defined by a fibrous material and a perforated metal sheet. A resin in its liquid state is introduced along a portion of the layered structure while a differential pressure is applied across the laminate structure until the resin permeates the fibrous material of each layered arrangement and fills perforations in each perforated metal sheet. The resin is cured thereby yielding a metal/composite hybrid laminate.

  8. Interactions between resin monomers and commercial composite resins with human saliva derived esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, F; Finer, Y; Santerre, J P

    2002-04-01

    Cholesterol esterase (CE) and pseudocholinesterase (PCE) have been reported to degrade commercial and model composite resins containing bisphenylglycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or the latter in combination with urethane modified BisGMA monomer systems. In addition, human saliva has been shown to contain esterase like activities similar to CE and PCE. Hence, it was the aim of the current study to determine to what extent human saliva could degrade two common commercial composite resins (Z250 from 3M Inc. and Spectrum TPH from L.D. Caulk) which contain the above monomer systems. Saliva samples from different volunteers were collected, processed, pooled, and freeze-dried. TEGDMA and BisGMA monomers were incubated with human saliva derived esterase activity (HSDEA) and their respective hydrolysis was monitored using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both monomers were completely hydrolyzed within 25 h by HSDEA. Photopolymerized composites were incubated with buffer or human saliva (pH 7.0 and 37 C) for 2, 8 and 16 days. The incubation solutions were analyzed using HPLC and mass spectrometry. Surface morphology characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy. Upon biodegradation, the Z250 composite yielded higher amounts of BisGMA and TEGDMA related products relative to the TPH composite. However, there were higher amounts of ethoxylated bis-phenol A released from the TPH material. In terms of total mass of products released, human saliva demonstrated a greater ability to degrade Z250. In summary, HSDEA has been shown to contain esterase activities that can readily catalyze the biodegradation of current commercial composite resins.

  9. Microhardness assessment of different commercial brands of resin composites with different degrees of translucence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taciana Emília de Almeida Anfe

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to improvements in its mechanical properties and to the availability of shade and translucence resources, resin composite has become one of the most widely used restorative materials in present day Dentistry. The aim of this study was to assess the relation between the surface hardness of seven different commercial brands of resin composites (Charisma, Fill Magic, Master Fill, Natural Look, Opallis, Tetric Ceram, and Z250 and the different degrees of translucence (translucid, enamel and dentin. Vickers microhardness testing revealed significant differences among the groups. Z250 was the commercial brand that showed the best performance in the hardness test. When comparing the three groups assessed within the same brand, only Master Fill and Fill Magic presented statistically significant differences among all of the different translucencies. Natural Look was the only one that showed no significant difference among any of the three groups. Charisma, Opallis, Tetric Ceram and Z250 showed significant differences among some of the tested groups. Based on the results found in this study, it was not possible to establish a relation between translucence and the microhardness of the resin composites assessed. Depending on the material assessed, however, translucence variation did affect the microhardness values of the resin composites.

  10. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira, E-mail: mirabelmcr@iae.cta.br [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Materiais; Costa, Michelle Leali [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (DMT/UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  11. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida; Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira; Costa, Michelle Leali

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  12. Surface roughness of composite resins subjected to hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Ana Carolina Cabral; Bohner, Lauren Oliveira Lima; de Godoi, Ana Paula Terossi; Colucci, Vivian; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Catirse, Alma Blásida Concepción Elizaur Benitez

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of hydrochloric acid on surface roughness of composite resins subjected to brushing. Sixty samples measuring 2 mm thick x 6 mm diameter were prepared and used as experimental units. The study presented a 3x2 factorial design, in which the factors were composite resin (n=20), at 3 levels: microhybrid composite (Z100), nanofilled composite (FiltekTM Supreme), nanohybrid composite (Ice), and acid challenge (n=10) at 2 levels: absence and presence. Acid challenge was performed by immersion of specimens in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.2) for 1 min, 4 times per day for 7 days. The specimens not subjected to acid challenge were stored in 15 mL of artificial saliva at 37 oC. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to abrasive challenge by a brushing cycle performed with a 200 g weight at a speed of 356 rpm, totaling 17.8 cycles. Surface roughness measurements (Ra) were performed and analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p≤0.05). Surface roughness values were higher in the presence (1.07±0.24) as compared with the absence of hydrochloric acid (0.72±0.04). Surface roughness values were higher for microhybrid (1.01±0.27) compared with nanofilled (0.68 ±0.09) and nanohybrid (0.48±0.15) composites when the specimens were not subjects to acid challenge. In the presence of hydrochloric acid, microhybrid (1.26±0.28) and nanofilled (1.18±0,30) composites presents higher surface roughness values compared with nanohybrid (0.77±0.15). The hydrochloric acid affected the surface roughness of composite resin subjected to brushing.

  13. Influence of Finishing and Polishing Techniques and Abrasion on Transmittance and Roughness of Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Pma; Ramos, T M; de Azevedo, C S; de Lima, E; de Souza, Shj; Turbino, M L; Cesar, P F; Matos, A B

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of finishing and polishing systems and toothbrush abrasion on transmittance (T) and surface roughness (Ra) of three composite resins (Filtek Z350 XT, Tetric N-Ceram, and IPS Empress Direct). Eighteen resin disks (10 mm diameter × 2 mm thick) finished by polyester strips had initial surface smoothness recorded, representing phase 1 (P1). Specimens were divided into three groups (n=6) according to the finishing/polishing instrument used (OneGloss, TopGloss, and Sof-Lex) to compose phase 2 samples (P2). Then specimens were subjected to 514 cycles of toothbrush simulation using a toothpaste slurry, with a constant load applied to soft bristles, and were then washed (phase 3=P3). After each phase, the specimens were examined by an optical profiler and spectrophotometer to measure Ra and T. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance, Tukey and Pearson tests. T values were statistically influenced by composite resin ( p=0.000) and phase of measurement ( p=0.000) factors, while the finishing/polishing system used ( p=0.741) did not affect T. On the other hand, Ra values were statistically affected by the factor finishing/polishing system ( p=0.000), but not by composite resin ( p=0.100) and phase of measurement ( p=0.451). Tetric N-Ceram and Empress Direct presented higher values of roughness when polished by OneGloss, while TopGloss and Sof-Lex showed a lower roughness. It can be concluded that composite resins transmitted more light after dental abrasion. Transmittance of composite resins was not modified by the distinct roughness created by finishing/polishing instruments.

  14. Interaction of LED light with coinitiator-containing composite resins: effect of dual peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jae-Seong; Seol, Hyo-Joung; Park, Jeong-Kil; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2012-10-01

    Recently the colour stability of composite resins has been an issue due to the emphasis on the aesthetics of restored teeth. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how dual-peak LED units affect the polymerization of coinitiator-containing composite resins. Five composite resins [coinitiator-containing: Aelite LS Posterior (AL), Tetric EvoCeram (TE), and Vit-l-escence (VI); only CQ-containing: Grandio (GD) and Filtek Z350 (Z3)] were light cured using four different light-curing units (LCUs). Among them, Bluephase G2 (BP) and G-light (GL) were dual-peak LED LCUs. Microhardness, polymerization shrinkage, flexural, and compressive properties were measured. BP and GL had no consistent effect on the microhardness of AL, TE, and VI on the top and bottom surfaces of resin specimens. Among the specimens, AL and VI showed the least (9.86-10.41 μm) and greatest (17.58-19.21 μm) polymerization shrinkage, respectively. However, the effect of BP and GL on the shrinkage of specimens was not consistent. Among the specimens, GD showed the greatest flexural properties [strength (FS) and modulus (FM)] and TE showed the lowest flexural and compressive properties [strength (CS) and modulus (CM)]. In same resin product, maximum FS and CS differences due to the different LCUs were 10.3-21.0% and 3.6-9.2%, respectively. Furthermore, the influences of BP and GL on FS and CS were not consistent. The tested dual-peak LED LCUs had no consistent synergic effect on the polymerization of coinitiator-containing composite resins as compared with QTH and single-peak LED LCUs. The dual-peak LED LCUs achieve a similar degree of polymerization in coinitiator-composite resins as QTH and single-peak LED LCUs did. Choice of LCU does not appear to be a determinant of the light curing of coinitiator-composite resins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Influence of Hydroxylated Carbon Nanotubes on Epoxy Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoxia Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxylated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs/epoxy resin nanocomposites were prepared with ultrasonic dispersion and casting molding. The effect of hydroxylated MWNTs content on reactive activity of composites is discussed. Then the flexural and electrical properties were studied. Transmission electron microscope was employed to characterize the microstructure of nanocomposites. As a result, the reactive activity of nanocomposites obtained increases with the increasing content of MWNTs. When MWNTs content of the composites is 1 wt%, as compared to neat resin, the flexural strength increases from 143 Mpa to 156 MPa, the modulus increases from 3563 Mpa to 3691 MPa, and the volume and surface resistance of nanocomposites decrease by two orders of magnitude, respectively.

  16. Do the monomers release from the composite resins after artificial aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokay, Ugur; Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Aksoy, Abdurrahman; Ozmen, Bilal

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the effect of thermal cycling on the amount of monomer released from three different composite materials by HPLC analysis method. Three different composite materials, inlay composite, posterior composite and micro-hybrid composite were used. Sixty cylinder specimens each with a dimension of approximately 1 cm width and 3 mm depth, were prepared before experiments were carried out. Inlay composite material was polymerized according to manufacturers' instructions. Thermal cycling device was used to simulate thermal differences which occur in the mouth media. Monomers were analyzed using HPLC technic after thermal cycling process. The amount of ethoxylated Bis-GMA and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) in inlay composite material, the amount of ethoxylated Bis-GMA in posterior composite material, the amount of ethoxylated Bis-GMA and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) in micro-hybrid composite material were investigated. Monomer release of thermal cycles levels showed a linear increase in UDMA and TEGDMA (P composite showed a cubic change (P composite resins have more outstanding features than direct composite resins in terms of biocompatibility. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of Home Bleaching on Microleakage of Fiber-reinforced and Particle-filled Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching may exert some negative effects on existing composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of home bleaching on microleakage of fiber-reinforced and particle-filled composite resins. Materials and methods. Ninety class V cavities (1.5×2×3 mm were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 90 bovine teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=15 and restored as follows: Groups 1 and 2 with Z100, groups 3 and 4 with Z250, and groups 5 and 6 with Nulite F composite resins. All the specimens were thermocycled. Groups 1, 3 and 5 were selected as control groups (without bleaching and the experimental groups 2, 4 and 6 were bleached with 22% carbamide peroxide gel. All the samples were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours and then sectioned longitudinally. Dye penetration was evaluated under a stereomicroscope (×25, at both the gingival and incisal margins. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (α=0.05. Results. Statistical analyses revealed that bleaching gel increased microleakage only at gingival margins with Z250 (P=0.007. Moreover, the control groups showed a statistically significant difference in microleakage at their gingival margins. Nulite F had the maximum microleakage while Z250 showed the minimum (P=0.006. Conclusion. Microleakage of home-bleached restorations might be related to the type of composite resin used.

  18. Resin composites: Modulus of elasticity and marginal quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Ana R; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian; Flury, Simon

    2014-09-01

    To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity but quite similar polymerization contraction. MOD cavities (n=30) were prepared in extracted premolars, restored and then subjected to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. Marginal quality of the restorations before and after loading was analyzed on epoxy replicas under a scanning electron microscope. The percentage of gap-free margins and occurrence of paramarginal fractures were registered. Modulus of elasticity and polymerization contraction were analyzed with parametric and margins with nonparametric ANOVA and post hoc Tukey HSD or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, respectively. The number of paramarginal fractures was analyzed with exact Fisher tests (α=0.05). Grandio demonstrated significantly more gap-free enamel margins than Charisma and Filtek Supreme XTE, before and after loading (p0.05). No significant effect of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (pGrandio when compared to Charisma (p=0.008). The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can be improved by the selection of a resin composite with modulus of elasticity close to that of dentine, although an increase in paramarginal enamel fractures can result as a consequence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of polishing procedures on color stability of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Ahmet Umut; Güler, Eda; Yücel, Ali Cağin; Ertaş, Ertan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different polishing methods on color stability of posterior, universal and nanohybrid composite resin restorative materials upon exposure to a staining agent. Twenty-five specimens were prepared for each of 5 different composite resins (Filtek Z250, Filtek P60, Quadrant LC, Grandio and Filtek Supreme). Specimens were divided into 5 groups and different polishing procedures, including polishing discs (Pd), polishing discs then diamond polishing paste (PdP), polishing discs then a liquid polishing system (Biscover) (PdB), and combinations of these (PdPB) were used. Unpolished specimens served as the control (C). The specimens were stored for 48 h in a coffee solution. The color of all specimens was measured before and after exposure with a colorimeter, and total color change (DeltaE*) were calculated. The data were analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and the means were compared by Tukey HSD test (alpha=0.05). The lowest color difference was observed in the groups PdP and C, while the highest color difference was observed in PdPB, and PdB. When comparing the five different restorative materials, no significant difference was observed between FiltekP60 and FiltekZ250, and these materials demonstrated significantly less color change than Quadrant LC and the nanohybrid materials (Grandio, Filtek Supreme). The posterior (Filtek P60) and universal (Filtek Z250) composite resin restorative materials, which do not contain tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), were found to be less stainable than the nanohybrid (Grandio, Filtek Supreme) and universal (Quadrant LC) composite resins, which contain TEGDMA. The use of diamond polishing paste after polishing with polishing discs significantly decreased staining when compared to the groups that used polishing discs alone, for all restorative materials tested. The highest color change values were obtained for the specimens that were polished with the Biscover liquid polish

  20. Effects of polishing procedures on color stability of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Umut Güler

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different polishing methods on color stability of posterior, universal and nanohybrid composite resin restorative materials upon exposure to a staining agent. Twenty-five specimens were prepared for each of 5 different composite resins (Filtek Z250, Filtek P60, Quadrant LC, Grandio and Filtek Supreme. Specimens were divided into 5 groups and different polishing procedures, including polishing discs (Pd, polishing discs then diamond polishing paste (PdP, polishing discs then a liquid polishing system (Biscover (PdB, and combinations of these (PdPB were used. Unpolished specimens served as the control (C. The specimens were stored for 48 h in a coffee solution. The color of all specimens was measured before and after exposure with a colorimeter, and total color change (DE* were calculated. The data were analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and the means were compared by Tukey HSD test (a=0.05. The lowest color difference was observed in the groups PdP and C, while the highest color difference was observed in PdPB, and PdB. When comparing the five different restorative materials, no significant difference was observed between FiltekP60 and FiltekZ250, and these materials demonstrated significantly less color change than Quadrant LC and the nanohybrid materials (Grandio, Filtek Supreme. The posterior (Filtek P60 and universal (Filtek Z250 composite resin restorative materials, which do not contain tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA, were found to be less stainable than the nanohybrid (Grandio, Filtek Supreme and universal (Quadrant LC composite resins, which contain TEGDMA. The use of diamond polishing paste after polishing with polishing discs significantly decreased staining when compared to the groups that used polishing discs alone, for all restorative materials tested. The highest color change values were obtained for the specimens that were polished with the Biscover liquid polish

  1. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA; Mário Fernando de GÓES; Marcelo GIANNINI

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15) according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC...

  2. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strengths of facing composite resins to zirconia copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumita, M; Kokubo, Y; Kano, T

    2012-09-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the bond strength between zirconia and facing composite resin using different surface conditioning methods before and after thermocycling. Four primers, three opaque resins, and two facing composite resins were used, and 10 surface treatment procedures were conducted. The bond strength was measured before and after 4,000 cycles of thermocycling. The mean values of each group were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The bond strengths of facing composite resins to zirconia after various treatments varied depending on the primers, opaque resins, body resins, and thermocycling. The application of primers and opaque resins to the zirconia surface after sandblasting is expected to yield strong bond strength of the facing composite resin (Estenia CG&B) even after thermocycling.

  3. [Evaluation of porosity in the restorations of light-cured resin composite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin-yi; Zhang, Wu; Lee, Sean; Roggenkamp, Clyde; Lu, Mei; Li, Yi-ming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the consistency of resin composite and insertion techniques on the homogeneity of the Class I restorations. Standardized Class I cavities were prepared in polymethyl methyacrylate (PMMA) blocks and restored with three resin composites (Prodigy, Tetric EvoCeram and Tetric Ceram HB) using either a packing or an injection technique by six operators. Then the restorations were sectioned longitudinally and inspected for the presence of porosities and voids with microscope. The consistence of the three resins was tested using an area method. There is little porosity in original resin. After insertion, large numbers of porosities were observed in restorations, with Tetric EvoCeram presented much more porosities (1137.1 +/- 365.0 for packing and 566.1 +/- 206.4 for injection) than Prodigy (241.0 +/- 116.1, 195.8 +/- 28.7) and Tetric Ceram HB (193.1 +/- 35.8, 156.3 +/- 33.0). Tetric Ceram HB showed the highest consistency, followed by Tetric EvoCeram and Prodigy. No linear correlation was found between the consistency of the composite and the porosity of their restorations. For Tetric EvoCeram, the restorations inserted with packing showed significant more porosity than that with injection. Contrastively, the restorations of Prodigy or Tetric Ceram HB presented no apparent difference for the two filling techniques. The porosity in restoration was primarily created during the insertion. There was no linear correlation between the consistency of the composite and the porosity of their restorations. The porosity of composite resin is material-brand dependent. The influence of filling techniques on the porosity of restoration is depending on the composite used.

  4. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed

  5. Hygroscopic expansion kinetics of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrahlah, A; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the extent and rate of hygroscopic expansion of resin composites at 37°C. Eight resin composites were examined: 1 micro-hybrid (Bright Light(®)), 5 nano-hybrids (Experimental Vertise™; Nanoceram-Bright(®); Tetric EvoCeram(®); Grandio(®) SO; Ceram X™ duo) and 2 flowables (X-tra base; Venus(®) Diamond Flow). Five disks (15 mm×2 mm) of each material were prepared. The mean change in specimen diameter was recorded by a custom-built non-contact laser micrometer. Specimens were initially measured dry and then at fixed time intervals, over 150 days, after storage in distilled water at 37±1°C. Data were re-expressed in volumetric terms and analysed by repeated measures ANOVA, one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (α=0.05). The volumetric hygroscopic expansion ranged from 0.58 to 2.26 and can be considered in three bands. First, Experimental Vertise had the highest expansion (pGrandio So, Nanoceram-Bright and X-tra base, with no significant difference between them. For the size (2mm thickness) and shape of specimen measured, equilibrium was attained in all cases by 60 days. Within this set of resin-composites the equilibrium expansion varied by almost 400% of the lowest material. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of modeling liquid/resin and polishing on the color change of resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto SEDREZ-PORTO

    Full Text Available Abstract Modeling liquids/resins have been used to build up resin composite (RC restorations, although there is a lack of information regarding their effects on the color stability of the latter. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the presence of modeling liquid between layers of RC and the finishing/polishing state of the material on color change in specimens exposed to red wine staining over time. Specimens were prepared by placing four increments (±0.5 mm thick of RC (Filtek™ Z350 XT, 3M ESPE into molds; half of which were prepared by applying modeling liquid (Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose™ Adhesive, SBMP, 3M ESPE between the layers of RC, whereas the other half were prepared without SBMP (control. Light-activation was performed after application of the final RC layer using a light-emitting diode (Radii, SDI curing unit with an irradiance of 900 mW/cm2 for 20 s. Each group was divided according to the surface finishing protocol (n = 7: nothing (non-polished or polishing with Sof-Lex™/diamond paste (polished. Initial colors of the specimens were evaluated with a digital spectrophotometer and the CIEL*a*b* color system. The specimens were stored in wine (37°C for 12 months, and the color measurements were reassessed after 4, 6, and 12 months of storage. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis was performed at the end. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α = 5%. The presence of SBMP resulted in lower overall color change of the RC as compared with the control. The non-polished specimens exhibited a significantly higher color change than the polished specimens. SEM images corroborated the previous findings. In summary, the use of modeling liquid between layers of RC shows potential for application to reduce or delay the staining process of RC over time. Moreover, polishing is essential to provide increased color stability of the RC restoration.

  7. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, A; Nandlal, B

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown. The study samples consisted of 30 primary anterior stainless steel crowns (Unitek TM, size R4), embedded in resin blocks with crown, in test groups of 15 samples each. Mounting of the crown was done using resin block with one crown each. Sandblasting was done and the bonding agent Prime and Bond NT (Dentsply) was applied on the labial surface of the primary anterior sandblasted crown. The composite resin and nanocomposite resin were placed into the well of Teflon jig and bonded to Stainless Steel Crowns. The cured samples were placed in distilled water and stored in incubator at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. Shear bond strength was measured using universal testing machine (Hounsefield U.K. Model, with a capacity of 50 KN). Independent sample 't' test revealed a nonsignificant (P resin and nanocomposite resin had statistically similar mean shear bond strength, with nanocomposite having little more strength compared to conventional composite.

  8. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  9. Process for curing ionizing radiation-highly sensitive resin composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, K.; Sasaki, T.; Tabei, K.; Goto, K.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for curing a radiation curable composition consisting essentially of (a) an amide represented by the formula R,CONR 2 R 3 and (b) an unsaturated polyester resin by irradiating the composition with an ionizing radiation. R 1 is H, an alkyl groups having from 1 to 17 carbon atoms or an alkenyl groups having from 1 to 17 carbon atoms, and R 2 and R 3 are each -H, -CH 3 , or -CH 2 OH. R 1 and R 2 taken together represent alkylene having 2 to 5 carbon atoms

  10. Effect of filler particles morphology of resin-composites on cavity packing force for repeated condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleem, Muhammad; Watts, David C

    2017-05-31

    Effect of variation in morphology and size of filler particles, temperature and increase in condensation speed on packability of resincomposites was investigated. Eight experimental light-cured resin-composites (RZDn series) were tested. Each material was placed in a cylindrical mould at 26 or 32ºC. A flat-ended stainless-steel probe (φ=6 mm) was mechanically lowered with two different speeds 2 and 8 mm/s onto and into at the surface of the unset sample until a compressive force of 1 N was reached. This was repeated for five cycles, and from each cycle F p was calculated. All spherical and irregular filler particle resin-composites showed a decrease in F p with increase in number of compressions. Increase in temperature also decreased F p , but this effect was not very prominent in the case of irregular filler resin-composites. Filler particle morphology, increase in temperature and compression cycle speed has a prominent effect on packability of resin-composites.

  11. INFLUENCE OF IRRADIATION EXPOSURE TIME ON THE DEPTH CURE OF RESTORATIVE RESIN COMPOSITE

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    Francesca Fabiano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the degree of conversion by the hardness measurements of a commercial resin composite. The specimens were prepared according to ISO 4049 and photo-activated for 20s – 40s – 60s with a light-emitting diodes (LEDs. To establish the optimal increment technique mono-layers 1 mm and 2 mm thick were tested. The ratio bottom-to-top was assessed for the mono-layers groups. Vickers hardness profiles were measured for mono-layer, bi-layer and tri-layer along the cross-section. The microhardness map showed difference in the mechanical characteristic of overlying resin confirmed by SEM images analysis of the fracture mechanics. Curing effectiveness of resin composite is not only dependent on the curing light unit but also from thickness of the resin composite and the duration of the exposure. The data suggest that an exposure time of 40 s or higher is required to provide composites with a homogeneous and high hardness, moreover, a 1 mm buildup multi-layering technique results in adequate curing of the bottom layer and better mechanical properties.

  12. The Effect of Different Disinfecting Agents on Bond Strength of Resin Composites

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    Ahmed Mohammed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different disinfectant agents on bond strength of two types of resin composite materials. Methods. A total of 80 sound posterior teeth were used. They were divided into four groups (n=20 according to the dentin surface pretreatment (no treatment, chlorhexidine gluconate 2%, sodium hypochlorite 4%, and EDTA 19%. Each group was divided into two subgroups according to the type of adhesive (prime and bond 2.1 and Adper easy one. Each subgroup was further divided into two subgroups according to the type of resin composite (TPH spectrum and Tetric EvoCeram. Shear bond strength between dentin and resin composite was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Data collected were statistically analyzed by t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Results. It was found that dentin treated with EDTA recorded the highest shear bond strength values followed by sodium hypochlorite and then chlorhexidine groups while the control group showed the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusions. The surface treatment of dentin before bonding application has a great effect on shear bond strength between resin composite and dentin surface.

  13. Effect of melamine foam cleaning on the surface condition of composite resin artificial teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Rika; Kurogi, Tadafumi; Murata, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the abrasive and cleaning effects of melamine foam and other cleaning agents on the surfaces of composite resin artificial tooth specimens. A stained composite resin artificial tooth in a used denture was cleaned using a denture brush and melamine foam, and the stain removal effect was evaluated macroscopically. Next, 5 types of cleaning material (fourfold-compression melamine foam, MEL; brush with water, BRU; denture dentifrice without abrasive, POL; denture dentifrice with abrasive, TAF; conventional dentifrice, AQU) and 15 plate-shaped specimens made of composite resin for artificial teeth were used for wear tests. The surface roughness was measured using a laser scanning microscope. Furthermore, the surface properties were observed using a digital microscope. Surface roughness data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test. Artificial tooth stains that could not be removed by brushing became removable using melamine foam. With regard to surface roughness in the context of the wear test, significant differences were not indicated between MEL and POL, whereas BRU-, TAF-, and AQU-treated specimens showed significantly increased surface roughness (p teeth. Traces of wear were not observed in specimens treated with melamine foam and the denture dentifrice not containing abrasives. It was suggested that these two materials would be desirable and useful to use for composite resin tooth cleaning. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Influence of nanometer scale particulate fillers on some properties of microfilled composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different weight fractions of nanometer sized particulate filler on properties of microfilled composite resin. Composite resin was prepared by mixing 33 wt% of resin matrix to the 67 wt% of silane treated microfine silica particulate fillers with various fractions of nanometer sized fillers (0, 10, 15, 20, 30 wt%) using a high speed mixing machine. Test specimens made of the composites were tested with a three-point bending test with a speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Surface microhardess (Vicker's microhardness) was also determined. The volumetric shrinkage in percent was calculated as a buoyancy change in distilled water by means of the Archimedes principle. The degree of monomer conversion (DC%) of the experimental composites containing different nanofiller fractions was measured using FTIR spectroscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) was determined using a surface profilometer. Nanowear measurements were carried out using a nanoindentation device. The water uptake of specimens was also measured. Parameters were statistically analysed by ANOVA (P < 0.05). The group without nanofillers showed the highest flexural strength and modulus, DC% and Ra value. The group with 30% nanofillers had the highest water uptake and volumetric shrinkage. No significant difference was found in Vicker's microhardness and the nanowear of the composites. The plain microfilled composite demonstrated superior properties compared to the composites loaded with nanofillers with the exception of surface roughness.

  15. Effect of light-curing units on microleakage under dental composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, R. S.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Saade, E. G.; Nadalin, M. R.; Andrade, M. F.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of two light-curing units (QTH and LED) on microleakage of Class II composite resin restorations with dentin cavosurface margins. Twenty extracted mandibular first premolars, free of caries and fractures were prepared two vertical “slot” cavities in the occluso-mesial and -destal surfaces (2 mm buccal-lingually, 2 mm proximal-axially and cervical limit in enamel) and divided into 4 equal groups ( n = 8): GI and GII: packable posterior composite light-activated with LED and QTH, respectively; GIII and GIV: micro-hybrid composite resin light-activated with LED and QTH, respectively. The composite resins were applied following the manufacturer’s instructions. After 24 h of water storage specimens were subjected to thermocycling for a total of 500 cycles at 5 and 55°C and the teeth were then sealed with impermeable material. Teeth were immersed in 0.5% Basic fuchsin during 24 h at room temperature, and zero to three levels of penetration score were attributed. The Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests showed significant statistically similar ( P > 0.05) from GI to GII and GIII to GIV, which the GII (2.750) had the highest mean scores and the GIII and GIV (0.875) had lowest mean scores. The use of different light-curing units has no influence on marginal integrity of Class II composite resin restorations and the proprieties of composite resins are important to reduce the microleakage.

  16. SORPTION AND SOLUBILITY OF LOW-SHRINKAGE RESIN-BASED DENTAL COMPOSITES

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    Sevda Yantcheva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-based composites are well-established restorative materials. However, these materials may absorb significant amounts of water when exposed to aqueous environments. Sorption and solubility are affecting composite restorations by two different mechanisms; the first is the up taking of water producing an increased weight and the second is the dissolution of materials in water, leading to a weight reduction of the final conditioned samples. Objective: To measure the water sorption and solubility of different low-shrinkage resin-based composites. Six materials were selected: Filtek P60, Filtek Ultimate, SonicFill, Filtek Silorane, Kalore and Venus Diamond. Materials and methods: Five disc specimens were prepared of each material and polymerized with diode light-curing unit. Water sorption and solubility of the different materials were were calculated by means of weighting the samples before and after water immersion and desiccation. Data were statistically analyzed using Shapiro-Wilk One Way Analysis of Variance followed by the Holm-Sidak comparison test . Results: There were significant differences (p<=0.001 between materials regarding sorption and solubility. Regarding sorption F. Silorane showed lowest values, followed by SonicFill, without significant difference between them. Statistical significant differences exist between F. Silorane and F.P60, F. Ultimate, Kalore. Significant differences exist between SonicFill and F. Ultimate. F.Silorane (-0.018 and Kalore (-0.010 showed lowest values of solubility but there were marginal difference among all composites investigated. Conclusions: 1.The material with lowest values of sorption and solubility was F.Silorane. 2. The attained sorption and solubility values for composites are influenced by the differences in resin matrix composition and filler contend. 3. Modifications of dimethacrylate matrix did not minimize significantly sorption and solubility of composites. 4. Besides water

  17. Double Vacuum Bag Process for Resin Matrix Composite Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A double vacuum bag molding assembly with improved void management and laminate net shape control which provides a double vacuum enviromnent for use in fabricating composites from prepregs containing air and/or volatiles such as reactive resin matrix composites or composites from solvent containing prepregs with non-reactive resins matrices. By using two vacuum environments during the curing process, a vacuum can be drawn during a B-stage of a two-step cycle without placing the composite under significant relative pressure. During the final cure stage, a significant pressure can be applied by releasing the vacuum in one of the two environments. Inner and outer bags are useful for creating the two vacuum environments with a perforated tool intermediate the two. The composite is placed intermediate a tool plate and a caul plate in the first environment with the inner bag and tool plate defining the first environment. The second environment is characterized by the outer bag which is placed over the inner bag and the tool plate.

  18. Elution of monomer from different bulk fill dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Mehmet Ata; Cebe, Fatma; Cengiz, Mehmet Fatih; Cetin, Ali Rıza; Arpag, Osman Fatih; Ozturk, Bora

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the elution of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, HEMA, and Bis-EMA monomers from six bulk fill composite resins over four different time periods, using HPLC. Six different composite resin materials were used in the present study: Tetric Evo Ceram Bulk Fill (Ivoclar Vivadent, Amherst, NY), X-tra Fill (VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany), Sonic Fill (Kerr, Orange, CA, USA), Filtek Bulk Fill (3M ESPE Dental Product, St. Paul, MN), SDR (Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany), EQUIA (GC America INC, Alsip, IL). The samples (4mm thickness, 5mm diameter) were prepared and polymerized for 20s with a light emitted diode unit. After fabrication, each sample was immediately immersed in 75wt% ethanol/water solution used as extraction fluid and stored in the amber colored bottles at room temperature. Ethanol/water samples were taken (0.5mL) at predefined time intervals:10m (T1), 1h (T2), 24h (T3) and 30 days (T4). These samples were analyzed by HPLC. The obtained data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD at significance level of pcomposites (pcomposite resins in all time periods and the amount of eluted monomers was increased with time. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein A chromatography resin lifetime-impact of feed composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Mili; Rathore, Anurag S; Lintern, Katherine; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2018-01-05

    Adsorbent lifetime during protein A chromatography is not readily predicted or understood, representing a key challenge to be addressed for biopharmaceutical manufacturers. This article focuses on the impact of feed composition on the performance of a typical agarose-based protein A resin across a lifetime of 50 cycles. Cycling studies were performed using three different feed materials with varying levels of feed components including proteases, histones, DNA, and nonhistone proteins. Changes in the process and quality attributes were measured. The DBCs were not seen to vary between conditions although there was a reduction in particle porosity in all cases. Fluorescence spectroscopy and LC-MS/MS were used to identify the contribution and extent of fouling to the observed capacity loss. Residual protein A ligand density and deposition of foulants (HCP, residual mAb, and DNA) varied between the three feed materials. Resins cycled in feed materials containing high concentrations of HCP and histones were seen to have greater extents of capacity loss. The mode of performance loss, capacity loss, or impact on product quality was seen to vary depending on the feed material. The results indicate that feed material composition may be correlated to the rate and mode of resin aging as a basis for improved process understanding. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  1. Improved Thermal Property of a Multilayered Graphite Nanoplatelets Filled Silicone Resin Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin; Zhang, Haiyan; Tang, Muyao; Tu, Wenying; Zhang, Xiubin

    2015-02-01

    We produced graphite nanoplatelets (GNP)/silicone resin composites at various loadings. The utilized GNPs were characterized by two-dimensional structure with high aspect ratio (~1810), and the GNP with approximately 10-30 nm thickness and 10-50 µm in length evenly dispersed throughout the resin matrix, which enables that GNPs effectively act as thermally conductive medium, thus contributed considerably to the formation of an efficient three-dimensional network for heat flow. The thermal conductivities of 5, 10, 15, and 20 wt.% GNP composite were 0.35, 1.02, 1.32, and 2.01 W/(m K), and were ca. 0.9, 4.7, 6.3, and 10.2 times higher than that of silicone resin at room temperature, respectively. The thermal conductivity decreased with elevated temperature in 25-200 °C, which was reminiscent at higher loading. Differential scanning calorimeter analysis showed that GNP addition increased the curing temperature of silicone resin from 90 to 119 °C, probably by hindering the free movement (mobility) of the silicone chains. The result showed that the GNP not only reduced the CTE but also improved the thermal stability of composite simultaneously.

  2. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiraldo Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Materials and Methods: Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46. A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk of 1.0 mm thickness obtained from bovine tooth. On the acrylic resin base, elastomer mold of 2.0 mm was adapted. The temperature increase was measured after composite light curing. After 24 h, the specimens were submitted to Knoop hardness test (HMV-2000, Shimadzu, Tokyo, Japan. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey′s test (a = 0.05. Results: For both composites, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05 in the top surface hardness; however, PAC promoted statistically lower (P < 0.05 Knoop hardness number values in the bottom. The mean temperature increase showed no significant statistical differences (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The standardized radiant exposure showed no influence on the temperature increase of the composite, however, showed significant effect on hardness values.

  3. Effect of preheat repetition on color stability of methacrylate- and silorane-based composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed Kahnamouei, Mehdi; Gholizadeh, Sarah; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Daneshpooy, Mehdi; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Rezaei, Yashar

    2017-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preheating methacrylate- and silorane-based composite resins on their color stability up to 40 times at 55‒60°C. Methods. Seventy-six methacrylate and silorane-based composite resin samples, with a diameter of 10 mm and a height of 2 mm, were divided into 4 groups (n=19). After the samples were prepared, their color parameters were determined using a reflective spectrophotometer. The composite resin samples were separately stored in a solution of tea for 40 consecutive days. Then the samples underwent a color determination procedure again using a spectrophotometer and color changes were recorded. Finally two-way ANOVA was used to study the effect of composite temperature on its staining (Pcomposite resin samples compared to non-heated samples at P=0.005 and P=0.029 for silorane-based and Z250 composite resin samples, respectively. Results. Both composite resin type (P=0.014) and preheating (Pcomposite resin samples, up to 55‒60°C for 40 rounds, resulted in more color changes compared with unheated composite resin samples. After storage in a solution of tea the color change rate in the composite resin samples of silorane-based was higher than the Z250 composite resin samples.

  4. A comparative effect of various surface chemical treatments on the resin composite-composite repair bond strength

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    Shaloo Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was an attempt to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength between pre-existing composite and repair composite resin. Materials and Methods: Forty acrylic blocks were prepared in a cuboidal mould. In each block, a well of 5 mm diameter and 5 mm depth was prepared to retain the composite resin (Filtek™ Z350, 3M/ESPE. Aging of the composite discs was achieved by storing them in water at 37°C for 1 week, and after that were divided into 5 groups (n = 8 according to surface treatment: Group I- 37% phosphoric acid, Group II-10% hydrofluoric acid, Group III-30% citric acid, Group IV-7% maleic acid and Group V- Adhesive (no etchant. The etched surfaces were rinsed and dried followed by application of bonding agent (Adper™ Single Bond 2. 3M/ESPE. The repair composite was placed on aged composite, light-cured for 40 seconds and stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. Shear bond strength between the aged and the new composite resin was determined with a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: The compressive shear strengths were compared for differences using ANOVA test followed by Tamhane′s T2 post hoc analysis. Results: The surface treatment with 10% hydrofluoric acid showed the maximum bond strength followed by 30% citric acid, 7% maleic acid and 37% phosphoric acid in decreasing order. Conclusion: The use of 10% hydrofluoric acid can be a good alternative for surface treatment in repair of composite resin restoration as compared to commonly used 37% orthophosphoric acid.

  5. The effect of exposure time on diametral tensile strength of light-cured resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia M Tetelepta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition or extend the exposure time in using light-cured resin composite are often done by practitioners in order to get a higher mechanical strength. Nevertheless, failure still can occur. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of exposure time on Diametral Tensile Strength (DTS of two different resin composite used for provisional crown and bridge restoration and filling materials. A total of 60 cylindrical specimens (6mm diameter x 3mm thickness were divided into three groups (n=10. The first group was cured as recommended by the manufacturer, the second group were cured two times, and the third group were cured three times. Furthermore, specimens were immersed in distilled water for 24 hours at a temperature of 37 °C. DTS were tested by universal testing machine and the results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA continued with Post Hoc Tamhane to see the difference between the groups. The results showed DTS composite as filling materials was significantly higher compared with the resin composite  for provisional crown and bridge restoration. DTS of composite as filling materials in first group had a higher value than first  and third groups. The composite for the provisional crown and bridge restoration in second group had a lower DTS value than in first and third groups. In third group, DTS increased but not significantly. DTS also could be influenced by the composition of filler content and type of matrix. The conclusion of this study was to extend the exposure time can weaken the DTS resin composite.

  6. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Repair Micro-shear Bond Strength of Silica- and Zirconia-filled Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaei, Mohammad; Bahari, Mahmoud; Ahmadi, Anahid; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Effect of surface treatments on repair bond strength of aged composite resins might be different due to their dissimilar fillers. The aim was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on repair micro-shear bond strength (µSBS) of silica- (Spectrum TPH) and zirconia-filled (Filtek Z250) composite resins. Materials and methods Twenty-seven composite resin blocks were made from each type of composite resin: Z250 and Spectrum TPH. After aging, blocks of each type were randomly divided into three groups according to surface treatments: alloy primer, silane, and only surface roughening. Subsequently, each group was further subdivided into 3 subgroups based on the adhesive system used: Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond, and Margin Bond. Four composite resin columns were added on each block. After thermocycling, µSBStest were done at cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analysed using multifactor ANOVA, one-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Bonferroni tests (α = 0.05). Results Analysis of data showed that the effect of composite resin type was not significant (p > 0.05), but the effects of the type of surface treatment (p = 0.01) and the type of adhesive system (p = 0.01) were significant on repair µSBS. In addition, the cumulative effect of the composite type-surface treatment and the composite type with the type of adhesive system were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, the cumulative effects of the adhesive system-surface treatment (p = 0.03) and the composite type-the adhesive system-surface treatments (p = 0.002) were significant. Conclusion Although repair µSBS values of both silica- and zirconia-filled composite resins were similar, use of different combinations of surface treatments and adhesive systems affected their repair µSBS differently. PMID:23277859

  7. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Xediek Consani, Rafael Leonardo; Mendes, Wilson Batista; Lympius, Thais; Coelho Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC) lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk of 1.0 mm thickness obtained from bovine tooth. On the acrylic resin base, elastomer mold of 2.0 mm was adapted. The temperature increase was measured after composite light curing. After 24 h, the specimens were submitted to Knoop hardness test (HMV-2000, Shimadzu, Tokyo, Japan). Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). For both composites, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the top surface hardness; however, PAC promoted statistically lower (P 0.05). The standardized radiant exposure showed no influence on the temperature increase of the composite, however, showed significant effect on hardness values.

  8. Colour spectrum and resin-type determine the concentration and composition of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in plastic pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisner, Mara; Majer, Alessandra; Taniguchi, Satie; Bícego, Márcia; Turra, Alexander; Gorman, Daniel

    2017-09-15

    This study assessed the concentration and composition of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in plastic pellets, collected from sandy beaches and considered different resin and colour tones. Results showed that polyethylene pellets, while displaying a greater range of total PAH concentrations did not differ significantly from polypropylene pellets. More importantly, both resin types demonstrated predictable increases in total PAH across a spectrum of darkening colour tones. Multivariate comparisons of 36 PAH groups, further showed considerable variability across resin type and colour, with lighter coloured pellets comprising lower molecular weight, while darker pellets contained higher weight PAHs. Overall, we show predictable variation in PAH concentrations and compositions of plastic pellets of different ages and resin types that will directly influence the potential for toxicological effects. Our findings suggest that monitoring programs should take these attributes into account when assessing the environmental risks of microplastic contamination of marine and coastal habitats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microhardness of composite resins at different depths varying the post-irradiation time

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    Juliane Cristina Ciccone-Nogueira

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the microhardness of posterior composite resins at different depths varying the post-irradiation time. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For each composite resin [Solitaire 2 (SO - Heraus Kulzer, P60 (P - 3M, Prodigy Condesable (PC - Kerr, Surefil (S - Dentsply and Alert (A - Pentron], 6 specimens (3 mm in diameter; 4mm high were prepared using a black polyurethane cylindrical matrix. The resins were inserted in a bulk increment and light cured for 40 seconds. Microhardness was analyzed at different depths (top, 0.4 mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0mm, 3.0 mm and 4.0 mm and at two moments (20 minutes and 24 hours after light-curing. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Overall, microhardness means decreased significantly with the increase of depth, being lower in the first moment tested. P, S and PC showed the highest microhardness means. CONCLUSION: It may be concluded that the tested composite resins presented a gradual decrease of microhardness as depth increased and this drop was more accentuated for depths beyond 2 mm. For all materials, higher microhardness means were recorded 24 hours after light activation. P60 yielded the best results at the different depths evaluated.

  10. Microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite to resin-coated dentin: interaction between diamond bur roughness and coating material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Oishi, Takumi; Sugawara, Toyotarou; Hirai, Yoshito

    2009-02-01

    This aim of this study was to determine the effect of type of bur and resin-coating material on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of indirect composite to dentin. Dentin surfaces were first ground with two types of diamond bur and resin-coated using UniFil Bond (UB) or Adper Single Bond (SB), and then bonded to a resin composite disc for indirect restoration with adhesive resin cement. After storage for 24 hr in distilled water at 37 degrees C, microTBS was measured (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). When UB was applied to dentin prepared using the regular-grit diamond bur, microTBS was significantly lower than that in dentin prepared using the superfine-grit bur. In contrast, no significant difference was found between regular-grit and superfine-grit bur with SB. However, more than half of the superfine-grit specimens failed before microTBS testing. These results indicate that selection of bur type is important in improving the bond strength of adhesive resin cement between indirect resin composite and resin-coated dentin.

  11. Study on polyethylene glycol/epoxy resin composite as a form-stable phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yutang; Kang Huiying; Wang Weilong; Liu Hong; Gao Xuenong

    2010-01-01

    Form-stable polyethylene glycol (PEG)/epoxy resin (EP) composite as a novel phase change material (PCM) was prepared using casting molding method. In this new material, PEG acts as the latent heat storage material and EP polymer serves as the supporting material, which provides structural strength and prevents the leakage of the melted PEG. The structure and morphology of the novel composite were observed using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The thermo-mechanical property and transition behavior were characterized by polarizing optical microscope (POM), static thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The experimental results show that, as a result of the physical tangled function of the epoxy resin carrier to the PEG segment, the composite macroscopically presents the solid-solid phase change characteristic.

  12. Simulation of Air Entrapment and Resin Curing During Manufacturing of Composite Cab Front by Resin Transfer Moulding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppusamy Raghu Raja Pandiyan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mould filling and subsequent curing are the significant processing stages involved in the production of a composite component through Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM fabrication technique. Dry spot formation and air entrapment during filling stage caused by improper design of filling conditions and locations that lead to undesired filling patterns resulting in defective RTM parts. Proper placement of inlet ports and exit vents as well as by adjustment of filling conditions can alleviate the problems during the mould filling stage. The temperature profile used to polymerize the resin must be carefully chosen to reduce the cure time. Instead of trial and error methods that are expensive, time consuming, and non-optimal, we propose a simulation-based optimization strategy for a composite cab front component to reduce the air entrapment and cure stage optimization. In order to be effective, the optimization strategy requires an accurate simulation of the process utilizing submodels to describe the raw material characteristics. Cure reaction kinetics and chemo-rheology were the submodels developed empirically for an unsaturated polyester resin using experimental data. The simulations were performed using commercial software PAM RTM 2008, developed by ESI Technologies. Simulation results show that the use of increase in injection pressure at the inlet filling conditions greatly reduce the air entrapped. For the cab front, the alteration of injection pressure with proper timing of vent opening reduced the air entrapped during mould filling stage. Similarly, the curing simulation results show that the use of higher mould temperatures effectively decreases the cure time as expected.

  13. Effects of 35% Carbamide Peroxide Gel on Surface Roughness and Hardness of Composite Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sharafeddin, F.; Jamalipour, GR.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Bleaching agents may not be safe for dental materials. The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the effects of Opalescent Quick ?in-office bleaching gel? containing 35% carbamide peroxide on the surface roughness and hardness of microfilled (Heliomolar) and hybride (Spectrum TPH) composite resins. Materials and Methods: Twenty specimens of Spectrum TPH composite resins and twenty Heliomolar composite resins were fabricated using a metallic ring (6.5 mm diameter and 2.5 mm...

  14. Diametral tensile strength of four composite resin core materials with and without centered fiber dowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Cornel H; Ji, Donatta Y-J; Rizkalla, Amin S; Santos, Gildo C

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the diametral tensile strength of composite resin core materials with and without fiber dowels. Eight groups were established (n = 20), four with composite resins and four with fiber dowels. Samples were tested using a universal testing machine and evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA and a Tukey B-rank order test (P = 0.05) indicated that the tensile values of two of the four composite resins decreased significantly when their matching fiber dowels were introduced.

  15. Flexural and diametral tensile strength of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Della Bona

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the flexural strength (sf and the diametral tensile strength (st of light-cured composite resins, testing the hypothesis that there is a positive relation between these properties. Twenty specimens were fabricated for each material (Filtek Z250- 3M-Espe; AM- Amelogen, Ultradent; VE- Vit-l-escence, Ultradent; EX- Esthet-X, Dentsply/Caulk, following ISO 4049 and ANSI/ADA 27 specifications and the manufacturers’ instructions. For the st test, cylindrical shaped (4 mm x 6 mm specimens (n = 10 were placed with their long axes perpendicular to the applied compressive load at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The sf was measured using the 3-point bending test, in which bar shaped specimens (n = 10 were tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Both tests were performed in a universal testing machine (EMIC 2000 recording the fracture load (N. Strength values (MPa were calculated and statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey (a = 0.05. The mean and standard deviation values (MPa were Z250-45.06 ± 5.7; AM-35.61 ± 5.4; VE-34.45 ± 7.8; and EX-42.87 ± 6.6 for st; and Z250-126.52 ± 3.3; AM-87.75 ± 3.8; VE-104.66 ± 4.4; and EX-119.48 ± 2.1 for sf. EX and Z250 showed higher st and sf values than the other materials evaluated (p < 0.05, which followed a decreasing trend of mean values. The results confirmed the study hypothesis, showing a positive relation between the material properties examined.

  16. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandak, Manoj G.; Pattanaik, Navdheeraj; Das, Ayan

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC). Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE) was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE). In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE) was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch) showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05) whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0–001). Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A) in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A) as well as without application of the adhesive agent. PMID:23293476

  17. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  18. Diffusion through composite materials made with thermosetting resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Bruno.

    1981-08-01

    Medium and low-level radioactive wastes may be coated in a solid matrix mainly made with thermosetting resins: the study of water and cesium migration through composite materials made with thermosetting resins is usefull to compare the water tightness of different coatings. Disks with a thickness of two millimeters were used to measure the water absorption. Diffusion cells including a plane membrane the thickness of which was at least 70μ were used to measure the diffusion of cesium 137. The diffusion coefficient of water in pure thermosetting resins, polyester or epoxyde, is about 10 -9 cm 2 .s -1 ; the diffusion coefficients of cesium in the same materials are about 10 -12 cm 2 .s -1 ; the introduction of solid particles in these polymers generally induces an acceleration of the diffusion process: the diffusion coefficient may reach 10 -8 cm 2 .s -1 . This lost of water-tightness may be reduced either by rendering insoluble the filler mixed to the polymer, or by diminushing the porosity of the interfacial zones by improving the bonding between the polymer and the filler [fr

  19. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksy, Mariusz; Szwarc-Rzepka, Karolina; Heneczkowski, Maciej; Oliwa, Rafał; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2014-08-22

    A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP) with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS) curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM.

  20. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Oleksy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM.

  1. Cuspal Deflection of Premolars Restored with Bulk-Fill Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behery, Haytham; El-Mowafy, Omar; El-Badrawy, Wafa; Saleh, Belal; Nabih, Sameh

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study compared cuspal deflection of premolars restored with three bulk-fill composite resins to that of incrementally-restored ones with a low-shrinkage silorane-based restorative material. Forty freshly-extracted intact human upper premolars were used. Reference points at buccal and palatal cusp tips were acid-etched and composite rods were horizontally bonded to them (TPH-Spectra-HV, Dentsply). Two acrylic resin guiding paths were made for each premolar to guide beaks of a digital micrometer used for cuspal deflection measurements. Standardized MOD cavities, 3 mm wide bucco-lingually and 3.5 mm deep, were prepared on each premolar. Prepared teeth were then equally divided into four groups (n = 10) and each group was assigned to one of four composite resin (QuiXX, Dentsply; X-tra fil, Voco; Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Ivoclar Vivadent; low-shrinkage Filtek LS, 3M/ESPE). Adper Single Bond-Plus, 3M/ESPE was used with all bulk-fill restoratives. LS-System Adhesive, 3M/ESPE was used with Filtek LS. For each prepared premolar, cuspal deflection was measured in microns as the difference between two readings between reference points before and after restoration completion. Means and SDs were calculated and data statistically-analyzed using One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Filtek LS showed the lowest mean cuspal deflection value 6.4(0.84)μm followed by Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill 10.1(1.2) μm and X-tra fil 12.4(1.35)μm, while QuiXX showed the highest mean 13(1.05)μm. ANOVA indicated significant difference among mean values of groups (p composite resins tested. Filtek LS had the lowest significant mean cuspal deflection in comparison to all tested bulk-fill restoratives. The use of Tetric EvoCeram Bulk fill composite resin restorative for class II MOD cavities resulted in reduced cuspal deflection in comparison to the two other bulk-fill composite resins tested. The silorane-based Filtek LS restorative resulted in the least cuspal deflection in

  2. Epoxy resin/carbon black composites below the percolation threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macutkevic, J; Kuzhir, P; Paddubskaya, A; Maksimenko, S; Banys, J; Celzard, A; Fierro, V; Stefanutti, E; Cataldo, A; Micciulla, F; Bellucci, S

    2013-08-01

    A set of epoxy resin composites filled with 0.25-2.0 wt.% of commercially available ENSACO carbon black (CB) of high and low surface area (CBH and CBL respectively) has been produced. The results of broadband dielectric spectroscopy of manufactured CB/epoxy below the percolation threshold in broad temperature (200 K to 450 K) and frequency (20 Hz to 1 MHz) ranges are reported. The dielectric properties of composites below the percolation threshold are mostly determined by alpha relaxation in pure polymer matrix. The glass transition temperature for CB/epoxy decreases in comparison with neat epoxy resin due to the extra free volume at the polymer-filler interface. At room temperature, the dielectric permittivity is higher for epoxy loaded with CBH additives. In contrast, at high temperature, the electrical conductivity was found to be higher for composites with CBL embedded. The established influence of the CB surface area on the broadband dielectric characteristics can be exploited for the production of effective low-cost antistatic paints and coatings working at different temperatures.

  3. Mechanical properties of composite resin blocks for CAD/CAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvahutanon, Sasipin; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Shiozawa, Maho; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Asakawa, Yuya; Oki, Meiko; Finger, Werner J; Arksornnukit, Mansuang

    2014-01-01

    This study compared commercial composite resin blocks with one ceramic block for use in computer-aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Four composite resins, one composite ceramic, and one feldspar-ceramic block were investigated. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), and Vickers hardness (VH) were determined under three conditions: dry storage; immersion in water at 37°C for 7 days; and immersion in water at 37°C for 7 days followed by 10,000 thermocycles. After dry storage, FS ranged from 127 to 242 MPa, FM from 9.6 to 51.5 GPa, and VH from 64 to 455. Two-way ANOVA was performed for FS, FM and VH followed by Tukey's multiple comparison (α<0.05). Results demonstrated that the materials degraded after water immersion and thermocycling, but their properties were within the acceptable range for fabrication of single restorations according to the ISO standard for ceramics (ISO 6872:2008).

  4. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  5. Fatigue resistance and failure mode of adhesively restored custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boff, Luís Leonildo; Oderich, Elisa; Cardoso, Antônio Carlos; Magne, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance and failure mode of composite resin and porcelain onlays and crowns bonded to premolar custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments. Sixty composite resin mesostructures were fabricated with computer assistance with two preparation designs (crown vs onlay) and bonded to a metal implant abutment. Following insertion into an implant with a tapered abutment interface (Titamax CM), each metal-composite resin abutment was restored with either composite resin (Paradigm MZ100) or ceramic (Paradigm C) (n = 15) and attached with adhesive resin (Optibond FL) and a preheated light-curing composite resin (Filtek Z100). Cyclic isometric chewing (5 Hz) was then simulated, starting with 5,000 cycles at a load of 50 N, followed by stages of 200, 400, 600, 800, 1,000, 1,200, and 1,400 N (25,000 cycles each). Samples were loaded until fracture or to a maximum of 180,000 cycles. The four groups were compared using life table survival analysis (log-rank test). Previously published data using zirconia abutments of the same design were included for comparison. Paradigm C and MZ100 specimens fractured at average loads of 1,133 N and 1,266 N, respectively. Survival rates ranged from 20% to 33.3% (ceramic crowns and onlays) to 60% (composite resin crowns and onlays) and were significantly different (pooled data for restorative material). There were no restoration failures, but there were adhesive failures at the connection between the abutment and the mesostructure. The survival of the metal-composite resin premolar abutments was inferior to that of identical zirconia abutments from a previous study (pooled data for abutment material). Composite resin onlays/crowns bonded to metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments presented higher survival rates than comparable ceramic onlays/crowns. Zirconia abutments outperformed the metal-composite resin premolar abutments.

  6. Penggunaan Fiber Reinforced Composite Sebagai Resin Bonded Prosthesis Pada Gigi Anterior

    OpenAIRE

    Pintadi, Hastoro

    2007-01-01

    Resin bonded prosthesis is a fixed bridge which replace a space where one or two teeth have been lost or extracted, by using acid etched technique and resin bonding. The main goals in selecting a Resin bonded prosthesis were to preserve tooth structure, maintain esthetics and lower patient fees while providing restorations that had the potential for long-term service. This case report discuss about fiber reinforced composite used as a main material for resin bondedprosthesis to replace incivu...

  7. Influence of curing protocol and ceramic composition on the degree of conversion of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Marcos Daniel Septimio; Andreeta, Marcello Rubens Barsi; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins De

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Due to increasing of aesthetic demand, ceramic crowns are widely used in different situations. However, to obtain long-term prognosis of restorations, a good conversion of resin cement is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) of one light-cure and two dual-cure resin cements under a simulated clinical cementation of ceramic crowns. Material and Methods: Prepared teeth were randomly split according to the ceramic's material, resin cement and curing protocol. The crowns were cemented as per manufacturer's directions and photoactivated either from occlusal suface only for 60 s; or from the buccal, occlusal and lingual surfaces, with an exposure time of 20 s on each aspect. After cementation, the specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were transversally sectioned from occlusal to cervical surfaces and the DC was determined along the cement line with three measurements taken and averaged from the buccal, lingual and approximal aspects using micro-Raman spectroscopy (Alpha 300R/WITec®). Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Tukey test at =5%. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences among cements, curing protocols and ceramic type (pcrowns; Duolink resin cement culminated in higher DC regardless ceramic composition and curing protocol. Conclusion: The DC of resin cement layers was dependent on the curing protocol and type of ceramic. PMID:29211292

  8. Selecting the Best Materials Compositions of Resin Based Bioasphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, Ary; Widiharjo, Budi; Djumari

    2017-07-01

    Damar asphalt is one type of bioaspal which is a mixture with the main ingredient is a resin as a binder and cooking oil as a solvent. One major drawback of this damar asphalt is the low ductility. To improve the ductility values, then use the added material Filler. Filler serves as a divider between the impurities with damar asphalt, increases ductility and increase the ability of cohesion or bonding between the particles of material damar asphalt. The purpose of this study was to determine damar asphalt modifications to the properties in accordance with the properties of damar asphalt test specifications based on the value of penetration. This method uses some variant on material such as powder bricks and fly ash as a binder. Solvent in constituent used oil and used cooking oil. It also added the polymer latex up to 10% at intervals of 2%. The best composition of damar asphalt materials were obtained with gum rosin, Fly Ash, Oil and Latex. Damar asphalt modification damar asphalt optimum mix of resin (100g pure resin or resin chunk + 350g powder), Fly Ash powder (150g), cooking oil (205g), and latex 4%, ductility increased from 63.5 cm to 119.5 cm, the value of the flash point was originally at temperature of 240 °C to 260 °C, damar asphalt penetration of 68.2 dmm to 43 dmm, and the value of density decreases from 1.01 g / cm3 to 0.99 g / cm3. Damar asphalt at these modifications meet the specifications in terms of solubility in trichlore ethylene is equal to 99.5%, and also meet the affinity of damar asphalt at 99%. With the optimum value, damar asphalt could be categorized as bitumen 40/60 penetration.

  9. Voltage-Induced Nonlinear Conduction Properties of Epoxy Resin/Micron-Silver Particles Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhaoming; Lu, Pin; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Qingguo

    2018-01-01

    The nonlinear conduction properties of epoxy resin (ER)/micron-silver particles (MP) composites were investigated. Under sufficient high intensity applied constant voltage, the obvious nonlinear conduction properties of the samples with volume fraction 25% were found. With increments in the voltage, the conductive switching effect was observed. The nonlinear conduction mechanism of the ER/MP composites under high applied voltages could be attributed to the electrical current conducted via discrete paths of conductive particles induced by the electric field. The test results show that the ER/MP composites with nonlinear conduction properties are of great potential application in electromagnetic protection of electron devices and systems.

  10. Effectiveness of bleaching agent on composite resin discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih Sampoerno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The discoloration of teeth, especially anterior teeth, is one of aesthetic problems. The use of tooth bleaching agents for discolored natural teeth is becoming increasingly popular. Many dentists, however, get many problems when they conduct bleaching process since there is much composite filling on patient’s anterior teeth. Although many research have focused on the discoloration of composite resin after bleaching process, the problem still becomes debatable. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of the discoloration between hybrid composite and nano composite before and after the application of tooth bleaching agent, 38% hydrogen peroxide. Methods: Eighteen disk-shaped specimens (5 mm of each of two composite resins, hybrid and nano filler, were prepared. The each group was treated 3 times and the specimens were divided into two groups consisted of 9 specimens for each, and then immersed in black tea solutions for 72 hours. Next, after having staining and bleaching processes, the color of the specimens was measured with a optic spectrophotometer by using photo with type BPY-47 and digital microvolt. The differences of the light intensity among three measurements were then calculated. Afterwards, GLM MANOVA Repeated Measure and parametric analysis (Independent t-test and Paired t-test were then used to analyze the data. Results: After staining process, it is then known that the nano composite had more discoloration and more affected by the black tea solution than the hybrid one. Conclusion: After bleaching, the discoloration was finally removed completely from both hybride and nano filler composite resins and became brighter from the baseline color.Latar belakang: Salah satu problem estetik adalah adanya perubahan warna pada gigi anterior. Peningkatan pemakaian bahan bleaching semakin popular. Banyak dokter gigi mempunyai problem ketika mereka akan melakukan proses bleaching dan ditemukan banyak

  11. The effects of different opacifiers on the translucency of experimental dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Karine; Azhar, Gulelala; Wood, Duncan J; Moharamzadeh, Keyvan; van Noort, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different opacifiers on the translucency of experimental dental composite-resins. Three metal oxides that are used as opacifiers were tested in this study: titanium oxide (TiO 2 ), aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) and zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ). Experimental composite-resins were fabricated containing 25wt.% urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA)-based resin matrix and 75% total filler including different concentrations of metal oxides (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1wt.%) blended into silane treated barium-silicate filler. The specimens (15.5mm diameter and 1mm thickness) were light-cured and tested in the transmittance mode using a UV/VIS spectrophotometer at wavelengths from 380 to 700nm under a standard illuminant D65. The color differences (ΔE* ab) between different concentrations of opacifiers were also measured in transmittance mode based on their Lab values. Statistical analysis by ANOVA and Tukey's test showed a significant decrease (pcomposite-resins. There was a linear correlation between different concentrations of TiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 and total transmittance. Total transmittance was also found to be wavelength dependent. The color differences for the concentrations of 0-1wt.% of the opacifiers were above 1 ΔE* unit, with Al 2 O 3 showing the smallest color shift. The type and the amount of the opacifiers used in this study had a significant effect on the translucency of the experimental UDMA-based dental composite resins. The most effective opacifier was TiO 2 , followed by ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 in decreasing order, respectively. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of sealant agents on the color stability and surface roughness of nanohybrid composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Doğu Ömür; Şahin, Onur; Koroglu, Aysegül; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of nanohybrid composite resins is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of sealant agents on the surface roughness and color stability of 4 nanohybrid composite resin materials. Forty disks (10×2 mm) were fabricated for each nanohybrid composite resin material (Z-550, Tetric EvoCeram, Clearfill Majesty, Ice) (N=160) and divided into 4 surface treatment groups: 1 conventional polishing (control) and 3 different sealant agent (Palaseal, Optiglaze, BisCover) coupling groups (n=10). The specimens were thermocycled, and surface roughness (Ra) values were obtained with a profilometer. Scanning electron microscope images were also recorded. CIELab color parameters of each specimen were measured with a spectrophotometer before and after 7 days of storage in a coffee solution. Color differences were calculated by the CIEDE 2000 (ΔE00) formula. The data were statistically analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The surface treatment technique significantly affected the Ra values of the composite resins tested (Pcomposite resin material was also significant for ΔE00 values (Pcomposite resin groups, significant decreases in Ra were observed only for the Palaseal agent coupled composite resin groups (except Ice) compared with the control groups (Pcomposite resin group, except for BisCover applied Clearfill Majesty (Pcomposite resin groups, significant differences were observed between the color change seen with BisCover and other sealants for Clearfill Majesty composite resin (Pcomposite resins except for Ice produced smoother surfaces. All surface sealant agents provided less discoloration of nanohybrid composite resins after coffee staining compared with conventional polishing except for BisCover applied Clearfill Majesty composite resin. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  13. [Is amalgam stained dentin a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtanus, J D

    2016-06-01

    After the removal of amalgam restorations, black staining of dentin is often observed, which is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from amalgam. A study was carried out to determine whether this amalgam stained dentin is a proper substrate for bonding resin composites. A literature study and an in vitro study showed that Sn and Zn in particular are found in amalgam stained dentin, and this was the case only in demineralised dentin. In vitro, demineralised dentin acted as porte d'entrÈe for amalgam corrosion products. Bond strength tests with 5 adhesive strategies showed no differences between bond strengths to amalgam stained and to sound dentin, but did show different failure types. A clinical study showed good survival of extensive cusp replacing resin composite restorations. No failures were attributed to inadequate adhesion. It is concluded that staining of dentin by amalgam corrosion products has no negative effect upon bond strength of resin composite. It is suggested that Sn and Zn may have a beneficial effect upon dentin, thus compensating the effects of previous carious attacks, preparation trauma and physico-chemical challenges during clinical lifetime.

  14. A Study on Tensile Behavior and Water Uptake of Wood Powder-Composites Based on Epoxy and Unsaturated Polyester Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir hossein Pirayeshfar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two kinds of epoxy resins (i.e. high-viscosity and low-viscosity as well as one polyester resin (orthophthalic grade were selected and examined as pure resins and also as a polymeric matrix for producing wood-composites. In this study, tensile properties, water uptake, and degradation of samples in water were also investigated. The results show that addition of wood particles to the thermoset resins strongly impresses on their tensile behavior and water uptake. Tensile studies show that addition of wood powder improves the tensile properties of polyester resin as compared with viscosity epoxy one, although its modulus value is relatively less than that of low viscosity epoxy resin. Water uptake measurements also revealed that pure polyester resin and its related composites possess minimum water uptake and less degradation in water as compared with corresponding epoxy specimens and from which the lowest extent of materials is extracted and migrated to the water even after 50 days immersion in water.

  15. Influence of light curing and sample thickness on microhardness of a composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio HB Aguiar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Flávio HB Aguiar1, Kelly RM Andrade1, Débora AN Leite Lima1, Gláucia MB Ambrosano2, José R Lovadino11Department of Restorative Dentistry; 2Department of Social Dentistry/Statistics, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, SP, BrazilAbstract: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of light-curing units and different sample thicknesses on the microhardness of a composite resin. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and assigned to nine experimental groups (n = 5: considering three light-curing units (conventional quartz tungsten halogen [QTH]: 550 mW/cm2 – 20 s; high irradiance QTH: 1160 mW/cm2 – 10 s; and light-emitting diode [LED]: 360 mW/cm2 – 40 s and three sample thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm. All samples were polymerized with the light tip 8 mm away from the specimen. Knoop microhardness was then measured on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample. The top surfaces, with some exceptions, were almost similar; however, in relation to the bottom surfaces, statistical differences were found between curing units and thicknesses. In all experimental groups, the 0.5-mm-thick increments showed microhardness values statistically higher than those observed for 1- and -2-mm increments. The conventional and LED units showed higher hardness mean values and were statistically different from the high irradiance unit. In all experimental groups, microhardness mean values obtained for the top surface were higher than those observed for the bottom surface. In conclusion, higher levels of irradiance or thinner increments would help improve hybrid composite resin polymerization.Keywords: photo-polymerization, light-curing distance, light-curing units, composite resin, composite thickness, microhardness

  16. Process for hardening an alkyd resin composition using ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadashi; Murata, Koichiro; Maruyama, Tsutomu.

    1969-01-01

    In an alkyd resin composition having free hydroxide radicals and containing a conjugated unsaturated fatty acid and/or oil as a component thereof, a process for hardening an alkyd resin composition comprises the steps of dissolving into a vinyl monomer, the product obtained by the semi-esterification reaction of said hydroxide radicals with acid anhydrides having polymerizable radicals and hardening by ionizing radiation to provide a coating with a high degree of cross-linking, with favorable properties such as toughness, hardness, chemical resistance and resistance to weather and with the feasibility of being applied as the ground and finish coat on metals, wood, paper, outdoor construction or the like. Any kind of ionization radiation, particularly accelerated electron beams, γ radiation can be used at 50 0 C to -5 0 C for a few seconds or minutes, permitting continuous operation. In one example, 384 parts of phthalic anhydride, 115 parts of pentaerythritol, 233 parts of trimethylol ethane, 288 parts of tung fatty acid and 49 parts of para-tertiary-butyl benzoic acid are mixed and heated with 60 parts of xylene to an acid value of 12. In addition, 271 parts of maleic anhydride and 0.6 parts of hydroquinone are admixed with the content and heated to terminate the reaction. 100 parts of a 50% stylene solution of this alkyd resin are mixed with 1 part of a 60% toluene solution of cobalt naphthenate, and then coated on a glass plate and irradiated with high energy electron beams of 300 kV with a dose of 5 Mrad for 1 sec. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Chemical recycling of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites in oxygen in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Yongping; Wang, Zhi; Feng, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    The carbon fibers in carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites were recovered in oxygen in supercritical water at 30 ± 1 MPa and 440 ± 10 o C. The microstructure of the recovered carbon fibers was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom force microscopy (AFM). The results revealed that the clean carbon fibers were recovered and had higher tensile strength relative to the virgin carbon fibers when the decomposition rate was above 85 wt.%, although the recovered carbon fibers have clean surface, the epoxy resin on the surface of the recovered carbon fibers was readily observed. As the decomposition rate increased to above 96 wt.%, no epoxy resin was observed on the surface of the carbon fibers and the oxidation of the recovered carbon fibers was readily measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The carbon fibers were ideally recovered and have original strength when the decomposition rates were between 94 and 97 wt.%. This study clearly showed the oxygen in supercritical water is a promising way for recycling the carbon fibers in carbon fibers reinforced resin composites.

  18. Epoxy Resin Based Composites, Mechanical and Tribological Properties: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Bello

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available High fuel consumption by automobile and aerospace vehicles built from legacy alloys has been a great challenge to global design and material engineers. This has called for researches into material development for the production of lighter materials of the same or even superior mechanical properties to the existing materials in this area of applications. This forms a part of efforts to achieve the global vision 2025 i.e to reduce the fuel consumption by automobile and aerospace vehicles by at least 75 %. Many researchers have identified advanced composites as suitable materials in this regard. Among the common matrices used for the development of advanced composites, epoxy resin has attained a dominance among its counterparts because of its excellent properties including chemical, thermal and electrical resistance properties, mechanical properties and dimensional stability. This review is a reflection of the extensive study on the currently ongoing research aimed at development of epoxy resin hybrid nanocomposites for engineering applications. In this paper, brief explanation has been given to different terms related to the research work and also, some previous works (in accordance with materials within authors’ reach in the area of the ongoing research have been reported.

  19. Resin composites: strength of the bond to dentin versus mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Kasper Boel; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2007-03-01

    This study (1) investigated whether the combination of an adhesive system from one manufacturer with a resin composite from the same manufacturer provides superior bonding of the resin composite to dentin compared with the combination of an adhesive system from one manufacturer with a resin composite from another manufacturer, and (2) tested for a possible influence on bond strength of mechanical properties of the resin composite. After application of an adhesive system, a resin composite was bonded to flattened human dentin and tested in shear after 1 week. Five adhesive systems (AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond, Optibond Solo Plus, and Xeno III) were tested with each of five resin composites (Tetric Ceram, Filtek Supreme, Clearfil AP-X, Premise, and EsthetX). The mechanical properties flexural strength and flexural modulus were determined by three-point loading. Bond strengths were influenced by the brand of adhesive system (P resin composite (P resin composite from the same manufacturer did not provide bond strengths that were superior to those obtained when an adhesive system from one manufacturer was combined with a resin composite from another manufacturer. Independent of the brand of resin composite, the adhesive system Clearfil SE Bond mediated the highest bond strength to dentin. For each adhesive system, the resin composite Clearfil AP-X resulted in the highest bond strength to dentin. Significant positive correlations were found between bond strength and flexural strength (P < 0.0026, r = 0.21) and between bond strength and flexural modulus (P < 0.0017, r = 0.22).

  20. Treatment planning and smile design using composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marus, Robert

    2006-05-01

    Recent advances in dental materials and adhesive protocols have expanded the restorative procedures available to today's clinicians. Used in combination with proper treatment planning, these innovations enable dental professionals to provide enhanced aesthetic care that achieves the increasing expectations of their patients. Using a case presentation, this article will document the steps required to harmoniously integrate smile design, material selection, and patient communication that are involved in the provisional of aesthetic dental care. This article discusses the utilization of composite resin as a tool to enhance the patient's smile. Upon reading this article, the reader should: Become familiar with a smile-enhancing technique which can be completed in one office visit. Realize the benefits that intraoral composite mockups offer in terms of prototyping and confirming patient satisfaction.

  1. Marginal quality and wear of extended posterior resin composite restorations: Eight-year results in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Norbert; Küssner, Pierre; Motmaen, Ila; Köhl, Michael; Wöstmann, Bernd; Frankenberger, Roland

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate wear and marginal quality of resin composite restorations over eight years of clinical service in vivo. 30 patients received 68 resin composite restorations (36 Grandio, 32 Tetric Ceram) in the course of a prospective clinical trial. 3-D evaluation of 36 selected teeth involving 144 epoxy replicas was carried out using a special 3-D scanning device with an accuracy of U1=2.5+L/350 μm; U3=3+L/300 μm. In vivo replicas were sputter-coated with gold and examined under a SEM at 200× magnification. Marginal integrity between resin composite and enamel was expressed as a percentage of the entire judgeable margin length. During the clinical 8-year observation period, wear significantly increased in the restored areas as well as in OCAs. RBCs under investigation showed no significant differences regarding wear (p>0.05). Localization of the restorations (premolar vs. molar or upper vs. lower) did not show a significant influence on wear rates (p>0.05). Clinically, by SEM, and by 3-D scanning distinct changes of worn contours on enamel and RBC were visible. Quantitative margin analysis revealed a change of perfect margins (58% at baseline vs. 14% at 8 years), positive step formations (15% at baseline vs. 10% at 8 years), and negative step formations (20% at baseline vs. 71% at 8 years) over time (pGrandio showed lower values (Mann-Whitney U-test; p<0.05). The portion of negative step formations was lower for Tetric Ceram at baseline (Mann-Whitney-U test; p<0.05). After eight years of clinical service, neither wear nor marginal quality was a critical factor for estimation and survival of extended posterior resin composite restorations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Comparative study of polymerization shrinkage and related properties of flowable composites and an unfilled resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovinszky, Katalin; Molnár, Lilla; Bakó, József; Szalóki, Melinda; Hegedus, Csaba

    2014-03-01

    The polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of dental composites are in the center of the interest of researchers and manufacturers. It is a great challenge to minimize this important property as low as possible. Many factors are related and are in complicated correlation with each other affecting the polymerization shrinkage. Polymerization shrinkage stress degree of conversion and elasticity has high importance from this aspect. Our aim was to study the polymerization shrinkage and related properties (modulus of elasticity, degree of conversion, shrinkage stress) of three flowable composite (Charisma Opal Flow, SDR, Filtek Ultimate) and an unfilled composite resin. Modulus of elasticity was measured using three point flexure tests on universal testing machine. The polymerization shrinkage stress was determined using bonded-disc technique. The degree of conversion measurements were performed by FT-IR spectroscopy. And the volumetric shrinkage was investigated using Archimedes principle and was measured on analytical balance with special additional equipment. The unfilled resin generally showed higher shrinkage (8,26%), shrinkage stress (0,8 MPa) and degree of conversion (38%), and presented the lowest modulus of elasticity (3047,02MPa). Highest values of unfilled resin correspond to the literature. The lack of fillers enlarges the shrinkage, and the shrinkage stress, but gives the higher flexibility and higher degree of conversion. Further investigations needs to be done to understand and reveal the differences between the composites.

  3. The effect of toothbrushing on surface gloss of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefever, Dorien; Perakis, Nikolaos; Roig, Miguel; Krejci, Ivo; Ardu, Stefano

    2012-02-01

    To determine the changes in surface gloss of different composite materials after laboratory toothbrushing simulation. 36 specimens were fabricated for each material and polished with 120-, 220-, 500-, 1200-, 2400- and 4000-grit SiC abrasive paper, respectively. Gloss measurements were made with a glossmeter (Novocurve) prior to testing procedures and then subjected to simulated toothbrushing for 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes by means of an electric toothbrush with a pressure of 2N while being immersed in a 50 RDA toothpaste slurry. Four supplementary samples per group were analyzed under SEM immediately after polishing procedures and four samples after 60 minutes simulated toothbrushing in order to evaluate the causes of the gloss decrease. The tested resin composite materials were Filtek Supreme XTE, Durafill, HRi Enamel Plus, Miris 2, Empress Direct, Venus Diamond, Gradia Direct, Clearfil Photo Posterior and G-aenial. Natural enamel represented the control group. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal Wallis and Tukey post-hoc test, with a level of significance set at 0.05. Resin composite initial gloss values ranged from 68.9 to 100.5 at baseline to 10.6 to 62.6 after 1 hour of brushing. Highest gloss values were obtained by Filtek Supreme XTE, followed by Empress Direct and Durafill. Lowest values were obtained by Clearfil Photoposterior, Miris 2, Enamel HRi and Venus Diamond. Natural enamel was the only substrate to maintain its gloss throughout the brushing procedure (110.4 after 60 minutes). SEM analysis revealed different patterns of surface degradation depending on the composite material.

  4. Mechanical evaluation of five flowable resin composites by the dynamic micro-indentation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Satoshi; Iwai, Hirotoshi; Tanimoto, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the strength of brittle materials, such as resin composites, is extremely difficult. Micro-indentation hardness testing is a convenient way of investigating the mechanical properties of a small volume of material. In this study, the mechanical properties of five commercially available flowable resin composites were investigated by the dynamic micro-indentation method. Additionally, the effects of inorganic-filler content on the dynamic hardness and elastic modulus of flowable composites obtained by this method were investigated. The weight percentages of the inorganic fillers in the resin composites were determined by the ashing technique. The results indicate that the mechanical properties of flowable composites are affected by not only the filler content but also the properties of the resin matrix. In conclusion, the dynamic micro-indentation method is a useful technique for determining the mechanical behavior of dental resin composites as brittle material.

  5. Comparison of stabilities in translucency, fluorescence and opalescence of direct and indirect composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Lee, Young-Keun

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate translucency, fluorescence and opalescence stabilities of direct and indirect composite resins after aging. One direct (16 shades) and two indirect composite resins (16 and 26 shades) were investigated. Resins were filled in a mold (1 mm thick) and light cured; post-curings were performed for indirect resins. Color was measured before and after 5,000 cycles of thermocycling on a reflection spectrophotometer in reflectance and transmittance modes to calculate parameters for translucency (TP), fluorescence (FL) and opalescence (OP). Differences in the changes of TP, FL and OP after aging by the type of resin were determined by t test, and those were also determined by one-way ANOVA with the factor of the brand or the shade group (P resins; and were -2.0 to 1.8, -0.9 to 0.4 and -2.9 to 3.7, respectively, for indirect resins. Changes in TP were not significantly different by the type of resin, but those in FL and OP were different (P = 0.05). Changes in optical parameters were influenced by the brand or the shade group of the resins (P resins varied depending on type, brand or shade group. Aging significantly affected fluorescence and opalescence, but not translucency, of indirect resins compared to those of direct resins.

  6. The effect of processing on autohesive strength development in thermoplastic resins and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Jeremy C.; Loos, Alfred C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    1989-01-01

    In the present investigation of processing effects on the autohesive bond strength of neat polysulfone resin and graphite-reinforced polysulfone-matrix composites measured resin bond strength development in precracked compact tension specimens 'healed' by heating over a contact period at a given temperature. The critical strain energy release rate of refractured composite specimens did not exhibit the strong time or temperature dependence of the neat resin tests; only 80-90 percent of the undamaged fracture energy is recoverable.

  7. Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms for low cost composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, J. G.; Bayha, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms are being evaluated at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company (LASC) under NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. This work is aimed towards the development of low-cost, damage-tolerant composite fuselage structures. Resin systems for resin transfer molding and powder epoxy towpreg materials are being evaluated for processability, performance and cost. Three developmental epoxy resin systems for resin transfer molding (RTM) and three resin systems for powder towpregging are being investigated. Various 3D textile preform architectures using advanced weaving and braiding processes are also being evaluated. Trials are being conducted with powdered towpreg, in 2D weaving and 3D braiding processes for their textile processability and their potential for fabrication in 'net shape' fuselage structures. The progress in advanced resin screening and textile preform development is reviewed here.

  8. In Situ Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide-Reinforced Silicone-Acrylate Resin Composite Films Applied in Erosion Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduced graphene oxide reinforced silicone-acrylate resin composite films (rGO/SAR composite films were prepared by in situ synthesis method. The structure of rGO/SAR composite films was characterized by Raman spectrum, atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric analyzer. The results showed that the rGO were uniformly dispersed in silicone-acrylate resin matrix. Furthermore, the effect of rGO loading on mechanical properties of composite films was investigated by bulge test. A significant enhancement (ca. 290% and 320% in Young’s modulus and yield stress was obtained by adding the rGO to silicone-acrylate resin. At the same time, the adhesive energy between the composite films and metal substrate was also improved to be about 200%. Moreover, the erosion resistance of the composite films was also investigated as function of rGO loading. The rGO had great effect on the erosion resistance of the composite films, in which the Rcorr (ca. 0.8 mm/year of composite film was far lower than that (28.7 mm/year of pure silicone-acrylate resin film. Thus, this approach provides a novel route to investigate mechanical stability of polymer composite films and improve erosion resistance of polymer coating, which are very important to be used in mechanical-corrosion coupling environments.

  9. Bonding of Glass Ceramic and Indirect Composite to Non-aged and Aged Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged

  10. Shrinkage-stress kinetics of photopolymerised resin-composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Julian D.

    The use of directly-placed substances as restorative materials in teeth remains the technique of choice for preserving function and form in teeth that have cavities. The current aesthetic restorative materials of choice are resin-composite materials, although these undergo molecular densification during polymerisation, which has deleterious effects. Although shrinkage-strain is the cause, it is the shrinkage-stress effects that may be seen as being responsible for the problems with adhesive resin-based restorations that are encountered clinically, the bond may fail with separation of the material from the cavity wall, leading to marginal discolouration, pulpal irritation and subsequent necrosis, post operative sensitivity, recurrent caries and eventual failure of restorations. Other outcomes include cohesive fracture of enamel or cusps, cuspal movement (strain) and persistent pain. The aims of this research were to characterise the effects of variations in resin-composite formulation on shrinkage-strain and shrinkage-stress kinetics. In particular, the influence of the size and morphology of the dispersed phase was investigated through the study of experimental formulations. Polymerisation shrinkage-strain kinetics were assessed with the bonded-disk method. It was found that resin-composites with spherical filler particles had significantly lower shrinkage-strain compared to those with irregular filler particles. Additionally, shrinkage-strain was found to be dependent on the size of filler particle, and this trend was related, in part, to differences in the degree of conversion. The data were also used to calculate the activation energy for each material, and a relationship between this and filler particle size for the irregular fillers was demonstrated. A fixed-compliance cantilever beam instrument (Bioman) was used for characterisation of shrinkage-stress kinetics. Significant differences were identified between materials in relation to filler particle size and

  11. Cavity Adaptation of Water-Based Restoratives Placed as Liners under a Resin Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela B. Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the cavity adaptation of mineral trioxide (ProRoot MTA/MT, tricalcium silicate (Biodentine/BD, and glass ionomer (Equia Fil/EF cements used as liners and the interfacial integrity between those liners and a composite resin placed as the main restorative material. Materials and Methods. Standardized class I cavities (n: 8 per group were prepared in upper premolars. Cavities were lined with a 1 mm thick layer of each of the tested materials and restored with Optibond FL adhesive and Herculite Precis composite resin. Cavity adaptation of the restorations was investigated by computerized X-ray microtomography. The regions of interest (ROI were set at the cavity-liner (CL interface and the liner-resin (LR interface. The percentage void volume fraction (%VVF in the ROI was calculated. The specimens were then sectioned and the interfaces were evaluated by reflection optical microscopy, to measure the % length (%LD of the interfacial gaps. Selected samples were further evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (a=0.05. Results. MT showed significantly higher %VVF and %LD values in CL interfaces than BD and EF (p<0.05. No significant differences were found among the materials for the same values at the LR interfaces. Conclusions. When used as a composite liner, ProRoot MTA showed inferior cavity adaptation at dentin/liner interface when compared to Biodentine and Equia Fil.

  12. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin composite to composite after aging conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Barbosa, Silvia Helena; Melo, Renata Marques; Galhano, Graziela Avila Prado; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of two different surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a bis-GMA-adduct/bis-EMA/TEGDMA based resin composite after three aging conditions. Methods. Thirty-six composite resin blocks (Esthet X, Dentsply) were prepared (5 mm x 6 mm x 6

  13. The effect of proximal contour on marginal ridge fracture of Class II composite resin restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Kuijs, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the marginal ridge fracture strength of Class II composite resin restorations placed with a straight or contoured matrix band using composite resins with different modulus of elasticity. METHODS: In 60 artificial first molars standardized MO-preparations were ground. Two

  14. [Effect of bleaching agents on the color of indirect and direct composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wenzhong; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Yining

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of bleaching agents on the color of indirect and direct composite resins. Five resin composite materials were tested in this in vitro study. The five composites were as follow: two indirect composite resins (Adoro SR, Ceramage) and three direct composite resins (Filtek Z350, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic, and Gradia Direct Anterior). For each material, twenty disk-shaped specimens were prepared and randomly divided into five groups according to the color parameters of specimens before bleaching treatment. The composite resin specimens were treated by one of five sample solutions which were at-home bleaching agents (10% and 15% carbarmide peroxide), in- office bleaching agents (38% H(2)O(2) and 35%H(2)O(2)) and deionized water (control group). The color parameters of specimens were measured by spectrophotometer at baseline and after bleaching treatments. The color differences (ΔE values) between baseline and post-treatments were calculated. The data of color differences were evaluated statistically using two-way analysis with a significance level of 0.05. The color changes of the resin composites were less than 2.0 after bleaching agent treatment, therefore were not perceptible. Slight increase of L(*) values and decrease of C(*)ab values in color parameters of specimens were observed. There were statistically significant differences in ΔE values for different bleaching treatments and resin materials (P = 0.001). The bleaching agents did not affect the color of indirect and direct composite resins tested.

  15. Longevity of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth in Public Dental Health Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette

    2013-01-01

    To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service.......To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service....

  16. Composite panels made with biofiber or office wastepaper bonded with thermoplastic and/or thermosetting resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Muehl; Andrzej M. Krzysik; Poo Chow

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two groups of composite panels made from two types of underutilized natural fiber sources, kenaf bast fiber and office wastepaper, for their suitability in composite panels. All panels were made with 5% thermosetting phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin and 1.5% wax. Also, an additional 10% polypropylene (PP) thermoplastic resin was...

  17. The effectiveness of different polymerization protocols for class II composite resin restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, L.C.G. de; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Geitenbeek, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of reduced light exposure times on Vickers hardness (VH) of class II composite resin restorations. METHODS: Class II restorations were made in vitro in three 2mm thick increments in a human molar. Two composite resins (Clearfil AP-X; Esthet-X) were polymerized

  18. Clinical success and survival of indirect resin composite crowns: results of a 3-year prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the new resin composite "NECO" as a material for indirect restorations clinically. Methods Forty-five patients were selected, of which 12 men and 33 women, with a mean age of 53. A total of 91 post-canine indirect resin composite NECO (Heraeus Kulzer,

  19. Fracture strength and fatigue resistance of dental resin-based composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; Palav, P.; Aboushelib, M.M.N.; van Dalen, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber-reinforcement on the fracture strength and fatigue resistance of resin-based composites. Methods: One hundred rectangular bar-shaped specimens (2 mm × 2 mm × 25 mm) made of resin-based composite were prepared in a

  20. Five-year clinical performance of posterior resin composite restorations placed by dental students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the survival over a five-year period of posterior resin composite restorations placed by students. METHODS: Class I and II resin composite restorations placed by second-fourth year dental students were evaluated. Patients attended the dental school every 6 months for a

  1. Influence of salivary enzymes and alkaline pH environment on fatigue behavior of resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmohammadi, H.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Aboushelib, M.N.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of enzymatic activity and alkaline medium on flexural strength and rotary fatigue resistance of direct and indirect resin composite restorative materials. Methods: Three direct resin composite materials Filtek Z100, Filtek Z250 and Filtek Silorane (3M ESPE), and two

  2. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (ptested FRC posts is required for effective bonding.

  3. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joo Hoon; Choi, Eui Hwan

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  4. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hoon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  5. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Bismaleimide (BMI) resins are an attractive new addition to world-wide composite applications. This type of thermosetting polyimide provides several unique characteristics such as excellent physical property retention at elevated temperatures and in wet environments, constant electrical properties over a vast array of temperature settings, and nonflammability properties as well. This makes BMI a popular choice in advance composites and electronics applications [I]. Bismaleimide-2 (BMI-2) resin was used to infuse intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) based carbon fiber. Two panel configurations consisting of 4 plies with [+45deg, 90deg]2 and [0deg]4 orientations were fabricated. For tensile testing, a [90deg]4 configuration was tested by rotating the [0deg]4 configirration to lie orthogonal with the load direction of the test fixture. Curing of the BMI-2/IM7 system utilized an optimal infusion process which focused on the integration of the manufacturer-recommended ramp rates,. hold times, and cure temperatures. Completion of the cure cycle for the BMI-2/IM7 composite yielded a product with multiple surface voids determined through visual and metallographic observation. Although the curing cycle was the same for the three panellayups, the surface voids that remained within the material post-cure were different in abundance, shape, and size. For tensile testing, the [0deg]4 layup had a 19.9% and 21.7% greater average tensile strain performance compared to the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45degg] layups, respectively, at failure. For tensile stress performance, the [0deg]4 layup had a 5.8% and 34.0% greater average performance% than the [90deg]4 and [+45deg, 90deg, 90deg,-45deg] layups.

  6. Color Stability Assessment of Two Different Composite Resins with Variable Immersion Time Using Various Beverages: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Senthil; Ajay, R; Miskeen Sahib, S A; Chittrarasu, M; Navarasu, M; Ragavendran, N; Burhanuddin Mohammed, Omar Farooq

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the difference in the color of microhybrid (MH) and nanofilled (NF) composite resins after 24 and 48 h in beverages such as red wine (RW), Coca-Cola, and distilled water. The specific objective of this study was to investigate the cumulative effect of the colorant solutions on the dental composites. MH and NF composite resins (A2 shade) were used in this current study. Sixty disk-shaped material specimens (10 mm in diameter × 2 mm in thickness) were prepared using a fiber mold (ring), with the desired dimensions. The specimen surfaces were polished using super-snap polishing system. Sixty specimens were divided into two groups of 30 each (Group I: MH resin composite; Group II: NF resin composite). Both the groups divided into six subgroups (Subgroup I: RW for 24 h [RW-24]; Subgroup II: RW for 48 h; Subgroup III: Coca-Cola for 24 h [CC-24]; Subgroup IV: Coca-Cola for 48 h [CC-48]; Subgroup V: Distilled water for 24 h [DW-24]; Subgroup VI: Distilled water for 48 h [DW-48]). All the samples were immersed in respective drinks for a period of 24 h, and color differences were measured using ultraviolet spectrophotometer. Once again, all the samples were immersed for another 24 h in the same drinks. After 48 h, the color change of the samples was measured. Measurements were made according to the CIE L × a × b × color space relative to the CIE standard illuminant D65. The color changes of the specimens were evaluated using the following formula: Statistical analysis was performed. The data were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA and t -test at a significance level of 0.05. Color stability of MH composite resin was found to be inferior than the NF resin composite irrespective of immersion medium and time. In RW, the color change observed was maximum for both composite resins followed by Coca-Cola. Immersing the resin composites in distilled water for 24 and 48 h had negligible color change. A 48-h immersion of both composite resins in

  7. Color stability assessment of two different composite resins with variable immersion time using various beverages: An In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Senthil Kumar

    2017-01-01

    48 h had negligible color change. A 48-h immersion of both composite resins in all three immersion mediums showed greater color change than 24 h immersion.

  8. [Aging of silorane- and methacrylate-based composite resins: effects on color and translucency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Pan, Jie; Lin, Hong; Shen, Song

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the color stability and translucency of silorane-based low shrinkage composite after in vitro aging procedures of thermal cycling and water storage respectively, and to compare with those of conventional methacrylate-based posterior composite. Three light-cured composite resins, dimethacrylate-based composite A (Filtek™ Z350), B (Filtek™ P60) and silorane-based composite C (Filtek™ P90), were tested in this study. Ten specimens (10 mm in diameter, 1 mm in height) of each composite were prepared. The ten specimens in each group were then divided into two subgroups (n = 5). One subgroup underwent thermal cycling [(5.0 ± 0.5)~(55.0 ± 1.0) °C, 10 000 cycles] and the other was stored in 37 C° distilled water for 180 days. With a spectrophotometer, the CIE L * a * b * parameters of the specimens were tested before and after artificial aging against white, medium grey and black backgrounds, respectively. △E, TP and △TP were calculated and data were analyzed using independent-samples t test and partial analysis (P composite showed color alteration above the clinically acceptable levels (△E > 3.3), and also showed higher △E with a statistically significant difference in comparison with the other composites (B and C) (P composite C showed more alteration compared with composite B (P composite underwent greater alteration with regard to color stability and translucency.

  9. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooran Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Prompt L-Pop (PLP adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1 Immediate light-curing, (2 delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3 self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  10. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    This study determined whether the strength with which resin composite bonds to dentin is influenced by variations in the curing rate of resin composites. Resin composites were bonded to the dentin of extracted human molars. Adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied and cured (10 seconds...... @ 1000 mW/cm2) for all groups. A split Teflon mold was clamped to the treated dentin surface and filled with resin composite. The rate of cure was varied, using one of four LED-curing units of different power densities. The rate of cure was also varied using the continuous or pulse-delay mode...... of the four power densities was followed by a one-minute interval, after which light cure was completed (14, 29, 27 or 78 seconds), likewise, giving a total energy density of 16 J/cm2. The specimens produced for each of the eight curing protocols and two resin composites (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent...

  11. Color Stability of the Bulk-Fill Composite Resins with Different Thickness in Response to Coffee/Water Immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamszadeh, Sayna; Sheikh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh Mahsa; Hasani, Elham; Abrandabadi, Ahmad Najafi; Panahandeh, Narges

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the color stability of bulk-fill and conventional composite resin with respect to thickness and storage media. Twenty specimens of a conventional composite resin (6 mm diameter and 2 mm thick) and 40 specimens of the bulk-fill Tetric EvoCeram composite resin at two different thicknesses (6 mm diameter and 2 mm thick or 4 mm thick, n = 20) were prepared. The specimens were stored in distilled water during the study period (28 d). Half of the specimens were remained in distilled water and the other half were immersed in coffee solution 20 min/d and kept in distilled water between the cycles. Color changes (ΔE) were measured using the CIE L (⁎) a (⁎) b (⁎) color space and a digital imaging system at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days of storage. Data were analyzed using Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test (P Composite resins showed significant increase in color changes by time (bulk-fill > conventional; P color changes with increasing the increment thickness, which was significant at 14 (P Color change of bulk-fill composite resin was greater than that of the conventional one after coffee staining and is also a function of increment thicknesses.

  12. Mechanical fatigue degradation of ceramics versus resin composites for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Geinzer, Eva; Muschweck, Anna; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    For posterior partial restorations an overlap of indication exists where either ceramic or resin-based composite materials can be successfully applied. The aim of this study was to compare the fatigue resistance of modern dental ceramic materials versus dental resin composites in order to address such conflicts. Bar specimens of five ceramic materials and resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and stored for 14 days in distilled water at 37°C. The following ceramic materials were selected for testing: a high-strength zirconium dioxide (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar), a machinable lithium disilicate (e.max CAD, Ivoclar), a pressable lithium disilicate ceramic (e-max Press, Ivoclar), a fluorapatite-based glass-ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar), and a machinable color-graded feldspathic porcelain (Trilux Forte, Vita). The composite materials selected were: an indirect machinable composite (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) and four direct composites with varying filler nature (Clearfil Majesty Posterior, Kuraray; GrandioSO, Voco; Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar-Vivadent; and CeramX Duo, Dentsply). Fifteen specimens were tested in water for initial strength (σin) in 4-point bending. Using the same test set-up, the residual flexural fatigue strength (σff) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz (n=25). Weibull parameters σ0 and m were calculated for the σin specimens, whereas the σff and strength loss in percentage were obtained from the fatigue experiment. The zirconium oxide ceramic showed the highest σin and σff (768 and 440 MPa, respectively). Although both lithium disilicate ceramics were similar in the static test, the pressable version showed a significantly higher fatigue resistance after cyclic loading. Both the fluorapatite-based and the feldspathic porcelain showed equivalent initial and cyclic fatigue properties. From the composites, the highest filled direct material Clearfil Majesty Posterior showed superior fatigue performance

  13. Effects of Different Light Curing Units/Modes on the Microleakage of Flowable Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A. Ruya; Celik, Cigdem; Dayangac, Berrin; Ozgunaltay, Gul

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different light curing units and modes on microleakage of flowable composite resins. Methods Eighty Class V cavities were prepared in buccal and lingual surfaces of 40 extracted human premolars with cervical wall located in dentin and the occlusal wall in enamel. These teeth were randomly assigned into two groups (n=20) and restored with different flowable composites; Group I: Esthet-X Flow, Group II: Grandio Flow. Each group was randomly divided into four subgroups; while the samples of the first subgroup were polymerized with conventional Halogen light, the rest of them were polymerized with different curing modes of Light Emitting Diode (LED). The second subgroup was polymerized with fast-curing; the third subgroup with pulse-curing and those of the fourth subgroup with step-curing modes of LED. After the samples were thermocycled and immersed in dye, they were longitudinally sectioned. Dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results None of the restorations showed leakage on enamel margins. On dentin margins no significant differences were observed between flowable composite resins polymerized with halogen light (P>.05). While step curing mode of LED presented significant differences between the resins, the difference was insignificant when fast-curing and pulse-curing mode of LED were used. No statistically significant differences were observed between curing units for Esthet-X Flow samples. For Grandio Flow samples, only step-curing mode of LED caused statistically higher leakage scores than halogen and other curing modes of LED (P<.05). Conclusions The effect of curing units’ type and curing mode on flowable composite resin leakage might be material-dependent. PMID:19212529

  14. Composite resin color stability: influence of light sources and immersion media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Aleixo dos Santos Domingos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the influence of light sources and immersion media on the color stability of a nanofilled composite resin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Conventional halogen, high-power-density halogen and high-power-density light-emitting diode (LED units were used. There were 4 immersion media: coffee, tea, Coke® and artificial saliva. A total of 180 specimens (10 mm x 2 mm were prepared, immersed in artificial saliva for 24 h at 37±1ºC, and had their initial color measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIELab system. Then, the specimens were immersed in the 4 media during 60 days. Data from the color change and luminosity were collected and subjected to statistical analysis by the Kruskall-Wallis test (p<0.05. For immersion time, the data were subjected to two-way ANOVA test and Fisher's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: High-power-density LED (ΔE=1.91 promoted similar color stability of the composite resin to that of the tested halogen curing units (Jet Lite 4000 plus - ΔE=2.05; XL 3000 - ΔE=2.28. Coffee (ΔE=8.40; ΔL=-5.21 showed the highest influence on color stability of the studied composite resin. CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in color stability regardless of the light sources, and coffee was the immersion medium that promoted the highest color changes on the tested composite resin.

  15. Translucency and masking ability of various composite resins at different thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Farideh; Radafshar, Golpar; Tavangar, Maryam; Davaloo, Reza; Khosravian, Aref; Mirfarhadi, Nastaran

    2014-09-01

    Optical properties of the composite resins, concerning their translucency and thickness, are affected by discolored tooth structure or inherent darkness of the oral cavity. This study aimed to compare the translucency parameter (TP) of five different composite resins in different thicknesses and to evaluate their masking ability in black backgrounds. Five brands of composite resins; Gradia (GC) and Crystalline (Confi-dental) in opaque A2 (OA2), Vit-l-escence (Ultradent) in opaque snow (OS), Herculite XRV (Kerr) and Opallis (FGM) in dentin A2 (DA2) shades were selected to enroll the study. Color coordinates of each composite were determined at 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mm thicknesses on a white backing, the backing of material itself and a black backing were calculated by using a spectrophotometer to evaluate the translucency parameter (TP) of the study materials. The masking ability was also calculated from the specimens on the material itself and on black backing. The values under 2 were estimated as imperceptible. One-way ANOVA, T-test and Tukey HSD were employed for statistical analysis. The masking ability values, recorded for the 1.5 mm-thick specimens, were in the range of imperceptible except for the Herculite. There was no difference in TP values of the materials at 1.5 mm thickness. Opaque snow shade of Vit-l-escence and opaque A2 shade of Gradia showed lower TP values in comparison with the other 1 and 0.5 mm-thick materials and this difference was statistically significant (pcomposite resins could not mask the black background color.

  16. Effects of Simulated Gastric Juice on CAD/CAM Resin Composites-Morphological and Mechanical Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Adriana D; Münchow, Eliseu A; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T; Platt, Jeffrey A; Bottino, Marco C

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of simulated gastric juice on CAD/CAM resin composites by means of morphological and mechanical (i.e., hardness) evaluations. Fourteen specimens of each resin composite (Lava Ultimate and Paradigm MZ100) were prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. They were submitted to erosive challenges in a simulated gastric juice (pH = 1.2) solution for 6 and 24 hours. Vickers microhardness and surface roughness (R a , R q ) evaluations were taken before (baseline) and after acid exposure. Morphological analysis was obtained using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical analysis was performed using two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls's test (α = 0.05). Paradigm MZ100 demonstrated higher microhardness than Lava Ultimate regardless of the storage time period (p ≤ 0.001), and microhardness was not affected by the acidic challenge (p = 0.58). After 6 hours of acid exposure, a significant decrease in R a and R q was seen for Paradigm MZ100 when compared to the baseline (R a p = 0.032; R q p = 0.013); however, for Lava Ultimate only Rq decreased (p = 0.021), while R a remained unchanged (p = 0.38). After 24 hours of acid exposure, while Paradigm MZ100 exhibited no additional changes in surface roughness (p ≥ 0.75), Lava Ultimate became rougher (R a p = 0.041; R q p = 0.014), as confirmed by SEM imaging. The acidic scenario tested in the present study changed the surface roughness of the resin composites but not their Vickers microhardness. Moreover, both resin composites seem suitable for use under acidic scenarios, although Paradigm MZ100 showed enhanced stability compared to Lava Ultimate. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Temperature rise during polymerization of different cavity liners and composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Ozcan; Turel, Verda; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thermal insulating properties of different light curing cavity liners and composite resins during light emitting diode (LED) curing. Sixty-four dentin discs, 1 mm thick and 8 mm in diameter, were prepared. Specimens were divided into four groups. Calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2), resin-modified glass ionomer cement, flowable composite and adhesive systems were applied to dentin discs according to the manufacturers' instructions. The rise in temperature during polymerization with a LED curing unit (LCU) was measured using a K-type thermocouple connected to a data logger. Subsequently, all specimens were randomly divided into one of two groups. A silorane-based composite resin and a methacrylate-based composite resin were applied to the specimens. Temperature rise during polymerization of composite resins with LCU were then measured again. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey analyses. There were significant differences in temperature rise among the liners, adhesives, and composite resins (P < 0.05). Silorane-based composite resin exhibited significantly greater temperature rises than methacrylate-based resin (P < 0.05). The smallest temperature rises were observed in Ca(OH)2 specimens. Thermal insulating properties of different restorative materials are important factors in pulp health. Bonding agents alone are not sufficient to protect pulp from thermal stimuli throughout curing.

  18. Effect of reinforcement with resin composite on fracture strength of structurally compromised roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yuji; Komada, Wataru; Yoshida, Keiichi; Otake, Shiho; Okada, Daizo; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the fracture resistance of structurally compromised roots restored with four different post and core systems. Thirty-two bovine roots were uniformly shaped to simulate human mandibular premolar roots. The roots were divided into four groups based on the type of restoration: cemented cast post and core (Group MC), resin composite build-up (Group CR), resin composite and prefabricated glass fiber post build-up (Group FRC), and thick-layer dual-cured resin composite-reinforced small-diameter tapered cast post and core (Group CRM). After a static loading test, the failure mode and fracture resistance were recorded. Group CRM (719.38+/-196.73 N) exhibited a significantly high fracture resistance compared with the other groups (Group MC: 429.56+/-82.43 N; Group CR: 349.56+/-66.21 N; Group FRC: 398.94+/-112.71 N; pCRM exhibited better mechanical properties for structurally compromised roots with no ferrules, although all types of restorations showed non-restorable fracture modes.

  19. Degree of conversion of nanofilled and microhybrid composite resins photo-activated by different generations of LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benicia Carolina Iaskieviscz Ribeiro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:This study aimed at evaluating the degree of conversion (DC of four composite resins, being one nanofilled and 3 microhybrid resins, photo-activated with second- and third-generation light-emitting diodes (LEDs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Filtek TM Z350 nanofilled composite resins and Amelogen® Plus, Vit-l-escenceTM and Opallis microhybrid resins were photo-activated with two second-generation LEDs (Radii-cal and Elipar Free LightTM 2 and one third-generation LED (Ultra-Lume LED 5 by continuous light mode, and a quartz halogen-tungsten bulb (QHT, control. After 24 h of storage, the samples were pulverized into fine powder and 5 mg of each material were mixed with 100 mg of potassium bromide (KBr. After homogenization, they were pressed, which resulted in a pellet that was evaluated using an infrared spectromer (Nexus 470, Thermo Nicolet equipped with TGS detector using diffuse reflectance (32 scans, resolution of 4 cm-1 coupled to a computer. The percentage of unreacted carbon-carbon double bonds (% C=C was determined from the ratio of absorbance intensities of aliphatic C=C (peak at 1637 cm-1 against internal standard before and after curing of the specimen: aromatic C-C (peak at 1610 cm-1. RESULTS: The ANOVA showed a significant effect on the interaction between the light-curing units (LCUs and the composite resins (p<0.001. The Tukey’s test showed that the nanofilled resin (FiltekTM Z350 and Opallis when photo-activated by the halogen lamp (QTH had the lowest DC compared with the other microhybrid composite resins. The DC of the nanofilled resin (FiltekTM Z350 was also lower using LEDs. The highest degrees of conversion were obtained using the third-generation LED and one of second-generation LEDs (Elipar Free LightTM 2. CONCLUSIONS: The nanofilled resin showed the lowest DC, and the Vit-l-escenceTM microhybrid composite resin showed the highest DC. Among the LCUs, it was not possible to establish an order, even though the second

  20. Grinding efficiency of abutment tooth with both dentin and core composite resin on axial plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miho, Otoaki; Sato, Toru; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate grinding efficiency in abutment teeth comprising both dentin and core composite resin in the axial plane. Grinding was performed over 5 runs at two loads (0.5 or 0.25 N) and two feed rates (1 or 2 mm/sec). The grinding surface was observed with a 3-D laser microscope. Tomographic images of the grinding surfaces captured perpendicular to the feed direction were also analyzed. Using a non-ground surface as a reference, areas comprising only dentin, both dentin and core composite resin, or only core composite resin were analyzed to determine the angle of the grinding surface. Composite resins were subjected to the Vickers hardness test and scanning electron microscopy. Data were statistically analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparison tests. Multiple regression analysis was performed for load, feed rate, and Vickers hardness of the build-up material depending on number of runs. When grinding was performed at a constant load and feed rate, a greater grinding angle was observed in areas comprising both dentin and composite resin or only composite resin than in areas consisting of dentin alone. A correlation was found between machinability and load or feed rate in areas comprising both dentin and composite resin or composite resin alone, with a particularly high correlation being observed between machinability and load. These results suggest that great caution should be exercised in a clinical setting when the boundary between the dentin and composite resin is to be ground, as the angle of the grinding surface changes when the rotating diamond point begins grinding the composite resin.

  1. Influence of polishing on surface roughness following toothbrushing wear of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla-Vecchia, Karine Battestin; Taborda, Talita Damas; Stona, Deborah; Pressi, Heloísa; Burnett Júnior, Luiz Henrique; Rodrigues-Junior, Sinval Adalberto

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of different polishing systems on the surface roughness of composite resins following procedures to simulate the effects of toothbrushing over time. Four currently available commercial composites were used to make 128 cylindrical specimens. The specimens were randomly allocated to polishing with a 1-step polisher or 1 of 3 multistep polishers (n = 8 per group). The baseline surface roughness was measured, and the specimens were submitted to 5000, 10,000, and 20,000 brushing cycles to represent toothbrushing throughout 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Results showed that surface roughness was influenced by the type of composite and polishing system and was not influenced by the simulated toothbrushing time. However, the surface roughness, as challenged by toothbrushing wear, was affected by the interaction among the composite, the polisher, and the toothbrushing time. The 1-step polisher produced the highest surface roughness and influenced toothbrushing wear resistance of some composites.

  2. Polymerization shrinkage of different types of composite resins and microleakage with and without liner in class II cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, E; Ozgunaltay, G

    2014-01-01

    To determine the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of four different types of composite resin and to evaluate microleakage of these materials in class II (MOD) cavities with and without a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) liner, in vitro. One hundred twenty-eight extracted human upper premolar teeth were used. After the teeth were divided into eight groups (n=16), standardized MOD cavities were prepared. Then the teeth were restored with different resin composites (Filtek Supreme XT, Filtek P 60, Filtek Silorane, Filtek Z 250) with and without a RMGIC liner (Vitrebond). The restorations were finished and polished after 24 hours. Following thermocycling, the teeth were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, then midsagitally sectioned in a mesiodistal plane and examined for microleakage using a stereomicroscope. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage of materials was measured using a video imaging device (Acuvol, Bisco, Inc). Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. All teeth showed microleakage, but placement of RMGIC liner reduced microleakage. No statistically significant differences were found in microleakage between the teeth restored without RMGIC liner (p>0.05). Filtek Silorane showed significantly less volumetric polymerization shrinkage than the methacrylate-based composite resins (pcomposite resin restorations resulted in reduced microleakage. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage was least with the silorane-based composite.

  3. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin composite to composite after aging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Barbosa, Silvia Helena; Melo, Renata Marques; Galhano, Graziela Avila Prado; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two different surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a bis-GMA-adduct/bis-EMA/TEGDMA based resin composite after three aging conditions. Thirty-six composite resin blocks (Esthet X, Dentsply) were prepared (5 mm x 6 mm x 6 mm) and randomly assigned into three groups for aging process: (a) immersion in citric acid (pH 3.0 at 37 degrees C, 1 week) (CA); (b) boiling in water for 8h (BW) and (c) thermocycling (x5000, 5-55 degrees C, dwell time: 30s) (TC). After aging, the blocks were assigned to one of the following surface conditioning methods: (1) silica coating (30 microm SiO(x)) (CoJet, 3M ESPE)+silane (ESPE-Sil) (CJ), (2) phosphoric acid+adhesive resin (Single Bond, 3M ESPE) (PA). Resin composite (Esthet.X) was bonded to the conditioned substrates incrementally and light polymerized. The experimental groups formed were as follows: Gr1:CA+PA; Gr2:CA+CJ; Gr3:BW+PA; Gr4: BW+CJ; Gr5:TC+PA; Gr6: TC+CJ. The specimens were sectioned in two axes (x and y) with a diamond disc under coolant irrigation in order to obtain non-trimmed bar specimens (sticks, 10 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm) with 1 mm(2) of bonding area. The microtensile test was accomplished in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm min(-1)). The means and standard deviations of bond strength (MPa+/-S.D.) per group were as follows: Gr1: 25.5+/-10.3; Gr2: 46.3+/-10.1; Gr3: 21.7+/-7.1; Gr4: 52.3+/-15.1; Gr5: 16.1+/-5.1; Gr6, 49.6+/-13.5. The silica coated groups showed significantly higher mean bond values after all three aging conditions (presin-resin bond strength values compared to acid etching with phosphoric acid followed by adhesive resin applications. Thermocycling the composite substrates resulted in the lowest repair bond strength compared to citric acid challenge or boiling in water.

  4. Relative biocompatibility of micro-hybrid and nano-hybrid light-activated composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabisi Arigbede, Abiodun; Folasade Adeyemi, Bukola; Femi-Akinlosotu, Omowumi

    2017-01-01

    Background. In vitro studies have revealed a direct association between resin content and cytotoxicity of composite resins; however, implantation studies in this regard are sparse. This study investigates the relationship between filler content of composite resins and biocompatibility. Methods. This research employed twelve 180‒200-gr male Wistar rats, 1 nano-hybrid (Prime-Dent Inc.) and 1 micro-hybrid (Medental Inc.) composite resins containing 74% and 80‒90% filler content, respectively. The samples were assessed on the 2nd, 14th and 90th day of implantation. Four rats were allocated to each day in this experimental study. A section of 1.5mm long cured nano-hybrid and micro-hybrid materials were implanted into the right and left upper and lower limbs of the rats, respectively. Eight samples were generated on each day of observation. Inflammation was graded according to the criteria suggested by Orstavik and Major. Pearson's chi-squared test was employed to determine the relationship between the tissue responses of the two materials. Statistical significance was set at P resin had a score of 3.0 for cellular inflammation. On the 14th day, the micro-hybrid resin also exhibited a lower average grade for cellular inflammation. On the 90th day, the micro-hybrid resin had a higher grade of inflammation (0.9) compared to 0.3 recorded for nano-hybrid. The composite resins with higher filler content elicited a significantly lower grade of inflammation irrespective of the duration (χ=20.000, df=8, P=0.010) while the composite resins with lower filler content elicited a significantly lower inflammatory response on the 90th day (χ=4.000, df=1, P=0.046). Conclusion. The composite resins with higher filler content generally elicited significantly lower grades of inflammation, and the composite resins with lower filler content exhibited significantly lower inflammatory response on the 90th day of implantation.

  5. Effect of Preheating on the Mechanical Properties of Resin Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uctasli, Mine Betül; Arisu, Hacer Deniz; Lasilla, Lippo VJ; Valittu, Pekka K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the flexural strength and modulus of two commercial resin composites, at room temperature and 40, 45 and 50°C prior to light polymerization with standard and step-cure protocols. Methods One nanohybrid (Grandio, VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany), and microhybrid composite resin (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were used. The materials were inserted into rectangular moulds at room temperature or preheated to a temperature of 40, 45 or 50°C and cured with standard or step-cure protocols with high intensity halogen (Elipar Highlight, 3M-ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). Ten specimens were prepared for each preheating and light curing protocol. A three-point bending test was performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s post hoc tests (P<.05) to examine the effect of curing protocol and preheating. Pearson’s correlation test was used to determine the correlation between tested mechanical properties and preheating. Results There were no statistically significant difference between tested mechanical properties of the materials, curing protocols and temperature of the materials. No significant correlation was found between preheating and tested mechanical properties. Conclusions The mechanical properties of the tested materials did not changed by preheating so the tested materials could be preheated because of the other potential clinical advantages like more adaptation to the cavity walls. PMID:19212532

  6. Three-dimensional evaluation of surface roughness of resin composites after finishing and polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Veena S; Sainudeen, Shan; Padmanabhan, Prabeesh; Vijayashankar, L V; Sujathan, Unu; Pillai, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of finishing and polishing procedures on four novel resin composites using three-dimensional optical profilometer. Four composites classified according to their filler size, were selected: Filtek™ Z350 XT/Nanofill (3M™ ESPE™), Esthet-X HD/Hybrid (Dentsply Caulk), Te Econom/Microfill (Ivoclar Vivadent(®)), Tetric EvoCeram(®) /Nanohybrid (Ivoclar Vivadent(®)). Composite specimens were made in Plexiglass mold and polished with Soflex (3M ESPE), Enhance + Pogo (Dentsply Caulk). Both the systems were used according to the manufacturers' instructions, and the polished surfaces were assessed with an optical profilometer. Kruskal-Wallis test and further pairwise comparison were performed by Mann-Whitney test. The smoothest surfaces for all the resin composites tested were obtained from the Mylar strip; statistically significant differences were observed among them (P = 0.001). The order of composites was ranked from the lowest to highest surface roughness; Filtek Z350 XT Econom < Tetric EvoCeram < Esthet XHD. Pairwise multiple comparison with Mann-Whitney test showed Filtek Z350 to have the smoothest surface and the least with Teric EvoCeram. Among the polishing systems, Soflex showed the smoothest surface and was significantly different from Pogo (P = 0.046). The effectiveness of the polishing systems seems to be dependent on the material used, treatment modality and also on the filler particle size.

  7. Research Progress on Microwave Curing of Epoxy Resin and Its Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Xue-hong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Research progress of microwave curing on epoxy resin and its composites was summarized on the basis of introducing the principle of microwave curing technology and its advantages. The paper focused on the effect of microwave curing on the curing rate of epoxy resin and its composites as well as the mechanical and thermal properties of cured products. Two suitable composite systems for wave curing of powder-strengthened epoxy and fiber-strengthened epoxy and a few key technological problems for industrial application are introduced. The application prospect of microwave curing on epoxy resin and its composites was also presented.

  8. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, M.; Brzostowski, A.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt was made to decrease the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin, taking place during radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified with cinnamic and acrylic acids. A composition of 90 parts of polyester resin, 10 parts of epoxy resin modified with cinnamic acid, and 150 parts of a silica filler showed a volume shrinkage of 1.2%. (author)

  9. UV curing silicon-containing epoxy resin and its glass cloth reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guang; Tang Zhuo; Huang Pengcheng

    2007-01-01

    A UV-curable cationic silicon-containing epoxy resin formulation was developed. The gel conversion of the cured resin after 10-min UV irradiation reached 80% in the presence of 5% diaryliodonium salt photoinitiator and 5.5% polyol chain transfer agent by cationic ring-opening polymerization. The glass cloth-reinforced composites were fabricated with the silicon-containing epoxy resin using the wet lay-up technique and UV irradiation. The mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated. Compared with glass cloth reinforced bisphenol A epoxy resin matrix composites, the silicon-containing epoxy resin matrix composites possessed higher tensile strength and interlayer shear strength which was 158.5MPa and 9.9MPa respectively while other mechanical properties such as flexural property and tensile modulus were similar. (authors)

  10. Evaluation of the polymerization shrinkage of experimental flowable composite resins through optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Vanda S. M.; Mota, Cláudia C. B. O.; Souza, Alex F.; Cajazeira, Marlus R. R.; Gerbi, Marleny E. M. M.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluated the polymerization shrinkage of two experimental flowable composite resins (CR) with different proportions of Urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers in the organic matrix (50:50 and 60:40, respectively). A commercially available flowable CR, Tetric N-Flow (Ivoclair Vivadent, Liechtenstein, Germany), was employed as the control group. The resins were inserted in a cylindrical teflon mold (7 mm diameter, 0.6 mm height) and scanned with OCT before photoactivation, immediately after and 15 minutes after light-curing (Radii-Cal, SDI, Australia, 1,200 mW/cm2 ) exposure. A Callisto SD-OCT system (Thorlabs Inc, USA), operating at 930 nm central wavelength was employed for imaging acquisition. Cross-sectional OCT images were captured with 8 mm transverse scanning (2000x512 matrix), and processed by the ImageJ software, for comparison between the scanning times and between groups. Pearson correlation showed significant shrinkage for all groups in each time analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test showed greater polymerization shrinkage for the 50:50 UDMA/TEGDMA group (p=0.001), followed by the control group (p=0.018). TEGDMA concentration was proportionally related to the polymerization shrinkage of the flowable composite resins.

  11. Effect of five staining solutions on the colour stability of two acrylics and three composite resins based provisional restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Sebnem Begüm; Koçak, Ayşe; Aktepe, Esra

    2006-09-01

    The effect of coffee, tea, coca-cola, orange-juice and red wine on the colour stability of acrylic and composite based provisional materials were evaluated. Two acrylic resins and three composite resins were studied. 48 standardized specimens for each provisional material were prepared. Each group was divided into 6 subgroups. Specimens from each group were immersed in staining solutions at room temperature for 30 days. Red wine and tea caused the most significant colour changes and orange juice showed the least significant colour changes. deltaE of all of the provisional restorations materials was changed after the immersion in all of the staining solutions during the experimental process.

  12. The effect of home bleaching agents on the surface roughness of five different composite resins: A SEM evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Esra; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Ulusoy, Nuran; Deniz, Sule Tugba; Yuksel-Devrim, Ece

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) and carbamide peroxide (CP) on the surface roughness of five different composite resins using profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thirty-six specimens (1 mm thick, 10 mm in diameter) of five composite resins were fabricated. Each composite group was equally divided into three subgroups as control, CP and HP. In control group, specimens were stored in daily refreshed distilled water during the 14-day testing period. In other groups, 10% HP (Opalescence Treswhite) and 10% CP (Opalescence PF) were applied and surface roughness values (Ra) of each specimen were measured with a profilometer at the end of 14 days. Additionally, SEM analysis was performed to evaluate the surface deformations of composite resins. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Ra values of composite groups exposed to bleaching agents were statistically higher than control group (p composite group while SEM micrographs showed higher surface alterations at HP group compared to CP. Among the composite resins tested, Ceram-X Mono revealed the lowest Ra values after CP and HP applications as seen at SEM images. Home bleaching agents increased the surface roughness of all composites. Except CP applied Ceram-X mono specimens, Ra values of all composite resins evaluated in this study exceeded the critical limit of 0.2 μm. Ceram-X mono was the least affected composite material after bleaching application. SCANNING 38:277-283, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nanosilica Modification of Elastomer-Modified VARTM Epoxy Resins for Improved Resin and Composite Toughness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinette, Jason; Bujanda, Andres; DeSchepper, Daniel; Dibelka, Jessica; Costanzo, Philip; Jensen, Robert; McKnight, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Recent publications have reported a synergy between rubber and silica in modified epoxy resins that results in significantly improved fracture toughness without reductions in other material properties...

  14. Effect of a home bleaching agent on the fracture toughness of resin composites, using short rod design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, R; Fani, M; Barfi Ghasrodashti, Ar; Nouri Yadkouri, N; Mousavi, Sm

    2014-06-01

    Resin composites are brittle materials and their major shortcomings are manifested in their sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been described, few studies are available on assessing the effect of bleaching agents on resin composites using the short rod design. To place various resin composites into distilled water at 37°C for 21 days and determine the effect of immersion time in distilled water, with and without exposure to 10% carbamide peroxide by employing short rod design fracture toughness test. Specimens were prepared from three resin composites; Rok (SDI), Esthet (Dentsply), and Estelite (Tokuyama). For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared using a custom-made mould. Specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups of 8 and conditioned in 37°C distilled water for either 24 hours, or 21 days. 21 day specimens were tested both with and without applying bleaching agent; Polanight (SDI). Study group specimens were bleached for 21 days, 2 hours a day. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The maximum load at specimen failure was recorded and the KIc (MPa. M (0.5)) was calculated. Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between material and time (ptest showed that after 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Rok revealed the highest KIc followed by Esthet and Estelite. The bleaching agent significantly improved the fracture toughness values of Esthet while it decreased that of Estelite. The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and distilled water. In comparison with Rok and Estelite, fracture toughness of Esthet was increased due to aging and application of bleaching agent.

  15. Compatibility between dental adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-Luc; MacKenzie, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    Information is lacking about incompatibilities between certain types of adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins, and universal adhesives have yet to be tested with these resins. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the bonding outcome of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins by using different categories of adhesive solutions and to determine whether incompatibilities were present. One hundred and eighty caries-free, extracted third molar teeth were allocated to 9 groups (n=20), in which 3 different bonding agents (Single Bond Plus [SB]), Scotchbond Multi-purpose [MP], and Scotchbond Universal [SU]) were used to bond 3 different composite resins (CompCore AF [CC], Core Paste XP [CP], and Filtek Supreme Ultra [FS]). After restorations had been fabricated using an Ultradent device, the specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours. The specimens were tested under shear force at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and post hoc pairwise comparisons (α=.05). All 3 composite resins produced comparable shear bond strengths when used with MP (P=.076). However, when either SB or SU was used, the light-polymerized composite resin (FS) and 1 dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CC) bonded significantly better than the other dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CP) (Pcomposite resins can obtain equally good bond strengths as light-polymerizing alternatives. However, not all dual-polymerizing composite resins perform well with all bonding systems; some incompatibilities exist between different products. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of mineral trioxide aggregate surface treatments on morphology and bond strength to composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joo-Hee; Jang, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Euiseong

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micromorphologic changes that accompany different surface treatments on mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and their effect on the bond strength to the composite resin with 4 adhesive systems. Three types of MTA cement, ProRoot MTA (WMTA) (Dentsply, Tulsa, OK), MTA Angelus (AMTA) (Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil), and Endocem MTA (EMTA) (Maruchi, Wonju, Korea), were prepared and stored for a week to encourage setting. Surface treatment was performed using phosphoric acid or self-etch primer, and an untreated MTA surface was prepared as a control. The surface changes were observed using scanning electron microscopy. MTA surfaces were bonded with 4 adhesive systems, including Scotchbond Multipurpose (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN), Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE), Clearfil SE BOND (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan), and AdheSE One F (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), to evaluate the adhesive effectiveness of MTA followed by composite resin restoration. The shear bond strength of the polymerized specimens was tested. For WMTA and AMTA, untreated surfaces showed an irregular crystalline plate with clusters of globular aggregate particles. For EMTA, the untreated surface presented a reticular matrix with acicular crystals. After surface treatment, superficial crystalline structures were eroded regardless of the MTA cement and adhesive system used. WMTA bonded significantly more strongly than AMTA and EMTA, regardless of the adhesive system used. In the WMTA and AMTA groups, AdheSE One F showed the highest bond strength to the composite. For EMTA, no significant differences were found across adhesive systems. Acidic treatment of the MTA surface affected the micromorphology and the bond strength to the composite. Within the limitations of this study, using a 1-step self-etch adhesive system might result in a strong bond to WMTA when the composite resin restoration is required over MTA cement. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists

  17. Environmentally Friendly Bio-Based Vinyl Ester Resins for Military Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    formulations have been developed. The FAVE-L resin uses 65% Bisphenol A vinyl ester monomer, 20 wt% styrene, and 15 wt% methacrylated lauric acid (MLau...composites, fatty acid , vinyl ester 9. Distribution $tatement (requr’iedl lsmanuscript subjectto export control? E ruo I yes Circfe appropriate l tter and...resins is to replace some or all of the styrene with fatty acid -based monomers. These fatty acid vinyl ester resins allow for the formulation of high

  18. Dynamic-mechanical response of graphite/epoxy composite laminates and neat resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P.; Carlsson, L.; Sternstein, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical measurement results are presented for the case of carbon fiber-reinforced, epoxy matrix composite laminates subjected to loading perpendicular to the lamination plane, as well as for neat epoxy resin under the same conditions, where temperatures ranged between 20 and 200 C and deformation levels lie within the linear viscoelastic region. In-phase and out-of-phase stiffnesses are found to become superposed, forming master curves that cover a 12-decade frequency range. The application of a master curve scaling procedure shows that the in-phase stiffness has the same shape, and out-of-phase stiffness has the same dispersion, for all laminates irrespective of stacking sequence and are, in turn, nearly identical to those for the neat epoxy resin. An empirical function is found for the relaxation modulus which, when converted to a dynamic modulus, yields good overall agreement for both of the dynamic stiffness components as a function of frequency.

  19. Effects of LDEF flight exposure on selected polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Young, Philip R.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1992-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composites materials which received over five years and nine months of exposure to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment in experiment AO134 on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. The changes in mechanical properties of ultimate tensile strength and tensile modulus for exposed flight specimens are compared to the three sets of control specimens. Marked changes in surface appearance are discussed, and resin loss is reported. The chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymetric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure.

  20. Compilation of radiation damage test data. Pt. 2. Thermoset and thermoplastic resins, composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlet, M.; Fontaine, A.; Schoenbacher, H.

    1998-01-01

    This catalogue summarizes radiation damage test data on thermoplastic and thermoset resins and composites. Most of them are epoxy resins used as insulator for magnet coils. Many results are also given for new engineering thermoplastics which can be used either for their electrical properties or for their mechanical properties. The materials have been irradiated either in a 60 Co source, up to integrated absorbed doses between 200 kGy and a few megagrays, at dose rates of the order of 1 Gy/s, or in a nuclear reactor at dose rates of the order of 50 Gy/s, up to doses of 100 MGy. The flexural strength, the deformation and the modulus of elasticity have been measured on irradiated and non-irradiated samples, according to the recommendations of the International Electrotechnical Commissions. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (orig.)

  1. In vivo wear pattern of experimental light-cured hybrid composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, A; Sekiya, K; Fukushima, M; Iwaku, M

    1993-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of various types of microfiller on the in vivo wear resistance of composite resins. Experimental light-cured composites with two different microfiller systems were prepared: (1) 56 wt % fine quartz filler, 21 wt% organic filler and 3 wt% colloidal silica filler (Hybrid type 1), and (2) 64 wt% fine quartz filler and 21 wt% colloidal silica filler (Hybrid type 2). The resin monomer consisted of 50 wt % Bis-GMA and 50 wt% TEGDMA. These materials were placed in 2 mm diameter cylindrical cavities located in the OCA (occlusal contact area) or the CFA (contact free area) in cast gold-silver-palladium alloy full coverage crowns, which were temporarily set in a volunteer patient's mouth. The crowns were removed at monthly intervals for SEM observation. Hybrid type 1, which contained organic fillers, showed bulk fractures in the OCA, by the second month of the experiment. However, reinforcement of the resin matrix by dispersion of microfiller provided Hybrid type 2 with superior wear resistance for up to two months.

  2. Research and Development Progress of National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites on Advanced Aeronautical Resin Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Bintai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applications and research progress in advanced aeronautical resin matrix composites by National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites (LAC were summarized. A novel interlaminar toughening technology employing ultra-thin TP non-woven fabric was developed in LAC, which significantly improved the compression after impact (CAI performances of composite laminates.Newly designed multilayer sandwich stealth composite structures exhibited a good broadband radar absorbing properties at 1-18 GHz.There were remarkable developments in high toughness and high temperature resin matrix composites, covering major composite processing technologies such as prepreg-autoclave procedure, liquid composite molding and automation manufacture, etc. Finally, numerical simulation and optimization methods were deliberately utilized in the study of composites curing behavior, resin flow and curing deformation. A composite material database was also established.In conclusion, LAC has been a great support for the development of aeronautical equipment, playing such roles as innovation leading, system dominating, foundation supporting and application ensuring of aerocomposites.

  3. Mixed resin and carbon fibres surface treatment for preparation of carbon fibres composites with good interfacial bonding strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Hongwei; Wang, Jianlong; Li, Kaixi; Wang, Jian; Gu, Jianyu

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work is to improve the interlaminar shear strength of composites by mixing epoxy resin and modifying carbon fibres. The effect of mixed resin matrix's structure on carbon fibres composites was studied. Anodic oxidation treatment was used to modify the surface of carbon fibres. The tensile strength of multifilament and interlaminar shear strength of composites were investigated respectively. The morphologies of untreated and treated carbon fibres were characterized by scanning electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface analysis indicates that the amount of carbon fibres chemisorbed oxygen-containing groups, active carbon atom, the surface roughness, and wetting ability increases after treatment. The tensile strength of carbon fibres decreased little after treatment by anodic oxidation. The results show that the treated carbon fibres composites could possess excellent interfacial properties with mixed resins, and interlaminar shear strength of the composites is up to 85.41 MPa. The mechanism of mixed resins and treated carbon fibres to improve the interfacial property of composites is obtained.

  4. Influence of curing protocol and ceramic composition on the degree of conversion of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Daniel Septimio Lanza

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to increasing of aesthetic demand, ceramic crowns are widely used in different situations. However, to obtain long-term prognosis of restorations, a good conversion of resin cement is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC of one light-cure and two dual-cure resin cements under a simulated clinical cementation of ceramic crowns. Material and Methods: Prepared teeth were randomly split according to the ceramic's material, resin cement and curing protocol. The crowns were cemented as per manufacturer's directions and photoactivated either from occlusal suface only for 60 s; or from the buccal, occlusal and lingual surfaces, with an exposure time of 20 s on each aspect. After cementation, the specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were transversally sectioned from occlusal to cervical surfaces and the DC was determined along the cement line with three measurements taken and averaged from the buccal, lingual and approximal aspects using micro-Raman spectroscopy (Alpha 300R/WITec®. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Tukey test at =5%. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences among cements, curing protocols and ceramic type (p<0.001. The curing protocol 3x20 resulted in higher DC for all tested conditions; lower DC was observed for Zr ceramic crowns; Duolink resin cement culminated in higher DC regardless ceramic composition and curing protocol. Conclusion: The DC of resin cement layers was dependent on the curing protocol and type of ceramic.

  5. Degree of conversion of nanofilled and microhybrid composite resins photo-activated by different generations of LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Benicia Carolina Iaskieviscz; Boaventura, Juliana Maria Capelozza; Brito-Gonçalves, Joel de; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Saad, José Roberto Cury

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the degree of conversion (DC) of four composite resins, being one nanofilled and 3 microhybrid resins, photo-activated with second- and third-generation light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Filtek™ Z350 nanofilled composite resins and Amelogen® Plus, Vit-l-escence™ and Opallis microhybrid resins were photo-activated with two second-generation LEDs (Radii-cal and Elipar Free Light™ 2) and one third-generation LED (Ultra-Lume LED 5) by continuous light mode, and a quartz halogen-tungsten bulb (QHT, control). After 24 h of storage, the samples were pulverized into fine powder and 5 mg of each material were mixed with 100 mg of potassium bromide (KBr). After homogenization, they were pressed, which resulted in a pellet that was evaluated using an infrared spectromer (Nexus 470, Thermo Nicolet) equipped with TGS detector using diffuse reflectance (32 scans, resolution of 4 cm(-1)) coupled to a computer. The percentage of unreacted carbon-carbon double bonds (% C=C) was determined from the ratio of absorbance intensities of aliphatic C=C (peak at 1637 cm-1) against internal standard before and after curing of the specimen: aromatic C-C (peak at 1610 cm-1). The ANOVA showed a significant effect on the interaction between the light-curing units (LCUs) and the composite resins (presin (Filtek™ Z350) and Opallis when photo-activated by the halogen lamp (QTH) had the lowest DC compared with the other microhybrid composite resins. The DC of the nanofilled resin (Filtek™ Z350) was also lower using LEDs. The highest degrees of conversion were obtained using the third-generation LED and one of second-generation LEDs (Elipar Free Light™ 2). The nanofilled resin showed the lowest DC, and the Vit-l-escence™ microhybrid composite resin showed the highest DC. Among the LCUs, it was not possible to establish an order, even though the second-generation LED Radii-cal provided the lowest DC.

  6. Comparison of fracture resistance of teeth restored with ceramic inlay and resin composite: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti D Desai

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The fracture resistant strength of teeth restored with ceramic inlay was comparable to that of the normal intact teeth or slightly higher, while teeth restored with direct composite resin restoration showed less fracture resistant strength than that of the normal teeth.

  7. Effect of preheat repetition on color stability of methacrylate- and silorane-based composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Abed Kahnamouei, Mehdi; Gholizadeh, Sarah; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Daneshpooy, Mehdi; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Rezaei, Yashar

    2017-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preheating methacrylate- and silorane-based composite resins on their color stability up to 40 times at 55‒60°C. Methods. Seventy-six methacrylate and silorane-based composite resin samples, with a diameter of 10 mm and a height of 2 mm, were divided into 4 groups (n=19). After the samples were prepared, their color parameters were determined using a reflective spectrophotometer. The composite resin samples were separately sto...

  8. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with 2 Different Fiber-reinforced Composite and 2 Conventional Composite Resin Core Buildup Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Ashly Mary; Amirtharaj, L Vijay; Sanjeev, Kavitha; Mahalaxmi, Sekar

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with 2 fiber-reinforced composite resins and 2 conventional composite resin core buildup materials. Sixty noncarious unrestored human maxillary premolars were collected, endodontically treated (except group 1, negative control), and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10). Group 2 was the positive control. The remaining 40 prepared teeth were restored with various direct core buildup materials as follows: group 3 teeth were restored with dual-cure composite resin, group 4 with posterior composite resin, group 5 with fiber-reinforced composite resin, and group 6 with short fiber-reinforced composite resin. Fracture strength testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test. Fracture patterns for each sample were also examined under a light microscope to determine the level of fractures. The mean fracture resistance values (in newtons) were obtained as group 1 > group 6 > group 4 > group 3 > group 5 > group 2. Group 6 showed the highest mean fracture resistance value, which was significantly higher than the other experimental groups, and all the fractures occurred at the level of enamel. Within the limitations of this study, a short fiber-reinforced composite can be used as a direct core buildup material that can effectively resist heavy occlusal forces against fracture and may reinforce the remaining tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of toothbrush hardness on in vitro wear and roughness of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoizumi, Hideaki; Yamada, Junji; Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Kanehira, Masafumi; Finger, Werner J; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2013-11-01

    To investigate and compare the effects of toothbrushes with different hardness on abrasion and surface roughness of composite resins. Toothbrushes (DENT. EX Slimhead II 33, Lion Dental Products Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) marked as soft, medium and hard, were used to brush 10 beam-shaped specimens of each of three composites resins (Venus [VEN], Venus Diamond [VED] and Venus Pearl [VEP]; HeraeusKulzer) with standardized calcium carbonate slurry in a multistation testing machine (2N load, 60 Hz). After each of five cycles with 10k brushing strokes the wear depth and surface roughness of the specimens were determined. After completion of 50k strokes representative samples were inspected by SEM. Data were treated with ANOVA and regression analyses (p composite resins increased linearly with increasing number of brushing cycles (r² > 0.9). Highest wear was recorded for VEN, lowest for VED. Hard brushes produced significantly higher wear on VEN and VEP, whereas no difference in wear by toothbrush type was detected for VED. Significantly highest surface roughness was found on VED specimens (Ra > 1.5 µm), the lowest one on VEN (Ra composite resins produced by toothbrushing with dentifrice depend mainly on the type of restorative resin. Hardness grades of toothbrushes have minor effects only on abrasion and surface roughness of composite resins. No relationship was found between abrasion and surface roughness. The grade of the toothbrush used has minor effect on wear, texture and roughness of the composite resin.

  10. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  11. Thermal Expansion and Swelling of Cured Epoxy Resin Used in Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal expansion and swelling of resin material as influenced by variations in temperature during moisture absorption is discussed. Comparison measurements using composites constructed of graphite fibers and each of two epoxy resin matrices are included. Polymer theory relative to these findings is discussed and modifications are proposed.

  12. Nanoparticles Decorated on Resin Particles and Their Flame Retardancy Behavior for Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour F. Attia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New nanocomposites have been developed by doping of amberlite IR120 resin with spherical TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of maleate diphosphate. Polystyrene composites of resin, maleate diphosphate, and resin-maleate diphosphate were prepared individually. This is in addition to preparation of polymer nanocomposites of polystyrene-resin doped TiO2 nanoparticles-maleate diphosphate. The flame retardancy and thermal stability properties of these developed polymer composites were evaluated. The inclusion of resin and resin doped nanoparticles improved the fire retardant behavior of polystyrene composites and enhanced their thermal stability. Synergistic behavior between flame retardant, resin, and nanoparticles was detected. The rate of burning of the polymer nanocomposites was recorded as 10.7 mm/min achieving 77% reduction compared to pure polystyrene (46.5 mm/min. The peak heat release rate (PHRR of the new polymer composites has reduced achieving 46% reduction compared to blank polymer. The morphology and dispersion of nanoparticles on resin and in polymer nanocomposites were characterized using transmission and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The flame retardancy and thermal properties were evaluated using UL94 flame chamber, cone tests, and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively.

  13. "Greener" hybrid adhesives composed of urea formaldehyde resin and cottonseed meal for wood based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urea formaldehyde (UF) resins are one of the most widely used adhesives in wood based composites. The major concerns of the resin utilization are free formaldehyde release and poor water resistance. As a renewable raw materials, water washed conttonseed meal can be used in wood bonding. To produce “...

  14. Heat treatment of a direct composite resin: influence on flexural strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lumi Miyazaki

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of a direct composite, for indirect application, that received heat treatment, with or without investment. One indirect composite was used for comparison. For determination of the heat treatment temperature, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were performed, considering the initial weight loss temperature and glass transition temperature (Tg. Then, after photoactivation (600 mW/cm² - 40 s, the specimens (10 x 2 x 2 mm were heat-treated following these conditions: 170ºC for 5, 10 or 15 min, embedded or not embedded in investment. Flexural strength was assessed as a means to evaluate the influence of different heat treatment periods and investment embedding on mechanical properties. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05. TGA showed an initial weight loss temperature of 180ºC and DSC showed a Tg value of 157°C. Heat treatment was conducted in an oven (Flli Manfredi, Italy, after 37°C storage for 48 h. Flexural strength was evaluated after 120 h at 37°C storage. The results showed that different periods and investment embedding presented similar statistical values. Nevertheless, the direct composite resin with treatments presented higher values (178.7 MPa compared to the indirect composite resin (146.0 MPa and the same direct composite submitted to photoactivation only (151.7 MPa. Within the limitations of this study, it could be concluded that the heat treatment increased the flexural strength of the direct composite studied, leading to higher mechanical strength compared to the indirect composite.

  15. Heat treatment of a direct composite resin: influence on flexural strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Caroline Lumi; Medeiros, Igor Studart; Santana, Ivone Lima; Matos, Jivaldo do Rosário; Rodrigues Filho, Leonardo Eloy

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength of a direct composite, for indirect application, that received heat treatment, with or without investment. One indirect composite was used for comparison. For determination of the heat treatment temperature, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were performed, considering the initial weight loss temperature and glass transition temperature (Tg). Then, after photoactivation (600 mW/cm(2) - 40 s), the specimens (10 x 2 x 2 mm) were heat-treated following these conditions: 170 masculineC for 5, 10 or 15 min, embedded or not embedded in investment. Flexural strength was assessed as a means to evaluate the influence of different heat treatment periods and investment embedding on mechanical properties. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). TGA showed an initial weight loss temperature of 180 masculineC and DSC showed a Tg value of 157 degrees C. Heat treatment was conducted in an oven (Flli Manfredi, Italy), after 37 degrees C storage for 48 h. Flexural strength was evaluated after 120 h at 37 degrees C storage. The results showed that different periods and investment embedding presented similar statistical values. Nevertheless, the direct composite resin with treatments presented higher values (178.7 MPa) compared to the indirect composite resin (146.0 MPa) and the same direct composite submitted to photoactivation only (151.7 MPa). Within the limitations of this study, it could be concluded that the heat treatment increased the flexural strength of the direct composite studied, leading to higher mechanical strength compared to the indirect composite.

  16. Microshear bond strength of preheated silorane- and methacrylate-based composite resins to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbuga, Sezer; Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Cayabatmaz, Muhammed; Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Cantekin, Kenan; Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preheating on microshear bond strength (MSBS) of silorane and methacrylate-based composite resins to human dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into three main groups: (1) composite resins were heated upto 68 °C; (2) cooled to 4 °C; and (3) control [room temperature (RT)]. Each group was then randomly subdivided into four subgroups according to adhesive system used [Solobond M (Voco), All Bond SE (Bisco), Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) (Kuraray), Silorane adhesive system (SAS) (3M ESPE)]. Resin composite cylinders were formed (0.9 mm diameter × 0.7 mm length) and MSBS of each specimen was tested. The preheated groups exhibited the highest MSBS (p composite resins may be an alternative way to increase the MSBS of composites on dentin. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Differences in physico-mechanical behaviors of resol(e) and novolac type phenolic resin based composite bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakati, Biraj Kumar [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, North Guwahati, PIN 781 039, Dist. Kamrup (Assam) (India); Deka, Dhanapati [Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784 028, Dist. Sonitpur (Assam) (India)

    2007-09-15

    Composite bipolar plates for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) are prepared by compression molding technique using polymer as binder and graphite as electric filler material with some other reinforcements. Study on the effect of resole and novolac type phenolic resin on the properties of composite bipolar plate, such as bulk density, porosity, bulk conductivity, hardness, flexural strength, etc. shows that both of the resin shows different physico-mechanical properties. Moreover, single cell performance analysis also shows variation for resole and novolac based composites. A novel concept of triple continuous structure to provide graphite polymer blends with high electrical conductivity, high shore hardness, high flexural strength, less porosity and low density has been proposed and study on the effect of different types of phenolic resin on the properties and performance of bipolar plate reveals that novolac type powdered phenolic resin gives better mechanical properties than resole type phenolic resin. However, resole type phenolic resin compound has slightly higher electrical conductivity due to more number of polar -OH group presents on its cured form. But due to the less porosity and higher mechanical strength, bipolar plates with novolac type phenolic resin gives better performance in I-V analysis than bipolar plates with resole type phenolic resin. (author)

  18. Composite materials based on modified epoxy resin and carbon fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalez, Viviane; Barcia, Fabio L.; Soares, Bluma G.

    2006-01-01

    Epoxy resin networks have been modified with block copolymer of polybutadiene and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (DGEBA)-based on epoxy resin. The epoxy resin modified with carboxyl-terminated polybutadiene presented improved impact resistance and outstanding mechanical performance in terms of flexural and tensile properties because of the presence of rubber particles homogeneously dispersed inside the epoxy matrix. This modified system also resulted in an improvement of mechanical properties o...

  19. A comparison of fatigue crack growth in resin composite, dentin and the interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soappman, Matthew J; Nazari, Ahmad; Porter, Judith A; Arola, D

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the fatigue crack growth properties of the dentin/resin adhesive interface. Compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from coronal dentin, resin composite, and dentin bonded to resin composite using Optibond Solo Plus adhesive. All specimens were then subjected to cyclic Mode I loading while fully hydrated at a stress ratio of R=0.1 and frequency of 5 Hz. Steady state fatigue crack growth was modeled using the Paris Law in terms of the exponent (m) and coefficient (C). The average fatigue crack growth rates in the resin composite ranged from 1.6E-06 to 3.8E-05 mm/cycle with growth occurring over a stress intensity range from 0.40 to 0.77 MPa m(1/2); the average growth exponent was 6.9+/-3.1. Average fatigue crack growth rates for the dentin/resin interface specimens ranged from 5.5E-07 to 6.4E-03 mm/cycle with growth occurring over a stress intensity range from 0.37 to 0.64 MPa m(1/2). The Paris Law exponent for these specimens ranged from 16resin and at the adhesive-dentin interface. In addition, many of the dentin/resin specimens underwent unstable fracture at a comparatively low stress intensity range without undergoing cyclic crack growth. The dentin/resin adhesive interface proved to be significantly more sensitive to fatigue crack growth than either dentin or resin composite. Variation in the cyclic crack growth responses of the dentin/resin interface specimens suggests that the interface, and particularly the adhesive resin, exhibits lower resistance to crack initiation and growth in comparison to dentin.

  20. Comparison of the resin cement bond strength to an indirect composites treated by Er;YAG laser and sandblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansure Mirzaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Indirect composites are designed to overcome the shortcomings of direct composites such as polymerization shrinkage and low degree of conversion. But, good adhesion of resin cements to indirect composites is still difficult. This research was designed to assess the effect of different powers of Er;YAG laser compared with sandblasting. On the micro tensil bond strength of resin cement to indirect composites.   Materials and Methods: Specimens were prepred using dental resin composite (Gradia GC and metallic mold (15×5×5 mm and were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 24 blocks were prepared and randomly divided into 12 groups. G1:no treatment (as control, G 2-6: Er; YAG laser irradiation (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Watt, G7: sandblast. Two composite blocks were bonded to each other with Panavia F.2. resin cement. The cylindrical sections with dimensions of 1 mm were tested in a microtensile bond strength tester device using 0.5 mm/min speed until fracture points. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Interaction between lasers irradiation and sandblast treatments were significant (P0.05 whether samples were sandblasted or not. Samples which received 300 mJ of laser showed lower bond strength compared with no laser treatment. Other groups showed no significant difference (P>0.05.   Conclusion: It seems that application of sandblast with proper variables, is a good way to improve bond strength.Laser application had no influence in improving the bond strength between the indirect composite and resin cement.

  1. Effect of Shade and Light Curing Mode on the Degree of Conversion of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sm, Mousavinasab; M, Atai; N, Salehi; A, Salehi

    2016-12-01

    The degree of conversion depends on the material composition, light source properties, distance from light source, light intensity, curing time, and other factors such as shade and translucency. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of different light-curing modes and shades of methacrylate and silorane-based resin composites on the degree of conversion of resin composites (DC). The methacrylate-based (Filtek Z250, 3M, ESPE) and low-shrinkage silorane-based (Filtek P90, 3M, ESPE) resin composites were used in three groups as follows: group 1-Filtek Z250 (shade A3), group 2-Filtek Z250 (shade B2), and group 3-Filtek P90 (shade A3). We used a light-emitting diode (LED) curing unit for photopolymerization. 10 samples were prepared in each group to evaluate the degree of conversion; 5 samples were cured using soft-start curing mode, and the other 5 were cured using standard curing mode. The DC of the resin composites was measured using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The data were analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and one-way ANOVA statistical tests. The degree of conversion of silorane-based resin composite was 70 - 75.8% and that of methacrylate-based resin composites was 60.2 - 68.2% (p = 0.009). The degree of conversion of the composite with brighter colour (B2) was statistically more than the darker composite (A3). Higher degree of conversion was achieved applying the standard curing mode. The results of the study showed that the colour and type of the resin composite and also the curing mode influence the degree of conversion of resin composites.

  2. Polymerization shrinkage assessment of dental resin composites: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisarly, Dalia; Gezawi, Moataz El

    2016-09-01

    Composite restorations are widely used worldwide, but the polymerization shrinkage is their main disadvantage that may lead to clinical failures and adverse consequences. This review reports, currently available in vitro techniques and methods used for assessing the polymerization shrinkage. The focus lies on recent methods employing three-dimensional micro-CT data for the evaluation of polymerization shrinkage: volumetric measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation through tracing particles before and after polymerization. Original research articles reporting in vitro shrinkage measurements and shrinkage stresses were included in electronic and hand-search. Earlier methods are easier, faster and less expensive. The procedures of scanning the samples in the micro-CT and performing the shrinkage vector evaluation are time consuming and complicated. Moreover, the respective software is not commercially available and the various methods for shrinkage vector evaluation are based on different mathematical principles. Nevertheless, these methods provide clinically relevant information and give insight into the internal shrinkage behavior of composite applied in cavities and how boundary conditions affect the shrinkage vectors. The traditional methods give comparative information on polymerization shrinkage of resin composites, whereas using three-dimensional micro-CT data for volumetric shrinkage measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation is a highly accurate method. The methods employing micro-CT data give the researchers knowledge related to the application method and the boundary conditions of restorations for visualizing the shrinkage effects that could not be seen otherwise. Consequently, this knowledge can be transferred to the clinical situation to optimize the material manipulation and application techniques for improved outcomes.

  3. Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Hybrid and Nano-hybrid Resin Composites after Ageing under Acidic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferooz M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Tooth-coloured restorative materials are brittle with the major shortcomings of sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been studied, no fracture toughness test data for nano-hybrid composites under acidic condition for a long period of time has been published. Objectives: To compare the fracture toughness (KIc of two types of resin composites under tensile loading and to assess the effect of distilled water and lactic acid on the resistance of the restoratives to fracture after three months of immersion. Materials and Methods: Four resin composites were used: three nanohybrids [EsteliteSigma Quick (Kuraray, Luna (SDI, Paradigm (3M/ESPE] and one hybrid, Rok (SDI. The specimens were prepared using a custom-made polytetrafluorethylene split mould, stored in distilled water (pH 6.8 or 0.01mol/L lactic acid (pH 4 and conditioned at 37°C for 24 hours, 1 or 3 months. They were loaded under tensile stress using a universal testing machine; the maximum load (N to the specimen failure was recorded and the fracture toughness (KIc was calculated. Data were analysed by ANOVA and Tukey’s test using SPSS, version 18. Results: The results of two-way ANOVA did not show a significant combined effect of material, time, and storage medium on fracture toughness (p= 0.056. However, there was a strong interaction between materials and time (p=0.001 when the storage medium were ignored. After 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Paradigm revealed the highest KIc values followed by Rok, Luna and Estelite. Immersion in either distilled water or lactic acid significantly decreased the fracture toughness of almost all materials as time interval increased. Conclusions: Paradigm showed the highest fracture toughness followed by Rok, Luna and Estelite respectively. As time increased, KIc significantly decreased for almost all resin composites except for Luna which showed a slight decrease

  4. Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored by Various Types and Placement Techniques of Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horieh Moosavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To verify the fracture resistance of premolars with mesioocclusodistal preparations restored by different resin composites and placement techniques. Sixty premolars were randomly divided into two groups based on type of composite resin: Filtek P60 or Nulite F, and then each group was separated into three subgroups: bulk, centripetal, and fiber insert according to the type of placement method (n=10. Single-bond adhesive system was used as composite bonding according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were restored in Groups 1, 2, and 3 with Filtek P60 and in Groups 4, 5, and 6 with Nulite F. After being stored 24 hours at 37∘C, a 4 mm diameter steel sphere in a universal testing machine was applied on tooth buccal and lingual cusps at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Groups 3 and 6 showed higher fracture resistance than Groups 1, 2, 4, and 5. Among the placement techniques, the fiber insert method had a significant effect, but the type of composite was ineffective. The insertion technique in contrast to the type of material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance of premolar teeth.

  5. A comparative study to determine strength of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and autopolymerizing composite resin influenced by temperature during polymerization: An In Vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuj Chhabra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Temporary coverage of a prepared tooth is an important step during various stages of the fixed dental prosthesis. Provisional restorations should satisfy proper mechanical requirements to resist functional and nonfunctional loads. A few studies are carried out regarding the comparison of the effect of curing environment, air and water, on mechanical properties of autopolymerizing acrylic and composite resin. Hence, the aim of this study was to compare the transverse strength of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and autopolymerizing composite resin as influenced by the temperature of air and water during polymerization. Materials and Methods: Samples of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and composite resin were prepared by mixing as per manufacturer's instructions and were placed in a preformed stainless steel mold. The mold containing the material was placed under different controlled conditions of water temperature and air at room temperature. Polymerized samples were then tested for transverse strength using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: Alteration of curing condition during polymerization revealed a significant effect on the transverse strength. The transverse strength of acrylic resin specimens cured at 60°C and composite resin specimens cured at 80°C was highest. Polymerizing the resin in cold water at 10°C reduced the mechanical strength. Conclusions: Polymerization of the resin in hot water greatly increased its mechanical properties. The method of placing resin restoration in hot water during polymerization may be useful for improving the mechanical requirements and obtaining long-lasting performance.

  6. Effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy composites and the neat resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Funk, Joan G.; Collins, William D.; Gray, Stephanie L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy-resin composites have been investigated. Composites with carbon, glass, and aramid reinforcement fibers were individually studied. The epoxy was a commercially-available resin that was especially developed for pultrusion fabrication. The pultrusions were conducted at 400 F with postcures at 400, 450, 500, and 550 F. Measurements of the flexural, shear, and interlaminar fracture-toughness properties showed that significant postcuring can occur during the pultrusion process. All three mechanical properties were degraded by the higher (500 and 550 F) temperatures; photomicrographs suggest that the degradation was caused at the fiber-resin interface for all three fiber types.

  7. Possible mechanisms for the interaction of polymeric composite resins with Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zahhhar, A.A.; Abdel-Aziz, H.M.; Siyam, T.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between the active groups of polymeric composite resins such as Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)-ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid disodium salt P(AM-AA)EDTANa 2 , Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)- montmorillonite P(AM-AA)-montmorillonite, and Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)-potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate P(AM-AA)-KNiHCF, with copper sulfate as a test ion has been studied. The spectroscopic studies show that the mechanism of interaction between polymeric composite resins and copper sulfate is a bond formation between the active groups of polymeric chains and copper ion. The bond formation depends on nature of polymeric chains. It was also found that the amide groups form complexes with hydrated cations, while carboxylate group interact by ion exchange mechanism through complex formation. Montmorillonite and hexacyanoferrate of the resins interact with metal ions by ion exchange mechanism

  8. Friction and wear behavior of nanosilica-filled epoxy resin composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Yingke; Chen Xinhua; Song Shiyong; Yu Laigui; Zhang Pingyu

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophilic silica nanoparticles (abridged as nano-SiO 2 ) surface-capped with epoxide were dispersed in the solution of epoxy resin (abridged as EP) in tetrahydrofuran under magnetic stirring. Resultant suspension of nano-SiO 2 in EP was then coated onto the surface of glass slides and dried at 80 °C in a vacuum oven for 2 h, generating epoxy resin-nanosilica composite coatings (coded as EP/nano-SiO 2 ). EP coating without nano-SiO 2 was also prepared as a reference in the same manner. A water contact angle meter and a surface profiler were separately performed to measure the water contact angles and surface roughness of as-prepared EP/nano-SiO 2 composite coatings. The friction and wear behavior of as-prepared EP/nano-SiO 2 composite coatings sliding against steel in a ball-on-plate contact configuration under unlubricated condition was evaluated. Particularly, the effect of coating composition on the friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings was highlighted in relation to their microstructure and worn surface morphology examined by means of scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that EP/nano-SiO 2 composite coatings have a higher surface roughness and water contact angle than EP coating. The EP-SiO 2 coatings doped with a proper amount of hydrophilic SiO 2 nanoparticles show lower friction coefficient than EP coating. However, the introduction of surface-capped nanosilica as the filler results in inconsistent change in the friction coefficient and wear rate of the filled EP-matrix composites; and it needs further study to achieve well balanced friction-reducing and antiwear abilities of the composite coatings for tribological applications.

  9. Comparison of fracture resistance of teeth restored with ceramic inlay and resin composite: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Priti D; Das, Utapal Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro fracture resistance of teeth restored with bonded ceramic inlay and direct composite resin restoration in comparison to the normal tooth. This study evaluated the fracture strength of the teeth restored with bonded ceramic inlay and direct composite resin restoration in comparison to the normal teeth. Thirty intact human maxillary first premolars were assigned to three groups: Group 1 - comprising sound/unprepared teeth (control). Group 2 - comprising of Class-II direct composite resin restored teeth and Group 3 - comprising Class-II ceramic inlay restored teeth. Cavities were prepared with occlusal width of 1/3 intercuspal distance and 2 mm deep pulpally. Group 2 teeth were restored with hybrid composite resin (Z350 3M ESPE, USA) and group 3 teeth were restored with Vitadur Alpha alumina (Ivoclare Vivadent, Liechtenstein, Europe). Ceramic inlay was bonded with adhesive cement (rely X resin cement of 3MESPE, USA). The specimens were subjected to a compressive load until they fractured. Data were analyzed statistically by unpaired Student's t test. The fracture resistant strength, expressed as kilonewton (KN), was group 1 - 1.51 KN, group 2 - 1.25 KN, and group 3 - 1.58 KN. Statistically, group III had highest fracture resistance followed by group I, while group II had the lowest average fracture resistance. The fracture resistant strength of teeth restored with ceramic inlay was comparable to that of the normal intact teeth or slightly higher, while teeth restored with direct composite resin restoration showed less fracture resistant strength than that of the normal teeth.

  10. Effect of silane type and air-drying temperature on bonding fiber post to composite core and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of silane type and temperature of silane application on push-out bond strength between fiberglass posts with composite resin core and resin cement. One hundred and sixty fiberglass posts (Exacto, Angelus) had the surface treated with hydrogen peroxide 24%. Posts were divided in 8 groups according to two study factors: air-drying temperature after silane application (room temperature and 60 ºC) and silane type: three pre-hydrolyzed--Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE) and one two-component silane--Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply). The posts (n=10) for testing the bond strength between post and composite core were centered on a cylindrical plastic matrix and composite resin (Filtek Z250 XT, 3M ESPE) that was incrementally inserted and photoactivated. Eighty bovine incisor roots (n=10) were prepared for testing the bond strength between post and resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) and received the fiberglass posts. Push-out test was used to measure the bond strength. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed that temperature and silane had no influence on bond strength between composite core and post. However, for bond strength between post and resin cement, the temperature increase resulted in a better performance for Silane Coupling Agent, Silano and RelyX Ceramic Primer. At room temperature Silane Coupling Agent showed the lowest bond strength. Effect of the warm air-drying is dependent on the silane composition. In conclusion, the use of silane is influenced by wettability of resinous materials and pre-hydrolyzed silanes are more stable compared with the two-bottle silane.

  11. Microtensile bond strengths to cavity floor dentin in indirect composite restorations using resin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Makoto; Nikaido, Toru; Maruoka, Rena; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the effect of a resin coating on the microtensile bond strengths (mu-TBSs) of indirect composite restorations bonded to dentin with resin cement and (2) to compare the mu-TBSs with that of a directly placed composite. Class I cavities were prepared in extracted human molars. The specimens were divided into five groups: For the indirect restorations, the cavity surfaces of the control group were left uncoated (group 1), while the surfaces of the experimental groups were resin coated with a dentin bonding system, Clearfil Protect Bond (PB; groups 2 and 3), or with a combination of PB and a flowable resin composite, Protect Liner F (PLF; group 4). The cavities were temporized for 1 day. Indirect composite restorations (Estenia) were cemented with a resin cement (Panavia F). Pretreatment with ED Primer II was performed in the groups 1, 3, and 4. For the direct restorations, the cavities were restored with PB and a direct composite (Clearfil AP-X; group 5). After 24 hours of water storage, mu-TBSs were measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and Sheffe's test (p resin coating consisting of a self-etching primer dentin bonding system and a flowable resin composite significantly improved the mu-TBS of indirect restorations bonded to dentin using resin cement. A resin coating should be required to improve dentin bonding performance of Panavia F in indirect restorations. However, direct composite restorations still provide higher bond strength compared to indirect restorations.

  12. Influence of fluorescent whitening agent on the fluorescent emission of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Young; Lee, Yong-Keun; Lim, Bum-Soon

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the fluorescent emission of experimental resin composites after addition of a fluorescent whitening agent in varied concentrations. The effects of thermocycling and composition of resin matrix on the fluorescent emission were also determined. An experimental light curing resin matrix was made by mixing Bis-GMA, UDMA and TEGDMA in the ratio of 1:1:1 by weight, and silane coated glass filler was added in the ratio of 50 wt.% of resin composite. A fluorescent whitening agent [FWA, 1,4-double-(benzoxazole-group-2-group)naphthalene] was added with the concentration of 0.01-0.1%. To determine the difference by the resin matrix, two resin composites (60 wt.% Bis-GMA or UDMA with 40 wt.% TEGDMA) with the same filler content were made, and the FWA was added. Five specimens of 2mm in thickness were made for each group. Spectral reflectance was measured relative to the illuminant D65 on a reflection spectrophotometer. From the spectral reflectance values, the difference in reflectance (fluorescence spectra) by the inclusion or exclusion of UV component was calculated. After the baseline measurement, thermocycling was performed for 500 and 1000 cycles, and the fluorescent emission was measured again. The concentration of FWA influenced the fluorescent peak heights and areas (presin matrix, but peak height and area were influenced by the resin matrix (presin composites.

  13. Effect of whitening dentifrices on the surface roughness of a nanohybrid composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa, Gabriela Migliorin; da Silva, Luciana Mendonça; de Menezes, Márcio; do Vale, Hugo Felipe; Regalado, Diego Ferreira; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The present study verified the influence of whitening dentifrices on the surface roughness of a nanohybrid composite resin. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two specimens were prepared with Filtek™ Z350 XT (3M/ESPE) and randomly divided into four groups (n = 08) that were subjected to brushing simulation equivalent to the period of 1 month. The groups assessed were a control group with distilled water (G1), Colgate Total 12 Professional Clean (G2), Sensodyne Extra Whitener Extra Fresh (G3), and Colgate Luminous White (G4). A sequence of 90 cycles was performed for all the samples. The initial roughness of each group was analyzed by the Surface Roughness Tester (TR 200-TIME Group Inc., CA, USA). After the brushing period, the final roughness was measured, and the results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kruskal–Wallis and Dunn tests for intergroup roughness comparison in the time factor. For intragroup and “Δ Final − Initial” comparisons, the Wilcoxon test and (one-way) ANOVA were, respectively, performed (α = 0.05). Results: The roughness mean values before and after brushing showed no statistically significant difference when the different dentifrices were used. None of the dentifrices analyzed increased significantly the nanohybrid composite resin surface roughness in a 1 month of tooth brushing simulation. Conclusions: These results suggest that no hazardous effect on the roughness of nanohybrid composite resin can be expected when whitening dentifrices are used for a short period. Similar studies should be conducted to analyze other esthetic composite materials. PMID:27095891

  14. Bond strength and monomer conversion of indirect composite resin restorations, Part 1: Light vs heat polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Daniel Alexandre Menezes Pedrosa; Magne, Pascal; Monteiro-Junior, Sylvio

    2014-12-01

    To assess the resin microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and the monomer conversion (MC) of indirect composite resin restorations made of three different materials. Two light-polymerized direct materials (Filtek Z100 and Premise) and one light- and heat-polymerized indirect material (Premise Indirect) were used. For MTBS testing, 42 cylindrical samples were fabricated (7 pairs per material). Surface conditioning included airborne-particle abrasion, cleaning, and application of a silane. Cylinders were bonded to each other using adhesive resin (Optibond FL). Specimens were stored in water for 24 h. Another 15 cylinders (5 per material) were fabricated for MC measurements (FT-IR) immediately and at 24 h. The MTBS data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and the MC to two-way ANOVA (material and storage time) (α=0.05), followed by post-hoc comparisons with the Tukey test. The MTBS to Z100 was 72.2 MPa, significantly higher than that to Premise (48.4 MPa) and Premise Indirect (52.7 MPa). The immediate MC was similar for all materials (range 51% to 56%) and significantly increased at 24 h (range 57% to 66%), except for Z100. Premise Indirect showed the highest MC (66% at 24 h). Z100 showed better "bondability" than Premise and Premise Indirect. Premise Indirect, with its heat initiator, did not present a higher MC.

  15. Single-component and fast-curing epoxy resin for liquid composite molding processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yiru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of single-component and fast-curing epoxy resins is highly desired for many industry applications. In this work, we report an epoxy system based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA and 1-(2-cyanoethyl-2-ethyl-4- methylimidazole (1C2E4MIM. The inductive effect of electron-withdrawing cyano group distinctly increases the latency of 1C2E4MIM without sacrificing the curing rate. The results of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA measurements indicate DGEBA/1C2E4MIM epoxy system can be fully cured in 15 min. The rheological, thermal and mechanical properties of DGEBA/1C2E4MIM epoxy system were studied in detail. The results show that the shelf life of this epoxy system is more than 4 days at room temperature and more than 6 months at -18 °C. The cured epoxy resins show high glass transition temperature (>155 °C, tensile strength (>80 MPa as well as excellent moist heat resistance. Finally, carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRPs were fabricated using this epoxy system as matrix via vacuum assisted resin infusion (VARI process. The mechanical properties of CFRPs, including tensile, flexural, compressive and interlaminar shear properties, were investigated.

  16. Interface and its effect on the interlaminate shear strength of novel glass fiber/hyperbranched polysiloxane modified maleimide-triazine resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping; Guan Qingbao; Gu Aijuan; Liang Guozheng; Yuan Li; Chang Jianfei

    2011-01-01

    Interface is Key topic of developing advanced fiber reinforced polymeric composites. Novel advanced glass woven fabric (GF) reinforced composites, coded as GF/mBT, were prepared, of which the matrix resin was hyperbranched polysiloxane (HBPSi) modified maleimide-triazine (mBT) resin. The influence of the composition of the matrix on the interfacial nature of the GF/mBT composites were studied and compared with that of the composite based on GF and BT resin using contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and dielectric properties over wide frequency and temperature ranges. Results show that the interfacial nature of the composites is dependent on the chemistries of the matrices, mBT matrices have better interfacial adhesion with GF than BT resin owing to the formation of chemical and hydrogen bonds between mBT resin and GF; while in the case of mBT resins, the content of HBPSi also plays an important role on the interfacial feature and thus the macro-performance. Specifically, with increasing the content of HBPSi in the matrix, the interlaminate shear strength of corresponding composites significantly improves, demonstrating that better interfacial adhesion guarantees outstanding integrated properties of the resultant composites.

  17. µCT-3D visualization analysis of resin composite polymerization and dye penetration test of composite adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2018-01-30

    This study evaluated the effects of the light curing methods and resin composite composition on composite polymerization contraction behavior and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall using μCT-3D visualization analysis and dye penetration test. Cylindrical cavities were restored using Clearfil tri-S Bond ND Quick adhesive and filled with Clearfil AP-X or Clearfil Photo Bright composite. The composites were cured using the conventional or the slow-start curing method. The light-cured resin composite, which had increased contrast ratio during polymerization, improved adaptation to the cavity wall using the slow-start curing method. In the μCT-3D visualization method, the slow-start curing method reduced polymerization shrinkage volume of resin composite restoration to half of that produced by the conventional curing method in the cavity with adhesive for both composites. μCT-3D visualization method can be used to detect and analyze resin composite polymerization contraction behavior and shrinkage volume as 3D image in the cavity.

  18. Effect of intermediate agents and pre-heating of repairing resin on composite-repair bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacchini, Federica; Magni, Elisa; Radovic, Ivana; Mazzitelli, Claudia; Monticellia, Francesca; Goracci, Cecilia; Polimeni, Antonella; Ferrari, Marco

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the composite-to-composite microtensile bond strength and interfacial quality after using different combinations of intermediate agents and pre-curing temperatures of repairing resin. Forty-five composite discs (8x4 mm) of Gradia Direct Anterior (GC Corp), stored in a saline solution at 37 degrees C for one month, were sandblasted (50 microm aluminum oxide), cleaned (35% phosphoric acid) and randomly divided into three groups (n=15) according to the intermediate agent applied: (1) no treatment; (2) unfilled resin (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Adhesive, 3M ESPE); (3) flowable composite (Gradia LoFlo, GC Corp). Each disc was incrementally repaired (8x8 mm) with the same resin as the substrate. For each group, three subgroups (n=5) were created, depending on the pre-curing temperature of the repairing resin-4 degrees C, 23 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Two bonded specimens per group were prepared to evaluate the composite-to-composite interfacial quality via scanning electron microscope. Microtensile bond strength measurements were performed with the remaining three specimens and failure mode was examined by stereomicroscopy. Two-way ANOVA revealed that temperature (p resin in groups where intermediate agents were used. The highest bond strengths were recorded when flowable composite was used as an intermediate agent under each of the three temperature conditions. Interfacial quality improved by raising the resin temperature from 4 degrees C to 37 degrees C.

  19. Synthesis of iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes for using as radiopacifiers in dental composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Lan, Jinle; Wang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Xuliang; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a strategy of using iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes as radiopacifiers for dental composite resin was evaluated. It was hypothesized that cyclophosphazenes bearing both iodine and acrylate group swere able to endow composite resins radiopacity without compromising mechanical properties. The cyclophosphazene compounds were synthesized by subsequently nucleophilic substitution of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene with hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 4-iodoaniline. Cyclotriphosphazenes containing two different molar ratios of HEMA to 4-iodoaniline (1:5 and 2:4) were obtained, and were identified with 1 H NMR, FT-IR, UV and mass spectroscopy. The iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes were able to dissolve well in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin, and were added at two contents (10 or 15%wt. of the resin). The resins were photo-cured and post-thermal treated before characterizations. The resulting composite resins demonstrated the ability of blocking X-ray. And the addition of HEMA-co-iodoaniline substituted cyclotriphosphazenes caused minor adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resins because the cyclotriphosphazenes could mix well and react with the resins. The presence of rigid phosphazene rings between resin backbones displayed an effective function of decreasing polymerization shrinkage. In summary, soluble and reactive iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes demonstrated advantages over traditional heavy metals or metal oxides in being used as additives for producing radiopaque dental resins. - Highlights: • Iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes were prepared via nucleophilic substitution. • The cyclotriphosphazenes endowed Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins radiopacity. • The cyclotriphosphazenes caused a minor adverse effect on mechanical properties

  20. Synthesis of iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes for using as radiopacifiers in dental composite resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Lan, Jinle [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Xuliang [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Cai, Qing, E-mail: caiqing@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yang, Xiaoping [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a strategy of using iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes as radiopacifiers for dental composite resin was evaluated. It was hypothesized that cyclophosphazenes bearing both iodine and acrylate group swere able to endow composite resins radiopacity without compromising mechanical properties. The cyclophosphazene compounds were synthesized by subsequently nucleophilic substitution of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene with hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 4-iodoaniline. Cyclotriphosphazenes containing two different molar ratios of HEMA to 4-iodoaniline (1:5 and 2:4) were obtained, and were identified with {sup 1}H NMR, FT-IR, UV and mass spectroscopy. The iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes were able to dissolve well in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin, and were added at two contents (10 or 15%wt. of the resin). The resins were photo-cured and post-thermal treated before characterizations. The resulting composite resins demonstrated the ability of blocking X-ray. And the addition of HEMA-co-iodoaniline substituted cyclotriphosphazenes caused minor adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resins because the cyclotriphosphazenes could mix well and react with the resins. The presence of rigid phosphazene rings between resin backbones displayed an effective function of decreasing polymerization shrinkage. In summary, soluble and reactive iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes demonstrated advantages over traditional heavy metals or metal oxides in being used as additives for producing radiopaque dental resins. - Highlights: • Iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes were prepared via nucleophilic substitution. • The cyclotriphosphazenes endowed Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins radiopacity. • The cyclotriphosphazenes caused a minor adverse effect on mechanical properties.

  1. Masking ability of a zirconia ceramic on composite resin substrate shades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Tabatabaian

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the tested zirconia ceramic could not thoroughly mask different shades of the composite resin substrates. Moreover, color masking of zirconia depends on the shade of substrate.

  2. Influence of curing rate on softening in ethanol, degree of conversion, and wear of resin composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of curing rate on softening in ethanol, degree of conversion, and wear of resin composites. METHOD: With a given energy density and for each of two different light-curing units (QTH or LED), the curing rate was reduced by modulating the curing mode. Thus......, the irradiation of resin composite specimens (Filtek Z250, Tetric Ceram, Esthet-X) was performed in a continuous curing mode and in a pulse-delay curing mode. Wallace hardness was used to determine the softening of resin composite after storage in ethanol. Degree of conversion was determined by infrared...... spectroscopy (FTIR). Wear was assessed by a three-body test. Data were submitted to Levene's test, one and three-way ANOVA, and Tukey HSD test (alpha = 0.05). Results: Immersion in ethanol, curing mode, and material all had significant effects on Wallace hardness. After ethanol storage, resin composites...

  3. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations. A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Material and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52.......4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4...... mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly...

  4. Polyimide Composites Properties of RTM370 Fabricated by Vacuum Assisted Resins Transfer Molding (VARTM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, Jim M.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    RTM370 imide resin based on 2,3,3 ,4 -biphenyl dianhydride ( a-BPDA), 3,4 -oxydianinline (3,4 -ODA) with 4-phenylethynylphthalic (PEPA) endcap has shown to exhibit high Tg (370 C) and low melt viscosity (10-30 poise) at 280 C with a pot-life of 1-2 h. Previously, RTM370 resin has been fabricated into composites with T650-35 carbon fabrics by resin transfer molding (RTM) successfully. RTM370 composites exhibit excellent mechanical properties up to 327 C (620 F), and outstanding property retention after aging at 288 C (550 F) for 1000 hrs. In this presentation, RTM 370 composites will be fabricated by vacuum assisted resins transfer molding (VARTM), using vacuum bags without mold. The mechanical properties of RTM370 composites fabricated by VARTM will be compared to those of RTM370 made by RTM.

  5. Composite Properties of RTM370 Polyimide Fabricated by Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, James M.; Mintz, Eric A.; Shonkwiler, Brian; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    RTM370 imide resin based on 2,3,3?,4?-biphenyl dianhydride (a-BPDA), 3,4'-oxydianinline (3,4'-ODA) with the 4-phenylethynylphthalic (PEPA) endcap has been shown to exhibit a high cured T(sub g) (370 C) and low melt viscosity (10-30 poise) at 280 C with a pot-life of 1-2 h. Previously, RTM370 resin has been successfully fabricated into composites reinforced with T650-35 carbon fabrics by resin transfer molding (RTM). RTM370 composites exhibit excellent mechanical properties up to 327?C (620?F), and outstanding property retention after aging at 288?C (550?F) for 1000 h. In this work, RTM370 composites were fabricated by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM), using vacuum bags on a steel plate. The mechanical properties of RTM370 composites fabricated by VARTM are compared to those prepared by RTM.

  6. Initial Development of Composite Repair Resins With Low Hazardous Air Pollutant Contents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaScala, John J; Bingham, Scott; Andrews, Kevin S; Sands, James M; Palmese, Guiseppe R

    2008-01-01

    Unsaturated polyester-based repair resins, such a Bondo, are widely used for automotive repair, marine repair, sporting equipment repair, and household repair of metal, composites, plastics, and wood...

  7. Surface roughness of composite resin veneer after application of herbal and non-herbal toothpaste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuraini, S.; Herda, E.; Irawan, B.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the surface roughness of composite resin veneer after brushing. In this study, 24 specimens of composite resin veneer are divided into three subgroups: brushed without toothpaste, brushed with non-herbal toothpaste, and brushed with herbal toothpaste. Brushing was performed for one set of 5,000 strokes and continued for a second set of 5,000 strokes. Roughness of composite resin veneer was determined using a Surface Roughness Tester. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test and Post Hoc Mann-Whitney. The results indicate that the highest difference among the Ra values occurred within the subgroup that was brushed with the herbal toothpaste. In conclusion, the herbal toothpaste produced a rougher surface on composite resin veneer compared to non-herbal toothpaste.

  8. Molecular composition and paleobotanical origin of Eocene resin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    characteristic of warm tropical climate suggesting the prevalence of such climate during early Eocene in northeast India. 1. Introduction ... family (Dutta et al. 2009, 2011b). These are also known as dammar resins and have been classified as Class II resins (Anderson et al. 1992; Dutta et al. 2009). These have been reported ...

  9. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents a preliminary study on obtaining and characterization of phenolic resin-based com- posites modified with nanometric silicon carbide. The nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating nanometric silicon carbide (nSiC) into phenolic resin at 0.5, 1 and 2 wt% contents using ultrasonication to ...

  10. Computerized mathematical model for prediction of resin/fiber composite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for the design and optimization of resin formulations. The behavior of a fiber-reinforced cured resin matrix can be predicted from constituent properties of the formulation and fiber when component interaction is taken into account. A computer implementation of the mathematical model has been coded to simulate resin/fiber response and generate expected values for any definable properties of the composite. The algorithm is based on multistage regression techniques and the manipulation of n-order matrices. Excellent correlation between actual test values and predicted values has been observed for physical, mechanical, and qualitative properties of resin/fiber composites. Both experimental and commercial resin systems with various fiber reinforcements have been successfully characterized by the model. 6 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  11. Fingerprint test data report: FM 5064J (Kaiser) lots No. 1 (K) - No. 4 (K). [resin matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Quality control tests are presented for resin matrix and carbon-carbon composites. Tests performed are filler test, resin test, prepregs test, and fabric test. The test results are presented in chart form.

  12. Are linear elastic material properties relevant predictors of the cyclic fatigue resistance of dental resin composites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the linear elastic material properties of direct dental resin composites and correlate them with their fatigue strength under cyclic loading. Bar specimens of twelve resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and tested for elastic modulus (Emod) in 3-point bending (n=10), flexural strength (FS) (n=15) and single-edge-notch-beam fracture toughness (FT) (n=15), both in 4-point bending. Using the same specimen geometry, the flexural fatigue strength (FFS) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz in 4-point bending (n=25). The observation of the fracture surface and fracture profiles was conducted using a scanning electron microscope in order to evaluate the respective fracture mechanisms according to the two different loading conditions. Materials were ranked differently according to the tested parameters. Only weak correlations were found between any of the initial properties and FFS or strength loss. The best correlation to FFS was found to be the Emod (r(2)=0.679), although only slightly. Crack path in both loading conditions was mainly interparticle, with the crack propagating mainly within the matrix phase for fatigued specimens and eventually through the filler/matrix interface for statically loaded specimens. Fracture of large particles or prepolymerized fillers was only observed in specimens of FS and FT. Initial properties were better associated with microstructural features, whereas the fatigue resistance showed to be more dependent on aspects relating to the matrix phase. Our results show that linear elastic properties such as elastic modulus, flexural strength and fracture toughness are not good descriptors of the fatigue resistance of dental resin composite under cyclic bending, and may therefore have limited clinical relevance. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Energy Drinks on Discoloration of Silorane and Dimethacrylate-Based Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadizenouz, Ghazaleh; Esmaeili, Behnaz; Ahangari, Zohreh; Khafri, Soraya; Rahmani, Aghil

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of two energy drinks on color change (ΔE) of two methacrylate-based and a silorane-based composite resin after one week and one month. Thirty cubic samples were fabricated from Filtek P90, Filtek Z250 and Filtek Z350XT composite resins. All the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Baseline color values (L*a*b*) of each specimen were measured using a spectrophotometer according to the CIEL*a*b* color system. Ten randomly selected specimens from each composite were then immersed in the two energy drinks (Hype, Red Bull) and artificial saliva (control) for one week and one month. Color was re-assessed after each storage period and ΔE values were calculated. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Filtek Z250 composite showed the highest ΔE irrespective of the solutions at both time points. After seven days and one month, the lowest ΔE values were observed in Filtek Z350XT and Filtek P90 composites immersed in artificial saliva, respectively. The ΔE values of Filtek Z250 and Z350XT composites induced by Red Bull and Hype energy drinks were not significantly different. Discoloration of Filtek P90 was higher in Red Bull energy drink at both time points. Prolonged immersion time in all three solutions increased ΔE values of all composites. However, the ΔE values were within the clinically acceptable range (<3.3) at both time points.

  14. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Guiraldo Ricardo; Consani Simonides; Xediek Consani Rafael; Mendes Wilson; Lympius Thais; Coelho Sinhoreti Mario

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC) lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Materials and Methods: Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk ...

  15. Effect of Porcelain Surface Pretreatments on Composite Resin-Porcelain Shear Bond Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    compared shear bond strengths between mechanically retained, silicoated, and sputter coated orthodontic brackets cemented with three different cements...between composite resin and porcelain, it is thought that thermocycling accelerates the hydrolysis induced degradation of the composite resin-porcelain bond...Bonding Orthodontic Attachments to Porcelain Teeth Using a Silane Coupling Agent, Am J Orthod 77: 233. Jones, D. W. (1985): Low Fusing Porcelains. In

  16. Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    microleakage with resulting pulpal sensitivity, staining , and recurrent caries.10 Additionally, incomplete curing of composite resins is associated...minimal stress.10 However, increased demand has led to greater use on posterior teeth , where considerable mechanical challenges occur under function...was placed on a plastic-strip-covered glass slide on a standard white background. The composite resin was injected into the mold and a plastic strip

  17. Factors affecting marginal integrity of class II bulk-fill composite resin restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Jafari Navimipour, Elmira; Ajami, Amir Ahmad; Ghiasvand, Negar; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2017-01-01

    Background. Bulk-fill composite resins are a new type of resin-based composite resins, claimed to have the capacity to be placed in thick layers, up to 4 mm. This study was carried out to evaluate factors affecting gap formation in Cl II cavities restored using the bulk-fill technique. Methods. A total of 60 third molars were used in this study. Two Cl II cavities were prepared in each tooth, one on the mesial aspect 1 mm coronal to the CEJ and one on the distal aspect 1 mm apical to the CEJ. The teeth were divided into 4 groups: A: The cavities were restored using the bulk-fill technique with Filtek P90 composite resin and its adhesive system and light-cured with quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light-curing unit. B: The cavities were restored similar to that in group A but light-cured with an LED light-curing unit. C: The cavities were restored using the bulk-fill technique with X-tra Fil composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond adhesive system and light-cured with a QTH curing unit. D: The cavities were restored similar to that in group C but light-cured with an LED light-curing unit. The gaps were examined under a stereomicroscope at ×60. Data were analyzed with General Linear Model test. In cases of statistical significance (Pcomposite resin type and margin location (Pcomposite resin type were not significant; however, the cumulative effect of composite rein type*gingival margin was significant (P=0.04) Conclusion. X-tra Fil composite exhibited smaller gaps compared with Filtek P90 composite with both light-curing units. Both composite resins exhibited smaller gaps at enamel margins. PMID:28748051

  18. Marginal leakage of compacted gold, composite resin, and high-copper amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormati, A A; Chan, K C

    1980-10-01

    Amalgam and compacted gold were found to have the least marginal leakage in Class V cavities. Composite resin with acid etching performed at an acceptable level. Without acid etching the marginal seal was unsatisfactory. The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. High-copper amalgam and compacted gold are the materials of choice for Class V restorations when esthetics are not of primary concern. 2. If composite resins are to be used, they should be placed with an acid-etch technique.

  19. Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers as Bonding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    Vandewalle, Kraig Civ 59 DTS/ 59 DG/ SGDTG WHASC f. 9 h. I I 1 CERTIFY ANY HUMAN OR ANIMAL RESEARCH RELATED STUDIES WERE APPROVED AND PERFORMED IN STRICT...strength of composite to dentin using resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGI) as bonding agents. Methods: Sixty extracted human third molars were...59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 2 MAR 20 16 l. Your paper, entitl ed Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin

  20. The role of oxygen inhibition of a self-etch adhesive on self-cure resin composite bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tatsuo; Finger, Werner J; Hoffmann, Marcus; Kanehira, Masafumi; Komatsu, Masashi

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strengths on enamel and dentin with a self-etch adhesive (iBond), with or without oxygen-inhibited surface layer, or covered with intermediate self-curing resin, in combination with chemical-cured composite (Core Paste). Bond strengths on human enamel and dentin (n = 8) were determined according to the following procedures: 1. Adhesive cured under ambient air. 2. Inhibited surface wiped with ethanol. 3. Adhesive cured under nitrogen. 4. Adhesive covered with glycerol during activation. 5. Adhesive coated with glycerol for 1 minute after activation. 6. As 5, but covered for 5 minutes. 7. Cured adhesive coated with intermediate self-curing resin. 8. As 7, but intermediate resin's amine component loaded with anion exchange resin in OH- form. Shear bond strengths (SBS) were measured after 24-hour storage in 37 degrees C water. SBSs on enamel (7.1 to 25.6 MPa) were, by ranking order (Presin group (mean 19.6 MPa), showed bond strengths resin was low, irrespective of the presence of an oxygen-inhibited layer. Deprotonization of the acidic adhesive monomer with an admixed anion exchange compound, added to an intermediate self-cured resin, was effective at overcoming the incompatibility.

  1. Formation of functionalized nanoclusters by solvent evaporation and their effect on the physicochemical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Henry A; Giraldo, Luis F; Casanova, Herley

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of silica nanoclusters (SiNC), obtained by a solvent evaporation method and functionalized by 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and MPS+octyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) (50/50wt/wt), on the rheological, mechanical and sorption properties of urethane dimethylacrylate (UDMA)/triethylenglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (80/20wt/wt) resins blend. Silica nanoparticles (SiNP) were silanized with MPS or MPS+OTMS (50/50wt/wt) and incorporated in an UDMA-isopropanol mix to produce functionalized silica nanoclusters after evaporating the isopropanol. The effect of functionalized SiNC on resins rheological properties was determined by large and small deformation tests. Mechanical, thermal, sorption and solubility properties were evaluated for composite materials. The UDMA/TEGDMA (80/20wt/wt) resins blend with added SiNC (ca. 350nm) and functionalized with MPS showed a Newtonian flow behavior associated to their spheroidal shape, whereas the resins blend with nanoclusters silanized with MPS+OTMS (50/50wt/wt) (ca. 400nm) showed a shear-thinning behavior due to nanoclusters irregular shape. Composite materials prepared with bare silica nanoclusters showed lower compressive strength than functionalized silica nanoclusters. MPS functionalized nanoclusters showed better mechanical properties but higher water sorption than functionalized nanoclusters with both silane coupling agents, MPS and OTMS. The solvent evaporation method applied to functionalized nanoparticles showed to be an alternative way to the sinterization method for producing nanoclusters, which improved some dental composite mechanical properties and reduced water sorption. The shape of functionalized silica nanoclusters showed to have influence on the rheological properties of SiNC resin suspensions and the mechanical and sorption properties of light cured composites. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanical properties of waste paper/jute fabric reinforced polyester resin matrix hybrid composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sekhar

    2017-09-15

    Hybrid composites were prepared with jute fabric and un-shredded newspaper in polyester resin matrix. The experiment was designed 1:2 weights ratio jute and unshredded newspaper to have 42 (w/w)% fibre content hybrid composites and two different sequences jute/paper/jute and paper/jute/paper of waste newspaper and jute fabric arrangement. Reinforcing material is characterized by chemically, X-ray diffraction methods, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and tensile testing. The tensile, flexural and interlaminar shear strength and fracture surface morphology of composites were evaluated and compared. It was found that tensile and flexural properties of the hybrid composite are higher than that of pure paper-based composite but less than pure woven jute composite. The hybridization effect of woven jute fabric and layering pattern effect on mechanical properties of newspaper/woven jute fabric hybrid composites were studied. The test results of composites were analyzed by one-way ANOVA (α=0.05), it showed significant differences among the groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparing microleakage and the layering methods of silorane-based resin composite in wide Class II MOD cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagis, Yildirim Hakan; Baltacioglu, Ismail Hakki; Kahyaogullari, Savas

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the effects of different layering techniques and different monomer-based composites on microleakage. Thirty-two freshly extracted caries-free human third molars were used. A wide mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity was prepared in each third molar, with the occlusal dimension being approximately two-thirds of the intercuspal dimension, and the cervical limit of one proximal box was stopped 1 mm below and the other 1 mm above the cementoenamel junction. The cavities were filled with a methacrylate-based nanohybrid composite (Grandio, VoCo) and a silorane-based microhybrid composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE). All samples were subjected to 1000 thermal cycles of 5 degrees C/55 degrees C in water with a 30-second dwell time and, after the procedure, the teeth were immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsin dye at 23 degrees C for 24 hours. Sectioned samples were examined under a stereomicroscope (Leica MZ12, Leica Microsystems), and microleakage scores were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U tests. No microleakage was observed for silorane-based resin composite restorations. The nanohybrid-based resin composite restorations showed different levels of leakage. Statistical analysis of microleakage scores showed differences only at the enamel margins for nanohybrid material for both layering techniques (p < 0.05). The nanohybrid-based resin composite restorations showed better results with the vertical layering technique for enamel margins.

  4. Strobes: Pyrotechnic Compositions That Show a Curious Oscillatory Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341356034; van Lingen, J.N.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311441769; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073464708; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986

    2013-01-01

    Strobes are pyrotechnic compositions which show an oscillatory combustion; a dark phase and a flash phase alternate periodically. The strobe effect has applications in various fields, most notably in the fireworks industry and in the military area. All strobe compositions mentioned in the literature

  5. Repair of bis-acryl provisional restorations using flowable composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, David M; Garcia, Lily T

    2004-11-01

    Provisional restorations provide interim coverage for prepared teeth while fixed definitive restorations are fabricated. Several types of autopolymerizing acrylic resins have been used for many years to fabricate provisional restorations. In recent years, bis-acryl resin composite material has gained popularity among clinicians for the direct fabrication of provisional fixed restorations. Occasionally, deficiencies may occur while fabricating a direct provisional restoration and require chairside repair. This article describes an effective procedure for the use of light-polymerized flowable composite resin for the intraoral repair of bis-acryl provisional restorations.

  6. Enhanced thermal conductivity of carbon fiber/phenolic resin composites by the introduction of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. A.; Kamio, S.; Tajiri, T.; Hayashi, T.; Song, S. M.; Endo, M.; Terrones, M.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-01

    The authors report a significant enhancement in the thermal conductivity of a conventional carbon fiber/phenolic resin composite system when adding highly crystalline multiwalled carbon nanotubes. They demonstrate that 7wt% of carbon nanotubes dispersed homogeneously in a phenolic resin acted as an effective thermal bridge between adjacent carbon fibers and resulted in an enhancement of the thermal conductivity (e.g., from 250to393W/mK). These results indicate that highly crystalline carbon nanotubes can be used as a multifunctional filler to enhance simultaneously the mechanical and thermal properties of the carbon fiber/phenolic resin composites.

  7. Fracture resistance of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-generated composite resin-based molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Akio; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Örtengren, Ulf; Niwano, Yoshimi; Sasaki, Keiichi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether different fabrication processes, such as the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system or the manual build-up technique, affect the fracture resistance of composite resin-based crowns. Lava Ultimate (LU), Estenia C&B (EC&B), and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic IPS e.max press (EMP) were used. Four types of molar crowns were fabricated: CAD/CAM-generated composite resin-based crowns (LU crowns); manually built-up monolayer composite resin-based crowns (EC&B-monolayer crowns); manually built-up layered composite resin-based crowns (EC&B-layered crowns); and EMP crowns. Each type of crown was cemented to dies and the fracture resistance was tested. EC&B-layered crowns showed significantly lower fracture resistance compared with LU and EMP crowns, although there was no significant difference in flexural strength or fracture toughness between LU and EC&B materials. Micro-computed tomography and fractographic analysis showed that decreased strength probably resulted from internal voids in the EC&B-layered crowns introduced by the layering process. There was no significant difference in fracture resistance among LU, EC&B-monolayer, and EMP crowns. Both types of composite resin-based crowns showed fracture loads of >2000 N, which is higher than the molar bite force. Therefore, CAD/CAM-generated crowns, without internal defects, may be applied to molar regions with sufficient fracture resistance. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  8. Variations in survival time for amalgam and resin composite restorations: a population based cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, S; Price, R; Andreou, P; Jones, G; Portolesi, A

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the association between the restorative material used and time to further treatment across population cohorts with universal coverage for dental treatment. Cohort study of variation in survival time for tooth restorations over time and by restoration material used based on an Accelerated Failure Time model. Primary dental care clinics. Members of Canada's First Nations and Inuit population covered by the Non-Insured Health Benefits program of Health Canada for the period April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2012. Tooth restorations using resin composite or amalgam material. Survival time of restoration to further treatment. Median survival time for resin composite was 51 days longer than amalgam, for restorations placed in 1999-2000. This difference was not statistically significant (p⟩0.05). Median survival times were lower for females, older subjects. Those visiting the dentist annually, and decreased monotonically over time from 11.2 and 11.3 years for resin composite and amalgam restorations respectively placed in 1999-2000 to 6.9 and 7.0 years for those placed in 2009-10. Resin composite restorations performed no better than amalgams over the study period, but cost considerably more. With the combination of the overall decrease in survival times for both resin composite and amalgam restorations and the increase in use of resin composite, the costs of serving Health Canada's Non-Insured Health Benefits population will rise considerably, even without any increase in the incidence of caries. Copyright© 2016 Dennis Barber Ltd

  9. Effect of light curing sources on microhardness of different composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, T. A.; Calabrez-Filho, S.; de Menezes, F. C. H.; Cavalcante, L. M. A.; Pimenta, L. A. F.; de Andrade, M. F.; Dantas, A. A. R.; Rastelli, A. N. S.

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the influence of light-curing units (LCUs) on Knoop microhardness (KHN) of different composite resins formulations. Four LCUs, one Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen (QTH) for 20 s, one Argon-Ion-Laser (AL) for 10 s, one Plasma-Arc-Curing (PAC) for 9 s, and one Light-Emitting-Diode (LED) for 20 s, and three composite resins, nanofill and easy cure (Filtek™ Supreme), microhybrid and medium cure (Herculite XRV), and microfill and difficult cure (Heliomolar) were used. Discs (4 × 2 mm2) of each composite resin were divided in 12 Groups and KHN was measured at the top (T) and bottom (B) surfaces. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test ( p < 0.05). Top presented significantly higher KHN than bottom surface for all composite resins and LCUs tested. Statistical significant differences were observed among the LCUs. At the bottom surface QTH and LED presented higher KHN than PAC and LA. However, at the top surface PAC and LA presented similar results than QTH for nanofill and microhybrid composite resins. Different LCUs play an important effect on Knoop microhardness and the composite resin formulations were significant factor on the photosensitivity.

  10. Bacterial colonization of resin composite cements: influence of material composition and surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Stephanie; Astasov-Frauenhoffer, Monika; Müller, Johannes A; Fischer, Jens; Waltimo, Tuomas; Rohr, Nadja

    2017-08-01

    So-called secondary caries may develop in the cement gap between the tooth and the bonded restoration. Cement materials with a low susceptibility to biofilm formation are therefore desirable. In the present study, the adhesion of Strepococcus mutans onto three adhesive (Multilink Automix, RelyX Ultimate, and Panavia V5) and three self-adhesive (Multilink Speed Cem, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, and Panavia SA plus) resin composite cements was evaluated. Previous studies have failed to evaluate concomitantly the effect of both the composition of the cements and their surface roughness on biofilm formation. The presence of S. mutans on cement surfaces with differing degrees of roughness was therefore recorded using fluorescence microscopy and crystal violet staining, and the composition of the cements was analyzed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping. Biofilm formation on resin composite cements was found to be higher on rougher surfaces, implying that adequate polishing of the cement gap is essential. The use of copper-containing cements (Multilink Automix, Panavia V5, and Panavia SA plus) significantly reduced biofilm formation. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  11. One Year Clinical Evaluation of a Low Shrinkage Composite Compared with a Packable Composite Resin: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Hoseinifar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of a packable and a low shrinkage methacrylate-based composite after one year.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 50 class I or II restorations were placed in 25 patients. Each patient received two restorations. The tested materials were: (I Filtek P60 + Single Bond 2 and (II Kalore GC + Single Bond 2. The restorations were evaluated by two independent examiners after one week (baseline, six months and one year according to the modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS criteria. The evaluated parameters included color match, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, retention, surface texture, postoperative sensitivity, marginal staining and secondary caries. Data were then analyzed using Friedman and conditional (matched logistic regression tests at P<0.05 level of significance. Results: P60 and Kalore performed similarly at six months and one year (P>0.05. When each composite resin was evaluated independently at baseline and after one year, no statistically significant differences were found except for marginal adaptation (P60 where four restorations were rated Bravo (clinically acceptable. In 8% of restorations, patients expressed postoperative sensitivity.Conclusions: Kalore GC and Filtek P60 showed acceptance clinical performance after one year of service.Keywords: Composite Resins; Dental Marginal Adaptation; Patients

  12. Influence of coffee on reflectance and chemistry of resin composite protected by surface sealant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Cesar, Ilene Cristine Rosia; Santos, Carla Gabriela Couto; De Cardoso, Ana Luiza Merigo Oliveira; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane Suzy; Munin, Egberto; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2007-10-01

    To assess the influence of the light-curing unit type and whether or not it was worth using surface sealant protection on resin composite restorative materials stained by coffee. Another objective was to propose the monitoring of coffee staining by FT-Raman spectroscopy using carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds as reference to the composite matrix degradation. Sixty cylindrical specimens of resin composite were prepared and divided into six groups: HC (control)--cured with a halogen light; LC (control) cured with a LED; HF--cured with a halogen light + Fortify Plus; LF--cured with a LED + Fortify Plus; HP--cured with a halogen light + PermaSeal; LP--cured with a LED + PermaSeal. After storage for 24 hours at 37% and 100% of relative humidity, the top surface was protected, and the other surfaces isolated. Polishing with paper discs was performed after 24 hours of curing and prior to FT-Raman spectroscopy and reflectance measurements. All specimens were submitted to coffee staining for 14 days and evaluated by both systems. Results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey tests. FT-Raman spectrum only showed significant changes in groups LC and LP (P< 0.05). Reflectance demonstrated that staining was present in all specimens protected by sealants. Sealant staining was larger in the HF (P < 0.001) group.

  13. Comparison of different polishing methods on the surface roughness of microhybrid, microfill, and nanofill composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Mariana D; Godas, André Gustavo de L; Fernandes, Juliana C; Suzuki, Thaís Y U; Guedes, Ana Paula A; Briso, André L F; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina; Dos Santos, Paulo H

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different polishing methods on the surface roughness of resin-based composites subjected to a thermocycling procedure. A total of 192 specimens were divided into 24 groups, according to composite materials (Filtek Z250, Point 4, Renamel Nanofill, Filtek Supreme Plus, Renamel Microfill, and Premise) and finishing and polishing systems (Sof-Lex Pop On, Super Snap, Flexidisc, and Flexidisc+Enamelize). The specimens were subjected to thermocycling (5000 cycles). Filtek Supreme Plus showed the lowest surface roughness values before thermocycling. After thermocycling, Filtek Supreme Plus continued to have the lowest surface roughness, with a statistically-significant difference for the other materials. After thermocycling, there was no statistically-significant difference among all the polishing techniques studied. The thermocycling was concluded as being able to change composite resins' surface roughness, whereas different finishing and polishing methods did not result in surface roughness changes after thermocycling. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Effect of Two Surface Sealants on Microleakage of Class V Resin Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosa Aboali

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: When composite resin polymerizes, shrinkage stresses tend to produce gaps at the tooth/ restoration interfaces. Surface sealants may reduce or avoid problems related to the marginal interface. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different surface sealants (Fortify and Optiguard on the microleakage of class V resin composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Twenty three sound noncarious molars were collected. Totally, 45 Class V cavities with the occlusal margins in enamel and cervical margins in cementum were prepared in both buccal and lingual surfaces. The specimens were randomly assigned in three groups (15 cavities in each group and then restored with a resin composite. After the finishing and polishing procedures, the restorations in each group were covered with a specific surface sealant, except for the control samples, which were not sealed. After placing restorations, the specimens were thermocycled and then immersed in a 50% silver nitrate solution (tracer agent for four hours, sectioned longitudinally and analyzed for leakage using a stereomicroscope in a blind manner. The marginal microleakage was evaluated at the occlusal and cervical interfaces and compared among the three groups using the Kruskall-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: Microleakage was found in all groups at both occlusal and cervical margins. Significantly greater leakage was observed at the cervical margins compared to the enamel margins of the material groups (P=0.005. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups at occlusal margins (P=0.66. In the cervical region, Fortify showed improved results and statistically presented the lowest degree of microleakage (P=0.003. onclusion: The used sealant materials presented different rates of effectiveness and Fortify decreased marginal microleakage significantly.

  15. The Effect of Drinks and Temperature on the Staining of Resin Composites Coated with Surface Sealants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui R

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: Surface staining of resin composite by dietary factors may be modified by the placement of a low-viscosity surface sealant aimed at reducing surface voids and defects occurring after light-curing and polishing. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the staining effect of various drinks and temperatures on the surface sealant (Fortify Plus™ sealed on a nano-filled resin composite (Supreme XTE™ after artificial aging at different temperatures. Materials and Methods: Surface sealant was applied on one surface of forty resin composite discs (10×2 mm. Five discs each were immersed in test solutions of black cola, commercial dark grape juice, coffee and distilled water (negative control. Discs were either placed at 4°C (20 discs or 37°C (20 discs and the colour difference (ΔE was calculated based on the colour coordinates at 0 (baseline, 7, 14 and 28 days of staining treatment. Two-factor with replication analysis was carried out with ANOVA. Results: The results showed significant discolouration after 28 days immersion in coffee (P<0.001 and grape juice group (P<0.001. Surface sealant significantly affected colour changes in coffee and grape juice group (P=0.002. Higher temperatures in coffee and grape juice also significantly increased the effect of staining (P<0.001. Conclusions: Surface sealant was able to reduce discolouration in the grape juice group only. A lower temperature of 4°C caused less staining in coffee and grape juice groups as compared to the 37°C corresponding test groups. Prolonged immersion time significantly increased discolouration in coffee and grape juice groups.

  16. [Effect of thermal cycling on surface microstructure of different light-curing composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Da; Liu, Kai-Lei; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Wei-Sheng; Liao, Chu-Hong; Jiang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of thermal cycling on surface microstructure of different light-curing composite resins. A nanofilled composite (Z350) and 4 microhybrid composites (P60, Z250, Spectrum, and AP-X) were fabricated from lateral to center to form cubic specimens. The lateral surfaces were abrased and polished before water storage and 40 000 thermal cycles (5/55 degrees celsius;). The mean surface roughness (Ra) were measured and compared before and after thermal cycling, and the changes of microstructure were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Significant decreases of Ra were observed in the composites, especially in Spectrum (from 0.164±0.024 µm to 0.140±0.017 µm, Presins, and fissures occurred on Z350 following the thermal cycling. Water storage and thermal cycling may produce polishing effect on composite resins and cause fissures on nanofilled composite resins.

  17. Effect of Different Liners on Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored with Conventional and Short Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Doozandeh, Maryam; Ghaffaripour, Dordaneh

    2018-01-11

    To see whether applying four different liners under short fiber-reinforced composite (SFRC), everX Posterior, compared to conventional composite resin, Z250, affected their strengthening property in premolar MOD cavities. Mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared in 120 sound maxillary premolars divided into 10 groups (n = 12) in terms of two composite resin types and 4 liners or no liner. For each composite resin, in 5 groups no liner, resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), conventional flowable composite (COFL), self-adhesive flowable composite resin (SAFL), and self-adhesive resin cement (SARC) were applied prior to restoring incrementally. After water storage and thermocycling, static fracture resistance was tested. Data (in Newtons) were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Fracture resistance was significantly affected by composite resin type (p = 0.02), but not by the liner (p > 0.05). The interaction of the two factors was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). SFRC exhibited higher fracture strength (1470 ± 200 N) compared to conventional composite resin (1350 ± 290), irrespective of the application of liners. Application of SARC and SAFL liners led to a higher number of restorable fractures for both composite resins. The four liners can be used without interfering with the higher efficacy of SFRC, compared to conventional composite resins, to improve the fracture strength of premolar MOD cavities. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Effects of air-polishing powders on color stability of composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    GÜLER, Ahmet Umut; DURAN, Ibrahim; YÜCEL, Ali Çagin; ÖZKAN, Pelin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different air-polishing powders on the color stability of different types of composite resin restorative materials. Material and methods Thirty cylindrical specimens (15×2 mm) were prepared for each of 7 composite resin restorative materials. All specimens were polished with a series of aluminum oxide polishing discs (Sof-Lex). The prepared specimens of each composite resin were randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 specimens each, for control (Group-C) and two air-powder applications (Group-CP: Cavitron Prophy-Jet; Group-PS: Sirona ProSmile prophylaxis powder). A standard air-polishing unit (ProSmile Handly) was used. All specimens were air-powdered for 10 s at 4-bar pressure. The distance of the spray nosel from the specimens was approximately 10 mm and angulation of the nosel was 90º. Specimens were stored in 100 mL of coffee (Nescafe Classic) for 24 h at 37ºC. Color measurement of all specimens was recorded before and after exposure to staining agent with a colorimeter (Minolta CR-300). Color differences (∆E*) between the 2 color measurements (baseline and after 24 h storage) were calculated. The data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA test, and mean values were compared by the Tukey HSD test (p≤0.05). Results According to the 2-way ANOVA results, composite resin restorative materials, air-polishing powders, and their interaction were statistically significant (pGrandio, CeramX Mono, and Quixfil composite resin restorative materials, no significant difference was observed between Group-PS and Group-CP (p>.05) and these groups demonstrated the highest ∆E* values. For Filtek Silorane and IntenS, the highest ∆E* values were observed in Group-PS. The lowest ∆E* values for all composite resin groups were observed in Group-C. When comparing the 7 composite resin restorative materials, Aelite Aesthetic Enemal demonstrated significantly less ∆E* values than the other composite resins

  19. Clinical evaluation of a nanohybrid and a flowable resin composite in non-carious cervical lesions: 24-month results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Emel; Yazici, A Rüya; Ozgunaltay, Gül; Dayangac, Berrin

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the 24-month clinical performance of cervical restorations using a nanohybrid and a flowable resin composite with a one-step self-etching adhesive. Twenty-one patients with at least one pair of non-carious cervical lesions participated in this study. A total of 134 non-carious cervical lesions were restored (67 with a nanohybrid resin composite, Grandio; 67 with a flowable resin composite, Grandio Flow) using a one-step self-etching adhesive system, Futura Bond NR, by one dentist. The restorations were evaluated for retention, color match, marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, surface texture, anatomic form, and secondary caries by two calibrated examiners at baseline and after 6, 12, and 24 months using modified USPHS criteria. The survival rates of the restorations were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier estimator. The comparison of resin composites for each category was performed with the Pearson chi-square test, and the performance of restorations at baseline and after each recall time was evaluated using McNemar's test (p Grandio and Grandio Flow, respectively. At the 24-month recall, the retention rate was 60% for Grandio and 54% for Grandio Flow. No statistically significant differences were found in retention rates among the restorative materials in any evaluation period (p > 0.05). For marginal discoloration and anatomical form, three Grandio and three Grandio Flow restorations showed Bravo scores at the end of 24 months. The restorations in both groups had Alfa ratings of 100% for the rest of the criteria evaluated. The nanohybrid and flowable resin composites showed similar clinical performances in the restoration of non-carious cervical lesions over 24 months.

  20. Impact of head and neck radiotherapy on the mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Troconis, Cristhian Camilo; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2017-11-01

    To analyze the evidence regarding the impact of head and neck radiotherapy (HNRT) on the mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems. Searches were conducted on PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ISI Web of Science databases using "Radiotherapy", "Composite resins" and "Adhesive systems" as keywords. Selected studies were written in English and assessed the mechanical behavior of composite resins and/or adhesive systems when bonding procedure was conducted before and/or after a maximum radiation dose ≥50Gy, applied under in vitro or in vivo conditions. In total, 115 studies were found but only 16 were included, from which five evaluated the effect of in vitro HNRT on microhardness, wear resistance, diametral tensile and flexural strength of composite resins, showing no significant negative effect in most of reports. Regarding bond strength of adhesive systems, 11 studies were included from which five reported no meaningful negative effect when bonding procedure was conducted before simulated HNRT. Conversely, five studies showed that bond strength diminished when adhesive procedure was done after in vitro radiation therapy. Only two studies about dental adhesion were conducted after in vivo radiotherapy but the results were not conclusive. The mechanical behavior of composite resins and adhesive systems seems not to be affected when in vitro HNRT is applied after bonding procedure. However, bond strength of adhesive systems tends to decrease when simulated radiotherapy is used immediately before bonding procedure. Studies assessing dentin bond strength after in-vivo HNRT were limited and controversial. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of tooth age on colour adjustment potential of resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A; Nakajima, M; Seki, N; Foxton, R M; Tagami, J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tooth age on colour adjustment potential of resin composite restorations in human teeth. Twenty extracted human premolars with an A2 shade, extracted for orthodontic reasons from younger patients (20-28yrs) (younger teeth) and periodontal reasons from older patients (45-69yrs) (older teeth), were used in this study. Cylindrical shaped cavities (3.0mm depth; 2.0mm diameter) were prepared in the centre of the crowns on the buccal surface. One of four resin composites of A2 shade (Kalore, KA; Solare, SO; Clearfil Majesty, MJ; Beautifil II, BF) was placed in the cavity, and the colour was measured at four areas (0.4mm×0.4mm) on the restored teeth (area 1; tooth area 1.0mm away from the border of resin composite restoration: area 2; tooth border area 0.3mm away from margin of resin composite restoration: area 3; resin composite border area 0.3mm away from margin of resin composite restoration: area 4; resin composite area at the centre of resin composite restoration) using a spectrophotometer (Crystaleye). The colour of each area was determined according to the CIELAB colour scale. Colour differences (ΔE*) between the areas of 1 and 2, 2 and 3, 3 and 4 and 1 and 4 were calculated, and also the ratio of ΔE*area2-3 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area2-3/1-4), ΔE*area3-4 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area3-4/1-4) and ΔE*area1-2 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area1-2/1-4) as a parameter of the colour shift in resin composite restoration, were determined. Moreover, the light transmission characteristics of the resin materials and dentine discs from the younger and older teeth were measured using a goniophotometer. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, and Dunnett's T3 and t-test for the post hoc test. ΔE*area2-3 (colour difference between resin composite and tooth at the border) and ΔE*area1-4 (colour difference between resin composite and tooth) of the older teeth groups were significantly larger than those of younger

  2. Effect of the surface roughness on interfacial properties of carbon fibers reinforced epoxy resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Wei; Gu Aijuan; Liang Guozheng; Yuan Li

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the surface roughness on interfacial properties of carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy (EP) resin composite is studied. Aqueous ammonia was applied to modify the surfaces of CFs. The morphologies and chemical compositions of original CFs and treated CFs (a-CFs) were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Compared with the smooth surface of original CF, the surface of a-CF has bigger roughness; moreover, the roughness increases with the increase of the treating time. On the other hand, no obvious change in chemical composition takes place, indicating that the treating mechanism of CFs by aqueous ammonia is to physically change the morphologies rather than chemical compositions. In order to investigate the effect of surface roughness on the interfacial properties of CF/EP composites, the wettability and Interfacial Shear Strength (IFSS) were measured. Results show that with the increase of the roughness, the wettabilities of CFs against both water and ethylene glycol improves; in addition, the IFSS value of composites also increases. These attractive phenomena prove that the surface roughness of CFs can effectively overcome the poor interfacial adhesions between CFs and organic matrix, and thus make it possible to fabricate advanced composites based on CFs.

  3. Spatial distribution of volatile compounds in epoxy resins for composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, M.A.; Wolf, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    Precision abrasion mass spectrometry (PAMS) was used to determine the quantitative distribution profile of water in three epoxy resin systems: tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with dicyandiamide (DICY), diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) cured with DICY, and TGDDM cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The first two resin systems also contain an epoxy cresol novolac. Specimens of the three resins were exposed to a humid environment for 4 to 2000 hours. The water distribution was determined immediately following environmental exposure. Distribution profiles of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and dichloromethane were also measured in the specimens. A brief description of the PAMS apparatus and a discussion of the distribution profiles of the sorbed gases in the three epoxy resin systems as a function of exposure time are given

  4. Use of eco-friendly epoxy resins from renewable resources as potential substitutes of petrochemical epoxy resins for ambient cured composites with flax reinforcements

    OpenAIRE

    Bertomeu Perelló, David; García Sanoguera, David; Fenollar Gimeno, Octavio Ángel; Boronat Vitoria, Teodomiro; Balart Gimeno, Rafael Antonio

    2012-01-01

    [EN] In the last years, some high renewable content epoxy resins, derived from vegetable oils, have been developed at industrial level and are now commercially available; these can compete with petroleum-based resins as thermoset matrices for composite materials. Nevertheless, due to the relatively high cost in comparison to petroleum-based resins, their use is still restricted to applications with relatively low volume consumption such as model making, tuning components, nautical parts, spec...

  5. Effect of two lasers on the polymerization of composite resins: single vs combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Jung-Hoon; Son, Sung-Ae; Park, Jeong-kil; Jeon, Gye-Rok; Ko, Ching-Chang; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2015-07-01

    The selection of a light-curing unit for the curing composite resins is important to achieve best outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to test lasers of 457 and 473 nm alone or in combination under different light conditions with respect to the cure of composite resins. Four different composite resins were light cured using five different laser combinations (530 mW/cm(2) 457 nm only, 530 mW/cm(2) 473 nm only, 177 mW/cm(2) 457 + 177 mW/cm(2) 473 nm, 265 mW/cm(2) 457 + 265 mW/cm(2) 473 nm, and 354 mW/cm(2) 457 + 354 mW/cm(2) 473 nm). Microhardness and polymerization shrinkage were evaluated. A light-emitting diode (LED) unit was used for comparison purposes. On top surfaces, after aging for 24 h, microhardness achieved using the LED unit and the lasers with different conditions ranged 42.4-65.5 and 38.9-67.7 Hv, respectively, and on bottom surfaces, corresponding ranges were 25.2-56.1 and 18.5-55.7 Hv, respectively. Of the conditions used, 354 mW/cm(2) 457 nm + 354 mW/cm(2) 473 nm produced the highest bottom microhardness (33.8-55.6 Hv). On top and bottom surfaces, microhardness by the lowest total light intensity, 354 (177 × 2) mW/cm(2), ranged 39.0-60.5 and 18.5-52.8 Hv, respectively. Generally, 530 mW/cm(2) at 457 nm produced the lowest polymerization shrinkage. However, shrinkage values obtained using all five laser conditions were similar. The study shows the lasers of 457 and 473 nm are useful for curing composite resins alone or in combination at much lower light intensities than the LED unit.

  6. Curing profile of bulk-fill resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Pongprueksa, Pong; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the curing profile of bulk-fill resin-based composites (RBC) using micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRaman). Four bulk-fill RBCs were compared to a conventional RBC. RBC blocks were light-cured using a polywave LED light-curing unit. The 24-h degree of conversion (DC) was mapped along a longitudinal cross-section using μRaman. Curing profiles were constructed and 'effective' (>90% of maximum DC) curing parameters were calculated. A statistical linear mixed effects model was constructed to analyze the relative effect of the different curing parameters. Curing efficiency differed widely with the flowable bulk-fill RBCs presenting a significantly larger 'effective' curing area than the fibre-reinforced RBC, which on its turn revealed a significantly larger 'effective' curing area than the full-depth bulk-fill and conventional (control) RBC. A decrease in 'effective' curing depth within the light beam was found in the same order. Only the flowable bulk-fill RBCs were able to cure 'effectively' at a 4-mm depth for the whole specimen width (up to 4mm outside the light beam). All curing parameters were found to statistically influence the statistical model and thus the curing profile, except for the beam inhomogeneity (regarding the position of the 410-nm versus that of 470-nm LEDs) that did not significantly affect the model for all RBCs tested. Most of the bulk-fill RBCs could be cured up to at least a 4-mm depth, thereby validating the respective manufacturer's recommendations. According to the curing profiles, the orientation and position of the light guide is less critical for the bulk-fill RBCs than for the conventional RBC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluorine analysis of human dentin surrounding resin composite after fluoride application by μ-PIGE/PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Katsushi; Komatsu, Hisanori; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Pereira, Patricia N.R.; Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Sato, Takahiro; Sano, Hidehiko

    2011-01-01

    the control group. In addition, PIGE analyses showed high concentrations of fluorine in the hybrid bonding layer of the 10,000 ppm F samples, suggesting that the fluorine contributes to the strength of the dentin-resin composite bond. Detection of fluoroapatite within the hybrid bonding layer suggests that bond strength involves remineralization processes.

  8. Fluorine analysis of human dentin surrounding resin composite after fluoride application by {mu}-PIGE/PIXE analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, Katsushi, E-mail: katsu@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Hokkaido, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan) and School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Department of Operative Dentistry, 302 Brauer, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7450 (United States); Komatsu, Hisanori [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Hokkaido, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Yamamoto, Hiroko [Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamada-Oka, Osaka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Pereira, Patricia N.R. [School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Department of Operative Dentistry, 302 Brauer, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7450 (United States); Bedran-Russo, Ana K. [University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Dentistry, Department of Restorative Dentistry, 801 S. Paulina St., Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Nomachi, Masaharu [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Osaka, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Sato, Takahiro [TARRI, JAEA, Advanced Radiation Technology, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Gunma, Takasaki 370-1292 (Japan); Sano, Hidehiko [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Hokkaido, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    applications or the control group. In addition, PIGE analyses showed high concentrations of fluorine in the hybrid bonding layer of the 10,000 ppm F samples, suggesting that the fluorine contributes to the strength of the dentin-resin composite bond. Detection of fluoroapatite within the hybrid bonding layer suggests that bond strength involves remineralization processes.

  9. The impact of in vitro aging on the mechanical and optical properties of indirect veneering composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Egli, Roger; Roos, Malgorzata; Ozcan, Mutlu; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2011-12-01

    Flexural strength, hardness, surface roughness, discoloration, and abrasion resistance are important properties of veneering composite resins. Recently introduced veneering resins are purported to have enhanced mechanical properties due to their composition, but their long-term durability is not known. The purpose of this study was to test the impact of aging on 3 different veneering composite resins. Indirect composite resins, GC Gradia, VITA VM LC, and Sinfony were prepared for flexural strength (n=165 per group), Martens hardness (n=10), surface roughness (n=10), discoloration measurement (n=30), and abrasion resistance (n=6) testing. After initial flexural strength measurement, the remaining specimens were stored in water or subjected to thermocycling for 1, 7, 28, 90, or 180 days, and hardness and surface roughness (water stored: n=5 and thermocycling: n=5) were tested. The discoloration specimens were divided into 3 groups: coffee, black tea, and red wine; n=10), and age and discoloration were measured. Abrasion resistance was determined after 120,000, 240,000, 640,000, and 1,200,000 mechanical thermocycling loading. One-way ANOVA was used, followed by a post hoc Scheffé test and t test. The longitudinal observations were analyzed by using linear mixed models (α=.05). When considering all 5 of the properties tested, Sinfony demonstrated the best results, followed by GC Gradia and VITA VM LC. The veneering composite resin, Sinfony, showed the most stable properties. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The comparative evaluation of fracture resistance and microleakage in bonded amalgam, amalgam, and composite resins in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanishree, H S; Shanthala, B M; Bobby, W

    2015-01-01

    The intense development of adhesive restorative materials and parents' preferences for esthetic restorations prompt clinicians to use alternative restorative materials for primary molars. Amalgam, however, is the choice of material when it comes to occlusal stress bearing areas, either in primary or permanent molars. To overcome the drawbacks of amalgam and restorative adhesive materials, the bonded amalgam technique is employed. To evaluate microleakage and fracture resistance of bonded amalgam in primary molars, and compare it with the microleakage and fracture resistance of high-copper amalgam and composite resin materials. An in vitro study and 60 caries-free primary molars were used. A total of 60 samples were randomly divided into two equal groups for the evaluation of microleakage and fracture resistance. Class V cavities for microleakage study prepared on 30 samples and Class II mesio-occluso-distal cavities for fracture resistance study on other 30 samples were prepared and randomly divided into three equal groups. Group I received amalgam, Group II received bonded amalgam, and Group III received composite resins. The microleakage was viewed under a stereomicroscope. The fracture resistance was evaluated using a universal testing machine. Bonded amalgam exhibited minimum microleakage, when compared to amalgam and composite resin and was found to be statistically insignificant (P = 0.203), while amalgam showed better fracture resistance compared to bonded amalgam and composite resin. It was found to be statistically insignificant (P = 0.144). Bonded amalgam appears to be comparable to amalgam when microleakage is considered and to composite resin when fracture resistance is considered; hence, bonded amalgam can also be an alternative material to amalgam in primary molars.

  11. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3(rd) year, overall "Bravo" rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3(rd) year evaluation (P composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities.

  12. Comparison between water and ethanol wet bonding of resin composite to root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Salvatore; Di Renzo, Simona; Castagnola, Raffaella; Grande, Nicola M; Plotino, Gianluca; Foschi, Federico; Mannocci, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of resin dentin interfaces created with adhesives applied on root dentin using the water wet or ethanol wet bonding technique. The morphology of resin dentin interfaces was evaluated using confocal microscopy. Four experimental resin adhesives (R#A to R#D) and one commercial three-step/etch and rinse adhesive were applied to the root canal dentin of endodontically treated single canal incisors using the water (control) or ethanol wet bonding technique. The ethanol wet bonding substrate was achieved by keeping the root canal immersed in absolute ethanol (100%) for 3 minutes. The root dentin bonded specimens were sectioned into beams, stored in distilled water (24 hours) and finally tested for microtensile bond strengths (tTBS). Additional dentin surfaces were conditioned and bonded as previously described. They were prepared for the microscopy study and finally observed using confocal microscopy. The ethanol wet bonding technique gave higher bond strength values for all the adhesives tested: in Group 1 (water wet bonding technique) no significant difference was found between the resins tested; the only exception being the most hydrophilic Resin #4 showing the highest bond strength values (P < 0.05). In Group 2 (ethanol wet bonding technique) no statistical differences were present between Resin #A and Resin #D. Resin #C showed the highest bond strength values. Confocal microscopy showed better resin diffusion and hybrid layer formation when the ethanol wet bonding was used.

  13. Synthesis of wrinkled mesoporous silica and its reinforcing effect for dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruili; Habib, Eric; Zhu, X X

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the reinforcing effect of wrinkled mesoporous silica (WMS), which should allow micromechanical resin matrix/filler interlocking in dental resin composites, and to investigate the effect of silica morphology, loading, and compositions on their mechanical properties. WMS (average diameter of 496nm) was prepared through the self-assembly method and characterized by the use of the electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and the N 2 adsorption-desorption measurements. The mechanical properties of resin composites containing silanized WMS and nonporous smaller silica were evaluated with a universal mechanical testing machine. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to study the fracture morphology of dental composites. Resin composites including silanized silica particles (average diameter of 507nm) served as the control group. Higher filler loading of silanized WMS substantially improved the mechanical properties of the neat resin matrix, over the composites loaded with regular silanized silica particles similar in size. The impregnation of smaller secondary silica particles with diameters of 90 and 190nm, denoted respectively as Si90 and Si190, increased the filler loading of the bimodal WMS filler (WMS-Si90 or WMS-Si190) to 60wt%, and the corresponding composites exhibited better mechanical properties than the control fillers made with regular silica particles. Among all composites, the optimal WMS-Si190- filled composite (mass ratio WMS:Si190=10:90, total filler loading 60wt%) exhibited the best mechanical performance including flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength and Vickers microhardness. The incorporation of WMS and its mixed bimodal fillers with smaller silica particles led to the design and formulation of dental resin composites with superior mechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of polishing kits on the surface roughness and color stability of different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaagaoglu, H; Aslan, T; Gürbulak, A; Albayrak, H; Taşdemir, Z; Gumus, H

    2017-05-01

    Different polishing kits may have different effects on the composite resin surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and color stability of four different composites which was applied different polishing technique. Thirty specimens were made for each composite resin group (nanohybrid, GrandioSo-GS; nanohybrid, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic-CME; hybrid, Valux Plus-VP; micro-hybrid, Ruby Comp-RC; [15 mm in diameter and 2 mm height]), with the different monomer composition and particle size from a total of 120 specimens. Each composite group was divided into three subgroups (n = 10). The first subgroup of the each composite subgroups served as control (C) and had no surface treatment. The second subgroup of the each composite resin groups was polished with finishing discs (Bisco Finishing Discs; Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, IL, USA). The third subgroup of the each composite resin was polished with polishing wheel (Enhance and PoGo, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany). The surface roughness and the color differences measurement of the specimens were made and recorded. The data were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test, and regression analysis was used in order to examine the correlation between surface roughness and color differences of the specimens (α = 0.05). The Kruskal-Wallis test indicated significant difference among the composite resins in terms of ΔE (P composite resins in terms of surface roughness (P > 0.05). Result of the regression analysis indicated statistically significant correlation between Ra and ΔE values (P < 0.05, r2 = 0.74). The findings of the present study have clinical relevance in the choice of polishing kits used.

  15. Fabrication of SiC-C composite from poycarbosilane, epoxy and polyvinyl butyral resin mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jin Wook; Park, Dong Won; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Kang, Phil Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has wide application in various industrial fields because of their good high strength and modulus, low density, oxidation resistance and thermal stability. In this study, SiC-C composites were prepared from mixture of polycarbosilane (PCS), epoxy resin, and polyvinyl butyral (PVB) with weight ration of 2/1/1. PCS/epoxy/PVB mixture was cured by electron beam irradiation at 5,000 kGy. The cured composite was pyrolyzed by heat treatment in flowing argon at 1,300 .deg. C for 1 hr. As the result of TGA analysis, the oxidation resistance showed 95.2% residue at 1,500 .deg. C under air

  16. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  17. The effect of surface conditioning on the bond strength of resin composite to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Igor R; Hafiana, Khaula; Curtis, Andrew; Barbour, Michele E; Attin, Thomas; Lynch, Christopher D; Jagger, Daryll C

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the tensile bond strength (TBS) and integrity of the amalgam-resin composite interface, using commercially available restoration repair systems. One hundred and sixty Gamma 2 amalgam specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 2 weeks and then randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning groups (n=20/group): Group 1: air abrasion, alloy primer and 'Panavia 21', Group 2: air abrasion and 'Amalgambond Plus', Group 3: air abrasion and 'All-Bond 3', Group 4: diamond bur, alloy primer and 'Panavia 21', Group 5: diamond bur and 'Amalgambond Plus', Group 6: diamond bur and 'All-Bond 3', Group 7: silica coating technique, and Group 8: non-conditioned amalgam surfaces (control group). Subsequently, resin composite material was added to the substrate surfaces and the amalgam-resin composite specimens were subjected to TBS testing. Representative samples from the test groups were subjected to scanning electron microscopy and surface profilometry. The data was analysed statistically with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's tests (α=0.05). The mean TBS of amalgam-resin composite ranged between 1.34 and 5.13MPa and varied with the degree of amalgam surface roughness and the type of conditioning technique employed. Significantly highest TBS values (5.13±0.96MPa) were obtained in Group 1 (p=0.013). Under the tested conditions, significantly greater tensile bond strength of resin composite to amalgam was achieved when the substrate surface was conditioned by air abrasion followed by the application of the Panavia 21 adhesive system. Effecting a repair of an amalgam restoration with resin composite via the use of air abrasion and application of Panavia 21 would seem to enhance the integrity of the amalgam-resin composite interface. Clinical trials involving the implementation of this technique are indicated to determine the usefulness of this technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. The clinical and radiographic success of bonded resin composite strip crowns for primary incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupietzky, Ari; Waggoner, William F; Galea, Jon

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and radiographic success of the treatment of maxillary anterior primary incisors with composite resin strip crowns placed in a private practice setting. This was a retrospective, clinical study of patients who had strip crowns (SC) placed on maxillary primary incisors, returned for at least 1, 6-month recall examination, and whose parents consented to participate in the study. Radiographic and photographic examinations were used for evaluation. Two evaluators rated the images independently. When ratings were not in agreement, the 2 examiners reviewed the photograph or radiograph together and reached a consensus rating. One hundred twelve restorations placed in 40 children were evaluated. The evaluations were performed after the crowns had been in place for an average of 18 months. None of the restorations were totally lost, and only 12% were rated as having lost some resin material, resulting in an 88% overall retention rate. There was no difference in restoration success if the crowns were placed 4 at a time, or if fewer crowns were placed in a single sitting; the failure rates were comparable. Teeth that had pulpal treatment were judged to have far more significant color match discrepancies than those teeth without pulpal treatment. Ninety-one percent of the teeth demonstrated healthy pulps. Eight per