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Sample records for resin acid abietic

  1. Abietic acid isolated from pine resin (Resina Pini) enhances angiogenesis in HUVECs and accelerates cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Yeon; Lee, Yun Kyung; Lee, Dong-Soo; Yoo, Jeong-Eun; Shin, Myoung-Sook; Yamabe, Noriko; Kim, Su-Nam; Lee, Seulah; Kim, Ki Hyun; Lee, Hae-Jeung; Roh, Seok Sun; Kang, Ki Sung

    2017-05-05

    Resin known as Resina Pini is listed in the Korean and Japanese pharmacopoeias and has been used for treating skin wounds and inflammation. Resin is composed of more than 50% abietic acid and 10% neutral substances. In the present study, the wound-healing effects of abietic acid and the possible underlying mechanism of action were investigated in various in vitro and in vivo models. The effects of abietic acid on tube formation and migration were measured in human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Protein expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation was evaluated via Western blotting analysis. The wound-healing effects of abietic acid were assessed using a mouse model of cutaneous wounds. The results showed that abietic acid enhanced cell migration and tube formation in HUVECs. Abietic acid induced significant angiogenic potential, which is associated with upregulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 expression. Additionally, 0.8μM abietic acid-treated groups showed accelerated wound closure compared to the controls in a mouse model of cutaneous wounds. The current data indicate that abietic acid treatment elevated cell migration and tube formation in HUVECs by the activation of ERK and p38 MAPKs. We suggest that abietic acid can be developed as a wound-healing agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. C-11 Acid and the Stereochemistry of Abietic Acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    organic chemistry' and of the theoretical treatment of the chemical bond, essential to an understanding of how natural products are formed through biosynthetic processes (enzyme mediated synthe- sis of complex structures from substrates of primary structure). C-11 and C-12 Acids. Oxidation of abietic acid or its methyl ...

  3. C-11 Acid and the Stereochemistry of Abietic Acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    developed by Barton (1969 Chemistry Nobel Prize) to the solution of an important configurational problem, as we shall see. The presently accepted structure of abietic acid is the result of intensive chemical researches extending over a period of more than a century. The subject is an important part of authoritative treatises.

  4. Terpenoid biotransformation in mammals. IV Biotransformation of (+)-longifolene, (-)-caryophyllene, (-)-caryophyllene oxide, (-)-cyclocolorenone, (+)-nootkatone, (-)-elemol, (-)-abietic acid and (+)-dehydroabietic acid in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Y; Ishida, T; Toyota, M; Takemoto, T

    1986-08-01

    The metabolism of (+)-longifolene, (-)-caryophyllene, (-)-caryophyllene oxide, (-)-cyclocolorenone, (+)-nootkatone, (-)-elemol, (-)-abietic acid and (+)-dehydroabietic acid was studied in rabbits. Each of these sesquiterpenoids was converted to primary, secondary or tertiary alcohols, among which the primary alcohol was predominant. A vinylic methyl group and an exomethylene group were easily hydroxylated and converted to a glycol via an epoxide in many cases. Eight new metabolites were determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods.

  5. Studies of transformation and particle-binding of resin acids during oxidative treatment of effluent from two New Zealand pulp mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanber, S A; Langdon, A G; Wilkins, A L

    2008-02-01

    Reactor studies of aerobic degradation of effluent from the first and last ponds of the treatment system of two New Zealand pulp and paper mills indicated that filterable BOD(5), resin acids and transformed resin acids, free and bound, degraded at similar rates. During oxidative treatment the resin acids of untreated effluent became increasingly bound to particulate material and a sediment high in abiet-13-enoic acid was formed.

  6. Oxidation of resin acids in colophony (rosin) and its implications for patch testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhra, S; Foulds, I S; Gray, C N

    1998-08-01

    Commercial preparations of colophony (rosin) used for patch testing are made from unmodified rosin in pet. and may be stored for some considerable time before being used. This would be satisfactory if the composition and dermatological activity of the preparations were both reproducible and stable, but investigations by the authors have shown that the resin acids undergo progressive and substantial oxidation and that the dermatological activity of the preparations increases significantly with time. This may be a cause of inconsistent patch test results unless the composition can be stabilized. Gas liquid chromatography (GLC) analysis of a raw rosin sample and its commercial patch test preparation has shown that they both contained the same resin acids, but the concentration of the abietic type resin acids was found to be lower in the patch test preparations. The degradation of resin acids is due to their atmospheric oxidation, which may occur during the preparation and storage of the commercial rosin patch test preparation. The susceptibility of individual resin acids to atmospheric oxidation was demonstrated by analysing a sample of raw Portuguese gum rosin, which was then left exposed to air and light. Most of the resin acids were found to undergo oxidation at a rate which gradually diminished. More importantly, it is presumed that the concentration of oxidized resin acids increased correspondingly, and these have been shown to be more dermatologically active than the unoxidised resin acids. The rate of decrease of resin acid concentration was found to be in the following order: neoabietic>levopimaric and palustric>abietic>dehydroabetic acid. The pimaric type resin acids were found to be relatively inert to atmospheric oxidation when compared with the abietic type resin acids. Patch testing with the resulting partly oxidized Portuguese rosin produced positive reactions at a 35% higher frequency than the raw Portuguese rosin. The study demonstrates that the

  7. Tape-stripping as a method for measuring dermal exposure to resin acids during wood pellet production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Kåre; Hagström, Katja; Axelsson, Sara; Nylander-French, Leena

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a sensitive and specific method for quantifying dermal exposure to the resin acids 7-oxodehydroabietic acid (7-OXO), dehydroabietic acid (DHAA), abietic acid (AA), and pimaric acid (PA). In addition the method was evaluated in occupational settings during production of wood pellets. Tape-strips were spiked with the substances to evaluate the recovery of the acids from the tape. The removal efficiency of the tape was assessed by tape-stripping a specified area on a glass plate spiked with resin acids. The recovery of the acids from human skin in vivo was evaluated by applying acids in methanol onto the skin of volunteers. Occupational dermal exposure to the resin acids was assessed by tape-stripping the skin of workers involved in the production of wood pellets. The resin acids were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The limit of detection was 15 pg (7-OXO), 150 pg (DHAA), 285 pg (AA) and 471 pg (PA) per injection. The recovery from spiked tapes was in general 100%. The removal efficiency of the tape was 48-101%. Recovery tests from human skin in vivo showed a mean recovery of 27%. Quantifiable amounts of resin acids were observed on four different skin areas with an increase in exposure during a work shift. This study shows that occupational dermal exposure to resin acids can be assessed by tape-stripping and quantified by LC-MS.

  8. Diterpene resin acids in conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2006-11-01

    Diterpene resin acids are a significant component of conifer oleoresin, which is a viscous mixture of terpenoids present constitutively or inducibly upon herbivore or pathogen attack and comprises one form of chemical resistance to such attacks. This review focuses on the recent discoveries in the chemistry, biosynthesis, molecular biology, regulation, and biology of these compounds in conifers.

  9. SPE and HPLC/UV of resin acids in colophonium-containing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Ulrika; Berglund, Naghmeh; Lindahl, Fredrik; Axelsson, Sara; Redeby, Theres; Lassen, Pia; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2008-08-01

    A new method, involving SPE and HPLC/UV diode-array detection (DAD), was developed for the quantification of colophonium components in different consumer products, such as cosmetics. Colophonium is a common cause of contact dermatitis since its components can oxidize into allergens on exposure to air. Three different resin acids were used as markers for native and oxidized colophonium, abietic acid (AbA), dehydroabietic acid (DeA), and 7-oxodehydroabietic acid (7-O-DeA). The SPE method, utilizing a mixed-mode hydrophobic and anion exchange retention mechanism, was shown to yield very clean extracts. The use of a urea-embedded C(12) HPLC stationary phase improved the separation of the resin acids compared to common C(18). Concentrations higher than 2 mg/g of both AbA and DeA were detected in wax strips. In this product also 7-O-DeA, a marker for oxidized colophonium, was detected at a level of 28 microg/g. The LODs were in the range of 7-19 microg/g and the LOQs 22-56 microg/g. The method is simple to use and can be applied on many types of technical products, not only cosmetics. For the first time, a method for technical products was developed, which separates AbA from pimaric acid.

  10. Inhibition of platelet aggregation by diterpene acids from Pinus massoniana resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, H T; Fu, S L; Smal, M A

    1994-01-01

    The acidic fraction of the resin of Pinus massoniana Lamb. from China was converted to the p-nitrophenyl esters, and the esters separated by chromatography. The separated p-nitrophenyl esters were individually hydrolysed by potassium hydroxide in acetone-water at room temperature to 8 diterpene acids of the pimarane and abietane groups: pimaric acid (8(14),15-pimaradien-18-oic acid) (1), levopimaric acid (8(14),12-abietadien-18-oic acid) (2), palustric acid (8,13-abietadien-18-oic acid) (3), neobietic acid (8(14),13(15)-abietadien-18-oic acid) (4), abietic acid (7,13-abietadien-18-oic acid) (5), dehydroabietic acid (8,11,13-abietatrien-18-oic acid) (6), 7-oxodehydroabietic acid (7-oxo-8,11,13-abietatrien-18-oic acid) (7) and 7 alpha-hydroxydehydroabietic acid (7 alpha-hydroxy-8,11,13-abietatrien-18-oic acid) (8). The structure (and stereochemistry) of the diterpene acids were substantiated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (proton and carbon-13, one and two dimensional), by mass spectrometry (electron impact and methane chemical ionization) and by rotation measurements. The 8 diterpene acids were tested for their ability to inhibit the aggregation of washed rabbit platelets induced by platelet activating factor (PAF), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and by calcium ionophore A23187. With platelet aggregation induced by the latter two agonists, activities comparable with or higher than linolenic acid were given by the first 4 acids. With aggregation induced by PAF, the first 3 acids show activity, but at a level significantly lower than that of linolenic acid. Levopimaric acid has the highest activity among the diterpene acids tested. It is proposed that this activity is related to the folded shape of the molecule.

  11. Selected resin acids in effluent and receiving waters derived from a bleached and unbleached kraft pulp and paper mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, B.P.; Booth, M.M.; Delfino, J.J.; Holm, S.E.; Gross, T.S.

    2003-01-01

    Water samples were collected on three dates at 24 sites influenced by effluent from Georgia-Pacific's Palatka Pulp and Paper Mill Operation, a bleached and unbleached kraft mill near Palatka, Florida, USA. The sampling sites were located within the mill retention ponds, Rice Creek, and the St. John's River. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for abietic, dehydroabietic, and isopimaric acids, all of which are potentially toxic by-products of pulp production. Isopimaric acid concentrations greater than 12 mg/L were measured at the mill's effluent outfall but were less than 20 ??g/L at the end of Rice Creek. This result indicates that the waters of Rice Creek provide dilution or conditions conducive for degradation or sorption of these compounds. Large differences in resin acid concentrations were observed between sampling events. In two sampling events, the maximum observed concentrations were less than 2 mg/L for each analyte. In a third sampling event, all of the compounds were detected at concentrations greater than 10 mg/L. Data from the three sample dates showed that resin acid concentrations were below 20 ??g/L before the confluence of Rice Creek and the St. John's River in all cases.

  12. Conifer Diterpene Resin Acids Disrupt Juvenile Hormone-Mediated Endocrine Regulation in the Indian Meal Moth Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun-Woo; Yun, Chan-Seok; Jeon, Jun Hyoung; Kim, Ji-Ae; Park, Doo-Sang; Ryu, Hyung Won; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Shin, Yunhee; Jung, Chan Sik; Shin, Sang Woon

    2017-07-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are important components of oleoresin and greatly contribute to the defense strategies of conifers against herbivorous insects. In the present study, we determined that DRAs function as insect juvenile hormone (JH) antagonists that interfere with the juvenile hormone-mediated binding of the JH receptor Methoprene-tolerant (Met) and steroid receptor coactivator (SRC). Using a yeast two-hybrid system transformed with Met and SRC from the Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella, we tested the interfering activity of 3704 plant extracts against JH III-mediated Met-SRC binding. Plant extracts from conifers, especially members of the Pinaceae, exhibited strong interfering activity, and four active interfering DRAs (7α-dehydroabietic acid, 7-oxodehydroabietic acid, dehydroabietic acid, and sandaracopimaric acid) were isolated from roots of the Japanese pine Pinus densiflora. The four isolated DRAs, along with abietic acid, disrupted the juvenile hormone-mediated binding of P. interpunctella Met and SRC, although only 7-oxodehydroabietic acid disrupted larval development. These results demonstrate that DRAs may play a defensive role against herbivorous insects via insect endocrine-disrupting activity.

  13. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin...

  14. Exposure of Atlantic salmon parr (Salmo salar) to a combination of resin acids and a water soluble fraction of diesel fuel oil: A model to investigate the chemical causes of pigmented salmon syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croce, B. [Scottish Office Agriculture, Environment, and Fisheries Dept., Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Marine Lab.]|[Scottish Environmental Protection Agency, Aberdeen (United Kingdom). North East River Purification Board; Stagg, R.M. [Scottish Office Agriculture, Environment, and Fisheries Dept., Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Marine Lab.

    1997-09-01

    Pigmented salmon syndrome is a pollutant-induced hemolytic anemia and hyperbilirubinemia. As part of an investigation of this condition, S2 Atlantic salmon parr (Salmo salar) were exposed to a diesel fuel oil, water soluble fraction (WSF) in combination with a mixture of three resin acids (isopimaric, dehydroabietic, and abietic acids) in a continuous-flow freshwater system. The total nominal concentrations of resin acids in the exposure tanks were 10, 50, and 100 {micro}g/L; the diesel WSF was generated in situ and provided a mean hydrocarbon concentration of 2.0 {+-} 0.1 mg/L (n = 12) during the 9-d exposure period. Exposure to the diesel WSF alone depressed liver bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UDPGT) activity and induced phenol UDPGT activity. Exposure to the diesel WSF in the absence or presence of resin acids induced liver cytochrome P4501A and increased the concentrations in the plasma of the enzymes lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase. The combined exposure to diesel WSF with either 50 or 100 {micro}g/L total resin acid caused significant elevations in the concentrations of bilirubin in the plasma and many of these fish had yellow pigmentation on the ventral surface and around the gill arches. The results demonstrate that exposure to combinations of two groups of contaminants can result in the manifestation of toxic effects not apparent from exposure to either of these chemicals in isolation.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of resin acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savluchinske-Feio, Sonia; Curto, Maria João Marcelo; Gigante, Bárbara; Roseiro, J Carlos

    2006-09-01

    The wide potential of resin acids as bioactive agents gave rise to a growing effort in the search for new applications of the natural forms and their derivatives. In some of these compounds, the antimicrobial activity is associated to the presence in the molecules of functional groups such as the hydroxyl, aldehyde, and ketone or to their cis or trans configurations. The resin acid family covers a spectrum of antimicrobial activities against several microorganisms, from bacteria to fungi, in which the mode of action was studied by electron microscopy. The morphological alterations are consistent with an unspecific mode of action causing inhibition of the fungal growth or damaging the fungal cells in parallel with a mechanism of resistance based on the retention of the compound by the lipid accumulation. The sterol composition of phytopathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea and Lophodermium seditiosum treated with methyl cis-7-oxo-deisopropyldehydroabietate revealed the presence of ergosterol (M+ 396) and dihydroergosterol (M+ 398) in both cultures showing that this compound did not interfere with the ergosterol metabolic pathway of both fungi.

  16. Kinetic study of ion exchange in phosphoric acid chelating resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brikci-Nigassa, Mounir; Hamouche, Hafida

    1995-11-01

    Uranium may be recovered as a by product of wet phosphoric acid using a method based on specific ion exchange resins. These resins called chelates contain amino-phosphonic functional groups. The resin studied in this work is a purolite S-940; uranium may be loaded on this resin from 30% P2O5 phosphoric acid in its reduced state. The influence of different parameters on the successive steps of the process have been studied in batch experiments: uranium reduction, loading and oxydation. Uranium may be eluted with ammonium carbonate and the resin regeneration may be done with hydrochloric acid.Ferric ions reduce the effective resin capacity considerably and inert fixation conditions are proposed to enhance uranium loading

  17. Chelating ion exchange with macroreticular hydroxamic acid resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis, reactions, and analytical applications of hydroxamic acids, including chelating resins with this functional group, are reviewed. A procedure for attaching N-phenyl hydroxamic acid groups to Amberlite XAD-4 is described. The extraction of 20 metal ions from 2M hydrochloric acid by this resin is discussed. Conditions for the quantitative extraction and back-extraction of 9 ions are reported. The results are compared with work on solvent extraction with N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid. Procedures for attaching N-methyl and N-substituted hydroxamic acid groups to Amberlite XAD-4 are described. The N-phenyl, N-methyl, and N-unsubstituted hydroxamic acid resins are compared with respect to metal-ion complexation. The scope of applications for hydroxamic acid resins is investigated by studying the extraction of 19 metal ions as a function of pH. The resins are especially suitable for the extraction of zirconium(IV), titanium(IV), and uranium(IV) from strongly acidic solution. Aluminum(III) is separated from calcium and phosphate by extraction at pH 4. The use of the resins for the purification of reagents, concentration of trace constituents, and chromatographic separation is demonstrated

  18. Chelating ion exchange with macroreticular hydroxamic acid resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis, reactions, and analytical applications of hydroxamic acids, including chelating resins with this functional group, are reviewed. A procedure for attaching N-phenyl hydroxamic acid groups to Amberlite XAD-4 is described. The extraction of 20 metal ions from 2 M hydrochloric acid by this resin is discussed. Conditions for the quantitative extraction and back-extraction of 9 ions are reported. Results are compared with work on solvent extraction with N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid. Procedures for attaching N-methyl and N-unsubstituted hydroxamic acid groups to Amberlite XAD-4 are described. The N-phenyl, N-methyl, and N-unsubstituted hydroxamic acid resins are compared with respect to metal-ion complexation. The scope of applications for hydroxamic acid resins is investigated by studying the extraction of 19 metal ions as a function of pH. The resins are especially suitable for the extraction of zirconium(IV), titanium(IV), and uranium(IV) from strongly acidic solution. Aluminum(III) is separated from calcium and phosphate by extraction at pH 4. The use of the resins for the purification of reagents, concentration of trace constituents, and chromatographic separation is demonstrated

  19. Enhanced vanillin production from ferulic acid using adsorbent resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Dongliang; Ma, Cuiqing; Song, Lifu; Lin, Shan; Zhang, Zhaobin; Deng, Zixin; Xu, Ping

    2007-03-01

    High vanillin productivity was achieved in the batch biotransformation of ferulic acid by Streptomyces sp. strain V-1. Due to the toxicity of vanillin and the product inhibition, fed-batch biotransformation with high concentration of ferulic acid was unsuccessful. To solve this problem and improve the vanillin yield, a biotransformation strategy using adsorbent resin was investigated. Several macroporous adsorbent resins were chosen to adsorb vanillin in situ during the bioconversion. Resin DM11 was found to be the best, which adsorbed the most vanillin and the least ferulic acid. When 8% resin DM11 (wet w/v) was added to the biotransformation system, 45 g l(-1) ferulic acid could be added continually and 19.2 g l(-1) vanillin was obtained within 55 h, which was the highest vanillin yield by bioconversion until now. This yield was remarkable for exceeding the crystallization concentration of vanillin and therefore had far-reaching consequence in its downstream processing.

  20. Uranium extraction from sulfuric acid solution using anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M. E.; Abdel Aal, M. M.; Kandil, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium is currently recovered from sulfuric acid leach liquor using anion exchange resin as Amberlite IRA 402 (CT). This technology is based on fact that, uranium exists as anionic complexes. This takes place by controlling the pH of the solution, agitation time, temperature and resin to solution ratio (R/S). In this work, batch stirrer tank used for uranium extraction from sulfate medium and after extraction, elution process was done using 1M NaCl solution. After extraction and elution process, the resin was separated from the system and uranium was determined in the solution. (Author)

  1. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Berg; Yuen, Macaire M S; Madilao, Lina; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I-IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Selective separation of indium by iminodiacetic acid chelating resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, M.C.B.; Benedetto, J.S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Martins, A.H. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais]. E-mail: ahmartin@demet.ufmg.br

    2007-04-15

    - Indium can be recovered by treating residues, flue dusts, slags, and metallic intermediates in zinc smelting. This paper investigates the adsorption characteristics of indium and iron on an iminodiacetic acid chelating resin, Amberlite{sup R} IRC748 (Rohm and Haas Co.-USA). High concentrations of iron are always present in the aqueous feed solution of indium recovery. In addition, the chemical behaviour of iron in adsorptive systems is similar to that of indium. The metal concentrations in the aqueous solution were based on typical indium sulfate leach liquor obtained from zinc hydrometallurgical processing in a Brazilian plant. The ionic adsorption experiments were carried out by the continuous column method. Amberlite{sup R} IRC748 resin had a high affinity for indium under acidic conditions. Indium ions adsorbed onto the polymeric resin were eluted with a 0.5 mol/dm{sup 3} sulphuric acid solution passed through the resin bed in the column. 99.5% pure indium sulfate aqueous solution was obtained using the iminodiacetic acid chelating resin Amberlite{sup R} IRC748. (author)

  3. Isolation and characterization of isopimaric acid-degrading bacteria from a sequencing batch reactor.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, A E; Moore, E R; Mohn, W W

    1996-01-01

    We isolated two aerobic, gram-negative bacteria which grew on the diterpene resin acid isopimaric acid (IpA) as the sole carbon source and electron donor. The source of the isolates was a sequencing batch reactor treating a high-strength process stream from a paper mill. The isolates, IpA-1 and IpA-2, also grew on pimaric and dehydroabietic acids, and IpA-1 grew on abietic acid. Both strains used fatty acids, but neither strain used camphor, sitosterol, or betulin. Strain IpA-1 grew anaerobic...

  4. [Absorption and isolation of macroporous resin for five salvianolic acids from Salviae mitiorrhizae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yan; Zhu, Jing-Bo; Li, Lin; Jin, Yue

    2008-05-01

    To study the adsorption of the macroporous resin for the five salvianolic acids (danshen su, rosmarinic acid, protocate chualdehyde, salvianolic acid B, salvianolic acid A, extracted from Salviae mitiorrhizae. The five salvianolic acids were employed as an index, and the change of them in the static and dynamic absorbent was detected by HPLC, respectively. HP20 resin was a suitable marcoporous resin to purify salvianolic acids. The dynamic adsorption capacity of rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid B and salvianolic acid A was 30.506 mg x g(-1) (dry resin), 36.996 mg x g(-1), (dry resin), 43.85 mg x g(-1) (dry resin) respectively. It is not suitable that danshensu and protocate chualdehyde are the evaluation indexes for using 8 macroporous resins to purify salvianolic acids.

  5. Bile acid sequestrants : more than simple resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Out, Carolien; Groen, Albert K.; Brufau, Gemma

    Purpose of review Bile acid sequestrants (BAS) have been used for more than 50 years in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The last decade, bile acids are emerging as integrated regulators of metabolism via induction of various signal transduction pathways. Consequently, BAS treatment may exert

  6. Surface roughness of composite resins subjected to hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Ana Carolina Cabral; Bohner, Lauren Oliveira Lima; de Godoi, Ana Paula Terossi; Colucci, Vivian; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Catirse, Alma Blásida Concepción Elizaur Benitez

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of hydrochloric acid on surface roughness of composite resins subjected to brushing. Sixty samples measuring 2 mm thick x 6 mm diameter were prepared and used as experimental units. The study presented a 3x2 factorial design, in which the factors were composite resin (n=20), at 3 levels: microhybrid composite (Z100), nanofilled composite (FiltekTM Supreme), nanohybrid composite (Ice), and acid challenge (n=10) at 2 levels: absence and presence. Acid challenge was performed by immersion of specimens in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.2) for 1 min, 4 times per day for 7 days. The specimens not subjected to acid challenge were stored in 15 mL of artificial saliva at 37 oC. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to abrasive challenge by a brushing cycle performed with a 200 g weight at a speed of 356 rpm, totaling 17.8 cycles. Surface roughness measurements (Ra) were performed and analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p≤0.05). Surface roughness values were higher in the presence (1.07±0.24) as compared with the absence of hydrochloric acid (0.72±0.04). Surface roughness values were higher for microhybrid (1.01±0.27) compared with nanofilled (0.68 ±0.09) and nanohybrid (0.48±0.15) composites when the specimens were not subjects to acid challenge. In the presence of hydrochloric acid, microhybrid (1.26±0.28) and nanofilled (1.18±0,30) composites presents higher surface roughness values compared with nanohybrid (0.77±0.15). The hydrochloric acid affected the surface roughness of composite resin subjected to brushing.

  7. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  8. Removal of dyes from water using crosslinked aminomethane sulfonic acid based resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaner, Damla; Saraç, Ayfer; Senkal, Bahire Filiz

    2010-08-01

    A new polymeric resin with amino sulfonic acid pendant functions has been prepared for the extraction of acidic and basic dyes from water. Beaded polymer supports were prepared by suspension polymerization of vinyl benzyl chloride (0.9 mol) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (0.1 mol). The resulting copolymer beads were modified with amino methane sulfonic acid. The dye adsorption capacity of the resin was found as 0.16 g dye/g resin for ramazol black and 0.15 g dye/g resin for crystal violet. The pH depending measurements and dye sorption kinetics of the resin were also investigated.

  9. Oxidation-resistant acidic resins prepared by partial carbonization as cocatalysts in synthesis of adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huijuan; Li, Hongbian; Liu, Yangqing; Jin, Peng; Wang, Xiangyu; Li, Baojun

    2012-08-01

    The oxidation-resistant acidic resins are of great importance for the catalytic oxidation systems. In this paper, the oxidatively stable acidic resins are obtained from the cation ion exchange resins (CIERs) through the thermal treatment in N(2) atmosphere. The structure and properties of the thermally treated CIERs were characterized by chemical analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, acid capacity measurement and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The thermally treated CIERs possess high acid capacity up to 4.09 mmol g(-1). A partial carbonization is observed in the thermal treatment process of CIERs, but the morphology of resin spheres maintains well. The as-prepared CIERs are used as solid acids to assist the hydrogen peroxide oxidation of cyclohexene to adipic acid (ADA) with tungstic acid as the catalyst precursor. The improved yields of ADA in the recycling reaction are obtained in the presence of acidic CIERs. Meanwhile, the unproductive decomposition of H(2)O(2) is effectively suppressed. The high yields of ADA (about 81%) are kept by the thermally treated CIERs even after the fifth cycle. The thermally treated CIERs exhibit excellent acid-catalytic performance and possess remarkable oxidation-resistant capability.

  10. Usage of methyl ester of tall oil fatty acids and resinic acids as alternative diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskin, Ali; Yasar, Abdulkadir; Guerue, Metin; Altiparmak, Duran

    2010-01-01

    In the experimental study, tall oil fatty and resinic acids were investigated as alternative diesel fuels. The fatty acids, obtained by distilling the crude tall oil, were esterified with methanol in order to obtain tall oil methyl ester (biodiesel). Blends of the methyl ester, resinic acids and diesel fuel were prepared for test fuels. Performance and emission tests of the test fuels were carried out in an unmodified direct injection diesel engine on full load conditions. The results showed that the specific fuel consumption (SFC) with the blend fuels did not show a significant change. CO emission and smoke level decreased up to 23.91% and 19.40%, respectively. In general, NO x emissions showed on trend of increasing with the blend fuels (up to 25.42%). CO 2 emissions did not vary with the blend fuels significantly.

  11. Usage of methyl ester of tall oil fatty acids and resinic acids as alternative diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskin, Ali; Yasar, Abdulkadir [Tarsus Technical Education Faculty, Mersin University, 33500 Mersin (Turkey); Guerue, Metin [Engineering and Architectural Faculty, Gazi University, 06570 Maltepe, Ankara (Turkey); Altiparmak, Duran [Technical Education Faculty, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    In the experimental study, tall oil fatty and resinic acids were investigated as alternative diesel fuels. The fatty acids, obtained by distilling the crude tall oil, were esterified with methanol in order to obtain tall oil methyl ester (biodiesel). Blends of the methyl ester, resinic acids and diesel fuel were prepared for test fuels. Performance and emission tests of the test fuels were carried out in an unmodified direct injection diesel engine on full load conditions. The results showed that the specific fuel consumption (SFC) with the blend fuels did not show a significant change. CO emission and smoke level decreased up to 23.91% and 19.40%, respectively. In general, NO{sub x} emissions showed on trend of increasing with the blend fuels (up to 25.42%). CO{sub 2} emissions did not vary with the blend fuels significantly. (author)

  12. Studies concerning the anion ex-change resins catalyzed esterification of epichlorohydrin with organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Muresan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the esterification of carboxylic acids with epichlorohydrin over two macroporous strong base anion exchange resins with different polymer matrix. For both resins, the influence of reaction parameters (temperature, catalyst loading, molar ratio on the reaction rate and the yields of the two isomeric esters were investigated.

  13. Development of melamine modified urea formaldehyde resins based o nstrong acidic pH catalyzed urea formaldehyde polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    To upgrade the performance of urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin bonded particleboards, melamine modified urea-formaldehyde (MUF) resins based on strong acidic pH catalyzed UF polymers were investigated. The study was conducted in a series of two experiments: 1) formulation of MUF resins based on a UF polymer catalyzed with strong acidic pH and 2) determination of the...

  14. Separation of chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle crude extracts by macroporous resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Yang, Ruiyuan; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2008-05-15

    Chlorogenic acid, one of the most bioactive compounds rich in the Chinese medicinal herb honeysuckle, is a natural antioxidant and serves as anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic agent. An efficient preparative separation process of chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle crude extracts has been developed in the present study. HPD-850 resin offers the best adsorption capacity, and adsorption and desorption ratios for chlorogenic acid among the nine macroporous resins tested, and its adsorption rate at 25 degrees C fit best to the Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption capacity of HPD-850 resin was found to depend strongly on the pH value of the initial adsorption solution. The dynamic adsorption and desorption experiments have been carried out on a HPD-850 resin packed column to optimize the separation process of chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle crude extracts. After one run treatment with HPD-850 resin, the chlorogenic acid content in the final product was increased 4.46-fold from 11.2% to 50.0%, with a recovery yield of 87.9%. The preparative separation of chlorogenic acid can be easily and efficiently achieved via adsorption and desorption on HPD-850 resin, and the method developed will provide a potential approach for large-scale separation and purification of chlorogenic acid for its wide pharmaceutical use.

  15. Industrial alkyd resins: characterization of pentaerythritol and phthalic acid esters using integrated mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Nasa, Jacopo; Degano, Ilaria; Modugno, Francesca; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2015-02-15

    Alkyd resins are synthetic polyesters used as paints and coatings. Current approaches for their analysis do not allow the characterization of pentaerythritol and phthalic acid esters, whose detection is interesting to fully characterize the materials, e.g. for forensic or cultural heritage applications. A combined analytical approach based on Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS), High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)/MS and flow injection analysis (FIA)/MS was adopted. GC/MS was used to characterize the fatty acid profile and the polybasic acids in extracts from industrial alkyd resins. HPLC/MS and FIA/MS were used for the characterization of the triglyceride profile of the oil used to manufacture the resin and for the identification of reaction products deriving from the synthesis process. The multi-analytical approach was applied on two different industrial alkyd resins produced from two different oils. The GC/MS analysis was successful in characterizing the fatty acid profile and the aromatic fraction of the resin. The HPLC/MS analysis allowed us to characterize the pentaerythritol and phthalic acid ester and the triglycerides residues from the synthesis process, by studying their high-resolution tandem mass spectra. The application of liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry to the study of industrial alkyd resins allowed us to characterize for the first time the esters formed by the transesterification reactions involving pentaerythritol, phthalic acid and triglycerides. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Analysis of diterpenoic compounds in natural resins applied as binders in museum objects by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Anna; Kolivoska, Viliam; Kaml, Isabella; Baatz, Wolfgang; Kenndler, Ernst

    2007-07-20

    The exudates of conifers consist mainly of diterpenoic acids of the abietane and pimarane type (abietic, neoabietic, dehydroabietic, palustric, pimaric, isopimaric, levopimaric and sandaracopimaric acid) and larixol acetate. These natural resins were used as adhesives, coatings, varnishes or plasticizers in artistic and historic works since ancient times. For the purpose of conservation and restoration and for art historic examination of such museum objects the identification of the binding media used is undoubtedly of paramount importance. In the present paper, the characterization of these resins based on the pattern of their diterpenoid constituents is carried out by capillary electrophoresis. For separation a background electrolyte which has been initially introduced for the analysis of chlorinated and natural resin acids in waste water was modified and the experimental conditions were adjusted in terms of resolution and analysis time. Separation was carried out in borate buffer at pH 9.25 (ionic strength 20 mmol L(-1)) with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin and sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin as additives to increase selectivity and enhance the solubility of the analytes. With this electrophoretic system the resin acids of interest and larixol acetate--all as anionic cyclodextrin complexes--were separated within 5 min and detected at 200, 250 and 270 nm with a diode array detector. The electrophoretic patterns served for the characterisation of the relevant diterpenoic resins, balsams and copals. Sample pre-treatment was limited to sonication in methanol at 55 degrees C for 30 min. This enables the identification of the resins in mixtures with other binders like plant gums, animal glues or drying oils, even when these media are present in excess. Colophony was identified as resinous constituent of a modelling mass for gilded frames originating from the 19th century.

  17. (Methacrylic Acid-Co-Divinylbenzene) Resin as Filler

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    divinylbenzene) resin (PMD) as a new filler-binder for direct compression tablets. Methods: Powder properties of PMD and MCC were characterized. Tablets made from PMD and MCC with and without propranolol hydrochloride were evaluated for ...

  18. Synthesis and characterization of an N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.F.

    1977-10-01

    A chelating ion-exchange resin with N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylene-diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) used as the ligand chemically bonded to XAD-4 by an ester linkage, HEDTA-4, was synthesized. It is stable under normal experimental conditions with the liquid chromatograph. The structure of the resin was confirmed by an infrared spectrum, and by potentiometric titrations. The capacity of the resin was also obtained by potentiometric titration and by a nitrogen analysis. The resin was used to pack a column of 5 mm internal diameter and 5 cm long. The effect of pH on the retention of different metal ions on the resin was studied. It was found that the resin was most selective for chromium(III), copper(II), lead(II), mercury(II), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV) and zinc(II) at a pH of less than 3. Furthermore, the resin proves to be functioning with a chelating mechanism rather than ion-exchange, and it can concentrate trace metal ions in the presence of a large excess of calcium and magnesium. This makes the resin potentially useful for purifying and analyzing drinking water

  19. Derivatization Technique To Identify Specifically Carbonyl Groups by Infrared Spectroscopy: Characterization of Photooxidative Aging Products in Terpenes and Terpeneous Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbühl, Stefan; Brändle, Andreas; Hochuli, Andreas; Scherrer, Nadim C; Caseri, Walter

    2017-02-07

    Analysis of bioorganic materials by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is frequently limited due to overlapping of diagnostic bands from the various components, which poses a fundamental problem to this analytical technique. The distinction of oxidized di- and triterpenes, for example, is hindered by the superposition of similar absorption bands of carbonyl functional groups summing up to a broad, nondistinctive signal. This study presents a technique for selective fluorination of various carboxylic acids by exposure to gaseous sulfur tetrafluoride. The derivatization treatment leads to characteristic band shifts, allowing the separation of otherwise overlapping bands. Accordingly, the IR bands of primary acids, α,β-unsaturated acids, tertiary acids, peroxy acids, esters, ketones, and α,β-unsaturated ketones are split into distinct absorption bands. The capability of this method is demonstrated on the example of natural resins and their ingredients, which are commonly known to be susceptible to oxidation at ambient conditions. The derivatization method enables one to identify various carbonyl containing functional groups by infrared spectroscopy, even in complex mixtures of terpenes. It unveils previously hidden degradation reactions running in terpenes and natural resins exposed to artificial aging by irradiation with light. New insight is presented on the individual reaction pathways of the terpenes hydroxydammarenone and abietic acid as well as of natural resin varnishes made from dammar and colophony.

  20. Resin replica in enamel deproteinization and its effect on acid etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Roberto; Valencia, Roberto; Uribe, Mario; Ceja, Israel; Cruz, J; Saadia, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to identify the topographical features of deproteinized (NaOCl) and etched with phosphoric acid (H3PO4) enamel surface, compared to phosphoric acid surface alone with a Resin Replica model. Ten extracted lower first and second permanent molars were polished with pumice and water, and then divided into 3 equal buccal sections having similar physical and chemical properties. The enamel surfaces of each group were subjected to the following treatments: Group A: Acid Etching with H3PO4 37% for 15 seconds. Group B: Sodium Hypochlorite (NaOCl) 5.25% for 60 seconds followed by Acid Etching with H3PO4 37% for 15 seconds. Group C; No treatment (control). All the samples were treated as follow: Adhesive and resin were applied to all groups after A, B and C treatment were performed; Then enamel/dentin decalcification and deproteinization and topographic SEM Resin Replica assessment were used to identify resin tags enamel surface quality penetration. Showed that group B reached an area of 7.52 mm of the total surface, with a 5.68 mm2 (73%) resin tag penetration equivalent type I and II etching pattern, 1.71 mm2 (26%) equivalent to type III etching pattern and 0.07 mm2 (1%) unaffected surface. Followed by group A with 7.48 mm2 of the total surface, with a 3.47 mm2 (46 %)resin tag penetration equivalent to type I and II etching pattern, 3.30 mm2 (45%)equivalent to type III etching pattern and 0.71 mm2, and (9%) unaffected surface. Group C did not show any resin tag penetration. A significant statistical diference (P enamel is deproteinizated with 5.25% NaOCl for 1 minute prior H3PO4, the surface and topographical features of the replica resin penetration surface increases significantly with type I-II etching pattern.

  1. Concentration and separation of trace metals with an arsonic acid resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, J S; Moyers, E M

    1976-08-01

    Macroporeus arsonic acid resins with different pore sizes and surface areas were prepared and the properties compared. One of the resins was used for concentration of trace metal ions from dimineralized water, tap-water, and sea-water. The effect of pH and complexing agents on the recovery of metal ions was studied. A method for separation of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) from each other and from other metal ions was developed.

  2. Effect of the chemical structure of anion exchange resin on the adsorption of humic acid: behavior and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Chendong; Wang, Jun; Li, Haibo; Li, Aimin; Zhou, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Polystyrenic (PS) anion-exchange resin and polyacrylic (PA) anion-exchange resin were used to investigate the effect of resin chemical structure on the adsorption of humic acid (HA). Due to the rearrangement of HA to form layers that function as barricades to further HA diffusion, PS resin exhibited 12.4 times slower kinetics for the initial adsorption rate and 8.4 times for the diffusion constant in comparison to that of the PA resin. An HA layer and a spherical cluster of HA can be observed on the surface of the PS and PA resins after adsorption, respectively. The considerable difference in HA adsorption between the PS and PA resins was due to the difference in molecule shape for interaction with different resin structures, which can essentially be explained by the hydrophobicity and various interactions of the PS resin. A given amount of HA occupies more positively charged sites and hydrophobic sites on the PS resin than were occupied by the same amount of HA on the PA resin. Increased pH resulted in an increase of HA adsorption onto the PA resin but a decrease in adsorption onto PS resin, as the non-electrostatic adsorption led to electrostatic repulsion between the HA attached to the resin and the HA dissolved in solution. These results suggest higher rates of adsorption and higher regeneration efficiency for interaction of HA with more hydrophilic anion exchange materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro adsorption of oxalic acid and glyoxylic acid onto activated charcoal, resins and hydrous zirconium oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, R.; Scholten, J.; de Koning, H. W.; Tijssen, J.; ten Hoopen, H. W.; Olthuis, F. M.; Feijen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Patients suffering from primary hyperoxaluria show elevated plasma concentrations of oxalic acid and glyoxylic acid. The in vitro adsorption of these compounds into activated charcoal, a series of neutral and ion exchange resins and onto hydrous zirconium oxide has been investigated. Hydrous

  4. Large scale purification of puerarin from Puerariae Lobatae Radix through resins adsorption and acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Qing-Feng; Chen, Ji-Guang; Shangguang, Xin-Cheng; Guo, Yu-Xian

    2015-02-01

    Puerarin is the major isoflavone of Puerariae Lobatae Radix. A method for large scale purification of puerarin was developed through resins adsorption and acid hydrolysis. The adsorption properties of six macroporous resins (D101, S-8, H103, X-5, HPD600, AB-8) were compared through the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium adsorption isotherms. Results showed that H103 resin had the best adsorption rate and capacity. The mass transfer zone motion model was further used for analyzing the fixed bed adsorption of H103 resin. Its length of mass transfer zone with 2mg/ml of puerarin in water and 10% ethanol at flow rate of 10ml/min were 41.6 and 47.5cm, while the equilibrium adsorption capacity was 165.03 and 102.88mg/g, respectively. By using 75% ethanol, puerarin could be well desorbed from the resin with recovery of 97.4%. Subsequently, H103 resin was successfully used for puerarin purification from Puerariae Lobatae Radix. The content of total isoflavones and puerarin in the resin adsorption product were 69.25% and 41.78%, respectively, which were about three times increased compared to the crude extract. Then, the product was hydrolyzed by 2.5M HCl at 90°C for 1h. Puerarin with purity of 90% and a byproduct daidzein with purity of 78% were obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis of hemicellulose-acrylic acid graft copolymer super water absorbent resin by ultrasonic irradiation technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang LIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The hemicellulose super water absorbent resin is prepared by using ultrasonic irradiation technology, with the waste liquid produced during the preparation of viscose fiber which contains a large amount of hemicellulose as raw material, acrylic acid as graft monomer, N,N’-methylene bis acrylamide (NMBA as cross linking agent, and (NH42S2O8-NaHSO3 as the redox initiation system. The synthesis conditions, structure and water absorption ability of resin are discussed. The results indicate that water absorbency of the resin is 311 g/g, the tap water absorbency is 102 g/g, the normal saline absorbency is 55 g/g, and the artificial urine absorbency is 31 g/g under the optimal synthesis conditions, so the resin has great water absorption rate and water retaining capacity. The FT-IR and SEM analysis shows that the resin with honeycomb network structure is prepared. The successfully synthesized of the resin means that the hemicellulose waste liquid can be highly effectively recycled, and it provides a kind of new raw material for the synthesis of super water absorbent resin.

  6. Adsorption performance of salicylic acid on a novel resin with distinctive double pore structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guqing; Wen, Ruiming; Liu, Aijiao; He, Guowen; Wu, Dan

    2017-05-05

    Two approaches were used to synthesize two resins with different pore structures. In one way, the CH 2 Cl groups in macroporous chloromethylated polystyrene resin were transformed to methylene bridges, and achieved a hypercrosslinked resin with plentiful micropores (denoted GQ-06). In the other way, 50% of the CH 2 Cl groups in chloromethylated polystyrene resin was used to produce micropores, while the residual 50% of the CH 2 Cl groups was reacted with 2-aminopyridine, and prepared another resin with double pore structure of hypercrosslinked resin and macroporous resin (denoted GQ-11). The adsorption of salicylic acid (SA) on GQ-11 was investigated using GQ-06 as the reference adsorbent. The effect of pH on the adsorption of SA on GQ-06 was consistent with the dissociation curve of SA. The maximum adsorption capacity of SA on GQ-11 was observed at the solution pH of 2.64. The greater adsorption rate of SA on GQ-11 than that of GQ-06 was attributed to its double pore structure. The multifunctional adsorption mechanism of anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction resulted in the larger equilibrium capacity of SA on GQ-11 than that of GQ-06. GQ-06 and GQ-11 could be regenerated by absolute alcohol and 80% of alcohol -0.5mol/L of sodium hydroxide aqueous solution, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Exposure to acid anhydrides in three resin and one cushioned flooring manufacturing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tongeren, M J; Barker, R D; Gardiner, K; Harris, J M; Venables, K M; Taylor, A J; Harrington, J M

    1995-10-01

    Acid anhydrides are reactive organic chemicals of low molecular weight which cause occupational asthma. No previous research on the relationship between exposure to these chemicals and respiratory sensitization and development of occupational asthma has been reported. A retrospective cohort study was carried out in four factories (three alkyd resin factories and one cushioned flooring factory) to investigate the nature of exposure-response relationships for sensitization to phthalic anhydride (PA), trimellitic anhydride (TMA) and maleic anhydride (MA). This paper describes the results of full-shift and task-specific exposure measurements. Exposure to PA was low in relation to the Occupational Exposure Standard (OES). The highest full-shift PA exposures occurred among resin operators in the resin factory that used solid PA as compared to other resin factories where liquid PA was used. Arithmetic mean exposure levels to TMA and MA in the resin factories were well below their respective OESs. Short-term high exposures occurred during loading of acid anhydrides into the reactors and sampling and testing of the resin. Relatively high full-shift exposure to TMA occurred in the cushioned flooring factory, although no high peak exposures were detected.

  8. Sorption of Pu(IV) from nitric acid by bifunctional anion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, R.A.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Elshani, S.; Zhao, W.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Barr, M.E.; Marsh, S.F.; Chamberlin, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Anion exchange is attractive for separating plutonium because the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is very strongly sorbed and few other metal ions form competing anionic nitrate complexes. The major disadvantage of this process has been the unusually slow rate at which the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is sorbed by the resin. The paper summarizes the concept of bifunctional anion-exchange resins, proposed mechanism for Pu(IV) sorption, synthesis of the alkylating agent, calculation of K d values from Pu(IV) sorption results, and conclusions from the study of Pu(IV) sorption from 7M nitric acid by macroporous anion-exchange resins including level of crosslinking, level of alkylation, length of spacer, and bifunctional vs. monofunctional anion-exchange resins

  9. Green biorefinery: separation of lactic acid from grass silage juice by chromatography using neutral polymeric resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Vu Hong; Novalin, Senad

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work was to recover lactic acid in undissociated form from grass silage juice. For this aim, chromatographic separation using neutral polymeric resin Amberlite XAD1600 was investigated. Up to now, there is no hint in the literatures about using neutral polymeric resin for lactic acid separation from a mixture. Important factors (flow-rate, concentration of feed and loaded volume) that affect separation performance were firstly investigated with model solutions. The obtained results showed that lactic acid solutions with the purity varying from 93.2% to 99.9% could be obtained at the recovery yields over 99.4%. After that, trials with silage juice were carried out. Due to the complex composition of the feed, the purity of products decreased to 94% at a recovery yield of 97%. Although 99% of inorganic salts and sugars were separated from lactic acid organic acids in general and acetic acid in particular caused a purity problem. It seems that organic acids could not be separated from lactic acid by neutral resin Amberlite XAD1600. Besides the organic acid problem, some amino acids were remained in the products as impurities.

  10. Crypthophilic acids A, B, and C: resin glycosides from aerial parts of Scrophularia crypthophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliş, Ihsan; Sezgin, Yükselen; Dönmez, Ali A; Rüedi, Peter; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2007-01-01

    The water-soluble part of the methanolic extract from the aerial parts of Scrophularia crypthophila, through chromatographic methods, yielded three new resin glycosides, crypthophilic acids A - C (1-3). Compounds 1-3 are tetraglycosides of (+)-3S,12S-dihydroxypalmitic acid. The structures of these and 10 known compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical means. All natural resin glycosides known so far have been obtained from Convolvulaceae plants; this is the first report of such glycosides from another, taxonomically unrelated family (Scrophulariaceae).

  11. Dimerisation of isobutene on acidic ion-exchange resins

    OpenAIRE

    Honkela, Maija

    2005-01-01

    Dimerisation of isobutene produces diisobutenes that can be hydrogenated to isooctane (2,2,4-trimethyl pentane). Isooctane can be used as a high octane gasoline component. The aim of this work was to study the selective production of diisobutenes through the dimerisation of isobutene on ion-exchange resin catalysts and to construct kinetic models for the reactions in the system for reactor design purposes. High selectivities for diisobutenes were obtained in the presence of polar componen...

  12. Chemically modified polymeric resins for separation of cations, organic acids, and small polar moleculea by high performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, John B. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This thesis is divided into 4 parts: a review, ion chromatography of metal cations on carboxylic resins, separation of hydrophilic organic acids and small polar compounds on macroporous resin columns, and use of eluent modifiers for liquid chromatographic separation of carboxylic acids using conductivity detection.

  13. Exposure to wood dust, resin acids, and volatile organic compounds during production of wood pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagström, Katja; Axelsson, Sara; Arvidsson, Helena; Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss; Lundholm, Cecilia; Eriksson, Kåre

    2008-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate exposure to airborne substances that are potentially harmful to health during the production of wood pellets, including wood dust, monoterpenes, and resin acids, and as an indicator of diesel exhaust nitrogen dioxide. In addition, area measurements were taken to assess background exposure levels of these substances, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and carbon monoxide. Measurements were taken at four wood pellet production plants from May 2004 to April 2005. Forty-four workers participated in the study, and a total of 68 personal measurements were taken to determine personal exposure to wood dust (inhalable and total dust), resin acids, monoterpenes, and nitrogen dioxide. In addition, 42 measurements of nitrogen dioxide and 71 measurements of total dust, resin acids, monoterpenes, VOCs, and carbon monoxide were taken to quantify their indoor area concentrations. Personal exposure levels to wood dust were high, and a third of the measured levels of inhalable dust exceeded the Swedish occupational exposure limit (OEL) of 2 mg/m3. Parallel measurements of inhalable and total dust indicated that the former were, on average, 3.2 times higher than the latter. The data indicate that workers at the plants are exposed to significant amounts of the resin acid 7-oxodehydroabietic acid in the air, an observation that has not been recorded previously at wood processing and handling plants. The study also found evidence of exposure to dehydroabietic acid, and exposure levels for resin acids approached 74% of the British OEL for colophony, set at 50 microg/m3. Personal exposure levels to monoterpenes and nitrogen dioxide were low. Area sampling measurements indicated that aldehydes and terpenes were the most abundant VOCs, suggesting that measuring personal exposure to aldehydes might be of interest. Carbon monoxide levels were under the detection limit in all area measurements. High wood dust exposure levels are likely to have

  14. Effect of sulfuric acid etching of polyetheretherketone on the shear bond strength to resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproesser, Oliver; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-10-01

    To examine the influence of etching duration on the bond strength of PEEK substrate in combination with different resin composite cements. In total, 448 PEEK specimens were fabricated, etched with sulfuric acid for 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 300 s and then luted with two conventional resin cements (RelyX ARC and Variolink II) and one self-adhesive resin cement (Clearfil SA Cement) (n = 18/subgroup). Non-etched specimens served as the control group. Specimens were stored in distilled water for 28 days at 37°C and shear bond strengths were measured. Data were analyzed nonparametrically using Kruskal-Wallis-H (p sulfuric acid seems to be suitable and effective for PEEK surface pre-treatment, further investigations are required to examine the effect of other adhesive systems and cements.

  15. Esterification of oleic acid with ethanol catalyzed by sulfonated cation exchange resin: Experimental and kinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yuwang; Lu, Jie; Sun, Kaian; Ma, Lingling; Ding, Jincheng

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Esterification of oleic acid with ethanol was investigated in the presence of sulfonated cation exchange resin. • We studied kinetic model of the esterification of oleic acid with ethanol according to experimental data. • The proposed kinetic model can well predict oleic acid conversion. - Abstract: This paper investigated the effects of ethanol to oleic acid molar ratio, reaction temperature, catalyst loading, water content and catalyst recycling on sulfonated cation exchange resin in a stirred batch reactor under atmospheric pressure. When the esterification was carried out with an ethanol to oleic acid (42.4 g) molar ratio of 9:1, reflux of ethanol at 82 °C, 20 g of catalyst and 8 h of reaction time, the oleic acid conversion rate reached approximately 93%. A pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model for describing the esterification of oleic acid with ethanol by the sulfonated cation exchange resin was developed on the basis of laboratorial results. The kinetic model can well predict the oleic acid conversion

  16. A convenient procedure for the solid-phase synthesis of hydroxamic acids on PEGA resins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandurkar, Nitin Subhash; Petersen, Rico; Qvortrup, Katrine

    2011-01-01

    An efficient method for the solid-phase synthesis of hydroxamic acids is described. The method comprises the nucleophilic displacement of esters immobilized on PEGA resins with hydroxylamine/sodium hydroxide in isopropanol. The hydroxyaminolysis protocol is compatible with a broad range of PEGA...

  17. Influence of the Functionalization Degree of Acidic Ion-Exchange Resins on Ethyl Octyl Ether Formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guilera, J.; Hanková, Libuše; Jeřábek, Karel; Ramírez, E.; Tejero, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 78, MAY (2014), s. 14-22 ISSN 1381-5148 Grant - others:SEURDO(ES) CTQ2010-16047 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : acidic ion-exchange resin * sulfonation degree * ISEC Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.515, year: 2014

  18. Effects of different sulfuric acid etching concentrations on PEEK surface bonding to resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaijareenont, Pisaisit; Prakhamsai, Sasiprapha; Silthampitag, Patcharawan; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Arksornnukit, Mansuang

    2018-01-26

    This study evaluated the effects of surface pretreatment with different concentrations of sulfuric acid etching on surface properties and bonding between Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and a resin composite. Six groups of surface pretreatment (no pretreatment, etched with 70, 80, 85, 90, and 98% sulfuric acid for 60 s) were treated on PEEK. Surface roughness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses were examined. Shear bond strength (SBS) and cross-sectional observations of the interfaces were performed. One-way ANOVA analysis revealed differences in surface roughness and SBS between groups. The 90 and 98% sulfuric acid etching significantly achieved the highest SBS (psulfuric acid etching were suggested to be the optimal concentration to improve adhesion between PEEK and the resin composite.

  19. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  20. Adsorption of uranium ions by crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemal Oezeroglu; Niluefer Metin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the crosslinked polyester resin containing acrylic acid functional groups was used for the adsorption of uranium ions from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, the crosslinked polyester resin of unsaturated polyester in styrene monomer (Polipol 353, Poliya) and acrylic acid as weight percentage at 80 and 20%, respectively was synthesized by using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKp, Butanox M60, Azo Nobel)-cobalt octoate initiator system. The adsorption of uranium ions on the sample (0.05 g copolymer and 5 mL of U(VI) solution were mixed) of the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid was carried out in a batch reactor. The effects of adsorption parameters of the contact time, temperature, pH of solution and initial uranium(VI) concentration for U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid were investigated. The adsorption data obtained from experimental results depending on the initial U(VI) concentration were analyzed by the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity and free energy change were determined by using D-R isotherm. The obtained experimental adsorption data depending on temperature were evaluated to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy (ΔH o ), entropy (ΔS o ) and free energy change (ΔG o ) for the U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions. The obtained adsorption data depending on contact time were analyzed by using adsorption models such as the modified Freundlich, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. (author)

  1. Eco-friendly Crosslinking Agent for Acid Functional Acrylic Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Shah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil from J. multifida was extracted and it was first converted into N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl Jatropha fatty amide (HEJFA. HEJFA has been synthesized by reaction between Jatropha oil and diethanol amine in presence of zinc oxide as a catalyst. The reaction is relatively rapid and proceeded to high yield at 200±5 OC. The resulting HEJFA was used to formulate thermosetting coating compositions. Films were cured at ambient (air drying and elevated (stove drying temperatures using N, N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl Jatropha fatty amide (HEJFA as eco-friendly crosslinking agent for acrylic resin. The coating performance of the various compositions was tested by measurement of scratch hardness, impact strength and chemical resistance. The results show better performance of the HEJFA based compositions compared to butylated melamine formaldehyde (MF based compositions.

  2. Biophysical study of resin acid effects on phospholipid membrane structure and properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagalski, Vivien; Barker, Robert; Topgaard, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic resin acids (RAs) are synthesized by conifer trees as part of their defense mechanisms. One of the functions of RAs in plant defense is suggested to be the perturbation of the cellular membrane. However, there is a vast diversity of chemical structures within this class of molecules......, and there are no clear correlations to the molecular mechanisms behind the RA's toxicity. In this study we unravel the molecular interactions of the three closely related RAs dehydroabietic acid, neoabietic acid, and the synthetic analogue dichlorodehydroabietic acid with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) model...... are correlated with the physical chemical properties of the RA and their toxicity....

  3. Sorption Efficiency of a New Sorbent towards Cadmium(II: Methylphosphonic Acid Grafted Polystyrene Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacer Ferrah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new chelating polymeric sorbent has been developed using polystyrene resin grafted with phosphonic acid. After characterization by FTIR and elementary analysis, the new resin has been investigated in liquid-solid extraction of cadmium(II. The results indicated that phosphonic resin could adsorb Cd(II ion effectively from aqueous solution. The adsorption was strongly dependent on the pH of the medium and the optimum pH value level for better sorption was between 3.2 and 5.2. The influence of other analytical parameters including contact time, amount of resin, metal ion concentration, and the presence of some electrolytes was investigated. The maximum uptake capacity of Cd(II ions was 37,9 mg·g−1 grafted resin at ambient temperature, at an initial pH value of 5.0. The overall adsorption process was best described by pseudo second-order kinetic. When Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were tested, the latter had a better fit with the experimental data. Furthermore, more than 92% of Cd(II could be eluted by using 1.0 mol·L−1 HCl in one cycle.

  4. Simultaneous separation and detection of actinides in acidic solutions using an extractive scintillating resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roane, J E; DeVol, T A

    2002-11-01

    An extractive scintillating resin was evaluated for the simultaneous separation and detection of actinides in acidic solutions. The transuranic extractive scintillating (TRU-ES) resin is composed of an inert macroporous polystyrene core impregnated with organic fluors (diphenyloxazole and 1,4-bis-(4-methyl-5-phenyl-2-oxazolyl)benzene) and an extractant (octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide in tributyl phosphate). The TRU-ES resin was packed into FEP Teflon tubing to produce a flow cell (0.2-mL free column volume), which is placed into a scintillation detection system to obtain pulse height spectra and time series data during loading and elution of actinides onto/from the resin. The alpha-particle absolute detection efficiencies ranged from 77% to 96.5%, depending on the alpha energy and quench. In addition to the on-line analyses, off-line analyses of the effluent can be conducted using conventional detection methods. The TRU-ES resin was applied to the quantification of a mixed radionuclide solution and two actual waste samples. The on-line characterization of the mixed radionuclide solution was within 10% of the reported activities whereas the agreement with the waste samples was not as good due to sorption onto the sample container walls and the oxidation state of plutonium. Agreement between the on-line and off-line analyses was within 35% of one another for both waste samples.

  5. Adsorption Equilibrium Equation of Carboxylic Acids on Anion-Exchange Resins in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Nobuhiro; Urano, Kohei; Kokado, Naohiro; Urushigawa, Yoshikuni

    2001-06-01

    The adsorption of propionic acid and benzoic acid on anion-exchange resins was analyzed, and an adsorption equilibrium equation of carboxylic acids was proposed. The adsorption of carboxylic acids on the anion-exchange resins was considered to be the sum of the physical adsorption of the molecule and the ion-exchange adsorption of the ion, which were independent of each other. For the physical adsorption of carboxylic acids, it was conformed to the Freundlich equation. For the ion-exchange adsorption of carboxylate ions, the equilibrium equation corresponded well with the experimental results for wide ranges of concentration and pH. The equation contains a selectivity coefficient S(A)(Cl) for the chloride ion versus the carboxylate ion, which was considered essentially a constant. The influent of the bicarbonate ion from carbon dioxide in air could also be expressed by the additional equilibrium equation with the selectivity coefficient S(HCO(3))(Cl) for the chloride ion versus the bicarbonate ion. Consequently, an adsorption equilibrium equation can estimate the equilibrium adsorption amounts. Even the effect of a coexisting bicarbonate ion is inconsequential when the parameters of the Freundlich isotherm equation and the selectivity coefficients of the carboxylate ion and the bicarbonate ion in each resin are determined in advance. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. Study of plutonium IV elution from macromolecular anion exchange resin by 0.5 M nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadkarni, M.N.; Mayankutty, P.C.; Pillai, N.S.; Shinde, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary studies indicated that macroreticular resins possess more or less the same capacities and absorption characteristics for thorium, uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solutions as the conventional resins. Detailed studies were, then, conducted. It was found that Pu(IV) can be loaded on the macroreticular anion exchange resin, Amberlyst A-26 from 7.2 M nitric acid in much the same way as Dowex 1x4. It was also observed that the elution of Pu(IV) from Amberlyst A-26 by 0.5 M nitric acid is much more rapid and quantitative than from Dowex 1x4. (author)

  7. Separation of aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids by ion-exclusion chromatography with various cation-exchange resin columns and sulfuric acid as eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Jin, Ji-Ye; Takeuchi, Toyohide; Fujimoto, Chuzo; Choi, Seong-Ho; Ryoo, Jae-Jeong; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2003-05-16

    The application of various hydrophilic cation-exchange resins for high-performance liquid chromatography (sulfonated silica gel: TSKgel SP-2SW, carboxylated silica gel: TSKgel CM-2SW, sulfonated polymethacrylate resin: TSKgel SP-5PW, carboxylated polymethacrylate resins: TSKgel CM-5PW and TSKgel OA-Pak A) as stationary phases in ion-exclusion chromatography for C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, isovaleric, valeric, isocaproic, caproic, 2-methylhexanoic and heptanoic acids) and benzenecarboxylic acids (pyromellitic, trimellitic, hemimellitic, o-phthalic, m-phthalic, p-phthalic, benzoic, salicylic acids and phenol) was carried out using diluted sulfuric acid as the eluent. Silica-based cation-exchange resins (TSKgel SP-2SW and TSKgel CM-2SW) were very suitable for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of these benzenecarboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation of these benzenecarboxylic acids was achieved on a TSKgel SP-2SW column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 17 min using a 2.5 mM sulfuric acid at pH 2.4 as the eluent. Polymethacrylate-based cation-exchange resins (TSKgel SP-5PW, TSKgel CM-5PW and TSKgel OA-Pak A) acted as advanced stationary phases for the ion-exclusion chromatographic separation of these C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation of these C1-C7 acids was achieved on a TSKgel CM-5PW column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 32 min using a 0.05 mM sulfuric acid at pH 4.0 as the eluent.

  8. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks.

  9. Aminolysis of resin-bound N-nosylaziridine-2-carboxylic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian A; Christensen, Caspar; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2006-01-01

    [Structure: see text] Solid-phase synthesis is a rapidly developing area of organic chemistry, of particular importance for medicinal chemistry and chemical biology. Aziridines have previously only rarely been applied in solid-phase synthesis. In the present work, aminolysis of resin-bound, spring......-loaded N-nitrobenzenesulfonyl-activated aziridine-2-carboxylic acids has been optimized and employed in the synthesis of a number of open-chain and heterocyclic scaffolds, including enantiopure products....

  10. Screening Analyses of Pinosylvin Stilbenes, Resin Acids and Lignans in Norwegian Conifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Fiksdahl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The content and distribution of stilbenes and resin acids in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris and spruce (Picea abies, sampled in central Norway, have been examined. The contents of pinosylvin stilbenes in pine heartwood/living knots were 0.2-2/2-8 % (w/w. No stilbenes could be detected in spruce (Picea abies. The resin acid contents of pine sapwood/heartwood and knots were 1-4 and 5-10 % (w/w, respectively. Minor amounts of resin acids (< 0.2/< 0.04 %w/w were identified in spruce wood/knots. The lignan content in knots of Norwegian spruce was 6.5 % (w/w. Diastereomerically pure hydroxymatairesinol (HMR, 84 % of total lignans was readily isolated from this source since only minor quantities (2.6 % of total lignans of the allo-HMR diastereomer was detected. Insignificant amounts of lignans were present in the sapwood. Lignans could not be detected in the sapwood or knots of Norwegian sallow (Salix caprea, birch (Betula pendula or juniper (Juniperus communis.

  11. Removing and recovering of uranium from the acid mine waters by using ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes do

    1998-01-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of the few processes capable of reducing ionic contaminants in effluents to very low levels. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The local mineralogical features, allied to the biogeochemical phenomena, owing to presence of pyrite in the rock piles, moreover another factors, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants, including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by anionic exchanger. The iron interference is eliminated by lime pretreatment of water, increasing pH from 2.6 to 3.3-3.8 to precipitate this cation, without changing the uranium amount. Eight anionic resins were tested, based on the uranium loading, in sorption studies. Retention time, and pH influence was verified for the exchanger chose. With breakthrough of 1 mg U/L and 10 mg U/l in the feed solution, the uranium decontamination level was 94%. Typical values of loading resin were 20-30 g U/l and 70-90 g SO 4 /l. Uranium elution was done with Na Cl solution. Retention time, saline, and acid concentration were the parameters studied. The concentrate, obtained from the eluate by ammonia precipitation, presented uranium (86,8% as U 3 O 8 ) and impurities within commercial specifications. (author)

  12. Synthesis of iminodi(methylphosphonic acid)-type chitosan resin and its adsorption behavior for trace metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Satoko; Oshita, Koji; Sabarudin, Akhmad; Oshima, Mitsuko; Motomizu, Shoji

    2004-01-01

    A chitosan-based resin possessing the iminodi(methyphosphonic acid) moiety (IDP-type chitrosan resin) was synthesized by using cross-linked chitosan as a base material. The adsorption behavior of trace metal ions on the IDP-type chitosan resin was systematically investigated using a mini-column (1 ml of the resin) packed with the resin. The concentrations of metal ions in the effluents were measured by ICP-MS and ICP-AES. The resin could adsorb four metals, such as In(III), Sn(II), Th(IV), and U(VI), by almost 100% over a wide pH range (1-7). Uranium(VI) and thorium could not be eluted with nitric acid and hydrochloric acid (1-6 M); other metal ions were easily and readily eluted with 1 M nitric acid. The IDP-type chitosan resin synthesized in this work can be applied to the separation of U(VI) and Th(IV) from other metal ions. (author)

  13. The application of macroporous resins in the separation of licorice flavonoids and glycyrrhizic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Boqiang; Liu, Jie; Li, Huan; Li, Lei; Lee, Frank S C; Wang, Xiaoru

    2005-09-30

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) and licorice flavonoids (LF) are the two classes of bioactive components in licorice with known pharmacological effects. But long-term excessive intake of GA may cause sodium retention and hypertension. In this study, the performance and adsorption characteristics of four widely used macroporous resins for the separation of deglycyrrhizinated, flavonoids enriched licorice has been critically evaluated. The sorption and desorption properties of LF and GA on macroporous resins including XDA-1, LSA-10, D101 and LSA-20 have been compared. The adsorption capacity was found to depend strongly on the pH of the feed solution. XDA-1 offers much higher adsorption capacity for GA and LF than other resins, and its adsorption data fit the best to the Freundlich isotherm. XDA-1 also shows much higher adsorption affinity towards LF than that of GA based on calculated results from the measured adsorption isotherms. Dynamic adsorption and desorption experiments have been carried out on a XDA-1 resin packed column to obtain optimal parameters for separating GA and LF. An enriched LF extract (about 21.9% purity) free of GA, and an enriched GA extract with 66% purity can be separated from crude licorice extract in one run.

  14. Effect of humic acid on ciprofloxacin removal by magnetic multifunctional resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Cheng, Jiade; Jin, Jing; Zhou, Qing; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Qingqing; Li, Aimin

    2016-07-01

    Background organic matter significantly influences the removal of emerging contaminants in natural water. In this work, the adsorption of ciprofloxacin (CPX) onto a series of magnetic multifunctional resins (GMA10-GMA90) in the presence and absence of humic acid (HA) was conducted to demonstrate the effect of HA. Both hydrophobic and ion exchange interactions contributed to CPX adsorption. Negative charge-assisted hydrogen bonds also participated in the adsorption process, resulting in the high adsorption amount of anionic CPX onto the negatively charged GMA30 under basic solutions. HA could impact CPX adsorption not only as a competitive adsorbate but also as an additional adsorbent. At pH 5.6, the additional adsorption sites provided by adsorbed HA molecules on the resins dominated and thus facilitated the adsorption process. While at pH 10, HA inhibited the adsorption of CPX by directly competing for ion exchange sites and coexisting with CPX in the solution. The ratio of the amount of CPX adsorbed by dissolved HA to that by the resin reached as high as 1.61 for GMA90. The adsorbed HA molecules onto the resins could provide additional adsorption sites for CPX as proven by the enhanced CPX adsorption in HA-preloading systems at pH 5.6.

  15. Oxidative degradation of low and intermediate level Radioactive organic wastes 2. Acid decomposition on spent Ion-Exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghattas, N.K.; Eskander, S.B.

    1995-01-01

    The present work provides a simplified, effective and economic method for the chemical decomposition of radioactively contaminated solid organic waste, especially spent ion - exchange resins. The goal is to achieve volume reduction and to avoid technical problems encountered in processes used for similar purposes (incineration, pyrolysis). Factors efficiency and kinetics of the oxidation of the ion exchange resins in acid medium using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant, namely, duration of treatment and the acid to resin ratio were studied systematically on a laboratory scale. Moreover the percent composition of the off-gas evolved during the decomposition process was analysed. 3 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Design and synthesis of bio-based UV curable PU acrylate resin from itaconic acid for coating applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Deepak M; Phalak, Ganesh A; Mhaske, S T

    2017-01-01

    UV curable PUA resin was successfully synthesized from polyol based on sustainable resource originated from itaconic acid (IA), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). A polyol was synthesized by condensation reaction of IA with 16-hexanediol in the presence of p-Toluenesulfonic acid (pTSA). The synthesized PUA resin was characterized for its structural elucidation by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometer (FTIR), 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The synthesized UV curable PUA resin was incorporated in varying concentrations in conventional PUA coating system. The effects of varying concentration of synthesized UV curable PUA resin on rheology, crystallinity, thermal and coating properties were evaluated. The rheological behavior of the resins were evaluated at variable stress and result showed decrease in viscosity of resin as concentration of synthesized UV curable PUA resin increases in conventional PUA resin. The cured coatings have been evaluated for glass transition temperature ( T g ) and thermal behavior by differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis respectively. The degree of crystallinity of the coatings was determined from X-ray diffraction patterns using the PFM program. It was found that increase in the mass proportion of IA based PUA in coatings, the coating becomes more rigid and crystalline. The synthesized UV curable PUA coatings showed interesting mechanical, chemical, solvent and thermal properties as compared to the conventional PUA. Further, cured coatings were also evaluated for gel content and water absorption.

  17. The Use of Commercial Non-Hazardous Air Pollutant Monomers to Optimize the Properties of Fatty Acid-Based Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    It was found that cyclohexyl methacrylate (CHMA) was the most effective reactive diluent in replacing methacrylated lauric acid (MLau) because it...The reaction of glycidyl methacrylate and lauric acid to produce the MLau monomer... acid -based monomers to be used as the reactive diluent in VE resins (9, 10). Figure 1 depicts the synthetic route used to form methacrylated lauric

  18. Biogenic glutamic acid-based resin: Its synthesis and application in the removal of cobalt(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamiu, Zakariyah A.; Saleh, Tawfik A.; Ali, Shaikh A., E-mail: shaikh@kfupm.edu.sa

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • A novel resin embedded with metal chelating glutamic acid was synthesized. • The biogenic amino acid residues imparted remarkable efficacy to remove Co(II). • The resin showed excellent ability to remove various metals from wastewater. - Abstract: Inexpensive biogenic glutamic acid has been utilized to synthesize a cross-linked dianionic polyelectrolyte (CDAP) containing metal chelating ligands. Cycloterpolymerization, using azoisobutyronitrile as an initiator, of N,N-diallylglutamic acid hydrochloride, sulfur dioxide and a cross-linker afforded a pH-responsive cross-linked polyzwitterionic acid (CPZA) which upon basification with NaOH was converted into CDAP. The new resin, characterized by a multitude of spectroscopic techniques as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses, was evaluated for the removal of Co(II) as a model case under different conditions. The adsorption capacity of 137 mg g{sup −1} does indeed make the resin as one of the most effective sorbents in recent times. The resin leverages its cheap natural source and ease of regeneration in combination with its high and fast uptake capacities to offer a great promise for wastewater treatment. The resin has demonstrated remarkable efficiency in removing toxic metal ions including arsenic from a wastewater sample.

  19. Biogenic glutamic acid-based resin: Its synthesis and application in the removal of cobalt(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamiu, Zakariyah A.; Saleh, Tawfik A.; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel resin embedded with metal chelating glutamic acid was synthesized. • The biogenic amino acid residues imparted remarkable efficacy to remove Co(II). • The resin showed excellent ability to remove various metals from wastewater. - Abstract: Inexpensive biogenic glutamic acid has been utilized to synthesize a cross-linked dianionic polyelectrolyte (CDAP) containing metal chelating ligands. Cycloterpolymerization, using azoisobutyronitrile as an initiator, of N,N-diallylglutamic acid hydrochloride, sulfur dioxide and a cross-linker afforded a pH-responsive cross-linked polyzwitterionic acid (CPZA) which upon basification with NaOH was converted into CDAP. The new resin, characterized by a multitude of spectroscopic techniques as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses, was evaluated for the removal of Co(II) as a model case under different conditions. The adsorption capacity of 137 mg g −1 does indeed make the resin as one of the most effective sorbents in recent times. The resin leverages its cheap natural source and ease of regeneration in combination with its high and fast uptake capacities to offer a great promise for wastewater treatment. The resin has demonstrated remarkable efficiency in removing toxic metal ions including arsenic from a wastewater sample.

  20. Esterification of palm fatty acid distillate with epychlorohydrin using cation exchange resin catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhijanto, Budhijanto; Subagyo, Albertus F. P. H.

    2017-05-01

    Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) is one of the wastes from the conversion of crude palm oil (CPO) into cooking oil. The PFAD is currently only utilized as the raw material for low grade soap and biofuel. To improve the economic value of PFAD, it was converted into monoglyceride by esterification process. Furthermore, the monoglyceride could be polymerized to form alkyd resin, which is a commodity of increasing importance. This study aimed to propose a kinetics model for esterification of PFAD with epichlorohydrin using cation exchange resin catalyst. The reaction was the first step from a series of reactions to produce the monoglyceride. In this study, the reaction between PFAD and epichlorohydirne was run in a stirred batch reactor. The stirrer was operated at a constant speed of 400 RPM. The reaction was carried out for 180 minutes on varied temperatures of 60°C, 70°C, 80°C, dan 90°C. Cation exchange resin was applied as solid catalysts. Analysis was conducted periodically by measuring the acid number of the samples, which was further used to calculate PFAD conversion. The data were used to determine the rate constants and the equilibrium constants of the kinetics model. The kinetics constants implied that the reaction was reversible and controlled by the intrinsic surface reaction. Despite the complication of the heterogeneous nature of the reaction, the kinetics data well fitted the elementary rate law. The effect of temperature on the equilibrium constants indicated that the reaction is exothermic.

  1. Biodiesel production from acid oils and ethanol using a solid basic resin as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, J.M.; Errazu, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    In the search of an alternative fuel to substitute diesel fuel, biodiesel appears as one of the most promising sources of energy for diesel engines because of its environmental advantages and also due to the evolution of the petroleum market. Refined oil is the conventional raw material for the production of this biofuel; however, its major disadvantage is the high cost of its production. Therefore, frying oils, waste oils, crude oils and/or acid oils are being tested as alternative raw materials; nevertheless, there will be some problems if a homogeneous basic catalyst (NaOH) is employed due to the high amount of free fatty acid present in the raw oil. In this work, the transesterification reaction of acid oil using solid resin, Dowex monosphere 550 A, was studied as an alternative process. Ethanol was employed to have a natural and sustainable final product. The reaction temperature's effects, the initial amount of free fatty acid, the molar ratio of alcohol/oil and the type of catalyst (homogeneous or heterogeneous) over the main reaction are analyzed and their effects compared. The results obtained show that the solid resin is an alternative catalyst to be used to produce fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) by a transesterification reaction with a final conversion over 90%. On the other hand, the time required to achieve this conversion is bigger than the one required using conventional technology which employs a homogeneous basic catalyst. This reaction time needs to be optimized. (author)

  2. Raman spectroscopic study of the aging and nitration of actinide processing anion-exchange resins in concentrated nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscher, C. T.; Donohoe, R. J.; Mecklenburg, S. L.; Berg, J. M.; Tait, C. D.; Huchton, K. M.; Morris, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    Degradation of two types of anion exchange resins, Dowex 11 and Reillex HPQ, from the action of concentrated nitric acid (4 to 12 M) and radiolysis [from depleted uranium as UO 2 2+ nitrate species and 239 Pu as Pu(IV) nitrate species] was followed as a function of time with Raman vibrational spectroscopy. Elevated temperatures (∼50 degree sign C) were used in the absence of actinide metal loading to simulate longer exposures of the resin to a HNO 3 process stream and waste storage conditions. In the absence of actinide loading, only minor changes in the Dowex resin at acid concentrations ≤10 M were observed, while at 12 M acid concentration, the emergence of a Raman peak at 1345 cm-1 indicates the addition of nitro functional groups to the resin. Similar studies with the Reillex resin show it to be more resistant to nitric acid attack at all acid concentrations. Incorporation of weakly radioactive depleted uranium as the UO 2 2+ nitrate species to the ion-exchange sites of Dowex 11 under differing nitric acid concentrations (6 to 12 M) at room temperature showed no Raman evidence of resin degradation or nitration, even after several hundred days of contact. In contrast, Raman spectra for Dowex 11 in the presence of 239 Pu as Pu(IV) nitrate species reveal numerous changes indicating resin alterations, including a new mode at 1345 cm-1 consistent with a Pu(IV)-nitrate catalyzed addition of nitro groups to the resin backbone. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Dimmer-Acid-Based Nonisocyanate Polyurethane and Epoxy Resin Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, dimmer-acid-based hybrid nonisocyanate polyurethanes (HNIPUs were synthesized by the one-step method without catalyst. Three polyamines and two epoxy resins were selected as raw materials for HNIPU, and cyclic carbonate was synthesized based on our previous work. All of the products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. Then, HNIPU coatings were prepared and determined by swelling, water absorption, and water contact angle. The results showed that the HNIPU-4551 have the best mechanical and thermal properties because of its high crosslinking density. Among the different amines, it was confirmed that tetraethylenepentamine was the best amine curing agent for HNIPU coating. Meanwhile, the epoxy resin with a higher epoxy value would also form a higher crosslinking density. Those coatings showed an excellent impact strength, adhesion, flexibility, pencil hardness, hydrophilic, and appropriate crosslinking density.

  4. Uranium(VI) adsorption properties of a chelating resin containing polyamine-substituted methylphosphonic acid moiety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masaaki; Akiyoshi, Yoshirou

    1991-01-01

    Uranium(VI) adsorption and desorption properties of a chelating resin containing polyamine-substituted methylphosphonic acid moiety of 2.29 mmol/g-resin (APA) were examined. Uranium(VI) adsorption properties of several ion exchange resins and extractant agents which were known as excellent adsorbents for uranium(VI), were examined together for a comparison with those of APA. Uranium(VI) adsorption capacity of APA at the concentration of 100 mg·dm -3 -uranium(VI) in 100 g·dm -3 -H 2 SO 4 aq. soln., 190 g·dm -3 -H 3 PO 4 aq. soln. and uranium enriched sea water, was 0.2, 0.05 and 0.05 mmol·g -1 respectively. The adsorption capacity of APA for uranium(VI) in these solutions was larger than that of another adsorbents, except the adsorption of uranium(VI) in enriched sea water on ion exchange resin containing phosphoric acid moiety (adsorption capacity ; 0.2 mmol·g -1 ). Uranium(VI) adsorption rate on APA was high and the relation between treatment time (t : min) and uranium(VI) concentration (y : mg·dm -3 ) in 100 g·dm -3 H 2 SO 4 aq. soln. after treatment, was shown as following equation, y=20 0.048t+1.90 (0≤t≤30). The adsorbed uranium(VI) on APA was able to be eluted with a mixed aq. soln. of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hydroxide and also was able to be eluted with an aq. alkaline soln. dissolved reduction agents such as sodium sulfite and hydrazine. From these results, it was thought that uranium(VI) adsorbed on APA was eluted due to the reduction to uranium(VI) by these eluents. (author)

  5. Non-destructive evaluation by terahertz spectroscopy for penetration of acid solutions into epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kusano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy resins are used as high-performance thermosetting linings to protect substrates under corrosive environments. However, in a severe corrosive chemical solution, such protective layers may degrade with long time due to penetrations of solvent and solute molecules into resin network. In this regard, the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS is a promising tool for non-destructive evaluation of the penetrant amounts due to high transparency of such plastic materials and high sensitivity to the molecular vibrations in terahertz spectral range. In this work, the complex refractive indexes n and κ of epoxy specimens were measured after immersion into sulfuric acid solutions and compared with penetrated mass fractions of water and acid ions. It was found that n and κ depended linearly with water and sulfuric acid mass fraction in specimens, and κ of sulfuric acid immersed specimens was lager at higher frequency. While the calculated Δκ agreed well with THz-TDS measurement by THz-TDS, the calculated Δn was higher than the measurement. The difference may be attributed to the water and sulfuric states in the specimen.

  6. Adsorption of beta-naphthalenesulfonic acid/sulfuric acid from their solution by weakly basic resin: equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Hai; Si, Peng-Fei

    2005-01-01

    Experiments for single and bisolute competitive adsorption were carried out to investigate the adsorption behavior of beta-naphthalenesulfonic acid (NSA) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) from their solution at 25 degrees C onto weakly basic resin D301R. Adsorption affinity of sulfuric acid on D301R was found to be much higher than that of NSA. The data of single-solute adsorption were fitted to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich adsorption model. The ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) coupled with the single-solute adsorption models were used to predict the bisolute competitive adsorption equilibria. The IAST coupled with the Langmuir and the Freundlich model for sulfuric acid and NSA, respectively, yields the favorable representation of the bisolute competitive adsorption behavior.

  7. Evaluation and improvement of gamma-ray stability of chelating resins containing oxy-acid groups of phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jyo, Akinori; Yamabe, Kazunori; Shuto, Taketomi

    1998-01-01

    Chelating resins containing oxy-acid groups of phosphorus, such as phosphonic and phosphoric acid groups have been studied from the point of view of solvent extraction processes for the separation of nuclear fuel elements as well as of fission product ones. The present work was planned to evaluate the effect of gamma-ray on properties of the resins and to obtain directional information for design of the resins having high stability to gamma-ray. It was clarified that gamma-ray stability of the resins is not high; tolerance limit is ca. 2.3x10 3 C/kg. The present work also clarified that polymers crosslinked with divinylbenzene have much higher gamma-ray stability than ones crosslinked with dimetacrylate esters of oligo (ethylene glycol)s. (J.P.N.)

  8. Application of 10% Ascorbic Acid Improves Resin Shear Bond Stregth in Bleached Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamizar Kamizar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Restoration of the teeth immediately after bleaching with H2O2 35% is contraindicated due to the remnants of free radical that will stay inside dentin for 2-3 weeks which will compromise the adhesiveness of composite resin. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 10% ascorbic acid on shear bond strength of composite placed on bleached dentin. Methods:Twenty seven samples were divided equally into three groups. Group 1: dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid; Group 2: dentin was bleached with 35% H2O2 followed by etching with 35% phosphoric acid; Group 3: dentin was bleached with 35% H2O2, followed by application of 10% ascorbic acid and etched with 35% phosphoric acid. All samples were then stored at 370C for 24 hours. The Universal Testing Machine was used to measure shear bond strength and the results were analyzed with Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney test. Results: After nine independent experiments, 10% ascorbic acid application on bleached dentin resulted in highest increased in bond stregth (56.04±11.06MPa compared to Group 2 (29.09±7.63MPa and Group 1 (25.55±2.22MPa and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: Application of 10% ascorbic acid to the bleached dentin improved the shear bond strength of resin composite.

  9. Uranium adsorption from the sulphuric acid leach liquor containing more chlorides with cation-exchange resin SL-406

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Wang Zhaoguo; Chi Renqing; Niu Xuejun

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility of uranium adsorption was studied from the sulphuric acid leach liquor of a uranium ore containing more chlorides with cation-exchange resin SL-406. The influence of some factors on uranium adsorption was investigated. It was shown that the resin possesses better selectivity, stability and higher capacity. It can be effectively used to recovery uranium from leach liquors of uranium ores containing more chlorides

  10. Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Concentration on Resin Adhesion to a Feldspathic Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Andressa Borin; Prochnow, Catina; Rambo, Dagma; Gundel, Andre; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of different concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) on the contact angle and the resin bond strength durability to feldspathic ceramic. To evaluate the contact angles of distilled water on etched feldspathic ceramic, 25 specimens (12×10×2.4 mm) of VitaBlocks Mark II were used, divided into 5 groups (n=5): one unconditioned control (UC) group with no ceramic surface treatment, and 4 other groups that were etched for 60 s with different concentrations of HF: 1% (HF1), 3% (HF3), 5% (HF5) and 10% (HF10). The bond testing utilized 40 ceramic blocks (12×10×4 mm) that were fabricated and subjected to the same surface treatments as previously mentioned (excluding the control). The etched surfaces were silanized and resin cement was applied. After 24 h, the blocks were sectioned to produce bar specimens that were divided into two groups, non-aged (immediate testing) and aged (storage for 230 days+12,000 thermocycles at 5°C and 55°C), and subjected to microtensile testing (μTBS). Micromorphogical analysis of the treated surfaces was also performed (atomic force and scanning electron microscopy). One-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests were applied for data analysis. UC had the highest contact angle (61.4°), whereas HF10 showed the lowest contact angle (17.5°). In non-aged conditions, different acids promoted statistically similar bond strengths (14.2 to 15.7 MPa) (p>0.05); in terms of bond durability, only the bond strength of the HF1 group presented a statistically significant decrease comparing before and after aging (14.5 to 10.2 MPa). When etched with 3%, 5%, or 10% hydrofluoric acid, the ceramic tested showed stable resin adhesion after long-term aging.

  11. Adsorption behavior of benzenesulfonic acid by novel weakly basic anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Zuo, Peng; Luo, Junfen; Singh, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-04-01

    Two novel weakly basic anion exchange resins (SZ-1 and SZ-2) were prepared via the reaction of macroporous chloromethylated polystyrene-divinylbenzene (Cl-PS-DVB) beads with dicyclohexylamine and piperidine, respectively. The physicochemical structures of the resulting resins were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and pore size distribution analysis. The adsorption behavior of SZ-1 and SZ-2 for benzenesulfonic acid (BA) was evaluated, and the common commercial weakly basic anion exchanger D301 was also employed for comparison purpose. Adsorption isotherms and influence of solution pH, temperature and coexisting competitive inorganic salts (Na 2 SO 4 and NaCl) on adsorption behavior were investigated and the optimum desorption agent was obtained. Adsorption isotherms of BA were found to be well represented by the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters involving ΔH, ΔG and ΔS were also calculated and the results indicate that adsorption is an exothermic and spontaneous process. Enhanced selectivity of BA sorption over sulfate on the two novel resins was observed by comparison with the commercial anion exchanger D301. The fact that the tested resins loaded with BA can be efficiently regenerated by NaCl solution indicates the reversible sorption process. From a mechanistic viewpoint, this observation clearly suggests that electrostatic interaction is the predominant adsorption mechanism. Furthermore, results of column tests show that SZ-1 possesses a better adsorption property than D301, which reinforces the feasibility of SZ-1 for potential industrial application. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. HTGR fuel development: loading of uranium on carboxylic acid cation-exchange resins using solvent extraction of nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1975-09-01

    The reference fuel kernel for recycle of 233 U to HTGR's (High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors) is prepared by loading carboxylic acid cation-exchange resins with uranium and carbonizing at controlled conditions. The purified 233 UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 solution from a fuel reprocessing plant contains excess HNO 3 (NO 3 - /U ratio of approximately 2.2). The reference flowsheet for a 233 U recycle fuel facility at Oak Ridge uses solvent extraction of nitrate by a 0.3 M secondary amine in a hydrocarbon diluent to prepare acid-deficient uranyl nitrate. This nitrate extraction, along with resin loading and amine regeneration steps, was demonstrated in 14 runs. No significant operating difficulties were encountered. The process is controlled via in-line pH measurements for the acid-deficient uranyl nitrate solutions. Information was developed on pH values for uranyl nitrate solution vs NO 3 - /U mole ratios, resin loading kinetics, resin drying requirements, and other resin loading process parameters. Calculations made to estimate the capacities of equipment that is geometrically safe with respect to control of nuclear criticality indicate 100 kg/day or more of uranium for single nitrate extraction lines with one continuous resin loading contactor or four batch loading contactors. (auth)

  13. Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Hybrid and Nano-hybrid Resin Composites after Ageing under Acidic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferooz M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Tooth-coloured restorative materials are brittle with the major shortcomings of sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been studied, no fracture toughness test data for nano-hybrid composites under acidic condition for a long period of time has been published. Objectives: To compare the fracture toughness (KIc of two types of resin composites under tensile loading and to assess the effect of distilled water and lactic acid on the resistance of the restoratives to fracture after three months of immersion. Materials and Methods: Four resin composites were used: three nanohybrids [EsteliteSigma Quick (Kuraray, Luna (SDI, Paradigm (3M/ESPE] and one hybrid, Rok (SDI. The specimens were prepared using a custom-made polytetrafluorethylene split mould, stored in distilled water (pH 6.8 or 0.01mol/L lactic acid (pH 4 and conditioned at 37°C for 24 hours, 1 or 3 months. They were loaded under tensile stress using a universal testing machine; the maximum load (N to the specimen failure was recorded and the fracture toughness (KIc was calculated. Data were analysed by ANOVA and Tukey’s test using SPSS, version 18. Results: The results of two-way ANOVA did not show a significant combined effect of material, time, and storage medium on fracture toughness (p= 0.056. However, there was a strong interaction between materials and time (p=0.001 when the storage medium were ignored. After 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Paradigm revealed the highest KIc values followed by Rok, Luna and Estelite. Immersion in either distilled water or lactic acid significantly decreased the fracture toughness of almost all materials as time interval increased. Conclusions: Paradigm showed the highest fracture toughness followed by Rok, Luna and Estelite respectively. As time increased, KIc significantly decreased for almost all resin composites except for Luna which showed a slight decrease

  14. Affinity purification of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel from electroplax with resins selective for sialic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, W.M.; Emerick, M.C.; Agnew, W.S. (Yale Univ. School of medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1989-07-11

    The voltage-sensitive sodium channel present in the eel (Electrophorus electricus) has an unusually high content of sialic acid, including {alpha}-(2{yields}8)-linked polysialic acid, not found in other electroplax membrane glycopeptides. Lectins from Limax flavus (LFA) and wheat germ (WGA) proved the most effective of 11 lectin resins tried. The most selective resin was prepared from IgM antibodies against Neisseria meningitidis {alpha}-(2{yields}8)-polysialic acid which were affinity purified and coupled to Sepharose 4B. The sodium channel was found to bind to WGA, LFA, and IgM resins and was readily eluted with the appropriate soluble carbohydrates. Experiments with LFA and IgM resins demonstrated binding and unbinding rates and displacement kinetics, which suggest highly specific binding at multiple sites on the sodium channel protein. In preparative-scale purification of protein previously fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography, without stabilizing TTX, high yields were reproducibly obtained. Further, when detergent extracts were prepared from electroplax membranes fractionated by low-speed sedimentation, a single step over the IgM resin provided a 70-fold purification, yielding specific activities of 3,200 pmol of ({sup 3}H)TTX-binding sites/mg of protein and a single polypeptide of {approximately}285,000 Da on SDS-acrylamide gels. No small peptides were observed after this 5-h isolation. The authors describe a cation-dependent stabilization with millimolar levels of monovalent and micromolar levels of divalent species.

  15. Influence of ozone and paracetic acid disinfection on adhesion of resilient liners to acrylic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of paracetic acid (PAA) and ozone disinfection on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of silicone-based resilient liners to acrylic resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS One hundred and twenty dumbbell shaped heat-polymerized acrylic resins were prepared. From the mid segment of the specimens, 3 mm of acrylic were grinded off and separated parts were reattached by resilient liners. The specimens were divided into 2 control (control1, control7) and 4 test groups of PAA and ozone disinfection (PAA1, PAA7, ozone1 and ozone7; n=10). While control groups were immersed in distilled water for 10 min (control1) and 7 days (control7), test groups were subjected to PAA (16 g/L) or ozone rich water (4 mg/L) for 1 cycle (10 min for PAA and 60 min for ozone) per day for 7 days prior to tensile tests. Measurements of the TBS were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. RESULTS Adhesive strength of Mollosil decreased significantly by application of ozone disinfection. PAA disinfection had no negative effect on the TBS values of Mollosil and Molloplast B to acrylic resin. Single application of ozone disinfection did not have any negative effect on TBS values of Molloplast B, but prolonged exposure to ozone decreased its adhesive strength. CONCLUSION The adhesion of resilient liners to acrylic was not adversely affected by PAA disinfection. Immersion in ozonated water significantly decreased TBS of Mollosil. Prolonged exposure to ozone negatively affects adhesion of Molloplast B to denture base materials. PMID:27555898

  16. Stability of two resin combinations used as sealants against toothbrush abrasion and acid challenge in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkiner, Enver; Wegehaupt, Florian Just; Attin, Rengin; Wiegand, Annette; Attin, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    To test the stability of two conventional adhesives when combined with a low-viscosity caries infiltrant used for sealing sound enamel against toothbrush abrasion and acid challenge in vitro. Bovine enamel discs (Ø = 3 mm) randomly assigned to three groups (n = 10/group) were etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s and treated with resins of different monomer contents forming three test groups: (1) Untreated specimens (Control); (2) Infiltrant (Icon, DMG) + conventional enamel bonding adhesive (Heliobond, Ivoclar Vivadent); and (3) Infiltrant + conventional orthodontic adhesive (Transbond XT Primer, 3M Unitek). All specimens were immersed in hydrochloric acid (pH 2.6) for up to 9 days, during which they were exposed to 1825 toothbrush-strokes per day. Calcium dissolution was assessed using Arsenazo III method at 24-h intervals. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. Cumulative calcium dissolution for the untreated specimens (39.75 ± 7.32 μmol/ml) exceeded the sealed groups (Icon + Heliobond: 23.44 ± 7.03 μmol/ml; Icon + Transbond XT Primer: 22.17 ± 5.34 μmol/ml). Untreated specimens presented a relatively constant calcium dissolution rate throughout the experimental period, whereas the sealed groups presented a gradual increase indicating weakening of the seal by toothbrush abrasion. Both sealed groups presented significantly lower daily calcium dissolution at all time points compared to the control, except for Group 2 on the last measurement day. Low-viscosity caries infiltrant application on sound enamel prior to conventional resin application provided a protective effect against enamel demineralization, but this effect was not stable when challenged mechanically by toothbrush abrasion.

  17. Ion-exchange Resin Catalyzed Esterification of Lactic Acid with Isopropanol: a Kinetic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit P. Toor

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic behavior of esterification of lactic acid with isopropanol over an acidic cation exchange resin, Amberlyst 15, was studied under isothermal condition. Isopropyl lactate synthesized in this reaction is an important pharmaceutical intermediate. The experiments were carried out in a stirred batch reactor in the temperature range of 323.15 to 353.15 K. The effect of various parameters such as temperature, molar ratio and catalyst loading was studied. Variation in parameters on rate of reaction demonstrated that the reaction was intrinsically controlled. Kinetic modeling was performed using Eley-Rideal model which acceptably fits the experimental data. The activation energy was found to be 22.007 kJ/mol and frequency factor was 0.036809 l2 g-1 mol-1 min-1 for forward reaction. The value of entropy for the forward reaction was found to be 182.317 J K-1 mol-1 . © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 19th January 2011, Revised: 16th March 2011; Accepted: 16th March 2011[How to Cite: A.P. Toor, M. Sharma, S. Thakur, and R. K. Wanchoo. (2011. Ion-exchange Resin Catalyzed Esterification of Lactic Acid with Isopropanol: a Kinetic Study. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 6(1: 39-45. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.791.39-45][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.791.39-45 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/791 ] | View in  

  18. Novel bioactive polyester scaffolds prepared from unsaturated resins based on isosorbide and succinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Śmiga-Matuszowicz, Monika, E-mail: monika.smiga-matuszowicz@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Physical Chemistry and Technology of Polymers, M. Strzody Street 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Janicki, Bartosz; Jaszcz, Katarzyna; Łukaszczyk, Jan [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Physical Chemistry and Technology of Polymers, M. Strzody Street 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Kaczmarek, Marcin [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Biomaterials and Medical Devices Engineering, de Gaulle' a Street 66, 41-800 Zabrze (Poland); Lesiak, Marta; Sieroń, Aleksander L. [Medical University of Silesia, Department of General and Molecular Biology and Genetics, Medyków Street 18, 40-752 Katowice (Poland); Simka, Wojciech [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Technology and Fuels, B. Krzywoustego Street 6, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Mierzwiński, Maciej; Kusz, Damian [Medical University of Silesia, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Ziołowa Street 45, 40-635 Katowice (Poland)

    2014-12-01

    In this study new biodegradable materials obtained by crosslinking poly(3-allyloxy-1,2-propylene succinate) (PSAGE) with oligo(isosorbide maleate) (OMIS) and small amount of methyl methacrylate were investigated. The porous scaffolds were obtained in the presence of a foaming system consisted of calcium carbonate/carboxylic acid mixture, creating in situ porous structure during crosslinking of liquid formulations. The maximum crosslinking temperature and setting time, the cured porous materials morphology as well as the effect of their porosity on mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation process were evaluated. It was found that the kind of carboxylic acid used in the foaming system influenced compressive strength and compressive modulus of porous scaffolds. The MTS cytotoxicity assay was carried out for OMIS using hFOB1.19 cell line. OMIS resin was found to be non-toxic in wide range of concentrations. On the ground of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and energy X-ray dispersive analysis (EDX) it was found that hydroxyapatite (HA) formation at the scaffolds surfaces within short period of soaking in phosphate buffer solution occurs. After 3 h immersion a compact layer of HA was observed at the surface of the samples. The obtained results suggest potential applicability of resulted new porous crosslinked polymeric materials as temporary bone void fillers. - Highlights: • Isosorbide-based resin was used as a component of biodegradable scaffolds. • CAC/carboxylic acid system was proven as facile method to obtain porous scaffolds. • Porous scaffolds displayed the formation of hydroxyapatite at their surfaces.

  19. Impact of pH and application time of meta-phosphoric acid on resin-enamel and resin-dentin bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, A F M; Siqueira, F S F; Bandeca, M C; Costa, S O; Lemos, M V S; Feitora, V P; Reis, A; Loguercio, A D; Gomes, J C

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the immediate microshear resin-enamel bond strength (μSBS) and the immediate and 6-month microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage (NL) of the adhesive interface performed by different pHs of 40% meta-phosphoric acid (MPA) were compared with conventional 37% ortho-phosphoric acid (OPA) under different application times. Additionally, the enamel etching patterns were evaluated and the chemical/morphological changes induced by these differents groups were evaluated. One hundred and ninety-eight extracted human molars were randomly assigned into experimental groups according to the combination of independent variables: Acid [37% ortho-phosphoric acid (OPA), 40% meta-phosphoric acid (MPA) at pHs of: 0.5, 1 and 2] and Application Time [7, 15 and 30s]. Enamel-bond specimens were prepared and tested under μSBS. Resin-dentin beams were tested under μTBS tested immediately or after 6-months of water storage. Nanoleakage was evaluated using bonded-beams of each tooth/time-period. Enamel etching pattern and chemical and ultra-morphology analyses were also performed. The μSBS (MPa) data were subjected to a two-way repeated measures ANOVA (Acid vs. Application time). For μTBS, Acid vs application time vs storage time data were subjected to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). MPA pH 0.5 showed μTBS similar to OPA, independently of the application time on enamel (p>0.05) or dentin (p>0.05). OPA provided higher nanoleakage values than MPA (p = 0.003). Significant decreases in TBS and increases in NL were only observed for OPA after 6 months (p = 0.001). An increase in the application time resulted in a more pronounced etching pattern for MPA. Chemical analysis showed that dentin demineralized by MPA depicted peaks of brushite and octacalcium phosphate. MPA exposed less collagen than OPA. However, optimal results for MPA were dependent on pH/application time. The use of 40% meta-phosphoric acid with a pH of 0.5 is an alternative acid

  20. SOLVENT EFFECTS IN THE LIQUID-PHASE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A MACROPOROUS STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1992-01-01

    The liquid-phase hydration of cyclohexene, a pseudo first order reversible reaction catalyzed by a strong acid ion exchange resin, macroporous Amberlite XE 307, was investigated in solvent mixtures of water and sulfolane. A decrease by a factor of 3 and 6 is observed in the experimentally measured

  1. Selective recovery of a pyridine derivative from an aqueous waste stream containing acetic acid and succinonitrile with solvent impregnated resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, J.; Visser, T.J.; Schuur, Boelo; de Haan, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Solvent impregnated resins (SIRs) were evaluated for the recovery of pyridine derivatives from an aqueous waste-stream containing also acetic acid and succinonitrile. For this purpose, a new solvent was developed, synthesized and impregnated in Amberlite XAD4. Sorption studies were used to determine

  2. Effect of Repeated Acid Challenges on the Color Stability of Resin-Infiltrated Enamel White Spot Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    seen in patients with xerostomia, poor oral hygiene, cariogenic diet, eating disorders , and orthodontic patients where bonded brackets provide... Effect of Repeated Acid Challenges on the Color Stability of Resin- Infiltrated Enamel White Spot Lesions by Robert A. Lummis...Jr. Lieutenant Commander, Dental Corps United States Public Health Service A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Comprehensive

  3. Uranium loss from BISO-coated weak-acid-resin HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, R.L.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1977-02-01

    Recycle fuel for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contains a weak-acid-resin (WAR) kernel, which consists of a mixture of UC 2 , UO 2 , and free carbon. At 1900 0 C, BISO-coated WAR UC 2 or UC 2 -UO 2 kernels lose a significant portion of their uranium in several hundred hours. The UC 2 decomposes and uranium diffuses through the pyrolytic coating. The rate of escape of the uranium is dependent on the temperature and the surface area of the UC 2 , but not on a temperature gradient. The apparent activation energy for uranium loss, ΔH, is approximately 90 kcal/mole. Calculations indicate that uranium loss from the kernel would be insignificant under conditions to be expected in an HTGR

  4. Low pressure process for continuous fiber reinforced polyamic acid resin matrix composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druyun, Darleen A. (Inventor); Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Kidder, Paul W. (Inventor); Reddy, Rakasi M. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A low pressure processor was developed for preparing a well-consolidated polyimide composite laminate. Prepreg plies were formed from unidirectional fibers and a polyamic acid resin solution. Molding stops were placed at the sides of a matched metal die mold. The prepreg plies were cut shorter than the length of the mold in the in-plane lateral direction and were stacked between the molding stops to a height which was higher than the molding stops. The plies were then compressed to the height of the stops and heated to allow the volatiles to escape and to start the imidization reaction. After removing the stops from the mold, the heat was increased and 0 - 500 psi was applied to complete the imidization reaction. The heat and pressure were further increased to form a consolidated polyimide composite laminate.

  5. Selective Adsorption of Ag+ on a New Cyanuric-Thiosemicarbazide Chelating Resin with High Capacity from Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Lin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A new cyanuric-thiosemicarbazid (TSC-CC chelating resin was synthesized and employed to selectively adsorb Ag+ from acid solutions. The effects of acid concentration, initial concentration of Ag+, contact time and coexisting ions were investigated. The optimal acid concentration was 0.5 mol/L. The adsorption capacity of Ag+ reached 872.63 mg/g at acid concentration of 0.5 mol/L. The adsorption isotherm was fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model and the kinetic data preferably followed the pseudo-second order model. The chelating resin showed a good selectivity for the Ag+ adsorption from acid solutions. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were used to study the adsorption mechanism. The chelating and ionic interaction was mainly adsorption mechanism. The adsorbent presents a great potential in selective recovery Ag+ from acid solutions due to the advantage of high adsorption capacity and adapting strongly acidic condition. The recyclability indicated that the (TSC-CC resin had a good stability and can be recycled as a promising agent for removal of Ag+.

  6. Improvement of epoxy resin properties by incorporation of TiO2 nanoparticles surface modified with gallic acid esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radoman, Tijana S.; Džunuzović, Jasna V.; Jeremić, Katarina B.; Grgur, Branimir N.; Miličević, Dejan S.; Popović, Ivanka G.; Džunuzović, Enis S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanocomposites of epoxy resin and TiO 2 nanoparticles surface modified with gallates. • The T g of epoxy resin was increased by incorporation of surface modified TiO 2 . • WVTR of epoxy resin decreased in the presence of surface modified TiO 2 nanoparticles. • WVTR of nanocomposites was reduced with increasing gallates hydrophobic chain length. • Modified TiO 2 nanoparticles react as oxygen scavengers, inhibiting steel corrosion. - Abstract: Epoxy resin/titanium dioxide (epoxy/TiO 2 ) nanocomposites were obtained by incorporation of TiO 2 nanoparticles surface modified with gallic acid esters in epoxy resin. TiO 2 nanoparticles were obtained by acid catalyzed hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide and their structural characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Three gallic acid esters, having different hydrophobic part, were used for surface modification of the synthesized TiO 2 nanoparticles: propyl, hexyl and lauryl gallate. The gallate chemisorption onto surface of TiO 2 nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, while the amount of surface-bonded gallates was determined using thermogravimetric analysis. The influence of the surface modified TiO 2 nanoparticles, as well as the length of hydrophobic part of the gallate used for surface modification of TiO 2 nanoparticles, on glass transition temperature, barrier, dielectric and anticorrosive properties of epoxy resin was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, water vapor transmission test, dielectric spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization measurements. Incorporation of surface modified TiO 2 nanoparticles in epoxy resin caused increase of glass transition temperature and decrease of the water vapor permeability of epoxy resin. The water vapor transmission rate of epoxy/TiO 2 nanocomposites was reduced with increasing hydrophobic part chain length of

  7. Influence of hydrofluoric acid on extraction of thorium using a commercially available extraction chromatographic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada-Fujiwara, Asako; Hoshi, Akiko; Kameo, Yutaka; Nakashima, Mikio

    2009-05-01

    The dependence of Th recovery on hydrofluoric acid (HF) concentration in nitric acid (HNO(3)) solutions (1-5 mol/dm(3)) containing 1x10(-6) mol/dm(3) of Th and various concentrations of HF and the elution behavior were studied using a commercially available UTEVA (for uranium and tetravalent actinide) resin column. Thorium recovery decreased with an increase in HF concentration in the sample solutions. The concentration of HF at which Th recovery started to decrease was approximately 1x10(-4) mol/dm(3) in 1 mol/dm(3) HNO(3) solution, approximately 1x10(-3) mol/dm(3) in 3 mol/dm(3) HNO(3) solution, and approximately 1x10(-2) mol/dm(3) in 5 mol/dm(3) HNO(3) solution. When Al(NO(3))(3) (0.2 mol/dm(3)) or Fe(NO(3))(3) (0.6 mol/dm(3)) was added as a masking agent for F(-) to the Th solution containing 1x10(-1) mol/dm(3) HF and 1 mol/dm(3) HNO(3), Th recovery improved from 1.4+/-0.3% to 95+/-5% or 93+/-3%. Effective extraction of Th using UTEVA resin was achieved by selecting the concentration of HNO(3) and/or adding masking agents such as Al(NO(3))(3) according to the concentration of HF in the sample solution.

  8. Maleopimaric acid acetic acid solvate

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Yong-hong; Guo, Xiao-xin; Hu, Li-hong

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, C24H32O5·C2H4O2, is a derivative of abietic acid. The two fused and unbridged cyclohexane rings have chair conformations and the anhydride ring is planar. Of the other three six-membered rings, two have boat conformations and one has a twist-boat conformation. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  9. Releasing Pattern of Applied Phosphorus and Distribution Change of Phosphorus Fractions in the Acid Upland Soils with Successive Resin Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Hartono

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The releasing pattern of applied P in the acid upland soils and the soil properties influencing the pattern were studied. Surface horizons of six acid upland soils from Sumatra, Java and Kalimantan were used in this study. The releasing pattern of applied P (300 mg P kg-1 of these soils were studied by successive resin extraction. P fractionation was conducted to evaluate which fractions released P to the soil solution after successive resin extraction. The cumulative of resin-Pinorganic (Pi release of soils was fitted to the first order kinetic. Regression analyses using factor scores obtained from the previous principal components analyses was applied to determine soil properties influencing P releasing pattern. The results suggested that the maximum P release was significantly (P < 0.05 increased by acidity plus 1.4 nm mineral-related factor (PC2 i.e. exchangeable Al and 1.4 nm minerals (smectite and vermiculite and decreased by oxide related factor (PC1 i.e. aluminum (Al plus 1/2 iron (Fe (by ammonium oxalate, crystalline Al and Fe oxides, cation exchange capacity, and clay content. P fractionation analysis after successive resin extraction showed that both labile and less labile in the form of NaHCO3-Pi and NaOH-Pi fractions, respectively, can be transformed into resin-Pi when in the most labile resin-Pi is depleted. Most of P released in high oxides soils were from NaOH-Pi fraction while in low oxides soils were from NaHCO3-Pi. P release from the former fraction resulted in the maximum P release lower than that of the latter one. When NaHCO3-Pi was high, NaOH-Pi was relatively more stable than NaHCO3-Pi despite resin-Pi removal. NaHCO3-Pi and NaOH-Pi are very important P fractions in replenishing resin-Pi in these acid upland soils.

  10. Biogenic glutamic acid-based resin: Its synthesis and application in the removal of cobalt(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamiu, Zakariyah A; Saleh, Tawfik A; Ali, Shaikh A

    2017-04-05

    Inexpensive biogenic glutamic acid has been utilized to synthesize a cross-linked dianionic polyelectrolyte (CDAP) containing metal chelating ligands. Cycloterpolymerization, using azoisobutyronitrile as an initiator, of N,N-diallylglutamic acid hydrochloride, sulfur dioxide and a cross-linker afforded a pH-responsive cross-linked polyzwitterionic acid (CPZA) which upon basification with NaOH was converted into CDAP. The new resin, characterized by a multitude of spectroscopic techniques as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses, was evaluated for the removal of Co(II) as a model case under different conditions. The adsorption capacity of 137mgg -1 does indeed make the resin as one of the most effective sorbents in recent times. The resin leverages its cheap natural source and ease of regeneration in combination with its high and fast uptake capacities to offer a great promise for wastewater treatment. The resin has demonstrated remarkable efficiency in removing toxic metal ions including arsenic from a wastewater sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fabrication of micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin on aluminum by AFM probe processing and electrophoretic coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Sakairi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)], E-mail: takahasi@elechem1-mc.eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2008-11-30

    Micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin were fabricated on aluminum by anodizing, atomic force microscope (AFM) probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition. Barrier type anodic oxide films of 15 nm thickness were formed on aluminum and then the specimen was scratched with an AFM probe in a solution containing acrylic acid/melamine resin nano-particles to remove the anodic oxide film locally. After scratching, the specimen was anodically polarized to deposit acrylic acid/melamine resin electrophoretically at the film-removed area. The resin deposited on the specimen was finally cured by heating. It was found that scratching with the AFM probe on open circuit leads to the contamination of the probe with resin, due to positive shifts in the potential during scratching. Scratching of the specimen under potentiostatic conditions at -1.0 V, however, resulted in successful resin deposition at the film-removed area without probe contamination. The rate of resin deposition increased as the specimen potential becomes more positive during electrophoretic deposition. Arrays of resin dots with a few to several tens {mu}m diameter and 100-1000 nm height, and resin walls with 100-1000 nm height and 1 {mu}m width were obtained on specimens by successive anodizing, probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition.

  12. Characterization of hydroxybenzoic acid chelating resins: equilibrium, kinetics, and isotherm profiles for Cd(II and Pb(II uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BHAVNA A. SHAH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chelating ion-exchange resins were synthesized by polycondensation of ortho/para hydroxybenzoic acid with resorcinol/catechol employing formaldehyde as cross-linking agent at 80±5 °C in DMF. The resins were characterized by FTIR and XRD. The uptake behaviour of synthesized resins for Cd(II and Pb(II ions have been studied depending on contact time, pH, metal ion concentration and temperature. The sorption data obtained at optimized conditions were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Experimental data of all metal–resin system were best represented by the Freundlich isotherm. The maximum obtained sorption capacity for cadmium was 69.53 mg g-1 and 169.32 mg g-1 for Lead. The adsorption process follows first order kinetics and the specific rate constant Kr was obtained by the application of the Lagergan equation. Thermodynamic parameters ∆Gads, ∆Sads and ∆Hads were calculated for the metal–resin systems. The external diffusion rate constant (KS and the intra-particle diffusion rate constant (Kid were calculated by the Spahn–Schlunder and Weber–Morris models, respectively. The sorption process was found to follow an intra-particle diffusion phenomenon.

  13. Separation of Technetium in Nitric Acid Solution With an Extractant Impregnated Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jei Kwon Moon; Eil Hee Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Byung Chul Lee

    2006-01-01

    An extractant impregnated resin (EIR) was prepared by impregnation of Aliquat 336 into Amberlite XAD-4 for separation of technetium from rhodium in nitric acid solution. The prepared EIR showed high preference for rhenium (chemical analogue of technetium) over rhodium. The adsorption isotherms for rhenium were described well by Langmuir equation in both the single and multi-component systems. Maximum adsorption capacities obtained by modelling the isotherms of rhenium were 2.01 meq g -1 and 1.97 meq g -1 for the single and the multi-component systems, respectively. Column tests were also performed to confirm the separation efficiency of rhenium using a jacketed glass column (diam. 11 x L 150). The EIR column showed successful separation of rhenium with the breakthrough volume of about 122 BV for the breakthrough concentration of 0.08. Also the breakthrough data were modelled successfully by assuming a homogeneous diffusion model in the particle phase. The diffusivities obtained from the modelling were in the order of 10 -7 cm 2 min -1 for a rhenium. The rhenium adsorbed on the bed could be eluted with a high purity by using a nitric acid solution. (authors)

  14. Surface Engineering of PAMAM-SDB Chelating Resin with Diglycolamic Acid (DGA) Functional Group for Efficient Sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) from Aqueous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaiyaraja, P.; Venkatraman, B., E-mail: chemila07@gmail.com [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Deb, A.K. Singha [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Ponraju, D. [Safety Engineering Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Ali, Sk. Musharaf [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A new DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin has been synthesized for actinide sorption. • Maximum sorption capacities of resin are 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1}for U(VI) and Th(IV). • DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin could be regenerated and reused. • DFT calculation of actinides interaction with resin corroborates the experimental. • Resin is effective for sorption of actinides from both aqueous and HNO{sub 3} medium. - Abstract: A novel chelating resin obtained via growth of PAMAM dendron on surface of styrene divinyl benzene resin beads, followed by diglycolamic acid functionalization of the dendrimer terminal. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, nitric acid concentration, amount of adsorbent, shaking time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption efficiency. Diglycolamic acid terminated PAMAM dendrimer functionalized styrene divinylbenzene chelating resin (DGA-PAMAM-SDB) is found to be an efficient candidate for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions from aqueous (pH > 4) and nitric acid media (> 3 M). The sorption equilibrium could be reached within 60 min, and the experimental data fits with pseudo-second-order model. Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with sorption equilibrium data. The maximum U(VI) and Th(IV) sorption capacity onto DGA-PAMAMG{sub 5}-SDB was estimated to be about 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1} respectively at 25 °C. The interaction of actinides and chelating resin is reversible and hence, the resin can be regenerated and reused. DFT calculation on the interaction of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions with chelating resin validates the experimental findings.

  15. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, M.; Brzostowski, A.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt was made to decrease the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin, taking place during radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified with cinnamic and acrylic acids. A composition of 90 parts of polyester resin, 10 parts of epoxy resin modified with cinnamic acid, and 150 parts of a silica filler showed a volume shrinkage of 1.2%. (author)

  16. Distribution of 14 elements from two solutions simulating Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY (acid-dissolved sludge and acidified supernate) on four cation exchange resins and five anion exchange resins having different functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated a series of cation exchange and anion exchange resins for their ability to remove hazardous components from radioactive high-level waste (HLW). The anion exchangers were Reillex TM HPQ, a polyvinyl pyridine resin, and four strong-base polystyrene resins having trimethyl, tri ethyl, tri propyl, and tributyl amine as their respective functional groups. The cation exchange resins included Amberlyst TM 15 and Amberlyst tM XN-1010 with sulfonic acid functionality, Duolite TM C-467 with phosphonic acid functionality, and poly functional Diphonix TM with di phosphonic acid, sulfonic acid, and carboxylic acid functionalities. We measured the distributions of 14 elements on these resins from solutions simulating acid-dissolved sludge (pH 0.6) and acidified supernate (pH 3.5) from underground storage tank 102-SY at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, USA. To these simulants, we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U, Pu, and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr). For each of the 252 element/resin/solution combinations, distribution coefficients (Kds) were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 minutes, 2 hours, and 6 hours to obtain information about sorption kinetics from these complex media. Because we measured the sorption of many different elements, the tabulated results indicate which unwanted elements are most likely to interfere with the sorption of elements of special interest. On the basis of these 756 measured Kd values, we conclude that some of the tested resins appear suitable for partitioning hazardous components from Hanford HLW. (author). 10 refs., 11 tabs

  17. SEPARATION AND PRECONCENTRATION OF COPPER (II ION BY FATTY HYDROXAMIC ACIDS IMMOBILIZED ONTO AMBERLITE XAD – 4 RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Suhendra

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A method of copper (II ion preconcentration and separation from other ions by using a column containing fatty hydroxamic acids - loaded Amberlite XAD 4 resin (FHA-Amb is described. Several factors, which affect the separation and preconcentration efficiency such as pH, sample volume, and concentration of eluent and flow rate, have been investigated.  A quantitative recovery of copper (II ion from FHA-Amb resin column was obtained using 10% HNO3 solutions as eluent with a preconcentration factor of 60. A method for separation of Cu(II from Zn(II and Cd(II is proposed.  A rapid sample throughput, a clean separation, a high preconcentration factor and simplicity are the main advantages in these analytical procedures.   Keywords: extraction, preconcentration, fatty hydroxamic acid, copper (ii ion, amberlite XAD-4

  18. Efficient in situ separation and production of L-lactic acid by Bacillus coagulans using weak basic anion-exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yitong; Qian, Zijun; Liu, Peng; Liu, Lei; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Ouyang, Jia

    2018-02-01

    To get rid of the dependence on lactic acid neutralizer, a simple and economical approach for efficient in situ separation and production of L-lactic acid was established by Bacillus coagulans using weak basic anion-exchange resin. During ten tested resins, the 335 weak basic anion-exchange resins demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity and selectivity for lactic acid recovery. The adsorption study of the 335 resins for lactic acid confirmed that it is an efficient adsorbent under fermentation condition. Langmuir models gave a good fit to the equilibrium data at 50 °C and the maximum adsorption capacity for lactic acid by 335 resins was about 402 mg/g. Adsorption kinetic experiments showed that pseudo-second-order kinetics model gave a good fit to the adsorption rate. When it was used for in situ fermentation, the yield of L-lactic acid by B. coagulans CC17 was close to traditional fermentation and still maintained at about 82% even after reuse by ten times. These results indicated that in situ separation and production of L-lactic acid using the 335 resins were efficient and feasible. This process could greatly reduce the dosage of neutralizing agent and potentially be used in industry.

  19. Gas chromatographic determination of organic acids from fruit juices by combined resin mediated methylation and extraction in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, T J; Croft, M Y; Murby, E J; Wells, R J

    1997-10-17

    A procedure in which anionic analytes, trapped on ion exchange resin, are simultaneously methylated and released using methyl iodide in either supercritical carbon dioxide or acetonitrile has been extended to polyfunctional organic acids. The combined SFE methylation of fruit juice acids trapped onto ion exchange resin proceeds in good yield producing the methyl esters of fumaric, succinic, malic, tartaric, isocitric and citric acids which are readily separated by GC. Using this procedure low concentrations of one acid can be detected and quantitated in the presence of very high concentrations of another. This new method detects tartaric acid at levels of 10 ppm in juices containing 10,000 ppm citric acid. Quantitation was performed either by using GC-FID with triethyl citrate or diethyl tartrate as internal standards or with the element specific calibration capability of the GC-AED. A simple new technique for the determination of citric/isocitric acid ratio is now available. Also, in contrast to HPLC methods, the identity of an analyte is readily confirmed by GC-MS.

  20. [Effect of hydrofluoric acid concentration on the surface morphology and bonding effectiveness of lithium disilicate glass ceramics to resin composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailan, Qian; Lingyan, Ren; Rongrong, Nie; Xiangfeng, Meng

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed at determining the influence of hydrofluoric acid (HF) in varied concentrations on the surface morphology of lithium disilicate glass ceramics and bond durability between resin composites and post-treated lithium disilicate glass ceramics. After being sintered, ground, and washed, 72 as-prepared specimens of lithium disilicate glass ceramics with dimensions of 11 mm×13 mm×2 mm were randomly divided into three groups. Each group was treated with acid solution [32% phosphoric acid (PA) or 4% or 9.5% HF] for 20 s. Then, four acidified specimens from each group were randomly selected. One of the specimens was used to observe the surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy, and the others were used to observe the surface roughness using a surface roughness meter (including Ra, Rz, and Rmax). After treatment with different acid solutions in each group, 20 samples were further treated with silane coupling agent/resin adhesive/resin cement (Monobond S/Multilink Primer A&B/Multilink N), followed by bonding to a composite resin column (Filtek™ Z350) with a diameter of 3 mm. A total of 20 specimens in each group were randomly divided into two subgroups, which were used for measuring the microshear bond strength, with one of them subjected to cool-thermal cycle for 20 000 times. The surface roughness (Ra, Rz, and Rmax) of lithium disilicate glass ceramics treated with 4% or 9.5% HF was significantly higher than that of the ceramic treated with PA (Pglass ceramics treated with 9.5% HF also demonstrated better surface roughness (Rz and Rmax) than that of the ceramics treated with 4% HF. Cool-thermal cycle treatment reduced the bond strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramics in all groups (Pglass ceramics treated with HF had higher bond strength than that of the ceramics treated with PA. The lithium disilicate glass ceramics treated with 4% HF had higher bond strength than that of the ceramics treated with 9.5% HF (Pglass ceramics treated with 4

  1. Adsorption characteristics of 14C-labeled alanine, aspartic acid and adenosine triphosphate by metal-chelating resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Toshio; Matsunami, Tadao; Shibata, Setsuko; Honda, Yoshihide.

    1987-01-01

    (1) Adsorption properties of 14 C-alanine, 14 C-ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and 14 C-aspartic acid on the metal-chelating resins were determined and found that the Cu(II)-Chelex 100 and Fe(III)-Unicellex UR10, Fe(III)-Chelex 100 chelating resins were highly effective for the adsorption of 14 C-alanine and 14 C-ATP, respectively. (2) Desorption rate of 14 C-ATP from the Fe(III)-Unicellex UR10 and Fe(III)-Chelex 100 resins was somewhat higher than the case of 14 C-alanine, probably because the coordination bonds of Cu-alanine might be stronger than those of Fe-ATP. Thus, 14 C-labeled organic compounds such as 14 C-alanine and 14 C-ATP of a low activity concentration (3.7 mBq/ml) (1 x 10 -7 μCi/ml) in aqueous solution may be measured with liquid scintillation counter after pre-concentration by use of the Fe(III)- and Cu(II)-chelating resin columns. (author)

  2. Novel polysiloxane resin functionalized with dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6): Synthesis, characterization and extraction of Sr(II) in high acidity HNO3 medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Gang; Bai, Feifei; Wei, Jichao; Wang, Jianchen; Chen, Jing

    2012-07-30

    A novel kind of polysiloxane resin functionalized with dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) was synthesized through a post-modification approach. The DCH18C6 moieties bearing amino groups were firstly prepared, followed by covalent grafting to a silica precursor P-(CH(2))(3)-Cl (Where P represents a 3-dimentional polymerized silica matrix) based on nucleophilic substitution reaction. (29)Si and (13)C solid-state NMR, FT-IR, XPS, TGA, ESEM and elemental analysis were employed to systematically characterize the structure, thermal property and surface morphology of the functionalized resin. The results indicated that the DCH18C6 ligands were successfully bonded to the polysiloxane resin with a satisfactory grafting degree (33.6wt.%). Due to the robust organosilica framework and the covalent immobilization of the ligands, the functionalized resin had excellent thermal stability and acid resistance. Batch experiments showed that the resin could effectively separate Sr(II) in high acidity mediums. The distribution coefficient (K(d)) of 43.6cm(3)/g could be achieved in 5.0mol/L HNO(3) solution. The influences of contact time and acidity of HNO(3) on the resin's extraction performance were examined. The reusability and the selectivity to Sr(II) over interference ions were investigated. The DCH18C6-functionalized resin might be potentially applied for the radiostrontium removal in the high level liquid waste (HLLW). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Predicting the Viscosity of Low VOC Vinyl Ester and Fatty Acid-Based Resins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaScala, John J; Jeyarajasingam, Amutha; Winston, Cherise; Sand, James M; Palmese, Guiseppe R

    2005-01-01

    .... The viscosities of these resins were measured as a function of reactive diluent content and type, temperature, and vinyl ester molecular weight to determine the operating window for composite manufacture...

  4. [Effect of hydrofluoric acid etching time and resin bonding on the flexural strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dong-feng; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2013-08-01

    To analyze the effect of hydrofluoric acid(HFA) etching time and resin bonding on the flexural strength of IPS e.max® Press glass ceramic, and evaluate the efficacy of resin cements to seal the cracks of the etched ceramic. Two hundred and twenty-five bars (25.0 mm×3.0 mm×2.0 mm) were made from IPS e.max® Press ingots using lost-wax, hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology and randomly divided into five groups, forty-five each.In each group, the surfaces of ceramic bars were etched by 9.5% HFA gel for 0, 20, 40, 60 and 120 s respectively. Three specimens from each group were selected to observe the microstructure by the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Then each group were randomly subdivided into two subgroups (n = 20).One subgroup were coverd with a thin (approximately 0.1 mm) layer of resin cement (Variolink N), whereas the other subgroup remained unaltered.Half of the specimens were stored in 37°C water bath for 24 h and the other half went through thermocycle 10 000 times before 3-point bending test to determine their flexural strength.Interfaces between resin cement and etched ceramic were examined with FE-SEM. FE-SEM results showed that etching with HFA resulted in preferential dissolution of glass ceramic, and partially supported crystals within the glass matrix were lost with the increasing of etching time.FE-SEM indicated that resin cement sealed the cracks and defects and bonded tightly to etched ceramic surface. The mean flexural strength values of group 0, 20, 40, 60 and 120 s were (384 ± 33), (347 ± 43), (330 ± 53), (327 ± 67) , and (317 ± 41) MPa respectively. The mean flexural strength of each group except group 0 s increased significantly to (420 ± 31), (435 ± 50), (400 ± 39), and (412 ± 58) MPa respectively after the application of resin cement. Overtime HFA etching could have a wakening effect on IPS e.max® Press glass-ceramic. The application of dual-curing resin cement can compensate the strength loss of

  5. Adsorption and removal of clofibric acid and diclofenac from water with MIEX resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Chen, Juxiang; Zhang, Yansen; Wang, Qiongfang; Lu, Yuqi

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrates the use of MIEX resin as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of clofibric acid (CA) and diclofenac (DCF). The adsorption performance of CA and DCF are investigated by a batch mode in single-component or bi-component adsorption system. Various factors influencing the adsorption of CA and DCF, including initial concentration, contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial solution pH, agitation speed, natural organic matter and coexistent anions are studied. The Langmuir model can well describe CA adsorption in single-component system, while the Freundlich model gives better fitting in bi-component system. The DCF adsorption can be well fitted by the Freundlich model in both systems. Thermodynamic analyses show that the adsorption of CA and DCF is an endothermic (ΔH(o) > 0), entropy driven (ΔS(o) > 0) process and more randomness exists in the DCF adsorption process. The values of Gibbs free energy (ΔG(o)  0) for CA adsorption. The kinetic data suggest the adsorption of CA and DCF follow the pseudo-first-order model in both systems and the intra-particle is not the unique rate-limiting step. The adsorption process is controlled simultaneously by external mass transfer and surface diffusion according to the surface diffusion modified Biot number (Bis) ranging from 1.06 to 26.15. Moreover, the possible removal mechanism for CA and DCF is respectively proposed based on the ion exchange stoichiometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on composite resins containing ursolic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soohyeon; Song, Minju; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Park, Sung-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the inhibitory effect of ursolic acid (UA)-containing composites on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm. Materials and Methods Composite resins with five different concentrations (0.04, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 wt%) of UA (U6753, Sigma Aldrich) were prepared, and their flexural strengths were measured according to ISO 4049. To evaluate the effect of carbohydrate source on biofilm formation, either glucose or sucrose was used as a nutrient source, and to investigate the effect of saliva treatment, the specimen were treated with either unstimulated whole saliva or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). For biofilm assay, composite disks were transferred to S. mutans suspension and incubated for 24 hr. Afterwards, the specimens were rinsed with PBS and sonicated. The colony forming units (CFU) of the disrupted biofilm cultures were enumerated. For growth inhibition test, the composites were placed on a polystyrene well cluster, and S. mutans suspension was inoculated. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was recorded by Infinite F200 pro apparatus (TECAN). One-way ANOVA and two-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni correction were used for the data analyses. Results The flexural strength values did not show significant difference at any concentration (p > 0.01). In biofilm assay, the CFU score decreased as the concentration of UA increased. The influence of saliva pretreatment was conflicting. The sucrose groups exhibited higher CFU score than glucose group (p composite showed inhibitory effect on S. mutans biofilm formation and growth. PMID:23741708

  7. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of the efficacy of a peracetic acid-based disinfectant for decontamination of acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassot, Ana Lúcia Campani; Poisl, Maria Inês Pereira; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of a peracetic acid-based disinfectant for decontamination of heat-polymerized, chemically activated and microwave-polymerized acrylic resins. Resin plates were contaminated in vivo upon intraoral use by 10 volunteers for 7 nights and slabs were contaminated in vitro by contact with Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus. The contaminated acrylic resin specimens were immersed in a 0.2% peracetic acid-based disinfectant (Sterilife; Lifemed) for 5 min or 10 min and placed in a BHI culture medium. After incubation at 37 degrees C for 48 h, bacterial growth was assessed by analyzing turbidity of the medium. For all types of acrylic resin, no turbidity of the medium was observed for any of the resin specimens immersed in the peracetic acid-based disinfectant for either 5 or 10 min. On the other hand, the media with specimens that were not immersed in the disinfectant (control) showed turbidity in 100% of the cases, indicating the presence of microorganisms in both tested conditions. In conclusion, immersion for at least 5 min in a 0.2% peracetic acid-based disinfectant promoted high-level disinfection of heat-polymerized, chemically activated and microwave-polymerized acrylic resins contaminated with either human saliva or Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus stearothermophilus.

  8. Effects of the peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite on the colour stability and surface roughness of the denture base acrylic resins polymerised by microwave and water bath methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Flavio H C N; Orsi, Iara A; Villabona, Camilo A

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness (Ra) and color stability of acrylic resin colors (Lucitone 550, QC-20 and Vipi-Wave) used for fabricating bases for complete, removable dentures, overdentures and prosthetic protocol after immersion in chemical disinfectants (1% sodium hypochlorite and 2% peracetic acid) for 30 and 60 minutes. Sixty specimens were made of each commercial brand of resin composite, and divided into 2 groups according to the chemical disinfectants. Specimens had undergone the finishing and polishing procedures, the initial color and roughness measurements were taken (t=0), and after this, ten test specimens of each commercial brand of resin composite were immersed in sodium hypochlorite and ten in peracetic acid, for 30 and 60 minutes, with measurements being taken after each immersion period. These data were submitted to statistical analysis. There was evidence of an increase in Ra after 30 minutes immersion in the disinfectants in all the resins, with QC-20 presenting the highest Ra values, and Vipi-Wave the lowest. After 60 minutes immersion in the disinfectants all the resins presented statistically significant color alteration. Disinfection with 1% sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid altered the properties of roughness and color of the resins. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. The bile acid-sequestering resin sevelamer eliminates the acute GLP-1 stimulatory effect of endogenously released bile acids in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Albér, Anders; Rohde, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    of the present study was to assess the GLP-1 secretory and gluco-metabolic effects of endogenously released bile, with and without concomitant administration of the bile acid-sequestering resin, sevelamer, in patients with type 2 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a randomized, placebo......-controlled, and double-blinded cross-over study including 15 metformin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes. Four experimental study days in randomized order with administration of either sevelamer 3,200 mg or placebo in combination with intravenous infusion of cholecystokinin (CCK) (0.4 pmol sulfated CCK-8/kg...... was shown to eliminate the acute bile acid-induced increase in plasma GLP-1 excursions. CONCLUSIONS: Single-dose administration of sevelamer eliminated bile acid-mediated GLP-1 secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes, which could be explained by reduced bile acid stimulation of the basolaterally...

  10. Changes in volatile terpene and diterpene resin acid composition of resistant and susceptible white spruce leaders exposed to simulated white pine weevil damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, E S; Antonejevic, E; Alfaro, R I; Borden, J H

    2000-10-01

    Induced (traumatic) resin in white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) leaders resistant or susceptible to the white pine weevil (Pissodes strobi Peck) was analyzed for volatile terpenes and diterpene resin acids after simulated white pine weevil damage. Leaders from 331 trees were wounded just below the apical bud with a 1-mm diameter drill, coinciding with the natural time of weevil oviposition in the spring. Leaders were removed in the fall, and the bark and xylem from the upper and lower regions of the leader extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography. Unwounded trees had low amounts of resin in xylem compared with bark. In response to wounding, volatile terpenes and diterpene resin acids increased in the upper xylem (area of wounding), with resistant trees showing a greater increase than susceptible trees. Wounding caused monoterpenes in particular to decrease in the lower region of the leader (away from the drilled area) in greater amounts in susceptible trees than in resistant trees. In response to wounding, the proportion of monoterpene to resin acid increased in the upper and lower xylem of resistant trees, and slightly increased in the upper xylem of susceptible trees. Monoterpene-enriched resin is more fluid than constitutive resin, and probably flows more readily into oviposition cavities and larval mines, where it may kill immature weevils. Loss of resin components in the lower xylem suggested catabolism and transport of these materials to the site of wounding; however, energetic and regulatory data are necessary to confirm this hypothesis. This study provides a basis for measuring the ability of a tree to undergo traumatic resinosis that could be used to screen for resistance to white pine weevil.

  11. Synthetic resin-bound truncated Candida antarctica lipase B for production of fatty acid alkyl esters by transesterification of corn and soybean oils with ethanol or butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen R; Moser, Bryan R; Robinson, Samantha; Cox, Elby J; Harmsen, Amanda J; Friesen, Jon A; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Jones, Marjorie A; Pinkelman, Rebecca; Bang, Sookie S; Tasaki, Ken; Doll, Kenneth M; Qureshi, Nasib; Liu, Siqing; Saha, Badal C; Jackson, John S; Cotta, Michael A; Rich, Joseph O; Caimi, Paolo

    2012-05-31

    A gene encoding a synthetic truncated Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was generated via automated PCR and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Western blot analysis detected five truncated CALB variants, suggesting multiple translation starts from the six in-frame ATG codons. The longest open reading frame, which corresponds to amino acids 35-317 of the mature lipase, appeared to be expressed in the greatest amount. The truncated CALB was immobilized on Sepabeads® EC-EP resin and used to produce ethyl and butyl esters from crude corn oil and refined soybean oil. The yield of ethyl esters was 4-fold greater from corn oil than from soybean oil and was 36% and 50% higher, respectively, when compared to a commercially available lipase resin (Novozym 435) using the same substrates. A 5:1 (v/v) ratio of ethanol to corn oil produced 3.7-fold and 8.4-fold greater yields than ratios of 15:1 and 30:1, respectively. With corn oil, butyl ester production was 56% higher than ethyl ester production. Addition of an ionic catalytic resin step prior to the CALB resin increased yields of ethyl esters from corn oil by 53% compared to CALB resin followed by ionic resin. The results suggest resin-bound truncated CALB has potential application in biodiesel production using biocatalysts. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Ion Exchange Study of Some New Copolymer Resins Derived from 8-Hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic Acid, Biuret and Formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Dhakite

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Copolymer resins (8-HQSABF were synthesized by the condensation of 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid and biuret with formaldehyde in the presence of hydrochloric acid as catalyst, proved to be selective chelation ion exchange copolymer resins for certain metals. Chelation ion exchange properties to these polymers were studied for Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of the distribution of a given metal ions between the polymer sample and a solution containing the metal ion. The study was carried out over a wide pH range and in a media of various ions strengths. The polymer showed a higher selectivity for Cu2+ ions than for Cd2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ ions. Hence on the basis of above studies these copolymer may be used as semiconductors, surface coating, ion-exchangers, materials for rechargeable battery cell in various electronic industries, plastic materials, elastomers and in boiler plants

  13. A Robust Epoxy Resins @ Stearic Acid-Mg(OH)2 Micronanosheet Superhydrophobic Omnipotent Protective Coating for Real-Life Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yifan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2016-06-29

    Superhydrophobic coating has extremely high application value and practicability. However, some difficult problems such as weak mechanical strength, the need for expensive toxic reagents, and a complex preparation process are all hard to avoid, and these problems have impeded the superhydrophobic coating's real-life application for a long time. Here, we demonstrate one kind of omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating via a simple antideposition route and one-step superhydrophobization process. The whole preparation process is facile, and expensive toxic reagents needed. This omnipotent coating can be applied on any solid substrate with great waterproof ability, excellent mechanical stability, and chemical durability, which can be stored in a realistic environment for more than 1 month. More significantly, this superhydrophobic coating also has four protective abilities, antifouling, anticorrosion, anti-icing, and flame-retardancy, to cope with a variety of possible extreme natural environments. Therefore, this omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating not only satisfies real-life need but also has great application potential in many respects.

  14. Calcium isotope fractionation in liquid chromatography with benzo-18-crown-6 resin in aqueous hydrobromic acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takuya; Oi, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography operated in a breakthrough mode was employed to study calcium isotope fractionation in the aqueous hydrobromic acid medium. Highly porous silica beads, the inner pores of which were embedded with a benzo-18-crown-6 ether resin, were used as column packing material. Enrichment of heavier isotopes of calcium was observed in the frontal part of respective calcium chromatograms. The values of the isotope fractionation coefficient were on the order of 10 -3 . The observed isotope fractionation coefficient was dependent on the concentration of hydrobromic acid in the calcium feed solution; a higher HBr concentration resulted in a smaller fractionation coefficient value. The present calcium isotope effects were most probably mass-dependent, indicating that they mostly came from isotope effects based on molecular vibration. Molecular orbital calculations supported the present experimental results in a qualitative fashion. Chromatography operated in aqueous HBr media is a better system of Ca isotope separation than that operated in aqueous HCl media. (author)

  15. Isolation and characterization of isopimaric acid-degrading bacteria from a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A E; Moore, E R; Mohn, W W

    1996-09-01

    We isolated two aerobic, gram-negative bacteria which grew on the diterpene resin acid isopimaric acid (IpA) as the sole carbon source and electron donor. The source of the isolates was a sequencing batch reactor treating a high-strength process stream from a paper mill. The isolates, IpA-1 and IpA-2, also grew on pimaric and dehydroabietic acids, and IpA-1 grew on abietic acid. Both strains used fatty acids, but neither strain used camphor, sitosterol, or betulin. Strain IpA-1 grew anaerobically with nitrate as an electron acceptor. Strains IpA-1 and IpA-2 had growth yields of 0.19 and 0.23 g of protein per g of IpA, respectively. During growth, both strains transformed IpA carbon to approximately equal amounts of biomass, carbon dioxide, and dissolved organic carbon. In both strains, growth on IpA induced an enzymatic system which caused cell suspensions to transform all four of the above resin acids. Cell suspensions of IpA-1 and IpA-2 removed IpA at rates of 0.56 and 0.13 mumol mg of protein-1 h-1, respectively. Cultures and cell suspensions of both strains failed to completely consume pimaric acid and yielded small amounts of an apparent metabolite from this acid. Cultures and cell suspensions of both strains yielded large amounts of three apparent metabolites from dehydroabietic acid. Analysis of 16S rDNA sequences indicated that the isolates are distinct members of the genus Pseudomonas sensu stricto.

  16. Effect of phytic acid etchant on resin-dentin bonding: Monomer penetration and stability of dentin collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Kalyan; Hiraishi, Noriko; Nassar, Mohannad; Otsuki, Masayuki; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Tagami, Junji

    2017-07-01

    Phytic acid (IP6) works well as an etchant in dentin bonding to remove the smear layer due to its acidity and chelating effect. This study compared the etching effect of IP6 with phosphoric acid (PA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on resin-dentin bond strength, micromorphology of the etched dentin surface and nanoleakage formation along resin-dentin interfaces and compared the protecting effect against collagen degradation. Dentin disks and flat dentin surfaces were obtained from extracted human teeth. Specimens were etched with 35% PA (15s), 0.5M EDTA (30s) or 1% IP6 (30s). The surfaces and longitudinal sections of the etched dentin disks were observed using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). An etch-and-rinse adhesive was used to create composite build up-specimens for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing and nanoleakage observation. To evaluate the effect on collagen degradation, demineralized bovine root dentin blocks were challenged with bacterial collagenase and then observed under light microscope. PA- and EDTA- treated groups showed significantly lower μTBS when compared to IP6-treated group. PA showed distinct nanoleakage and severe collagen degradation. Only slight nanoleakage was detected in IP6 group. IP6 showed better effect than EDTA in preventing collagen degradation induced by bacterial collagenase. IP6 effectively removed the smear layer and etched dentin, providing high bond strength values and causing minimal nanoleakage and slight collagen degradation. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Input to Resin Column Structural Analysis if Autocatalytic Resin Reaction Occurs in HB-Line Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallman, D.F.

    2001-07-10

    Solutions of plutonium in nitric acid are purified and concentrated using anion resin prior to precipitation. There have been instances of resin column explosions caused by autocatalytic reactions of anion resins in nitric acid within the DOE complex

  18. Esterification of oleic acid in a three-phase, fixed-bed reactor packed with a cation exchange resin catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung Mo; Kimura, Hiroko; Kusakabe, Katsuki

    2011-01-01

    Esterification of oleic acid was performed in a three-phase fixed-bed reactor with a cation exchange resin catalyst (Amberlyst-15) at high temperature, which was varied from 80 to 120 °C. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yields in the fixed-bed reactor were increased with increases in the reaction temperature, methanol flow rate and bed height. Moreover, the FAME yields were higher than those obtained using a batch reactor due to an equilibrium shift toward the product that resulted from continuous evaporation of the produced water. In addition, there was no catalyst deactivation during the esterification of oleic acid. However, addition of sunflower oil to the oleic acid reduced the FAME yield obtained from simultaneous esterification and transesterification. The FAME yield was 97.5% at a reaction temperature of 100 °C in the fixed-bed with a height of 5 cm when the methanol and oleic acid feed rates were 8.6 and 9.0 mL/h, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF COMPOSITE RESIN TO DENTAL ENAMEL CONDITIONED WITH PHOSPHORIC ACID OR Nd: YAG LASER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO Carlos de Paula

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has been focused on a comparison between the shear bond strength of a composite resin attached to dental enamel surface, after a 35% phosphoric acid etching and after a Nd:YAG laser irradiation with 165.8 J/cm2 of energy density per pulse. After etching and attaching resin to these surfaces, the specimens were thermocycled and then underwent the shearing bond strength tests at a speed of 5 mm/min. The results achieved, after statistical analysis with Student's t-test, showed that the adhesion was significantly greater in the 35% phosphoric acid treated group than in the group treated with the Nd:YAG laser, thus demonstrating the need for developing new studies to reach the ideal parameters for an effective enamel surface conditioning as well as specific adhesives and composite resins when Nd:YAG laser is used

  20. Effect of alcohols on elution chromatography of trivalent actinides and lanthanides using tertiary pyridine resin with hydrochloric acid-alcohol mixed solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Itoh, Keisuke; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki; Hara, Mitsuo; Ozawa, Masaki

    2004-07-02

    Elution chromatography with a tertiary pyridine resin has been used to separate the trivalent actinides (An3+) from the lanthanides (Ln3+) using an alcoholic hydrochloric acid solvent. Trivalent Am and Cm were separated from the Ln by employing a 1 cm(phi) x 10 cm resin column with the mixed solvent system composed of concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCl) and alcohols. The distribution coefficients (Kd) and the separation factors between An and Ln (alpha(An)(Ln)) increased as the alcohol content of the solvent mixture increased. On the other hand, the Kd and alpha(An)(Ln) decreased drastically upon the addition of water to the solvent mixture. Among the four alcohols investigated (methanol, ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol), the ethanol-HCl mixed solvent system showed the largest Kd and alpha(An)(Ln). The mechanism of adsorption for An and Ln cations on the pyridine resin is discussed in addition to the results presented herein.

  1. Preparation of a ribonucleic acid-(polyamidoamine)-(zirconia-urea-formaldehyde resin) high-performance liquid affinity chromatographic stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, S; Yu, S; Zhao, C

    2001-07-01

    A preparative method for a high-performance liquid affinity chromatographic (HPLAC) stationary phase is described. The 3- to 5-microm nonporous composite spherical microparticles of zirconia and urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin are synthesized through the reaction of zirconyl chloride with hexamethylene tetra-amine and urea, and then it is used as the matrix of the HPLAC stationary phase of which the diameter and structure are determined by scanning electron microscopy. In a methanol medium, the polyamidoamine (PAMAM) starburst dentritic spacer arms are linked with the imido-groups on the surface of the matrix by the Michael addition reaction with methyl acrylate and the amination reaction with ethylene diamine. After repeating these steps in triplets, amine-terminated dentritic spacer arms with a generation of 3 are obtained. The topological structure of the spacer arms is examined by solid-state 13C NMR. The Br-substituted ribonucleic acid (RNA) ligand is obtained by the reaction of liquid bromine with RNA and bonded to the dendritic spacer arms of the matrix in a solution of NaOH (pH 9-11). The binding capacity of RNA is measured by UV spectrophotometry. A new type of stationary phase--RNA-(PAMAM)-(zirconia-UF resin--for HPLAC, which possesses starburst dendritic spacer arms, is synthesized and used for the separation of biological macromolecules.

  2. Purification of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) from fermentation of defatted rice bran extract by using ion exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan Nha, Vi; Phung, Le Thi Kim; Dat, Lai Quoc

    2017-09-01

    Rice bran is one of the significant byproducts of rice processing with 10 %w/w of constitution of whole rice grain. It is rich in nutrient compounds, including glutamic acid. Thus, it could be utilized for the fermentation with Lactobateria for synthesis of GABA, a valuable bioactive for antihypertensive effects. However, the concentration and purity of GABA in fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract is low for production of GABA drug. This research focused on the purification of GABA from the fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract by using cation exchange resin. The results indicate that, the adsorption isotherm of GABA by Purelite C100 showed the good agreement with Freundlich model, with high adsorption capacity. The effects of pH and concentration of NaCl in eluent on the elution were also investigated. The obtained results show that, at the operating conditions of elution as follows: pH 6.5, 0.8 M of NaCl in eluent, 0.43 of bed volume; concentration of GABA in accumulative eluent, the purity and recovery yield of GABA were 743.8 ppm, 44.0% and 84.2%, respectively. Results imply that, it is feasible to apply cation exchange resin for purification of GABA from fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract.

  3. Can heat treatment procedures of pre-hydrolyzed silane replace hydrofluoric acid in the adhesion of resin cement to feldspathic ceramic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotes, Caroline; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Furtado; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Leite, Fabíola Pessoa; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of heat treatment (HT) procedures of a pre-hydrolyzed silane on bond strength of resin cement to a feldspathic ceramic. Ceramic and composite blocks (N = 30) were divided into six groups (n = 5) and subjected to the following conditioning procedures: G1: 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF) for 20 s + silane (RelyX Ceramic Primer, 3M ESPE) + resin cement (Panavia F2.0, Kuraray) (control); G2: HF (20 s) + silane + heat treatment in furnace (HTF) (100°C, 2 min) + resin cement; G3: silane + HTF + resin cement; G4- HF (20 s) + silane + heat treatment with hot air (HTA) (50 ± 5°C for 1 min) + resin cement; G5: silane + HTA + resin cement; G6: silane + resin cement. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). After debonding, the substrate and adherent surfaces were analyzed using a stereomicroscope and SEM to categorize the failure types. The data were statistically evaluated using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The control group (G1) showed no pre-test failures and presented significantly higher mean MTBS (16.01 ± 1.12 MPa) than did other groups (2.63 ± 1.05 to 12.55 ± 1.52 MPa) (p = 0.0001). In the groups where HF was not used, HTF (G3: 12.55 ± 1.52 MPa) showed significantly higher MTBS than did HTA (G5: 2.63 ± 1.05 MPa) (p silane either in a furnace or with the application of hot air cannot replace the use of HF gel for the adhesion of resin cement to feldspathic ceramic. Yet when mean bond strengths and incidence of pre-test failures are considered, furnace heat treatment delivered the second best results after the control group, being considerably better than hot air application.

  4. Characterization of Group V Dubnium Homologs on DGA Extraction Chromatography Resin from Nitric and Hydrofluoric Acid Matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Despotopulos, J D; Sudowe, R

    2012-02-21

    somewhere between Nb and Pa. Much more recent studies have examined the properties of Db from HNO{sub 3}/HF matrices, and suggest Db forms complexes similar to those of Pa. Very little experimental work into the behavior of element 114 has been performed. Thermochromatography experiments of three atoms of element 114 indicate that the element 114 is at least as volatile as Hg, At, and element 112. Lead was shown to deposit on gold at temperatures about 1000 C higher than the atoms of element 114. Results indicate a substantially increased stability of element 114. No liquid phase studies of element 114 or its homologs (Pb, Sn, Ge) or pseudo-homologs (Hg, Cd) have been performed. Theoretical predictions indicate that element 114 is should have a much more stable +2 oxidation state and neutral state than Pb, which would result in element 114 being less reactive and less metallic than Pb. The relativistic effects on the 7p{sub 1/2} electrons are predicted to cause a diagonal relationship to be introduced into the periodic table. Therefore, 114{sup 2+} is expected to behave as if it were somewhere between Hg{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Pb{sup 2+}. In this work two commercially available extraction chromatography resins are evaluated, one for the separation of Db homologs and pseudo?homologs from each other as well as from potential interfering elements such as Group IV Rf homologs and actinides, and the other for separation of element 114 homologs. One resin, Eichrom's DGA resin, contains a N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide extractant, which separates analytes based on both size and charge characteristics of the solvated metal species, coated on an inert support. The DGA resin was examined for Db chemical systems, and shows a high degree of selectivity for tri-, tetra-, and hexavalent metal ions in multiple acid matrices with fast kinetics. The other resin, Eichrom's Pb resin, contains a di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 extractant with isodecanol solvent

  5. SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN .3. EFFECT OF SULFOLANE ON THE EQUILIBRIUM CONVERSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    The liquid-phase hydration of cyclohexene, a pseudo-first-order reversible reaction catalyzed by a strong acid ion-exchange resin, was investigated in solvent mixtures of water and sulfolane. Macroporous Amberlite XE 307 was used because of its superior catalytic activity. Chemical equilibrium

  6. Properties of the Carboxylate ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Bert; Dario, Maarten; Boren, Hans; Torstenfelt, Boerje; Puigdomenech, Ignasi; Johansson, Claes

    2002-09-01

    Weakly acidic, carboxylic resin has been selected, together with strong base anion resins, for water purification at the Forsmark 1 and 2 reactors. For the strong (but not the weak) ion exchange resin the Nuclear Power Inspectorate has given permission to dispose the spent resins in the SFR 1 (the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste). This report gives a review of the carboxylic resins and comes to the conclusion that the resins are very stable and that there should not exist any risks for increased leaching of radionuclides from SFR 1 if these resins are disposed (compared to the strong resins)

  7. Catalytic Upgrading of bio-oil using 1-octene and 1-butanol over sulfonic acid resin catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Wang, Qingwen; Tripathi, Prabhat; Pittman, Charles U.

    2011-02-04

    Raw bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass must be refined before it can be used as a transporation fuel, a petroleum refinery feed or for many other fuel uses. Raw bio-oil was upgraded with the neat model olefin, 1-octene, and with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures over sulfonic acid resin catalysts frin 80 to 150 degrees celisus in order to simultaneously lower water content and acidity and to increase hydrophobicity and heating value. Phase separation and coke formation were key factors limiting the reaction rate during upgrading with neat 1-octene although octanols were formed by 1-octene hydration along with small amounts of octyl acetates and ethers. GC-MS analysis confirmed that olefin hydration, carboxylic acid esterification, acetal formation from aldehydes and ketones and O- and C-alkylations of phenolic compounds occurred simultaneously during upgrading with 1-octene/1-butanol mixtures. Addition of 1-butanol increased olefin conversion dramatically be reducing mass transfer restraints and serving as a cosolvent or emulsifying agent. It also reacted with carboxylic acids and aldehydes/ketones to form esters, and acetals, respectively, while also serving to stabilize bio-oil during heating. 1-Butanol addition also protected the catalysts, increasing catalyst lifetime and reducing or eliminationg coking. Upgrading sharply increased ester content and decreased the amounts of levoglucosan, polyhydric alcohols and organic acids. Upgrading lowered acidity (pH value rise from 2.5 to >3.0), removed the uppleasant ordor and increased hydrocarbon solubility. Water content decreased from 37.2% to < 7.5% dramatically and calorific value increased from 12.6 MJ kg to about 30.0 MJ kg.

  8. Consequences of enamel preparation with sodium hypochlorite, polyacrylic and phosphoric acids for the bonding of brackets with resin-modified glass ionomer cements

    OpenAIRE

    Trindade, Alessandra Marques; Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Smith Neto, Perrin; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Akaki, Emílio; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of deproteinization with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) prior to enamel conditioning with 10% polyacrylic acid (PAA) and 35% phosphoric acid (PA) on the bond strength (BS) of brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were divided into 5 groups (n = 20 in each group): G1 (control), enamel conditioning with PA, application of adhesive and bonding of brackets...

  9. Effect Of Sodium Hypochlorite And Peracetic Acid On The Surface Roughness Of Acrylic Resin Polymerized By Heated Water For Short And Long Cycles.

    OpenAIRE

    Sczepanski, Felipe; Sczepanski, Claudia Roberta Brunnquell; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surface roughness of acrylic resin submitted to chemical disinfection via 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) or 1% peracetic acid (C2H4O3). Materials and Methods: The disc-shaped resin specimens (30 mm diameter ×4 mm height) were polymerized by heated water using two cycles (short cycle: 1 h at 74°C and 30 min at 100°C; conventional long cycle: 9 h at 74°C). The release of substances by these specimens in water solution was also quantified. Specimens were fabricated, di...

  10. Effect of experimental acid/base conditioner on microtensile bond strength of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to dentin after long-term water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeno, Kohyoh; Taira, Yohsuke; Ito, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    An experimental conditioner (Exp), which was an aqueous solution of 10% ascorbic acid and 5% ferric chloride, was prepared in this study. This study evaluated the effect of Exp on the microtensile bond strength between a self-curing resin and dentin after long-term water immersion. Flat human dentin surfaces were sequentially pretreated with 40% phosphoric acid, 10% sodium hypochlorite, and Exp. Surface pretreatment with an aqueous solution of 10% citric and 3% ferric chloride (10-3) was used as a control. Composite resin rods were bonded to pretreated dentin surfaces using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Microtensile bond strengths were evaluated after water immersion at 24 h, 12 months, 24 months, and 36 months. At each immersion period, the bond strength of Exp was significantly higher than that of 10-3. After 36 months, Exp showed no significant decrease in microtensile bond strength, but 10-3 showed significant reductions. Pretreatment with experimental acid/base conditioner markedly improved the bonding durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human dentin when compared against the conventional 10-3 treatment.

  11. Preparation and characterization of anion exchange resin decorated with magnetite nanoparticles for removal of p-toluic acid from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah, Morteza; Ahmadpour, Ali; Rohani Bastami, Tahereh

    2015-02-01

    Polystyrene resin was covalently functionalized with diethanolamine and then decorated with magnetite nanoparticles by a novel and simple co-precipitation method using iron(II) sulfate as precursor. The products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Adsorption of p-toluic acid (p-TA) onto magnetite-decorated polystyrene (MAG-PS) was studied and compared with that of diethanolamine-functionalized polystyrene and a commercial anion exchange resin. Results showed that the magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 20.4 nm were successfully formed on the surface of polystyrene resin, and MAG-PS was exhibited high affinity for the removal of p-TA.

  12. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Epoxy Resins from Fatty Acids as a Versatile Route for the Formation of Polymer Thermosets with Tunable Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torron, Susana; Semlitsch, Stefan; Martinelle, Mats; Johansson, Mats

    2016-12-12

    The work herein presented describes the synthesis and polymerization of series of bio-based epoxy resins prepared through lipase catalyzed transesterification. The epoxy-functional polyester resins with various architectures (linear, tri-branched, and tetra-branched) were synthesized through condensation of fatty acids derived from epoxidized soybean oil and linseed oil with three different hydroxyl cores under bulk conditions. The selectivity of the lipases toward esterification/transesterification reactions allowed the formation of macromers with up to 12 epoxides in the backbone. The high degree of functionality of the resins resulted in polymer thermosets with T g values ranging from -25 to over 100 °C prepared through cationic polymerization. The determining parameters of the synthesis and the mechanism for the formation of the species were determined through kinetic studies by 1 H NMR, SEC, and molecular modeling studies. The correlation between macromer structure and thermoset properties was studied through real-time FTIR measurements, DSC, and DMA.

  13. The impact of hydrofluoric acid etching followed by unfilled resin on the biaxial strength of a glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posritong, Sumana; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel; Eckert, George J; Bottino, Marco A; Bottino, Marco C

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the null hypotheses that hydrofluoric (HF) acid etching time would neither decrease the biaxial flexural strength of a glass-based veneering ceramic nor enhance it after silane and unfilled resin (UR) applications. Disc-shaped IPS e.max ZirPress specimens were allocated into 12 groups: G1-control (no-etching), G2-30 s, G3-60 s, G4-90 s, G5-120 s, G6-60 s+60 s. Groups (G7-G12) were treated in the same fashion as G1-G6, but followed by silane and UR applications. Surface morphology and roughness (Ra and Rq) of the ceramics were assessed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and profilometry, respectively. Flexural strength was determined by biaxial testing. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and the Sidak test (α=0.05). Weibull statistics were estimated and finite element analysis (FEA) was carried out to verify the stress concentration end areas of fracture. The interaction (etching time vs. surface treatment) was significant for Ra (p=0.008) and Rq (0.0075). Resin-treated groups presented significantly lower Ra and Rq than non-treated groups, except for the 60s group (pceramic microstructure and that the UR was able to penetrate into the irregularities. A significant effect of etching time (p=0.029) on flexural strength was seen. G7-G12 presented higher strength than G1-G6 (pceramic flexural strength. Moreover, the flexural strength could be enhanced after UR treatment. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High Performance Fatty Acid-Based Vinyl Ester Resin for Liquid Molding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Geng, Xing; La Scala, John J; Sands, James M; Palmese, Guiseppe R

    2007-01-01

    ...% compared to 40-60 wt% associated with commercial products. In addition, fatty acid-based monomers can bring about other benefits like higher toughness, lower exothermal heat and low volume shrinkage...

  15. Selective sorption of ruthenium from acidic medium by Amberlite XAD 7 resin impregnated with iodide salt of N,N'-diisobutyl(α-Trialkylammonium)-acetamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Shikha; Ghosh, Sunil K.; Sharma, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the removal of ruthenium (III) from aqueous nitric acid solutions using solvent impregnated resin (SIR). The SIR has been made by impregnating Amberlite XAD-7 with iodide salt of N,N'-diisobutyl(α-trialkylammonium)acetamide as the extractant and methanol as the solvent by a wet impregnation technique. This solvent has already been successfully investigated by us for selective extraction of ruthenium (III) from nitric acid solution by solvent extraction technique. Maximum loading of ammonium acetamide on Amberlite XAD was found to be in the ratio of 1:2. Loaded resin was characterized by IR and SEM analyses. The effect of metal ion concentration on the sorption of ruthenium (III) ions has been investigated to quantify the sorption capacity of resin for Ru. Maximum loading of ruthenium was found to be 14 mg/g of resin. Maximum K d obtained was 754. Ruthenium was successfully stripped from SIR using sodium hydroxide solution in a single contact. (author)

  16. Preparation and characterization of anion exchange resin decorated with magnetite nanoparticles for removal of p-toluic acid from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davarpanah, Morteza, E-mail: Davarpanah.morteza@gmail.com; Ahmadpour, Ali; Rohani Bastami, Tahereh

    2015-02-01

    Polystyrene resin was covalently functionalized with diethanolamine and then decorated with magnetite nanoparticles by a novel and simple co-precipitation method using iron(II) sulfate as precursor. The products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. Adsorption of p-toluic acid (p-TA) onto magnetite-decorated polystyrene (MAG-PS) was studied and compared with that of diethanolamine-functionalized polystyrene and a commercial anion exchange resin. Results showed that the magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 20.4 nm were successfully formed on the surface of polystyrene resin, and MAG-PS was exhibited high affinity for the removal of p-TA. - Highlights: • .Polystyrene resin was covalently functionalized with diethanolamine. • .The functionalized adsorbents were decorated with magnetite nanoparticles (∼20 nm). • .Proposed magnetization procedure was high-efficient and relatively simple. • .Magnetic adsorbent was presented high affinity for removal of p-toluic acid.

  17. Ion-exclusion chromatographic behavior of aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids on a sulfonated styrene--divinylbenzene co-polymer resin column with sulfuric acid containing various alcohols as eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazutoku; Towata, Atsuya; Ohashi, Masayoshi

    2003-05-16

    The addition of C1-C7 alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol, heptanol, hexanol and heptanol) to dilute sulfuric acid as eluent in ion-exclusion chromatography using a highly sulfonated styrene-divinylbenzene co-polymer resin (TSKgel SCX) in the H+ form as the stationary phase was carried out for the simultaneous separations of both (a) C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, valeric, 2-methylvaleric, isocaproic, caproic, 2,2-dimethyl-n-valeric, 2-methylhexanoic, 5-methylhexanoic and heptanoic acids) and (b) benzenecarboxylic acids (pyromellitic, hemimellitic, trimellitic, o-phthalic, m-phthalic, p-phthalic, benzoic and salicylic acids and phenol). Heptanol was the most effective modifier in ion-exclusion chromatography for the improvement of peak shapes and a reduction in retention volumes for higher aliphatic carboxylic acids and benzenecarboxylic acids. Excellent simultaneous separation and relatively highly sensitive conductimetric detection for these C1-C7 aliphatic carboxylic acids were achieved on the TSKgel SCX column (150 x 6 mm I.D.) in 30 min using 0.5 mM sulfuric acid containing 0.025% heptanol as eluent. Excellent simultaneous separation and highly sensitive UV detection at 200 nm for these benzenecarboxylic acids were also achieved on the TSKgel SCX column in 30 min using 5 mM sulfuric acid containing 0.075% heptanol as eluent.

  18. Glucose-lowering effects and mechanisms of the bile acid-sequestering resin sevelamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Mikkelsen, Kristian; Sonne, David P

    2018-01-01

    and mechanism(s) of sevelamer in patients with type 2 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this double-blinded randomized controlled trial, we randomized 30 patients with type 2 diabetes to sevelamer (n=20) or placebo (n=10). Participants were subjected to standardized 4-hour liquid meal tests at baseline...... synthesis of bile acids, a shift towards a more hydrophilic bile acid pool and increased lipogenesis. No glucagon-like peptide-1-mediated effects on insulin, glucagon or gastric emptying were evident, which point to limited contribution of this incretin hormone to the glucose-lowering effect of sevelamer...

  19. Preconcentration and determination of trace metal ions from aqueous samples by newly developed gallic acid modified Amberlite XAD-16 chelating resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R K; Pant, Parul

    2009-04-15

    Gallic acid was immobilized on Amberlite XAD-16 by coupling it through -N=N group. The resulting chelating resin Amberlite XAD-16 gallic acid, characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), infrared (IR) spectra and BET analysis, was used to preconcentrate Cr(III), Mn(II),Fe(III),Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II)ions. The resin was employed for the preconcentration of the metal ions present in river water and industrial area aqueous samples. Several parameters like effect of pH, effect of time, effect of sample volume and flow rate of sample were investigated. The sorption capacities for the resin were 216 micromol g(-1), 180 micromol g(-1), 403 micromol g(-1), 281 micromol g(-1), 250 micromol g(-1) and 344 micromol g(-1) for Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) respectively. The preconcentration factors for Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) were found out to be 300, 200, 400, 285.7, 300 and 400 respectively. The effect of various interfering ions was also studied. Results were validated by using standard addition method for river water sample.

  20. Resin glycosides from Porana duclouxii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wen-Bing; Zhang, Dai-Gui; Liu, Chun-Jie; Li, Guan-Hua; Li, You-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    A new intact resin glycoside (3) and two glycosidic acids (1 and 2), all having a common trisaccharide moiety and (11S)-hydroxytetradecanoic acid or (3S,11S)-dihydroxytetradecanoic acid as the aglycone, were obtained from the roots of Porana duclouxii. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and chemical correlations. These compounds represent the first examples of resin glycosides from the genus Porana.

  1. Effect of the Acidic Dental Resin Monomer 10-methacryloyloxydecyl Dihydrogen Phosphate on Odontoblastic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Haejin; Lee, Sang-Im; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-11-01

    Although 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) is frequently used as an acidic resin monomer in dental adhesives, its effect on dental pulp cells (DPCs) has been rarely reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 10-MDP on the inflammatory response and odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs at minimally toxic concentrations. We found that 10-MDP caused the release of inflammatory cytokines including NO, PGE2, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, 10-MDP reduced alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization nodule formation and mRNA expression of odontoblastic differentiation markers such as dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1, osterix and Runx2 in a concentration-dependent manner with low toxicity. In addition, 10-MDP induced activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its target gene, haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). We evaluated whether the effect of 10-MDP was related to the induction of HO-1 and found that treatment with a selective inhibitor of HO-1 reversed the production of 10-MDP-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokines and the inhibition of differentiation markers. Pre-treatment with either a GSH synthesis inhibitor or antioxidants blocked 10-MDP-induced mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Nrf2 and NF-κB pathways. Taken together, the results of this study showed that minimally toxic concentrations of 10-MDP promoted an inflammatory response and suppressed odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs by activating Nrf2-mediated HO-1 induction through MAPK and NF-κB signalling. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  2. Use of a phenolic-carboxylic acid cation resin in the treatment of low-level liquid waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilton, J.M.

    1981-09-01

    The loading capacity of CS-100 resin, using plant waste as feed, was found to be significantly reduced after 20 loading-elution cycles; one-fourth or less of the original capacity was retained after 30 cycles. No important differences were noted between an untreated column and a column that had been reconverted to the sodium form in the regeneration step. Omission of the sodium regeneration could not be adopted as a routine procedure because it produced a packing effect in the plant beds; however, reconversion to the sodium form is now achieved by using a stoichiometric amount of caustic rather than a 100% excess, as was previous practice. Since the distribution coefficients for calcium and strontium are about six times greater than that for cesium, no loss of 90 Sr would be expected while 137 Cs is loading. Laboratory results obtained by using plant conditions and feed indicate that a typical bed would remove 96% of 90 Sr in the feed. Cobalt-60 is generally the greatest contributor to the radioactivity of the plant effluent. Laboratory tests indicate that this 60 Co is present as a mixture of a soluble anionic complex and insoluble colloids. The anionic complex could be removed by placing an anion exchange column in the effluent from the CS-100 resin bed. In studies of the dynamics of loading on CS-100 resin, the contact time in plant operation (3 to 4 min per column volume) was found to be more than adequate to obtain the desired results. Effects of flow velocity were not investigated. Data from a series of laboratory experiments show that CS-100 resin can be eluted satisfactorily with 0.5 to 1.0 M formic or acetic acid, although a larger volume is required than for elution with 0.5 M nitric acid

  3. Effect of acid etching duration on tensile bond strength of composite resin bonded to erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser-prepared dentine. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chousterman, M; Heysselaer, D; Dridi, S M; Bayet, F; Misset, B; Lamard, L; Peremans, A; Nyssen-Behets, C; Nammour, S

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of composite resin bonded to erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser-prepared dentine after different durations of acid etching. The occlusal third of 68 human third molars was removed in order to expose the dentine surface. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups: group B (control group), prepared with bur and total etch system with 15 s acid etching [37% orthophosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4))]; group L15, laser photo-ablated dentine (200 mJ) (laser irradiation conditions: pulse duration 100 micros, air-water spray, fluence 31.45 J/ cm(2), 10 Hz, non-contact hand pieces, beam spot size 0.9 mm, irradiation speed 3 mm/s, and total irradiation time 2 x 40 s); group L30, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 30 s acid etching; group L60, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 60 s acid etching; group L90, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 90 s acid etching. A plot of composite resin was bonded onto each exposed dentine and then tested for tensile bond strength. The values obtained were statistically analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) coupled with the Tukey-Kramer test at the 95% level. A 90 s acid etching before bonding showed the best bonding value (P < 0.05) when compared with all the other groups including the control group. There is no significance difference between other groups, nor within each group and the control group. There was a significant increase in tensile bond strength of the samples acid etched for 90 s.

  4. Adsorption kinetics, isotherm, and thermodynamics studies of acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acids (AKBA) from Boswellia serrata extract using macroporous resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niphadkar, Sonali S; Rathod, Virendra K

    2017-09-14

    An acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) is potent anti-inflammatory agent found in Boswellia serrata oleogum resin. Adsorption characteristics of AKBA from B. serrata were studied using macroporous adsorbent resin to understand separation and adsorption mechanism of targeted molecules. Different macroporous resins were screened for adsorption and desorption of AKBA and Indion 830 was screened as it showed higher adsorption capacity. The kinetic equations were studied and results showed that the adsorption of AKBA on Indion 830 was well fitted to the pseudo first-order kinetic model. The influence of two parameters such as temperature (298, 303, and 308 K) and pH (5-8) on the adsorption process was also studied. The experimental data was further investigated using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherm models. It was observed that Langmuir isotherm model was found to be the best fit for AKBA adsorption by Indion 830 and highest adsorption capacity (50.34 mg/g) was obtained at temperature of 303 K. The values of thermodynamic parameters such as the change of Gibbs free energy (ΔG*), entropy (ΔS*), and enthalpy (ΔH*), indicated that the process of adsorption was spontaneous, favourable, and exothermic.

  5. Ion exchange removal of chromium (iii) from tannery wastes by using a strong acid cation exchange resin amberlite ir-120 h+ and its hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, T.

    2014-01-01

    A strong acid cation exchange resin Amberlite IR-120 H+ and its hybrids with Mn(OH)/sub 2/, Cu(OH)/sub 2/ and Fe(OH)/sub 3/ are used for the removal of chromium (III) from spent tannery bath. The experimental data give good fits with the Langmuir sorption model. The thermodynamic parameters entropy (delta S), enthalpy (delta H) and free energy (delta G) changes are computed, which reveal that the chromium removal from tannery wastes by ion exchangers is an endothermic, physical sorption and entropically driven process. The rate of sorption is found to increase with the increase of resin dosage, stirring speed and temperature. Different kinetic models such as film diffusion, particle diffusion and Lagergren pseudo first order are used to evaluate the mechanism of the process. It is found that the hybrid ion exchange resins have better removal capacity as compared to the parent ion exchanger. The increase in the removal capacity is found to be in the order of the corresponding PZC values of the hybrid ion exchangers. Further, it is suggested that the higher exchange capacity is the result of Donnan effect and specific adsorption of chromium by the oxides / hydroxides present inside the matrix of the organic cation exchanger. (author)

  6. Kinetics of soybean oil epoxidation with peracetic acid formed in situ in the presence of an ion exchange resin: Pseudo-homogeneous model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Milovan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model was proposed for the epoxidation of vegetable oils with peracetic acid formed in situ from acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an acidic ion exchange resin as a catalyst. The model is pseudo-homogeneous with respect to the catalyst. Besides the main reactions of peracetic acid and epoxy ring formation, the model takes into account the side reaction of epoxy ring opening with acetic acid. The partitioning of acetic acid and peracetic acid between the aqueous and organic phases and the change in the phases’ volumes during the process were considered. The temperature dependency of the apparent reaction rate coefficients is described by a reparameterized Arrhenius equation. The constants in the proposed model were estimated by fitting the experimental data obtained for the epoxidations of soybean oil conducted under defined reaction conditions. The highest epoxy yield of 87.73% was obtained at 338 K when the mole ratio of oil unsaturation:acetic acid:hydrogen peroxide was 1:0.5:1.35 and when the amount of the catalyst Amberlite IR-120H was 4.04 wt.% of oil. Compared to the other reported pseudo-homogeneous models, the model proposed in this study better correlates the change of double bond and epoxy group contents during the epoxidation process. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III45022

  7. Uranium recovery and uranium remove from acid mine waters by ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina com resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos R.L. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao do Laborarorio; Fatibello Filho, Orlando [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    1999-11-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of few processes capable of reducing contaminants in effluents to very low levels according to environmental legislation. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The presence of pyrite in the waste rock piles, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants. Including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by an anionic exchanger. Studies of uranium sorption without treatment, and with lime pretreatment of water to precipitate the iron and recovery uranium as commercial product, are presented. Uranium elution was done with NaCl solutions. Saline concentration and retention time were the parameters studied. the uranium decontaminations level in the effluents from acid mine water was 94%. (author) 10 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  8. Reaction catalysts of urea-formaldehyde resin, as related to strength properties of southern pine particleboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. -Y. Hse

    1974-01-01

    Twelve resins were formulated with factorial combinations of three alkaline catalysts (i.e., somdium hydroxide, hexamethylenetetramine, and triethanolamine) and four acidic catalysts (i.e., acetic acid, hydrochloric acid, ammonium chloride, and phosphoric acid). The resins were replicated.

  9. Di-D-fructose dianhydride-enriched products by acid ion-exchange resin-promoted caramelization of D-fructose: chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Pereira, Elena; Rubio, Enrique M; Pilard, Serge; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M

    2010-02-10

    Caramelization commonly occurs when sugars, or products containing a high proportion of sugars, are heated either dry or in concentrated aqueous solutions, alone or in the presence of certain additives. Upon thermal treatment of sugars, dehydration and self-condensation reactions occur, giving rise to volatiles (principally 2-hydroxymethylfurfural, HMF), pigments (melanoidines) and oligosaccharidic material, among which di-D-fructose dianhydrides (DFAs) and glycosylated DFA derivatives of different degree of polymerization (DP) have been identified. This study reports a methodology to produce caramel-like products with a high content of DFAs and oligosaccharides thereof from commercial D-fructose based on the use of acid ion-exchange resins as caramelization promotors. The rate of formation of these compounds as a function of D-fructose concentration, catalyst proportion, temperature, catalyst nature and particle size has been investigated. The use of sulfonic acid resins allows conducting caramelization at remarkable low temperatures (70-90 degrees C) to reach conversions into DFA derivatives up to 70-80% in 1-2 h, with relative proportions of HMF < 2%.The relative abundance of individual DFA structures can be modulated by acting on the catalyst nature and reaction conditions, which offers a unique opportunity for nutritional studies of DFA-enriched products with well-defined compositions.

  10. Evolution of Diterpene Metabolism: Sitka Spruce CYP720B4 Catalyzes Multiple Oxidations in Resin Acid Biosynthesis of Conifer Defense against Insects1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism. PMID:21994349

  11. Evolution of diterpene metabolism: Sitka spruce CYP720B4 catalyzes multiple oxidations in resin acid biosynthesis of conifer defense against insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism.

  12. Removal of CdTe in acidic media by magnetic ion-exchange resin: A potential recycling methodology for cadmium telluride photovoltaic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Teng, E-mail: zhangteng@mail.iee.ac.cn; Dong, Zebin; Qu, Fei; Ding, Fazhu; Peng, Xingyu; Wang, Hongyan; Gu, Hongwei

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Sulfonated magnetic microsphere was prepared as one strong acid cation-exchange resin. • Cd and Te can be removed directly from the highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. • Good chemical stability, fast adsorbing rate and quick magnetic separation in strong acidic media. • A potential path for recycling CdTe photovoltaic waste. - Abstract: Sulfonated magnetic microspheres (PSt-DVB-SNa MPs) have been successfully prepared as adsorbents via an aqueous suspension polymerization of styrene-divinylbenzene and a sulfonation reaction successively. The resulting adsorbents were confirmed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The leaching process of CdTe was optimized, and the removal efficiency of Cd and Te from the leaching solution was investigated. The adsorbents could directly remove all cations of Cd and Te from a highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. The adsorption process for Cd and Te reached equilibrium in a few minutes and this process highly depended on the dosage of adsorbents and the affinity of sulfonate groups with cations. Because of its good adsorption capacity in strong acidic media, high adsorbing rate, and efficient magnetic separation from the solution, PSt-DVB-SNa MPs is expected to be an ideal material for the recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste.

  13. Effect of sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid on the surface roughness of acrylic resin polymerized by heated water for short and long cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sczepanski, Felipe; Sczepanski, Claudia Roberta Brunnquell; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the surface roughness of acrylic resin submitted to chemical disinfection via 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) or 1% peracetic acid (C2H4O3). The disc-shaped resin specimens (30 mm diameter ×4 mm height) were polymerized by heated water using two cycles (short cycle: 1 h at 74°C and 30 min at 100°C; conventional long cycle: 9 h at 74°C). The release of substances by these specimens in water solution was also quantified. Specimens were fabricated, divided into four groups (n = 10) depending on the polymerization time and disinfectant. After polishing, the specimens were stored in distilled deionized water. Specimens were immersed in 1% NaClO or 1% C2H4O3 for 30 min, and then were immersed in distilled deionized water for 20 min. The release of C2H4O3 and NaClO was measured via visual colorimetric analysis. Roughness was measured before and after disinfection. Roughness data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. There was no interaction between polymerization time and disinfectant in influencing the average surface roughness (Ra, P = 0.957). Considering these factors independently, there were significant differences between short and conventional long cycles (P = 0.012), but no significant difference between the disinfectants hypochlorite and C2H4O3 (P = 0.366). Visual colorimetric analysis did not detect release of substances. It was concluded that there was the difference in surface roughness between short and conventional long cycles, and disinfection at acrylic resins polymerized by heated water using a short cycle modified the properties of roughness.

  14. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  15. Resistance to fracture of endodontically treated premolars restored with glass ionomer cement or acid etch composite resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ranga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Due to the weakness of endodontically treated posterior teeth requires more strengthened restoration to withstand occlusal forces. The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the resistance to fracture of endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars restored with different materials in mesio-occluso-distal (MOD cavity preparations. Materials and Methods: MOD cavity preparations in 80 endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars were restored using four different methods. Fiber rings were filled with stone plaster and the teeth were placed into the plaster up to the level of cemento-enamel junction. The teeth were grouped according to restorative method, mounted in an Instrom T.T. machine, and the buccal walls subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. Result: The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups compared. All teeth fractured in a similar manner irrespective of the restorative method used. Conclusion: The resistance to the fracture of the teeth was the same when they were stored with glass ionomer cement as a base over which composite resin was placed. When the entire cavities were filled with glass ionomer cement, the resistance to fracture of the teeth decreased significantly compared with the acid etch resin technique.

  16. Effect of a self-etching primer and phosphoric acid etching on the bond strength of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Saiki, Osamu; Hiraba, Haruto; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to human enamel. A self-etching primer that contained 4-META (Teeth Primer, TP) and 35-45% or 60-65% concentrations of phosphoric acid (K-Etchant Gel, KE, and Super Bond C&B Red Activator, RA) were used as the surface treatment agents. A methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based self-polymerizing resin (Super-Bond C&B) was used as a luting agent. The shear bond strength was determined both pre and post thermocycling. The results were statistically analyzed with a non-parametric procedure. The post-thermocycling shear bond strength of the TP group was significantly higher than that of other groups, and that of the KE group was significantly higher compared with the RA group. These results demonstrated that 4-META was effective. Furthermore, when the degree of tooth demineralization was compared, surface treatment with less demineralization using TP was the most effective treatment.

  17. Leaf oil and resin acid components of lacebark pine, pinus bungeana zucc. Shiromatsu no ha no seiyu oyobi jushi san seibun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Nasuo; Dewa, Naoyuki; Tsuneya, Tomoyuki (Tottori Univ., Tottori (Japan). Faculty of General Education); Kageyama, Mikiko; Nakajima, Akira; Yamamoto, Jiro; Nakajima, Ruka (Shiono Koryo Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan))

    1989-11-30

    This study had the objective to search for the leafoil component of lacebark pine (Pinus bungeana Zucc), compare it with those of several other pines and Sciadopitys verillata Sieb, et Zucc whose fragrance comparatively resembles that of lacebark pine, and clarify the difference of fragrance. In addition, with regard to the resin acid component of resin, its comparison with those of red pine and black pine was made, and furthermore, in order to clarify the feature of the fragrance of lacebark pine, comparison by the enfleurage method was made with red pine, black pine and the above Sciadopitys. The leaf oils were extracted by steam distillation on the basis of making the extraction conditions such as the amount of samples, distillation time, and the amount of distillate, etc. as same as possible. As a result, with regard to the yield of the oil obtained by steam distillation, lacebark pine {prime} s was extremely big and almost twice more than those of black pine and red pine. Concerning the oil component, lacebark pine showed especially high contents of {alpha} -thujene, {alpha} -pinene and camphene and high contents of {beta} -caryophyllene and germacrene-D. Black pine had much of pinene and red pine had much of myrcene, etc. 21 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  19. Variability and determinants of wood dust and resin acid exposure during wood pellet production: measurement strategies and bias in assessing exposure-response relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagström, Katja; Lundholm, Cecilia; Eriksson, Kare; Liljelind, Ingrid

    2008-11-01

    Production of wood pellets is a relatively new and expanding industry in which the exposure profiles differ from those in other wood-processing industries like carpentries and sawmills where there are lower levels of wood dust. Sixty-eight personal exposure measurements of wood dust (inhalable and total dust) and resin acids were collected for 44 participants at four production plants located in Sweden. Results were used to estimate within- and between-worker variability and to identify uniformly exposed groups and determinants of exposure. In addition, overexposure, whether the risk of the long-term mean exposure of a randomly selected worker exceeding the occupational exposure limit is acceptably low, was calculated as well as the underestimation of the exposure-response relationship (attenuation). Greater variability in exposure between work shifts than between workers was observed with the within-worker variation accounting for 57-99% of the total variance in the individual-based model. Several uniformly exposed groups were detected but were mostly associated with a between-worker variation of zero which is an underestimation of the between-worker variation but an indication of uniformly exposed groups. Cleaning was identified as a work task that increases exposure slightly; so reducing workers' exposure during this operation is advisable. The levels of wood dust were high and were found to pose unacceptable risks of overexposure at all plants for inhalable dust and at three out of four plants for total dust. These findings show that exposure to dust needs to be reduced in this industry. For resin acids, the exposure was classed as acceptable at all plants. According to an individual-based model constructed from the data, the level of attenuation was high, and thus there would be substantial bias in derived dose-response relationships.

  20. Synthesis of novel chitosan resin derivatized with serine diacetic acid moiety and its application to on-line collection/concentration of trace elements and their determination using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Lukman; Sabarudin, Akhmad; Oshima, Mitsuko; Motomizu, Shoji

    2007-04-04

    A novel chelating resin functionalized with serine diacetic acid moiety was synthesized by using chitosan as base material, and applied to the collection/concentration of trace elements in environmental water samples, followed by the determination using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The synthesized resin, crosslinked chitosan serine diacetic acid (CCTS-SDA), showed good adsorption behavior toward trace amounts of Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, V, Ga, Sc, In, and Th in a wide pH range. Additionally, rare earth elements also can be retained on the resin at neutral pH region. The adsorbed elements can be easily eluted with 1 mol L(-1) of nitric acid, and their recoveries were found to be 90-100%. The CCTS-SDA was packed in a mini-column, which was then installed in a computer-controlled auto-pretreatment system (Auto-Pret System) for on-line trace elements collection and determination with ICP-AES. Experimental parameters which related to the improvement of sensitivity and reproducibility were optimized. The limits of detection (LOD) for 13 elements were found to be in sub-ppb level. The proposed method with CCTS-SDA resin was successfully applied to the determination of trace elements in river water samples. The method was validated by determining a certified reference material of river water, SLRS-4.

  1. Effect of a low-viscosity adhesive resin on the adhesion of metal brackets to enamel etched with hydrochloric or phosphoric acid combined with conventional adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkiner, Enver; Ozcan, Mutlu; Wegehaupt, Florian Just; Wiegand, Annette; Eden, Ece; Attin, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of a low-viscosity adhesive resin (Icon) applied after either hydrochloric (HCl) or phosphoric acid (H3PO4) on the adhesion of metal brackets to enamel. Failure types were analyzed. The crowns of bovine incisors (N = 20) were sectioned mesio-distally and inciso-gingivally, then randomly assigned to 4 groups according to the following protocols to receive mandibular incisor brackets: 1) H3PO4 (37%)+TransbondXT (3M UNITEK); 2) H3PO4 (37%)+Icon+TransbondXT; 3) HCl (15%)+Icon (DMG)+TransbondXT 4) HCl (15%)+Icon+Heliobond (Ivoclar Vivadent)+TransbondXT. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and thermocycled (5000x, 5°C to 55°C). The shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure types were classified according to the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Contact angles of adhesive resins were measured (n = 5 per adhesive) on ceramic surfaces. No significant difference in SBS was observed, implying no difference between combinations of adhesive resins and etching agents (p = 0.712; ANOVA). The Weibull distribution presented significantly lower Weibull modulus (m) of group 3 (m = 2.97) compared to other groups (m = 5.2 to 6.6) (p group 1 (45.4 ± 7.9) > group 2 (44.2 ± 10.6) > group 3 (42.6 ± 15.5). While in groups 1, 3, and 4 exclusively an ARI score of 0 (no adhesive left on tooth) was observed, in group 2, only one specimen demonstrated score 1 (less than half of adhesive left on tooth). Contact angle measurements were as follows: Icon (25.86 ± 3.81 degrees), Heliobond (31.98 ± 3.17 degrees), TransbondXT (35 ± 2.21 degrees). Icon can be safely used with the conventional adhesives tested on surfaces etched with either HCl or H3PO4.

  2. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl [Wastewater Division, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 319, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad, E-mail: ahoseinib@yahoo.com [Wastewater Division, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 319, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein [Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kharghani, Keivan [Water Division, Department of Engineering, Torbat-e-Hydarieh Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 121, Torbat-e-Hydarieh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei, Hossein [Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastegar, Ayoob [Wastewater Division, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 319, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Engineering, Kashmar Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 161, Kashmar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • The objective of the study is to investigate the potential application of a selective EIR for sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. • The effects of several physiochemical parameters were investigated. • The sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms were used to explain the sorption mechanism. • The thermodynamic studies showed the feasibility of sorption process. • The EIR beads showed a great potential for effective removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. - Abstract: In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid–liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions.

  3. Determination of isotopic composition of dissolved copper in seawater by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after pre-concentration using an ethylenediaminetriacetic acid chelating resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Shotaro; Tanimizu, Masaharu; Hirata, Takafumi; Sohrin, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A simple analytical method for determining the Cu isotopic composition in seawater using an ethylenediaminetriacetic acid chelating resin was developed. •The accuracy was evaluated via addition of NIST SRM976 or 65 Cu-enriched standard to seawater. •δ 65 Cu of seawater reference materials (i.e., CASS-5 and NASS-6) and seawater samples from the northwestern Pacific Ocean were firstly determined. -- Abstract: Copper is an essential trace metal that shows a vertical recycled-scavenged profile in the ocean. To help elucidate the biogeochemical cycling of Cu in the present and past oceans, it is important to determine the distribution of Cu isotopes in seawater. However, precise isotopic analysis of Cu has been impaired by the low concentrations of Cu as well as co-existing elements that interfere with measurements by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The objective of this study is to develop a simple Cu pre-concentration method using Nobias-chelate PA1 resin (Hitachi High Technologies). This extraction followed by anion exchange, allows precise analysis of the Cu isotopic composition in seawater. Using this method, Cu was quantitatively concentrated from seawater and >99.9999% of the alkali and alkaline earth metals were removed. The technique has a low procedural blank of 0.70 ng for Cu for a 2 L sample and the precision of the Cu isotopic analysis was ±0.07‰ (±2SD, n = 6). We applied this method to seawater reference materials (i.e., CASS-5 and NASS-6) and seawater samples obtained from the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The range of dissolved δ 65 Cu was 0.40–0.68‰

  4. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The objective of the study is to investigate the potential application of a selective EIR for sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. • The effects of several physiochemical parameters were investigated. • The sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms were used to explain the sorption mechanism. • The thermodynamic studies showed the feasibility of sorption process. • The EIR beads showed a great potential for effective removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. - Abstract: In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid–liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions

  5. Synthesis of activated carbon-based amino phosphonic acid chelating resin and its adsorption properties for Ce(III) removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Yan, Chunjie; Wang, Yixia; Tang, Conghai; Zhou, Sen; Zhao, Yuan; Ma, Rui; Duan, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the adsorption of Ce(III) onto chelating resin based on activated carbon (CRAC). The CRAC adsorbent was prepared from activated carbon (AC) followed by oxidation, silane coupling, ammoniation and phosphorylation, and characterized by Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry, nitrogen adsorption measurements and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of solution pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time were studied by batch technique. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to describe the adsorption behaviour of Ce(III) by CRAC, and the results showed that the adsorption behaviour well fitted the Langmuir model. The maximum uptake capacity (qmax) calculated by using the Langmuir equation for cerium ions was found to be 94.34 mg/g. A comparison of the kinetic models and the overall experimental data was best fitted with the type 1 pseudo second-order kinetic model. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) showed that the adsorption for Ce(III) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic at 25-45 °C. The CRAC showed an excellent adsorptive selectivity towards Ce(III). Moreover, more than 82% of Ce(III) adsorbed onto CRAC could be desorbed with HCl and could be used several times.

  6. Cost and Performance Report: Low-Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP)/Volatile Organic Compound (VOC)-Compliant Resins for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    acid chain length decrease (4), but cost is also a factor. Methacrylated lauric acid monomers represent a balance of these factors...affects the cost. Shorter fatty acids , such as octanoic acid , are more expensive than longer acids , such as lauric acid . Novolac resins are more... acid vinyl ester resin system FAVE-L fatty acid vinyl ester resin system based on lauric acid FAVE-O fatty acid vinyl ester resin system based

  7. A Tribute to Bardhan and Sengupta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    resin acids, such as pimaric acid and abietic acid (Figure 1), were ... acids. This prompted Bardhan and Sengupta to look into the locations of the substituents when no method was known by which substituted phenanthrenes could be obtained (see Box 1) .... phenanthrene using phenethyl magnesium halide (17) and cyclo-.

  8. Evaluation of some anionic exchange resins as potential tablet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of resin concentration and compression force on the properties of tablets using the selected resin was investigated. In addition, the disintegrant efficacy of the selected resin in the tablet formulations containing either a basic drug, e.g., dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DMP), or an acidic drug, e.g., diclofenac ...

  9. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  10. Development of radiation-curable resin based on natural rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan Mohd; Abdul Ghani Harun

    1993-01-01

    A new radiation curable resin based on natural rubber has been developed. The resin was based on the reaction between low molecular weight epoxidised natural rubber and acrylic acid. When formulated with reactive monomers and photoinitiator, it solidified upon irradiation with UV light. The resin may find applications in coating for cellulosic-based substrates and pressure-sensitive adhesive

  11. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  12. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Ng; Jimmy C. M. Hsiao; Keith C. T. Tong; Harry Kim; Yanjie Mai; Keith H. S. Chan

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin ...

  13. Resin Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    to see plastic deformation of the surface. 8.1.4.3 Density: Density using the Archimedes principle (ASTM D 792). 8.1.4.4 Density as a Function of...the cure and postcure, quickly cool the sample to 0 °C or lower the temperature to quench the reaction, and then ramp the temperature at 5 °C/min to...prepared by pouring 10 g of resin into a 30-mL screw-cap scintillation vial and adding appropriate amounts of initiator, catalyst, and inhibitor

  14. Epoxidation of linseed oil-Alkyd resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motawie, A.M.; Ismail, E.A.; Mazroua, A.M.; Abd EI Aziem, M.S.; Ramadan, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Three types of different linseed oil-alkyd resin ( Alk (I), Alk (II), and Alk (III) ) were prepared with the calculated amounts of mono glycerides and adipic acid (1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 Eq.Wt) respectively via monoglyceride method. The obtained alkyd resins were epoxidized via reaction with the calculated quantities of peracetic acid, which was prepared by the reaction of acetic anhydride with H 2 O 2 . Epoxidation occurred with the ratio (1: 1, 1 :3, and 1:6 Eq. Wt) of alkyd to peracetic acid. The effect of reaction time on the epoxy group content was measured during the epoxidation process. The prepared alkyd resins were analyzed by IR and H 1 NMR. The metal coated film properties of epoxidized alkyd resins were compared with those of unmodified alkyd resins. It was observed that the coating films of epoxidized alkyd resins have better in drying properties, hardness, adhesion, impact and flexibility than those of un epoxidized alkyd resins. The flammability properties of the paper coated films for the prepared brominated epoxidized alkyd resins were found to be fire retardant

  15. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  16. Recovery of tretrachloroaurate through ion exchange with Dowex 11 resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    The recovery of the tretrachloroaurate complex by the anionic ion exchange resin Dowex 11 has been studied. The kinetics of gold adsorption were dependent of both gold and resin concentrations and temperature. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the expression Q=kC''n. The loaded resin could be eluted by an acidic thiourea solution at 20 degree centigree. After several adsorption-elution cycles there is not any apparent loss in the adsorption properties of the resin. (Author) 6 refs

  17. Interacting Blends of Novel Unsaturated Polyester Amide Resin with Styrene

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Hasmukh S.; Panchal, Kumar K.

    2004-01-01

    Novel unsaturated poly (ester-amide) resins (UPEAs) were prepared by the reaction between an epoxy resin, namely diglycidyl ether of bisphenol–A (DGEBA) and unsaturated aliphatic bisamic acids using a base catalyst. These UPEAs were then blended with a vinyl monomer namely, Styrene (STY.) to produce a homogeneous resin syrup. The curing of these UPEAs-STY. resin blends was carried out by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a catalyst and was monitored by using a differential scanning calorimeter ...

  18. Preparation and characterization of molecularly-imprinted polymers for extraction of sanshool acid amide compounds followed by their separation from pepper oil resin derived from Chinese prickly ash (Zanthoxylum bungeanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Jin, Xinkai; Li, Yao; Chen, Guangjing; Chen, Kewei; Kan, Jianquan

    2018-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers were prepared using the molecular structure analogs of sanshool as template molecule, 2-vinylpyridine and β-cyclodextrin as double functional monomers, ethylene dimethacrylate as cross linker, and azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator. The structural characteristics of the polymers were determined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic adsorption and isothermal adsorption were also investigated. The molecularly imprinted polymers were used to prepare a molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction column in order to separate acid amide components from pepper oil resin derived from Chinese prickly ash (Zanthoxylum bungeanum). After eluting, the percentage of acid amide components was enhanced to 92.40 ± 1.41% compared with 23.34 ± 1.21% in the initial pepper oil resin, indicating good properties of purification of molecularly imprinted polymers and potential industrial application. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Low HAP/VOC Compliant Resins for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    on lauric acid FAVE-O fatty acid vinyl ester resin system based on octanoic acid FTIR Fourier transform infrared GIC Mode 1 fracture energy... lauric acid MOct methacrylated octanoic acid MPa megapascals Msi 1 million lb per square inch mW mega watt NESHAP National Emissions Standard... lauric acid (MLau) monomers represent a balance of these factors, as they have good resin and polymer properties, and low cost. Due to the low cost of

  20. Removing and recovering of uranium from the acid mine waters by using ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina por resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes do

    1998-07-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of the few processes capable of reducing ionic contaminants in effluents to very low levels. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The local mineralogical features, allied to the biogeochemical phenomena, owing to presence of pyrite in the rock piles, moreover another factors, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants, including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by anionic exchanger. The iron interference is eliminated by lime pretreatment of water, increasing pH from 2.6 to 3.3-3.8 to precipitate this cation, without changing the uranium amount. Eight anionic resins were tested, based on the uranium loading, in sorption studies. Retention time, and pH influence was verified for the exchanger chose. With breakthrough of 1 mg U/L and 10 mg U/l in the feed solution, the uranium decontamination level was 94%. Typical values of loading resin were 20-30 g U/l and 70-90 g SO{sub 4}/l. Uranium elution was done with Na Cl solution. Retention time, saline, and acid concentration were the parameters studied. The concentrate, obtained from the eluate by ammonia precipitation, presented uranium (86,8% as U{sub 3} O{sub 8}) and impurities within commercial specifications. (author)

  1. Detection of biologically active diterpenoic acids by Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talian, Ivan; Orinak, Andrej; Efremov, Evtim V.

    2010-01-01

    is not suitable for their unambiguous identification, especially not in solution. We attempted to increase the sensitivity by applying UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) techniques. The UV-Raman spectra of the three compounds in ethanol/water 50 : 50 showed only very......Three poorly detectable, biologically active diterpenoic acids, kaurenoic, abietic, and gibberellic acid, were studied by using different modes of Raman spectroscopy. Because of their structural similarities, in the absence of strongly polarizable groups, conventional Raman spectroscopy...

  2. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  3. Processing large-diameter poly(L-lactic acid) microfiber mesh/mesenchymal stromal cell constructs via resin embedding: an efficient histologic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Alessandro, Delfo; Danti, Serena; Pertici, Gianni; Moscato, Stefania; Metelli, Maria Rita; Petrini, Mario; Danti, Sabrina; Berrettini, Stefano; Nesti, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we performed a complete histologic analysis of constructs based on large diameter ( > 100 μm) poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) microfibers obtained via dry-wet spinning and rat Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (rMSCs) differentiated towards the osteogenic lineage, using acrylic resin embedding. In many synthetic polymer-based microfiber meshes, ex post processability of fiber/cell constructs for histologic analysis may face deterring difficulties, leading to an incomplete investigation of the potential of these scaffolds. Indeed, while polymeric nanofiber (fiber diameter = tens of nanometers)/cell constructs can usually be embedded in common histologic media and easily sectioned, preserving the material structure and the antigenic reactivity, histologic analysis of large polymeric microfiber/cell constructs in the literature is really scant. This affects microfiber scaffolds based on FDA-approved and widely used polymers such as PLLA and its copolymers. Indeed, for such constructs, especially those with fiber diameter and fiber interspace much larger than cell size, standard histologic processing is usually inefficient due to inhomogeneous hardness and lack of cohesion between the synthetic and the biological phases under sectioning. In this study, the microfiber/MSC constructs were embedded in acrylic resin and the staining/reaction procedures were calibrated to demonstrate the possibility of successfully employing histologic methods in tissue engineering studies even in such difficult cases. We histologically investigated the main osteogenic markers and extracellular matrix molecules, such as alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, osteocalcin, TGF-β1, Runx2, Collagen type I and the presence of amorphous, fibrillar and mineralized matrix. Biochemical tests were employed to confirm our findings. This protocol permitted efficient sectioning of the treated constructs and good penetration of the histologic reagents, thus allowing distribution and expression of

  4. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  5. Cloning and expression of a CYP720B orthologue involved in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids in Pinus brutia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiz, Asli; Sen, Alaattin

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases mediate a broad range of oxidative reactions involved in the biosynthesis of both primary and secondary metabolites in plants. Until now, only two P450 genes, CYP720B1 from Pinus taeda and CYP720B4 from Picea sitchensis, have been functionally characterised and described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to describe the cloning and expression of CYP720B from Pinus brutia due to its suggested role in the synthesis of bioactive compounds used for chemical defence against insects. A PCR product of the P. brutia CYP720B gene was cloned into the pCR8/GW/TOPO cloning vector. After optimising the sequence for codon usage in yeast, it was transferred into the inducible expression vector pYES-DEST52 and transfected into the S. cerevisiae INVSc1 strain. Sequence analysis showed that the P. brutia CYP720B gene contains an open reading frame of 1,464 nucleotides, which encodes a 53,570 Da putative protein of 487 amino acid residues. The putative protein contains the classic heme-binding sequence motif that is conserved in all P450 enzymes. It shares 99 and 61% identity with the deduced amino acid sequences of CYP720B1 from Pinus taeda and CYP720B4 from Picea sitchensis, respectively. Recombinant CYP720B protein expression was confirmed using western blot analysis. Furthermore, recombinant CYP720B was functionally active, showing a Soret peak at approximately 448 nm in the reduced CO difference spectra. These data suggest that the cloned gene is an orthologue of CYP720B in P. brutia and might be involved in DRA biosynthesis.

  6. Comparison of the irritation potentials of Boswellia serrata gum resin and of acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid by in vitro cytotoxicity tests on human skin-derived cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlando, Bruno; Parodi, Alessandro; Volante, Andrea; Bassi, Anna Maria

    2008-03-15

    Indian frankincense is a gum resin from Boswellia serrata of Burseraceae used in Ayurveda and Western medicine for the antinflammatory effects of boswellic acids, particularly 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA). We evaluated in vitro cytotoxicities of B. serrata extract and AKBA on differentiated and undifferentiated keratinocytes (HaCaT and NCTC 2544), and foetal dermal fibroblasts (HFFF2), using neutral red uptake (NRU), MTT, and DNA assays. Comparison between NRU and MTT, and between the extract and AKBA, suggested a relatively higher toxicity of both substances on lysosomes respect to mitochondria. Extract cytotoxicity on lysosomes was higher in NCTC and HFFF2 than on the more differentiated HaCaT. DNA assay showed low extract inhibition on HFFF2 proliferation, possibly due to lower growth rate, and a stronger effect on NCTC than on HaCaT, possibly related to higher proapoptotic effect on the less differentiated NCTC, as also suggested by higher AKBA toxicity on NCTC than on HaCaT. In general, gum resin and AKBA toxicities were slightly lower or higher than that of the reference compound SDS. Our in vitro model allowed to compare the sensitivities of different human skin cells to B. serrata, and indicated that the gum resin and AKBA exert moderate to low toxicity on the skin.

  7. Evolution of Conifer Diterpene Synthases: Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis in Lodgepole Pine and Jack Pine Involves Monofunctional and Bifunctional Diterpene Synthases1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dawn E.; Zerbe, Philipp; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet; Madilao, Lina L.; Yuen, Macaire; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are major components of pine (Pinus spp.) oleoresin. They play critical roles in conifer defense against insects and pathogens and as a renewable resource for industrial bioproducts. The core structures of DRAs are formed in secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism via cycloisomerization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) by diterpene synthases (diTPSs). Previously described gymnosperm diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze the initial bicyclization of GGPP followed by rearrangement of a (+)-copalyl diphosphate intermediate at two discrete class II and class I active sites. In contrast, similar diterpenes of gibberellin primary (i.e. general) metabolism are produced by the consecutive activity of two monofunctional class II and class I diTPSs. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we discovered 11 diTPS from jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Three of these were orthologous to known conifer bifunctional levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthases. Surprisingly, two sets of orthologous PbdiTPSs and PcdiTPSs were monofunctional class I enzymes that lacked functional class II active sites and converted (+)-copalyl diphosphate, but not GGPP, into isopimaradiene and pimaradiene as major products. Diterpene profiles and transcriptome sequences of lodgepole pine and jack pine are consistent with roles for these diTPSs in DRA biosynthesis. The monofunctional class I diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis form a new clade within the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d3 subfamily that evolved from bifunctional diTPS rather than monofunctional enzymes (TPS-c and TPS-e) of gibberellin metabolism. Homology modeling suggested alterations in the class I active site that may have contributed to their functional specialization relative to other conifer diTPSs. PMID:23370714

  8. Evolution of conifer diterpene synthases: diterpene resin acid biosynthesis in lodgepole pine and jack pine involves monofunctional and bifunctional diterpene synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dawn E; Zerbe, Philipp; Jancsik, Sharon; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Dullat, Harpreet; Madilao, Lina L; Yuen, Macaire; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are major components of pine (Pinus spp.) oleoresin. They play critical roles in conifer defense against insects and pathogens and as a renewable resource for industrial bioproducts. The core structures of DRAs are formed in secondary (i.e. specialized) metabolism via cycloisomerization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) by diterpene synthases (diTPSs). Previously described gymnosperm diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze the initial bicyclization of GGPP followed by rearrangement of a (+)-copalyl diphosphate intermediate at two discrete class II and class I active sites. In contrast, similar diterpenes of gibberellin primary (i.e. general) metabolism are produced by the consecutive activity of two monofunctional class II and class I diTPSs. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we discovered 11 diTPS from jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). Three of these were orthologous to known conifer bifunctional levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthases. Surprisingly, two sets of orthologous PbdiTPSs and PcdiTPSs were monofunctional class I enzymes that lacked functional class II active sites and converted (+)-copalyl diphosphate, but not GGPP, into isopimaradiene and pimaradiene as major products. Diterpene profiles and transcriptome sequences of lodgepole pine and jack pine are consistent with roles for these diTPSs in DRA biosynthesis. The monofunctional class I diTPSs of DRA biosynthesis form a new clade within the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d3 subfamily that evolved from bifunctional diTPS rather than monofunctional enzymes (TPS-c and TPS-e) of gibberellin metabolism. Homology modeling suggested alterations in the class I active site that may have contributed to their functional specialization relative to other conifer diTPSs.

  9. Studying Room Temperature Curing of Phenolic Resin and their Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Beheshty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic resins are synthetic low molecular weight thermoset resins which are polymerized and cured to higher molecular weights by condensation method. These resins have high weathering resistance, high oxidative thermal properties and good chemical resistance. Phenolic resins can be cured thermally or by acid curing. The most common method of curing phenolic resin is by thermal curing that takes place in the range of 130-180oC. At room temperature, however, phenolic resins are cured by acid catalysts. In this paper, room temperature curing of resol phenolic resin by para toluene sulphonic acid has been investigated. The acid quantity has been determined for room temperature curing of two types of resols to achieve a reasonable hardness and gelation time. Temperature curing and thermal stability of respective resins have been investigated by DSC and TGA, respectively. A glass-phenolic composite plate has been prepared and cured by these two methods. The results show that the optimum amount of acid is 20% by weight. Optimum mechanical properties, chemical resistance and thermal properties have been achieved for acid cured system. The hot cured resin, however, has better properties.

  10. Method for curing alkyd resin compositions by applying ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Murata, K.; Maruyama, T.

    1975-01-01

    An alkyd resin composition is prepared by dissolving a polymerizable alkyd resin having from 10 to 50 percent of oil length into a vinyl monomer. The polymerizable alkyd resin is obtained by a half-esterification reaction of an acid anhydride having a polymerizable unsaturated group and an alkyd resin modified with conjugated unsaturated oil having at least one reactive hydroxyl group per one molecule. The alkyd resin composition thus obtained is coated on an article, and ionizing radiation is applied on the article to cure the coated film thereon. (U.S.)

  11. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Ng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  12. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith H. S.; Mai, Yanjie; Kim, Harry; Tong, Keith C. T.; Ng, Desmond; Hsiao, Jimmy C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  13. Triterpenoids of Resin of Schinus terebinthifolius and Their Anti-inflammatory Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuhito, Nobushi; Taiki, Matsushita; Naoki, Oikawa; Yuzo, Okazaki; Shigetoshi, Tsutsumi; Masahiko, Kurokawa; Young Kun, Park; Ken, Yasukawa; School of Pharmacy, Nihon University; School of Pharmacy, Nihon University; School of Pharmacy, Nihon University; Amazonfood Ltd.; Amazonfood Ltd.; Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University of Health and Welfare; Department of Food Science, College of Food Engineering, State University of Campinas

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory effects on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation in mice was observed in the methanol extract of the plant resin of Schinus terebinthifolius. Five known compounds were isolated from the resin of S. terebinthifolius: betulonic acid, moronic acid, 3-oxooleanolic acid, masticadienoic acid and anwuweizonic acid.

  14. Treatment method for stabilization of radioactive exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideo, Oni; Takashi, Miyake; Hitoshi, Miyamoto; Toshio, Funakoshi; Yuzo, Inagaki.

    1988-01-01

    This is a method for eluting radioactive nuclides from a radioactive ion exchange resin in which it has been absorbed. First, the Cs in this resin is extracted using a neutral salt solution which contains Na + . The Cs that has been transferred to the neutral salt solution is absorbed and expelled by inorganic ion exchangers. Then the Co, Fe, Mn and Sr in said resin are eluted using an acidic solution; the Co, Fe, Mn and Sr that have been transferred to the acidic solution are separated from that solution by means of a diffusion dialysis vat. This process is a unique characteristic of this ion exchange resin treatment method. 1 fig

  15. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  16. Post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, A.U.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin using a digital microhardness tester. Change in hardness of these materials over a period of 6 months was compared to that of conventional glass ionomer cements and a composite resin. With the exception of the composite resin, all materials showed a significant increase in hardness over 24 h after their initial set. Dual-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed decreased hardness with increased storage time in saline at 37 o C. Results suggest that the addition of resins to glass ionomer cements does not improve initial hardness and does not negate the acid-base reaction of conventional cements. Resin addition may, however, lead to increased water sorption and decreased hardness. (author)

  17. Ontario Hydro Research Division's program for treatment of spent ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nott, B.R.; Dodd, D.J.R.

    1981-09-01

    A brief review of the evolution of work programmes for chemical treatment of spent ion-exchange resins in Ontario Hydro's Research Division is presented. Attention has been focussed on pre-treatment processes for the treatment of the spent resins prior to encapsulation of the products in solid matrices. Spent Resin Regeneration and Acid Stripping processes were considered in some detail. Particular attention was paid to carbon-14 on spent resins, its determination in and removal from the spent resins (with the acid stripping technique). The use of separate cation and anion resin beds instead of mixed bed resins was examined with a view to reducing the volume of resin usage and consequently the volume of waste radioactive ion-exchange resin generated. (author)

  18. Epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Glenn R.; Salyer, Ival O.; Ball, III, George L.

    1976-07-13

    By mixing one part of a prepolymer containing a polyamine partially polymerized with an organic epoxide and subsequently reacted with a fatty acid containing from 8 to 32 carbon atoms, and then reacting this prepolymer mixture with 3 parts of an organic epoxide, a composition was obtained which made a gas frothable, shear-stable, room temperature curing, low density foam. A particularly advantageous prepolymer was prepared using a polyamine selected from the group consisting of diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine, and tetraethylenepentamine, partially polymerized with an organic epoxide having an average molecular weight of about 350 and having an epoxide equivalent of 185 to 192, and reacted with 2-10 weight percent linoleic acid. When one part of this prepolymer was reacted with about three parts of epoxy, and frothed by whipping in air or nitrogen an epoxy foam was produced which could be troweled onto surfaces and into corners or crevices, and subsequently cured, at near ambient temperature, to a strong dimensionally stable foam product.

  19. Environmentally Friendly Bio-Based Vinyl Ester Resins for Military Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    formulations have been developed. The FAVE-L resin uses 65% Bisphenol A vinyl ester monomer, 20 wt% styrene, and 15 wt% methacrylated lauric acid (MLau...composites, fatty acid , vinyl ester 9. Distribution $tatement (requr’iedl lsmanuscript subjectto export control? E ruo I yes Circfe appropriate l tter and...resins is to replace some or all of the styrene with fatty acid -based monomers. These fatty acid vinyl ester resins allow for the formulation of high

  20. Design of a metal primer containing a dithiooctanoate monomer and a phosphonic acid monomer for bonding of prosthetic light-curing resin composite to gold, dental precious and non-precious metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Fujii, Toshihide; Negoro, Noriyuki; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    The effect of metal primers on adhesion of a resin composite to dental metal alloys was investigated. Experimental primers containing a dithiooctanoate monomer [10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT) or 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (6-MHDT)] and a phosphonic acid monomer [6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA) or 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 3-phosphonopropionate (6-MHPP)] were prepared. After treating Au, Au alloy, Ag alloy, Au-Ag-Pd alloy, and Ni-Cr alloy with the experimental primers, their shear bond strengths (SBSs) with a prosthetic light-curing resin composite (Solidex, Shofu Inc., Japan) were measured after 1-day storage followed by 5,000 thermal cycles. The SBSs between Solidex and the primer-treated metals which were incubated in air at 50°C for 2 months were further measured. Results showed that the SBSs [mean (SD)] of all metal adherends treated with primer DT-PA-1 (5.0 wt% 10-MDDT, 1.0 wt% 6-MHPA) ranged between 31.2 (5.2) and 34.5 (5.8) MPa. The SBSs of the primer-treated metals did not degrade after 2-month incubation at 50°C. Therefore, a combined primer application consisting of a dithiooctanoate monomer and a phosphonic acid monomer provided efficacious bonding to Au as well as precious and non-precious metal alloys.

  1. USE OF STRONG ACID RESIN PUROLITE C100E FOR REMOVING PERMANENT HARDNESS OF WATER – FACTORS AFFECTING CATIONIC EXCHANGE CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOGDAN BANDRABUR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper experimentally investigates the performance and capacity of Purolite C100E commercial resin recommended for water softening applications in the food industry. The practical ion exchange capacity and the softening process efficiency are studied in batch mode as a function of the sorption specific process factors. Optimum operation conditions were determined as initial pH 7.1, resin dose 8 g dry resin•L-1, temperature 25 oC, contact time of 360 min, and in those conditions the retention capacity for the Ca2+ ions is 17.18 mg•g-1 that corresponds to a removal efficiency equal to 85.7%.

  2. Method of heat decomposition for chemical decontaminating resin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To make resin wastes into non-deleterious state, discharge them into a resin waste storage tank of existent radioactive waste processing facility and store and dispose them. Constitution: In the processing of chemical decontaminating resin wastes, iron exchange resins adsorbing chemical decontaminating agents comprising a solution of citric acid, oxalic acid, formic acid and EDTA alone or as a mixture of them are heated to dry, thermally decomposed and then separated from the ion exchange resins. That is, the main ingredients of the chemical decontaminating agents are heat-decomposed when heated and dried at about 250 deg C in air and converted into non-toxic gases such as CO, CO 2 , NO, NO 2 or H 2 O. Further, since combustion or carbonization of the basic materials for the resin is not caused at such a level of temperature, the resin wastes removed with organic acid and chelating agents are transferred to an existent resin waste storage tank and stored therein. In this way, facility cost and radiation exposure can remarkably be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Modified ion exchange resins - synthesis and properties. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doescher, F.; Klein, J.; Pohl, F.; Widdecke, H.

    1982-01-22

    Sulfomethylated resins are prepared by polymer analogous reactions, starting from macroporous poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) matrices. Different reaction paths are discussed and used in the synthesis. Sulfomethylation can be achieved by reaction of a chloromethylated resin with dimethyl sulfide and sodium sulfonate or alternatively by oxidation of polymer-bound thiol groups. Both methods give high conversions as shown by IR spectra and titration of the sulfonic acid groups. Poly(1-(4-hydroxysulfomethylphenyl)ethylene) (3) is obtained by reaction of poly(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylene) (2) resin with formaldehyde/sodium sulfonate. The thermal stability, catalytic activity, and ion exchange equilibria of the sulfomethylated resin are investigated.

  4. Initial Development of Composite Repair Resins With Low Hazardous Air Pollutant Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    particular, methacrylated octanoic acid (MOct) and methacrylated lauric acid (MLau) were used to formulate many of the HAP-free repair resins because of... acid MLau methacrylate lauric acid MOct methacrylate octanoic acid MS glass microspheres N sodium metaborate, NaBO2 NESHAP National...NESHAP. Fortunately, nonvolatile fatty acid monomers can be used to replace the styrene in these repair resins. Fatty acid monomers were

  5. Uptake behaviour of actinides employing malonamide grafted polystyrene-divinyl benzene resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, S.A.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, one resin was prepared by chemically anchoring N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-dibutyl malonamide (DMDBMA) to chloromethylated polymeric resin. An attempt has been made to investigate the solid phase extraction of trivalent (Am and Pu), tetravalent (Pu and Th) and hexavalent (U) actinides using the anchored resin from nitric acid solution

  6. Color test for selective detection of secondary amines on resin and in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Mirsharghi, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Resins for solid-phase synthesis give orange to red-brown resin beads selectively when secondary amines are present on the resin when treated with a solution of acetaldehyde and an Fmoc-amino acid in NMP. The method shows good specificity and gives colorless beads when exposed to a variety of other...

  7. Interacting Blends of Novel Unsaturated Polyester Amide Resin with Styrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasmukh S. Patel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel unsaturated poly (ester-amide resins (UPEAs were prepared by the reaction between an epoxy resin, namely diglycidyl ether of bisphenol–A (DGEBA and unsaturated aliphatic bisamic acids using a base catalyst. These UPEAs were then blended with a vinyl monomer namely, Styrene (STY. to produce a homogeneous resin syrup. The curing of these UPEAs-STY. resin blends was carried out by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO as a catalyst and was monitored by using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. The glass fibre reinforced composites (i.e. laminates of these UPEA-STY. resin blends were fabricated using the DSC data. The chemical, mechanical and electrical properties of the glass fibre composites have also been evaluated. The unreinforced cured samples of the UPEA-STY. resin blends were also analyzed by thermogravimetry (TGA.

  8. Resin glycosides from the aerial parts of Operculina turpethum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenbing; Jiang, Zi-Hua; Wu, Ping; Xu, Liangxiong; Wei, Xiaoyi

    2012-09-01

    Three glycosidic acids, turpethic acids A-C, and two intact resin glycosides, turpethosides A and B, all having a common pentasaccharide moiety and 12-hydroxy fatty acid aglycones of different chain lengths, were obtained from the aerial parts of Operculina turpethum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and chemical correlations. The aglycones were characterized as 12-hydroxypentadecanoic acid in two compounds, 12-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid in two other components, and 12-hydroxyheptadecanoic acid in the fifth compound, which were all confirmed by synthesis. The absolute configurations of these aglycones were all established as S by Mosher's method. These compounds represent the first examples of resin glycosides with a monohydroxylated 12-hydroxy fatty acid as an aglycone, and one compound is the first described resin glycoside having a hydroxylated C(17) fatty acid as its aglycone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Penggunaan Fiber Reinforced Composite Sebagai Resin Bonded Prosthesis Pada Gigi Anterior

    OpenAIRE

    Pintadi, Hastoro

    2007-01-01

    Resin bonded prosthesis is a fixed bridge which replace a space where one or two teeth have been lost or extracted, by using acid etched technique and resin bonding. The main goals in selecting a Resin bonded prosthesis were to preserve tooth structure, maintain esthetics and lower patient fees while providing restorations that had the potential for long-term service. This case report discuss about fiber reinforced composite used as a main material for resin bondedprosthesis to replace incivu...

  10. Interacting Blends of Novel Unsaturated Polyester Amide Resin with Vinyl Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, H. S.; Panchal, K. K.; Patel, S. R.; Desai, S. N.

    2004-01-01

    Novel unsaturated poly (ester- amide) resins (UPEAs) were prepared by the reaction between an epoxy resin, namely diglycidyl ether of bisphenol–A (DGEBA) and unsaturated aliphatic bisamic acids using a base catalyst. These UPEAs were then blended with a vinyl monomer namely, Vinyl acetate (VA) to produce a homogeneous resin syrup. The curing of these UPEAs-VA resin blends was carried out by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as an initiator for the radical polymerization and was monitored by using ...

  11. Microshear bond strength of composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates utilizing unfilled versus filled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Siamak; Ghasemi, Amir; Kotick, Philip G

    2014-11-01

    Failures such as marginal discoloration and composite chipping are still the problems of tooth-colored restorations on the substrate of enamel and porcelain, which some of these problems are consequently as a result of failures in the bonding layer. Using filled resin has been recently introduced to increase the bond strength of this layer. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins to enamel incubated in periods of 24 h and 9 months and porcelain with unfilled resin and flowable composites (filled resin). In this in vitro study, two groups of 75 enamel samples with different storage times (24 h and 9 months) and a group of 75 porcelain samples were used. They were divided into 5 experimental groups of 15 samples in each. Composite cylinders in tygon tubes were bonded on the surface of acid-etched enamel and pretreated porcelain. Wave, Wave MV, Wave HV, Grandioflow and Margin Bond were used as bonding agents. The μ-SBS was measured at the speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bond strengths were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey test. P composites (filled resins) can be used instead of unfilled resins in bonding composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates.

  12. Resin catalysts and method of preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1986-12-16

    Heat stabilized catalyst compositions are prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  13. On-line preconcentration using a resin functionalized with 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid for the determination of trace elements in biological samples by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, Valfredo A.; Bezerra, Marcos A.; Amorim, Fabio A.C.

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper, an on-line preconcentration procedure for determination of cadmium, copper and zinc by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) is proposed. Amberlite XAD-4 functionalized with 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (XAD4-DHB) packed in a minicolumn was used as sorbent material. The metals were retained on the XAD-DHB resin, from which it could be eluted directly to the thermospray flame furnace system. The detection limits were 28 (Cd), 100 (Cu) and 77 ng L -1 (Zn) for 60 s preconcentration time, at a sample flow rate of 7.0 mL min -1 . Enrichment factors were 102, 91 and 62, for cadmium, copper and zinc, respectively. The procedure has been applied successfully to metal determination in biological standard reference materials

  14. Study and application on lean resin converting in uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shaoxi; Huang Qijin; Zhu Shuguang; Yi Faqing; Du Wenjie

    2012-01-01

    The field test about sulphuric acid used to convert lean resin was finished. The results indicated sulphuric acid could replace chlorin in lean resin and could be reclaimed to desorption procedure. The consumption of NaCl decreased, the chlorin concentration of tailing decreased too. Both of uranium loss and waste water volume were reduced. The uranium concentration of tailing decreased and energy saving and emission reduction can be achieved. (authors)

  15. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  16. Application of Ketone-Based Resins as Anticorrosive Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esma Sezer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of some newly synthesized modified ketonic resins on corrosion inhibition of stainless steel (SS and copper (Cu was investigated in acidic medium. Carboxyl, hydroxyl, and carbonyl functionalized resins have been coated on metal electrode as a thin film by dipping method. Corrosion characteristics of coating on SS (304 L and Cu were investigated by polarization, open-circuit, and impedance measurement. These measurements performed at different time and the stability of polymeric coating were tested with time in acidic medium. The resin coating was able to protect both the SS and copper.

  17. Four Pentasaccharide Resin Glycosides from Argyreia acuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bang-Wei; Sun, Jing-Jing; Pan, Jie-Tao; Wu, Xiu-Hong; Yin, Yong-Qin; Yan, You-Shao; Hu, Jia-Yan

    2017-03-11

    Four pentasaccharide resin glycosides, acutacoside F-I ( 1 - 4 ), were isolated from the aerial parts of Argyreia acuta . These compounds were characterized as a group of macrolactones of operculinic acid A, and their lactonization site of 11 S -hydroxyhexadecanoic acid was esterified at the second saccharide moiety (Rhamnose) at C-2. The absolute configuration of the aglycone was S . Their structures were elucidated by established spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  18. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000?). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  19. Four new resin glycosides, murasakimasarins I-IV, from the tuber of Ipomoea batatas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Masateru; Teramoto, Sena; Naito, Saori; Takahashi, Asuka; Yoneda, Akito; Shinkai, Masato; Taga, Naoki; Yasuda, Sin; Tsuchihasi, Ryota; Okawa, Masafumi; Kinjo, Junei; Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro

    2018-03-05

    Four new resin glycosides having macrolactone structures (jalapins), murasakimasarins I-IV, were isolated from the tubers of Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. ('Murasakimasari', Convolvulaceae), along with three known glycosides. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data as well as chemical evidence. Murasakimasarin III is the first representative of a resin glycoside with 10-methylundecanoic acid as the component organic acid.

  20. Synthesis of a boron modified phenolic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida M. Kawamoto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic resin has long been used as matrix for composites mainly because of its flame retardant behavior and high char yield after pyrolysis, which results in a self supporting structure. The addition of ceramic powders, such as SiC and B4C, as fillers to the phenolic resin, results in better thermo-oxidative stability, but as drawbacks, it has poor homogeneity, adhesion and processing difficulties during molding of the composites. The addition of single elements, such as boron, silicon and phosphorus in the main backbone of the thermo-set resin is a new strategy to obtain special high performance resins, which results in higher mechanical properties, avoiding the drawbacks of simply adding fillers, which results in enhanced thermo-oxidative stability compared to conventional phenol-formaldehyde resins. Therefore, the product can have several applications, including the use as ablative thermal protection for thermo-structural composites. This work describes the preparation of a boron-modified phenolic resin (BPR using salicyl alcohol and boric acid. The reaction was performed in refluxing toluene for a period of four hours, which produced a very high viscosity amber resin in 90% yield.The final structure of the compound, the boric acid double, substituted at the hydroxyl group of the aromatic ring, was determined with the help of the Infrared Spectroscopy, ¹H-NMR, TGA-DSC and boron elemental analysis. The absorption band of the group B-O at 1349 cm ˉ¹ can be visualized at the FT-IR spectrum. ¹H-NMR spectra showed peaks at 4.97-5.04 ppm and 3.60-3.90 ppm assigned to belong to CH2OH groups from the alcohol. The elemental analysis was also performed for boron determination.The product has also been tested in carbon and silicon fibers composite for the use in thermal structure. The results of the tests showed composites with superior mechanical properties when compared with the conventional phenolic resin.

  1. Determination of degradation conditions of exchange resins containing technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera S, A.; Monroy G, F.; Quintero P, E.

    2014-10-01

    The quantification of Tc-99 in spent exchange resins, coming from nuclear power plants, is indispensable to define their administration. The Tc-99 is a pure beta emitter of 210000 years of half-life, volatile and of a high mobility in water and soil. For this reason, the objective of this work is to establish a digestion method of ionic exchange resins containing technetium that retains more than 95% of this radioisotope. Mineralization tests were carried out of a resin Amberlite IRN-150 by means of an oxidation heat, in acid medium, varying the resin mass, the medium volume, the media type, the temperature and the digestion time. The digested samples were analyzed by gas chromatography to estimate the grade of their degradation. The 99m Tc was used as tracer to determine the technetium percentage recovered after mineralizing the resin. The digestion process depends on the temperature and the resin mass. At higher temperature better mineralization of samples and to greater resin mass to a constant temperature, less degradation of the resin. The spectra beta of the 99m Tc and 99 Tc are presented. (Author)

  2. Amino acid analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  3. Two pentasaccharide resin glycosides from Argyreia acuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yong-Qin; Pan, Jie-Tao; Yu, Bang-Wei; Cui, Hong-Hua; Yan, You-Shao; Chen, Yan-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Two new compounds of acutacosides 1 and 2, pentasaccharide resin glycosides were isolated from the aerial parts of Argyreia acuta. The core of the two compounds was operculinic acid A, and they were esterfied at the same position, just one substituent group was linked at C-2 of Rha. The absolute configuration of the aglycone in the two compounds was established by Mosher's method, which was (11S)-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (jalapinolic acid). Their structures were established by a combination of spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  4. Study on removing chlorin by conversion-aborption of chlorin resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yunbai; Zhao Jinfang; Tang Zhijuan; Huang Qijin; Deng Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Theon version of chlorin resin and the reclamation of acid and uranium in converting solution were investigated. The results indicated the residual chlorin can meet the requirement after converting, acid and uranium in converting solution can be reclaimed. (authors)

  5. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  6. Waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resin obtained by miniemulsion polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Murillo, Edwin; López, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Four waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resins (HBRAA) were synthesized by miniemulsion polymerization from a hyperbranched alkyd resin (HBR), methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA) and acrylic acid (AA), by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and ammonium persulfate (AP) as initiators. The reaction between HBR and acrylic monomers was evidenced by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The conversion p...

  7. Separation of actinium-227 from its daughter products by cationic resins technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastasi, M.J.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method for separating actinium-227 from its daughter products based on ion exchange principle is shown. Radionuclides mixture in perchloric acid 8,5 N and chloridric acid 0,5 N medium pass by a cationic resin column. Thorium-227 and actinium-227, which are retained by the resin, are eluted with nitric acid 6 N which releases actinium-227 while oxalic acid 7% is used for thorium-227 elution [pt

  8. Chromatography of metal ions with a triazine chelating resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.N.

    1979-05-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and some analytical applications of a new triazine resin are described. Separation of group IB, IIB, VIB, and VIIB metal ions from group VIII metal ions is achieved by this PDT-4 resin. Calcium(II) and magnesium(II) are taken up at pH = 6, 0.1 M acetate and are eluted at pH = 6, 0.1 M sodium nitrate. Copper(II) is retained at pH = 6, 0.1 M acetate and pH = 1 hydrochloric acid and is eluted subsequently by 5 M perchloric acid. Molybdenum(VI) is sorbed selectively from 0.1 N sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid and is eluted in a tight band by 0.1 N sodium hydroxide. Numerous rapid column chromatographic separations are reported using this new resin, including analysis of NBS standard samples.

  9. Chromatography of metal ions with a triazine chelating resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.N.

    1979-05-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and some analytical applications of a new triazine resin are described. Separation of group IB, IIB, VIB, and VIIB metal ions from group VIII metal ions is achieved by this PDT-4 resin. Calcium(II) and magnesium(II) are taken up at pH = 6, 0.1 M acetate and are eluted at pH = 6, 0.1 M sodium nitrate. Copper(II) is retained at pH = 6, 0.1 M acetate and pH = 1 hydrochloric acid and is eluted subsequently by 5 M perchloric acid. Molybdenum(VI) is sorbed selectively from 0.1 N sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid and is eluted in a tight band by 0.1 N sodium hydroxide. Numerous rapid column chromatographic separations are reported using this new resin, including analysis of NBS standard samples

  10. Ion exchange resin fouling of molybdenum in recovery uranium processess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guowei; Zhao Guirong

    1990-09-01

    The relationship between anion exchange resin fouling and molybdic acid polymerization was studied. By using potentiometer titration and laser-Raman spectroscopy the relationship of molybdic acid polymerization and the pH value of solution or the molybdenum concentration was determined. It was shown that as the concentration of initial molybdenum in solution decreases from 0.2 mol/L to 0.5 mmol/L, the pH value of starting polymerization decreased from 6.5 to 4.5. The experimental results show that the fouling of 201 x 7 resin in the acidic solution is mainly caused by the adsorbing of Mo 3 O 26 4- ion and occupying the exchange radical site of the resin. Under the leaching conditions the molybdenum and phosphate existing in the leaching liquor can form 12-molybdo-phosphate ion. It also leads to resin fouling. The molybdenum on the fouled resin can synergically be desorbed by mixed desorbents containing ammonium hydroxide and ammonium sulfate. The desorbed resin can be used for uranium adsorption and the desorbed molybdenum can be recovered by ion exchange method

  11. Diterpene resin acid biosynthesis in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda): functional characterization of abietadiene/levopimaradiene synthase (PtTPS-LAS) cDNA and subcellular targeting of PtTPS-LAS and abietadienol/abietadienal oxidase (PtAO, CYP720B1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2006-08-01

    Diterpene resin acids are prominent defense compounds against insect pests and pathogens in conifers. Biochemical and molecular analyses in grand fir (Abies grandis), Norway spruce (Picea abies), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) have identified two classes of genes and enzymes that generate much of the structural diversity of terpenoid defense compounds: The terpenoid synthases (TPS) and cytochrome P450 monooxgenases (P450). Using a single substrate, geranylgeranyl diphosphate, families of single-product and multi-product diterpene synthases generate an array of cyclic diterpene olefins. These diterpenes are converted to diterpene resin acids by activity of one or more P450 enzymes. A few conifer diterpene synthases have previously been cloned and characterized in grand fir and in Norway spruce. We have also previously shown that the loblolly pine P450 abietadienol/abietadienal oxidase (PtAO) catalyzes multiple oxidations of several diterpene alcohols and aldehydes. Conifer diterpene synthases are thought to function in plastids while P450s can also be localized to plastids or to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here, we show that a loblolly pine cDNA (PtTPS-LAS) encodes a typical multi-product conifer diterpene synthase that forms levopimaradiene, abietadiene, palustradiene, and neoabietadiene similar to the grand fir abietadiene synthase and Norway spruce levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase. Subcellular targeting of PtTPS-LAS and PtAO to plastids and ER, respectively, was shown with green fluorescent fusion protein expression in tobacco cells. These data suggest that enzymes for conifer diterpene resin acid biosynthesis are localized to at least two different subcellular compartments, plastids and ER, requiring efficient transport of intermediates and secretion of diterpene resin acids into the extracelluar space.

  12. Ionization radiation curable polyacrylate resin coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.S.

    1975-01-01

    A carboxylic acid chloride or bromide, a sulfonyl chloride or bromide, cyanuric chloride, calcium hypochlorite or phosphorus oxychloride and optionally a buffering pigment are combined with a liquid, acrylate ester resin curable by exposure to high-energy ionizing radiation to yield a coating composition which upon being cured in air by exposure to ionizing radition yields a coating having an essentially tack-free surface. (Patent Office Record)

  13. Rheology of Polyaniline Dispersions in Acrylic Resin

    OpenAIRE

    PLESU, Nicoleta; LIESCU, Smaranda; ILIA, Gheorghe

    2006-01-01

    Acrylic dispersions based on polyaniline were obtained and characterised. The polyaniline was obtained by chemical polymerisation of aniline in different organic acid containing phosphorous, in the presence of ammonium-peroxidisulphate as oxidant agent. The blends were obtained by mechanical dispersion of polyaniline in commercially available acrylic resin. The flow behaviour of these dispersions at different shear rates was studied. Furthermore, the resulting acrylic dispersions w...

  14. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    to epoxy resin remained stable over the study period. Of the patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test, 71% returned a questionnaire; 95 patients had worked with epoxy resin in the occupational setting, and, of these, one-third did not use protective gloves and only 50.5% (48) had participated...

  15. Triterpenes from the resin of Boswellia neglecta | Dekebo | Bulletin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-03-13

    The resin of Boswellia neglecta yielded four triterpenes canaric acid, a -amyrin, a -amyrone and epi-a -amyrin. Canaric acid and epi-a -amyrin are isolated here for the first time from the family Burseraceae. The compounds were identified using 1D and 2D NMR techniques. (Received March 13, 2002; revised May 17, 2002)

  16. Enhancement of adhesion between resin coating materials and resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoaki; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Weerasinghe, Dinesh S; Harada, Naoko; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-07-01

    Resin coating technique is a unique method that improves the dentin bond strength of resin cements in indirect restorations. However, the weak link of a specimen bonded using the resin coating technique was reported to be the bonded interface between the resin coating material and resin cement. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to enhance the bonding performance between a resin coating material and a resin cement. Two light-cured flowable composites, Protect Liner F and Clearfil Flow FX, were used as coating materials, and two dual-cure composite materials, Panavia F 2.0 and Clearfil DC Core Automix, were used as resin cements. The ultimate tensile strength of each material and the microtensile bond strengths of the bonded specimens of resin coating material and resin cement were measured using a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Three-way ANOVA (p=0.05) revealed that the highest microtensile bond strength was obtained using a combination of Clearfil Flow FX and Clearfil DC Core Automix, and when the surface of the coating material was treated with ED Primer II. It was strongly suggested that materials with a higher ultimate tensile strength, when used in both resin coating and cementation, could enhance the bond strength between the two.

  17. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  18. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Kniazev, O.

    2001-01-01

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  19. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Kniazev, O. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Dept. Biotechnology, Mocow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  20. Method for digesting spent ion exchange resins and recovering actinides therefrom using microwave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, III, Sherrod L.; Nichols, Sheldon T.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods for digesting diphosphonic acid substituted cation exchange resins that have become loaded with actinides, rare earth metals, or heavy metals, in a way that allows for downstream chromatographic analysis of the adsorbed species without damage to or inadequate elution from the downstream chromatographic resins. The methods of the present invention involve contacting the loaded diphosphonic acid resin with concentrated oxidizing acid in a closed vessel, and irradiating this mixture with microwave radiation. This efficiently increases the temperature of the mixture to a level suitable for digestion of the resin without the use of dehydrating acids that can damage downstream analytical resins. In order to ensure more complete digestion, the irradiated mixture can be mixed with hydrogen peroxide or other oxidant, and reirradiated with microwave radiation.

  1. Enlightening the past: analytical proof for the use of Pistacia exudates in ancient Egyptian embalming resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Tim M; Gradl, Manuela; Welte, Beatrix; Metzger, Michael; Pusch, Carsten M; Albert, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Mastic, the resinous exudate of the evergreen shrub Pistacia lentiscus, is frequently discussed as one of the ingredients used for embalming in ancient Egypt. We show the identification of mastic in ancient Egyptian embalming resins by an unambiguous assignment of the mastic triterpenoid fingerprint consisting of moronic acid, oleanonic acid, isomasticadienonic and masticadienonic acid through the consolidation of NMR and GC/MS analysis. Differences in the observed triterpenoid fingerprints between mummy specimens suggest that more than one plant species served as the triterpenoid resin source. Analysis of the triterpenoid acids of ancient embalming resin samples in the form of their methyl- and trimethylsilyl esters is compared. In addition we show a simple way to differentiate between residues of mastic from its use as incense during embalming or from direct mastic application in the embalming resin. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Resin-salve from Norway spruce--a potential method to treat infected chronic skin ulcers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipponen, Arno; Rautio, Merja; Jokinen, Janne J; Laakso, Tapio; Saranpää, Pekka; Lohi, Jouni

    2007-04-01

    The home-made resin salve from Norway spruce is traditionally and widely used in folk medicine to heal various skin infections and wounds in Northern Finland. We have performed laboratory studies to solve the mechanism of resin salve. The resin salve exhibited a bacteriostatic effect against all tested Gram-positive bacteria important in human medicine including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), but was not effective against Gram-negative bacteria. An exception among the Gram-negative bacteria was Proteus vulgaris against which resin salve was effective. High amounts of lipophilic extractives, like resin acids were dissolved into water from the resin salve. Also, a large proportion of lignans and cinnamic acid were found in the water extract.

  3. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity Effects of Oleo-Gum-Resin and Its Essential Oil of Ferula assa-foetida and Ferulic Acid on 4T1 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Seyyed Majid; Asl, Amir Abdian; Shams, Ali; Mirghanizadeh-Bafghi, Seyyed Ali; Hafizibarjin, Zeynab

    2017-01-01

    Cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality and is a major public health problem worldwide. Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in women, and the incidence is also on the rise in the entire world. Medicinal plants have been an important source of several clinically useful anticancer agents. In this study, we studied the growth inhibitory effect of asafoetida and its essential oil and ferulic acid on antitumor activity using mouse breast cancer cell line. For this aim, cells were exposed to these components at different concentrations and for different time durations. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was carried out to characterize the cytotoxicity of the constituents used. Our results showed that all three constituents could inhibit 4T1 cell proliferation. Our MTT assay results showed a significant cytotoxicity effect in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. It also demonstrated that essential oil of asafoetida has a stronger effect in decreasing viability breast cancer cells. Ferulic acid showed a significant effect only at a dose of 500 μg/ml. Based on the results of cellular carried out in this study, we could demonstrate that asafoetida and its essential oil and ferulic acid have inhibitory effect on the growth of breast cancer cell line. As evidenced from these preliminary results, asafoetida and its derivative constituents may be considered as attractive alternatives to serve as lead compounds in drug development for breast cancer as an adjuvant therapy. However, much remains to be done before such agent could be introduced to the clinic.

  4. Cementation of residue ion exchange resins at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dustin, D.F.; Beckman, T.D.; Madore, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    Ion exchange resins have been used to purify nitric acid solutions of plutonium at Rocky Flats since the 1950s. Spent ion exchange resins were retained for eventual recovery of residual plutonium, typically by incineration followed by the aqueous extraction of plutonium from the resultant ash. The elimination of incineration as a recovery process in the late 1980s and the absence of a suitable alternative process for plutonium recovery from resins led to a situation where spent ion exchange resins were simply placed into temporary storage. This report describes the method that Rocky Flats is currently using to stabilize residue ion exchange resins. The objective of the resin stabilization program is: (1) to ensure their safety during interim storage at the site, and (2) to prepare them for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Included in the discussion is a description of the safety concerns associated with ion exchange resins, alternatives considered for their stabilization, the selection of the preferred treatment method, the means of implementing the preferred option, and the progress to date

  5. Composition of asphaltenes and resins of west Siberian petroleums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, I.V.; Babicheva, T.A.; Bodak, A.N.; Nemirovskaya, G.B.; Mashigorov, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    ESR and X-ray diffraction analysis was used to examine asphaltene and resin samples of West Siberia. Experiments were carried out to simulate the effect of catagenesis on resin and asphaltene composition. Processes of thermocatalytic transformations of crude oil in the deposit were found to have no marked effect on asphaltene and resin composition. Transformation of the organic input at sedimentation was assumed to be the main factor determining the qualitative and quantitative composition of crude oil resins and asphaltenes of West Siberia. Petroleums formed from organic matter, accumulating under reducing conditions, contain more asphaltenes and resins, they include much tetravalent vanadium and the asphaltenes have abundant paramagnetic centres. Petroleums formed from oxidized organic matter contain very little asphaltene low concentrations of paramagnetic centers, and little tetravalent vanadium. Resins of these petroleums are rich in oxygen. High levels of asphalt-resin matter in petroleums is related to the presence in the initial organic progenitors of polyunsaturated fatty acids and various nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  6. Carbon-14 removal for disposal of reactor deionizer resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlton, W.H.; Baumann, E.W.

    1991-01-01

    Disposal of depleted ion exchange resins from the primary system of the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors is complicated by the presence of Carbon-14. Because Carbon-14 has a long half-life (5,730 years) and high mobility in soils, burial of the resins is no longer a viable option. Consequently some 35 spent reactor deionizers have accumulated that are to be stored aboveground in H-Area for an indefinite period. Spent deionizers containing Carbon-14 will continue to accumulate with operation of the present production reactors and would also accumulate from the proposed heavy water new production reactor. Removal of the Carbon-14 from the resins would reduce the volume of Carbon-14 bearing waste and enable the resins to be disposed of as low-level waste. Studies at SRS have indicated that the Carbon-14 from reactor primary coolant is mostly retained by the resins as the bicarbonate anion. Thus Carbon-14 removal might be accomplished by an acidification operation with trapping of the carbon dioxide released, for separate disposal. Conversion of the bicarbonate from the resin to barium carbonate, for example, would reduce the volume of waste more than a hundredfold. Displacement and recovery of Carbon-14 dioxide from reactor coolant deionizers by acid treatment has been reported by the Canadians. This memorandum recommends that a process be developed for Carbon-14 dioxide removal from SRS spent reactor deionizer resins, drawing on the Canadian experience

  7. Diphonix trademark Resin: A review of its properties and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    The recently developed Diphonix trademark resin is a new multifunctional chelating ion exchange resin containing seminally substituted diphosphonic acid ligands chemically bonded to a styrene-based polymeric matrix. Diphonix can be regarded as a dual mechanism polymer, with a sulfonic acid cation exchange group allowing for rapid access, mostly non-specific, of ions into the polymeric network, and the diphosphonic acid group responsible for specificity (recognition) for a number of metal cations. The Diphonix resin exhibits an extraordinarily strong affinity for actinides, especially in the tetra- and hexavalent oxidation states. It has potential applications in TRU and mixed waste treatment and characterization, and in the development of new procedures for rapid actinide preconcentration and separation from environmental samples. Metal uptake studies have been extended to alkaline earth cations, to transition and post transition metal species, and to metal sorption from neutral or near neutral solutions. Also the kinetic behavior of the resin has been investigated in detail. Influence of the most commonly occurring matrix constituents (Na, Ca, Al, Fe, hydrofluoric, sulfuric, oxalic and phosphoric acids) on the uptake of actinide ions has been measured. This review paper summarizes the most important results studies on the Diphonix resin and gives an overview of the applications already in existence or under development in the fields of mixed waste treatment, actinide separation procedures, treatment of radwaste from nuclear power plants, and removal of iron from copper electrowinning solutions

  8. Quantitative analysis of PMR-15 polyimide resin by HPLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Lauver, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of individual components and of total solids of 50 wt pct PMR-15 resin solutions was determined using reverse-phase HPLC to within + or - 8 percent accuracy. Acid impurities, the major source of impurities in 3,3', 4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDE), were eliminated by recrystallizing the BTDE prior to esterification. Triester formation was not a problem because of the high rate of esterification of the anhydride relative to that of the carboxylic acid. Aging of PMR-15 resin solutions resulted in gradual formation of the mononadimide and bisnadimide of 4,4'-methylenedianiline, with the BTDE concentration remaining constant. Similar chemical reactions occurred at a reduced rate in dried films of PMR-15 resin.

  9. [Effect of soil phenolic acids on soil microbe of coal-mining depressed land after afforestation restoration by different tree species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Li; Yang, Li Xue

    2017-12-01

    Phenolic acids are one of the most important factors that influence microbial community structure. Investigating the dynamic changes of phenolic acids and their relationship with the microbial community structure in plantation soils with different tree species could contribute to better understanding and revealing the mechanisms of microbial community changes under afforestation restoration in coal-mining subsidence areas. In this study, plantations of three conifer and one deciduous species (Pinus koraiensis, Larix gmelinii, Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica, and Populus ussuriensis) were established on abandoned coal-mining subsidence areas in Baoshan District, Shuangyashan City. The contents of soil phenols, 11 types of phenolic acids, and microbial communities in all plots were determined. The results showed that the contents of soil complex phenol in plantations were significantly higher than that of abandoned land overall. Specifically, soils in larch and poplar plantations had higher contents of complex phenol, while soils in larch and Korean pine plantations had greater contents of total phenol. Moreover, soil in the P. koraiensis plantation had a higher content of water-soluble phenol compared with abandoned lands. The determination of 11 phenolic acids indicated that the contents of ferulic acid, abietic acid, β-sitosterol, oleanolic acid, shikimic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid were higher in plantation soils. Although soil phenol contents were not related with soil microbial biomass, the individual phenolic acids showed a significant relationship with soil microbes. Ferulic acid, abietic acid, and β-sitosterol showed significant promoting effects on soil microbial biomass, and they showed positive correlations with fungi and fungi/bacteria ratio. These three phenolic acids had higher contents in the poplar plantation, suggesting that poplar affo-restation had a beneficial effect on soil quality in coal-mining subsidence areas.

  10. Isoconversional kinetic analysis of the alkyd/melamine resins curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The curing reaction for the mixtures of alkyd resins based on ricinoleic acid, phthalic anhydride and three polyols (glycerin, trimethylolpropane or ethoxylated pentaerythritol with two different commercial melamine resins was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The curing kinetics analysis was performed using the isoconversional methods (Ozawa-Flynn-Wall, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and Friedman. Isoconversional methods were carried out with three heating rates (5, 10 and 20°C/min in a scanning temperature range from 40 to 250°C. It was found that the curing activation energy of resin mixtures is influenced by alkyd and melamine resin type due to the catalytic effect of hydroxyl group on the reactions. The dependence of apparent curing degree on time, which was obtained by mathematical transformations of dynamic DSC data using Ozawa-Flynn-Wall method, describes well the isothermal DSC experiments.

  11. Marginal leakage of compacted gold, composite resin, and high-copper amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormati, A A; Chan, K C

    1980-10-01

    Amalgam and compacted gold were found to have the least marginal leakage in Class V cavities. Composite resin with acid etching performed at an acceptable level. Without acid etching the marginal seal was unsatisfactory. The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. High-copper amalgam and compacted gold are the materials of choice for Class V restorations when esthetics are not of primary concern. 2. If composite resins are to be used, they should be placed with an acid-etch technique.

  12. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  13. Bismaleimide Copolymer Matrix Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John A.; Heimbuch, Alvin H.; Hsu, Ming-Ta S.; Chen, Timothy S.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite composites, prepared from 1:1 copolymer of two new bismaleimides based on N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have mechanical properties superior to those prepared from other bismaleimide-type resins. New heat-resistant composites replace metal in some structural applications. Monomers used to form copolymers with superior mechanical properties prepared by reaction of MMAB with maleic or citraconic anhydride.

  14. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  15. Use of the 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin for microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieronymaki, Matthaia; Androutsou, Maria Eleni; Pantelia, Anna; Friligou, Irene; Crisp, Molly; High, Kirsty; Penkman, Kirsty; Gatos, Dimitrios; Tselios, Theodore

    2015-09-01

    A fast and efficient microwave (MW)-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis protocol using the 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin and the Fmoc/tBu methodology, has been developed. The established protocol combines the advantages of MW irradiation and the acid labile 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin. The effect of temperature during the MW irradiation, the degree of resin substitution during the coupling of the first amino acids and the rate of racemization for each amino acid were evaluated. The suggested solid phase methodology is applicable for orthogonal peptide synthesis and for the synthesis of cyclic peptides. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Two cases of occupational allergic contact dermatitis from a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin in a neat oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte D; Andersen, Klaus E

    2003-01-01

    to a neat oil used in metal processing. Patch testing revealed that the relevant contact allergen was a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin, 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, bis(oxiranylmethyl) ester, added to the oil as a stabilizer. None of the patients had positive reactions to the bisphenol A-based epoxy resin...... product is essential....

  17. A New Resin Glycoside, Muricatin IX, from the Seeds of Ipomoea muricata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Masateru; Taketomi, Saki; Kakiki, Yuichi; Yasuda, Shin; Okawa, Masafumi; Kinjo, Junei; Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    A new resin glycoside, named muricatin IX (1), was isolated from the seeds of Ipomoea muricata (L.) JACQ. (Convolvulaceae). The structure of 1 was determined on the basis of spectroscopic data as well as chemical evidence. Compound 1 is the first representative of resin glycosides in which an organic acid connects the sugar moiety and the aglycone moiety to form macrocyclic ester ring.

  18. (THBA) resin and its use in extraction of heavy metal ions from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption of heavy metal cations, Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Fe(II) from aqueous solution by newly-synthesized tamarind 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (THBA) resin was investigated. The resin was characterised on the basis of FTIR, elemental analysis, ion-exchange capacity and physico-chemical properties.

  19. Biokompatibilitas Gelas Ionomer Modifikasi Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Rotua Lestari M

    2008-01-01

    Saat ini banyak berkembang material baru dalam dunia kedokteran gigi diantaranya adalah Gelas ionomer modifikasi resin yang dikembangkan untuk mengatasi kekurangan-kekurangan dari gelas ionomer konvensional. Adanya penambahan monomer resin daIam bentuk 2-hydroxyethylmetacylate (HEMA) telah meningkatkan kekuatan dari bahan ini. Gelas ionomer modifikasi resin mempunyai sifat-sifat fisis dan mekanis yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan gelas ionomer konvensional. Gelas ionomer modifikasi ...

  20. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  1. Study of phosphorous based resins for the uptake of plutonium from H2SO4 based analytical waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, H.; Mohandas, Jaya; Srinivasan, S.; Kumar, T.; Rajan, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    This study indicates that phosphorous based resins can be conveniently employed for the uptake of plutonium from analytical wastes even in strong acid media and also in the presence of diverse ions like silver and chromium. It is also evident that phosphorous based resins have proved to be efficient even in sulphuric acid medium

  2. Subsurface degradation of resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Rafat; Tyas, Martin J; Burrow, Michael F

    2007-08-01

    To determine the depth of a degraded subsurface layer produced in dental composites as a result of exposure to lactic acid or NaOH, by observing the penetration of AgNO(3) solution. Specimens were prepared from four resin composites; Point 4 (Kerr), Premise (Kerr), Filtek Supreme (3M/ESPE), Ceram X (Dentsply), and two polyacid-modified resin composites; Dyract (Dentsply) and F2000 (3M/ESPE). The specimens were immersed in distilled water for 1 week, transferred to one of three aqueous media at 60 degrees C for 2 weeks; distilled water, 0.01mol/L lactic acid or 0.1N NaOH, washed and immersed in 50% (w/w) aqueous silver nitrate for 10 days at 60 degrees C and placed in a photodeveloper solution. After reduction of the silver, specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned and polished, coated with carbon, and examined by backscattered mode scanning electron microscopy. The depth of silver penetration into the degraded area was measured from the SEM micrographs. Energy dispersive analysis X-ray (EDAX) was used to confirm the presence of silver. NaOH produced the greatest depth of degradation and lactic acid the least. Premise showed the greatest depth of silver penetration when subjected to NaOH, and Filtek Supreme the second with peeling of the surface and cracking, whereas F2000 and Point 4 showed the least in NaOH and lactic acid. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that the depth of silver penetration was material and solution dependent, and the differences were significant for most of the materials (P<0.05).

  3. Synthesis and curing of alkyd enamels based on ricinoleic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Jovičić Mirjana C.; Radičević Radmila Ž.; Simendić Vesna B.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of an alkyd resin with a melamine-formaldehyde resin gives a cured enamel film with the flexibility of the alkyd constituent and the high chemical resistance and hardness of the melamine resin at the same time. The melamine resin is a minor constituent and plays the role of a crosslinking agent. In this paper, alkyd resins of high hydroxyl numbers based on trimethylolpropane, ricinoleic acid and phthalic anhydride were synthesized. Two alkyds having 30 and 40 wt% of ricino...

  4. Fast kinetic and efficient removal of As(V) from aqueous solution using anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donia, Ahmed M.; Atia, Asem A.; Mabrouk, Dalia H.

    2011-01-01

    Glycidyl methacrylate/methelenebisacrylamide resin with immobilized tetraethylenepentamine ligand was prepared. This pentamine containing resin was transformed to two anion exchange resins through treatment by glycidyl trimethylammonium chloride to give (RI) or hydrochloric acid giving (RII). The resins were used to adsorb As(V) at different experimental conditions using batch and column methods. Kinetics and thermodynamic properties as well as the mechanism of interaction between As(V) and resin active sites were discussed. The maximum adsorption capacities of As(V) on RI and RII were found to be 1.83 and 1.12 mmol/g, respectively. The regeneration and the durability of the loaded resin towards the successive reuse were also investigated.

  5. Interacting Blends of Novel Unsaturated Polyester Amide Resin with Vinyl Acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Patel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel unsaturated poly (ester- amide resins (UPEAs were prepared by the reaction between an epoxy resin, namely diglycidyl ether of bisphenol–A (DGEBA and unsaturated aliphatic bisamic acids using a base catalyst. These UPEAs were then blended with a vinyl monomer namely, Vinyl acetate (VA to produce a homogeneous resin syrup. The curing of these UPEAs-VA resin blends was carried out by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO as an initiator for the radical polymerization and was monitored by using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. The glass fibre reinforced composites (i.e. laminates of these UPEA-VA resin blends were fabricated using the DSC data. The chemical, mechanical and electrical properties of the glass fibre composites have also been evaluated. The unreinforced cured samples of the UPEA-VA resin blends were also analyzed by thermogravimetry (TGA.

  6. The application of methacrylate resin and the derivation as restorative material of damaged tooth tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adioro Soetojo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of methacrylate resin and the derivation (composite resin and dentin bonding in clinical conservative dentistry has been widely developed. This material could be used to restore class I-V cavity with good aesthetic due to the compatible color with tooth. Composite resin adhesion hydrophobically in enamel that is due to mechanic retention in the form of resin tags which penetrates into enamel porosity. Meanwhile hydrophilic dentin bonding adhesion due to the chemical reaction between functional groups of amino collagen with carbonyl in dentin bonding forming amide binding. In addition mechanical retention in which dentin bonding penetrating into nano inter fibrilar cavity then polymerized. The success of methacrylate resin adhesion restoration is decided by enamel porosity, wetting character of resin, wetting contact angle, good etching acid, optimal humidity of tooth surface, the accuracy of dentist during filling is done etc.

  7. Marginal adaptation of composite resins under two adhesive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dačić, Stefan; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolić, Marija; Cenić, Milica; Dačić-Simonović, Dragica

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, different adhesive techniques were used to set up fillings with composite resins. After the application of etch and rinse or self etch adhesive technique, marginal adaptation of composite fillings was estimated by the length of margins without gaps, and by the microretention of resin in enamel and dentin. The study material consisted of 40 extracted teeth. Twenty Class V cavities were treated with 35% phosphorous acid and restored after rinsing by Adper Single Bond 2 and Filtek Ultimate-ASB/FU 3M ESPE composite system. The remaining 20 cavities were restored by Adper Easy One-AEO/FU 3M ESPE composite system. Marginal adaptation of composite fillings was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The etch and rinse adhesive technique showed a significantly higher percentage of margin length without gaps (in enamel: 92.5%, in dentin: 57.3%), compared with the self-etch technique with lower percentage of margin length without gaps, in enamel 70.4% (p resin tugs in interprismatic spaces of enamel, while the dentin microretention was composed of adhesive and hybrid layers with resin tugs in dentin canals. In the second technique, resin tugs were rarely seen and a microgap was dominant along the border of restoration margins. The SEM analysis showed a better marginal adaptation of composite resin to enamel and dentin with better microretention when the etch and rinse adhesive procedure was applied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Gastroprotective activity of the resin from Virola oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Claudia Hertel; Lenz, Dominik; Nogueira, Breno Valentim; Scherer, Rodrigo; Andrade, Tadeu Uggere; Costa, Helber Barcellos da; Romão, Wanderson; Pereira, Thiago Melo Costa; Endringer, Denise Coutinho

    2017-12-01

    The resin from the trunk wood of Virola oleifera (Schott) A. C. Smith (Myristicaceae) is used in folk medicine to hasten wound repair and to treat pain and inflammatory conditions, and our previous report indicated the anti-oxidative properties in other oxidative stress model. To investigate the protective effects of resin from V. oleifera in two experimental models of gastric ulcer oxidative-stress dependent. Plant material was collected and the resin was subjected to partitioning with organic solvents. The buthanol fraction was subjected to chromatographic and spectrometric methods for isolation and structural elucidation. The resin was quantified for polyphenols and flavonoids by colorimetric methods. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of resin was determined by three different methods. The ulcers were induced acutely in Swiss male mice with ethanol/HCl and indomethacin using single-doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg. The gastroprotection of the experimental groups was comparable to reference control lansoprazole (3 mg/kg). The high content of polyphenols (∼82%) and the presence of epicatechin and eriodictyol were determined. The LD 50 was estimated at 2500 mg/kg. At minimum (10 mg/kg) and maximum (100 mg/kg) dosage of resin, both in ethanol/HCl as indomethacin ulcer induction models demonstrate reduction of lesions (minimum: ∼97% and ∼66%; maximum: ∼95% and ∼59%). The gastroprotection might be related to tannins, phenolic acids and flavonoids present in the resin by antioxidant properties. The results indicate that this resin has gastroprotective activity probably associated with the presence of phenolic antioxidant substances.

  9. Influence of denture cleansers on the color stability of three types of denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guang; Murata, Hiroshi; Li, YingAi; Sadamori, Sinshuke; Hamada, Taizo

    2009-03-01

    Color stability is an important property of denture base acrylic resin. Color changes indicate aging or damaged dental materials. However, little information is available on the influence of denture cleansers on the color stability of acrylic resins. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of denture cleansers on the color stability of 3 different types of acrylic resin. One heat-polymerized (HP) acrylic denture base resin (Acron), 1 autopolymerized (AP) hard direct reline acrylic resin (Denture Liner), and 1 visible-light-polymerized (VLP) hard direct reline acrylic resin (Tokuso Lite-Rebase) were evaluated. Five specimens of each material, 10 x 10 x 2 mm, were immersed in 1 of 9 commercial denture cleanser solutions or distilled water (control). Color changes were measured with a colorimeter and evaluated using the CIE L*a*b* colorimetric system. Data were analyzed using 1-way and 3-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (alpha=.05). Significant differences (P<.05) were found among the acrylic resins and denture cleansers in terms of color change (DeltaE) produced after 365 days. The DeltaE values of all denture base acrylic resins increased with time. The DeltaE of the AP acrylic resin was larger than that of the other acrylic resins. The least discoloration was found with ZTC denture cleanser (acid type). The influence of alkaline peroxide-type denture cleanser (Steradent) on the color stability of HP acrylic resin and AP acrylic resin was significantly greater (P<.05) than that of the other cleansers. These results suggest that the color stability of denture base acrylic resins is influenced by polymerization type and the type of denture cleanser used.

  10. Methyl Jasmonate Induces Traumatic Resin Ducts, Terpenoid Resin Biosynthesis, and Terpenoid Accumulation in Developing Xylem of Norway Spruce Stems1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diane; Tholl, Dorothea; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) produces an oleoresin characterized by a diverse array of terpenoids, monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, and diterpene resin acids that can protect conifers against potential herbivores and pathogens. Oleoresin accumulates constitutively in resin ducts in the cortex and phloem (bark) of Norway spruce stems. De novo formation of traumatic resin ducts (TDs) is observed in the developing secondary xylem (wood) after insect attack, fungal elicitation, and mechanical wounding. Here, we characterize the methyl jasmonate-induced formation of TDs in Norway spruce by microscopy, chemical analyses of resin composition, and assays of terpenoid biosynthetic enzymes. The response involves tissue-specific differentiation of TDs, terpenoid accumulation, and induction of enzyme activities of both prenyltransferases and terpene synthases in the developing xylem, a tissue that constitutively lacks axial resin ducts in spruce. The induction of a complex defense response in Norway spruce by methyl jasmonate application provides new avenues to evaluate the role of resin defenses for protection of conifers against destructive pests such as white pine weevils (Pissodes strobi), bark beetles (Coleoptera, Scolytidae), and insect-associated tree pathogens. PMID:12114556

  11. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  12. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  13. Electrodeposition properties of modified cational epoxy resin-type photoresist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong He; Yunlong Zhang; Feipeng Wu; Miaozhen Li; Erjian Wang

    1999-01-01

    Multi-component cationic epoxy and acrylic resin system for ED photoresist was used in this work, since they can provide better storage stability for ED emulsion and better physical and chemical properties of deposited film than one-component system. The cationic main resin (AE) was prepared from amine modified epoxy resins and then treated with acetic acid. The amination degree was controlled as required. The synthetic procedure of cationic main resins is described in scheme I. The ED photoresist (AME) is composed of cationic main resin (AE) and nonionic multifunctional acrylic crosslinkers (PETA), in combination with suitable photo-initiator. They can easily be dispersed in deionized water to form a stable ED emulsion. The exposed part of deposited film upon UV irradiation occurs crosslinking to produce an insoluble semi-penetrating network and the unexposed part remains good solubility in the acidic water solution. It is readily utilized for fabrication of fine micropattern. The electrodeposition are carried out on Cu plate at room temperature. To evaluate the electrodeposition properties of ED photoresist (AME), the different influences are examined

  14. An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    , quantification of cesium adsorption performance as a function of operating temperature and pH, and evaluation of sodium uptake (titration) as function of pH and counteranion concentration. The results of these efforts are presented in this report. Hydraulic performance of the resin and the use of eluant alternatives to nitric acid have also been evaluated and have been reported elsewhere (Taylor 2009, Taylor and Johnson 2009).

  15. Urea-formaldehyde resins: production, application, and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryawan, A.; Risnasari, I.; Sucipto, T.; Heri Iswanto, A.; Rosmala Dewi, R.

    2017-07-01

    Urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin, one of the most important formaldehyde resin adhesives, is a polymeric condensation product of formaldehyde with urea, and being widely used for the manufacture of wood-based composite panels, such as plywood, particleboard, and fiberboard. In spite of its benefits such as fast curing, good performance in the panels (colorless), and lower cost; formaldehyde emission (FE) originated from either UF resin itself or composite products bonded by UF resins is considered a critical drawback as it affects human health particularly in indoor environment. In order to reduce the FE, lowering formaldehyde/urea (F/U) mole ratio in the synthesis of the UF resin was done. In this study, synthesis of UF resins was carried out following the conventional alkaline-acid two-step reaction with a second addition of urea, resulting in F/U mole ratio around 1.0, namely 0.95; 1.05, and 1.15. The UF resins produced were used as binder for particleboard making. The board was manufactured in the laboratory using shaving type particle of Gmelina wood, 8% UF resin based on oven dry particle, and 1% NH4Cl (20%wt) as hardener for the resin. The target of the thickness was 10 mm and the dimension was 25 cm x 25 cm. The resulted particleboard then was evaluated the physical and the mechanical properties by Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) A 5908 (2003). Further, the resulted particleboard also was used for the mice cage’s wall in order to mimic the real living environment. After four weeks exposure in the cages, the mice then were evaluated their mucous organs as well as their blood. The experiment results were as follows: 1) It was possible to synthesis UF resins with low F/U mole ratio; 2) However, the particleboard bonded UF resins with low F/U mole ratio showed poor properties, particularly on the thickness swelling and modulus of elasticity; 3) There was no significant differences among the mucous organs of the mice after a month exposure FE originated from

  16. Three new diterpenoids from the resin of Liquidambar formosana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hong-Jie; Li, Dan-Yi; Wang, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhan-Lin; Hua, Hui-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Three new diterpenoids, liquidambolide A (1) and liquiditerpenoic acids A (2) and B (3), together with 10 known diterpenes were isolated from the resin of Liquidambar formosana Hance, whose structures were elucidated by detailed analysis on the NMR and HR-ESI-MS spectra.

  17. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  18. Primary study on synthesis and characterization of the new type EB curable resins. Pt.2: Alkyd resins modified by LFA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Min; Wei Jinshan; Li Jun; Wang Ruiyu; Ha Hongfei

    1995-01-01

    The authors have synthesized a new type of EB curable resin by using oil fatty acid. The preparation method of coating and the performance of EB curing coating film were described. The synthesis process has been simplified and the price of the raw materials was lower

  19. Carbon dioxide capture using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, YuPo J.; Snyder, Seth W.; Trachtenberg, Michael S.; Cowan, Robert M.; Datta, Saurav

    2015-09-08

    The present invention provides a resin-wafer electrodeionization (RW-EDI) apparatus including cathode and anode electrodes separated by a plurality of porous solid ion exchange resin wafers, which when in use are filled with an aqueous fluid. The apparatus includes one or more wafers comprising a basic ion exchange medium, and preferably includes one or more wafers comprising an acidic ion exchange medium. The wafers are separated from one another by ion exchange membranes. The fluid within the acidic and/or basic ion exchange wafers preferably includes, or is in contact with, a carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme to facilitate conversion of bicarbonate ion to carbon dioxide within the acidic medium. A pH suitable for exchange of CO.sub.2 is electrochemically maintained within the basic and acidic ion exchange wafers by applying an electric potential across the cathode and anode.

  20. Gastroprotective effect of the Mapuche crude drug Araucaria araucana resin and its main constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Astudillo, Luis; Rodríguez, Jaime; Theoduloz, Cristina; Yáñez, Tania

    2005-10-03

    The resin from the tree Araucaria araucana (Araucariaceae) has been used since pre-columbian times by the Mapuche amerindians to treat ulcers. The gastroprotective effect of the resin was assessed in the ethanol-HCl-induced gastric ulcer in mice showing a dose-dependent gastroprotective activity at 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg per os. The main three diterpene constituents of the resin, namely imbricatolic acid, 15-hydroxyimbricatolal and 15-acetoxyimbricatolic acid were isolated and evaluated for gastroprotective effect at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg. A dose-related gastroprotective effect with highly significant activity (PMapuche culture.

  1. SHALLOW SHELL RESIN VERSUS TRADITIONAL RESIN: A CASE STUDY FOR Cu(II REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Arar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study on Cu2+ removal by shallow shell resin (Purolite SST 60 and traditional strongly acidic cation exchange resin (Purolite PFC 100 was performed. Batch experiments were carried out as a function of  resin  dosage and  solution pH and contact time. Ion exchange reaction showed a pH depended feature.  Maximum removal of Cu2+ achieved  pH  from 2 to 5. Sorption isothermal data is well interpreted by the Langmuir equation. Additionally, kinetic experiments showed that the pseudo first-order model was suitable for such resins. The regeneration performance of shallow shell technology (SST resin is better than PFC 100.  A solution of 2M H2SO4 performed well in regenerationof SST 60 resin. On the other han maximum regeneration reached 80% for PFC 100 resin.Özet: Bu çalışmada, klasik iyon değiştirici reçine (Purolite PFC 100 ve  sığ kabuk  reçine (Purolite SST 60  ile Cu2+ giderilmesi incelenmiştir. Yapılan kesikli çalışmalarla Cu2+ giderilmesine, reçine miktarı, çözelti pH`ı ve temas süresinin etkisi incelenmiştir. Çözelti pH`ının 2 ile 5 arasında olduğu durumda Cu2+ iyonları tamamen giderilmiştir. Denge çalışmalarında elde edilen sonuçlar Langmuir izoterm modeline daha uygun olmuştur. Kinetik çalışmalarda elde edilen sonuçlar yalancı birinci mertebe kinetik modeline uygunluk göstermişir. SST 60 reçinesinin rejenerasyon verimi PFC 100 reçinesinden daha yüksektir. 2M H2SO4 ile SST 60 reçinesi tamamen rejenere edilmiştir.

  2. Chemical composition of natural colophony from Pinus brutia and comparison with synthetic colophony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gören, Ahmet C; Bilsel, Gökhan; Oztürk, Alp Hakan; Topçu, Gülaçti

    2010-11-01

    The compositions of colophony resins obtained from Pinus brutia Ten trees by three different methods (acid paste, carved hole and scraping) from Ayvacik, Gökova and Kemalpaşa in Turkey were analyzed by capillary GC-MS. The main components were the monoterpenes alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, and delta3-carene, and the diterpenic resin acids palustric, abietic, kaur-9(11)-16-en-18-oic and neoabietic acid. The synthetic colophony resins exhibited similar contents to those of the natural resins obtained from the Gökova and Kemalpaşa regions of Turkey. However, colophony resins from Ayvacik exhibited only half the diterpenic acid content as those of the Gökova and Kemalpaşa resins. Out of the three techniques, the carved hole method caused rather different percentages in the constituents of the essential oils.

  3. In Vitro Color Change of Three Dental Veneering Resins in Tea, Coffee and Tamarind Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muttagi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the in vitro color changes of three dental resin veneering materials when immersed in tea, coffee and tamarind extracts.Materials and Methods: The color changes of heat polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin (Stellondetrey, B, F14, DPI Dental products of India Ltd, Mumbai, auto polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin (DPI, B, QV5, DPI Dental products of India Ltd, Mumbai andlight polymerized resin composite (Herculite XRV, Enamel A2, part no. 22860, lot no. 910437, Kerr Corporation, West Collins Avenue, Orange, CA, USA when immersed in water extracts of tea (Tata Tea Ltd. Bangalore, India, coffee (Tata Coffee Ltd. Coorg, Indiaand tamarind were evaluated using computer vision systems. The color images were recorded in R (red, G (green and B (blue form and converted into H (hue, S (saturationand V (value.Results: Significant color change occurred for auto polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin in tamarind extract, for heat polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin in tea extract andfor light polymerized resin composite in coffee extract. Auto polymerized tooth colored acrylic resin samples showed an overall higher color change. However, for all the material samples coffee extract produced more color change.Conclusion: These results suggest that the color stability of the resins is influenced by the presence of secondary metabolites such as tartaric acid, tannins, caffeine, saponins and phenols in tamarind, tea and coffee extracts.

  4. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  5. Chromatography resin support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin applicator. 872.3140 Section 872.3140 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of...

  7. Accurate determination of 129I concentrations and 129I/137Cs ratios in spent nuclear resins by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bourlès, Didier; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2014-01-01

    Determining long-lived radionuclide concentrations in radioactive waste has fundamental implications for the long-term management of storage sites. This paper focuses on the measurement of low 129 I contents in ion exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). Iodine-129 concentrations were successfully determined using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) following a chemical procedure which included (1) acid digestion of resin samples in HNO 3 /HClO 4 , (2) radioactive decontamination by selective iodine extraction using a new chromatographic resin (CL Resin), and (3) AgI precipitation. Measured 129 I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g, i.e. from 0.03 to 0.08 Bq/g. The calculation of 129 I/ 137 Cs activity ratios used for routine waste management produced values in agreement with the few available data for PWR resin samples. - Highlights: • In the context of radioactive waste management, this study aimed at measuring 129 I in spent resins using accelerator mass spectrometry. • The treatment procedure included microwave acid digestion of samples, iodine extraction by CL resins and AgI precipitation. • Developed first on synthetic matrices, the chemical treatment procedure was then successfully applied to real resin samples. • 129 I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g of dry resin. • Results are in agreement with previous measurements and support reference values currently used for nuclear resin management

  8. Alternative to latent catalysts for curing UF resins used in the production of low formaldehyde emission wood-based panels

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno Costa; Joao Pereira; Jorge Manuel Santos Silva Martins; João Ferra; Paulo Cruz; Fernao Magalhaes; Adelio Mendes; Luísa Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies alternative catalysts to ammonium sulfate for curing urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins. When using a latent catalyst like ammonium sulfate, hexamine is formed as by-product of curing reaction. It is believed that hexamine hydrolysis may contribute to formaldehyde release during the life-time of wood-based panels produced with UF resins. Orthophosphoric acid, on the other hand, catalyzes resin cure without by-product formation and was compared to ammonium sulfate. The pot-life o...

  9. Waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resin obtained by miniemulsion polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Murillo

    Full Text Available Abstract Four waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resins (HBRAA were synthesized by miniemulsion polymerization from a hyperbranched alkyd resin (HBR, methyl methacrylate (MMA, butyl acrylate (BA and acrylic acid (AA, by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO and ammonium persulfate (AP as initiators. The reaction between HBR and acrylic monomers was evidenced by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The conversion percentage, glass transition temperature (Tg, content of acrylic polymer (determined by soxhlet extraction and molecular weight increased with the content of acrylic monomers used in the synthesis. The main structure formed during the synthesis was the HBRAA. The analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS showed that the particle size distribution of HBRAA2, HBRAA3 and HBRAA4 resins were mainly monomodal. The film properties (gloss, flexibility, adhesion and drying time of the HBRAA were good.

  10. The influence of plutonium concentration and solution flow rate on the effective capacity of macroporous anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Gallegos, T.D.

    1987-07-01

    The principal aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility is anion exchange in nitric acid. Previous studies with gel-type anion exchange resin have shown an inverse relationship between plutonium concentration in the feed solution and the optimum flow rate for this process. Because gel-type resin has been replaced with macroporous resin at Los Alamos, the relationship between plutonium concentration and solution flow rate was reexamined with the selected Lewatit MP-500-FK resin using solutions of plutonium in nitric acid and in nitric acid with high levels of added nitrate salts. Our results with this resin differ significantly from previous data obtained with gel-type resin. Flow-rate variation from 10 to 80 liters per hour had essentially no effect on the measured quantities of plutonium sorbed by the macroporous resin. However, the effect of plutonium concentration in the feed solutions was pronounced, as feed solutions that contained the highest concentrations of plutonium also produced the highest resin loadings. The most notable effect of high concentrations of dissolved nitrate salts in these solutions was an increased resin capacity for plutonium at low flow rates. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Alkyd-amino resins based on waste PET for coating applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torlakoglu, A.; Gueclue, G.

    2009-01-01

    Waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flakes were depolymerized by using propylene glycol (PG) in the presence of zinc acetate as catalyst. Glycolysis reaction products of waste PET obtained by using PET/glycol molar ratio 1/2. Two short oil alkyd resins of high acid values (30-40 mgKOH/g) were prepared from phthalic anhydride (PA), glycerin (G), coconut oil fatty acids (COFA) and glycolyzed products of waste PET (PET-based alkyd resins) or glycols (PG) (reference alkyd resins). These alkyd resins were blended with 30%, 40%, and 50% of a commercial urea-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde/melamine-formaldehyde mixture (1/1 weight ratio) and heated at 140 deg. C. The physical and chemical properties such as drying time, hardness, abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, water resistance, alkaline resistance, acid resistance, gelation time, and thermal oxidative degradation resistance (with thermogravimetric analysis, TGA) of these alkyd-amino resins were investigated. The properties of the waste PET-based resins were found to be compatible with the properties of the reference resins

  12. Alkyd-amino resins based on waste PET for coating applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlakoğlu, A; Güçlü, G

    2009-01-01

    Waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flakes were depolymerized by using propylene glycol (PG) in the presence of zinc acetate as catalyst. Glycolysis reaction products of waste PET obtained by using PET/glycol molar ratio 1/2. Two short oil alkyd resins of high acid values (30-40mgKOH/g) were prepared from phthalic anhydride (PA), glycerin (G), coconut oil fatty acids (COFA) and glycolyzed products of waste PET (PET-based alkyd resins) or glycols (PG) (reference alkyd resins). These alkyd resins were blended with 30%, 40%, and 50% of a commercial urea-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde/melamine-formaldehyde mixture (1/1 weight ratio) and heated at 140 degrees C. The physical and chemical properties such as drying time, hardness, abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, water resistance, alkaline resistance, acid resistance, gelation time, and thermal oxidative degradation resistance (with thermogravimetric analysis, TGA) of these alkyd-amino resins were investigated. The properties of the waste PET-based resins were found to be compatible with the properties of the reference resins.

  13. Irradiation effects in the storage and disposal of radioactive ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swyler, K.J.; Dodge, C.E.; Dayal, R.; Weiss, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Research is under way to characterize the effects of self-irradiation on radwastes which may be generated when organic ion-exchange media are used in water demineralization or decontamination operations at nuclear facilities. External factors affecting the relation between laboratory evaluations and field performance are emphasized. Initial experiments do not yet indicate substantial radiation dose-rate effects on radiolytic gas yields or acid product formation, when (fully swollen) sulfonic acid resins are irradiated in a sealed air environment. At the same time, oxygen gas is removed from the environment of irradiated resins. Interaction between mild steel coupons and acidic species produced in the irradiation induced decomposition of sulfonic acid resin results in irradiation enhanced corrosion. Corrosion rates depend on radiation dose rate, moisture content and resin chemical loading. In some cases, corrosion rates decrease with time, suggesting depletion of acidic species within the resin bed, or a synergistic interaction between resin and corrosion coupon. Implications of these and other results on evaluating field behavior of radwaste containing ion-exchange media are discussed. 4 figures, 2 tables

  14. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  15. and phenol–formaldehyde resin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    formaldehyde resin (PFR) modified with tetraethylorthosilicate are investigated in detail. The chemical synthesis of PFR, its modification with nanometer- sized SiO2 particles created by sol–gel method and subsequent coating, enables a preparation of ...

  16. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  17. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  18. Modification of (DGEBA epoxy resin with maleated depolymerised natural rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DEGBA type epoxy resin has been modified with maleated depolymerised natural rubber (MDPR. MDPR was prepared by grafting maleic anhydride onto depolymerised natural rubber. MDPR has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. MDPR was blended with epoxy resin at three different ratios (97/3, 98/2 and 99/1, by keeping the epoxy resin component as the major phase and maleated depolymerised natural rubber component as the minor phase. The reaction between the two blend components took place between the acid/anhydride group in the MDPR and the epoxide group of the epoxy resin. The proposed reaction schemes were supported by the FT-IR spectrum of the uncured Epoxy/MDPR blends. The neat epoxy resin and Epoxy/MDPR blends were cured by methylene dianiline (DDM at 100°C for three hours. Thermal, morphological and mechanical properties of the neat epoxy and the blends were investigated. Free volume studies of the cured, neat epoxy and Epoxy/MDPR blends were correlated with the morphological and mechanical properties of the same systems using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Studies.

  19. The biological properties of a novel ethyl methacrylate resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Jinno, S; Hattori, N; Okeya, H; Ishikawa, A; Deguchi, M; Ohno, Y; Kawai, T; Noguchi, T

    2006-01-01

    A novel ethyl methacrylate (EMA) resin was developed to overcome the tissue, organ and systemic damage associated with the residual monomer of conventional methyl methacrylate (MMA) resin bone cement. EMA resin is a chemical/ photopolymerizable material and is easy to handle during clinical procedures. The biocompatibility of EMA was evaluated in accordance with ISO10993-6. No inflammatory response was observed 1 and 9 weeks after implantation in the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of ddY mice. EMA resin also demonstrated better biocompatibility when compared with conventional bone cements. Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) was used as a carrier for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and added to the EMA slurry. The EMA-PLLA composite membrane was sticky and BMP readily adhered to its surface. The EMA-PLLA-BMP composite membrane induced new bone formation, the new bone growing in the shape of the EMA in the thigh muscle pouch of ddY mice. This novel EMA resin has many potential clinical applications.

  20. Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

  1. Karakteristik Komposit Resin Berkemampuan Mengalir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Irawan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of resin composites as posterior restoratives has markedly increased over the past decade. The patients demand for better esthetics, concerns related to possible mercury toxicity from amalgam and improvements in resin composite materials have significantly contributed the popularity of these materials. Early problems related to composites included excessive wear, less of anatomic form, post operative sensitivity, secondary caries and marginal leakage. Marginal adaptation still remains an unavoidable problem for composite restoration, especially at the gingival wall of cervical or Class II restoration. In an attempt to improve marginal sealing, many techniques and lining materials have been designed. To reduce stress generated by polymerization shrinkage, applying and curing of resin composites in layers is often recommended. Using a thick adhesive layer or low-viscosity resin may, due to its elastic properties, serve as a flexible intermediate layer and compensate for the polymerization stress created in resin composite. Flowable composites were created by retaining the same small particle size of traditional hybrid composite but reducing the filler content and allowing the increased resin to reduce the viscosity of the mixture. Flowable composites were introduced in 1996 as liners, fissure sealants and also in tunnel preparations. They have been suggested for Class I, II, III and V cavity restorations, preventive resin restorations and composite, porcelain and amalgam repairing. Their usage as a liner under high filled resins in posterior restorations has been shown to improve the adaptation of composites and effectively achieve clinically acceptable results. This article attempts to give a broad characteristics of different types of flowable composites. 

  2. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  3. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Tetsurou (Nitto Denko Corp., Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)); Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu

    1989-09-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author).

  4. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tetsurou; Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu.

    1989-01-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author)

  5. Emulsification of resin modified by simultaneous graft polymerization with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Fumio; Sasaki, Takashi; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1983-01-01

    Emulsification of the epoxy resins, onto which hydrophilic groups were introduced by simultaneous co-graft polymerization with electron beam irradiation, were studied. Resins modified with use of ionic monomers such as methacrylic acid (MAc), diethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DE), tetramethylammonium methacrylate (TMAMA), or methacryloyloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (QDM) formed latexes, when they were dissolved into small amounts of solvents followed by the addition of water. A higher composition of hydrophilic monomer in the resin-monomer mixture gave a latex with a smaller particle size and higher storage stability. TMAMA and QDM, both of which were incompatible with epoxy resin, were very effective in decreasing the particle size and increasing stability of a latex. It was also ascertained that an alkyd resin were able to emulsified similarly by grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and MAc. (author)

  6. Development of production methods of volume source by the resinous solution which has hardening

    CERN Document Server

    Motoki, R

    2002-01-01

    Volume sources is used for standard sources by radioactive measurement using Ge semiconductor detector of environmental sample, e.g. water, soil and etc. that require large volume. The commercial volume source used in measurement of the water sample is made of agar-agar, and that used in measurement of the soil sample is made of alumina powder. When the plastic receptacles of this two kinds of volume sources were damaged, the leakage contents cause contamination. Moreover, if hermetically sealing performance of volume source made of agar-agar fell, volume decrease due to an evaporation off moisture gives an error to radioactive measurement. Therefore, we developed the two type methods using unsaturated polyester resin, vinilester resin, their hardening agent and acrylicresin. The first type is due to dispersing the hydrochloric acid solution included the radioisotopes uniformly in each resin and hardening the resin. The second is due to dispersing the alumina powder absorbed the radioisotopes in each resin an...

  7. Development of heat-resistant neutron shielding resin for high payload metal cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamoshida, Mamoru; Hiranuma, Takeshi; Shimizu, Masashi

    2007-01-01

    A new neutron shielding resin has been developed for a dual-purpose metal cask. The resin is composed of a cycloaliphatic epoxy, anhydrous acid, catalyst, aluminum hydroxide and boron tetracarbide. Its long-term stability was verified by thermal degradation tests. Estimated weight loss of the resin during storage was about 1-2%. Because the curing reaction of epoxy and curing reagents was moderate at room temperature, a large amount of resin could be treated at one time which would lower fabrication cost. The fabrication process was verified by a full-scale mock-up test. No significant voids or cracks were found in the resin and uniform elemental composition was confirmed. (author)

  8. Natural amber, copal resin and colophony investigated by UV-VIS, infrared and Raman spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, ZhiFan; Dong, Kun; Yang, XiaoYun; Lin, JinChang; Cui, XiaoYing; Zhou, RongFeng; Deng, Qing

    2013-08-01

    Natural amber, copal resin and colophony are have investigated by UV-VIS, infrared and Raman spectrum. In order to distinguish the natural amber, copal resin and colophony, we have successfully used the nondestructive examination (NDE) technology. The results show that UV-VIS could not distinguish these compositions. The infrared spectra can distinguish them, but the technology may destroy the specimen. The Raman spectra show three characteristic peaks of vibration near position 932 cm-1 and position 1179 cm-1 of copal resin, which confirm the existence of terpenes compounds in it. In the Raman spectra of colophony, the vibration characteristic peak at position 1589 cm-1, caused by the conjugate double bond of internal unsaturated resin acid, is the basis of the characteristic difference between colophony and natural amber. The advantages of the distinguished technology by Raman spectroscopy are convenient and nondestructive examination for natural amber, copal resin and colophony.

  9. Pilot Plant for treating of spent exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Alberto M.; Raffo Calderon, Maria del C.; Varani, Jose L.

    2004-01-01

    Spent exchange resins that have been accumulating during the last operational 30 years in Atucha I nuclear power plant (NPP) are a 'problematic' waste. These spent resins conform an intermediate level waste due to the total content of alpha, beta and gamma emitters (some samples of spent resins were analyzed in 2003). For this reason its treatment is more expensive since it is necessary to add more safety barriers for its final disposition and also for the radioprotection actions that are involved. Using sulfuric acid solutions it is possible to elute from the spent resins the ions that are retained. In the same operation are eluted Cobalt, Cesium and alpha emitters since that all these elements react as cations in aqueous solution. Decontamination by electrochemical methods was analyzed as an interesting method to apply after elution operation to these spent resins since that with the decontamination process it is possible to obtain a solid without activity and concentrate the activity in cells that are small in volume and its manipulation doesn't present any extra complication. Experiments made with active samples taken from the deposit were successful. Because of these results it was built a small plant to treat a batch of 100 dm 3 of wet spent exchange resins. Some problems with the material that was in the deposit together with spent resins caused that we had to plan a more complex strategy to obtain a complete decontamination of the spent resins (in this stage we used the cobalt retention cell that was described in other paper to retain Cobalt and alpha emitters and a sample of zeolites from Argentina ores to retain Cesium). Due to alpha emitters act electrochemically like cations it was possible to retain altogether with ionic Cobalt on the copper amalgam electrode. Working in the non-active lab with alcoholic solutions it was possible to retain ionic Cesium on a copper electrode (copper is covered by mercury fine film which forms a solid amalgam) with a

  10. Fixation of metallic sulfosalicylate complexes on an anionic exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahuzac, S.

    1969-06-01

    Since sulfosalicylate ions have acid-base properties, sulfosalicylate complexes have an apparent stability which varies with the ph. As a result, the fixation of sulfo-salicylates on an anionic exchange resin depends on the ph of the solution in equilibrium with the resin. This research has been aimed at studying the influence of the ph on the fixation on an anionic exchange resin (Dowex 1 x 4) of sulfosalicylate anions on the one hand, and of metallic sulfosalicylate complexes on the other hand. In the first part of this work, a determination has been made, by frontal analysis of the distribution of sulfosalicylate ions in the resin according to the total sulfosalicylate I concentration in the aqueous solution in equilibrium with the resin. The exchange constants of these ions between the resin and the solution have been calculated. In the second part, a study has been made of the fixation of anionic sulfosalicylate complexes of Fe(III), Al(III), Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II), Mn(II), Cd(II), Fe(II) and UO 2 2+ . By measuring the partition coefficients of these different elements between the resin and the solution it has been possible to give interpretation for the modes of fixation of the metallic ions, and to calculate their exchange constant between the resin and the solution. The relationship has been established for each metallic element studied, between its partition coefficient, the ph and the total concentration of the complexing agent in solution. Such a relationship makes it possible to predict, for given conditions, the nature of the species in solution and in the resin, as well as the partition coefficient of a metallic, element. Finally, in the third part of the work, use has been made of results obtained previously, to carry out some separations (Ni 2+ - Co 2+ ; Ni 2+ - Co 2+ - Cu 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Fe 3+ ; UO 2 2+ - Cr 3+ ; UO 2 2+ - Cu 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Ni 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Co 2+ ; UO 2 2+ - Mn 2+ and UO 2 2+ - Cd 2+ ), as well as the purification

  11. P134-M Solid Phase Synthesis of C-Terminus Fluorescent Peptide: Comparison of Fmoc-Lys(5-FAM)-Resin and Fmoc-Lys[5-FAM(Trt)]-Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, X.; Fu, W.; Sheng, L.

    2007-01-01

    Many FRET (Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer) peptides require a C-terminus fluorescent label. In order to facilitate the synthesis of C-terminus fluorescent peptides, we prepared and compared two kinds of resins, Fmoc-Lys(5-FAM)-resin (I) and Fmoc-Lys[5-FAM(trt)]-resin (II).1 Resin (II) has a phenolic hydroxyl group protected with trityl group. The reason for introducing the protecting group was supposedly to prevent the phenolic hydroxyl groups from reacting with the activated amino acids during peptide synthesis. In this report, a fluorescent peptide [EREQTVDLS-VKRPRTGRKKRRQ-RRRK(5-FAM)-NH2] was synthesized using each of these resins. Syntheses were carried out under similar standard conditions. The peptides obtained showed no significant difference in purity. These results showed that resin (I) is also suitable for synthesis of C-terminus fluorescent peptide.

  12. Adsorption of saponin compound in Carica papaya leaves extract using weakly basic ion exchanger resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Noraziani Zainal; Janam, Anathasia; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2016-11-01

    Adsorption of saponin compound in papaya leaves juice extract using Amberlite® IRA-67 resin was not reported in previous studies. In this research, Amberlite® IRA-67 was used to determine the amount of saponin that can be adsorbed using different weights of dry resin (0.1 g and 0.5 g). Peleg model was used to determine the maximum yield of saponin (43.67 mg) and the exhaustive time (5.7 days) prior to a preliminary resin-saponin adsorption study. After adsorption process, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in total saponin content (mg) for sample treated with 0.1 g (3.79 ± 0.55 mg) and sample treated with 0.5 g (3.43 ± 0.51 mg) dry weight resin. Long-term kinetic adsorption of resin-saponin method (>24 hours) should be conducted to obtain optimum freed saponin extract. Besides that, sample treated with 0.1 g dry weight resin had high free radical scavenging value of 50.33 ± 2.74% compared to sample treated with 0.5 g dry weight resin that had low free radical scavenging value of 24.54 ± 1.66% dry weights. Total saponin content (mg), total phenolic content (mg GAE) and free radical scavenging activity (%) was investigated to determine the interaction of those compounds with Amberlite® IRA-67. The RP-HPLC analysis using ursolic acid as standard at 203 nm showed no peak even though ursolic acid was one of the saponin components that was ubiquitous in plant kingdom. The absence of peak was due to weak solubility of ursolic acid in water and since it was only soluble in solvent with moderate polarity. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for total saponin content (mg) versus total phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) were +0.959 and +0.807. Positive values showed that whenever there was an increase in saponin content (mg), the phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) would also increase. However, as the resin-saponin adsorption was carried out, there was a significant decrease of radical scavenging activity

  13. Method for removing cesium from aqueous liquid, method for purifying the reactor coolant in boiling water and pressurized water reactors and a mixed ion exchanged resin bed, useful in said purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otte, J.N.A.; Liebmann, D.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for removing cesium from an aqueous liquid, and to a resin bed containing a mixture of an anion exchange resin and cation exchange resin useful in said purification. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention is a method for purifying the reactor coolant of a presurized water or boiling water reactor. Said method, which is particularly advantageously employed in purifying the reactor coolant in the primary circuit of a pressurized reactor, comprises contacting at least a portion of the reactor coolant with a strong base anion exchange resin and the strong acid cation exchange resin derived from a highly cross-linked, macroporous copolymer of a monovinylidene aromatic and a cross-linking monomer copolymerizable therewith. Although the reactor coolant can sequentially be contacted with one resin type and thereafter with the second resin type, the contact is preferably conducted using a resin bed comprising a mixture of the cation and anion exchange resins. 1 fig., refs

  14. Processing ix spent resin waste for C-14 isotope recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, F. H.; Woodall, K. B.; Sood, S. K.; Vogt, H. K.; Krochmainek, L. S.

    1991-01-01

    -213 Ci/m 3 for the Moderator spent resins generated by CANDU reactors. For an estimated average C-14 activity level of 100 Ci/m 3 , a total of 400 Ci of C-14 can be produced each year. Based on the current market value of the C-14 isotope, the cost of the demonstration plant can be recovered in less than two years. Upon successful demonstration, the process can be scaled up. The volume of resin wastes produced by the stations can readily supply a full scale production of 2000 Ci or more per annum. Several alternative routes have been considered for this process which include: thermal stripping vs. acid stripping of the spent resins, laser enrichment vs. cryogenic distillation for the enrichment of the gaseous intermediate product, and direct gas phase reaction vs. liquid phase ionic precipitation of the final product. Analysis of the experimental results obtained at Ontario Hydro Research Division and also those reported in the literature has led to the selection of the following process: The C-14 is first removed by acid stripping the resins to form carbon dioxide. The gas is then separated from the carrier gas and converted by reaction with zinc to carbon monoxide, which is cryogenically distilled. Essentially pure C-14 monoxide is obtained and oxidized to produce C-14 dioxide. The gas is then reacted with a suitable hydroxide to produce the desired carbonate product

  15. Flowsheet Validation For The Permanganate Digestion Of REILLEX(trademark) HPQ Anion Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyser, E.

    2009-01-01

    The flowsheet for the digestion of Reillex(trademark) HPQ was validated both under the traditional alkaline conditions and under strongly acidic conditions. Due to difficulty in performing a pH adjustment in the large tank where this flowsheet must be performed, the recommended digestion conditions were changed from pH 8-10 to 8 M HNO 3 . Thus, no pH adjustment of the solution is required prior to performing the permanganate addition and digestion and the need to sample the digestion tank to confirm appropriate pH range for digestion may be avoided. Neutralization of the acidic digestion solution will be performed after completion of the resin digestion cycle. The amount of permanganate required for this type of resin (Reillex(trademark) HPQ) was increased from 1 kg/L resin to 4 kg/L resin to reduce the amount of residual resin solids to a minimal amount ( 2 ) solids (1.71 kg/L resin) and involves the generation of a significant liquid volume due to the low solubility of permanganate. However, since only two batches of resin (40 L each) are expected to be digested, the total waste generated is limited.

  16. Going greener: Synthesis of fully biobased unsaturated polyesters for styrene crosslinked resins with enhanced thermomechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. M. F. Costa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work was the development of fully biobased unsaturated polyesters (UPs that upon crosslinking with unsaturated monomers (UM could lead to greener unsaturated polyester resins (UPRs with similar thermomechanical properties to commercial fossil based UPR. After the successful synthesis of the biobased UPs, those were crosslinked with styrene (Sty, the most commonly used monomer, and the influence of the chemical structure of the UPs on the thermomechanical characteristics of UPRs were evaluated. The properties were compared with those of a commercial resin (Resipur 9837©. The BioUPRs presented high gel contents and contact angles that are similar to the commercial resin. The thermomechanical properties were evaluated by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA and it was found that the UPR synthesized using propylene glycol (PG, succinic acid (SuAc and itaconic acid (ItAc presented very close thermomechanical properties compared to the commercial resin.

  17. Solvent impregnated resin for isolation of U(VI) from industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karve, M.; Rajgor, R.V.

    2008-01-01

    A solid-phase extraction method based upon impregnation of Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4- trimethylpentyl)mono-thio-phosphinic acid) on Amberlite XAD-2 resin is proposed for isolation of U(VI) from uranmicrolite ore tailing samples and industrial effluent samples. U(VI) was sorbed from nitric acid media on the solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) and was recovered completely with 1.0 M HCl. Based upon sorption behavior of U(VI) with Cyanex 302, it was quantitatively sorbed on the SIR in a dynamic method, while the other metal ions were not sorbed by the modified resin. The preparation of impregnated resin is simple, based upon physical interaction of the extractant and solid support, has good sorption capacity for U(VI), and is also reliable for detection of traces of U(VI). (authors)

  18. Analysis of potential hazards associated with 241Am loaded resins from nitrate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rubin, Jim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fife, Keith William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ricketts, Thomas Edgar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tappan, Bryce C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chavez, David E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-19

    LANL has been contacted to provide possible assistance in safe disposition of a number of 241Am-bearing materials associated with local industrial operations. Among the materials are ion exchange resins which have been in contact with 241Am and nitric acid, and which might have potential for exothermic reaction. The purpose of this paper is to analyze and define the resin forms and quantities to the extent possible from available data to allow better bounding of the potential reactivity hazard of the resin materials. An additional purpose is to recommend handling procedures to minimize the probability of an uncontrolled exothermic reaction.

  19. Radionuclide Leaching from Organic Ion Exchange Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of leach treatments for decontaminating organic ion exchange resins (OIER), which have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East Basin sludge. Based on process records, the OIER found in the K Basins is a mixed-bet strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolitetrademark NRW-037. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the OIER can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). To help understand the effects of anticipated OIER elutriation and washing, tests were performed with well-rinsed OIER material from K East Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed OIER having approximately 5% added K East canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). The rinsed resin-bearing material also contained the inorganic ion exchanger Zeolon-900trademark, a zeolite primarily composed of the mineral mordenite. The zeolite was estimated to comprise 27 weight percent of the dry H-08 BEAD G material

  20. Resin technologies: construction and staining of resin TMA's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howat, William J; Wilson, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    The traditional formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, and therefore the tissue microarrays created from it, provide good morphology but with a compromised antigenicity when compared to frozen tissue. In contrast, while solving the issue of antigenicity, frozen tissue suffers from a lack of morphology. We have demonstrated that tissue microarrays constructed in glycol methacrylate resin, when combined with a cold acetone fixation step, have been able to combine the superior morphology of resin-embedded sections with the superior antigenicity of frozen tissue for prospectively collected material.

  1. Corrosion protection of carbon steel by an epoxy resin containing organically modified clay

    OpenAIRE

    Hang, To Thi Xuan; Truc, Trinh Anh; Nam, Truong Hoai; Oanh, Vu Ke; Jorcin, Jean-Baptiste; Pébère, Nadine

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This study focusses on the use of montmorillonite clay (MMT) treated with an organic compound (aminotrimethylphosphonic acid (ATMP)) and dispersed in an epoxy resin to improve corrosion protection of carbon steel. X-ray diffraction was performed to verify that the individual silicate layers were separated and dispersed in the epoxy resin. Corrosion resistance of the coated steel was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and local electrochemical imp...

  2. Resins and additives for powder coatings and alkyd paints, based on renewable resources

    OpenAIRE

    Van Haveren, J.; Oostveen, E.A.; Micciche, F.; Noordover, B.A.J.; Koning, C.E.; Van Benthem, R.A.T.M.; Frissen, A.E.; Weijnen, J.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Due to limited fossil resources and an increased need for environmentally friendly, sustainable technologies, the importance of using renewable feedstocks in the paint and coatings area will increase in the decades to come. This paper highlights some of the perspectives in this area. Alkyd resins for high-solid paints and reactive diluents, completely based on commercially available renewable resources, were prepared and characterized. Alkyd resins based on sucrose and unsaturated fatty acids...

  3. Epoxy Resins in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Henry

    1960-01-01

    A method of embedding biological specimens in araldite 502 (Ciba) has been developed for materials available in the United States. Araldite-embedded tissues are suitable for electron microscopy, but the cutting qualities of the resin necessitates more than routine attention during microtomy. The rather high viscosity of araldite 502 also seems to be an unnecessary handicap. The less viscous epoxy epon 812 (Shell) produces specimens with improved cutting qualities, and has several features—low shrinkage and absence of specimen damage during cure, minimal compression of sections, relative absence of electron beam-induced section damage, etc.—which recommends it as a routine embedding material. The hardness of the cured resin can be easily adjusted by several methods to suit the materials embedded in it. Several problems and advantages of working with sections of epoxy resins are also discussed. PMID:13822825

  4. Process for Molding Nonreinforced (Neat) Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Void free moldings obtained for neat, condensation, thermosetting resins. Thermally and mechanically treat resin prior to molding to reduce amount of volatiles. With volatiles reduced molding temperature and pressure are applied in way to drive out remaining volatiles during molding.

  5. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used...

  6. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship between chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)

  7. Method for loading resin beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Rainey, R.H.; Greene, C.W.; Shockley, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145 to 200 0 C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145 0 C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO 3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate

  8. Uranium sorption by tannin resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares Rieumont, S.; Martinez Luzardo, J.; Torres Hernandez, J.; Lima Cazorla, D. de la Rosa.

    1998-01-01

    The sorption of uranium by immobilised Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. and Lysiloma latisiliqua L tannins was investigated. Immobilization condition were analyzed. These resins resulted suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. At pH 5.5 maximum in sorption capacity is registered. The presence of appreciable amount of sodium chloride do not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these that could be found in sea water and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. Tannin resins can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity

  9. Diclofenac removal in urine using strong-base anion exchange polymer resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Kelly A; Boyer, Treavor H

    2013-11-01

    One of the major sources of pharmaceuticals in the environment is wastewater effluent of which human urine contributes the majority of pharmaceuticals. Urine source separation has the potential to isolate pharmaceuticals at a higher concentration for efficient removal as well as produce a nutrient byproduct. This research investigated the efficacy of using strong-base anion exchange polymer resins to remove the widely detected and abundant pharmaceutical, diclofenac, from synthetic human urine under fresh and ureolyzed conditions. The majority of experiments were conducted using a strong-base, macroporous, polystyrene resin (Purolite A520E). Ion-exchange followed a two-step removal rate with rapid removal in 1 h and equilibrium removal in 24 h. Diclofenac removal was >90% at a resin dose of 8 mL/L in both fresh and ureolyzed urine. Sorption of diclofenac onto A520E resin was concurrent with desorption of an equivalent amount of chloride, which indicates the ion-exchange mechanism is occurring. The presence of competing ions such as phosphate and citrate did not significantly impact diclofenac removal. Comparisons of three polystyrene resins (A520E, Dowex 22, Dowex Marathon 11) as well as one polyacrylic resin (IRA958) were conducted to determine the major interactions between anion exchange resin and diclofenac. The results showed that polystyrene resins provide the highest level of diclofenac removal due to electrostatic interactions between quaternary ammonium functional groups of resin and carboxylic acid of diclofenac and non-electrostatic interactions between resin matrix and benzene rings of diclofenac. Diclofenac was effectively desorbed from A520E resin using a regeneration solution that contained 4.5% (m/m) NaCl in an equal-volume mixture of methanol and water. The greater regeneration efficiency of the NaCl/methanol-water mixture over the aqueous NaCl solution supports the importance of non-electrostatic interactions between resin matrix and benzene rings

  10. Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, YuPo J [Naperville, IL; Henry, Michael P [Batavia, IL; Snyder, Seth W [Lincolnwood, IL; Martin, Edward [Libertyville, IL; Arora, Michelle [Woodridge, IL; de la Garza, Linda [Woodridge, IL

    2009-03-24

    Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

  11. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  12. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  13. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  14. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  15. Thermal degradation kinetics and antimicrobial studies of terpolymer resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul R. Burkanudeen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The terpolymer (ASF was synthesized by condensation of anthranilic acid and salicylic acid with formaldehyde in the presence of glacial acetic acid as a catalyst at 140 ± 2 °C for 6 h with varying proportions of reactants. The terpolymer ASF-I was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The thermal decomposition behavior of ASF-I, II and III terpolymers was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA in a static nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 20 °C/min. Freeman–Carroll, Sharp–Wentworth and Phadnis–Deshpande methods were used to calculate the thermal activation energy (Ea the order of reaction (n, entropy change (ΔS, free energy change (ΔF, apparent entropy (S∗ and frequency factor (Z. Phadnis–Deshpande method was used to propose the thermal degradation model for the decomposition pattern of ASF-I terpolymer resin. The order of the decomposition reaction was found to be 0.901. The thermal activation energy determined with the help of these methods was in good agreement with each other. The ASF-I, II and III resins were tested for their inhibitory action against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The resins show potent inhibitory action against bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and fungi viz. Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium sp., Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans and Mucor sp.

  16. Characterization of tdt genes for the degradation of tricyclic diterpenes by Pseudomonas diterpeniphila A19-6a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C A; Wyndham, R C

    2002-01-01

    Resin acids are tricyclic diterpenes that are toxic to aquatic life when released in high concentrations in pulp mill effluents. These naturally formed organic acids are readily degraded by bacteria and fungi; nevertheless, many of the mechanisms involved are still unknown. We report the localization, cloning, and sequencing of genes for abietane degradation (9.18 kb; designated tdt (tricyclic diterpene) LRSABCD) from the gamma-Proteobacterium Pseudomonas diterpeniphila A19-6a. Using gene knockout mutants, we demonstrate that tdtL, encoding a putative CoA ligase, is required for growth on abietic and dehydroabietic acids. A second gene knockout in tdtD, encoding a putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, reduced the growth of strain A19-6a on abietic and dehydroabietic acids as sole sources of carbon and energy, but did not eliminate growth. The degree of homology between P450TdtD and P450TerpC, the closest known P450 homologue to TdtD, identifies TdtD as a new member of the P450 superfamily. Hybridization of six of the tdt genes to genomic DNA of a related resin acid degrading bacterium Pseudomonas abietaniphila BKME-9 identified tdt homologues in this strain that utilizes aromatic ring dioxygenase genes (dit) to open the ring structure of abietic and dehydroabietic acids. These results suggest the tdt and dit genes may function in concert to allow these Pseudomonas strains to degrade resin acids. Homologues of several of the tdt genes were detected in resin acid degrading Ralstonia and Comamonas species within the beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria.

  17. Resin infiltration of proximal caries lesions differing in ICDAS codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Sebastian; Bitter, Kerstin; Naumann, Michael; Dörfer, Christof E; Meyer-Lueckel, Hendrik

    2011-04-01

    Resin infiltration of non-cavitated proximal caries lesions has been shown to inhibit further demineralization. However, the effect of resin infiltration in cavitated lesions is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate infiltration patterns of proximal caries lesions differing in International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) codes. Extracted human molars and premolars showing proximal caries lesions with and without cavitations (ICDAS codes 2-5) were etched with 15% hydrochloric acid gel and resin infiltrated according to the manufacturer's instructions. Three sections from each lesion were prepared and analyzed using a dual-fluorescence staining technique and confocal microscopy. The dimensions of the demineralized and cavitated lesions areas, as well as the resin-infiltrated parts within these lesions, were measured. The demineralized parts were infiltrated from 73% to 100% (median values) but the cavities were filled only negligibly (0-5%). Teeth that had an ICDAS code of 5 showed a significantly lower percentage infiltration/filling of lesions compared to teeth with ICDAS codes of 2 and 3. It was concluded that under in vitro conditions the tested infiltrant penetrates most parts of the demineralized enamel but is not capable of filling up cavities and therefore the efficacy of caries infiltration, particularly in lesions with larger cavitations, might be impaired. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  18. An investigation of the applicability of the new ion exchange resin, Reillex{trademark}-HPQ, in ATW separations. Milestone 4, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, K.R.; Ball, J.; Grissom, M.; Williamson, M.; Cobb, S.; Young, D.; Wu, Yen-Yuan J.

    1993-09-07

    The investigations with the anion exchange resin Reillex{trademark}-HPQ is continuing along several different paths. The topics of current investigations that are reported here are: The sorption behavior of chromium(VI) on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ from nitric acid solutions and from sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate solutions; sorption behavior of F{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Cl{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Br{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; and the Honors thesis by one of the students is attached as Appendix II (on ion exchange properties of a new macroperous resin using bromide as the model ion in aqueous nitrate solutions).

  19. Shear bond strength of different surface treatments in bulk fill, microhybrid, and nanoparticle repair resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jesus Tavarez RR

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez,1 Lauber Jose dos Santos Almeida Júnior,2 Tayanne Christine Gomes Guará,1 Izabella Santos Ribeiro,1 Etevaldo Matos Maia Filho,1 Leily Macedo Firoozmand2 1Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ceuma University (CEUMA, 2Department of Dentistry I, University Federal of Maranhão (UFMA, São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of surface treatment and different types of composite resin on the microshear bond strength of repairs. Materials and methods: Seventy-two specimens (n=72 were prepared using a nanoparticle resin and stored in artificial saliva at 37 ± 1°C for 24 h. After this period, the specimens (n=24 were restored with microhybrid resin P60 (3M ESPE, nanoparticle resin Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, and Bulk Fill Surefil SDR Flow (Dentsply composite resins. Previously, the surfaces of the samples were treated, forming the following subgroups (n=12: (A conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, and (B abrasioned with a diamond tip for 3 s and conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid. In all groups, before insertion of the composite resin, the adhesive system Adper Single Bond 2 was actively applied and photopolymerized for 20 s. Results: The microshear test was executed to assess bond strength. Kruskal–Wallis (p<0.05 and Mann–Whitney statistical tests showed significant statistical difference considering that the bulk-fill resin turned out to have a lower bond strength than the conventional nanoparticle and microhybrid composites. With regard to the technique, the roughening with diamond bur followed by the application of phosphoric acid exhibited values higher than the exclusive use of acid. Conclusion: The microshear bond strength of the composite resin repairs varies in accordance with the type of composite resin utilized, and roughening the surface increased the bond strength of these materials. Keywords: bulk-fill resins, composite resins, dental

  20. Occupational exposure to epoxy resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Kersting, K.

    2014-01-01

    Products based on epoxy resins as a binder have become popular in various settings, among which the construction industry and in windmill blade production, as a result of their excellent technical properties. However, due to the same properties epoxy products are a notorious cause of allergic skin

  1. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of the steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise-Flow versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and  bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise

  2. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise™Flow Self-Adhering Flowable Composite, Kerr Dental, USA versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self

  3. Sulfonation of polyvinylidene difluoride resin and its application in extraction of restriction enzymes from DNA digestion solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Dong, Chunxia; Huang, Xu; Zhao, Jindong

    2003-11-01

    Sulfonation of polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) resin was achieved by incubation of the resin with sulfuric acid at a moderately high temperature. The sulfonated PVDF (SPVDF) resin was studied for its ability to extract restriction enzymes from DNA digestion solutions. The SPVDF resin was effective in adsorbing restriction enzymes such as EcoRI and BamHI and the extraction procedure was easy and simple to perform. The adsorption depended upon the amount of the resin added. We found that 1 mg of the SPVDF resin could completely remove all restriction enzyme activity routinely used in DNA digestion within 2 min after its addition. Treatment of a digestion solution with the SPVDF resin did not change the reaction solution and the same digestion buffer could be used for another digestion of the same DNA with other enzymes. We also found that, in comparison with normal PVDF, the SPVDF resin adsorbed less DNA, resulting in less loss of DNA in the extraction step. The potential application of the SPVDF resin in other procedures of molecular cloning and enzyme purification is discussed.

  4. Properties of resorcinol-tannin-formaldehyde copolymer resins prepared from the bark extracts of Taiwan acacia and China fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Jau; Lan, Wei-Chuan

    2006-01-01

    Resorcinol-tannin-formaldehyde copolymer resins (RTF) were prepared by using the bark extracts of Taiwan acacia (Acacia confusa) and China fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) to substitute part of the resorcinol. From the results, the content of reactive phenolic materials in Taiwan acacia and China fir bark extracts were 51.6% and 46.5%, respectively. Aromatic compounds were the main components in the bark extracts showed by FT-IR analysis. The conventional synthesis condition used for RF resin was certainly not suitable for the RTF copolymer resin. It should be formed the novolak RF prepolymer by reacting the resorcinol with formaldehyde at the first stage, and then the bark extracts added and underwent the copolymerization reaction under acidic condition at the second-stage. The RTF copolymer resins prepared had cold-setting capability. They had higher viscosity, shorter gel time as compared with the RF resin. The RTF copolymer resins could be carried out the gluing application immediately after the hardener was added and had bonding strength the same as RF resin. But the RTF copolymer resins had worse stability and shorter shelf life than RF resin.

  5. Studies on the Use of Gamma Radiation-Induced for Preparation of Some Modified Resins for the Separation of Some Metal Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo-Zahra, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    The work carried out in the present thesis is based on preparation, characterization and applications of some modified resins such as: poly(acrylamide)/poly(maleic acid) P(AAm)/P(MA) interpolymer complex (resin), poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid-amidoxime) P(AAm-AA-AO) resin and poly(hydroxamic acid) P(HA) resin. Poly(acrylamide)/poly(maleic acid) P(AAm)/P(MA) interpolymer complex (resin) was prepared by template polymerization of maleic acid (MA) monomer on poly(acrylamide) P(AAm) hydrogel as a template polymer in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (NMBA) as a crosslinker using gamma radiation-induced technique. Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid-amidoxime) P(AAm-AA-AO) resin was prepared by template polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) and acrylonitrile (AN) monomers on P(AAm) hydrogel as a template polymer in the presence of NMBA as a crosslinker using gamma radiation-induced technique. The conversion of nitrile group to amidoxime one was carried out by the treatment of the prepared resin with an alkaline solution of hydroxylamine. Poly(hydroxamic acid) P(HA) resin was prepared from the reaction of the corresponding water-soluble P(AAm) previously prepared by gamma radiation-induced with hydroxylamine hydrochloride in an alkaline medium. The functional groups on the prepared polymeric resins were confirmed by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were performed to evaluate the properties of the prepared polymeric resins, free or complexed with metal ions such as Cu 2+ metal ions.

  6. Markers, Reactions, and Interactions during the Aging of Pinus Resin Assessed by Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Victoria; Salvadó, Nati; Butí, Salvador; Cinque, Gianfelice; Pradell, Trinitat

    2017-04-28

    The resin extracted from the species of the Pinus genus (Pinaceae family) is a widely used material. Primarily, resins are made up of two types of diterpenoids: abietanes and pimaranes. Their composition changes with aging, affecting their chemical and physical properties; however, the chemical changes that occur during aging are not yet fully known. Understanding the evolution of pimaranes and abietanes and the chemical composition of the aged resins is essential to make the most of this substance and of its derivatives. A systematic study of the aging of Pinus resin with Raman complemented with infrared (IR) spectroscopy was carried out. This study provided new information about the interactions among the constituting molecules in resins aged over many years. In particular the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in aged samples was detected for the first time, and the formation of acid anhydrides from the reaction between pimaranes was demonstrated. Furthermore, Raman and IR spectra band assignments are proposed, and the specific markers of the main compounds of the resin are tagged. This will facilitate the qualitative analysis of resin compounds.

  7. EDF specifications on nuclear grade resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, Darren; Gressier, Frederic; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Ranchoux, Gilles; Marteau, Herve; Labed, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Ion exchange resins are widely used across EDF, especially within the nuclear division for the purification of water. Important applications include primary circuit, secondary circuit and effluent treatment, which require high quality nuclear grade resins to retain the dissolved species, some of which may be radioactive. There is a need for more and more efficient purification in order to decrease worker dose during maintenance but also to decrease volumes of radioactive resin waste. Resin performance is subject to several forms of degradation, including physical, chemical, thermal and radioactive, therefore appropriate resin properties have to be selected to reduce such effects. Work has been done with research institutes, manufacturers and on EDF sites to select these properties, create specifications and to continuously improve on these specifications. An interesting example of research regarding resin performance is the resin degradation under irradiation. Resins used in the CVCS circuit of EDF nuclear power plants are subject to irradiation over their lifetime. A study was carried out on the effects of total integrated doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 MGy on typically used EDF mixed bed resins in a 'mini-CVCS' apparatus to simultaneously test actual primary circuit fluid. The tests confirmed that the resins still perform efficiently after a typical CVCS radiation dose. Certain resins also need additional specifications in order to maintain the integrity of the particular circuits they are used in. Recently, EDF has updated its requirements on these high purity nuclear grade resins, produced generic doctrines for all products and materials used on site which include resins of all grades, and as a result have also updated a guide on recommended resin usage for the French fleet of reactors. An overview of the evolutions will be presented. (authors)

  8. Long term stability of cannabis resin and cannabis extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Christian

    2010-01-01

    at room temperature, 4 °C and - 20 °C for up to 4 years. Acidic THC degrades exponentially via decarboxylation with concentration halve-lives of approximately 330 and 462 days in daylight and darkness, respectively. The degradation of neutral THC seems to occur somewhat slower. When cannabinoids were...... stored in extracted form at room temperature the degradation rate of acidic THC increased significantly relative to resin material with concentration halve-lives of 35 and 91 days in daylight and darkness, respectively. Once cannabis material is extracted into organic solvents, care should be taken...

  9. Resin glycosides from the yellow-skinned variety of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2013-10-02

    Native to tropical America, Ipomoea batatas has been cultivated for over 5000 years in Mexico. The yellow-skinned tuber crop variety, with an orange flesh, has a higher nutritional value than potato. Raw sweet potato can cause a purge due to its resin glycoside content. Purification of the chloroform-soluble resin glycosides from the roots of this variety was accomplished by preparative-scale HPLC, which allowed for the collection of six oligosaccharides, batatin VII (1) and batatinosides VII-IX (2-4), all of novel structure, together with the known resin glycosides pescaprein I and batatinoside IV. High-field NMR spectroscopy and FAB mass spectrometry were used to characterize each structure, identifying operculinic acid A for compounds 2 and 4, and simonic acid B for 3, as their pentasaccharide glycosidic cores. Batatin VII (1) represents a dimer of the know batatinoside IV, consisting of two units of simonic acid B.

  10. Influence of phosphoproteins' biomimetic analogs on remineralization of mineral-depleted resin-dentin interfaces created with ion-releasing resin-based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Salvatore; Osorio, Raquel; Watson, Timothy F; Toledano, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the remineralization of acid-etched dentin pre-treated with primers containing biomimetic analogs and bonded using an ion-releasing light-curable resin-based material. An experimental etch-and-rinse adhesive system filled with Ca(2+), PO4(3-)-releasing Ca-Silicate micro-fillers was created along with two experimental primers containing biomimetic analogs such as sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP) and/or polyaspartic acid (PLA). Dentin specimens etched with 37% H3PO4 were pre-treated with two different aqueous primers containing the polyanionic biomimetic analogs or deionized water and subsequently bonded using the experimental resin-based materials. The specimens were sectioned and analyzed by AFM/nanoindentation to evaluate changes in the modulus of elasticity (Ei) across the resin-dentin interface at different AS storage periods (up to 90 days). Raman cluster analysis was also performed to evaluate the chemical changes along the interface. The phosphate uptake by the acid-etched dentin was evaluated using the ATR-FTIR. Additional resin-dentin specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength. SEM examination was performed after de-bonding, while confocal laser microscopy was used to evaluate the interfaces ultramorphology and micropermeability. Both biomimetic primers induced phosphate uptake by acid-etched dentin. Specimens created with the ion-releasing resin in combination with the pre-treatment primers containing either PLA and TMA showed the greatest recovery of the Ei of the hybrid layer, with no decrease in μTBS (p>0.05) after 3-month AS storage. The ion-releasing resin applied after use of the biomimetic primers showed the greatest reduction in micropermeability due to mineral precipitation; these results were confirmed using SEM. The use of the ion-releasing resin-based system applied to acid-etched dentin pre-treated with biomimetic primers containing analogs of phosphoproteins such as poly-l-aspartic acid and/or sodium

  11. Chemical Characterization of Beer Aging Products Derived from Hard Resin Components in Hops (Humulus lupulus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Yamada, Makiko; Taniguchi, Harumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-25

    The bitter taste of beer originates from resins in hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which are classified into two subtypes (soft and hard). Whereas the nature and reactivity of soft-resin-derived compounds, such as α-, β-, and iso-α-acids, are well studied, there is only a little information on the compounds in hard resin. For this work, hard resin was prepared from stored hops and investigated for its compositional changes in an experimental model of beer aging. The hard resin contained a series of α-acid oxides. Among them, 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones were unstable under beer storage conditions, and their transformation induced primary compositional changes of the hard resin during beer aging. The chemical structures of the products, including novel polycyclic compounds scorpiohumulinols A and B and dicyclohumulinols A and B, were determined by HRMS and NMR analyses. These compounds were proposed to be produced via proton-catalyzed cyclization reactions of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones. Furthermore, they were more stable than their precursor 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones during prolonged storage periods.

  12. Preparation of alkyd resins containing PEG unit and their dispersing effects of inorganic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chill Won; Gong, Myoung Seon [Dept. of Chemistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea); Kim, Chang Bae [Dept. of Chemistry, Dankook University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol)-containing alkyd resins were prepared for the dispersing agent and binder by reacting the carboxy-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) with 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane monostearate obtained from 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane and stearic acid. Dispersing properties of titanium dioxide and talc were compared by measuring transmittance of the dispersing solutions, and rate of the sedimentation in 1,1,1-trichloroethane. These alkyd resins, which contained both hydrophilic and lipophilic parts, showed a good dispersion of the polar inorganic particles in the non-polar solvent. The dispersing effect of the PEG-containing alkyd resins showed its maximum when the molecular weights of hydrophilic and lipophilic parts were almost the same. This happened when the alkyd resin was prepared from PEG 1000, which turned out to agree well with HLB value 10.25. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Decontamination of spent ion-exchangers contaminated with cesium radionuclides using resorcinol-formaldehyde resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamarchuk, Marina; Egorin, Andrey; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Marinin, Dmitry; Avramenko, Valentin

    2017-01-05

    The origin of the emergence of radioactive contamination not removable in the process of acid-base regeneration of ion-exchange resins used in treatment of technological media and liquid radioactive waste streams has been determined. It has been shown that a majority of cesium radionuclides not removable by regeneration are bound to inorganic deposits on the surface and inside the ion-exchange resin beads. The nature of the above inorganic inclusions has been investigated by means of the methods of electron microscopy, IR spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The method of decontamination of spent ion-exchange resins and zeolites contaminated with cesium radionuclides employing selective resorcinol-formaldehyde resins has been suggested. Good prospects of such an approach in deep decontamination of spent ion exchangers have been demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Interactions of natural resins and pigments in works of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Tommaso; Piccirillo, Anna; Nervo, Marco; Chiantore, Oscar

    2017-10-01

    The degradation process involving the formation of metal soaps in drying oils is a well-known problem due to cations from pigments reacting with free fatty acids from the oil. The aggregation of these carboxylates in semi-crystalline structures can lead to eruptions through the paint layers and 'blooming' on the surface. In this work, the metal soaps formation in presence of natural resins has been assessed and studied by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with experiments concerning the ageing of drying oil and different natural resins (shellac, dammar and colophony) in the presence of common historic pigments (smalt, ochre, umber, azurite, lead white, zinc white and titanium white). Mixtures of resins and pigments have been exposed to photo-ageing in solar box up to 1000h, thermal ageing at 50°C up to 1100h and 6month of room conditions exposure as reference. The decrease in the intensity of the carbonyl band in the spectra, as well as the contemporary increase of the metal carboxylates (in the range from 1500 to 1650cm -1 ) absorption bands, were used as the main indicators of metal soap formation. It has been observed that some pigments, particularly zinc white and smalt, present a 'catalytic' effect favouring the simultaneous formation of associated oxalates. The formation of oxalates and different degradation products from natural resins in the presence of pigments is particularly important, as it deeply affects the removability of varnishes and, more generally, the cleaning processes. Moreover, it permanently modifies the interface between painting and varnish layers as well as the aesthetic aspects of the painted surfaces. The influence of natural resins reactivity with pigments and their role in the oxalate formation is an issue still unexplored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of the components of hard resin in hops (Humulus lupulus L.) and structural elucidation of their transformation products formed during the brewing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Taniguchi, Harumi; Yamada, Makiko; Matsukura, Yasuko; Koizumi, Hideki; Furihata, Kazuo; Shindo, Kazutoshi

    2014-11-26

    The resins from hops (Humulus lupulus L.), which add the bitter taste to beer, are classified into two main sub-fractions, namely, soft and hard resins. α- and β-Acids in soft resin and their transformation during the wort boiling process are well-studied; however, other constituents in resins, especially hard resin, have been unidentified. In this study, we identified humulinones and hulupones as soft-resin components, in addition to 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones and tricyclooxyisohumulones A and B as hard-resin components. These compounds are all oxidation products derived from α- or β-acids. We also investigated compositional changes in the hard resin during the wort boiling process, which has a significant effect on the taste of the beer, by using model boiling experiments. The major changes were identified to be isomerization of 4'-hydroxyallohumulinones into 4'-hydroxyallo-cis-humulinones, followed by decomposition into cis-oxyhumulinic acids. These findings will be helpful in systematically evaluating and optimizing the effect of the hard resin on beer quality.

  16. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  17. Process for hardening an alkyd resin composition using ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadashi; Murata, Koichiro; Maruyama, Tsutomu.

    1969-01-01

    In an alkyd resin composition having free hydroxide radicals and containing a conjugated unsaturated fatty acid and/or oil as a component thereof, a process for hardening an alkyd resin composition comprises the steps of dissolving into a vinyl monomer, the product obtained by the semi-esterification reaction of said hydroxide radicals with acid anhydrides having polymerizable radicals and hardening by ionizing radiation to provide a coating with a high degree of cross-linking, with favorable properties such as toughness, hardness, chemical resistance and resistance to weather and with the feasibility of being applied as the ground and finish coat on metals, wood, paper, outdoor construction or the like. Any kind of ionization radiation, particularly accelerated electron beams, γ radiation can be used at 50 0 C to -5 0 C for a few seconds or minutes, permitting continuous operation. In one example, 384 parts of phthalic anhydride, 115 parts of pentaerythritol, 233 parts of trimethylol ethane, 288 parts of tung fatty acid and 49 parts of para-tertiary-butyl benzoic acid are mixed and heated with 60 parts of xylene to an acid value of 12. In addition, 271 parts of maleic anhydride and 0.6 parts of hydroquinone are admixed with the content and heated to terminate the reaction. 100 parts of a 50% stylene solution of this alkyd resin are mixed with 1 part of a 60% toluene solution of cobalt naphthenate, and then coated on a glass plate and irradiated with high energy electron beams of 300 kV with a dose of 5 Mrad for 1 sec. (Iwakiri, K.)

  18. Seasonal variation and resin composition in the Andean tree Austrocedrus chilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olate, Verónica Rachel; Soto, Alex; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2014-05-21

    Little is known about the changes in resin composition in South American gymnosperms associated with the different seasons of the year. The diterpene composition of 44 resin samples from seven Austrocedrus chilensis (Cupressaceae) trees, including male and female individuals, was investigated in three different seasons of the year (February, June and November). Twelve main diterpenes were isolated by chromatographic means and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The diterpene composition was submitted to multivariate analysis to find possible associations between chemical composition and season of the year. The principal component analysis showed a clear relation between diterpene composition and season. The most characteristic compounds in resins collected in summer were Z-communic acid (9) and 12-oxo-labda-8(17),13E-dien-19 oic acid methyl ester (10) for male trees and 8(17),12,14-labdatriene (7) for female trees. For the winter samples, a clear correlation of female trees with torulosic acid (6) was observed. In spring, E-communic acid (8) and Z-communic acid (9) were correlated with female trees and 18-hydroxy isopimar-15-ene (1) with male tree resin. A comparison between percent diterpene composition and collection time showed p < 0.05 for isopimara-8(9),15-diene (2), sandaracopimaric acid (4), compound (7) and ferruginol (11).

  19. Development of Highly Nano-Dispersed NiO/GDC Catalysts from Ion Exchange Resin Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Caravaca

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel NiO/GDC (Gadolinium-doped Ceria cermet catalysts were developed by the Weak Acid Resin (WAR method using an ion exchange resin template. In addition, the specific surface area of these tunable materials was enhanced by NiO partial dissolution in aqueous acid solution. The whole procedure highly improved the micro-structural properties of these materials compared to previous studies. Catalysts with high metal loadings (≥10%, small Ni nanoparticles (<10 nm, and high specific surface areas (>70 m2/g were achieved. These properties are promising for catalytic applications such as methane steam reforming for H2 production.

  20. Ether-soluble resin glycosides from the roots of Ipomoea batatas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yong-Qin; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Two new resin glycosides, batataosides I (1) and II (2), and five known compounds, friedelin (3), scopoletin (4), octadecyl caffeate (5), beta-sistosterol (6) and daucosterol (7), were isolated from the roots of Ipomoea batatas. Their structures have been determined based on the chemical and spectral data. Batataosides I and II have novel structures because the core simonic acid B was esterised with cinnamic acid for the first time, and three different substituent esterification groups in one resin glycoside is scarce. The absolute configuration of the aglycone was elucidated to be S by Mosher's method.

  1. Synthesis of Hydrophobic, Crosslinkable Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Bismaleimides have also been crosslinked with radical initiators to produce brittle networks [4].If a damine is added, chain extension and radical crosslinkinq...are produced during cure.The company also produced a similar phenylene based resin, with pendant nitrile groups which could be crosslinked without the...benzenes and tetra substituted cyclopentadienones [881. g. Preparation of poly 1,4 phenylene by nickel (0> catalysed electropolymerisation 1891. Cont’d

  2. Highly efficient synthetic method onpyroacm resin using the boc SPPS protocol for C-terminal cysteine peptide synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juvekar, Vinayak; Kim, Kang Tae; Gong, Young Dae [Innovative Drug Library Research Center, Dept. of Chemistry, College of Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    A very effective process on Pyroacm resin was developed for solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of C-terminal cysteine and cysteine ester peptides. The process uses cysteine side chain anchoring to the Pyroacm resin and the Boc protocol for SPPS. The Pyroacm resin showed remarkable stability under standard trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMSA) cleavage condition. TFMSA cleavage of protecting groups generates a peptide-linked resin, which can be subjected to peptide modification reactions. Finally, the peptide can be cleaved from the resin using methoxycarbonylsulfenyl chloride. The utility of this protocol was demonstrated by its applications to the synthesis of model peptides, key intermediates in the preparation of natural products riparin 1.2 and a-factor.

  3. Use of water as displacing agent in ion exchange chromatographic separation of isotope of boron using weak base ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Mohanakrishnan, G.; Anand Babu, C.; Krishna Prabhu, R.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to study the feasibility of using weakly basic anion exchange resin for enrichment of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography and water as eluent. The results of experiments carried out to determine total chloride capacity (TCC), strong base capacity (SBC) of the resin at different concentrations of boric acid and enrichment profiles are reported in this paper. (author)

  4. Tensile bond strength of Er,Cr:YSGG laser-irradiated human dentin and analysis of dentin-resin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bor-Shiunn; Lin, Po-Yen; Chen, Min-Huey; Hsieh, Tseng-Ting; Lin, Chun-Pin; Lai, Juin-Yih; Lan, Wan-Hong

    2007-05-01

    As the bond strength of composite resin to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-irradiated dentin has not yet been evaluated, the objectives of this study were to investigate the tensile bond strength and to analyze the resin-dentin interface among bur-cut/acid-etched, Er,Cr:YSGG laser-ablated/acid-etched and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-ablated human dentin. Crown dentin disks prepared from extracted human third permanent molars were used for the observation of surface morphological changes by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The laser energy parameters were 3.5 W and 20 Hz with water spray (air pressure level, 80%; water pressure level, maximum level). Another group of crown dentin disks were prepared for composite resin restoration and observation of resin-dentin bond interface after demineralization in 6N hydrochloric acid (HCl) for 1 min and deproteinization in 1% sodium hypochlorite solution (NaOCl) for 10 min. The tensile bond strengths of the three groups were measured by a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fracture types at the dentin-resin interface were analyzed using the digital stereoscopic microscope and fractured surfaces of the debonded specimens were examined by SEM. All three groups showed that the treated surfaces were free of dentin debris and smear layer. The peritubular dentin protruded from the surrounding intertubular dentin after laser irradiation. The dentin-resin interface treated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation and acid etching demonstrated numerous resin tags converging into a bulge and then diverging again. The length of resin tags was greater than 100 microm. The tensile bond strengths of bur-cut/acid-etched, laser-ablated/acid-etched and laser-ablated human dentin were 5.37+/-1.51, 5.17+/-1.41 and 3.29+/-0.86 MPa, respectively. No statistical significance was found between the bur-cut/acid-etched and laser-ablated/acid-etched groups. The predominant fracture modes of bur-cut/acid-etched, laser-ablated/acid-etched and laser

  5. Evaluation of adhesion of reline resins to the thermoplastic denture base resin for non-metal clasp denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choe, Han Cheol; Son, Mee Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tensile and transverse bond strength of chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II, Mild Rebaron LC) to a thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) used for non metal clasp denture. The results were compared with those of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20) and a thermoplastic polyamide resin (Biotone). The failure sites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the mode of failure. As results, the bond strength of reline resins to a thermoplastic acrylic resin was similar to the value of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin. However, thermoplastic polyamide resin showed the lowest value. The results of this study indicated that a thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasps denture allows chairside reline and repair. It was also found that the light-polymerized reline resin had better bond strength than the autopolymerizing reline resin in relining for a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin and a thermoplastic acrylic resin.

  6. Use of Anion Exchange Resins for One-Step Processing of Algae from Harvest to Biofuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Poenie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Some microalgae are particularly attractive as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel production due to their rapid growth, high content of triacylglycerols, and ability to be grown on non-arable land. Unfortunately, obtaining oil from algae is currently cost prohibitive in part due to the need to pump and process large volumes of dilute algal suspensions. In an effort to circumvent this problem, we have explored the use of anion exchange resins for simplifying the processing of algae to biofuel. Anion exchange resins can bind and accumulate the algal cells out of suspension to form a dewatered concentrate. Treatment of the resin-bound algae with sulfuric acid/methanol elutes the algae and regenerates the resin while converting algal lipids to biodiesel. Hydrophobic polymers can remove biodiesel from the sulfuric acid/methanol, allowing the transesterification reagent to be reused. We show that in situ transesterification of algal lipids can efficiently convert algal lipids to fatty acid methyl esters while allowing the resin and transesterification reagent to be recycled numerous times without loss of effectiveness.

  7. Effects of mechanical and chemical surface treatments on the resin-glass ceramic adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattabanasuk, Vanthana; Charnchairerk, Paleenee; Punsukumtana, Lada; Burrow, Michael F

    2017-08-01

    Intraoral repair of fractured ceramic restorations using resin composite is practical for dental treatment. In the present study, we investigated whether differences in surface treatments for glass ceramic would affect resin adhesion. Leucite-reinforced glass ceramic plates (IPS Empress Esthetic) were ground with 320-grit silicon carbide paper, cleaned using phosphoric acid, and then etched with hydrofluoric acid (IPS Ceramic Etching Gel) or left unetched, and silanized using silane coupling agent (RelyX Ceramic Primer) or kept unsilanized. Either conventional (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose) or universal (Scotchbond Universal) adhesive was used to bond the resin composite to ceramic surfaces. Specimens were subjected to microshear test after 37°C water storage for 24 h, and fractured surfaces were examined. Ceramic surface hydrophobicity after treatments was verified with contact angle measurements. Data were analyzed using anova and Tukey's tests. Regardless of the adhesive tested, hydrofluoric acid-etched ceramics showed higher bond strengths. Ceramic primer application improved resin bonding, even in non-etched groups, and also influenced fractography (P ceramics treated with ceramic primer were higher than those treated with silane-containing universal adhesive (P resin adhesion to glass ceramic. Universal adhesive seems to not function in the same manner as a silane coupling agent. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Pentasaccharide resin glycosides from Ipomoea cairica and their cytotoxic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bangwei; Luo, Jianguang; Wang, Junsong; Zhang, Dongming; Yu, Shishan; Kong, Lingyi

    2013-11-01

    Six partially acylated pentasaccharide resin glycosides, cairicosides A-F, were isolated from the aerial parts of Ipomoea cairica. These compounds were characterized as a group of macrolactones of simonic acid A, partially acylated with different organic acids. The lactonization site of 11S-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid (jalapinolic acid) was bound to the second saccharide moiety at C-3 in cairicosides A-E, while at C-2 in cairicoside F. Structures were established by spectroscopic and chemical methods. Compounds cairicosides A-E exhibited moderate cytotoxicity against a small panel of human tumor cell lines with IC50 values in the range of 4.28-14.31μM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of adsorption and separation phenomena of metal ions in organic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Atsushi; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Suzuki, Shinichi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2007-11-01

    Analytical technique using organic resins has already been well-developed, and its applications are employed in various fields; nevertheless, the chemical phenomena occurring inside the resin remain unclear for the most part. In the present study, we apply EXAFS spectroscopy to elucidate the adsorption and separation phenomena of metal ions by organic resin. That is, the chemical species of trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) adsorbed in a tertiary pyridine resin from hydrochloric acid and nitric acid solutions have been determined by EXAFS. The results in HCl solutions suggest that Ln(III) ions are partly dehydrated in the resin phase, enabling the pyridine groups of the resin and chloride ions to coordinate to the Ln(III) ions in their primary coordination sphere. On the other hand, Ln(III) ions are tightly coordinated by several nitrate ions in HNO3 solutions and they keep forming the nitrate complex even in the resin phase. The lighter Ln of Nd tends to form an anionic nitrate complex, [Nd(NO3)4.nH2O]-, in the resin phase, while the middle Ln of Sm exists as a cationic nitrate complex, [Sm(NO3)2.nH2O]+, for the most part. On the basis of these EXAFS results, the adsorption and separation mechanisms of the pyridine resin in HCl solutions are interpreted as the direct coordination of pyridine groups to metal ions, while the mechanisms in HNO3 solutions are mainly dominated by the anion-exchange reaction between the protonated pyridine groups and the anionic nitrate complexes of Ln(III). The obtained results demonstrate that the hydration of metal ions weakens, and instead, other complexations are enhanced in the resin phase.

  10. Creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) resin increases water demands and reduces energy availability in desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Antonio M; Dearing, M Denise; Karasov, William H

    2004-07-01

    Although many plant secondary compounds are known to have serious consequences for herbivores, the costs of processing them are generally unknown. Two potential costs of ingestion and detoxification of secondary compounds are elevation of the minimum drinking water requirement and excretion of energetically expensive metabolites (i.e., glucuronides) in the urine. To address these impacts, we studied the costs of ingestion of resin from creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) on desert woodrats (Neotoma lepida). The following hypotheses were tested: ingestion of creosote resin by woodrats (1) increases minimum water requirement and (2) reduces energy available by increasing fecal and urinary energy losses. We tested the first hypothesis, by measuring the minimum water requirement of woodrats fed a control diet with and without creosote resin. Drinking water was given in decreasing amounts until woodrats could no longer maintain constant body mass. In two separate experiments, the minimum drinking water requirement of woodrats fed resin was higher than that of controls by 18-30% (about 1-1.7 ml/d). We tested several potential mechanisms of increased water loss associated with the increase in water requirement. The rate of fecal water loss was higher in woodrats consuming resin. Neither urinary water nor evaporative water loss was affected by ingestion of resin. Hypothesis 2 was tested by measuring energy fluxes of woodrats consuming control vs. resin-treated diets. Woodrats on a resin diet had higher urinary energy losses and, thus, metabolized a lower proportion of the dietary energy than did woodrats on control diet. Fecal energy excretion was not affected by resin. The excretion of glucuronic acid represented almost half of the energy lost as a consequence of resin ingestion. The increased water requirement and energy losses of woodrats consuming a diet with resin could have notable ecological consequences.

  11. Rapid analysis of abietanes in conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, P J; Kopper, B J; Raffa, K F; Illman, B L

    2006-12-01

    Diterpene resin acids are major constituents of conifer oleoresin and play important roles in tree defense against insects and microbial pathogens. The tricyclic C-20 carboxylic acids are generally classified into two groups, the abietanes and the pimaranes. The abietanes have conjugated double bonds and exhibit characteristic UV spectra. Here, we report the analysis of abietanes by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using multiwavelength detection to optimize quantification of underivatized abietic, neoabietic, palustric, levopimaric, and dehydroabietic acids. The utility of the method is demonstrated with methanol extracts of white spruce (Picea glauca) phloem, and representative concentrations are reported.

  12. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  13. Solidifying power station resins and sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.S.D.; Haigh, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive ion exchange resins and sludges arise at nuclear power stations from various operations associated with effluent treatment and liquid waste management. As the result of an intensive development programme, the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has designed a process to convert power station resins and sludges into a shielded, packaged solid monolithic form suitable for final disposal. Research and development, the generic CEGB sludge/resin conditioning plant and the CEGB Active Waste Project are described. (U.K.)

  14. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Nagem Filho, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill ...

  15. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  16. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes da; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion wit...

  17. Microbiological study of water-softener resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, J M; Engelhard, W E; Parsons, J E

    1969-09-01

    Microbial identification using effluents backflushed from exhausted urban and rural tank resins and cleaned resins containing the sulfonated copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene (SDB) were completed, along with microbial assessment of the concentrated stock salt brine. Forty-four different bacterial and fungal genera were identified. Extensive biochemical and animal virulence tests completed on one of the six bacterial salt brine isolates indicated a pathogenic staphylococcal strain. The retention of Staphylococcus aureus, a Flavobacterium sp, and Escherichia coli B bacteriophage was demonstrated both by using the nonexhausted sodium-regenerated resin and by using the same resin exchanged with different mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. Effluent counts completed after bacterial seepage through the resins indicated the Pb(++) exchanged resin removed 55% of the bacteria; Na(+), Fe(++), and Al(+++) removed 31 to 36% and Ca(++) and Cu(++) removed about 10 to 15%. Seventy per cent or more of the bacteriophage was removed by Fe(++), Cu(++), and Al(+++), whereas the Ca(++) and Na(++) cations removed 25 to 31%. Over a 77-day period, nonsterile tap water was passed through bacterial seeded and uninoculated SDB (Na) resin columns. Effluent and resin elution counts demonstrated the growth and survival of 2 different bacteria per column. Increased bacterial retention, survival, and multiplication occurred concomitantly with accumulation of organic and inorganic materials and the Ca(++) and Mg(++) cations from the tap water. Furthermore, microbial elution from resin particles taken from column depths of 1, 8, and 16 cm indicated a bacterial diminution with increasing depths.

  18. Heat-cured Acrylic Resin versus Light-activated Resin: A Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Although light-activated resins (Eclipse) have been reported to possess superior physical and mechanical properties compared with the heat-cured acrylic resins (Lucitone-199), a few studies have compared overdentures with a locator attachment constructed from heat-cured acrylic resins with those constructed ...

  19. Ion exchange and protonation equilibria of an amphoteric ion-exchange resin in the presence of simple salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yoshinobu; Qu, Hui; Konaka, Junko

    2008-09-01

    The influence of simple salts on the ion exchange and protonation equilibria of an amphoteric ion-exchange resin, which has strong base and weak acid moieties in a single functional group fixed onto the styrene-DVB matrix, has been investigated. Concentrations of ionic species in the amphoteric ion-exchange resin in equilibrium with various sodium salt solutions were estimated by (23)Na NMR spectroscopy. For the NaClO(4) system, the ratio of sodium ion concentration in the resin phase to that in the equilibrium solution was greater than 1 and increased with a decrease in the salt concentration. In contrast to an ordinary cation-exchange resin, the ion exchange behavior of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on the amphoteric ion-exchange resin showed a marked dependence on the kinds of salts: the distribution coefficients for the NaCl system were independent of the salt concentration, while the log D vs. log[Na(+)] plots for the NaClO(4) system showed linear relationships with slopes being neither -2 nor 0. Apparent protonation constants of the carboxylate in the functional group of the resin in equilibrium with NaClO(4) solutions were greater than those with NaCl solutions. The ion exchange and protonation properties of the amphoteric ion-exchange resin were elucidated on the basis of the information about the salt concentrations in the resin phase estimated by the NMR method.

  20. Accurate determination of 41Ca concentrations in spent resins from the nuclear industry by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bourlès, Didier; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2013-01-01

    The radiological characterisation of nuclear waste is essential for managing storage sites. Determining the concentration of Long‐Lived RadioNuclides (LLRN) is fundamental for their long-term management. This paper focuses on the measurement of low 41 Ca concentrations in ions exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). 41 Ca concentrations were successfully measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) after the acid digestion of resin samples, followed by radioactive decontamination and isobaric suppression through successive hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate and final CaF 2 precipitations. Measured 41 Ca concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 ng/g, i.e. from 0.06 to 0.09 Bq/g. The 41 Ca/ 60 Co activity ratios obtained were remarkably reproducible and in good agreement with the current ratio used for resins management. - Highlights: • In the context of radioactive waste management, this study aimed at measuring 41 Ca in spent resins using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. • A chemical treatment procedure was developed to quantitatively recover calcium in solution and selectively extract it. • Developed firstly on synthetic matrices, the chemical treatment procedure was then successfully applied to real resin samples. • Accelerator mass spectrometry allowed measuring concentrations of 41 Ca in spent resins as low as 0.02 ng/g of dry resin. • Final results are in agreement with current data used for spent resins management

  1. Determination of degradation conditions of exchange resins containing technetium; Determinacion de condiciones de degradacion de resinas de intercambio conteniendo tecnecio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera S, A.; Monroy G, F.; Quintero P, E., E-mail: aa_1190@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The quantification of Tc-99 in spent exchange resins, coming from nuclear power plants, is indispensable to define their administration. The Tc-99 is a pure beta emitter of 210000 years of half-life, volatile and of a high mobility in water and soil. For this reason, the objective of this work is to establish a digestion method of ionic exchange resins containing technetium that retains more than 95% of this radioisotope. Mineralization tests were carried out of a resin Amberlite IRN-150 by means of an oxidation heat, in acid medium, varying the resin mass, the medium volume, the media type, the temperature and the digestion time. The digested samples were analyzed by gas chromatography to estimate the grade of their degradation. The {sup 99m}Tc was used as tracer to determine the technetium percentage recovered after mineralizing the resin. The digestion process depends on the temperature and the resin mass. At higher temperature better mineralization of samples and to greater resin mass to a constant temperature, less degradation of the resin. The spectra beta of the {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 99}Tc are presented. (Author)

  2. [Contact allergy to epoxy resins plastics based on materials collected by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Krecisz, Beata

    2003-01-01

    Of the 5604 patients examined in 1984-2001 for suspected occupational dermatitis, 160 persons (2.8%) showed allergy to epoxy resins plastics. Allergy was more frequent in men (4.9%) than in women (1.2%); in 154 persons, allergy was of occupational etiology (in a group of 160 patients with allergy to epoxy resins, the following proportions were observed: bricklayers, platelayers--17.5%; fitters, turners, machinist millers--13.8%; plastics molders--13.1%; laminators--11.3%; electrical equipment assemblers--10.6%; painters--10.0%). Having compared the frequency of allergy to components of epoxy resins in the years 1984-1993 and 1994-2001, it was found that allergy to resin, reactive diluents and plasticizers was on increase, whereas allergy to amines and acid anhydrides hardeners was on decrease. In a group of 13 chemical compounds entering into the composition of epoxy resins, epoxy resin contributed to the largest number of positive patch tests (77.5% of epoxy-allergic persons). This was followed by triethylenetetramine (23.1%), ethylenediamine (13.1%), phthalic anhydride (8.1%), diethylenetetramine (6.9%) and phenylglycidylether (6.2%). In addition, three patients reacted to both epoxy resin and cycloaliphatic resin.

  3. Restored viability and function of dental pulp cells on poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin supplemented with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, N; Yamada, M; Paranjpe, A; Tsukimura, N; Kubo, K; Jewett, A; Ogawa, T

    2008-12-01

    This study examines cytotoxicity of poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based dental temporary filling resin to dental pulp cells, and the potential amelioration of the toxicity with an anti-oxidant amino-acid, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Dental pulp cells extracted from rat maxillary incisors were cultured on the resin material with or without NAC incorporation, or on the polystyrene. The cultures were supplied with osteoblastic media, containing dexamethasone. Forty five percent of cells on the PMMA dental resin were necrotic at 24h after seeding. However, this percentage was reduced to 27% by incorporating NAC in the resin, which was the level equivalent to that in the culture on polystyrene. The culture on the untreated resin was found to be negative for alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity at days 5 and 10 or von Kossa mineralized nodule formation at day 20. In contrast, some areas of the cultures on NAC-incorporated resin substrates were ALP and von Kossa positive. Collagen I and dentin sialoprotein genes were barely expressed in day 7 culture on the untreated resin. However, those genes were expressed in the culture on the resin with NAC. These results suggest that the decreased cell viability and the nearly completely suppressed odontoblast-like cell phenotype of dental pulp cells cultured on PMMA dental resin can be salvaged to a biologically significant degree by the incorporation of NAC in the resin.

  4. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS ) Resin with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    synthetic) resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate ...

  5. Development of solvent-free offset ink using vegetable oil esters and high molecular-weight resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Min; Kim, Young Han; Kim, Sung Bin

    2013-01-01

    In the development of solvent-free offset ink, the roles of resin molecular weight and used solvent on the ink performance were evaluated by examining the relationship between the various properties of resin and solvent and print quality. To find the best performing resin, the soy-oil fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) was applied to the five modified-phenolic resins having different molecular weights. It is found from the experimental results that the ink made of higher molecular weight and better solubility resin gives better printability and print quality. It is because larger molecular weight resin with better solubility gives higher rate of ink transfer. From the ink application of different esters to high molecular weight resin, the best printing performance was yielded from the soy-oil fatty acid butyl ester (FABE). It is due to its high kinematic viscosity resulting in the smallest change of ink transfer weight upon multiple number of printing, which improves the stability of ink quality.

  6. A novel malonamide grafted polystyrene-divinyl benzene resin for extraction, pre-concentration and separation of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S A; Mohapatra, P K; Manchanda, V K

    2009-01-30

    A new chelating polymeric extraction chromatographic resin was prepared by chemical anchoring of N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-dibutyl malonamide (DMDBMA) with chloromethylated Merrifield resin((R)). The grafted resin exhibited stronger binding for hexavalent and tetravalent actinides such as U(VI), Th(IV) and Pu(IV) over trivalent actinides, viz. Am(III) and Pu(III). Batch studies on solid phase extraction performed over a wide range of acid solution (0.01-6M HNO(3)) revealed that ternary mixer of uranium, americium and plutonium or thorium, americium and plutonium could be separated from each other at 1M HNO(3). Desorption of U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III) from the loaded resin was efficiently carried out using 0.1M alpha-HIBA, 0.25M oxalic acid and 0.01M EDTA, respectively. Quantitative pre-concentration of actinide ions such as Th(IV) and U(VI) was possible from 3M HNO(3) solution. The practical utility of the grafted resin was evaluated by uranium sorption measurements in several successive cycles. The sorption efficiency of the resin with respect to uranyl ion remained unchanged even after 30 days of continuous use. The surface morphology of the resin was monitored with the help of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique.

  7. The effects of fouled anion resin on condensate polishing plant performance at Dungeness B power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, Chris [British Energy, Barnwood, Gloucester (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    The return to power, after an outage, at Dungeness B Power Station was delayed because of problems in achieving an in-specification feedwater acid conductivity. Dungeness B has a full flow cation/mixed bed condensate polishing plant (CPP). Investigations showed that the acid conductivity was produced by carbon dioxide and organic impurities both by-passing the CPP and slipping through it. Resin analysis showed that the anion resin had severely impaired sulfate removal kinetics. The paper covers the work done to try and identify the nature and source of the organics and their effect on the anion resin. One significant finding was that the carbonate removal kinetics were as impaired as those for sulfate removal; this had not been previously experienced in the CPP at any British Energy plant. (orig.)

  8. Resin composite for sealing and its use in a solar cell. Fushiyo jushi soseibutsu oyobi sore wo mochiita taiyo denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, H.; Mimura, T.; Takehara, N.

    1994-01-28

    This invention presents resin composites for sealing of a solar cell composed of a hardening resin and a thermoplastic resin which has a number average molecular weight larger than that of the hardening resin and is soluble in the hardening resin, and the invention affords a solar cell to endure a long-term stable operation and to give a good performance. The hardening resin includes unsaturated polyester resin, phenolic resin, alkyd resin, unsaturated acrylic resin, epoxy resin, polyurethane resin, melamine resin, diallyl phthalate resin, their oligomers and their modifications. The thermoplastic resin includes saturated polyester resin, phenolic resin, acrylic resin, styrene resin, epoxy resin, polyurethane resin, polyvinyl acetate resin, polyvinyl chloride resin, polyvinyl alcohol resin, polyacetal resin, their modifications and their copolymer resin. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Inverse-Frontal Chromatography studies on enrichment of Boron-10 using quaternery 4-vinylpyridine-divinylbenzene resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejawada, Venki; Mohapatra, C.; Rao, A.S.; Prasad, K.L.; Murthy, P.K.; Rao, A.K.; Singh, H.P.; Vithal, G.K.; Kumar, Sangita D.

    2014-01-01

    In order to enrich 10 B, band migration of boric acid-mannitol with hydrochloric acid solution was performed by inverse frontal chromatography on a porous, 25% crosslinked, 38% quaternized 4-vinylpyridine-divinylbenzene resin (py-resin). The work was initiated to replace the existing strong base anion exchange resin type-II (SBA-II) which is used in Boron Enrichment Plant (BEP) of heavy water plant Manuguru. Before its application in BEP, it is mandatory to evaluate py-resin for its performance. The studies showed that maximum of 40% 10 B enrichment observed after 13 m band movement and there was no further improvement, hence profile sampling carried out after 28 m. (author)

  10. Morphological, Mechanical and Physio-chemical Performance of ortho-Cresol Epoxy Novolac Based Vinyl Ester Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswal Shipra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vinyl ester resin (VEOCN was prepared from o-cresol epoxy resin (EOCN and methacrylic acid in the presence of triphenyl phosphine as catalyst and hydroquinone as inhibitor with acid value of ~ 7 mg of KOH per gram of solid. O-cresol based novolac resin (OCN, OCN based epoxy resin (EOCN and VEOCN were characterized by Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. The thermal and mechanical behavior of the samples prepared at 30°C from VEOCN using styrene and methyl-methacrylate respectively as reactive diluents, in the presence of benzoyl peroxide (2 phr as initiator was studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and Universal Testing Machine (UTM. Chemical resistance of above VER samples was also evaluated as a function of % weight loss and with the help of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, upon immersing the VEOCN samples in different solutions for 90 days.

  11. Hybrid layer seals the cementum/4-META/MMA-TBB resin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Saori; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Toshiki; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuko; Ikeda, Takatsumi; Sano, Hidehiko; Sidhu, Sharanbir K

    2007-01-01

    Although 4-META/MMA-TBB resin has adhesive properties to dentin, and has been clinically used for the bonding treatment of vertically fractured roots and apicoectomy, there has not been any investigation on the adhesion of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to cementum. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding and the sealing ability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to cementum. Bovine root cementum and dentin surfaces were treated with a citric acid and ferric chloride solution, and the 4-META/MMA-TBB resin was applied on the treated surfaces before testing. The microtensile bond strength and the leakage levels obtained for the cementum were almost equal to those for the dentin. In SEM and TEM observations, a hybrid layer approximately 2-3 microm in thickness was observed at the interface between the resin and the cementum. It is concluded that 4-META/MMA-TBB resin adhered to cementum via a hybrid layer on cementum, as previously reported for dentin. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effect of intermediate agents and pre-heating of repairing resin on composite-repair bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacchini, Federica; Magni, Elisa; Radovic, Ivana; Mazzitelli, Claudia; Monticellia, Francesca; Goracci, Cecilia; Polimeni, Antonella; Ferrari, Marco

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the composite-to-composite microtensile bond strength and interfacial quality after using different combinations of intermediate agents and pre-curing temperatures of repairing resin. Forty-five composite discs (8x4 mm) of Gradia Direct Anterior (GC Corp), stored in a saline solution at 37 degrees C for one month, were sandblasted (50 microm aluminum oxide), cleaned (35% phosphoric acid) and randomly divided into three groups (n=15) according to the intermediate agent applied: (1) no treatment; (2) unfilled resin (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Adhesive, 3M ESPE); (3) flowable composite (Gradia LoFlo, GC Corp). Each disc was incrementally repaired (8x8 mm) with the same resin as the substrate. For each group, three subgroups (n=5) were created, depending on the pre-curing temperature of the repairing resin-4 degrees C, 23 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Two bonded specimens per group were prepared to evaluate the composite-to-composite interfacial quality via scanning electron microscope. Microtensile bond strength measurements were performed with the remaining three specimens and failure mode was examined by stereomicroscopy. Two-way ANOVA revealed that temperature (p resin in groups where intermediate agents were used. The highest bond strengths were recorded when flowable composite was used as an intermediate agent under each of the three temperature conditions. Interfacial quality improved by raising the resin temperature from 4 degrees C to 37 degrees C.

  13. Preconcentration of Cu (II) from seawater using a novel and stable phenol-formaldehyde resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, D; Starvin, Maria; Biju, V M

    2010-01-01

    Preconcentration of Cu (II) from seawater using a novel phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin was investigated. 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-4-azo-3-hydroxybenzene-formaldehyde resin (DAHBF) was prepared by condensing 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-4-azo-3-hydroxybenzene with formaldehyde (1:2 mole ratio) in the presence of oxalic acid as catalyst. Polychelates were obtained when the DAHBF was treated with the aqueous solution of Cu (II) ions. The polymeric resin and polymer-metal complexes were characterized with thermal analysis and spectral studies. The IR spectra of polychelates suggest that the metal was coordinated through the oxygen atoms of the dihydroxybenzene moiety. The TGA data revealed the thermal stability of the resin and the polychelates. X-ray diffraction study revealed the incorporation of the metal ion significantly enhanced the degree of crystallinity. The sorption properties of the chelate forming resin towards divalent metal ion [Cu(II)] was studied as a function of pH, preconcentration time, metal concentration, amount of resin, aqueous phase volume and presence of electrolyte. This procedure was validated for recovery of copper from seawater samples. The method has adequate accuracy and it can be used for determination of copper in sea water samples.

  14. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer...... with and without silane treatment significantly decreased the bond strength of Panavia F to the post. CONCLUSION: The bond strength of resin cements to the posts was affected by the material of the post, the surface treatment of the post, and by the type of resin cement. The bond strength of resin cement to dentin...

  16. Curing kinetics of alkyd/melamine resin mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Jovičić Mirjana C.; Radičević Radmila Ž.

    2009-01-01

    Alkyd resins are the most popular and useful synthetic resins applied as the binder in protective coatings. Frequently they are not used alone but are modified with other synthetic resins in the manufacture of the coatings. An alkyd/melamine resin mixture is the usual composition for the preparation of coating called 'baking enamel' and it is cured through functional groups of resins at high temperatures. In this paper, curing kinetics of alkyd resins based on castor oil and dehydrated castor...

  17. Tensile bond strength of an aged resin composite repaired with different protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Esra Uzer; Ergücü, Zeynep; Türkün, L Sebnem; Ercan, Utku Kürșat

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments and bonding procedures on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin composites repaired 6 months after polymerization. Resin composite sticks were aged in distilled water at 37°C for 6 months. They were divided into 12 groups (n = 10) according to the combination of surface treatment/bonding procedures [none, only bur treatment, XP Bond (XPB/Dentsply/DeTrey) with/without bur, AdheSE (A-SE/Ivoclar/Vivadent) with/without bur, Composite Primer (CP/GC) with/without bur, CP after bur and acid-etching, XPB after acid etching and CP with bur, A-SE after bur and CP]. The ultimate tensile bond strength (UTS) of the resin composites was tested in intact but aged specimens. Tensile bond strengths were tested with a universal testing machine (Shimadzu). Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan Multiple Comparisons tests (p < 0.05). All repaired groups showed significantly higher TBS than the group without any sureface treatment (p < 0.05). Four groups resulted in TBS similar to those of intact resin composite UTS: A-SE, A-SE with bur, A-SE after CP with bur, and XPB after acid etching+CP with bur. Bur treatment, silane primer or etch-and-rinse adhesive application alone were not successful in the repair process of aged resin composite, whereas self-etching adhesive alone showed similar performance to the intact specimens. Combined procedures generally showed better performance: A-SE with bur, A-SE after CP with bur, and XPB after acid etching +CP with bur showed TBS similar to those of the intact specimens. It was concluded that bur roughening of the surfaces and rebonding procedures were essential for repairing aged resin composites.

  18. Gold Loading on Ion Exchange Resins in Non-Ammoniacal Resin-Solution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Muslim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The loading of gold using strong base anion exchange resin in non-ammoniac resin-solution (NARS systems has been studied. The loading of gold onto ion exchange resins is affected by polythionate concentration, and trithionate can be used as the baseline in the system. The results also show that resin capacity on gold loading increases due to the increase in the equilibrium thiosulfate concentration in the NARS system. Gold loading performances show the need of optimization the equilibrium concentrations of thiosulfate in the NARS system. Keywords: equilibrium, gold loading, resin capacity, thiosulfate, trithionate

  19. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as

  20. The solidification of spent resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiao, S. J.; Tsai, C. M.; Shyu, Y. H.

    1991-01-01

    A quasi-steady apparatus was applied to measure the thermal conductivity of solids ranging in size for 0.3 to 200 L, and temperature distributions in the solids were recorded during the curing, and theoretical equation for conduction in a cylindrical form with uniform energy generation was established to define the thermal state of reaction. The heat of reaction calculated from the theoretical equation with experimental values for the maximum temperature and thermal conductivity agrees very well with the data reported. The relationships among heat of reaction and amount of curing agent, retardant, loading of spent resin, and water were established

  1. Comparative study using different resins to determine thorium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Mychelle M.L.; Silva, Paulo S.C.; Maihara, Vera A., E-mail: my_linhares@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: pscsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: vmaihara@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Taddei, Maria Helena T., E-mail: mhtaddei@cnen.gov.br [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Poços de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratório de Pocos de Caldas; Cheberle, Luan T.V., E-mail: luancheberle@gmail.com [Ambientis Radioproteção, Barueri, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Thorium is a naturally occurring radioactive element that is widely distributed in the crust of the Earth. This element is very common in mineral formations in regions with high levels of natural radioactivity, therefore, its determination in environmental samples is important. Thorium isotopes ({sup 228}Th, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th) were determined in a reference material, the IAEA Soil 327 sample, to validate the two methods employed using different resins. The initial preparation with acid dissolution is the same to both, in the first is used anion exchange resin (DOWEX 1 x 2) and electrodeposition in silver planchets. And in the second method is used a specific chromatographic resin (TEVA) and cerium fluoride microprecipitation. At the end both analysis are quantified by alpha spectrometry. The two methods the results obtained were satisfactory for the reference material used, with relative error of less than 4% for {sup 228}Th, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th. The main differences found between them were spectrums resolutions, time and cost of analysis. (author)

  2. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS Resin with Polyester Resin in Composite Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Ugoamadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural resins can compete effectively with the synthetic ones in composite development. In this research, cashew nuts were picked and processed for the extraction of the resin content. The resin (natural resin so obtained was mixed with cobalt amine (accelerator, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (catalyst to develop two sets of composite specimens – specimens without fibres and specimens reinforced with glass fibres. This method of sample specimen development was repeated with polyester (synthetic resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate compressive strength of 55MPa compared to that of polyester resin with an ultimate strength of 68MPa. The result of tensile strength proved cashew nut shell liquid resin (with ultimate strength of 44MPa to be better than polyester resin with 39MPa as ultimate tensile strength. This means that natural resins could be a better substitute for the synthetic ones when the required quantities of fibers (reinforcements and fillers are used in the fibre-reinforced plastic composite developments.

  3. Metal Catalysis with Nanostructured Metals Supported Inside Strongly Acidic Cross-linked Polymer Frameworks: Influence of Reduction Conditions of AuIII-containing Resins on Metal Nanoclusters Formation in Macroreticular and Gel-Type Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Calore, L.; Cavinato, g.; Canton, P.; Peruzzo, L.; Banavali, R.; Jeřábek, Karel; Corain, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 391, AUG 30 (2012), s. 114-120 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : strongly acidic cross-linked polymer * frameworks * gold(0) nanoclusters Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.687, year: 2012

  4. Interfacial fracture toughness of different resin cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Rostami, Golriz; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Keshvad, Alireza; van Noort, Richard

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of HF acid etching and silane treatment on the interfacial fracture toughness of a self-adhesive and two conventional resin-based cements bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Lithium disilicate glass ceramic discs were prepared with two different surface preparations consisting of gritblasted with aluminium oxide, and gritblasted and etched with hydrofluoric acid. Ceramic surfaces with a chevron shaped circular hole were treated by an optimized silane treatment followed by an unfilled resin and then three different resin cements (Variolink II, Panavia F2, and Multilink Sprint). Specimens were kept in distilled water at 37°C for 24h and then subjected to thermocycling. The interfacial fracture toughness was measured and mode of failures was also examined. Data were analysed using analysis of variance followed by T-test analysis. No statistically significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between the gritblasted and gritblasted and etched surfaces for Variolink II resin cement was found (P>0.05). For the gritblasted ceramic surfaces, no significant difference in the mean fracture toughness values between Panavia F2 and Variolink II was observed (P>0.05). For the gritblasted and etched ceramic surfaces, a significantly higher fracture toughness for Panavia F2 than the other cements was found (Pceramic system was affected by the surface treatment and the type of luting agent. Dual-cured resin cements demonstrated a better bonding efficacy to the lithium disilicate glass ceramic compared to the self-adhesive resin cement. The lithium disilicate glass ceramic surfaces should be gritblasted and etched to get the best bond when used with Panavia F2 and Multilink Sprint resin cements, whereas for the Variolink II only gritblasting is required. The best bond overall is achieved with Panavia F2. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Mondelli, José

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1) rinsing with water and drying; (G2) application of an adhesive system; (G3) rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4) rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (presin increments.

  6. resin as polymer-supported synthesis support

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    dichloro-5,6-dicyano- benzoqunone ... ports used most widely in SPOS are Merrifield resin .... (2 × 10 mL). The resin was dried at 50°C for one hour to give white beads. IR (KBr): 3108, 3312 cm–1. 1H-NMR (500 MHz, CDCl3): δ 7⋅13 (br s, PS), 7⋅01.

  7. [Delayed asthma bronchiale due to epoxy resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authried, Georg; Al-Asadi, Haifaa; Møller, Ulla; Sherson, David Lee

    2013-10-28

    Epoxy resin is a low molecular weight agent, which can cause both acute and delayed allergic reactions. However, it is known causing skin reactions with direct or airborne contact. Rarely it can cause airway reactions like asthma bronchiale. We describe a case of a windmill worker who developed delayed asthma bronchiale due to airborne contact with epoxy resin.

  8. Facile synthesis of hypercrosslinked resins via chloromethylation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A sort of non-polystyrene type hypercrosslinked resin was firstly synthesized through chloromethylation of simple aryl molecules (benzene, toluene, naphthalene, diphenyl), succedent continuous Friedel–Crafts alkylation polymerization and post-crosslinking reaction. The chemical and porous structures of these novel resins ...

  9. Possible mechanisms for the interaction of polymeric composite resins with Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zahhhar, A.A.; Abdel-Aziz, H.M.; Siyam, T.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between the active groups of polymeric composite resins such as Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)-ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid disodium salt P(AM-AA)EDTANa 2 , Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)- montmorillonite P(AM-AA)-montmorillonite, and Poly(acrylamide-acrylic acid)-potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate P(AM-AA)-KNiHCF, with copper sulfate as a test ion has been studied. The spectroscopic studies show that the mechanism of interaction between polymeric composite resins and copper sulfate is a bond formation between the active groups of polymeric chains and copper ion. The bond formation depends on nature of polymeric chains. It was also found that the amide groups form complexes with hydrated cations, while carboxylate group interact by ion exchange mechanism through complex formation. Montmorillonite and hexacyanoferrate of the resins interact with metal ions by ion exchange mechanism

  10. Concentrating cesium-137 from seawater using resorcinol-formaldehyde resin for radioecological monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorin, Andrei; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Avramenko, Valentin [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal Univ., Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Palamarchuk, Marina; Marinin, Dmitry [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-01

    A method of preconcentrating cesium-137 from seawater using a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin, which enables one to optimize the ecological monitoring procedure, has been suggested. Studies of sorption of cesium-137 from seawater by resorcinol-formaldehyde resin have been performed, and it has been demonstrated that the cation exchanger is characterized by high selectivity with respect to cesium-137. It was found that the selectivity depended on the temperature of resin solidification and the seawater pH value. The maximal value of the cesium-137 distribution coefficient is equal to 4.1-4.5 x 10{sup 3} cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. Under dynamic conditions, the ion-exchange resin capacity is 310-910 bed volumes depending on the seawater pH, whereas the efficiency of cesium removal exceeds 95%. The removal of more than 95% of cesium-137 has been attained using 1-3 M solutions of nitric acid: here, the eluate volume was 8-8.4 bed volumes. Application of 3 M solution of nitric acid results in resin degradation with the release of gaseous products.

  11. Cytotoxicity of resin-based luting cements to pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Elaine Cristina Voltolini; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto De Souza

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of components released from different types of luting cements to two cell lines obtained from pulp tissue. Three types of luting cements were evaluated, distributed into the following groups: G1--negative control (no treatment); G2--resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (Rely X Luting 2); G3--self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X U200); and G4--conventional resin cement (Rely X ARC). Standardized cylindrical specimens (14 mm diameter and 1 mm thick) prepared with the dental materials were immersed in culture medium (DMEM) for 24 hours to obtain the extracts (DMEM + components released from the cements). Then, the extracts were applied to cultured odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells or human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). Finally, cell viability (MTT assay), cell death (Annexin/PI) (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 5%) and cell morphology (SEM) were assessed. Cements' components in contact with cells (SEM/EDS) and pH of the extracts were also evaluated. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (G2) caused the most intense toxic effect to the two cell lines; the cell viability reduction was around 95.8% and 89.4% for MDPC-23 cells and HDPCs, respectively, which was statistically significantly different compared with that of the negative control group (G1). Also, a high quantity of particles leached from this ionomeric cement was found on the cells, which showed intense morphological alterations. In the G2 group, 100% necrosis was observed for both cell lines, and an acidic pH was detected on the extract. Conversely, Rely X U200 (G3) and Rely X ARC (G4), which presented low solubility and no alteration in pH, caused only slight cytotoxicity to the cultured cells.

  12. Effect of surface treatment methods on the shear bond strength of auto-polymerized resin to thermoplastic denture base polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Polyamide polymers do not provide sufficient bond strength to auto-polymerized resins for repairing fractured denture or replacing dislodged denture teeth. Limited treatment methods have been developed to improve the bond strength between auto-polymerized reline resins and polyamide denture base materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of surface modification by acetic acid on surface characteristics and bond strength of reline resin to polyamide denture base. MATERIALS AND METHODS 84 polyamide specimens were divided into three surface treatment groups (n=28): control (N), silica-coated (S), and acid-treated (A). Two different auto-polymerized reline resins GC and Triplex resins were bonded to the samples (subgroups T and G, respectively, n=14). The specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test after they were stored in distilled water for 1 week and thermo-cycled for 5000 cycles. Data were analyzed with independent t-test, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α=.05). RESULTS The bond strength values of A and S were significantly higher than those of N (Pdenture base materials with acetic acid may be an efficient and cost-effective method for increasing the shear bond strength to auto-polymerized reline resin. PMID:28018569

  13. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  14. Electrodialytic decontamination of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nott, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a novel electrodialytic decontamination process for the selective removal of radioactive Cs from spent ion exchange resins containing large amounts of Li is described. The process involves passage of a dc electric current through a bed of the spent ion exchange resin in a specially designed electrodialytic cell. The radiocesium so removed from a volume of the spent resin is concentrated onto a much smaller volume of a Cs selective sorbent to achieve a significant radioactive waste volume reduction. Technical feasibility of the electrodialytic resin decontamination process has been demonstrated on a bench scale with a batch of simulated spent ion exchange resin and using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide as the Cs selective sorbent. A volume reduction factor between 10 and 17 has been estimated. The process appears to be economically attractive. Improvements in process economics can be expected from optimization of the process. Other possible applications of the EDRD process have been identified

  15. Embedding of reactor wastes in plastic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    STEAG Kernenergie GmbH is so far the only firm commercially to condition radioactive bead ion exchange resins by embedding in polystyrene resins. The objective of the work reported here was to study and develop methods for immobilization of other reactor wastes in plastic resins. Comparison studies on high quality cement however showed favourable results for cement with respect to process safety and economy. For this reason STEAG interrupted its work in the field of resin embedding after about one year. The work carried out during this period is surveyed in this report, which includes a comprehensive literature study on reactor wastes and their solidification in plastic resins as well as on regulations with regard to radioactive waste disposal in the member states of the European Communities

  16. Disinfection of denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J J; Cameron, S M; Runyan, D A; Craft, D W

    1999-02-01

    During repair or adjustments of acrylic resin removable complete and partial dentures, particles of the acrylic resin from the interior of the prosthesis may expose dental personnel to microbial health hazards if the prosthesis has not been thoroughly disinfected. This study investigates the efficacy of a commercially prepared microbial disinfectant (Alcide) on the external and internal surfaces of acrylic resins. Four groups of acrylic resin were incubated in an experimental model to simulate the oral environment over time. Specimens were treated in 2 groups, disinfected and not disinfected, and then further grouped by breaking and not breaking. Analysis was performed with microbial colony counts, SEM, and statistical analyses. Viable microorganisms still remain on the internal and external surfaces of treated resins. Chlorine dioxide reduces, but does not eliminate, viable microorganisms on these dental prostheses.

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Novolak Phenol Formaldehyde Resin from Liquefied Brown-Rotted Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai-Yun Li; Chung-Yun Hse; Te-Fu Qin

    2012-01-01

    The brown-rotted wood was liquefied in phenol with phosphoric acid as catalyst and the resulting liquefied products were condensed with formaldehyde to yield novolak liquefied wood-based phenol formaldehyde resin (LWPF). The results showed that brown-rotted wood could be more easily liquefied than sound wood in phenol. The residue content of liquefied wood decreased...

  18. Linkers, resins, and general procedures for solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelton, Anne Pernille Tofteng; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    and linkers for solid-phase synthesis is a key parameter for successful peptide synthesis. This chapter provides an overview of the most common and useful resins and linkers for the synthesis of peptides with C-terminal amides, carboxylic acids, and more. The chapter finishes with robust protocols for general...

  19. Mechanical Properties of Surface-Charged Poly(Methyl Methacrylate as Denture Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang E. Park

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the mechanical properties of a new surface-modified denture resin for its suitability as denture base material. This experimental resin is made by copolymerization of methacrylic acid (MA to poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA to produce a negative charge. Four experimental groups consisted of Orthodontic Dental Resin (DENTSPLY Caulk as a control and three groups of modified PMMA (mPMMA produced at differing ratios of methacrylic acid (5 : 95, 10 : 90, and 20 : 80 MA : MMA. A 3-point flexural test using the Instron Universal Testing Machine (Instron Corp. measured force-deflection curves and a complete stress versus strain history to calculate the transverse strength, transverse deflection, flexural strength, and modulus of elasticity. Analysis of Variance and Scheffe Post-test were performed on the data. Resins with increased methacrylic acid content exhibited lower strength values for the measured physical properties. The most significant decrease occurred as the methacrylic acid content was increased to 20% mPMMA. No significant differences at P<.05 were found in all parameters tested between the Control and 5% mPMMA.

  20. 21 CFR 177.1460 - Melamine-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1460 Melamine... melamine is made to react with not more than 3 moles of formaldehyde in water solution. (b) The resins may... polymerization reaction control agent. Phthalic acid anhydride Do. Zinc stearate For use as lubricant. (c) The...

  1. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1900 Urea... urea is made to react with not more than 2 moles of formaldehyde in water solution. (b) The resins may... polymerization-control agent. Tetrachlorophthalic acid anhydride Do. Zinc stearate For use as lubricant. (c) The...

  2. Enhancing the quality of alkyd resins using methyl esters of rubber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the alkyd samples were fairly resistant to brine, acid and water but poorly resistant to alkali. However, the MERSO alkyds were observed to have a better resistance than the RSO alkyd resins. The scratch/gouge pencil hardness shows that the hardness of the alkyd films decreases with the oil length. Keywords: Alkyd ...

  3. Repair bond strength of a resin composite to alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goia, Tamiye Simone; Pereira Leite, Fabiola Pessoa; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Oezcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the microtensile bond strength of a repair resin to an alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic (Vitadur-alpha, Vita) after 3 surface conditioning methods: Group 1, etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid for 1 minute plus rinsing and drying, followed by application of silane for 5

  4. Calysolins I-IV, resin glycosides from Calystegia soldanella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takigawa, Ayako; Muto, Haruka; Kabata, Kiyotaka; Okawa, Masafumi; Kinjo, Junei; Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru

    2011-11-28

    Four new resin glycosides having intramolecular cyclic ester structures (jalapins), named calysolins I-IV (1-4), were isolated from the methanol extract of leaves, stems, and roots of Calystegia soldanella , along with one known jalapin (5) derivative. The structures of 1-4 were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data and chemical evidence. They fall into two types, one having a 22-membered ring (1 and 4) and the other with a 27-membered ring (2 and 3). The sugar moieties of 1-4 were partially acylated by some organic acids. Compound 4 is the first example of a hexaglycoside of jalapin.

  5. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative 137 Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either 85 Sr or 60 Co. Release rates of 137 Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement

  6. Kinetic study on the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to levulinic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girisuta, B.; Janssen, L. P. B. M.; Heeres, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    A variety of interesting bulk chemicals is accessible by the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose. An interesting example is levulinic acid, a versatile precursor for fuel additives, polymers, and resins. A detailed kinetic study on the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to levulinic acid is

  7. Control of resin production in Araucaria angustifolia, an ancient South American conifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, J C; da Silva Rodrigues-Corrêa, K C; Fett-Neto, A G

    2015-07-01

    Araucaria angustifolia is an ancient slow-growing conifer that characterises parts of the Southern Atlantic Forest biome, currently listed as a critically endangered species. The species also produces bark resin, although the factors controlling its resinosis are largely unknown. To better understand this defence-related process, we examined the resin exudation response of A. angustifolia upon treatment with well-known chemical stimulators used in fast-growing conifers producing both bark and wood resin, such as Pinus elliottii. The initial hypothesis was that A. angustifolia would display significant differences in the regulation of resinosis. The effect of Ethrel(®) (ET - ethylene precursor), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), sulphuric acid (SuA) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP - nitric oxide donor) on resin yield and composition in young plants of A. angustifolia was examined. In at least one of the concentrations tested, and frequently in more than one, an aqueous glycerol solution applied on fresh wound sites of the stem with one or more of the adjuvants examined promoted an increase in resin yield, as well as monoterpene concentration (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and limonene). Higher yields and longer exudation periods were observed with JA and ET, another feature shared with Pinus resinosis. The results suggest that resinosis control is similar in Araucaria and Pinus. In addition, A. angustifolia resin may be a relevant source of valuable terpene chemicals, whose production may be increased by using stimulating pastes containing the identified adjuvants. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  8. Evaluation of Resin-Resin Interface in Direct Composite Restoration Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Iovan, G.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resin-resin interface when a universal bonding agent was used in two different strategies in direct restoration repair. Two composite resins (a micro-filled hybrid and a nano-filled hybrid) as old restorations that have to be repair, a universal bonding agent and a micro-filled hybrid composite resin (different then that aged) as new material for repair were chosen for the study. Non-aged samples were used as control and aged samples were used as study groups. The universal bonding agent was applied in etch-and-rinse and in self-etch strategies. The interface between old and new composite resins was evaluated by SEM and the microleakage was assessed by scoring the dye penetration. Very good adaptation of the two different composite resins placed in direct contact in non-aged samples was recorded. No gaps or defects were visible and strong resin-resin contact was observed. After aging, enlargement of resin-resin junction were observed in most of the samples and a increased dye penetration was recorded irrespective of the strategy (etch-and-rinse or self-etch) used for bonding agent application.

  9. Bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four kinds of injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, a polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and a polycarbonate) and PMMA, as a control, were tested. The eight types of surface treatment: ((1) no treatment, (2) air abrasion, (3) dichloromethane, (4) ethyl acetate, (5) 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (6) air abrasion and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (7) tribochemical silica coating, and (8) tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin) were applied to each specimen. The chairside autopolymerizing reline resins were bonded to disks of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. All of the specimens were immersed in water for 4 months and then thermocycled for 10,000 cycles in water between 5 and 55°C. The shear bond strengths were determined. The shear bond strengths of the two polyamides treated using air abrasion, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate and no treatment were exceedingly low. The greatest bond strength was recorded for the polyethylene terephthalate copolymer specimens treated with tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (22.5MPa). The bond strengths of the other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins increased using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin were the most effective surface treatments among all denture base resins tested. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation and quality assessment of high-purity ginseng total saponins by ion exchange resin combined with macroporous adsorption resin separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-Nan; Wang, Zhong-Li; Dai, Jian-Guo; Chen, Lin; Huang, Yu-Fang

    2014-05-01

    To prepare high-purity ginseng total saponins from a water decoction of Chinese ginseng root. Total saponins were efficiently purified by dynamic anion-cation exchange following the removal of hydrophilic impurities by macroporous resin D101. For quality control, ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with a charged aerosol detector (CAD) was applied to quantify marker components. The total saponin content was estimated by a colorimetric method using a vanillin-vitriol system and CAD response. D201, which consisted of a cross-linked polystyrene matrix and -N(+)(CH3)3 functional groups, was the best of the four anion exchange resins tested. However, no significant difference in cation exchange ability was observed between D001 (strong acid) and D113 (weak acid), although they have different functional groups and matrices. After purification in combination with D101, D201, and D113, the estimated contents of total saponins were 107% and 90% according to the colorimetric method and CAD response, respectively. The total amount of representative ginsenosides Re, Rd, Rg1, and compound K was approximately 22% based on ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-CAD quantitative analysis. These findings suggest that an ion exchange resin, combined with macroporous adsorption resin separation, is a promising and feasible purification procedure for neutral natural polar components. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The resin glycosides from the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. LAM.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Naoki; Horiuchi, Yoshinori

    2008-11-01

    Four new and two known ether-soluble resin glycosides were isolated from popular sweet potato (the roots of Ipomoea batatas L. LAM., Kokei 14 go, Convolvulaceae) in Japan. Unlike ester-type dimers, batatins I and II, obtained from other sweet potato (Ipomoea batabas var. batatas), the glycosides were tetra or pentasaccharide monomers in which the sugar moieties are partially acylated by organic acids and combine with the aglycone, jalapinolic acid, to form a macrocyclic ester.

  12. Comparison of Flexural Strength of Resin Cements After Storing in Different Media and Bleaching Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geramipanah, Farideh; Rezaei, Susan Mir Mohammad; Jafary, Maryam; Sadighpour, Leyla

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different storage media and bleaching treatments on the flexural strength of two resin cements (Panavia and BisCem). One hundred rectangular-shaped specimens were prepared with two resin cements and were stored in five media types (n = 10): distilled water (DW), lactic acid (LA), sodium hydroxide (NH), in-office bleaching (OB) and home bleaching (HB). There was significant interaction between the solutions and cements (p except Panavia in OB) (p exception of in-office bleaching.

  13. Preparation and characterization of (St-DVB-MAA) ion exchange resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanquan; Sun, Xiangwei; Ling, Lixing; Wang, Shumin; Wu, Wufeng; Cheng, Shihong; Hu, Yue; Zhong, Chunyan

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, used polyvinyl alcohol as dispersing agent, Benzoyl peroxide as initiator of polymerization, Divinyl benzene as cross-linking agent, Styrene and 2-Methylpropenoic acid as monomer, ion exchange resin (copolymer of St-DVB-MAA)were prepared by suspension polymerization on 80°C. The structures, components and properties of the prepared composite micro gels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The experiment of ion exchange was conducted by resin to deal with copper ions in the solution. The result showed that performance of the ion exchange capacity was excellent, which impacted by pH.

  14. The development of 126Sn separation procedure by means of TBP resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andris, Boris; Bena, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Separation possibilities of 126 Sn with a new extraction-chromatographic material TBP Resin were studied. Suitable conditions for tin separation were determined in hydrochloric acid medium. 126 Sn was concentrated on TBP resin from 6 mol L -1 HCl and was eluted with 0.1 mol L -1 HCl. A purification step to remove 137 Cs with AMP-PAN column was necessary to obtain sufficiently purified samples which were directly measured with gamma spectrometry for 126 Sn activity. Separation of 126 Sn from a raw sludge sample was done according to proposed procedure, 126 Sn was detected and its activity was determined. (author)

  15. [Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junling, Wu; Qiang, Zhang; Ruinan, Sun; Ting, Zhu; Jianhua, Ge; Chuanjian, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt, and to measure its effect on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. A novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt was synthesized according to methods introduced in previous research. Samples of the novel nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers were modified by a coupling agent and then added into resin composite at 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% or 20% mass fractions; 0% composite was used as control. A flexural test was used to measure resin composite mechanical properties. Results showed that a dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was formed. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, lactic acid production, and live/dead assay of biofilm on the resin composite were calculated to test the effect of the resin composite on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. The incorporation of nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers with as much as 15% concentration into the resin composite showed no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resin composite (P > 0.05). Resin composite containing 5% or more nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers significantly inhibited the metabolic activity of dental plaque microcosm biofilm, suggesting its strong antibacterial potency (P < 0.05). This novel resin composite exhibited a strong antibacterial property upon the addition of up to 5% nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers, thereby leading to effective caries inhibition in dental application.

  16. Mineralogy of fossil resins in Northern Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdasarov, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The investigation is focused on identification and origin of fossil resins from the Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary sediments of Northern Eurasia on the basis of detailed study of their physical and chemical characteristics: morphology; size; mass; density; optical, mechanical, and thermal properties; chemical composition; etc. The composition of amorphous organic minerals with polymeric structure, fossil resins included, is studied with IR spectrometry, the EPR method, derivatography at low heating rates, XRD, chemical analysis, emission spectrometry, etc. The results of investigation summarized for the Baltic-Dnieper, North Siberian, and Far East amber-bearing provinces show some similarity of fossil resins in combination with specific features inherent to each province. Resins from the Baltic-Dnieper province should be termed as amber (succinite). Their variety is the most characteristic of Northern and Eastern Europe. Amber-like fossil resins from the North Siberian and Far East provinces are irrelevant to succinite. They usually occur as brittle resins, namely, retinite and gedanite, without jewelry value. Viscous fossil resin rumänite with an expected high economic value occurs in the Far East, on the shore of Sakhalin Island.

  17. Investigation of fossil resins and amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yu. Makarova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fossil resins and amber are a product of lithogenesis of resinous substances of higher plants – resinite. These components of plants, like other lipoid ingredients (suberins, coutines, sporinins, natural rubbers are resistant to microbial action, so they are well preserved in bacterial processing of organic matter in the stages of sedimento- and diagenesis, and are well diagnosed in microscopic studies. They occur in a rather wide age range of sedimentary rocks. The amber of the Baltic region of the Eocene age is most fully studied. The article presents the results of a study of the collection of fossil resins and amber from various regions of the world. Samples were studied microscopically; carbon isotope analysis, infrared spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy were performed. The most informative analysis of high-molecular polymeric compounds is IR spectroscopy. It was found that in the analyzed samples of fossil resins of different ages, aromatic compounds are not observed, most of which are first volatilized in fossilization processes. The possibility of influencing the group composition of amber and amber-like resins for sedimentation, diagenesis and catagenesis is discussed. The IR spectra of fossil and modern resin conifers are compared. Using the IR spectroscopy method, an attempt was made to identify the botanical origin of fossil resins.

  18. An eco-friendly synthesis, characterization, morphology and ion exchange properties of terpolymer resin derived from p-hydroxybenzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti B. Patle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel chelating terpolymer resin has been synthesized through the terpolymerization of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and biuret with formaldehyde (p-HBBF in 1:1:2 mol ratio using hydrochloric acid as a reaction medium by condensation technique. The synthesized terpolymer resin was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. On basis of the spectral studies, the structure of the terpolymer resin was proposed. The physico-chemical parameters have been evaluated for the terpolymer resin. Non-aqueous conductometric titration was used to determine the average molecular weight and polydispersity of the p-HBBF terpolymer resin and the intrinsic viscosity was also determined. The semicrystalline nature of the synthesized terpolymer was established by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Terpolymer (p-HBBF synthesized is proved to be selective chelating ion exchange terpolymer resin for certain metals. Chelating ion exchange properties of this polymer was studied for Fe3+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, Ni2+ and Pb2+ ions. A batch equilibrium method was employed in the study of the selectivity of the distribution of a given metal ions between the polymer sample and a solution containing the metal ion. The morphology of the terpolymers was studied by scanning electron microscopy, showing amorphous nature of the resins therefore can be used as a selective ion-exchanger for certain metal ions.

  19. Melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin for bonding particleboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Feng Fu; Hui Pan

    2008-01-01

    For the development of a cost-effective melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin (MUF), the study evaluated the effects of reaction pH and melamine content on resin properties and bond performance of the MUF resin adhesive systems. Eight resins, each with three replicates, were prepared in a factorial experiment that included two formulation variables: two reaction...

  20. Traumatic resin ducts as indicators of bark beetle outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Justin DeRose; Matthew F. Bekker; James N. Long

    2017-01-01

    The formation of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs) represents an important induced defense in woody plants that enhances oleoresin production and flow in response to environmental perturbations. In some genera (Pinus), resin ducts are copious and conspicuous; however, in others (Picea), resin ducts are relatively rare. The occurrence and strength of resin ducts, in...

  1. Synthesis and curing of alkyd enamels based on ricinoleic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Mirjana C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of an alkyd resin with a melamine-formaldehyde resin gives a cured enamel film with the flexibility of the alkyd constituent and the high chemical resistance and hardness of the melamine resin at the same time. The melamine resin is a minor constituent and plays the role of a crosslinking agent. In this paper, alkyd resins of high hydroxyl numbers based on trimethylolpropane, ricinoleic acid and phthalic anhydride were synthesized. Two alkyds having 30 and 40 wt% of ricinoleic acid were formulated by calculation on alkyd constant. Alkyds were characterized by FTIR and by the determination of acid and hydroxyl numbers. Then synthesized alkyds were made into baking enamels by mixing with melamine-formaldehyde resins (weight ratio of 70:30 based on dried mass. Two types of commercial melamine resins were used: threeisobutoxymethyl melamine-formaldehyde resin (TIMMF and hexamethoxymethyl melamine resin (HMMMF. Prepared alkyd/melamine resin mixtures were cured in a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC under non-isothermal mode. Apparent degree of curing as a function of temperature was calculated from the curing enthalpies. Kinetic parameters of curing were calculated using Freeman-Carroll method. TIMMF resin is more reactive with synthesized alkyds than HMMMF resin what was expected. Alkyd resin with 30 wt% of ricinoleic acid is slightly more reactive than alkyd with 40 wt% of ricinoleic acid, probably because it has the high contents of free hydroxyl and acid groups. The gel content, Tg, thermal stability, hardness, elasticity and impact resistance of coated films cured at 150°C for 60 min were measured. Cured films show good thermal stability since the onset of films thermal degradation determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA is observed at the temperatures from 281 to 329°C. Films based on alkyd 30 are more thermal stable than those from alkyd 40, with the same melamine resin. The type of alkyd resin has no significant

  2. Properties of a nanodielectric cryogenic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Physical properties of a nanodielectric composed of in situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles ({le} 5 nm in diameter) and a cryogenic resin are reported. The dielectric losses were reduced by a factor of 2 in the nanocomposite, indicating that the presence of small TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles restricted the mobility of the polymer chains. Dielectric breakdown data of the nanodielectric was distributed over a narrower range than that of the unfilled resin. The nanodielectric had 1.56 times higher 1% breakdown probability than the resin, yielding 0.64 times thinner insulation thickness for the same voltage level, which is beneficial in high voltage engineering.

  3. SEM and elemental analysis of composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoda, H.; Yamada, T.; Inokoshi, S.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four chemically cured, 21 light-cured anterior, three light-cured anterior/posterior, and 18 light-cured posterior composite resins were examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the elemental composition of their filler particles was analyzed with an energy dispersive electron probe microanalyzer. According to the results obtained, the composite resins were divided into five groups (traditional, microfilled type, submicrofilled type, hybrid type, and semihybrid), with two additional hypothetical categories (microfilled and hybrid). Characteristics of each type were described with clinical indications for selective guidance of respective composite resins for clinical use

  4. In-depth disinfection of acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, V B; Saunders, T R; Pimsler, M; Elfring, D R

    1995-09-01

    This study demonstrated that bacteria penetrate three kinds of dental acrylic resin after a short time period. Samples of acrylic resin were contaminated with a variety of bacteria and were then placed in three different disinfecting solutions as directed by the manufacturers. After the specific dilution and immersion time, cultures were made from the resin samples. The only effective disinfectant was a 0.525% solution of sodium hypochlorite at a 10-minute immersion. It disinfected not only the surfaces but also the bacteria that penetrated the surfaces to a depth of 3 mm.

  5. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  6. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  7. Bonding of glass ceramic and indirect composite to non-aged and aged resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Özcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-02-01

    Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged resin composite to an indirect resin composite and pressed glass ceramic using two resin cements. Disk-shaped specimens (diameter: 3.5, thickness: 3 mm) (N = 160) produced from a microhybrid resin composite (Quadrant Anterior Shine) were randomly divided into eight groups. While half of the specimens were kept dry at 37°C for 24 h, the other half was aged by means of thermocycling (6000 times, 5°C to 55°C). The non-aged and aged resin composites were bonded to a highly filled indirect composite (Estenia) and a pressed glass ceramic (IPS Empress II) using either a photopolymerizing (Variolink Veneer) or a dual-polymerizing (Panavia F2.0) resin cement. While cementation surfaces of both the direct and indirect composite materials were silica coated (30 µm SiO2, CoJet-Sand) and silanized (ESPE-Sil), ceramic surfaces were conditioned with hydrofluoric acid (20 s), neutralized, and silanized prior to cementation. All specimens were cemented under a load of 750 g. Shear force was applied to the adhesive interface in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure types of the specimens were identified after debonding. Significant effects of aging (p ceramic in combination with both cements showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Both indirect composite (24.3 ± 5.1 MPa) and glass ceramic in combination with Variolink (22 ± 9 MPa) showed the highest results on non-aged composites, but were not significantly different from one another (p > 0.05). On the aged composites, indirect composite and glass ceramic showed no significant difference in bond strength within each material group (p > 0.05), with both Panavia (17.2 ± 6 and 15 ± 5.5 MPa, respectively) and Variolink (19 ± 8

  8. [Optimization of preparative separation and purification of water-soluble substance from Salvia miltiorrhiza by macroporous resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Li, Yong; Shen, Xue-mei; Sun, Li-min

    2007-10-01

    To study the optimum conditions for the isolation and purification of water-soluble substance from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge. The optimum macroporous resin was selected and the separation and purification process was evaluated by measuring the content of Salvianolic acid B in the fractions by HPLC. The XDA-5 macroporous resin was the most effective compared with other macroporous resins. The optimum conditions were screened, which were 18 mg/ml corresponding to Salvianolic acid B for concentration of extract, pH was 4, and the volume of 70% (V/V) ethanol as eluant was 3 BV. By this method, the elution efficiency of Salvianolic acid B exceeded 90%. The method is more effective for large-scale isolation and purification of water-soluble substance from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge.

  9. Shear bond strength of an autopolymerizing repair resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the shear bond strength of an autopolymerizing repair resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, a polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and a polycarbonate) were used in this study. The specimens were divided into eight groups according to the type of surface treatment given: (1) no treatment, (2) air abrasion with alumina, (3) dichloromethane, (4) ethyl acetate, (5) 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (6) alumina and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (7) tribochemical silica coating or (8) tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Half of the specimens in groups 1, 5, 6 and 8 were thermocycled for 10,000 cycles in water between 5-55°C with a dwell time of 1 min at each temperature. The shear bond strengths were determined. The shear bond strengths to the two polyamides treated with alumina, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate and no treatment were very low. The greatest post-thermocycling bond strengths to polyamides were recorded for the specimens treated with tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (PA12: 16.4 MPa, PACM12: 17.5 MPa). The greatest post-thermocycling bond strengths to polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and polycarbonate were recorded for the treatment with alumina and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (22.7 MPa, 20.8 MPa). Polyamide was exceedingly difficult to bond to an autopolymerizing repair resin; the shear bond strength improved using tribochemical silica coating followed by the application of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Both polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and polycarbonate were originally easy to bond to an autopolymerizing repair resin. However, with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, the bond was more secure.

  10. Magnetic ion-exchange resin treatment: Impact of water type and resin use

    OpenAIRE

    Mergen, Maxime Rodolphe Denis; Jefferson, Bruce; Parsons, Simon A.; Jarvis, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Three raw waters of fundamentally different natural organic matter (NOM) character were treated by magnetic resin using a bench-scale method designed to mimic how the resin is used in continuous operation. Increasing water hydrophobicity resulted in reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal with removal of 56%, 33% and 25% for waters containing 21%, 50% and 75% hydrophobic NOM, respectively. Study of consecutive resin uses showed that the NOM in the hydrophobic water ha...

  11. Mechanical properties of dental resin composites by co-filling diatomite and nanosized silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hua; Zhu Meifang; Li Yaogang; Zhang Qinghong; Wang Hongzhi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical property effects of co-filling dental resin composites with porous diatomite and nanosized silica particles (OX-50). The purification of raw diatomite by acid-leaching was conducted in a hot 5 M HCl solution at 80 deg. C for 12 h. Both diatomite and nanosized SiO 2 were silanized with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The silanized inorganic particles were mixed into a dimethacrylate resin. Purified diatomite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherm. Silanized inorganic particles were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a thermogravimetric analysis. The mechanical properties of the composites were tested by three-point bending, compression and Vicker's microhardness. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show the cross-section morphologies of the composites. Silanization of diatomite and nanosized silica positively reinforced interactions between the resin matrix and the inorganic particles. The mechanical properties of the resin composites gradually increased with the addition of modified diatomite (m-diatomite). The fracture surfaces of the composites exhibited large fracture steps with the addition of m-diatomite. However, when the mass fraction of m-diatomite was greater than 21 wt.% with respect to modified nanosized silica (mOX-50) and constituted 70% of the resin composite by weight, the mechanical properties of the resin composites started to decline. Thus, the porous structure of diatomite appears to be a crucial factor to improve mechanical properties of resin composites.

  12. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  13. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  14. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  15. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. After embedding, planar surfaces of posts (n = 9 to 14) and human dentin (n = 10) were obtained by grinding. The posts received one of three surface treatments: 1. roughening (sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid etching), 2. application of primer (Alloy Primer, Metalprimer II, silane), or 3. roughening followed by application of primer (sandblasting or etching followed by primer, Cojet treatment). ParaPost Cement and Panavia F were bonded to the post and dentin specimens, and the bonded specimens were placed in water at 37 degrees C for 7 days. The specimens were debonded in shear. Panavia F had significantly higher bond strength to ground ParaPost XH, Cerapost, and dentin than did ParaPost Cement. Most surface treatments resulted in an improved bond strength of resin cements to the posts. Compared to the ground control, Cojet treatment and sandblasting were the most effective treatments. Etching of Cerapost with hydrofluoric acid with and without silane treatment significantly decreased the bond strength of Panavia F to the post. The bond strength of resin cements to the posts was affected by the material of the post, the surface treatment of the post, and by the type of resin cement. The bond strength of resin cement to dentin was influenced by the type of resin cement.

  16. Proton-conducting membrane based on epoxy resin-poly(vinyl alcohol)-sulfosuccinic acid blend and its nanocomposite with sulfonated multiwall carbon nanotubes for fuel-cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakati, Nitul; Das, Gautam; Yoon, Young Soo

    2016-01-01

    A blend of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGB) in the presence of sulfosuccinic acid (SSA) was investigated as hydrolytically-stable proton-conducting membrane. The PVA modification was carried out by varying the DGB:SSA ratio (20:20, 10:20, and 5:20). A nanocomposite of the blend (20:20) was prepared with sulfonated multiwall carbon nanotubes (viz., 1, 3 and 5 wt%). The water uptake behavior and the proton conductivity of the prepared membranes were evaluated. The ionic conductivity of the membranes and the water uptake behavior depended on the s-MWCNT and the DGB contents. The ionic conductivity showed an enhancement for the blend and for the nanocomposite membrane as compared to the pristine polymer.

  17. Synthesis, Chacterization, and Thermal Study of Terpolymeric Resin Derived from m-cresol, Hexamine and Formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Khedkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Terpolymeric resin was prepared from m-cresol (0.1M, hexamine (0.05M and formaldehyde (0.2M by acid catalyzed polycondensation method using 1M HCl in temperature range of 122-130°C.The resin was abbreviated as m-CHF-I. The molecular weight of terpolymer was determined by non-aqueous conductometric titration technique. The structure of resin was determined by its elemental analysis, UV-VIS, IR, and NMR data. The thermokinetic parameters were determined using Freeman-Carroll (FC and Sharp Wentworth (SW method in temperature range (410-485°C.The values of activation energies (Ea, entropy (∆S, and free energies (∆G were in good agreement . The order of degradation reaction determined by FC method was confirmed by SW method.

  18. Waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resin obtained by mini emulsion polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo, Edwin; Lopez, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Four waterborne hyper branched alkyd-acrylic resins (HBRAA) were synthesized by mini emulsion polymerization from a hyper branched alkyd resin (HBR), methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA) and acrylic acid (AA), by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and ammonium persulfate (AP) as initiators. The reaction between HBR and acrylic monomers was evidenced by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The conversion percentage, glass transition temperature (T g ), content of acrylic polymer (determined by soxhlet extraction) and molecular weight increased with the content of acrylic monomers used in the synthesis. The main structure formed during the synthesis was the HBRAA. The analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the particle size distribution of HBRAA2, HBRAA3 and HBRAA4 resins were mainly mono modal. The film properties (gloss, flexibility, adhesion and drying time) of the HBRAA were good. (author)

  19. Development of a neutral embedding resin for optical imaging of fluorescently labeled biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongfu; Gang, Yadong; Chen, Shenghua; Wang, Yu; Xiong, Yumiao; Li, Longhui; Yin, Fangfang; Liu, Yue; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-10-01

    Plastic embedding is widely applied in light microscopy analyses. Previous studies have shown that embedding agents and related techniques can greatly affect the quality of biological tissue embedding and fluorescent imaging. Specifically, it is difficult to preserve endogenous fluorescence using currently available acidic commercial embedding resins and related embedding techniques directly. Here, we developed a neutral embedding resin that improved the green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and DsRed fluorescent intensity without adjusting the pH value of monomers or reactivating fluorescence in lye. The embedding resin had a high degree of polymerization, and its fluorescence preservation ratios for GFP, YFP, and DsRed were 126.5%, 155.8%, and 218.4%, respectively. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  20. Flame Retardance and Physical Properties of Novel Cured Blends of Unsaturated Polyester and Furan Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kaur Kandola

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Novel blends of two furan resins with an unsaturated polyester have been prepared and cured by parallel free radical (for the unsaturated polyester and acid-catalysed crosslinking (for the furan resin to give co-cured composite materials. Although these materials have inferior physical properties, such as low Tg and low storage modulus compared with those of unsaturated polyester and furan resins alone, they show markedly improved flame retardance compared with that of the normally highly flammable unsaturated polyester. This increased flame retardance arises from a condensed phase mechanism in which the furanic component forms a semi-protective char, reducing rates of thermal degradation and total heat release and heat of combustion. The blends also burn with reduced smoke output compared with that from unsaturated polyester alone.

  1. Development of a neutral embedding resin for optical imaging of fluorescently labeled biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongfu; Gang, Yadong; Chen, Shenghua; Wang, Yu; Xiong, Yumiao; Li, Longhui; Yin, Fangfang; Liu, Yue; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-10-01

    Plastic embedding is widely applied in light microscopy analyses. Previous studies have shown that embedding agents and related techniques can greatly affect the quality of biological tissue embedding and fluorescent imaging. Specifically, it is difficult to preserve endogenous fluorescence using currently available acidic commercial embedding resins and related embedding techniques directly. Here, we developed a neutral embedding resin that improved the green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and DsRed fluorescent intensity without adjusting the pH value of monomers or reactivating fluorescence in lye. The embedding resin had a high degree of polymerization, and its fluorescence preservation ratios for GFP, YFP, and DsRed were 126.5%, 155.8%, and 218.4%, respectively.

  2. Waterborne hyperbranched alkyd-acrylic resin obtained by mini emulsion polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murillo, Edwin, E-mail: edwinalbertomurillo@gmail.com [Grupo de Investigacion en Materiales Polimericos (GIMAPOL), Universidad Francisco de Paula Santander, San Jose de Cucuta (Colombia); Lopez, Betty [Grupo de Investigacion en Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle, Medellin (Colombia)

    2016-10-15

    Four waterborne hyper branched alkyd-acrylic resins (HBRAA) were synthesized by mini emulsion polymerization from a hyper branched alkyd resin (HBR), methyl methacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA) and acrylic acid (AA), by using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and ammonium persulfate (AP) as initiators. The reaction between HBR and acrylic monomers was evidenced by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The conversion percentage, glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), content of acrylic polymer (determined by soxhlet extraction) and molecular weight increased with the content of acrylic monomers used in the synthesis. The main structure formed during the synthesis was the HBRAA. The analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the particle size distribution of HBRAA2, HBRAA3 and HBRAA4 resins were mainly mono modal. The film properties (gloss, flexibility, adhesion and drying time) of the HBRAA were good. (author)

  3. The strengthening of resin cemented dental ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to advance the understanding of the mechanism of resin-strengthening conferred to dental ceramic materials by resin-based composite materials. The investigation is presented as a series of manuscripts. In the first study (Manuscript 3.1), dental porcelain disc-shaped specimens were resin-coated with three resin-based composite materials with different flexural moduli at discrete resin thicknesses. The discs were loaded to failure in a biaxial flexure t...

  4. Pengaruh Sifat-Sifat Fisik Resin Akrilik Terhadap Basis Protesa

    OpenAIRE

    Amriani Syahfitri

    2008-01-01

    Saat ini resin akrilik banyak digunakan secara umum untuk konstruksi gigi tiruan. Sebagai bahan basis prothesa, penggunaan resin akrilik terutama resin heat cured adalah yang paling sering digunakan selain bernilai estetis, juga lebih ekonomis. Pada prothesa yang ideal memerlukan suatu basis yang kuat, Syarat- syarat basis protesa tidak semuanya dapat dipenuhi oleh basis resin akrilik. Sifat-sifat fisik resin akrilik mempunyai pengaruh terhadap basis protesa. Untuk menghindari k...

  5. Efficiency of Polyphenol Extraction from Artificial Honey Using C18 Cartridges and Amberlite® XAD-2 Resin: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua Yung An

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the extraction efficiency of nine known polyphenols [phenolic acids (benzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid, trans-cinnamic acid, and vanillic acid and flavonoids (naringenin, naringin, quercetin, and rutin] was conducted by deliberately adding the polyphenols to an artificial honey solution and performing solid phase extraction (SPE. Two SPE methods were compared: one using Amberlite XAD-2 resin and another one using a C18 cartridge. A gradient high performance liquid chromatography system with an RP18 column and photodiode array detector was utilized to analyze the extracted polyphenols. The mean percent of recovery from the C18 cartridges was 74.2%, while that from the Amberlite XAD-2 resin was 43.7%. The recoveries of vanillic acid, naringin, and rutin were excellent (>90%; however, gallic acid was not obtained when C18 cartridges were used. Additionally, the reusability of Amberlite XAD-2 resin was investigated, revealing that the mean recovery of polyphenols decreased from 43.7% (1st extraction to 29.3% (3rd extraction. It was concluded that although Amberlite XAD-2 resin yielded a higher number of compounds, C18 cartridges gave a better extraction recovery. The lower recovery seen for the Amberlite XAD-2 resin also cannot be compensated by repeated extractions due to the gradual decrease of extraction recovery when reused.

  6. Resin Flow Analysis in the Injection Cycle of a Resin Transfer Molded Radome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestanian, Hossein; Poursina, Mehrdad

    2007-04-01

    Resin flow analysis in the injection cycle of an RTM process was investigated. Fiberglass and carbon fiber mats were used as reinforcements with EPON 826 epoxy resin. Numerical models were developed in ANSYS finite element software to simulate resin flow behavior into a mold of conical shape. Resin flow into the woven fiber mats is modeled as flow through porous media. The injection time for fiberglass/epoxy composite is found to be 4407 seconds. Required injection time for the carbon/epoxy composite is 27022 seconds. Higher injection time for carbon/epoxy part is due to lower permeability value of the carbon fibers compared to glass fiber mat.

  7. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  8. Nanosilica Modification of Elastomer-Modified VARTM Epoxy Resins for Improved Resin and Composite Toughness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinette, Jason; Bujanda, Andres; DeSchepper, Daniel; Dibelka, Jessica; Costanzo, Philip; Jensen, Robert; McKnight, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Recent publications have reported a synergy between rubber and silica in modified epoxy resins that results in significantly improved fracture toughness without reductions in other material properties...

  9. Resin-based preparation of HTGR fuels: operation of an engineering-scale uranium loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1977-10-01

    The fuel particles for recycle of 233 U to High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors are prepared from uranium-loaded carboxylic acid ion exchange resins which are subsequently carbonized, converted, and refabricated. The development and operation of individual items of equipment and of an integrated system are described for the resin-loading part of the process. This engineering-scale system was full scale with respect to a hot demonstration facility, but was operated with natural uranium. The feed uranium, which consisted of uranyl nitrate solution containing excess nitric acid, was loaded by exchange with resin in the hydrogen form. In order to obtain high loadings, the uranyl nitrate must be acid deficient; therefore, nitric acid was extracted by a liquid organic amine which was regenerated to discharge a NaNO 3 or NH 4 NO 3 solution waste. Water was removed from the uranyl nitrate solution by an evaporator that yielded condensate containing less than 0.5 ppM of uranium. The uranium-loaded resin was washed with condensate and dried to a controlled water content via microwave heating. The loading process was controlled via in-line measurements of the pH and density of the uranyl nitrate. The demonstrated capacity was 1 kg of uranium per hour for either batch loading contractors or a continuous column as the resin loading contractor. Fifty-four batch loading runs were made without a single failure of the process outlined in the chemical flowsheet or any evidence of inability to control the conditions dictated by the flowsheet

  10. Adsorption Properties of Ionic Species on Cross-linked Chitosans Modified with Catechol and Salicylic Acid Moieties

    OpenAIRE

    Oshita, Koji; Takayanagi, Toshio; Oshima, Mitsuko; Motomizu, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    Catechol-type chitosan resin and salicylic acid-type chitosan resin were easily synthesized for use in estimating the adsorption behavior of 34 elements at pH 1 - 7 in aquatic media. The catechol-type chitosan resin could adsorb Cu(II) at pH 3 - 7, In(III) at pH 4 - 6, Pb(II) and lanthanoids at pH 5 - 7, and U(VI) at pH 4 - 7 more effectively than the salicylic acid-type chitosan resin and the cross-linked chitosan resin (base material). Adsorption ability was in the order: catechol-type chit...

  11. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  12. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Materials and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age...... 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments...... up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Chlorotrifluoroethylene-1,1-difluoroethylene-tetrafluoroethylene co-polymer resins produced by copolymerization of..., Extrusion, and Coating Materials,” which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and...

  14. Liquid Resins With Low VOC Emissions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaScala, John J; Sands, James M; Palmese, Guiseppe R

    2004-01-01

    .... The polymer properties were similar to that of commercial resins, including Tg greater than 120 C, flex strength greater than 100 MPa, modulus of approximately 3 GPa, and fracture toughness greater than 200 J/m2...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... by osmotic pressure in monochlorobenzene; or (2) 1,1′-Sulfonylbis[4-chlorobenzene] polymer with 4,4... determined by osmotic pressure in dimethylformamide. (b) The basic polysulfone resins identified in paragraph...

  16. Treatment of alpha active organic liquid scintillator waste with ion exchange resins-column studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal Chetty, K.; Vaidya, V.N.; Venugopal, V.; Rao, P.R.V.

    2002-01-01

    The distribution ratios and percentage extraction for americium and total alpha due to plutonium and americium were determined using mixture of resins from the simulated alpha active organic liquid scintillator waste solution. Macroporous Bifunctional Phosphinic Acid (MPBPA) resin along with Amberlite IR-120 or AG 50WX8 in the ratios 1 : 1 to 1 : 6 were studied and the percentage extraction of better than 97% and distribution ratio of more than 480 were obtained. The data indicated the usefulness of these resins to remove alpha activity from these organic waste solutions. The column experiments were carried out using the active organic liquid scintillator waste with and without dilution with alcohol, and only alcoholic waste generated in the laboratory during the washing of the used liquid scintillator vials. The column containing either single MPBPA resin or with additional resin bed of Amberlite IR-120 were used for the treatment of the wastes. In the case of alcoholic waste after removal of activity it was reused for rinsing of the used vials. (author)

  17. Preparation of extractive resins for producing terbium-161; Preparacion de resinas extractivas para produccion de terbio-161

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Cruz B, C. C.; Monroy G, F. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: fabiola.monroy@inin.gob.mx

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents the development of a methodology for extractive resins preparation to base of HDEHP, which allows to separation of Tb from Gd generating an own technology of preparation of these resins. The study included the extractive resins preparation from 6 different supports: kieselguhr Dg, alumina, red volcanic rock, chiluca, quarry and fluorite; two treatment types of of supports and varied concentrations of HDEHP extractant (di(2-etil hexyl) orthophosphoric acid), in order to determine which resin has improved efficiency of Gd and Tb separation, and radionuclide purity of {sup 161}Tb. Resins were prepared to base of kieselguhr to determine the most appropriate silicon deposition process. Two silicon deposition treatments were realized: treatment I , by contact with silicon deposition solution (dimethyldichlorosilane / heptane 1:30) and treatment II by contact with vapors of dimethyldichlorosilane in vacuum. The extractant retention was carried out to different concentrations of HDEHP / acetone: 1:4, 1:8, 1:15, 1:20, 1:30 and 1:40. According to the results, there is not direct relation of HDEHP concentration used in extractive resins preparation to base of kieselguhr over the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation and of radionuclide purity of {sup 161}Tb. The effect of support in the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation was studied to prepare resins with the supports kieselguhr, alumina, quarry, chiluca, volcanic rock and fluorite, using the silicon deposition treatment II for the supports and a concentration of HDEHP / acetone 1:20, for extractant retention. Only resins based on kieselguhr could separate to Gd from Tb quantitatively, the resin at a concentration of HDEHP / Acetone 1:20 was the best results obtained in Gd and Tb separation, achieving a separation efficiency greater than 90% and a radionuclide purity higher than 99%. (Author)

  18. Rapid determination of polyprenylated xanthones in gamboge resin of Garcinia hanburyi by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing-Zheng; Yip, Yue-Keung; Han, Quan-Bin; Qiao, Chun-Feng; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2007-02-01

    A rapid ion-pair HPLC method was developed and validated for the determination of eight polyprenylated xanthones including three pairs of epimers, namely morellic acid (MA), 30-hydroxygambogic acid (HGA), 30-hydroxyepigambogic acid (HEGA), isogambogic acid (IGA), epiisogambogic acid (EIGA), gambogenic acid (GNA), gambogic acid (GA), and epigambogic acid (EGA), in gamboge resin of Garcinia hanburyi. The separation was performed on a narrow bore C8 column with isocratic elution using a mixture of methanol-ACN-40 mM KH2PO4 buffer (37.5:37.5:25 v/v/v, containing 0.1% tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide). The newly developed method was used to determine the contents of the eight compounds present in the gamboge. Results showed that GA and EGA are the dominant components of gamboge. The content ratio of each epimer pair remained constant, indicating that the content ratio of epimers can be used as a specific characteristic for the quality control of gamboge.

  19. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  20. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschueren, K.; Balwant Kaur

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology