WorldWideScience

Sample records for residue burning months

  1. Effects of oil and oil burn residues on seabird feathers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Linnebjerg, Jannie Fries; Sørensen, Martin X.

    2016-01-01

    . To protect seabirds, a rapid removal of oil is crucial and in situ burning could be an efficient method. In the present work exposure effects of oil and burn residue in different doses was studied on seabird feathers from legally hunted Common eider (Somateria mollissima) by examining changes in total weight...... of the feather and damages on the microstructure (Amalgamation Index) of the feathers before and after exposure. The results of the experiments indicate that burn residues from in situ burning of an oil spill have similar or larger fouling and damaging effects on seabird feathers, as compared to fresh oil....

  2. Development of the crop residue and rangeland burning in the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomass burning has been identified as an important contributor to the degradation of air quality because of its impact on ozone and particulate matter. One component of the biomass burning inventory, crop residue burning, has been poorly characterized in the National Emissions Inventory (NEI). In the 2011 NEI, wildland fires, prescribed fires, and crop residue burning collectively were the largest source of PM2.5. This paper summarizes our 2014 NEI method to estimate crop residue burning emissions and grass/pasture burning emissions using remote sensing data and field information and literature-based, crop-specific emission factors. We focus on both the postharvest and pre-harvest burning that takes place with bluegrass, corn, cotton, rice, soybeans, sugarcane and wheat. Estimates for 2014 indicate that over the continental United States (CONUS), crop residue burning excluding all areas identified as Pasture/Grass, Grassland Herbaceous, and Pasture/Hay occurred over approximately 1.5 million acres of land and produced 19,600 short tons of PM2.5. For areas identified as Pasture/Grass, Grassland Herbaceous, and Pasture/Hay, biomass burning emissions occurred over approximately 1.6 million acres of land and produced 30,000 short tons of PM2.5. This estimate compares with the 2011 NEI and 2008 NEI as follows: 2008: 49,650 short tons and 2011: 141,180 short tons. Note that in the previous two NEIs rangeland burning was not well defined and so the comparison is not e

  3. Estimating emissions from crop residue open burning in China based on statistics and MODIS fire products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Bo, Yu; Xie, Shaodong

    2016-06-01

    With the objective of reducing the large uncertainties in the estimations of emissions from crop residue open burning, an improved method for establishing emission inventories of crop residue open burning at a high spatial resolution of 0.25°×0.25° and a temporal resolution of 1month was established based on the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) Thermal Anomalies/Fire Daily Level3 Global Product (MOD/MYD14A1). Agriculture mechanization ratios and regional crop-specific grain-to-straw ratios were introduced to improve the accuracy of related activity data. Locally observed emission factors were used to calculate the primary pollutant emissions. MODIS satellite data were modified by combining them with county-level agricultural statistical data, which reduced the influence of missing fire counts caused by their small size and cloud cover. The annual emissions of CO2, CO, CH4, nonmethane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), N2O, NOx, NH3, SO2, fine particles (PM2.5), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) were 150.40, 6.70, 0.51, 0.88, 0.01, 0.13, 0.07, 0.43, 1.09, 0.34, and 0.06Tg, respectively, in 2012. Crop residue open burning emissions displayed typical seasonal and spatial variation. The highest emission regions were the Yellow-Huai River and Yangtse-Huai River areas, and the monthly emissions were highest in June (37%). Uncertainties in the emission estimates, measured as 95% confidence intervals, range from a low of within ±126% for N2O to a high of within ±169% for NH3. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Tillage and residue burning affects weed populations and seed banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwal, S; Sindel, B M; Jessop, R S

    2006-01-01

    An integrated weed management approach requires alternative management practices to herbicide use such as tillage, crop rotations and cultural controls to reduce soil weed seed banks. The objective of this study was to examine the value of different tillage practices and stubble burning to exhaust the seed bank of common weeds from the northern grain region of Australia. Five tillage and burning treatments were incorporated in a field experiment, at Armidale (30 degrees 30'S, 151 degrees 40'E), New South Wales, Australia in July 2004 in a randomized block design replicated four times. The trial was continued and treatments repeated in July 2005 with all the mature plants from the first year being allowed to shed seed in their respective treatment plots. The treatments were (i) no tillage (NT), (ii) chisel ploughing (CP), (iii) mould board ploughing (MBP), (iv) wheat straw burning with no tillage (SBNT) and (v) wheat straw burning with chisel ploughing (SBC). Soil samples were collected before applying treatments and before the weeds flowered to establish the seed bank status of the various weeds in the soil. Wheat was sown after the tillage treatments. Burning treatments were only initiated in the second year, one month prior to tillage treatments. The major weeds present in the seed bank before initiating the trial were Polygonum aviculare, Sonchus oleraceus and Avena fatua. Tillage promoted the germination of other weeds like Hibiscus trionum, Medicago sativa, Vicia sp. and Phalaris paradoxa later in the season in 2004 and Convolvulus erubescens emerged as a new weed in 2005. The MBP treatment in 2004 reduced the weed biomass to a significantly lower level of 55 g/m2 than the other treatments of CP (118 g/m2) and NT plots (196 g/m2) (P < 0.05). However, in 2005 SBC and MBP treatments were similar in reducing the weed biomass. In 2004, the grain yield trend of wheat was significantly different between CP and NT, and MBP and NT (P < 0.05) with maximum yield of 5898

  5. Air Toxics Emissions from Open Burning of Crop Residues in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM Oanh, N. T.; Permadi, D. A.; Hopke, P. K.; Smith, K. R.; Nguyet, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Agricultural crops production in Southeast Asia (SEA) increases annually to meet domestic consumption of growing population and also for export. Crop residue open burning (CROB) is commonly practiced by farmers to quickly dispose of huge amounts of the agricultural waste, such as rice straw, generated after each crop cycle. This CROB activity emits various toxic air pollutants as well as short-lived climate pollutants such as black carbon particles. Our study focused on quantifying the 2015 annual emissions of semi-volatile organic compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), dioxins/furans (PCDD/PCDF), organochlorine pesticides (OCP), along with other conventional trace gases, particulate matter, and greenhouse gases from CROB in 10 major agricultural crop producing SEA countries. Crop production statistics and current field OB practices were gathered from our primary surveys and relevant secondary data sources. Emission factors for rice straw and maize residue burning were taken mainly from our measurements in Thailand while for other crops relevant published data were used. The best emission estimates of air toxics from CROB in SEA were 112 g-TEQ/yr of PCDD/PCDF, 33 t/yr of OCP, and 25 Gg/yr of total PAH of which the well-known carcinogenic benzo[a]pyrene was 0.3 Gg/yr. The CROB of rice production had the highest shares of emissions (33-95%) among considered 8 crop types. Indonesia was the top contributor to the total SEA emissions (30-45%) followed by Vietnam (16-26%), Thailand (6-22%) and Myanmar (5-18%). The spatial distributions of emissions, 0.1º x 0.1º, for each specie were prepared using MODIS land cover data. Temporally, higher emissions were observed in the harvesting months of the main rice crops. This emissions database can be used in regional air quality modeling studies to assess the impacts of CROB activity and to promote non-open burning alternatives.

  6. Carbon and Air Quality Emissions from Crop Residue Burning in the Contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, J. L.; Korontzi, S.; Justice, C. O.

    2009-12-01

    Crop residue burning is a global agricultural activity that is a source of carbon and air quality emissions. Carbon and air quality emissions from crop residue burning in the contiguous U.S. (CONUS) were estimated for a five-year period, 2003 through 2007, using multispectral remote sensing-derived products. The atmospheric species that comprise the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) were selected as air quality emissions. CO2 emissions were also calculated due to its importance to global climate change. This analysis utilized multiple remote sensing data sets and products to quantify crop residue burning in CONUS, including multi-year crop type maps, an 8-day difference Normalized Burn Ratio product, and calibrated area estimates of cropland burning from 1 km MODIS Active Fire Points. Remote sensing products were combined in a GIS to quantify the location of cropland burning, burned area size, and associated crop type. A crop-specific emission factor database was compiled from the scientific literature. Fuel loads and combustion efficiency estimates were derived from the literature as well as from in-field collaborators. These data were combined to estimate crop residue burning emissions using the bottom-up methodology developed by Seiler and Crutzen (1980). This analysis found that an average of 1,239,000 ha of croplands burn each year in the CONUS. Florida, Arizona, Idaho, Utah, Washington, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oregon, California, and Colorado accounted for approximately 61% of the total crop residue burning. Crop residue burning is a significant fire activity in the CONUS, averaging 43% of the burned area reported for wildland fires in the U.S. (including Alaska and Hawaii). Crop residue burning was also found to be a significant source of emissions that negatively impacted air quality. Crop residue burning emissions occurred most often in summer and fall, with the exception of winter and early spring

  7. Satellites may underestimate rice residue and associated burning emissions in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasko, Kristofer; Vadrevu, Krishna P.; Tran, Vinh T.; Ellicott, Evan; Nguyen, Thanh T. N.; Bui, Hung Q.; Justice, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we estimate rice residue, associated burning emissions, and compare results with existing emissions inventories employing a bottom-up approach. We first estimated field-level post-harvest rice residues, including separate fuel-loading factors for rice straw and rice stubble. Results suggested fuel-loading factors of 0.27 kg m-2 (±0.033), 0.61 kg m-2 (±0.076), and 0.88 kg m-2 (±0.083) for rice straw, stubble, and total post-harvest biomass, respectively. Using these factors, we quantified potential emissions from rice residue burning and compared our estimates with other studies. Our results suggest total rice residue burning emissions as 2.24 Gg PM2.5, 36.54 Gg CO and 567.79 Gg CO2 for Hanoi Province, which are significantly higher than earlier studies. We attribute our higher emission estimates to improved fuel-loading factors; moreover, we infer that some earlier studies relying on residue-to-product ratios could be underestimating rice residue emissions by more than a factor of 2.3 for Hanoi, Vietnam. Using the rice planted area data from the Vietnamese government, and combining our fuel-loading factors, we also estimated rice residue PM2.5 emissions for the entirety of Vietnam and compared these estimates with an existing all-sources emissions inventory, and the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED). Results suggest 75.98 Gg of PM2.5 released from rice residue burning accounting for 12.8% of total emissions for Vietnam. The GFED database suggests 42.56 Gg PM2.5 from biomass burning with 5.62 Gg attributed to agricultural waste burning indicating satellite-based methods may be significantly underestimating emissions. Our results not only provide improved residue and emission estimates, but also highlight the need for emissions mitigation from rice residue burning.

  8. 'Toy' laser macular burns in children: 12-month update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoof, N; O'Hagan, J; Pawlowska, N; Quhill, F

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that high-powered hand-held laser devices cause retinal injury. We present 12-month follow-up data for three patients that we previously reported with such retinal injuries. A retrospective case series of three children with maculopathy secondary to exposure to high-power hand-held laser devices. All children underwent clinical examination and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) at presentation and follow-up. Fundus-controlled microperimetry was also undertaken 12-19 months after exposure. Three children sustained macular injury after exposure to a high-powered hand-held laser. Acutely, they presented with a 'vitelliform-like' maculopathy with reduced vision. Over the course of follow-up, the best corrected Snellen acuity in all three patients improved to 'normal' levels (range 6/6-6/9). Long-term deficits in foveal retinal sensitivity were identified in two patients using fundus-controlled microperimetry. SD-OCT imaging showed persistent disruption of the foveal outer photoreceptor layers in all three children. Although visual acuity improved over time, deficits in microperimetry and SD-OCT persisted. All three children had retinal pigment epithelium changes, requiring follow-up for longer-term sequelae of laser injuries such as expansion of retinal atrophy and development of choroidal neovascular membranes.

  9. Composition of in situ burn residue as a function of weathering conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne; Ascanius, Birgit Elkjær; Brandvik, Per Johan

    2013-01-01

    removed the light compounds eluting before C13. No effect from the prior weathering time or the different ice coverage was seen in the burn residue composition. The content of selected Poly Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined and it was noted that the concentration of PAHs with more than 4 rings...

  10. Tracers and impact of open burning of rice straw residues on PM in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, M.; López, J. M.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; García-Gacio, D.; Blanco-Heras, G.; López-Mahía, P.; Piñeiro-Iglesias, M.; Sanz, M. J.; Sanz, F.; Chi, X.; Maenhaut, W.

    Biomass burning emissions of rice straw residues may be carried out near urban agglomerations and may present a potential health risk for the population. Thus, tracers of these emissions should be clearly identified. We present a detailed chemical characterisation, including inorganic and organic tracer species, of PM 10 aerosol at a rural site located close to the urban agglomeration of Valencia (Eastern Spain) during the rice straw burning season in 2006. Our results show that open burning of rice field residues increased daily PM 10 concentrations on a regional scale (approximately 17,400 ha) by 10-15 μg m -3 on average, with a maximum of 30 μg m -3 on peak episodic days. PM 10 levels during open burning events were especially enriched in oxalate, fluoranthene, C 31n-alkane, levoglucosan, K, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), oleic acid, Cl -, Na, NO 3-, and V. High enrichments were also obtained for Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd, and Na, probably as a consequence of the bioaccumulation of trace metals in rice straw and the influence of sea spray and brackish waters on the crops. Anthropogenic contributions from lubricant oil residues, probably from agricultural machinery or nearby traffic emissions, were also detected in the levels of n-alkanes (C 19). The high Carbon Preference Index (CPI; >3.5) obtained for n-alkanoic acids confirmed their mostly biogenic origin. Organic tracers were more sensitive than inorganic species to the influence of indirect (regional scale or long-range transported) biomass burning emissions. Source apportionment of the PM 10 mass by means of PCA-MLRA showed that rice straw burning reached maximum contributions up to 40% of the PM 10 mass during peak episodes.

  11. Analysis of daily, monthly, and annual burned area using the fourth-generation global fire emissions database (GFED4)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giglio, L.; Randerson, J. T.; van der Werf, G.R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the fourth generation of the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED4) burned area data set, which provides global monthly burned area at 0.25° spatial resolution from mid-1995 through the present and daily burned area for the time series extending back to August 2000. We produced the full

  12. Chemical Characterization of Pineapple Leaf Residue Chars generated by Controlled Combustion and by open burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng L.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to compare the chemical characteristics of pineapple leave residues (PLRs char generated by controlled combustion and by open burning. The properties of char generated by control combustion (CC and open burning (OB varied, due to differences in the production process. The total N, K and surface area of the char generated by CC were significantly higher than the OB. The results indicate that the CC process was better to be applied as a soil amendment than was the OB process.

  13. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doing so puts you in danger as well. Chemical and Electrical Burns For chemical and electrical burns, call 911 or ... the power source has been turned off. For chemical burns: Dry chemicals should be brushed off the skin ...

  14. Forest treatment residues for thermal energy compared with disposal by onsite burning: Emissions and energy return

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Greg; Calkin, David [Human Dimensions Science Program, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, PO Box 7669, 200 East Broadway Street, Missoula, MT 59807 (United States); Loeffler, Dan [The University of Montana, College of Forestry and Conservation, PO Box 7669, 200 East Broadway Street, Missoula, MT 59807 (United States); Chung, Woodam [The University of Montana, College of Forestry and Conservation, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Mill residues from forest industries are the source for most of the current wood-based energy in the US, approximately 2.1% of the nation's energy use in 2007. Forest residues from silvicultural treatments, which include limbs, tops, and small non-commercial trees removed for various forest management objectives, represent an additional source of woody biomass for energy. We spatially analyzed collecting, grinding, and hauling forest residue biomass on a 515,900 ha area in western Montana, US, to compare the total emissions of burning forest residues in a boiler for thermal energy with the alternatives of onsite disposal by pile-burning and using either natural gas or 2 distillate oil to produce the equivalent amount of useable energy. When compared to the pile-burn/fossil fuel alternatives, carbon dioxide emissions from the bioenergy alternative were approximately 60%, methane emissions were approximately 3%, and particulate emissions less than 10 {mu}m were 11% and 41%, respectively, for emission control and no-control boilers. Emissions from diesel consumption for collecting, grinding, and hauling biomass represented less than 5% of the total bioenergy emissions at an average haul distance of 136 km. Across the study area, an average 21 units of bioenergy were produced for each unit of diesel energy used to collect, grind, and haul biomass. Fossil fuel energy saved by the bioenergy alternative relative to the pile-burn/fossil fuel alternatives averaged 14.7-15.2 GJ t{sup -1} of biomass. (author)

  15. Development of the crop residue and rangeland burning in the 2014 National Emissions Inventory using information from multiple sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This workbook contains all the activity data, emission factor data, and ancillary data used to compute crop residue burning and rangeland emissions for the 2014 NEI...

  16. Emissions, energy return and economics from utilizing forest residues for thermal energy compared to onsite pile burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greg Jones; Dan Loeffler; Edward Butler; Woodam Chung; Susan Hummel

    2010-01-01

    The emissions from delivering and burning forest treatment residue biomass in a boiler for thermal energy were compared with onsite disposal by pile-burning and using fossil fuels for the equivalent energy. Using biomass for thermal energy reduced carbon dioxide emissions on average by 39 percent and particulate matter emissions by 89 percent for boilers with emission...

  17. Organic particulate emissions from field burning of garden and agriculture residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cátia; Evtyugina, Margarita; Alves, Célia; Monteiro, Cristina; Pio, Casimiro; Tomé, Mário

    2011-08-01

    To assess the particulate matter (PM) composition, the smoke from three different agriculture and garden residues, commonly subjected to open field burning in Northern Portugal (potato haulm (A), arable weed vegetation (B) and collard greens stalks/pruned green leafy-twigs (C)) have been sampled into 3 different size fractions (PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10 and PM > 10 ). To replicate another frequent practise of reducing or dispose agriculture/garden debris, residue C was complementarily burned in a metal container with addition of used lubricant oil. The size-segregated aerosol samples were analysed for elemental (EC) and organic (OC) carbon by a thermal-optical transmission technique. The organosoluble OC was fractionated by vacuum flash chromatography and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Burning of residue C produced the highest PM emissions. OC was the dominant carbonaceous component in all aerosol samples, contributing to about 98% of total carbon (TC). The detailed chemical profiles of particulate emissions, including organic tracer compounds, have been assessed. The contribution of phenolics (0.2-39% OC, w/w) and organic acids (1.5-13% OC, w/w) to OC was always predominant over other organic compounds, whose distribution patterns were found to vary from one residue to another. The polyphenols, as the guaiacyl derivatives, were particularly abundant in PM from the residue C burning, but anthropogenic constituents completely superimposed the emission profiles after addition of used lubricant oil. It was shown that the prevailing ambient conditions (such as high humidity) likely contributed to atmospheric processes (e.g. coagulation and hygroscopic growth), which influenced the particle size characteristics of the smoke tracers, shifting their distribution to larger diameters. Since it was shown that the relative contribution of different carbon forms and organic compounds may strongly depend on the size of the particulate matter, the barely

  18. Health-related quality of life 6 months after burns among hospitalized patients: Predictive importance of mental disorders and burn severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmu, Raimo; Partonen, Timo; Suominen, Kirsi; Saarni, Samuli I; Vuola, Jyrki; Isometsä, Erkki

    2015-06-01

    Major burns are likely to have a strong impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We investigated the level of and predictors for quality of life at 6 months after acute burn. Consecutive acute adult burn patients (n=107) admitted to the Helsinki Burn Centre were examined with a structured diagnostic interview (SCID) at baseline, and 92 patients (86%) were re-examined at 6 months after injury. During follow-up 55% (51/92) suffered from at least one mental disorder. The mean %TBSA was 9. TBSA of men did not differ from that of women. Three validated instruments (RAND-36, EQ-5, 15D) were used to evaluate the quality of life at 6 months. All the measures (RAND-36, EQ-5, 15D) consistently indicated mostly normal HRQoL at 6 months after burn. In the multivariate linear regression model, %TBSA predicted HRQoL in one dimension (role limitations caused by physical health problems, p=0.039) of RAND-36. In contrast, mental disorders overall and particularly major depressive disorder (MDD) during follow-up (p-values of 0.001-0.002) predicted poor HRQoL in all dimensions of RAND-36. HRQoL of women was worse than that of men. Self-perceived HRQoL among acute burn patients at 6 months after injury seems to be mostly as good as in general population studies in Finland. The high standard of acute treatment and the inclusion of small burns (%TBSAMental disorders strongly predicted HRQoL at 6 months. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Black carbon and particulate matter optical properties from agricultural residue burning in the Pacific Northwest United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, A. L.; Aurell, J.; Urbanski, S. P.; Hays, M. D.; Gullett, B.

    2014-12-01

    Burning of agricultural residues in field is a common management practice that is used to quickly clear fields of post-harvest vegetation and to stimulate seed production in some grass species. Although cropland burning contributes only a minor fraction to the United States particulate matter and black carbon emissions, it can have substantial impacts on local and regional air quality and visibility. During the 2013 burning season in the Pacific Northwest United States emissions were measured from a series of burns carried out on cropland. Kentucky bluegrass residues (Poa pratensis), winter wheat stubble (Triticum aestivum), and chemically fallowed winter wheat stubble were burned in field. Particulate matter, light absorption and scattering, and black carbon concentrations were measured at ground level downwind of the field. Although particulate emissions varied substantially by fuel type and even among fields of the same fuel with different treatments (i.e., light versus heavy residues) the black carbon fraction of particulate matter was consistently less than 5% and accordingly single scattering albedos were above 0.9. The emissions exhibited strong spectral variation, with absorption angstrom exponents in the range of 3 - 5 in the wavelength range of 405 to 532 nm. Laboratory burns with residues collected from the fields produced emissions that were considerably more absorbing with single scattering albedos near 0.65 and lower absorption angstrom exponents of 1 - 2.

  20. Using Satellite Imagery to Improve the Characterization of Crop Residue Burning Emissions in the U.S. National Emission Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, T. E.; Pouliot, G.; Rao, V.; McCarty, J. L.; Soja, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning contributes to the degradation of air quality because of its impact on ozone and particulate matter. One sector of the U.S. National Emission Inventory (NEI), crop residue burning, has been difficult to characterize. Previous "bottom up" efforts have resulted in omissions in some regions and unrealistic gradients of emissions across state boundaries. This work integrates daily fire locations from NOAA's Hazard Mapping System (HMS), burn scar products from NASA satellite imagery, and updated emission factors to build an improved characterization of temporally and spatially resolved emission datasets for regional air quality modeling. Comparisons with earlier estimates show significant changes in the temporal and spatial distribution of crop residue burning emissions. Results from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system exercised at a 12 km resolution across the continental U.S. show relatively small but appreciable changes in fine particulate (PM2.5) concentrations over parts of the modeling domain.

  1. Operating efficiency of an emergency Burns theatre: An eight month analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arvind; Lutterodt, Christopher; Leon-Villapalos, Jorge

    2017-11-01

    The efficient use of operating theatres is important to insure optimum cost-benefit for the hospital. We used the emergency Burns theatre as a model to assess theatre efficiency at our institution. Data was collected retrospectively on every operation performed in the Burns theatre between 01/04/15 and 30/11/15. Each component of the operating theatre process was considered and integrated to calculate values for surgical/anaesthetic time, changeover time and ultimately theatre efficiency. A total of 426 operations were carried out over 887h of allocated theatre time (ATT). Actual operating time represented 67.7%, anaesthetic time 8.8% and changeover time 14.2% of ATT. The average changeover time between patients was 30.1min. Lists started on average 27.7min late each day. There were a total of 5.8h of overruns and 9.6h of no useful activity. Operating theatre efficiency was 69.3% for the 8 month period. Our study highlights areas where theatre efficiency can be improved. We suggest various strategies to improve this that may be applied universally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Direct radiative effect of carbonaceous aerosols from crop residue burning during the summer harvest season in East China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huan; Song, Yu; Liu, Mingxu; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; McFiggans, Gordon; Xu, Tingting; Du, Pin; Li, Jianfeng; Wu, Yusheng; Hu, Min; Zhao, Chun; Zhu, Tong

    2017-04-01

    East China experiences extensive crop residue burnings in fields during harvest season. The direct radiative effect (DRE) of carbonaceous aerosols from crop residue burning in June 2013 in East China was investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem). Absorption of organic aerosol (OA) in the presence of brown carbon was considered using the parameterization of Saleh et al. (2014), in which the imaginary part of the OA refractive index is a function of wavelength and the ratio of black carbon (BC) and OA. The carbonaceous emissions from crop fires were estimated using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire radiative power (FRP) product with a localized crop-burning-sourced BC-to-organic carbon (OC) ratio emission ratio of 0.27. Evaluation of the model results with in situ measurements of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 µm (PM2. 5) chemical composition, MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) detections and meteorological observations showed that this model was able to reproduce the magnitude, spatial variation and optical characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol pollution. The observed BC and OC peak concentrations at the site in Suixi, Anhui province, during the 2013 wheat burning season reached 55.3 µg m-3 and 157.9 µg m-3. WRF-Chem simulations reproduced these trends with a correlation coefficient of 0.74, estimating that crop residue burning contributed 86 and 90 % of peak BC and OC, respectively. The simulated hourly DRE from crop residue burning at the top of atmosphere (TOA) reached a maximum of +22.66 W m-2 at the Suixi site. On average, the simulations showed that the crop residue burning introduced a net positive DRE of +0.14 W m-2 at TOA throughout East China, with BC from this source as the main heating contributor (+0.79 W m-2). The OA DRE from crop burning (-0.22 W m-2) was a combined effect of the positive DRE of absorption (+0.21 W m-2) and a stronger

  3. Factors associating with the presence of residual thrombosis after 3-month treatment of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingluan; Xu, Mingling; Sun, Nina; Cheng, Zhaozhong; Sui, Jingjing

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the factors associating with the presence of residual thrombosis in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE) after at least 3-month anticoagulant therapy. Demographic and clinical data of 180 cases in the affiliated hospital of Qingdao University from January 2005 to June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. APE in all patients were confirmed by computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Patients were then detected for the presence of residual thrombosis according to a second CTPA. After appropriate comparison test, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors for residual thrombosis. Among 180 patients, complete clearance of thrombosis occurred in 115 (63.9%) patients. Residual thrombosis remained in 65 (36.1%) patients. The independent factors associating with residual thrombosis include unprovoked APE (OR 0.231, 95% CI 0.062-0.861) and fibrinogen level in acute phase (OR 1.958, 95% CI 1.282-2.911). Furthermore, these two variables were both associated with the presence of residual thrombosis in patients receiving different parenteral anticoagulants (unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin). Pulmonary thrombosis in some patients with APE are not completely dissolved after at least 3-month treatment. Additionally, unprovoked APE is positive predictor of decreased residual thrombosis and fibrinogen level in acute phase is a risk factor of the presence of residual thrombosis.

  4. Synergistic analyses of optical and microphysical properties of agricultural crop residue burning aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amit Kumar; Shibata, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Agriculture crop residue burning is one of the important sources of trace gas emissions and aerosol loading over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB). The present study deals with the spatial variability including the vertical structure of optical and microphysical properties of aerosols, during the crop residue burning season (October and November) of 2009 over the IGB. Increased number of fire counts observed by MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) that is associated with high aerosol optical depth (MODIS-AOD > 0.7) and enhanced tropospheric columnar NO2 concentrations observed by OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), suggests agriculture crop residue burning as a main source of aerosol loading over the IGB during October and November. PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Science coupled with Observations from a Lidar) observations show an increase in fine mode AOD (at 865 nm) from October (0.1-0.2) to November (0.2-0.3) over the IGB, which is well corroborated with MODIS observations. CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) data shows the elevated aerosol plume (4.0-4.5 km) over the north-west IGB (associated with burning activities) that could have been caused by positive buoyancy through pyro-convection. However, large concentrations of aerosol were found below 1.0 km altitude. The averaged vertical structure of crop residue burning aerosols shows an exponential decrease with altitude (mean scale height ˜1.44 ± 0.20 km). Aerosol optical and microphysical properties coupled with backward air trajectories analyses at Kanpur indicated regional transport of biomass burning aerosols in a downwind direction from north-west IGB to south-east IGB. Aerosol classification, using AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork)-derived absorption properties coupled with size parameter (2006-2010) showed clear seasonal dependency of aerosol types which revealed the presence of biomass burning aerosols only during the crop

  5. Spatial distribution of pollutant emissions from crop residue burning in the Punjab and Sindh provinces of Pakistan: uncertainties and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Muhammad; Riaz, Muhammad; Arif, Muhammad Saleem; Shahzad, Sher Muhammad; Hussain, Sabir; Akhtar, Muhammad Javed; van den Berg, Leon; Abbas, Farhat

    2015-11-01

    Emissions of gaseous and particulate pollutants from burning of wheat straw, rice straw, cotton straw, and bagasse were studied for the two agricultural-activity-dominated provinces of Pakistan: the Punjab and Sindh. Emission estimates, inventory, and allocation maps indicated distinct patterns of pollutant emissions in the two provinces. Comparative pollutant emission analysis revealed that the Punjab province produced higher pollutants from agricultural biomass burning than Sindh province. Total emissions from these two provinces were estimated to be 16,084.04 Gg (16.08 Tg) for the year 2006/2007. Wheat straw was found to be the dominant source of CO, CO2, SO2, NOx, and EC emissions in the both provinces. However, for the emissions of CH4, NH3, EC, and OC, the Punjab and Sindh provinces differed markedly for the crop residue share in these pollutant emissions. Rice straw was found to be the largest contributor of CH4 (51%) and NH3 (65%) in Sindh province. When total emissions from biomass burning were considered at provincial level, wheat straw and bagasse were the major crop residues which accounted for 72 and 14% of pollutant emissions, respectively, in the Punjab province, whereas, in Sindh province, the order of crop residue contribution in total emission was as follows: wheat (59%) > bagasse (19%) > rice (14%) > cotton (7%). Emission inventory data of total pollutants per unit area under cultivation (Mg ha(-1)) revealed that Sindh province produced higher emissions per hectare for wheat straw, rice straw, and bagasse than the Punjab province.

  6. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans emissions from open burning of crop residues in China between 1997 and 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2008-01-01

    Annual emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from open burning of crop residues in each province of China mainland between 1997 and 2004 were estimated to be ranged from 1.38x10(3) to 1.52x10(3) g I-TEQ/yr, with the average of 1.50+/-0.08x10(3) g I-TEQ/yr, which contributed to approximately 10% approximately 20% of the total emissions in China. The PCDD/F emissions mainly occurred in the largest crop-producing provinces, especially in those of higher economic levels. The major sources of PCDD/F emissions from open burning in China were found to be cereal residues (i.e. rice, wheat, and corn), which accounted about 70% of the total emissions. Moreover, the first-order one-variable grey differential equation model (GM (1,1) model) for annual emissions of PCDD/Fs was established based on grey system theory. The GM (1,1) model was proved to be robust to predict the annual PCDD/F emissions from crop residue field burning in forthcoming years.

  7. PM2.5 emissions and source profiles from open burning of crop residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Haiyan; Tian, Jie; Wang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Qiyuan; Han, Yongming; Cao, Junji; Long, Xin; Chen, L.-W. Antony; Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Huang, Ru-Jin; Dusek, Ulrike

    2017-11-01

    Wheat straw, rice straw, and corn stalks, the major agricultural crop residues in China, were collected from six major crop producing regions, and burned in a laboratory combustion chamber to determine PM2.5 source profiles and speciated emission factors (EFs). Organic carbon (OC) and water-soluble ions (the sum of NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3- and SO42-) are major constituents, accounting for 43.1 ± 8.3% and 27.4 ± 14.6% of PM2.5, respectively. Chloride (Cl-) and water-soluble potassium (K+) are the dominant ionic species, with an average abundance of 14.5 ± 8.2% and 6.4 ± 4.4% in PM2.5, respectively. The average K+/Cl- ratio is ∼0.4, lower than 2.8-5.4 for wood combustion. Similarity measures (i.e., Student's t-test, coefficient of divergence, correlations, and residual to uncertainty ratios) show the crop profiles are too similar for the species measured to be resolved from one another by receptor modeling. The largest difference was found between rice straw and corn stalk emissions, with higher OC and lower Cl- and K+ abundances (50%, 8%, and 3% of PM2.5, respectively) for corn stalks; lower OC, and higher Cl- and K+ abundances (38%, 21%, and 10% of PM2.5, respectively) for rice straw. Average EFs were 4.8 ± 3.1 g kg-1 for OC, 1.3 ± 0.8 g kg-1 for Cl- and 0.59 ± 0.56 g kg-1 for K+. Flaming and smoldering combustions resulted in an average modified combustion efficiency (MCE) of 0.92 ± 0.03, and low elemental carbon (EC) EFs (0.24 ± 0.12 g kg-1). OC/EC ratios from individual source profiles ranged from 12.9 ± 4.3 for rice straw to 24.1 ± 13.5 for wheat straw. The average K+/EC ratio was 2.4 ± 1.5, an order of magnitude higher than those from residential wood combustion (0.2-0.76). Elevated emission rates were found for OC (387 Gg yr-1) and Cl- (122 Gg yr-1), accounting for 44% and 14% of 2008 PM2.5 emissions in China.

  8. Soil physical properties regulate lethal heating during burning of woody residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt Busse; Carol Shestak; Ken Hubbert; Eric Knapp

    2010-01-01

    Temperatures well in excess of the lethal threshold for roots (60°C) have been measured in forest soils when woody fuels are burned. Whether this heat pulse is strongly moderated by soil moisture or soil texture is not fully understood, however. We measured soil heat profi les during 60 experimental burns, identifying changes in maximum soil temperature and heat...

  9. Characterization of Emissions and Residues from Simulations of the Deepwater Horizon Surface Oil Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    The surface oil burns conducted by the U.S. Coast Guard from April to July 2010 during the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico were simulated by small scale burns to characterize the pollutants, determine emission factors, and gather particulate matter for subsequent...

  10. Modeling crop residue burning experiments and assessing the fire impacts on air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescribed burning is a common land management practice that results in ambient emissions of a variety of primary and secondary pollutants with negative health impacts. The community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is used to conduct 2 km grid resolution simulations of prescr...

  11. Respiratory health concerns in children at some strategic locations from high PM levels during crop residue burning episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sachin; Agarwal, Ravinder; Mittal, Susheel K.

    2016-07-01

    Particulate Matter (PM) levels in the ambient air of three urban sites of strategic importance in Punjab (second largest agricultural state of India) were monitored from September 2013 to June 2014 covering two seasons of crop residue burning episodes of rice and wheat, respectively. During both crop periods, the levels varied from 71 to 167 μgm-3(PM10) and 43-107 μgm-3 (PM2.5), which were observed to be much beyond the permissible limits of 100 μgm-3 for PM10 and 60 μgm-3 for PM2.5 set by state pollution control agencies. Simultaneously, Pulmonary Function Test (PFT) parameters of children (age group 10-16 years) residing at these sites were monitored. PFT parameters like Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) were monitored on 50 healthy subjects at each site. The results indicated an alarming fall in FVC (5%-7%) and in PEF (4%-6%) parameters during the crop residue burning period's .The decrement was almost same for all age groups of children. The adverse effect was more on female subjects than male subjects. The impact of particulate matter pollution was more prominent in industrially important site (7%, SIS) as compared to historically (3%, HIS) and commercially (4%, CAS) important sites.

  12. Forest treatment residues for thermal energy compared with disposal by onsite burning: Emissions and energy return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greg Jones; Dan Loeffler; David Calkin; Woodam Chung

    2010-01-01

    Mill residues from forest industries are the source for most of the current wood-based energy in the US, approximately 2.1% of the nation's energy use in 2007. Forest residues from silvicultural treatments, which include limbs, tops, and small non-commercial trees removed for various forest management objectives, represent an additional source of woody biomass for...

  13. ‘Toy' laser macular burns in children: 12-month update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoof, N; O'Hagan, J; Pawlowska, N; Quhill, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is increasing evidence that high-powered hand-held laser devices cause retinal injury. We present 12-month follow-up data for three patients that we previously reported with such retinal injuries. Methods A retrospective case series of three children with maculopathy secondary to exposure to high-power hand-held laser devices. All children underwent clinical examination and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) at presentation and follow-up. Fundus-controlled microperimetry was also undertaken 12–19 months after exposure. Results Three children sustained macular injury after exposure to a high-powered hand-held laser. Acutely, they presented with a ‘vitelliform-like' maculopathy with reduced vision. Over the course of follow-up, the best corrected Snellen acuity in all three patients improved to ‘normal' levels (range 6/6–6/9). Long-term deficits in foveal retinal sensitivity were identified in two patients using fundus-controlled microperimetry. SD-OCT imaging showed persistent disruption of the foveal outer photoreceptor layers in all three children. Conclusion Although visual acuity improved over time, deficits in microperimetry and SD-OCT persisted. All three children had retinal pigment epithelium changes, requiring follow-up for longer-term sequelae of laser injuries such as expansion of retinal atrophy and development of choroidal neovascular membranes. PMID:26611842

  14. Burning crop residues under no-till in semi-arid land, Northern Spain - effects on soil organic matter, aggregation, and earthwor populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Virto, I.; Imaz, M.J.; Enrique, A.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Bescansa, P.

    2007-01-01

    Stubble burning has traditionally been used in semi-arid land for pest and weed control, and to remove the excess of crop residues before seeding in no-tillage systems. We compared differences in soil properties in a long-term (10 years) tillage trial on a carbonated soil in semi-arid north-east

  15. A study of the application of residue from burned biomass in mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enori Gemelli

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to study the viability of burnt biomass residue from a pulp and paper plant applied as a raw material for mortar used in the construction industry. The waste - bottom ash - was incorporated into the mortar as a mineral addition to the Portland cement. The effect of the waste's grain size on the properties of mortars containing 10% in volume of waste was investigated, as well as the effect of the concentration of waste with grain size under 0.15 mm. The samples were evaluated after 28 days of aging by uniaxial compression, leaching test and scanning electron microscopy. These characterization techniques indicated that the properties of the mortars depend on the concentration, granulation and size distribution of the waste in the mortar's structure. Furthermore, some chemical elements may be present in stabilized and/or encapsulated form in the cement matrix.

  16. Longitudinal Evaluation of Hospitalized Burn Patients in Sivas City Center for Six Months and Comparison with a Previously Held Community-based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Faruk Erin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was designed to longitudinally demonstrate the rate and epidemiology of hospitalized burn patients in Sivas city center within 6 months. The second aim was to compare the results of the current study with those of a previously held community-based survey in the same region. Material and Methods: Patients who were hospitalized due to burn injuries in Sivas city for six months were longitudinally evaluated. Epidemiological data of these patients were analyzed. Results: During the course of the study, 87 patients (49 males and 38 females were hospitalized. The ratio of burn patients to the total number of hospitalized patients was 0.38%. The most common etiologic factor was scalds (70.1%. Burns generally took place in the kitchen (41.4% and living room (31.4%, and majority of the patients received cold water as first-aid treatment at the time of injury. The vast majority of patients were discharged from the hospital without the need of surgical intervention (83.9%, and the duration of treatment was between 1 and 14 days for 73.6% of the patients. Sixty patients (68.9% had a total burn surface area under 10%. The total cost of the hospitalization period of these patients was 137.225 Turkish Lira (83.308–92.908$, and the average cost per patient was 1.577 Turkish Lira (957–1067$. Conclusion: Our study revealed a considerable inconsistency when compared with the results of the community-based survey, which had been previously conducted in the same region. We concluded that hospital-based studies are far from reflecting the actual burn trauma potential of a given district in the absence of a reliable, standard, nation-wide record system. Population-based surveys should be encouraged to make an accurate assessment of burn rates in countries lacking reliable record systems.

  17. Burn Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Aydemir

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are important in terms of causing serious disability and threatening life. With the establishment of modern burn treatment units and advances in acute care management contributed to a reduced mortality rate over the last decades. As a result of improved outcome, more attention has to be given to a comprehensive burn rehabilitation program. Burn rehabilitation is a process that starts from day of admission and continues for months or sometimes years after the initial event. The term ‘burn rehabilitation’ incorporates the physical, physiological and social aspects of care. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. Burn rehabilitation aims to prevent the possible complications, minimalize joint contractures and deformities, increase range of motion, control hypertrophic scarring, achieve the best possible functional capacity and to regain the patients vocational and recreational activities. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 70-7

  18. Multi-pollutant emissions from the burning of major agricultural residues in China and the related health-economic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlin; Hu, Yunjie; Zhang, Fei; Chen, Jianmin; Ma, Zhen; Ye, Xingnan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Lin; Tang, Xingfu; Zhang, Renhe; Mu, Mu; Wang, Guihua; Kan, Haidong; Wang, Xinming; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2017-04-01

    Multi-pollutants in smoke particulate matter (SPM) were identified and quantified for the biomass burning of five major agricultural residues (wheat, rice, corn, cotton, and soybean straw) in China by an aerosol chamber system combined with various measurement techniques. The primary emission factors (EFs) for PM1. 0 and PM2. 5 are 3.04-12.64 and 3.25-15.16 g kg-1. Organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble inorganics (WSIs), water-soluble organic acids (WSOAs), water-soluble amine salts (WSAs), trace mineral elements (THMs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and phenols in smoke PM1. 0/PM2. 5 are 1.34-6.04/1.54-7.42, 0.58-2.08/0.61-2.18, 0.51-3.52/0.52-3.81, 0.13-0.64/0.14-0.77, (4.39-85.72/4.51-104.79) × 10-3, (11.8-51.1/14.0-131.6) × 10-3, (1.1-4.0/1.8-8.3) × 10-3, and (7.7-23.5/9.7-41.5) × 10-3 g kg-1, respectively. Black carbon (BC) mainly exists in PM1. 0; heavy-metal-bearing particles favour residing in the range of smoke PM1. 0-2. 5, which is also confirmed by individual particle analysis. With respect to the five scenarios of burning activities, the average emissions and overall propagation of uncertainties at the 95 % confidence interval (CI) of SPM from agricultural open burning in China in 2012 were estimated to be 1005.7 (-24.6, 33.7 %), 901.4 (-24.4, 33.5 %), 432.4 (-24.2, 33.5 %), 134.2 (-24., 34.0 %), 249.8 (-25.4, 34.9 %), 25.1 (-33.3, 41.4 %), 5.8 (-30.1, 38.5 %), 8.7 (-26.6, 35.6 %), 0.5 (-26.0, 34.9 %), and 2.7 (-26.1, 35.1 %) Gg for PM2. 5, PM1. 0, OC, EC, WSI, WSOA, WSA, THM, PAHs, and phenols , respectively. The emissions were further spatio-temporally characterized using a geographic information system (GIS) in different regions in the summer and autumn post-harvest periods. It was found that less than 25 % of the total emissions were released during the summer harvest, which was mainly contributed by the North Plain and the centre of China, especially Henan, Shandong, and Anhui, which are the top three provinces

  19. Predictors of moderate to severe fatigue 12 months following admission to hospital for burn: Results from the Burns Registry of Australia and New Zealand (BRANZ) Long Term Outcomes project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbe, Belinda J; Cleland, Heather; Watterson, Dina; Schrale, Rebecca; McRae, Sally; Taggart, Susan; Darton, Anne; Wood, Fiona; Edgar, Dale W

    2016-12-01

    Fatigue has been identified as an outcome of concern following burn but is rarely captured in outcomes studies. We aimed to: (i) describe the prevalence, and predictors, of moderate to severe fatigue in the first 12 months following burn, and (ii) establish the association between fatigue and health-related quality of life and work outcomes. Adult burns patients, admitted >24h, were recruited from five BRANZ sites. Participants were followed-up at 1-, 6-, and 12-months after injury using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP)-work scale. Moderate to severe fatigue was defined as a global BFI score of 4-10. Multivariable mixed effects regression modelling was used to identify demographic, socioeconomic, burn size and severity predictors of moderate/severe fatigue at follow-up. The mean±SD age of the 328 participants was 42.1±16.7years, 70% were male, 47% were flame burns, and the mean±SD %TBSA was 8.7±11.2. The prevalence of moderate/severe fatigue decreased from 37% at 1-month, to 32% at 6-months and 26% at 12-months. The adjusted odds of moderate/severe fatigue were 2.62 (95% CI: 1.27, 5.42) times higher for women compared to men, and 2.64 (95% CI: 1.03, 6.79) times higher in patients with a %TBSA≥20. Compared to patients in major cities, the adjusted odds of reporting moderate/severe fatigue were 2.48 fold higher (95% CI: 1.17, 5.24) for patients residing in inner regional areas, and 3.60 fold (95% CI: 1.43, 9.05) higher for patients living in remote/very remote areas. At each time point, the physical and mental health summary scores, and each sub-scale score, of the SF-36 were significantly lower in patients reporting moderate/severe fatigue. Patients experiencing moderate to severe fatigue reported higher work-related disability on the SIP work scale at each time point after injury. More than a quarter of participants reported moderate to severe fatigue on the BFI at 12-months and

  20. GHG AND AEROSOL EMISSION FROM FIRE PIXEL DURING CROP RESIDUE BURNING UNDER RICE AND WHEAT CROPPING SYSTEMS IN NORTH-WEST INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Acharya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Emission of smoke and aerosol from open field burning of crop residue is a long-standing subject matter of atmospheric pollution. In this study, we proposed a new approach of estimating fuel load in the fire pixels and corresponding emissions of selected GHGs and aerosols i.e. CO2, CO, NO2, SO2, and total particulate matter (TPM due to burning of crop residue under rice and wheat cropping systems in Punjab in north-west India from 2002 to 2012. In contrasts to the conventional method that uses RPR ratio to estimate the biomass, fuel load in the fire pixels was estimated as a function of enhanced vegetation index (EVI. MODIS fire products were used to detect the fire pixels during harvesting seasons of rice and wheat. Based on the field measurements, fuel load in the fire pixels were modelled as a function of average EVI using second order polynomial regression. Average EVI for rice and wheat crops that were extracted through Fourier transformation were computed from MODIS time series 16 day EVI composites. About 23 % of net shown area (NSA during rice and 11 % during wheat harvesting seasons are affected by field burning. The computed average fuel loads are 11.32 t/ha (±17.4 during rice and 10.89 t/ha (±8.7 during wheat harvesting seasons. Calculated average total emissions of CO2, CO, NO2, SO2 and TPM were 8108.41, 657.85, 8.10, 4.10, and 133.21 Gg during rice straw burning and 6896.85, 625.09, 1.42, 1.77, and 57.55 Gg during wheat burning. Comparison of estimated values shows better agreement with the previous concurrent estimations. The method, however, shows its efficiency parallel to the conventional method of estimation of fuel load and related pollutant emissions.

  1. Crude oil burning mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Malmquist, Linus Mattias Valdemar; Jomaas, Grunde

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve predictions for the burning efficiency and the residue composition of in-situ burning of crude oil, the burning mechanism of crude oil was studied in relation to the composition of its hydrocarbon mixture, before, during and after the burning. The surface temperature, flame...... to the predictions of four conceptual models that describe the burning mechanism of multicomponent fuels. Based on the comparisons, hydrocarbon liquids were found to be best described by the Equilibrium Flash Vaporization model, showing a constant gas composition and gasification rate. The multicomponent fuels...... followed the diffusion-limited gasification model, showing a change in the hydrocarbon composition of the fuel and its evaporating gases, as well as a decreasing gasification rate, as the burning progressed. This burning mechanism implies that the residue composition and burning efficiency mainly depend...

  2. First Characterization of Biomass Burning Smoke from Cooking Fires, Peat, Crop Residue and Other Fuels By High Resolution PTR-TOF Mass Spectrometry and FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, C.; Veres, P. R.; Williams, J.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) is a major influence on Earth's atmosphere, but for many fire-types the emissions have only been measured for a few species. For all types of BB, progress has been limited by a lack of information on the emissions of semi-volatile organic gases that are precursors for secondary aerosol and ozone. During the Fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4), the BB emissions from 158 laboratory fires were quantified by ~40 scientists for an assortment of globally relevant fuels including rarely sampled sources such as US and Asian crop residue; Indonesian and extratropical peat; and cooking fires in traditional and advanced stoves. In this work, we present the primary emissions of gas-phase non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) measured using an advanced Proton-Transfer-Reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) in tandem with measurements of other major emissions by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. We developed a composition and mass dependent sensitivity and best assignments for many observed peaks. The known and tentatively assigned peaks together account for ~80-96% of total observed NMOC mass. Much of the NMOC mass is rarely measured or previously unmeasured high molecular mass compounds including ringed aromatic hydrocarbons, phenolic compounds, and furans, which are all secondary organic aerosol precursors. Large air quality benefits are demonstrated for more advanced cooking technologies. This work produced globally relevant emission ratios and emission factors to better represent biomass burning in current atmospheric models.

  3. Local levels of biomarkers after surgical and nonsurgical debridement of residual pockets and nonresidual sites in diabetic patients: a 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Joyce Pinho; Shaddox, Luciana Machion; de Mendonca, Adriana Cutrim; Bastos, Marta Ferreira; de Miranda, Tamires Szeremeske; Santos, Vanessa Renata; Duarte, Poliana Mendes

    2015-01-01

    There is scarce evidence on suitable approaches for the treatment of unresponsive or residual periodontal sites in diabetic patients. This study assessed the effects of surgical debridement (SD) and nonsurgical debridement (NSD), associated with amoxicillin and metronidazole, on clinical and immunological outcomes of residual pockets and adjacent healthy sites in patients with type 2 diabetes. A split-mouth, randomized controlled trial was conducted in 21 patients presenting at least 2 residual pockets in contralateral quadrants 12 months after basic nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Patients received systemic antibiotics, and contralateral quadrants were assigned to receive SD or NSD. The changes in clinical parameters were evaluated from baseline to 12 months. Local levels of 14 cytokines and chemokines were measured with multiplex bead immunoassays at baseline and 3 and 12 months after therapy. There were no statistically significant differences between SD and NSD for changes in clinical parameters from baseline to 12 months (P > 0.05). There was a significantly greater increase in the levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin 6 from baseline to 3 months in the healthy sites adjacent to residual pockets receiving SD (P infection and stable wound healing in these sites at 12 months.

  4. Optimization of burn referrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiband, Hanna K; Lundin, Kira; Alsbjørn, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Correct estimation of the severity of burns is important to obtain the right treatment of the patient and to avoid over- and undertriage. In this study we aimed to assess how often the guidelines for referral of burn injured patients are met at the national burn centre (NBC), Denmark....... METHODS: We included burn patients referred to the NBC in a three-months period. Patient records were systematically analyzed and compared with the national guidelines for referral of burn injured patients. RESULTS: A total of 97 burn injured patients were transferred for treatment at the NBC and the most...... common reason for referral was partial thickness burn exceeding 3% estimated area of burn (55% of the patients) while facial burns (32%) and inhalational injury (25%) were other common reasons. We found that 29 (30%) of the referrals were considered potentially unnecessary according to the guidelines...

  5. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): Emissions of particulate matter from wood and dung cooking fires, brick kilns, generators, trash and crop residue burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Elizabeth; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stockwell, Chelsea; Christian, Ted; Bhave, Prakash; Siva Praveen, Puppala; Panday, Arnico; Adhikari, Sagar; Maharjan, Rashmi; Goetz, Doug; DeCarlo, Peter; Saikawa, Eri; Yokelson, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMASTE) field campaign targeted the in situ characterization of widespread and under-sampled combustion sources. In Kathmandu and the Terai, southern Nepal's flat plains, samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were collected from wood and dung cooking fires (n = 22), generators (n = 2), groundwater pumps (n = 2), clamp kilns (n = 3), zig-zag kilns (n = 3), trash burning (n = 4), one heating fire, and one crop residue fire. Co-located measurements of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds allowed for the application of the carbon mass balance approach to estimate emission factors for PM2.5, elemental carbon, organic carbon, and water-soluble inorganic ions. Organic matter was chemically speciated using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sterols, n-alkanes, hopanes, steranes, and levoglucosan, which accounted for 2-8% of the measured organic carbon. These data were used to develop molecular-marker based profiles for use in source apportionment modeling. This study provides quantitative emission factors for particulate matter and its constituents for many important combustion sources in Nepal and South Asia.

  6. Impact of single annual treatment and four-monthly treatment for hookworm and Ascaris lumbricoides, and factors associated with residual infection among Kenyan school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepha, Stella; Mwandawiro, Charles S; Anderson, Roy M; Pullan, Rachel L; Nuwaha, Fred; Cano, Jorge; Njenga, Sammy M; Odiere, Maurice R; Allen, Elizabeth; Brooker, Simon J; Nikolay, Birgit

    2017-02-09

    School-based deworming is widely implemented in various countries to reduce the burden of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs), however, the frequency of drug administration varies in different settings. In this study, we compared the impact of a single annual treatment and 4-monthly treatment over a follow-up among Kenyan school children, and investigated the factors associated with residual infection. We performed a secondary analysis of data from a randomized trial investigating whether deworming for STHs alters risk of acquiring malaria. Children received either a single treatment or 4-monthly albendazole treatments were followed longitudinally from February 2014 to October 2014. The relative impact of treatment and factors associated with residual infections were investigated using mixed-effects regression models. Predisposition to infection was assessed based on Spearman's rank and Kendall's Tau correlation coefficients. In the 4-monthly treatment group, the proportion of children infected with hookworm decreased from 59.9 to 5.7%, while Ascaris lumbricoides infections dropped from 55.7 to 6.2%. In the single treatment group, hookworm infections decreased over the same time period from 58.7 to 18.3% (12.6% absolute difference in reduction, 95% CI: 8.9-16.3%), and A. lumbricoides from 56.7 to 23.3% (17.1% absolute difference in reduction, 95% CI: 13.1-21.1%). There was strong evidence for predisposition to both STH types. Residual hookworm infection among children on 4-monthly treatment were associated with male sex and baseline nutritional status, whereas A. lumbricoides infection was associated with individual and school-level infection at baseline, latrine cleanliness at schools. This study found that 4-monthly treatment w more effective than single annual treatment. Repeated treatments led to dramatic reductions in the intensities of STHs, but did not completely clear infections among school children in Kenya, a presumed reflection of reinfection in a setting

  7. Crude oil burning mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Malmquist, L.M.V.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve predictions for the burning efficiency and the residue composition of in-situ burning of crude oil, the burning mechanism of crude oil was studied in relation to the composition of its hydrocarbon mixture, before, during and after the burning. The surface temperature, flame...... height, mass loss rate and residues of three hydrocarbon liquids (n-octane, dodecane and hexadecane), two crude oils (DUC and REBCO) and one hydrocarbon liquid mixture of the aforementioned hydrocarbon liquids were studied using the Crude Oil Flammability Apparatus. The experimental results were compared...... on the highest achievable oil slick temperature. Based on this mechanism, predictions can then be made depending on the hydrocarbon composition of the fuel and the measured surface temperature....

  8. Burning Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Burning feet By Mayo Clinic Staff Burning feet — the sensation that your feet are painfully hot — can be mild or severe. In some cases, your burning feet may be so painful that the pain interferes ...

  9. Novel use of a flowable collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrix (Integra™ Flowable Wound Matrix) combined with percutaneous cannula scar tissue release in treatment of post-burn malfunction of the hand--A preliminary 6 month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirche, C; Senghaas, A; Fischer, S; Hollenbeck, S T; Kremer, T; Kneser, U

    2016-02-01

    Long-term function following severe burns to the hand may be poor secondary to scar adhesions to the underlying tendons, webspaces, and joints. In this pilot study, we report the feasibility of applying a pasty dermal matrix combined with percutaneous cannula teno- and adhesiolysis. In this 6 month follow-up pilot study, we included eight hands in five patients with hand burns undergoing minimal-invasive, percutaneous cannula adhesiolysis and injection of INTEGRA™ Flowable Wound Matrix for a pilot study of this new concept. The flowable collagen-glycosaminoglycan wound matrix (FCGWM) was applied with a buttoned 2mm cannula to induce formation of a neo-gliding plane. Post treatment follow-up was performed to assess active range of motion (AROM), grip strength, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score, Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) and quality of life Short-Form (SF)-36 questionnaire. No complications were detected associated with the treatment of FCGWM injection. The mean improvement (AROM) at 6 months was 30.6° for digits 2-5. The improvement in the DASH score was a mean of 9 points out of 100. The VSS improved by a mean of 2 points out of 14. The study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of percutaneous FCGWM for dermal augmentation after burn. Results from this pilot study show improvements in AROM for digits 2-5, functional scores from the patient's perspective (DASH) and scar quality (VSS). The flowable form of established INTEGRA™ wound matrix offers the advantage of minimal-invasive injection after scar release in the post-burned hand with a reduction in the risk of postsurgical re-scarring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Burns dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Helen E; Wood, Fiona

    2017-03-01

    Burn injuries are common and costly; each year, there are more than 200,000 cases, costing the Australian community $150 million. Management of smaller burn injuries in the community can be improved by appropriate first aid, good burn dressings and wound management. This can reduce the risk of the burn becoming deeper or infected, and can potentially reduce the requirement for specialist review or surgery. The objective of this article is to provide healthcare professionals with information about the pathophysiology of burn wound progression. This information includes the aims of burn wound dressings and indications for different types of dressings in different burn depths, advantages of blister debridement, and the reasoning behind advice given to patients after healing of the burn wound. This article provides a framework used by the State Burn Service of Western Australia, by which clinicians can understand the needs of a specific burn wound and apply these principles when choosing an appropriate burn dressing for their patient. Every intervention in the journey of a patient with a burn injury affects their eventual outcome. By managing all burn injuries effectively at every single step, we can reduce burn injury morbidity as a community.

  11. Are burns photographs useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, L; Boyle, M; Taggart, I; Watson, S

    2006-11-01

    Routine photography of all patients admitted to the West of Scotland Regional Burns Unit was introduced in 2003. To date, there are few burns units to evaluate the usefulness of photographs taken. To assess the usefulness of photographs of patients admitted to the burns unit to various members of the multidisciplinary team. A questionnaire was completed by hospital staff involved in the management of burns patients over a 3-month period. A total of 43 questionnaires were completed. The majority of questionnaires were completed by nursing staff (55%) followed by medical staff (23%); physiotherapy (5%); anaesthetists (7%); theatre staff (5%); students (2%); dietician (2%). About 98% of respondents agreed that photographs were useful overall, particularly for teaching purposes. About 9% disagreed that photographs were useful for assessment due to difficulty in assessing depth of burn. About 72% agreed that the photographs were useful for patient management and improve patient care. About 88% agreed that all patients should have photographs available in future. Advantages of photographs include; moving and handling of patients; patient positioning in theatre; reviewing wound healing and complications. They are useful for assessing site, size and type of burn. Disadvantages include difficulty in assessing depth of burn, technical factors, and unavailability out of hours. Photographs of burns patients are useful overall to all members of the multidisciplinary team.

  12. Iatrogenic Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Kaya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic burns are rare complications that can occur after using medical devices and chemicals in hospitals. Usually, these burns are deep and cause additional morbidity to patients. In this article, 6 iatrogenic burn patients referred to our department are presented, and predisposing factors and preventive measures are discussed.

  13. Multinational study in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes: association of age, ketoacidosis, HLA status, and autoantibodies on residual beta-cell function and glycemic control 12 months after diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, H.B.; Swift, P.G.F.; Holl, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    .005), and by stimulated C-peptide (p glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA; p = 0.0004) at 1 month. HbA1c at 12 months was predicted by HbA1c at diagnosis (p ethnicity...... (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Younger age, ketoacidosis at diagnosis, and IA and GADA 1 month after diagnosis were the strongest explanatory factors for residual beta-cell function at 12 months. Glycemic control at 12 months was influenced predominantly by ethnicity, HbA1c at diagnosis, and GADA at 1...

  14. Comparison of heat transfer and soil impacts of air curtain burner burning and slash pile burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woongsoon Jang; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Han-Sup Han

    2017-01-01

    We measured soil heating and subsequent changes in soil properties between two forest residue disposal methods: slash pile burning (SPB) and air curtain burner (ACB). The ACB consumes fuels more efficiently and safely via blowing air into a burning container. Five burning trials with different fuel sizes were implemented in northern California, USA. Soil temperature...

  15. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE: emissions of trace gases and light-absorbing carbon from wood and dung cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Stockwell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE campaign took place in and around the Kathmandu Valley and in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP of southern Nepal during April 2015. The source characterization phase targeted numerous important but undersampled (and often inefficient combustion sources that are widespread in the developing world such as cooking with a variety of stoves and solid fuels, brick kilns, open burning of municipal solid waste (a.k.a. trash or garbage burning, crop residue burning, generators, irrigation pumps, and motorcycles. NAMaSTE produced the first, or rare, measurements of aerosol optical properties, aerosol mass, and detailed trace gas chemistry for the emissions from many of the sources. This paper reports the trace gas and aerosol measurements obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, whole-air sampling (WAS, and photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAX; 405 and 870 nm based on field work with a moveable lab sampling authentic sources. The primary aerosol optical properties reported include emission factors (EFs for scattering and absorption coefficients (EF Bscat, EF Babs, in m2 kg−1 fuel burned, single scattering albedos (SSAs, and absorption Ångström exponents (AAEs. From these data we estimate black and brown carbon (BC, BrC emission factors (g kg−1 fuel burned. The trace gas measurements provide EFs (g kg−1 for CO2, CO, CH4, selected non-methane hydrocarbons up to C10, a large suite of oxygenated organic compounds, NH3, HCN, NOx, SO2, HCl, HF, etc. (up to ∼ 80 gases in all. The emissions varied significantly by source, and light absorption by both BrC and BC was important for many sources. The AAE for dung-fuel cooking fires (4.63 ± 0.68 was significantly higher than for wood-fuel cooking fires (3.01 ± 0.10. Dung-fuel cooking fires also emitted high levels of NH3 (3.00 ± 1.33 g kg−1, organic acids (7.66 ± 6.90 g kg−1, and HCN

  16. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): emissions of trace gases and light-absorbing carbon from wood and dung cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Christian, Ted J.; Goetz, J. Douglas; Jayarathne, Thilina; Bhave, Prakash V.; Praveen, Puppala S.; Adhikari, Sagar; Maharjan, Rashmi; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Saikawa, Eri; Blake, Donald R.; Simpson, Isobel J.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Panday, Arnico K.

    2016-09-01

    The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE) campaign took place in and around the Kathmandu Valley and in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) of southern Nepal during April 2015. The source characterization phase targeted numerous important but undersampled (and often inefficient) combustion sources that are widespread in the developing world such as cooking with a variety of stoves and solid fuels, brick kilns, open burning of municipal solid waste (a.k.a. trash or garbage burning), crop residue burning, generators, irrigation pumps, and motorcycles. NAMaSTE produced the first, or rare, measurements of aerosol optical properties, aerosol mass, and detailed trace gas chemistry for the emissions from many of the sources. This paper reports the trace gas and aerosol measurements obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, whole-air sampling (WAS), and photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAX; 405 and 870 nm) based on field work with a moveable lab sampling authentic sources. The primary aerosol optical properties reported include emission factors (EFs) for scattering and absorption coefficients (EF Bscat, EF Babs, in m2 kg-1 fuel burned), single scattering albedos (SSAs), and absorption Ångström exponents (AAEs). From these data we estimate black and brown carbon (BC, BrC) emission factors (g kg-1 fuel burned). The trace gas measurements provide EFs (g kg-1) for CO2, CO, CH4, selected non-methane hydrocarbons up to C10, a large suite of oxygenated organic compounds, NH3, HCN, NOx, SO2, HCl, HF, etc. (up to ˜ 80 gases in all). The emissions varied significantly by source, and light absorption by both BrC and BC was important for many sources. The AAE for dung-fuel cooking fires (4.63 ± 0.68) was significantly higher than for wood-fuel cooking fires (3.01 ± 0.10). Dung-fuel cooking fires also emitted high levels of NH3 (3.00 ± 1.33 g kg-1), organic acids (7.66 ± 6.90 g kg-1), and HCN (2.01 ± 1.25 g kg-1), where the latter could

  17. A comprehensive biomass burning emission inventory with high spatial and temporal resolution in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Xing, Xiaofan; Lang, Jianlei; Chen, Dongsheng; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Wei, Lin; Wei, Xiao; Liu, Chao

    2017-02-01

    . As for the straw burning emission of various crops, corn straw burning has the largest contribution to all of the pollutants considered, except for CH4; rice straw burning has highest contribution to CH4 and the second largest contribution to other pollutants, except for SO2, OC, and Hg; wheat straw burning is the second largest contributor to SO2, OC, and Hg and the third largest contributor to other pollutants. Heilongjiang, Shandong, and Henan provinces located in the north-eastern and central-southern regions of China have higher emissions compared to other provinces in China. Gridded emissions, which were obtained through spatial allocation based on the gridded rural population and fire point data from emission inventories at county resolution, could better represent the actual situation. High biomass burning emissions are concentrated in the areas with more agricultural and rural activity. The months of April, May, June, and October account for 65 % of emissions from in-field crop residue burning, while, regarding EC, the emissions in January, February, October, November, and December are relatively higher than other months due to biomass domestic burning in heating season. There are regional differences in the monthly variations of emissions due to the diversity of main planted crops and climatic conditions. Furthermore, PM2.5 component results showed that OC, Cl-, EC, K+, NH4+, elemental K, and SO42- are the main PM2.5 species, accounting for 80 % of the total emissions. The species with relatively high contribution to NMVOC emission include ethylene, propylene, toluene, mp-xylene, and ethyl benzene, which are key species for the formation of secondary air pollution. The detailed biomass burning emission inventory developed by this study could provide useful information for air-quality modelling and could support the development of appropriate pollution-control strategies.

  18. [Ocular burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, H; Gérard, M; Schrage, N

    2008-09-01

    Ocular or thermal burns account for 7.7%-18% of ocular trauma. The majority of victims are young. The burns occur in the setting of accidents at work or in the home, or during a physical attack. Chemical burns by strong acids or bases are responsible for the most serious injuries. Associated with the destruction of limbal stem cells, they present as recurrent epithelial ulcerations, chronic stromal ulcers, deep stromal revascularization, conjunctival overlap, or even corneal perforation. The initial clinical exam is sometimes difficult to perform in the presence of burning symptoms. Nevertheless, it enables the physician to classify the injury, establish a prognosis, and most importantly, guide the therapeutic management. The Roper-Hall modification of the Hughes classification system is the most widely utilized, broken down into stages based on the size of the stromal opacity and the extent of possible limbal ischemia. This classification is now favorably supplemented by those proposed by Dua and Wagoner, which are based on the extent of the limbal stem cell deficiency. The prognosis of the more serious forms of ocular burns has markedly improved over the last decade because of a better understanding of the physiology of the corneal epithelium. Surgical techniques aimed at restoring the destroyed limbal stem cells have altered the prognosis of severe corneal burns. In order to decrease the incidence of burns, prevention, particularly in industry, is essential.

  19. Burning Issue: Handling Household Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to injury. , as your immune system shifts into gear. “The immune system response is intended to limit ... maintain blood pressure. Grafting—placing healthy skin on top of the burn wound—might help promote new ...

  20. Field determination of biomass burning emission ratios and factors via open-path FTIR spectroscopy and fire radiative power assessment: headfire, backfire and residual smouldering combustion in African savannahs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Wooster

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning emissions factors are vital to quantifying trace gas release from vegetation fires. Here we evaluate emissions factors for a series of savannah fires in Kruger National Park (KNP, South Africa using ground-based open path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and an IR source separated by 150–250 m distance. Molecular abundances along the extended open path are retrieved using a spectral forward model coupled to a non-linear least squares fitting approach. We demonstrate derivation of trace gas column amounts for horizontal paths transecting the width of the advected plume, and find for example that CO mixing ratio changes of ~0.01 μmol mol−1 [10 ppbv] can be detected across the relatively long optical paths used here. Though FTIR spectroscopy can detect dozens of different chemical species present in vegetation fire smoke, we focus our analysis on five key combustion products released preferentially during the pyrolysis (CH2O, flaming (CO2 and smoldering (CO, CH4, NH3 processes. We demonstrate that well constrained emissions ratios for these gases to both CO2 and CO can be derived for the backfire, headfire and residual smouldering combustion (RSC stages of these savannah fires, from which stage-specific emission factors can then be calculated. Headfires and backfires often show similar emission ratios and emission factors, but those of the RSC stage can differ substantially. The timing of each fire stage was identified via airborne optical and thermal IR imagery and ground-observer reports, with the airborne IR imagery also used to derive estimates of fire radiative energy (FRE, allowing the relative amount of fuel burned in each stage to be calculated and "fire averaged" emission ratios and emission factors to be determined. These "fire averaged" metrics are dominated by the headfire contribution, since the FRE data indicate that the vast majority

  1. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE: emissions of particulate matter from wood- and dung-fueled cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jayarathne

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE characterized widespread and under-sampled combustion sources common to South Asia, including brick kilns, garbage burning, diesel and gasoline generators, diesel groundwater pumps, idling motorcycles, traditional and modern cooking stoves and fires, crop residue burning, and heating fire. Fuel-based emission factors (EFs; with units of pollutant mass emitted per kilogram of fuel combusted were determined for fine particulate matter (PM2.5, organic carbon (OC, elemental carbon (EC, inorganic ions, trace metals, and organic species. For the forced-draft zigzag brick kiln, EFPM2.5 ranged from 12 to 19 g kg−1 with major contributions from OC (7 %, sulfate expected to be in the form of sulfuric acid (31.9 %, and other chemicals not measured (e.g., particle-bound water. For the clamp kiln, EFPM2.5 ranged from 8 to 13 g kg−1, with major contributions from OC (63.2 %, sulfate (23.4 %, and ammonium (16 %. Our brick kiln EFPM2.5 values may exceed those previously reported, partly because we sampled emissions at ambient temperature after emission from the stack or kiln allowing some particle-phase OC and sulfate to form from gaseous precursors. The combustion of mixed household garbage under dry conditions had an EFPM2.5 of 7.4 ± 1.2 g kg−1, whereas damp conditions generated the highest EFPM2.5 of all combustion sources in this study, reaching up to 125 ± 23 g kg−1. Garbage burning emissions contained triphenylbenzene and relatively high concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Sb, making these useful markers of this source. A variety of cooking stoves and fires fueled with dung, hardwood, twigs, and/or other biofuels were studied. The use of dung for cooking and heating produced higher EFPM2.5 than other biofuel sources and consistently emitted more PM2.5 and OC than burning hardwood and/or twigs; this trend was consistent across traditional mud

  2. Ultrasound assessed thickness of burn scars in association with laser Doppler imaging determined depth of burns in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Mill, Julie; Kravchuk, Olena; Kimble, Roy M

    2010-12-01

    This study describes the ultrasound assessment of burn scars in paediatric patients and the association of these scar thickness with laser Doppler imaging (LDI) determined burn depth. A total of 60 ultrasound scar assessments were conducted on 33 scars from 21 paediatric burn patients at 3, 6 and 9 months after-burn. The mean of peak scar thickness was 0.39±0.032 cm, with the thickest at 6 months (0.40±0.036 cm). There were 17 scald burn scars (0.34±0.045 cm), 4 contact burn scars (0.61±0.092 cm), and 10 flame burn scars (0.42±0.058 cm). Each group of scars followed normal distributions. Twenty-three scars had original burns successfully scanned by LDI and various depths of burns were presented by different colours according to blood perfusion units (PU), with dark blue burns, with the thinnest scars for green coloured burns and the thickest for dark blue coloured burns. Within light blue burns, grafted burns healed with significantly thinner scars than non-grafted burns. This study indicates that LDI can be used for predicting the risk of hypertrophic scarring and for guiding burn care. To our knowledge, this is the first study to correlate the thickness of burns scars by ultrasound scan with burn depth determined by LDI. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of six versus 12 months of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with drug-eluting stent implantation after risk stratification with the residual SYNTAX score: Results from a secondary analysis of the I-LOVE-IT 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Miaohan; Li, Yi; Li, Jing; Xu, Kai; Jing, Quanmin; Dong, Shaohong; Jin, Zhe; Zhao, Pitian; Xu, Bo; Han, Yaling

    2017-03-01

    The optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation remains undetermined, especially for those at high risk of cardiac events postprocedure. This study was aimed to investigate the impact of 6 versus 12 months of DAPT after DES implantation based on risk stratification with the residual SYNTAX score (rSS). A total of 2737 patients in the I-LOVE-IT 2 trial were grouped according to rSS status (low rSS [rSS = 0, n = 1474] versus high rSS [rSS > 0, n = 1263]) and DAPT duration (6 months vs. 12 months). The primary endpoint was 12-month target lesion failure (TLF), and the major secondary endpoints were 12-month net adverse clinical events (NACE) and major bleeding. Incidences of TLF (5.2 vs. 7.4%, P = 0.01) and NACE (9.2 vs. 13.4%, P rSS, 12-month DAPT was associated with slightly lower risks of TLF (3.0% vs. 1.6%, P = 0.08) and NACE (7.0 vs. 4.4%, P = 0.054) compared with 6-month DAPT within 6 to 12 months after PCI. Patients with different DAPT durations had similar risks of bleeding both in the low and high rSS groups. Patients with high rSSs have an increased risk of TLF and NACE at 12 months after DES implantation. Twelve-month DAPT might be superior to 6-month DAPT in patients with high rSS for reducing adverse events within 6 to 12 months after PCI without excessive risk of bleeding. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Burns: dressings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burns are classified according to depth. This overview concerns the treatments for partial-thickness burns, which can be expected or have the potential to heal spontaneously (superficial partial-thickness and mid-dermal partial-thickness burns). Injuries that involve the deeper part of the dermis and require surgical treatments to achieve healing are not the focus of this overview. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic overview and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for partial-thickness burns? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2014 (BMJ Clinical Evidence overviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). Results At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 322 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 193 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 160 studies and the further review of 33 full publications. Of the 33 full articles evaluated, two systematic reviews and two RCTs were added at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for 30 PICO combinations. Conclusions In this systematic overview, we categorised the efficacy for 10 interventions, based on information relating to the effectiveness and safety of alginate dressing, biosynthetic dressing, chlorhexidine-impregnated paraffin gauze dressing, hydrocolloid dressing, hydrogel dressing, paraffin gauze dressing, polyurethane film, silicone-coated nylon dressing, silver-impregnated dressing, and silver sulfadiazine cream. PMID:26173045

  5. Satisfaction with life after burn: A Burn Model System National Database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverman, J; Mathews, K; Nadler, D; Henderson, E; McMullen, K; Herndon, D; Meyer, W; Fauerbach, J A; Wiechman, S; Carrougher, G; Ryan, C M; Schneider, J C

    2016-08-01

    While mortality rates after burn are low, physical and psychosocial impairments are common. Clinical research is focusing on reducing morbidity and optimizing quality of life. This study examines self-reported Satisfaction With Life Scale scores in a longitudinal, multicenter cohort of survivors of major burns. Risk factors associated with Satisfaction With Life Scale scores are identified. Data from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) Burn Model System (BMS) database for burn survivors greater than 9 years of age, from 1994 to 2014, were analyzed. Demographic and medical data were collected on each subject. The primary outcome measures were the individual items and total Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) scores at time of hospital discharge (pre-burn recall period) and 6, 12, and 24 months after burn. The SWLS is a validated 5-item instrument with items rated on a 1-7 Likert scale. The differences in scores over time were determined and scores for burn survivors were also compared to a non-burn, healthy population. Step-wise regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of SWLS scores at different time intervals. The SWLS was completed at time of discharge (1129 patients), 6 months after burn (1231 patients), 12 months after burn (1123 patients), and 24 months after burn (959 patients). There were no statistically significant differences between these groups in terms of medical or injury demographics. The majority of the population was Caucasian (62.9%) and male (72.6%), with a mean TBSA burned of 22.3%. Mean total SWLS scores for burn survivors were unchanged and significantly below that of a non-burn population at all examined time points after burn. Although the mean SWLS score was unchanged over time, a large number of subjects demonstrated improvement or decrement of at least one SWLS category. Gender, TBSA burned, LOS, and school status were associated with SWLS scores at 6 months

  6. Car radiator burns: a prevention issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitts, Angela; Alden, Nicole E; Conlin, Tara; Yurt, Roger W

    2004-01-01

    Scald burns continue to be the major cause of injury to patients admitted to the burn center. Scald burns occurring from car radiator fluid comprise a significant subgroup. Although manufacturer warning labels have been placed on car radiators, these burns continue to occur. This retrospective review looks at all patients admitted to our burn center who suffered scald burns from car radiator fluid to assess the extent of this problem. During the study period, 86 patients were identified as having suffered scald burns as a result of contact with car radiator fluid. Seventy-one percent of the burn injuries occurred in the summer months. The areas most commonly burned were the head and upper extremities. Burn prevention efforts have improved greatly over the years; however, this study demonstrates that scald burns from car radiator fluid continue to cause physical, emotional, and financial devastation. The current radiator warning labels alone are not effective. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has proposed a new federal motor vehicle safety standard to aid in decreasing the number of scald burns from car radiators. The results of this study were submitted to the United States Department of Transportation for inclusion in a docket for federal legislation supporting these safety measures.

  7. Rehabilitation of the burn patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Procter Fiona

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation is an essential and integral part of burn treatment. It is not something which takes place following healing of skin grafts or discharge from hospital; instead it is a process that starts from day one of admission and continues for months and sometimes years after the initial event. Burns rehabilitation is not something which is completed by one or two individuals but should be a team approach, incorporating the patient and when appropriate, their family. The term ′Burns Rehabilitation′ incorporates the physical, psychological and social aspects of care and it is common for burn patients to experience difficulties in one or all of these areas following a burn injury. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. The aims of burn rehabilitation are to minimise the adverse effects caused by the injury in terms of maintaining range of movement, minimising contracture development and impact of scarring, maximising functional ability, maximising psychological wellbeing, maximising social integration

  8. Longitudinal study of pesticide residue levels in human milk from Western Australia during 12 months of lactation: Exposure assessment for infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jian; Gridneva, Zoya; Gay, Melvin C. L.; Lai, Ching T.; Trengove, Robert D.; Hartmann, Peter E.; Geddes, Donna T.

    2016-12-01

    The presence of pesticides in human milk (HM) is of great concern due to the potential health effects for the breastfed infant. To determine the relationships between HM pesticides and infant growth and development, a longitudinal study was conducted. HM samples (n = 99) from 16 mothers were collected at 2, 5, 9 and 12 months of lactation. A validated QuEChERS method and Gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) were used for the analysis of 88 pesticides in HM. Only p,p’-DDE, p,p’-DDT and β-HCH were detected with a mean concentration (±SD) of 52.25 ± 49.88 ng/g fat, 27.67 ± 20.96 ng/g fat and 48.00 ± 22.46 ng/g fat respectively. The concentrations of the detected pesticides decreased significantly throughout the first year of lactation. No significant relationships between HM p,p’-DDE and infant growth outcomes: weight, length, head circumference and percentage fat mass were detected. The actual daily intake (ADI) of total DDTs in this cohort was 14-1000 times lower than the threshold reference and significantly lower than the estimated daily intake (EDI). Further, the ADI decreased significantly throughout the first 12 months of lactation.

  9. The relative importance of hydrophobicity in determining runoff-infiltration processes in burned forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Lea; Malkinson, Dan; Voogt, Annelies; Leska, Danny; Argaman, Eli; Keesstra, Saskia

    2010-05-01

    Wildfires induce fundamental changes to vegetation and soil structure/texture which conseqeuntly have major impacts on infiltration capacity, overland flow generation, runoff and sediment yields. The relative importance, however, of fire-induced soil water repellency (WR) on hydrological and erosional processes is somewhat controversial, partially, as the direct effects of soil WR in-situ field conditions have been difficult to isolate. It is generally accepted that hydrophobicity is caused by the formation of organic substances in forest soils, while burning is considered to enhance this process. Given the complex response of the soil-vegetation system to burning, soil WR is only one of several affecting soil hydrology. Other factors include the physical sealing of soils triggered by rain drops energy, the increase in soil erodibility due to changes in soil aggregates, and the role of the ash in sealing the burned surface. The degree and spatial distribution of WR burned varies considerably with fire severity, soil and vegetation type, soil moisture content and time since burning. Nevertheless, given the inverse relationship between soil moisture and hydrophobicity, the role of the latter in determining overland flow during wet winters when the soil is mostly inundated, is marginal. Following a 60 ha wildfire, which took place at the Pe'eram catchment during July 2009, we assessed the spatio-temporal distribution of WR in a burned Pinus halepensis forest. The site, located in the Upper Galille, Israel, was severely burned; the combustion removed all understory vegetation and burned down some of the trunks, leaving a thick layer of ash. The soils composed of reddish-brown clay loam forest soil and terra rossa on limestone bedrock, greyish light rendzina characterises the marl and chalk exposures. To consider the effect of distance from trees, in-situ hydrophobicity was assessed within a week, month and five months after the fire, using the WDPT test. Measurements

  10. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000059.htm Chemical burn or reaction To use the sharing features on ... the burned area from pressure and friction. Minor chemical burns will generally heal without further treatment. However, if ...

  11. First Aid: Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the Gynecologist? Blood Test: Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns Print A A A Scald burns from ... THIS TOPIC Kitchen: Household Safety Checklist Fireworks Safety First Aid: Sunburn Firesetting Fire Safety Burns Household Safety: Preventing ...

  12. Minor burns - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If this is not possible, put a cool, clean wet cloth on the burn, or soak the burn in a cool water bath for 5 minutes. ... After the burn is cooled, make sure it is a minor burn. If it is deeper, ... You may put a thin layer of ointment, such as petroleum ...

  13. LA50 in burn injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed-Forootan, K.; Karimi, H.; Motevalian, S.A.; Momeni, M.; Safari, R.; Ghadarjani, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Burn injuries put a huge financial burden on patients and healthcare systems. They are the 8th leading cause of mortality and the 13th most common cause of morbidity in our country. We used data from our Burn Registry Program to evaluate risk factors for mortality and lethal area fifty percent (LA50) in all burn patients admitted over two years. We used multiple logistic regressions to identify risk factors for mortality. LA50 is a reliable aggregate index for hospital care quality and a good measure for comparing results, also with those of other countries. 28,690 burn patients sought medical attention in the Emergency Department, and 1721 of them were admitted. Male to female ratio was 1,75:1. 514 patients were under 15 years old. Median age was 25 (range: 3 months – 93 years). Overall, probability of death was 8.4%. LA50 was 62.31% (CI 95%: 56.57-70.02) for patients aged 15 and over and 72.52% (CI 95%: 61.01-100) for those under 15. In the final model, we found that Adjusted OR was significant for age, female sex, TBSA and inhalation injury (P < 0.05). LA50 values showed that children tolerate more extensive burns. Female sex, burn size, age and inhalation injury were the main risk factors for death. Authorities should pay special attention to these variables, especially in prevention programs, to reduce mortality and improve patient outcome. Children have better outcome than adults given equal burn size. Suicide rates are higher for women than men in our country PMID:27857645

  14. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Nasri-Heir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients.

  15. Lethal triad in severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherren, P B; Hussey, J; Martin, R; Kundishora, T; Parker, M; Emerson, B

    2014-12-01

    Hypothermia, acidaemia and coagulopathy in trauma is associated with significant mortality. This study aimed to identify the incidence of the lethal triad in major burns, and describe demographics and outcomes. Patients admitted during a 71 month period with a total body surface area burn (TBSA)≥30% were identified. A structured review of a prospective database was conducted. The lethal triad was defined as a combination of coagulopathy (International normalised ratio>1.2), hypothermia (temperature≤35.5°C) and acidaemia (pH≤7.25). Fifteen of 117 patients fulfilled the criteria for the lethal triad on admission. Lethal triad patients had a higher median (IQR) abbreviated burn severity index (ABSI) (12 (9-13) vs. 8.5 (6-10), p=0.001), mean (SD) TBSA burn (59.2% (18.7) vs. 47.9% (18.1), p=0.027), mean (SD) age (46 (22.6) vs. 33 (28.3) years, p=0.033), and had a higher incidence of inhalational injury (p0.05). The lethal triad was associated with increased mortality (66.7% vs. 13.7%, plethal triad was not shown to be a predictor of mortality (p>0.05). Burn patients with the lethal triad have a high mortality rate which reflects the severity of the injury sustained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Material Utilization of Organic Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinemann, Jan Christoph; Pleissner, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    Each year, 1.3 billion tons of food waste is generated globally. This waste traces back to industrial and agricultural producers, bakeries, restaurants, and households. Furthermore, lignocellulosic materials, including grass clippings, leaves, bushes, shrubs, and woods, appear in large amounts. Depending on the region, organic waste is either composted, burned directly, or converted into biogas. All of the options set aside the fact that organic residues are valuable resources containing carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and phosphorus. Firstly, it is clear that avoidance of organic residues is imperative. However, the residues that accumulate nonetheless should be utilized by material means before energy production is targeted. This review presents different processes for the microbial utilization of organic residues towards compounds that are of great importance for the bioeconomy. The focus thereby is on the challenges coming along with downstream processing when the utilization of organic residues is carried out decentralized. Furthermore, a future process for producing lactic acid from organic residues is sketched.

  17. The Bradford Burn Study: the epidemiology of burns presenting to an inner city emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A A; Rawlins, J; Shenton, A F; Sharpe, D T

    2007-01-01

    Objective The Bradford Burn Study prospectively reviewed all burn attendances at a single emergency department in the UK over a 1 year period. The study reviewed the epidemiology, demographics and outcomes of all patients entered into the study. Design and setting A 12 month prospective study of burn injuries attending an inner city emergency department serving a population of 1 million people. Results 460 patients were enrolled into the study. Average patient age was 22.7 years, male: female ratio was 1:1.4, and children burn units. Conclusions Emergency departments manage patients with burns well, and referrals to plastic surgery departments are appropriate. The majority of burns can be prevented by addressing educational issues and vulnerable sections of the population. PMID:17652679

  18. Burns - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Burns URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/burns.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  19. Regional biomass burning trends in India: Analysis of satellite fire data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    agricultural or crop residue in fields (Levine 2000;. Bond et al. 2004; Sahu et al. 2012). Biomass burning ..... the harvesting practices as burning of agricultural residue makes major fraction of biomass which is ..... and related trace gases at a tropical urban site in India;. Atmos. Environ. 40 880–891. Sahu L K and Sheel V ...

  20. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) germplasm for non-burn seed production

    Science.gov (United States)

    A ban on open-field burning of post-harvest residue of grass seed production fields has been implemented in Washington, and restrictions are in place in Idaho and Oregon, USA. Our previous research showed that without post-harvest burning of residue, bluegrass seed yield decreased over time (Johnson...

  1. Economics of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Michael J; Phillips, Linda G

    2008-07-01

    Sustaining a burn injury sets in motion a cycle of pain, disfigurement, and a search for survival. In pediatric burns, the injury extends to the parents where fear, ignorance, and helplessness forever change their lives. Pediatric burn injuries are caused by fire, hot liquids, clothing irons, hair curlers, caustic substances like drain cleaner, the grounding of an electrical source, and exposure to radiation. Efficiency in the delivery of pediatric burn care is critical. Maximizing resource utilization means continual self-evaluation and economic analysis of therapeutic modalities. Griffiths et al found that most childhood burns are due to scalds, which can be treated for $1061 per percent burn. Paddock et al reduced the cost of treating superficial pediatric burns and reduced the length of stay in hospital using silver-impregnated gauze over traditional methods. Barrett et al found improved cosmesis of skin grafts using cultured epithelial autografts but at a substantially increased cost. Corpron et al showed that pediatric burn units that treat burns >10% total body surface area and operative treatment of pediatric burns regardless of size generate positive revenue. There is a paucity of evidentiary pediatric burn economic data. More research is needed to address areas of pediatric burn care inefficiency. Improving knowledge of cost in all health care endeavors will create competition and drive down expenditures.

  2. Epidemiology of burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand the epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of specialized burn care in The Netherlands. This thesis is mainly based on historical data of the burn centre in Rotterdam from 1986, combined with historical data from the burn centres in Groningen and Beverwijk from

  3. Comparison of childhood burns associated with use of microwave ovens and conventional stoves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, E C; Tanz, R R

    1993-02-01

    To identify the incidence, type, and severity of burns associated with microwave oven (MW) use and to compare MW-associated burns with those associated with use of conventional stoves, we conducted a review of a national data base. Data were obtained from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission Injury Information Clearinghouse for 1986 through 1990 concerning burn injuries to children (0 to 19 years). There were an estimated 5160 burns associated with MW use. The mean age was 7.6 years (median, 6 years); 25% of burns were to children younger than 36 months old. Fifty-eight percent involved females. Most MW burns were scalds (95%); 16% of these scalds were from exploding eggs or other food. No MW burn involved a body surface area greater than 25% and no patient required hospital admission. Microwave oven burns were compared with stove burns. There were an estimated 41198 stove-associated burns to children. The mean age was 5.8 years; the median was 3 years. Forty-five percent of burns were to children younger than 36 months old; 55% were to males. Most stove burns (74%) were thermal; 7% involved a body surface area greater than 25%. Five percent of children with stove burns required hospital admission. We conclude that (1) burns to children associated with MW use are less frequent and less severe than stove burns; (2) MW burns predominantly affect females; and (3) burn prevention efforts should emphasize the hazards of stoves, which vastly exceed those of MWs.

  4. Determination of PM10 and its ion composition emitted from biomass burning in the chamber for estimation of open burning emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillapapiromsuk, Sopittaporn; Chantara, Somporn; Tengjaroenkul, Urai; Prasitwattanaseree, Sukon; Prapamontol, Tippawan

    2013-11-01

    Biomass samples including agricultural waste (rice straw and maize residue) and forest leaf litter were collected from Chiang Mai Province, Thailand for the burning experiment in the self-designed stainless steel chamber to simulate the emissions of PM10. The burning of leaf litter emitted the highest PM10 (1.52±0.65 g kg(-1)). The PM10-bound ions emitted from the burning of rice straw and maize residue showed the same trend, which was K(+)>Cl(-)>SO4(2-)>NH4(+)>NO3(-). However, the emissions from maize residue burning were ~1.5-2.0 times higher than those from the rice straw burning. The ion content emitted from leaf litter burning was almost the same for all ion species. Noticeably, K(+) and Cl(-) concentrations were ~2-4 times lower than those emitted from agricultural waste burning. It can be deduced that K(+) and Cl(-) were highly emitted from agricultural waste burning due to the use of fertilizer and herbicides in the field, respectively. Based on emission values obtained from the chamber, the pollutant emission rate from open burning was calculated. Burned areas in Chiang Mai Province were 3510 and 866 km(2) in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Forest burning was 71-88%, while agricultural land burning accounted for 12-29% (rice field: crop field=1:3) of total burned area. Therefore, emissions of PM10 from open burning in Chiang Mai were 3051 ton (2010) and 705 ton (2011). Major ions emitted from agricultural waste burning were found to be K(+) and Cl(-), while those from forest burning were SO4(2-) and K(+). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the Burn Patients Presenting to Emergency Clinic of a Education Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enver İlhan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Burn is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups. Its treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach. In this study we aimed to evaluate burn cases and discuss the relevant literature. Material and Method: 449 burn patients presenting to the Emergency Clinic in January 2008-2009 were retrospectively evaluated accompanied by the literature.Results: Most of the burns occurred in summer months. The most age group suffering from burns was between 25 and 34 years. Flame-type burns were more frequent than scald-type burns. Burns most often occurred at workplaces, which was followed by homes. The upper extremities were most often afflicted by burns. Discussion: Burns are an important social health issue. Imprudence and ac-cidents facilitate burn occurrence. Prevention is the most significant treat-ment method.

  6. Pediatric scalp burns: hair today, gone tomorrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Seema; Jacques, Madeleine; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    Scalp burns in the pediatric population appear relatively uncommon, with most reported cases occurring in adults secondary to electrical burns. We reviewed our experience with the management of these injuries in children. A retrospective review was conducted at our institution from March 2004 to July 2011. Scalp burns were defined as any burn crossing over the hairline into the scalp region. During the 7-year 4-month study, there were 107 scalp burns, representing 1.8% of the 6074 burns treated at our institution during that time. The cause was scald in 97, contact in 4, flame in 3, friction in 2, and chemical in 1. The majority (n = 93, 87%) appeared superficial to mid-dermal, with an average time to complete healing of 10.3 days. The remaining 14 cases (13%) were mid-dermal to full thickness, with an average time to complete healing of 50.8 days. Grafting was required in 12 cases (11%). The mean time to grafting was 4 weeks (range, 2 weeks to 2.5 months). The main complication of scalp burns was alopecia, which occurred in all grafted sites as well as in 4 patients treated conservatively. There were no other complications after grafting and no cases of graft loss. In our pediatric series, scalp burns were most commonly caused by scald injuries and were superficial to mid-dermal in depth. These generally healed rapidly but occasionally resulted in alopecia. The management of deep dermal and full-thickness scalp burns remains challenging in children, with the decision to graft often delayed.

  7. [Treatment of burns in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyatier, J L; Latarjet, J; Comparin, J P; Zaragori, M; Robert, A; Braye, F; Weill, E; Masson, C L

    1995-10-01

    Because of the potential severity of their residual deformities, burn injuries in infants justify an early management in specialized centres when they cover more than 5% of body surface and in every case when hands, face, or external genitalia are concerned. Cooling with cold water is the first aid treatment to be performed as early as possible after the injury. The treatment in specialized centres must be both general and surgical. General treatment includes fluid and electrolyte therapy, temperature control, appropriate nutrition and pain suppression. Pain suppression is a major part of the treatment and morphine must be largely used. Surgical treatment starts as soon as the patient arrives in the centre and is eventually performed under general anesthesia: all the burned areas are covered with occlusive dressings. Infections are prevented by systematic cultures and adjusted antibiotic therapy. A vigorous rehabilitation program must be instituted as soon as possible: massages, compressive clothes, splints, physical therapy, plastic surgery. Primary prevention by sustained parental education is important in order to reduce the frequency of burn injuries in infants.

  8. SAFARI 2000 Emissions Estimates, MODIS Burned Area Product, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The recently generated MODIS burned area product over southern Africa for the month of September 2000 was used to calculate regional biomass burning...

  9. Burn mortality in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qader, Ari Raheem

    2012-08-01

    Mortality rates are important outcome parameters after burn, and can serve as objective end points for quality control. Causes of death after severe burn have changed over time. In a prospective study, eight hundred and eighty-four burn patients were admitted to the Burns and Plastic surgery Hospital in Sulaimani-Kurdistan region of Iraq in 2009. Age, gender, nationality, cause of burn, extent of injury, cause of death and mortality rate were tabulated and analyzed, 338 (38.2%) were male and 546 (61.8%) were female. The highest number of cases occurred in January, with the highest short period incidence occurring in April. Out of 884 cases, 260 persons died. Burn injuries were more frequent and larger with higher mortality in females than in males. Flame was the major cause of burns. Self-inflicted burns were noted mainly in young women. A large number of burns which affect children and females, occur in the domestic setting and could have been prevented. Therefore, it is necessary to implement programs for health education relating to prevention of burn injuries focusing on the domestic setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Nutritional Therapy in Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Durmuş

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A burn is characterized by the damage to one’s body tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, or radiation. The incidence of burn injuries has recently been decreasing. However, it is a fact that burns constitute a significant problem all over the world, with a few million people being affected by burns each year. A burn is an extensive trauma that affects the whole organism and determines the prognosis through its physiopathology. The case of the burn patient is also characterized by the acute phase response. Since burn patients have a non-functional skin barrier, they experience loss of liquids, minerals, proteins and electrolytes. They can also develop protein, energy and micro-nutrition deficiencies due to intense catabolic processes, infections and increased bodily needs in case of wound healing. Therefore, nutritional therapy is one of the major steps that need to be monitored from the initial moments of the burn injury through to the end of the burn treatment. This study focuses on the significance of nutritional therapy for burn patients in the light of current literature.

  11. [The pain from burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, J

    2002-03-01

    The painful events associated with the treatment of a severe burn can, because of their long-lasting and repetitive characteristics, be one of the most excruciating experiences in clinical practice. Moreover, burn pain has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Although nociception and peripheral hyperalgesia are considered the major causes of burn pain, the study of more hypothetical mechanisms like central hyperalgesia and neuropathic pain may lead to a better understanding of burn pain symptoms and to new therapeutic approaches. Continuous pain and intermittent pain due to therapeutic procedures are two distinct components of burn pain. They have to be evaluated and managed separately. Although continuous pain is by far less severe than intermittent pain, the treatment is, in both cases, essentially pharmacological relying basically on opioids. Because of wide intra- and inter-individual variations, protocols will have to leave large possibilities of adaptation for each case, systematic pain evaluation being mandatory to achieve the best risk/benefit ratio. Surprisingly, the dose of medication decreases only slowly with time, a burn often remaining painful for long periods after healing. Non pharmacological treatments are often useful and sometimes indispensable adjuncts; but their rationale and their feasibility depends entirely on previous optimal pharmacological control of burn pain. Several recent studies show that burn pain management is inadequate in most burn centres.

  12. Predictors of muscle protein synthesis after severe pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Eva C; Herndon, David N; Lee, Jinhyung; Porter, Craig; Cotter, Matthew; Suman, Oscar E; Sidossis, Labros S; Børsheim, Elisabet

    2015-04-01

    Following a major burn, skeletal muscle protein synthesis rate increases but is often insufficient to compensate for massively elevated muscle protein breakdown rates. Given the long-term nature of the pathophysiologic response to burn injury, we hypothesized that muscle protein synthesis rate would be chronically elevated in severely burned children. The objectives of this study were to characterize muscle protein synthesis rate of burned children over a period of 24 months after injury and to identify predictors that influence this response. A total of 87 children with 40% or greater total body surface area (TBSA) burned were included. Patients participated in stable isotope infusion studies at 1, 2, and approximately 4 weeks after burn and at 6, 12, and 24 months after injury to determine skeletal muscle protein fractional synthesis rate. Generalized estimating equations with log link normal distribution were applied to account for clustering of patients and control for patient characteristics. Patients (8 ± 6 years) had large (62, 51-72% TBSA) and deep (47% ± 21% TBSA third degree) burns. Muscle protein fractional synthesis rate was elevated throughout the first 12 months after burn compared with established values from healthy young adults. Muscle protein fractional synthesis rate was lower in boys, in children older than 3 years, and when burns were greater than 80% TBSA. Muscle protein synthesis is elevated for at least 1 year after injury, suggesting that greater muscle protein turnover is a component of the long-term pathophysiologic response to burn trauma. Muscle protein synthesis is highly affected by sex, age, and burn size in severely burned children. These findings may explain the divergence in net protein balance and lean body mass in different populations of burn patients. Prognostic study, level III.

  13. Burns and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, M

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of the first descriptive analytic study of a group of 183 burn patients, treated in the Burn Unit at the University Hospital of Cartagena, Colombia during the period since January 1985 until December 1990. There is presented experience with the selected group of 24 patients in whom the diagnosis of burn was associated with epilepsy. There is also analysed and described the gravity of the scars sequels, neurological disorders, the complication of the burn and an impact of this problem on the patient, his (her) family and the community. It is very important to report that there was found Neurocisticercosis in 66.6% of the group of burn patients with epilepsy, and it is probably the first risk factor of burn in this group.

  14. Sustained Subconjunctival Delivery of Infliximab Protects the Cornea and Retina Following Alkali Burn to the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengxin; Robert, Marie-Claude; Kapoulea, Vassiliki; Lei, Fengyang; Stagner, Anna M.; Jakobiec, Frederick A.; Dohlman, Claes H.; Paschalis, Eleftherios I.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is upregulated in eyes following corneal alkali injury and contributes to corneal and also retinal damage. Prompt TNF-α inhibition by systemic infliximab ameliorates retinal damage and improves corneal wound healing. However, systemic administration of TNF-α inhibitors carries risk of significant complications, whereas topical eye-drop delivery is hindered by poor ocular bioavailability and the need for patient adherence. This study investigates the efficacy of subconjunctival delivery of TNF-α antibodies using a polymer-based drug delivery system (DDS). Methods The drug delivery system was prepared using porous polydimethylsiloxane/polyvinyl alcohol composite fabrication and loaded with 85 μg of infliximab. Six Dutch-belted pigmented rabbits received ocular alkali burn with NaOH. Immediately after the burn, subconjunctival implantation of anti-TNF-α DDS was performed in three rabbits while another three received sham DDS (without antibody). Rabbits were followed with photography for 3 months. Results After 3 months, the device was found to be well tolerated by the host and the eyes exhibited less corneal damage as compared to eyes implanted with a sham DDS without drug. The low dose treatment suppressed CD45 and TNF-α expression in the burned cornea and inhibited retinal ganglion cell apoptosis and optic nerve degeneration, as compared to the sham DDS treated eyes. Immunolocalization revealed drug penetration in the conjunctiva, cornea, iris, and choroid, with residual infliximab in the DDS 3 months after implantation. Conclusions This reduced-risk biologic DDS improves corneal wound healing and provides retinal neuroprotection, and may be applicable not only to alkali burns but also to other inflammatory surgical procedures such as penetrating keratoplasty and keratoprosthesis implantation. PMID:28114570

  15. Spatial analysis of pediatric burns shows geographical clustering of burns and 'hotspots' of risk factors in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsman, David; Li, Zhe; Bruce, Eleanor; Connolly, Siobhan; Harvey, John G; Kennedy, Peter; Maitz, Peter K M

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric burns are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and it is estimated that more than 80% are preventable. Studies among adults have shown that burns risk are geographically clustered, and higher in socioeconomically-disadvantaged areas. Few studies among children have examined whether burns are geographically clustered, and if burn prevention programs are best targeted to high-risk areas. Retrospective analyses examined the 2005-to-2014 NSW Severe Burns Injury Service data. Geospatial imaging software was used to map the relative-risk and clustering of burns by postcodes in Greater Sydney Area (GSA). Cluster analyses were conducted using Getis-Ord and Global Moran's I statistics. High- and low-risk populations and areas were examined to ascertain differences by sociodemographic characteristics, etiology and the extent of the burn. Scalds were the most common types of burns and boys were at greater risk than girls. There was significant clustering of burns by postcode area, with a higher relative risk of burns in western and north-western areas of Sydney. The high-risk clusters were associated with socioeconomic disadvantage, and areas of low burns risk were associated with socioeconomic advantage. In both high- and low-risk areas burns occurred more frequently in the 12-24 months and the 24-36 months age groups. The implication of this study is that pediatric burns risk clustering occurs in specific geographic regions that are associated with socioeconomic disadvantage. The results of this study provide greater insight into how pediatric populations can be targeted when devising intervention strategies, and suggest that an area-targeted approach in socioeconomically-disadvantaged areas may reduce burns risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Burn prevention in Zambia: a work in progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Jason P; Latenser, Barbara A; Liao, Junlin

    2013-01-01

    , the residual deficit posteducation could still be large and potentially contributing to heightened burn injury incidence. Customized and integrated educational programs may be proposed regarding the epidemiological profile of burn knowledge deficit from various schools. This study represents one of the few reports on the effectiveness of a burn prevention program in an LMIC. Future epidemiological data will be needed from nearby healthcare facilities to determine whether this program decreased burn morbidity and mortality at the hospital level.

  17. Management of Hand Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Irmak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The hand is one of the most frequently affected body parts by burn injuries with a rate of 80% among all burn wounds. Early and effective treatment ensures the best chance of survival as well as a good functional prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology, variation, relationship between etiology and hospital stay, clinical features, and management of hand burns. Material and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted the University of Health Sciences; Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Application and Research Center, Departmant of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery and the Intensive Burn Care Unit between April 2009 and April 2014. Burns were assessed based on etiology, anatomical location, percentage of total body surface area affected, and depth of injury. Treatment was categorized as conservative, elective operative, or urgent operative. Results: In the study period, 788 patients were admitted to our Burn Unit. Of these, 240 were females (30.5% and 548 were males (69.5%. The most common type of burn injury in this study was thermal injury (695 cases; 88.2%, followed by electrical injury (67 cases; 8.5%, and chemical, frictional or unknown injuries (26 cases; 3.3%. Majority (more than 85% of the patients had second-degree burns, and some had third-degree burns. Conclusions: Burns commonly affect the hands, and many functional problems may develop if appropriate basic treatments are neglected. The best treatment for burns is prevention. Appropriate indoor arrangement and simple but effective measures that can be taken at home can significantly reduce burn trauma exposure.

  18. Stress disorder and PTSD after burn injuries: a prospective study of predictors of PTSD at Sina Burn Center, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi-Bazargani H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani1, Hemmat Maghsoudi2, Mohsen Soudmand-Niri3, Fatemeh Ranjbar4, Hossein Mashadi-Abdollahi51Neuroscience Research Center, Statistics and Epidemiology Department, School of Health and Nutrition, 2Department of Surgery, 3School of Psychology, 4Department of Psychiatry, 5National Public Health Management Centre, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranBackground: A burn injury can be a traumatic experience with tremendous social, physical, and psychological consequences. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and predictors of PTSD Checklist score initially and 3 months after injury in burns victims admitted to the Sina Burn Center in north-west Iran.Methods: This prospective study examined adult patients aged 16–65 years with unintentional burns. The PTSD Checklist was used to screen for PTSD.Results: Flame burns constituted 49.4% of all burns. Mean PTSD score was 23.8 ± 14.7 early in the hospitalization period and increased to 24.2 ± 14.3, 3 months after the burn injury. Twenty percent of victims 2 weeks into treatment had a positive PTSD screening test, and this figure increased to 31.5% after 3 months. The likelihood of developing a positive PTSD screening test increased significantly after 3 months (P < 0.01. Using multivariate regression analysis, factors independently predicting PTSD score were found to be age, gender, and percentage of total body surface area burned.Conclusion: PTSD was a problem in the population studied and should be managed appropriately after hospital admission due to burn injury. Male gender, younger age, and higher total body surface area burned may predict a higher PTSD score after burn injury. Keywords: post-traumatic stress disorder, burn injury, predictors, Iran

  19. Childhood burns in south eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoro Philemon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burns injuries are recognized as a major health problem worldwide. In children and, particularly, in our environment where poverty, ignorance and disease are still high, they constitute significant morbidity and mortality. Previous studies on this topic in parts of Nigeria either lumped adults and children together or were retrospective. We, therefore, prospectively studied the current trends in burns in children. Patients and Methods: This prospective study of burns spanned over a period of 18 months (June 2006-December 2007 at the Paediatric Surgery Units of the Imo State University Teaching Hospital, Orlu, and the Federal Medical Centre, Owerri, Imo State. Data were collected and analysed for age, sex, cause/type of burn, place of burn, presence or absence of adult/s, initial prehospital intervention, interval between injury and presentation, surface area and depth of burn and treatment and outcome. Results: Fifty-three patients were studied, 31 (58.4% were male and 22 (41.6% were female (M:F = 1.4:1. Patients mostly affected were aged 2 years and below. The most common cause of burns was hot water in 31 (58.5% patients. The vast majority of these injuries happened in a domestic environment (92.5% and in the presence of competent adult/s (88.7%. Outcome of treatment was good: there were two (3.8% deaths and 46 (86% patients had complete recovery. Conclusion: Burns is still a major health problem among children in south eastern Nigeria. Fortunately, outcome of appropriate treatment is good. However, we think that poor safety consciousness among parents is a major predisposing factor. Public enlightenment on measures to ensure safe home environment may be necessary to avoid or limit childhood burns.

  20. Pediatric facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Theodore A; Gosain, Arun K

    2008-07-01

    Despite major advances in the area of burn management, burn injury continues to be a leading cause of pediatric mortality and morbidity. Facial burns in particular are devastating to the affected child and result in numerous physical and psychosocial sequelae. Although many of the principles of adult burn management can be applied to a pediatric patient with facial burns, the surgeon must be cognizant of several important differences. Facial burns and subsequent scar formation can drastically affect the growth potential of a child's face. Structures such as the nose and teeth may become deformed due to abnormal external forces caused by contractures. Serious complications such as occlusion amblyopia and microstomia must be anticipated and urgently addressed to avert permanent consequences, whereas other reconstructive procedures can be delayed until scar maturation occurs. Furthermore, because young children are actively developing the concept of self, severe facial burns can alter a child's sense of identity and place the child at high risk for future emotional and psychologic disturbances. Surgical reconstruction of burn wounds should proceed only after thorough planning and may involve a variety of skin graft, flap, and tissue expansion techniques. The most favorable outcome is achieved when facial resurfacing is performed with respect to the aesthetic units of the face. Children with facial burns remain a considerable challenge to their caregivers, and these patients require long-term care by a multidisciplinary team of physicians and therapists to optimize functional, cosmetic, and psychosocial outcomes.

  1. Residuation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Blyth, T S; Sneddon, I N; Stark, M

    1972-01-01

    Residuation Theory aims to contribute to literature in the field of ordered algebraic structures, especially on the subject of residual mappings. The book is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on ordered sets; directed sets; semilattices; lattices; and complete lattices. Chapter 2 tackles Baer rings; Baer semigroups; Foulis semigroups; residual mappings; the notion of involution; and Boolean algebras. Chapter 3 covers residuated groupoids and semigroups; group homomorphic and isotone homomorphic Boolean images of ordered semigroups; Dubreil-Jacotin and Brouwer semigroups; and loli

  2. Open versus closed sandwich wound dressing method in burn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 170 children under 12years admitted to the Pediatric surgical/female burn ward between the months of June 2006 to March 2007. A comparison was made between the open and closed sandwich method of burn wound dressing. The sandwich method entailed using 17 by ...

  3. Burn surgeons in South Africa: A rare species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twentyone respondents. (30%) had completed a burn care rotation during internship, and 43. (61%) had completed a 3 6month rotation at postgraduate level. Burn unit resources and activities. The majority of units (85%) had access to consultants. Only half the units had registrars (48%) and interns (51%) as part of the staff.

  4. Acute Stress Symptoms in Young Children with Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Frederick J.; Saxe, Glenn; Ronfeldt, Heidi; Drake, Jennifer E.; Burns, Jennifer; Edgren, Christy; Sheridan, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms are a focus of much research with older children, but little research has been conducted with young children, who account for about 50% of all pediatric burn injuries. This is a 3-year study of 12- to 48-month-old acutely burned children to assess acute traumatic stress outcomes. The aims were to…

  5. Burns and military clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  6. Burns and Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cairns BA, et al. Etiology and outcome of pediatric burns. J Pediatr Surg. 1996; 31(3): 329-33. ... RT, Feldman JA, McMillon M. Tap water scald burns in children. Pediatrics. 1978; 62(1): 1-7. 10 Baptiste MS, ...

  7. Treating and Preventing Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Burn Treatment & Prevention Tips for Families Page Content ​There are many different causes of serious burns in children, including sunburn , hot water or other hot liquids, and those due to ...

  8. Pain in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, J; Choinère, M

    1995-08-01

    While severe pain is a constant component of the burn injury, inadequate pain management has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Pain-generating mechanisms in burns include nociception, primary and secondary hyperalgesia and neuropathy. The clinical studies of burn pain characteristics reveal very clear-cut differences between continuous pain and pain due to therapeutic procedures which have to be treated separately. Some of the main features of burn pain are: (1) its long-lasting course, often exceeding healing time, (2) the repetition of highly nociceptive procedures which can lead to severe psychological disturbances if pain control is inappropriate. Pharmaco-therapy with opioids is the mainstay for analgesia in burned patients, but non-pharmacological techniques may be useful adjuncts. Routine pain evaluation is mandatory for efficient and safe analgesia. Special attention must be given to pain in burned children which remains too often underestimated and undertreated. More educational efforts from physicians and nursing staff are necessary to improve pain management in burned patients.

  9. Checklist and Decision Support in Nutritional Care for Burned Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1...Texas burn centers to submit data on nutritional provision in the burn ICU that would be analysed for gaps, and control theory algorithms applied to...complications such as high gastric residuals or hypotension . We may also find other unexpected gaps which will be included in further analyses. We then

  10. Soil and air temperature and biomass after residue treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.B. Fowler; J.D. Helvey

    1981-01-01

    Air temperature at 0.5 m and soil temperature at 0.01 m were measured during May and early June after forest harvest on four residue treatment sites and a control. Broadcast burning or burning in piles increased daily accumulation of heat in air while scattered chips and scarified and cleared treatments were equal to the control (broadcast, untreated slash). During mid...

  11. [Chickenpox, burns and grafts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Zegers, J; Fidel Avendaño, L

    1979-01-01

    An outbreak of chickenpox that occurred at the Burns Repair Surgery Unit, Department of Children's Surgery, Hospital R. del Río, between June and November, 1975, is reported. 27 cases of burned children were studied, including analysis of correlations of the stages and outcome of the disease (varicela), the trauma (burns) and the graft (repair surgery). As a result, the authors emphasize the following findings: 1. Burns and their repair are not aggravating factors for varicella. In a small number of cases the exanthema looked more confluent in the graft surgical areas and in the first degree burns healing spontaneously. 2. Usually there was an uneventful outcome of graft repair surgery on a varicella patient, either during the incubation period, the acme or the convalescence. 3. The fact that the outmost intensity of secondary viremia of varicella occurs before the onset of exanthemia, that is, during the late incubation period, is confirmed.

  12. Burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Kamala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  13. CLINICAL STUDY OF ELECTRICAL BURNS AMONG ALL BURNS CASES- 3 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabathula Durga Prasad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND With the advances in technology, electrical injuries are becoming more common and are the leading cause of work-related traumatic death. One third of all electrical traumas and most high-voltage injuries are job related and more than 50% of these injuries result from power line contact. The management of the major burn injury represents a significant challenge to every member of the burns team. Most of electrical burns present with gangrene of toes and limbs with eschar over body parts. Their presentation is mostly due to contact with high-voltage electricity at their work places. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was made to study the clinico-social profile of patients suffering electric burns admitted into Department of General Surgery. RESULTS 92 cases were evaluated and studied. Majority of patients developed gangrene of limbs and toes. Amputations and skin grafting was done. Most patients who suffered electric burns were males of age group 21 to 40 years. All cases are accidental and mostly occurred at work places. Most electric burns are high-voltage based and caused deep burns. Major complications like acute renal failure and septicaemia were encountered. Most of them suffered 16 to 30% burns. Most commonly isolated organism from wounds is pseudomonas. Most of them suffered a hospital stay of 1 to 2 months. CONCLUSION Electric burns are a burden to the society. Prevention is the best way to deal with them. Electricity-based employees have to be trained properly regarding safety measures to be taken. General education of public regarding safety measures can prevent electrical burn injuries.

  14. Cold burn injuries in the UK: the 11-year experience of a tertiary burns centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamoglu, Metin; Tan, Alethea; Vickers, Tobias; Segaren, Nicholas; Barnes, David; Dziewulski, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Guidance for the management of thermal injuries has evolved with improved understanding of burn pathophysiology. Guidance for the management of cold burn injuries is not widely available. The management of these burns differs from the standard management of thermal injuries. This study aimed to review the etiology and management of all cold burns presenting to a large regional burn centre in the UK and to provide a simplified management pathway for cold burns. An 11-year retrospective  analysis (1 January 2003-31 December 2014)  of all cold injuries presenting to a regional burns centre in the UK was conducted. Patient case notes were reviewed for injury mechanism, first aid administered, treatment outcomes and time to healing. An anonymized nationwide survey on aspects of management of cold burns was disseminated between 13 July 2015-5 October 2015 to British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS) and Plastic Surgery Trainees Association (PLASTA) members in the UK. Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were performed to identify relevant literature to provide evidence for a management pathway for cold burn injuries. Twenty-three patients were identified. Age range was 8 months-69 years. Total body surface area (TBSA) burn ranged from 0.25 to 5 %. Twenty cases involved peripheral limbs. Seventeen (73.9 %)cases were accidental, with the remaining six (26.1 %) cases being deliberate self-inflicted injuries. Only eight patients received first aid. All except one patient were managed conservatively. One case required skin graft application due to delayed healing. We received 52 responses from a total of 200 questionaires. Ninety percent of responders think clearer guidelines should exist. We present a simplified management pathway based on evidence identified in our literature search. Cold burns are uncommon in comparison to other types of burn injuries. In the UK, a disproportionate number of cold

  15. Burns in Sierra Leone: a population-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Evan G; Groen, Reinou S; Kamara, Thaim B; Stewart, Kerry-Ann; Cassidy, Laura D; Samai, Mohamed; Kushner, Adam L; Wren, Sherry M

    2014-12-01

    Burns remain disproportionately prevalent in developing countries. This study aims to describe the epidemiology of burns in Sierra Leone to serve as a baseline for future programs. A cluster randomized, cross-sectional, countrywide survey was conducted in 2012 in Sierra Leone. With a standardized questionnaire demographics and deaths during the previous 12 months of household members were assessed with the household representative. Thereafter, 2 randomly selected household members were interviewed, elucidating whether participants had ever had a burn in six body regions and determining burn mechanisms and patterns of health care seeking behavior. This study included 1843 households and 3645 individuals. 3.98% (145/3645) of individuals reported at least one burn-injury. The highest proportions of burns were reported in the age groups 0-4 years old (23/426, 5.4%) and 5-14 years old (37/887, 4.17%). The majority of burns (129/145, 89.0%) were caused by a hot liquid/object and the upper, extremities were the most commonly burned body regions, with 36% (53/145) of cases. 21% (30/145) of individuals with burns sought care from a traditional healer. Burns are highly prevalent in Sierra Leone. Further research and resources should be allocated to the care and prevention of thermal injuries. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Quality of life after burns in childhood (5-15 years): children experience substantial problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, M. E.; Polinder, S.; Essink-Bot, M. L.; van Loey, N. E. E.; Oen, I. M. M. H.; Dokter, J.; Boxma, H.; van Beeck, E. F.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess prevalence and correlates related to sub optimal outcome after pediatric burns and to make a comparison with pediatric injuries not related to burns. We conducted a cross-sectional study on quality of life (QOL) after burns in a sample (n=138; median 24 months

  17. Burning mouth and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenos-Kustner, Eduardo; Marques-Soares, Maria Sueli

    2002-01-01

    Stomatodynia is the complaint of burning, tickling or itching of the oral cavity, and can be associated with other oral and non-oral signs and symptoms. However, the oral mucosa often appears normal, with no apparent underlying organic cause to account for the symptomatology. The etiology is unknown, though evidence points to the participation of numerous local, systemic and psychological factors. Among the local factors, saliva may play an important role in the symptoms of burning mouth. Saliva possesses specific rheological properties as a result of its chemical, physical and biological characteristics - these properties being essential for maintaining balanced conditions within the oral cavity. Patients with burning mouth present evidence of changes in salivary composition and flow, as well as a probable alteration in the oral mucosal sensory perception related particularly to dry mouth and taste alterations. On the other hand, alterations in salivary composition appear to reflect on its viscosity and symptomatology of burning mouth. Saliva is a field open to much research related to burning mouth, and knowledge of its properties (e.g., viscosity) merits special attention in view of its apparent relationship to the symptoms of burning mouth. The present study describes our clinical experience with burning mouth, and discusses some of the aspects pointing to salivary alterations as one of the most important factors underlying stomatodynia.

  18. Improving burn care and preventing burns by establishing a burn database in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzaylov, Gennadiy; Murthy, Sushila; Dunaev, Alexander; Savchyn, Vasyl; Knittel, Justin; Zabolotina, Olga; Dylewski, Maggie L; Driscoll, Daniel N

    2014-08-01

    Burns are a challenge for trauma care and a contribution to the surgical burden. The former Soviet republic of Ukraine has a foundation for burn care; however data concerning burns in Ukraine has historically been scant. The objective of this paper was to compare a new burn database to identify problems and implement improvements in burn care and prevention in this country. Retrospective analyses of demographic and clinical data of burn patients including Tukey's post hoc test, analysis of variance, and chi square analyses, and Fisher's exact test were used. Data were compared to the American Burn Association (ABA) burn repository. This study included 1752 thermally injured patients treated in 20 hospitals including Specialized Burn Unit in Municipal Hospital #8 Lviv, Lviv province in Ukraine. Scald burns were the primary etiology of burns injuries (70%) and burns were more common among children less than five years of age (34%). Length of stay, mechanical ventilation use, infection rates, and morbidity increased with greater burn size. Mortality was significantly related to burn size, inhalation injury, age, and length of stay. Wound infections were associated with burn size and older age. Compared to ABA data, Ukrainian patients had double the length of stay and a higher rate of wound infections (16% vs. 2.4%). We created one of the first burn databases from a region of the former Soviet Union in an effort to bring attention to burn injury and improve burn care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Residue processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieg, W.; Rank, V.

    1942-10-15

    In the first stage of coal hydrogenation, the liquid phase, light and heavy oils were produced; the latter containing the nonliquefied parts of the coal, the coal ash, and the catalyst substances. It was the problem of residue processing to extract from these so-called let-down oils that which could be used as pasting oils for the coal. The object was to obtain a maximum oil extraction and a complete removal of the solids, because of the latter were returned to the process they would needlessly burden the reaction space. Separation of solids in residue processing could be accomplished by filtration, centrifugation, extraction, distillation, or low-temperature carbonization (L.T.C.). Filtration or centrifugation was most suitable since a maximum oil yield could be expected from it, since only a small portion of the let-down oil contained in the filtration or centrifugation residue had to be thermally treated. The most satisfactory centrifuge at this time was the Laval, which delivered liquid centrifuge residue and centrifuge oil continuously. By comparison, the semi-continuous centrifuges delivered plastic residues which were difficult to handle. Various apparatus such as the spiral screw kiln and the ball kiln were used for low-temperature carbonization of centrifuge residues. Both were based on the idea of carbonization in thin layers. Efforts were also being made to produce electrode carbon and briquette binder as by-products of the liquid coal phase.

  20. Making of a burn unit: SOA burn center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant Kumar Dash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Each year in India, burn injuries account for more than 6 million hospital emergency department visits; of which many require hospitalization and are referred to specialized burn centers. There are few burn surgeons and very few burn centers in India. In our state, Odisha, there are only two burn centers to cater to more than 5000 burn victims per year. This article is an attempt to share the knowledge that I acquired while setting up a new burn unit in a private medical college of Odisha.

  1. Managing a patient with burning mouth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Danny; Trudgill, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with an increasing frequency of symptoms of heartburn and retrosternal pain over the last few months, and a constant and intense burning pain affecting her tongue tip, mouth and lips for the past 5 years. She found consuming hot drinks exacerbated the burning oral pain and chewing gum seemed to alleviate some of her symptoms. She thought these oral sensations were caused by frequently licking her finger tips to separate prints in her work in publishing. She had b...

  2. Epidemiology, etiology and outcomes of burn patients in a Referral Burn Hospital, Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burns and its complications are regarded as a major problem in the society. Skin injuries resulted from ultraviolet radiation, radioactivity, electricity or chemicals as well as respiratory damage from smoke inhalation are considered burns. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology and outcome of burn patients admitted to Motahari Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Methods: Two hundred patients with second-degree burns admitted to Motahari Referral Center of Burn in Tehran, Iran. They were studied during a period of 12 months from May 2012 to May 2013. During the first week of treatment swabs were collected from the burn wounds after cleaning the site with sterile normal saline. Samples were inoculated in blood agar and McConkey agar, then incubation at 37 C for 48 hours. Identification was carried out according to standard conventional biochemical tests. Treatment continued up to epithelial formation and wound healing. Results of microbial culture for each patient was recorded. Healing time of the burn wounds in patients was recorded in log books. Chi-square test and SPSS Software v.19 (IBM, NY, USA were used for data analysis. Results: Our findings indicate that the most causes of burns are hot liquids in 57% of cases and flammable liquid in 21% of cases. The most cases of burns were found to be in the range of 21 to 30 percent with 17.5% and 7% in male and female respectively. Gram-negative bacteria were dominated in 85.7% and among them pseudomonas spp. with 37.5% were the most common cause of infected burns, followed by Enterobacter, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter and Klebsiella spp. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the most cause of burns in both sex is hot liquid. Men were more expose to burn than women and this might be due to the fact that men are involved in more dangerous jobs than female. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common organism encountered in burn infection.

  3. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/ ...

  4. American Burn Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the premier educational event for the entire burn care team. Submit an abstract or session idea, exhibit or sponsor the meeting, or plan to attend. Find out more about the 50th Annual Meeting in Chicago, ...

  5. Burns (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oven. The liquid may heat unevenly, resulting in pockets of breast milk or formula that can scald a baby's mouth. Screen fireplaces and wood-burning stoves. Radiators and electric baseboard heaters may ...

  6. Management of burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Trop, Marija; Neuhaus, Kathrin

    2013-10-01

    Small and moderate scalds in toddlers are still the most frequent thermal injuries the pediatric surgeons have to face today. Over the last years, surgical treatment of these patients has changed in many aspects. Due to new dressing materials and new surgical treatment strategies that are particularly suitable for children, today, far better functional and aesthetic long-term results are possible. While small and moderate thermal injuries can be treated in most European pediatric surgical departments, the severely burned child must be transferred to a specialized, ideally pediatric, burn center, where a well-trained multidisciplinary team under the leadership of a (ideally pediatric) burn surgeon cares for these highly demanding patients. In future, tissue engineered full thickness skin analogues will most likely play an important role, in pediatric burn as well as postburn reconstructive surgery. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Burn Wise Awareness Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health and safety outreach materials in the form of an awareness kit. Designed specifically for state, local, and tribal air agencies working to reduce wood smoke pollution, it includes best burn tips, social media m

  8. Smartphone applications in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzer, Paul; Parvizi, Daryousch; Lumenta, David B; Giretzlehner, Michael; Branski, Ludwik K; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Tuca, Alexandru; Rappl, Thomas; Smolle, Christian; Kamolz, Lars P

    2015-08-01

    Since the introduction of applications (apps) for smartphones, the popularity of medical apps has been rising. The aim of this review was to demonstrate the current availability of apps related to burns on Google's Android and Apple's iOS store as well as to include a review of their developers, features, and costs. A systematic online review of Google Play Store and Apple's App Store was performed by using the following search terms: "burn," "burns," "thermal," and the German word "Verbrennung." All apps that were programmed for use as medical apps for burns were included. The review was performed from 25 February until 1 March 2014. A closer look at the free and paid calculation apps including a standardized patient was performed. Four types of apps were identified: calculators, information apps, book/journal apps, and games. In Google Play Store, 31 apps were related to burns, of which 20 were calculation apps (eight for estimating the total body surface area (TBSA) and nine for total fluid requirement (TFR)). In Apple's App Store, under the category of medicine, 39 apps were related to burns, of which 21 were calculation apps (19 for estimating the TBSA and 17 for calculating the TFR). In 19 out of 32 available calculation apps, our study showed a correlation of the calculated TFR compared to our standardized patient. The review demonstrated that many apps for medical burns are available in both common app stores. Even free available calculation apps may provide a more objective and reproducible procedure compared to manual/subjective estimations, although there is still a lack of data security especially in personal data entered in calculation apps. Further clinical studies including smartphone apps for burns should be performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. Ball lightning burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaggi, Gennaro; Monstrey, Stan; von Heimburg, Dennis; Hamdi, Mustapha; Van Landuyt, Koen; Blondeel, Phillip

    2003-05-01

    Ball lightning is a rare physical phenomenon, which is not yet completely explained. It is similar to lightning but with different, peculiar characteristics. It can be considered a mix of fire and electricity, concentrated in a fireball with a diameter of 20-cm that most commonly appears suddenly, even in indoor conditions, during a thunderstorm. It moves quickly for several meters, can change direction, and ultimately disappears. During a great storm, a 28-year-old man and his 5-year-old daughter sustained burn wounds after ball lightning came from the outdoors through a chimney. These two patients demonstrated signs of fire and electrical injuries. The father, who lost consciousness, sustained superficial second-degree burn wounds bilaterally on the zygomatic area and deep second-degree burn wounds on his right hand (total body surface area, 4%). His daughter demonstrated superficial second-degree burn wounds on the left part of the face and deep second-degree and third-degree burn wounds (total body surface area, 30%) on the left neck, both upper arms, and the back. In this article, the authors report the first two cases of burn injuries resulting from ball lightning contact indoors. The literature on this rare phenomenon is reviewed to elucidate the nature of ball lightning. Emphasis is placed on the nature of injuries after ball lightning contact, the therapy used, and the long-term complications.

  10. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third......-degree burn injury was induced with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear...... neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization of the skin showed an increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes dominated inflammation in the group of mice...

  11. Management of pediatric hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodaki, Eirini; Kisch, Tobias; Mauss, Karl L; Senyaman, Oezge; Kraemer, Robert; Mailänder, Peter; Wünsch, Lutz; Stang, Felix

    2015-04-01

    Hand burns are common in the pediatric population. Optimal hand function is a crucial component of a high-quality survival after burn injury. This can only be achieved with a coordinated approach to the injuries. The aim of this study was to review the management algorithm and outcomes of pediatric hand burns at our institution. In total, 70 children fulfilling our study criteria were treated for a burn hand injury in our Burn Care Center between January 2008 and May 2013. 14 of the 70 pediatric patients underwent surgery because of the depth of the hand burns. The management algorithm depending on the depth of the burn is described. Two patients underwent correction surgery due to burn contractures later. For a successful outcome of the burned hand, the interdisciplinary involvement and cooperation of the plastic and pediatric surgeon, hand therapist, burn team, patient and their parents are crucial.

  12. Burn Patient Expectations from Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Sibel Yilmaz sahin; Umran Dal; Gulsen Vural

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Burn is a kind of painful trauma that requires a long period of treatment and also changes patients body image. For this reason, nursing care of burn patients is very important. In this study in order to provide qualified care to the burned patients, patient and #8217;s expectations from nurses were aimed to be established. METHODS: Patients and #8217; expectations were evaluated on 101 patients with burn in Ministry of Health Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital Burn Servic...

  13. Amniotic membrane extraction solution for ocular chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lingyi; Li, Wei; Ling, Shiqi; Sheha, Hosam; Qiu, Weiqiang; Li, Chaoyang; Liu, Zuguo

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of amniotic membrane extract (AME) for ocular chemical burns. Prospective non-comparative interventional case series study. Consecutive 14 eyes of 11 patients with acute or chronic chemical burns, being recruited in one referral centre, received AME topically in combination with traditional treatment. Ocular discomfort, visual acuity, ocular surface inflammation, re-epithelialization, corneal thickness, corneal neovascularization and symblepharon were evaluated. Symptom relieved and ocular surface inflammation reduced dramatically in all eyes. Epithelial defect healed in all eyes with acute burns, in which less than 7 clock hours of limbus was involved, after 16.6 days (1-44 days) AME treatment. AME failed to close the epithelial defect in all eyes with chronic chemical burn coexisting diffuse limbal stem cell deficiency; however, the area of epithelial defect decreased to 58% (11.1%-68.2%) at final visit. During a follow-up period of 8.2 months (6-11 months), visual acuity improved in 12 eyes (86%). There was mild neovascularization in three eyes with grade III and IV acute burns, and slow progress of neovascularization in chronic burns. Mild symblepharon developed in two eyes with grade III and IV acute burns, whereas there was no significant progress of symblepharon in chronic cases. Although it is a preliminary and uncontrolled study, topical application of AME is effective in reducing inflammation, promoting reepithelization in the treatment of chemical burns, especially for mild to moderate acute cases.

  14. Epidemiology of burns in teaching hospital of Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtazudin Wani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no information on the pattern of outcomes among burn patients in relation to clinical aspects in India. Hence, the present study was undertaken in a burn unit to determine selected epidemiological variables, assess the clinical aspects (etiology, extent and anatomical location and finally to analyze the outcomes in cases of burn injury. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was undertaken to analyze the patients admitted to the Burn Unit of Government Medical college Srinagar. The study was carried over a period 2 years from January 2013 to December 2014. Various variables including age and sex distribution, nature of burn injuries, Anatomical location, percentage of total body surface area burnt, depth of burns, Survival of expired patients and mortality were recorded and analyzed. Results: Highest incidence of burns was in the age group between 21 and 40 years; 61% patients were females and 39% were males; majority of our patients had burns in the range of 20 to 40% TBSA (total body surface area; mortality rate in our study was 36.82%; most common site of the burn injury was upper limb(30.19%;among patients who died those with TBSA burn of >60%, 41 to 60% and 31 to 40% succumbed within three, six and nine days respectively. Age ranged from 6 months to 93 years. Mean age of the patients was 31 years. Eighty percent patients belonged to rural areas and 20% belonged to Urban locality. Conclusion: People with low educational qualification should be taught about the proper and safe usage of modern appliances based on electricity, LPG or kerosene. People with psychiatric problems or low intelligence quotient (I.Q should be helped by their care takers in avoiding the burn injuries and also devices with alarms should be used in their households. Fuel or electric devices should be checked by a trained person regularly (e.g once in month to avoid usage of faulty devices.

  15. EMISSIONS OF CHROMIUM, COPPER, ARSENIC AND PCDDS/FS FROM OPEN BURNING OF CCA TREATED WOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aged and weathered chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood was burned in an open burn research facility to characterize the air emissions and residual bottom ash. In addition to continuous measurements of gases and temperature, samples were collected to characterize the emis...

  16. Towards more efficient burn care: Identifying factors associated with good quality of life post-burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, V; Phillips, M; Allison, G T; Wood, F M; Ching, D; Wicaksono, D; Plowman, S; Hendrie, D; Edgar, D W

    2015-11-01

    As minor burn patients constitute the vast majority of a developed nation case-mix, streamlining care for this group can promote efficiency from a service-wide perspective. This study tested the hypothesis that a predictive nomogram model that estimates likelihood of good long-term quality of life (QoL) post-burn is a valid way to optimise patient selection and risk management when applying a streamlined model of care. A sample of 224 burn patients managed by the Burn Service of Western Australia who provided both short and long-term outcomes was used to estimate the probability of achieving a good QoL defined as 150 out of a possible 160 points on the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B) at least six months from injury. A multivariate logistic regression analysis produced a predictive model provisioned as a nomogram for clinical application. A second, independent cohort of consecutive patients (n=106) was used to validate the predictive merit of the nomogram. Male gender (p=0.02), conservative management (p=0.03), upper limb burn (p=0.04) and high BSHS-B score within one month of burn (pgood outcome at six months and beyond. A Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis demonstrated excellent (90%) accuracy overall. At 80% probability of good outcome, the false positive risk was 14%. The nomogram was validated by running a second ROC analysis of the model in an independent cohort. The analysis confirmed high (86%) overall accuracy of the model, the risk of false positive was reduced to 10% at a lower (70%) probability. This affirms the stability of the nomogram model in different patient groups over time. An investigation of the effect of missing data on sample selection determined that a greater proportion of younger patients with smaller TBSA burns were excluded due to loss to follow up. For clinicians managing comparable burn populations, the BSWA burns nomogram is an effective tool to assist the selection of patients to a streamlined care pathway with the aim

  17. Clinical and demographic features of pediatric burns in the eastern provinces of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to perform a retrospective analysis of the causes of burns observed in children in the eastern provinces of Turkey. Method In this study, patients were studied retrospectively with regard to their age, sex, cause of burns, seasonal variations, social and economic factors, length of hospital stay, burned body surface area, medical history, site of injury, and mortality. Results A total of 125 patients undergoing inpatient treatment were male, (53.2%) and 110 were female (46.8%). The most common causes of burns in patients treated on an inpatient basis were scald burns (65.5%) and tandir burns (15.7%). The mean total body surface area of all the patients was 12.17+9.86%. When the patients were grouped according to tandir, cauldron, and others burn causes, a significant difference was seen between the in burn percentages caused by tandir and cauldron burns and other causes (p burn percentages were seen for cauldron burns than for tandir burns (p burn causes (tandir, cauldron, and others), a significant difference was determined between the hospitalization periods of patients with tandir burns and other burn causes (p = 0.001) The most commonly proliferating microorganism in burned areas was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (20.4%). Of the 235 patients, 61 were treated in operating rooms. During the 24-month period of the study, 2 of the 235 patients died (0.85%). Conclusion Pediatric burns in the eastern part of Turkey are different from those in other parts of Turkey, as well as in other countries. Due to the lifestyle of the region, tandir and cauldron burns, which cause extensive burn areas and high morbidity, are frequently seen in children. Therefore, precautions and educational programs related to the use of tandirs and cauldrons are needed in this region. PMID:21244683

  18. Understanding the Spectral Signature Characterization of Cropland Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boren, E. J.; Boschetti, L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate and reliable cropland burned area products are essential for aiding estimates of trace atmospheric gases and particles which influence atmospheric chemistry dynamics and air quality. Cropland residue burning has been estimated to account for approximately 8-11% of all global fires (Korontzi et al. 2006). Cropland residue burning is also a significant fraction of atmospheric emissions at the local level. Timely and accurate assessments of cropland fire activity are needed by local and regional administrators involved in carbon emission, human health, and air quality regulations. Remote sensing systems used for monitoring fire activity have significant detection uncertainty due to ambiguous spectral characteristics of cropland burning. The present research is focused on the quantitative characterization of the spectral signature of cropland burning by monitoring the spectral signal throughout the full growing, harvest, and burning periods. Field data collection was conducted in the southern Palouse region of Idaho and Washington. Reflectance was measured on a test area of spring wheat fields with an analytical spectral device (ASD) spectrometer. All the dates for field data collections are coincident with Landsat 8 overpasses, and the spatial sampling of field measurements were performed following the VALERI protocol for upscaling to 30 meter pixels (Baret et al. 2005).

  19. Epidemiology of burns in pediatric patients of Beijing City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Dawei; Shen, Chuanan; Chai, Jiake; Zhu, Hongjuan; Lin, Yanlu; Liu, Congying

    2016-10-18

    This study aimed to assess the epidemiological characteristics of pediatric burns in Beijing City. This was a retrospective study of pediatric patients (n = 400) admitted to four burn centers in Beijing City between June 2010 and May 2011. Burn severity was determined according to total body surface area (TBSA) percentage and degree. Patients were followed up for one year. Multivariate analyses were carried out to determine the factors (burn etiology, time and place of injury, living conditions, hospital type, first-aid treatment methods, and parent/guardian knowledge of burns, educational level, occupation) affecting burn properties (severity and pigmentation/scar). 191/400 (47.8 %) patients were aged 2-3 years, and scalding was the leading etiology (355/400, 88.8 %). Burn incidence peaked in May (14.8 %), at 10:00-12:00 and 17:00-20:00. Most burn events occurred indoors (272/400, 68.0 %), especially in the kitchen (180/400, 45.0 %). Roughly half of them involved head and neck; 188 (47.0 %) patients had mild burns, 140 (35.0 %) moderate, 44 (11.0 %) extensive, and 28 (7.0 %) critical burns; 184 (46.0 %) patients were treated only with cold-water rinsing or compress; 120 (30.0 %) received no first aid. Only 32 (8.0 %) patients visited a specialized institution. 164 patients underwent surgery. Hospitalization lasted for 14.8 ± 8.1 days. Independent risk factors for burn severity were occurrence month, living conditions, occupation of the mother, and first aid. 288 (72.0 %) patients developed pigmentation and scar within a year while no independent risk factors was observed. Pediatric burns often occurred indoors, especially in the kitchen, and a substantial proportion receives no first aid.

  20. Burns first aid treatment in remote Northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, David J; Tan, Swee Chin; Ward, Linda; McDermott, Kathleen

    2017-08-12

    It is well demonstrated that adequate burns first aid treatment (BFAT) improves clinical outcomes for the injured but adequacy remains low in many studies. This study presents a twelve month assessment of the adequacy of burns first aid treatment for patients managed by the Burns Service, Royal Darwin Hospital (RDH). Prospective study design of all patients managed by the Burns Service, Royal Darwin Hospital. Data were collated from two sources; RDH Burns Registry, and the Burns Registry of Australia and New Zealand (BRANZ). Inclusion criterion was all patients managed by the Burns Service, Royal Darwin Hospital for the period 1 January 2014-31 December 2014. Variables collected and analysed include: demographics, burn mechanism, burn wound depth and adequacy of and circumstances around first aid. Overall 310 cases were analysed. Most injuries involved adults (68%), 19% Indigenous persons and 70% of all patients had their burn injury occur in the urban region. Adequate BFAT occurred in 41% of cases. Adults, contact burns and those where the burn injury occurred in the remote regions were less likely to receive adequate BFAT. Indigenous persons were less likely to attempt any BFAT at all and when they did receive BFAT it was more likely applied by an emergency responder or health professional. Overall adequacy of BFAT is low in the Top End of the Northern Territory. Remote dwellers and Indigenous persons are at increased risk of not applying or receiving adequate BFAT. The poor level of adequate BFAT demonstrated in this study suggests that the Top End community particularly remote and Indigenous persons would benefit from targeted BFAT education programs that are delivered in a culturally and linguistically appropriate fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Burning mouth disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Bala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth disorder (BMD is a burning or stinging sensation affecting the oral mucosa, lips and/or tongue, in the absence of clinically visible mucosal lesions. There is a strong female predilection, with the age of onset being approximately 50 years. Affected patients often present with multiple oral complaints, including burning, dryness and taste alterations. The causes of BMD are multifactorial and remain poorly understood. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in this disorder with the discovery that the pain of burning mouth syndrome (BMS may be neuropathic in origin and originate both centrally and peripherally. The most common sites of burning are the anterior tongue, anterior hard palate and lower lip, but the distribution of oral sites affected does not appear to affect the natural history of the disorder or the response to treatment BMS may persist for many years. This article provides updated information on BMS and presents a new model, based on taste dysfunction, for its pathogenesis.

  2. Burn injuries and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Betsy B; Baird, Suzanne McMurtry; Troiano, Nan H

    2008-01-01

    Although burn injuries during pregnancy are considered relatively rare, the exact incidence is not known. Multiple factors influence morbidity and mortality resulting from burn injuries during pregnancy. These factors include the depth and size of the burn, the woman's underlying health and age, and the estimated gestational age of the fetus. Associated inhalation injury and development of other significant secondary complications also influence maternal and fetal outcomes. Successful burn care requires a team approach in which almost every healthcare discipline is represented. Initial care is almost always provided by a specially trained emergency medical team in an out-of-hospital setting. During this phase, the ability of the team to communicate with emergency hospital personnel facilitates appropriate clinical management at the scene. In addition, continued communication regarding the woman's status and responses to treatment allows critical care specialists within the hospital to ensure that necessary personnel and resources are available when the patient arrives. From the time the pregnant woman is admitted to a hospital for additional acute and critical care through the extensive process of rehabilitation from burn injuries, providing care often evokes strong emotions and requires specialized skills to achieve the most positive outcomes.

  3. Hand chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elliot P; Chhabra, A Bobby

    2015-03-01

    There is a vast and ever-expanding variety of potentially harmful chemicals in the military, industrial, and domestic landscape. Chemical burns make up a small proportion of all skin burns, yet they can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Additionally, the hand and upper extremity are the most frequently involved parts of the body in chemical burns, and therefore these injuries may lead to severe temporary or permanent loss of function. Despite this fact, discussion of the care of these injuries is sparse in the hand surgery literature. Although most chemical burns require only first response and wound care, some require the attention of a specialist for surgical debridement and, occasionally, skin coverage and reconstruction. Exposure to certain chemicals carries the risk of substantial systemic toxicity and even mortality. Understanding the difference between thermal and chemical burns, as well as special considerations for specific compounds, will improve patient treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Post-Burn Crude Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the Niger delta, crude oil spilled soils are burned as a means of decontaminating the impacted soils. Gas chromatography - flame ionization detector (GCFID) analyses were performed on oil residues extracted from burnt spilled oil soil samples to facilitate detailed chemical composition and characterization of petroleum ...

  5. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data.

  6. Psychiatric aspects of burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries and their subsequent treatment cause one of the most excruciating forms of pain imaginable. The psychological aspects of burn injury have been researched in different parts of the world, producing different outcomes. Studies have shown that greater levels of acute pain are associated with negative long-term psychological effects such as acute stress disorder, depression, suicidal ideation, and post-traumatic stress disorder for as long as 2 years after the initial burn injury. The concept of allostatic load is presented as a potential explanation for the relationship between acute pain and subsequent psychological outcomes. A biopsychosocial model is also presented as a means of obtaining better inpatient pain management and helping to mediate this relationship.

  7. Burn Safety Awareness on Playgrounds: Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Awareness on Playgrounds Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission CPSC wants ... of the risk of thermal burns from playground equipment. You may remember the metal slides of your ...

  8. Burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a complex disorder that is characterized by warm or burning sensation in the oral mucosa without changes on physical examination. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tip of the tongue, lateral borders, lips, hard and soft palate. This condition is probably of multi-factorial origin, often idiopathic, and its etiopathogensis is unknown. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms namely primary and secondary BMS. As a result, a multidisciplinary approach is required for better control of the symptoms. In addition, psychotherapy and behavioral feedback may also help eliminate the BMS symptoms.

  9. Electrothermal Ring Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Çil

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Low-voltage fountainheads such as car, tractor or motorcycle batteries are predisposed to produce large currents. Any metal object that comes into contact with these batteries may result in short-circuit. This may result in rapid and excessive heating of metal object and an electrothermal burn. Herein we presented a motorcycle driver who was 28-year-old man with electrothermal ring burn which was caused by metal chain that was used as a ring. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 106-7

  10. Landsat-Based Detection and Severity Analysis of Burned Sugarcane Plots in Tarlac, Philippines Using Differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloloy, A. B.; Blanco, A. C.; Gana, B. S.; Sta. Ana, R. C.; Olalia, L. C.

    2016-09-01

    The Philippines has a booming sugarcane industry contributing about PHP 70 billion annually to the local economy through raw sugar, molasses and bioethanol production (SRA, 2012). Sugarcane planters adapt different farm practices in cultivating sugarcane, one of which is cane burning to eliminate unwanted plant material and facilitate easier harvest. Information on burned sugarcane extent is significant in yield estimation models to calculate total sugar lost during harvest. Pre-harvest burning can lessen sucrose by 2.7% - 5% of the potential yield (Gomez, et al 2006; Hiranyavasit, 2016). This study employs a method for detecting burn sugarcane area and determining burn severity through Differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) using Landsat 8 Images acquired during the late milling season in Tarlac, Philippines. Total burned area was computed per burn severity based on pre-fire and post-fire images. Results show that 75.38% of the total sugarcane fields in Tarlac were burned with post-fire regrowth; 16.61% were recently burned; and only 8.01% were unburned. The monthly dNBR for February to March generated the largest area with low severity burn (1,436 ha) and high severity burn (31.14 ha) due to pre-harvest burning. Post-fire regrowth is highest in April to May when previously burned areas were already replanted with sugarcane. The maximum dNBR of the entire late milling season (February to May) recorded larger extent of areas with high and low post-fire regrowth compared to areas with low, moderate and high burn severity. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was used to analyse vegetation dynamics between the burn severity classes. Significant positive correlation, rho = 0.99, was observed between dNBR and dNDVI at 5% level (p = 0.004). An accuracy of 89.03% was calculated for the Landsat-derived NBR validated using actual mill data for crop year 2015-2016.

  11. An assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, A D

    2008-06-01

    The resuscitation of severe burn remains a controversial area within the burn care profession. There is ongoing debate as to what percentage burn is associated with a sufficient quality of life to support initial resuscitation efforts. We conducted a survey of delegates at the 39th Annual Meeting of the British Burns Association (2005), regarding attitudes towards resuscitation following major burns. Respondents were asked the maximum percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burn beyond which they would not wish to be resuscitated. They were also asked what maximum TBSA they perceived to be commensurate with an acceptable quality of life (QOL). One hundred and forty three of 300 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Thirty three percent of respondents would not wish to be resuscitated with 50-75% TBSA burns or greater. A further 35% would not wish to have life-sustaining intervention with 75-95% TBSA burns or greater. The remaining 32% indicated that they would not want resuscitation with TBSA burns>95%. Regardless of TBSA affected, 16% would not wish resuscitation if they had full thickness facial burns, a further 10% did not want resuscitation if both their hands and faces were affected. Our survey demonstrates the diversity of personal preference amongst burn care professionals. This would suggest that a unifying philosophy regarding the resuscitation of extensive burns will remain elusive.

  12. Propagation of Cigarette Static Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miura K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A propagation model of cigarette static burn at the cigarette periphery is proposed. Propagation of cigarette static burn is characterized by intermittent burn of the cigarette paper. The burning rate depends on the period of flash burn of the paper and is independent of the burning width. By measuring the local temperature near the front line of the burning propagation, the rate-determining step was identified as the time required to ignite the paper. A mathematical analysis was performed by calculating the heat transfer at the periphery during the paper heating period, and it was revealed that the thermal properties of the cigarette are the dominant factors of cigarette static burn. Modeling results showed good agreement with measured data.

  13. Accumulative eschar after burn

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Fushun

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Eschar formation is a potential sequela of burn injuries. Definitive management may include escharectomy and eschar debridement. After eschar removal, the wound can be covered with a skin graft or reepithelialization. For prolonged refractory eschar on the fingertips, topical use of rb?bFGF after debridement can achieve an optimal outcome.

  14. One Burn, One Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    law , no person shall be...Johannes Kepler University Linz Software GmbH Research Department Medical Informatics Hagenberg, Austria Herbert L. Haller, MD Trauma Hospital Linz of...0000000000000004 Address correspondence to M. Giretzlehner, PhD, Johannes Kepler University Linz, RISC Software GmbH, Research Department Medical Informatics, Softwarepark 35, 4232 Hagenberg, Austria. One Burn, One Standard LETTER TO THE EDITOR

  15. Effects of thinning, residue mastication, and prescribed fire on soil and nutrient budgets in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of thinning followed by residue mastication (THIN), prescribed fire (BURN), and thinning plus residue mastication plus burning (T+B) on nutrient budgets and resin-based (plant root simulator [PRS] probe) measurements of soil nutrient availability in a mixed-conifer forest were measured. ...

  16. Fatal Burn due to Solarium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celalettin Sever

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation burns are uncommon and their etiologies are various. The ultraviolet lights are also a source of radiation burns. We present a case of life-threatening radiation burn caused by long wave ultraviolet lights (UV at the solarium center. Up to now, despite its widespread use, fatal radiation burns caused by the indoor tanning device at the solarium center have not been reported. The circumstances of this injury and preventive measures are discussed.

  17. Efeito residual da adubação na cana-planta e da adubação nitrogenada e potássica na cana-soca colhidas com e sem a queima da palhada Residual effects of nitrogen, potassium and vinasse, fertilization on cane plant and ratoon harvested with and without straw burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivaldo Schultz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A aplicação de vinhaça na cana-de-açúcar, complementada com adubação nitrogenada e manutenção da palhada na superfície do solo, melhoram as propriedades físicas, químicas e biológicas do solo, podendo resultar em aumento da produtividade da cultura. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito residual de adubação na cana-planta e a adubação da cana-soca, com e sem aplicação de vinhaça, sob diferentes sistemas de colheita no município de Conceição da Barra - ES. O experimento foi conduzido no período de 2005 a 2007, num Argissolo Amarelo em Tabuleiros Costeiros. Utilizou-se o delineamento de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições, no esquema fatorial 2 x 7, com parcelas subdivididas, sendo dois tratamentos cana crua e cana queimada e sete subtratamentos com diferentes doses de N associadas a doses de K2O na forma de cloreto de K e vinhaça. Os tratamentos foram: testemunha (T1; vinhaça (T2; vinhaça + 80 kg de N incorporado (T3; vinhaça + 80 kg de N em cobertura (T4; vinhaça + 40 kg de N em cobertura (T5; K2O + 80 kg de N incorporado (T6; e K2O + 80 kg de N em cobertura (T7. Não houve efeito residual de adubação na produtividade de colmos na cana-planta. A cana crua apresentou produtividade superior à da cana queimada na cana-soca. Nesta, a fertilização com vinhaça complementada com N incorporado ou em cobertura e a adubação com 120 kg de K2O na forma de KCl + 80 kg de N incorporados ao solo proporcionaram produtividade superior à dos demais tratamentos. Não foi verificada diferença na produtividade de colmos entre as doses de 40 e 80 kg ha-1 de N, aplicadas em cobertura na cana-soca. A extração e retorno de nutrientes ocorreu de forma similar entre cana-planta e cana-soca.The application of vinasse supplemented with nitrogen fertilizer to sugarcane with stubble maintained on the soil surface improves the physical, chemical and biological soil properties and may result in increased crop yield. The aim of

  18. Biomass burning contribution to Beijing aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cheng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning, the largest global source of elemental carbon (EC and primary organic carbon (OC, is strongly associated with many subjects of great scientific concern, such as secondary organic aerosol and brown carbon which exert important effects on the environment and on climate in particular. This study investigated the relationships between levoglucosan and other biomass burning tracers (i.e., water soluble potassium and mannosan based on both ambient samples collected in Beijing and source samples. Compared with North America and Europe, Beijing was characterized by high ambient levoglucosan concentrations and low winter to summer ratios of levoglucosan, indicating significant impact of biomass burning activities throughout the year in Beijing. Comparison of levoglucosan and water soluble potassium (K+ levels suggested that it was acceptable to use K+ as a biomass burning tracer during summer in Beijing, while the contribution of fireworks to K+ could be significant during winter. Moreover, the levoglucosan to K+ ratio was found to be lower during the typical summer period (0.21 ± 0.16 compared with the typical winter period (0.51 ± 0.15. Levoglucosan correlated strongly with mannosan (R2 = 0.97 throughout the winter and the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio averaged 9.49 ± 1.63, whereas levoglucosan and mannosan exhibited relatively weak correlation (R2 = 0.73 during the typical summer period when the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio averaged 12.65 ± 3.38. Results from positive matrix factorization (PMF model analysis showed that about 50% of the OC and EC in Beijing were associated with biomass burning processes. In addition, a new source identification method was developed based on the comparison of the levoglucosan to K+ ratio and the levoglucosan to mannosan ratio among different types of biomass. Using this method, the major source of biomass burning aerosol in Beijing was suggested to be the combustion of crop residuals, while the

  19. Generation of crystalline silica from sugarcane burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Blond, Jennifer S; Horwell, Claire J; Williamson, Ben J; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2010-07-08

    Sugarcane leaves contain amorphous silica, which may crystallise to form crystalline silica polymorphs (cristobalite or quartz), during commercial sugarcane harvesting where sugarcane plants are burned. Respirable airborne particulate containing these phases may present an occupational health hazard. Following from an earlier pilot study (J. S. Le Blond, B. J. Williamson, C. J. Horwell, A. K. Monro, C. A. Kirk and C. Oppenheimer, Atmos. Environ., 2008, 42, 5558-5565) in which experimental burning of sugarcane leaves yielded crystalline silica, here we report on actual conditions during sugarcane burning on commercial estates, investigate the physico-chemical properties of the cultivated leaves and ash products, and quantify the presence of crystalline silica. Commercially grown raw sugarcane leaf was found to contain up to 1.8 wt% silica, mostly in the form of amorphous silica bodies (with trace impurities e.g., Al, Na, Mg), with only a small amount of quartz. Thermal images taken during several pre-harvest burns recorded temperatures up to 1056 degrees C, which is sufficient for metastable cristobalite formation. No crystalline silica was detected in airborne particulate from pre-harvest burning, collected using a cascade impactor. The sugarcane trash ash formed after pre-harvest burning contained between 10 and 25 wt% SiO(2), mostly in an amorphous form, but with up to 3.5 wt% quartz. Both quartz and cristobalite were identified in the sugarcane bagasse ash (5-15 wt% and 1-3 wt%, respectively) formed in the processing factory. Electron microprobe analysis showed trace impurities of Mg, Al and Fe in the silica particles in the ash. The absence of crystalline silica in the airborne emissions and lack of cristobalite in trash ash suggest that high temperatures during pre-harvest burning were not sustained long enough for cristobalite to form, which is supported by the presence of low temperature sylvite and calcite in the residual ash. The occurrence of quartz and

  20. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning... obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and silvicultural burning permits. ...

  1. Safety for Your Child: 6 to 12 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... act normally after a fall, call your doctor. Burns At 6 to 12 months children grab at ... Injury Prevention Program (Copyright © 1994 American Academy of Pediatrics, Updated 11/2012) The information contained on this ...

  2. Safety for Your Child: Birth to 6 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... act normally after a fall, call your doctor. Burns At 3 to 5 months, babies will wave ... Injury Prevention Program (Copyright © 1994 American Academy of Pediatrics, Updated 11/2012) The information contained on this ...

  3. Catalytic combustion of residual fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulzan, D. L.; Tacina, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    A noble metal catalytic reactor was tested using two grades of petroleum derived residual fuels at specified inlet air temperatures, pressures, and reference velocities. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5 percent were obtained. Steady state operation of the catalytic reactor required inlet air temperatures of at least 800 K. At lower inlet air temperatures, upstream burning in the premixing zone occurred which was probably caused by fuel deposition and accumulation on the premixing zone walls. Increasing the inlet air temperature prevented this occurrence. Both residual fuels contained about 0.5 percent nitrogen by weight. NO sub x emissions ranged from 50 to 110 ppm by volume at 15 percent excess O2. Conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x ranged from 25 to 50 percent.

  4. Emissions of fine particle fluoride from biomass burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarathne, Thilina; Stockwell, Chelsea E; Yokelson, Robert J; Nakao, Shunsuke; Stone, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-04

    The burning of biomasses releases fluorine to the atmosphere, representing a major and previously uncharacterized flux of this atmospheric pollutant. Emissions of fine particle (PM2.5) water-soluble fluoride (F-) from biomass burning were evaluated during the fourth Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-IV) using scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and ion chromatography with conductivity detection. F- was detected in 100% of the PM2.5 emissions from conifers (n=11), 94% of emissions from agricultural residues (n=16), and 36% of the grasses and other perennial plants (n=14). When F- was quantified, it accounted for an average (±standard error) of 0.13±0.02% of PM2.5. F- was not detected in remaining samples (n=15) collected from peat burning, shredded tire combustion, and cook-stove emissions. Emission factors (EF) of F- emitted per kilogram of biomass burned correlated with emissions of PM2.5 and combustion efficiency, and also varied with the type of biomass burned and the geographic location where it was harvested. Based on recent evaluations of global biomass burning, we estimate that biomass burning releases 76 Gg F- yr(-1) to the atmosphere, with upper and lower bounds of 40-150 Gg F- yr(-1). The estimated F- flux from biomass burning is comparable to total fluorine emissions from coal combustion plus other anthropogenic sources. These data demonstrate that biomass burning represents a major source of fluorine to the atmosphere in the form of fine particles, which have potential to undergo long-range transport.

  5. Emissions from Biomass Burning in the Yucatan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokelson, R.; Crounse, J. D.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Karl, T.; Urbanski, S.; Atlas, E.; Campos, T.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A. D.; hide

    2009-01-01

    In March 2006 two instrumented aircraft made the first detailed field measurements of biomass burning (BB) emissions in the Northern Hemisphere tropics as part of the MILAGRO project. The aircraft were the National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 and a University of Montana/US Forest Service Twin Otter. The initial emissions of up to 49 trace gas or particle species were measured from 20 deforestation and crop residue fires on the Yucatan peninsula. This included two trace gases useful as indicaters of BB (HCN and acetonitrile) and several rarely, or never before, measured species: OH, peroxyacetic acid, propanoic acid, hydrogen peroxide, methane sulfonic acid, and sulfuric acid. Crop residue fires emitted more organic acids and ammonia than deforestation fires, but the emissions from the main fire types were otherwise fairly similar. The Yucatan fires emitted unusually amounts of SO2 and particle chloride, likely due to a strong marine influence on the peninsula.

  6. Air-Freshener Burns: A New Paradigm in Burns Etiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Umran; Nicolaou, M.; Khan, M. S.; Tiernan, E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: We report a rare case of burns following the use of automated air-fresheners. Methods: We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to burns associated with air-fresheners. The mechanism and treatment of these types of injuries are also described. Results: A 44 year-old female was admitted under the care of the burns team following burns secondary to an exploding air-freshener canister. The patient sustained burns to the face, thorax and arms resulting in a seven-day hospital admission. The burns were treated conservatively. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of burns as a result of air-fresheners. As they become more ubiquitous, we anticipate the incidence of such cases to increase. As such, they pose a potential public health concern on a massive scale. PMID:22174972

  7. Managing a patient with burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Danny; Trudgill, Nigel

    2015-07-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with an increasing frequency of symptoms of heartburn and retrosternal pain over the last few months, and a constant and intense burning pain affecting her tongue tip, mouth and lips for the past 5 years. She found consuming hot drinks exacerbated the burning oral pain and chewing gum seemed to alleviate some of her symptoms. She thought these oral sensations were caused by frequently licking her finger tips to separate prints in her work in publishing. She had been previously diagnosed with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), and her heartburn symptoms had been controlled until recently with lansoprazole 15 mg daily. Her past medical history included irritable bowel syndrome and depression, for which she had been treated with mebeverine and paroxetine for a number of years. She was a non-smoker and did not consume alcohol. Clinical examination was unremarkable with no oral lesions on examination. Her routine laboratory tests, including autoimmune serology, haematinics and thyroid function tests were all within normal limits. She underwent a gastroscopy, which revealed moderate reflux oesophagitis, and following commencing omeprazole 20 mg twice daily, her heartburn resolved. However, her oral burning symptoms were not affected and a diagnosis of burning mouth syndrome (BMS) was made. Following explanation and reassurance concerning the cause of her BMS symptoms, she chose not to receive treatment for this but to access cognitive behavioural therapy in the future if her symptoms worsened.

  8. Quality of life after burns in childhood (5-15 years): children experience substantial problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baar, M E; Polinder, S; Essink-Bot, M L; van Loey, N E E; Oen, I M M H; Dokter, J; Boxma, H; van Beeck, E F

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to assess prevalence and correlates related to sub optimal outcome after pediatric burns and to make a comparison with pediatric injuries not related to burns. We conducted a cross-sectional study on quality of life (QOL) after burns in a sample (n=138; median 24 months post-burn) of Dutch and Flemish children (5-15 years) with an admission to a burn center. QOL was assessed with the Burn Outcomes Questionnaire (BOQ). The generic EuroQol-5D was used to allow for a comparison with children after injuries not related to burns. More than half of the children had long-term limitations. According to the BOQ, children frequently (>50%) experienced sub optimal functioning on 5 out of 12 dimensions, concerning 'appearance', 'parental concern', 'itch', 'emotional health' and 'satisfaction with current state'. Children with a high total burned surface area (TBSA ≥10%) showed significantly more sub optimal functioning on 'upper extremity function' (OR=5.3; ≥20% TBSA), 'appearance' (OR=5.5; ≥10-20% TBSA), 'satisfaction with current state' (OR=3.4; ≥10-20% TBSA) and 'parental concern' (OR=3.4; ≥10-20% TBSA), compared to children with less than 10% TBSA. Burn victims at 9 months post-injury appeared to be worse off at several health dimensions. After 24 months generic quality of life of in pediatric burns was more comparable to pediatric injuries not related to burns. Children after burns experience substantial problems, mainly on itch and appearance and several psychosocial dimensions. More extensive burns are related to sub optimal functioning. These problems are in part specific for burns and not picked up by generic measures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. Open burning of agricultural biomass: Physical and chemical properties of particle-phase emissions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hays, Michael D; Fine, Philip M; Geron, Christopher D; Kleeman, Michael J; Gullett, Brian K

    2005-01-01

    ... (AFs) of surface residuals of two major grain crops, rice (Oryza sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The O.sub.2 levels and CO/CO.sub.2 ratios of the open burn simulations are typical of the field fires of agricultural residues...

  10. Chemical Debridement of Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Stanley M.; Kan, Dorinne; Gruber, Charles; Crowley, Leo V.; Lent, Richard; Watford, Alvin; Seifter, Eli

    1974-01-01

    The development of effective, non-toxic (local and systemic) methods for the rapid chemical (enzymatic and non-enzymatic) debridement of third degree burns would dramatically reduce the morbidity and mortality of severely burned patients. Sepsis is still the major cause of death of patients with extensive deep burns. The removal of the devitalized tissue, without damage to unburned skin or skin only partially injured by burning, and in ways which would permit immediate (or very prompt) skin grafting, would lessen substantially the problems of sepsis, speed convalescence and the return of these individuals to society as effective human beings, and would decrease deaths. The usefulness and limitations of surgical excision for patients with extensive third degree burns are discussed. Chemical debridement lends itself to complementary use with surgical excision and has the potential advantage over surgical excision in not requiring anesthesia or a formal surgical operation. The authors' work with the chemical debridement of burns, in particular the use of Bromelain, indicates that this approach will likely achieve clinical usefulness. The experimental studies indicate that rapid controlled debridement, with minimal local and systemic toxicity, is possible, and that effective chemotherapeutic agents may be combined with the Bromelain without either interfering with the actions of the other. The authors believe that rapid (hours) debridement accomplished by the combined use of chemical debriding and chemotherapeutic agents will obviate the possibility of any increase in infection, caused by the use of chemical agents for debridement, as reported for Paraenzyme21 and Travase.39,48 It is possible that the short term use of systemic antibiotics begun just before and continued during, and for a short time after, the rapid chemical debridement may prove useful for the prevention of infection, as appears to be the case for abdominal operations of the clean-contaminated and

  11. Pattern of burns identified in the Pediatrics Emergency Department at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City: Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharthy, Nesrin; Al Mutairi, Mohammad; AlQueflie, Sulaiman; Nefesa, Aminah Bin; Manie, Najd Bin; Nafesa, Salahaldin Bin; Al Zahrani, Fawaz Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to report the incidence of pediatric burn injuries and describe the pattern and the trend of pediatrics burns seen in King Abdul-Aziz Medical City. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Data collected through chart review of pediatrics patients aged 1-month to 14 years who presented with a burn injury to the pediatric emergency department during the year 2013. Burn patients were divided into two groups based on the percentage of total body surface area (TBSA) burned: Either Burn incidence rate was 4.9 patients/1000/year. Children with burns on more than 10% TBSA accounted for 16% incidence (0.8/1000 emergency department patients). The burn injury severity ranged from 1% TBSA to 37%, with a mean of 5%. The proportion of male and female burn patients was 54.1% and 45.9%, respectively. Children between 1 and 3 years of age sustained the majority (48.6%) of burn injuries. Scald burns were found to be the most common cause of injury. Hot water and beverages were considered root for most of the scald burn injuries. As children advance in age, scald injury becomes less likely, and they are more obviously subjected to flame burn injuries. Burn injuries sustained at home were 35% compared to 2.7% occurring outside the home. None of the study variables were good predictors for severe burn injuries affecting more than 10% TBSA. The incidence and the severity of burn injuries remain high at the national level. Burn injuries continue to affect the pediatric population, predominantly, young children, which indicate the need for increasing parent educational programs and government regulations. Because we reported scald burns as the most common causes of burn injury, which are consistent with previous national reports, we recommend having legislation that focuses on scald burn prevention.

  12. Fluid replacement in burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolani, A; Governa, M; Barisoni, D

    1996-01-01

    Burn injury involves a large amount of water, electrolytes and proteins loss trough the burn wound. For this reason, to avoid shock, a wide infusion of fluid is necessary in the first hours after trauma. Many reanimation formulas were proposed in the past years, with different composition: saline, colloids, plasma. The authors have studied 40 burned patients admitted in Verona Burn Center within 4 hours after burn, with burns over 30% of the body surface area. Twenty of them were treated with Baxter reanimation formula (ringer lactated saline, RLS) while the others with Monafo hypertonic lactated saline (HLS), modified by Milan Burn Center. The two randomized groups were assessed and compared. In RLS group total fluid volume infused was higher while sodium requirements was lower than in HLS patients, with statistically significative difference (p electrolytes balance with lower fluid load, reducing tissue oedema and complication rate. Mortality rate was higher in HLS, may be for an higher Roy index in this group.

  13. Pattern of burns identified in the Pediatrics Emergency Department at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City: Riyadh

    OpenAIRE

    Alharthy, Nesrin; Al Mutairi, Mohammad; AlQueflie, Sulaiman; Nefesa, Aminah Bin; Manie, Najd Bin; Nafesa, Salahaldin Bin; Al Zahrani, Fawaz Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the study was to report the incidence of pediatric burn injuries and describe the pattern and the trend of pediatrics burns seen in King Abdul-Aziz Medical City. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Data collected through chart review of pediatrics patients aged 1-month to 14 years who presented with a burn injury to the pediatric emergency department during the year 2013. Burn patients were divided into two groups based on the percentage of...

  14. Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    generalized. Clinically, the like- controlled Pseudomonas burn wound infection in most lihood of septicemia appears to increase as the area of patients (2,4...31 patients, dida, Coccidiodes, Phycomyces, and Rhizopus . In 69 of pneumonia was the primary septic process in 27 (20 of these 75 patients (92%), the...carried out as described above and appropriate systemic anti- to which the invading organisms were sensitive and fungal agents are employed to control

  15. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Aspergillus), Blasto- T he use of effective topical chemotherapeutic agents to myces (Candida), and Zygomycetes (Mucor, Rhizopus ).6 reduce...below the infected burn wound . If the infection was controlled by these measures and the patient’s condition permit- ted, the involved area was...species, 18%; Mucor species and Rhizopus species, acetate in the morning and silver sulfadiazine in the evening. Prophy- 9.1%; and Microspora species and

  16. The Psychological Impact of First Burn Camp in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropez-Arceneaux, Lisa L; Castillo Alaniz, Arlen Tatiana; Lucia Icaza, Ivette; Alejandra Murillo, Evelyn

    were given 2 weeks after the camp and again at 6 months. Paired samples' t-tests were conducted and significance was set at P <.05. The results indicate that Camp Confio en Mi had a significant impact on campers' level of anxiety, depression, and self-esteem. Future burn camps are an important part of the continued advancement of postpediatric burn care in Nicaragua. This study reveals the importance of future researches necessity to focus on generalizing the results of this study to other children who have experienced similar burn injuries.

  17. [The exposure method of treatment of burns in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, C-A; Richard, P; Constant, I; Vazquez, M-P; Conti, E

    2013-08-01

    Acute burn is a more or less profound destruction of the skin envelope. The depth of the injury determines the severity of functional and aesthetic sequelae. Local care prevents the infection, factor of deepening of the burn. Currently the dressing used in most Burns centers is a bandage covering a bacterial product applied to the burn. The advantage of this dressing is to prevent the occurrence of local infection. In contrast, open-air method of treatment is based on the notions that the wound is infected. His purpose is to reduce the effects of infection by creating an unfavourable environment to the growth and multiplication of bacteria. The principle of this method is the formation over the burned area of an eschar. The eschar acts as a natural dressing to protect the injured area against infection. The residual skin islets are preserved. The surgical cleavage of the eschar is easy; the deep surface of the crust defines the surgical plan. Deep tangential excisions are not necessary. The implementation of this technique is easy and it is particularly well suited to pediatrics. Treatment is not painful and the child's activities are not hampered by bandages. Respect of the children's quality of life and medical-economic efficiency of this method give it a prominent place in the treatment of burns in children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [The ocular surface of severe alkali burns patients on confocal microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen-qing; Xu, Jian-jiang; Sun, Xing-huai; Qiu, Ting; Hong, Jia-xu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Wen-tao

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the morphology on the ocular surface of severe alkali burns patients by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy. This research was a retrospective observation case series. From February to November 2008 in Eye Ear Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University, 39 alkali burns patients who classified as III or IV according to Roper-Hall classification were enrolled in this study. They were divided into four groups according to the course of disease: A (less than 3 months), B (3 - 6 months), C (6 - 12 months) and D (over 12 months). In vivo laser scanning confocal microscopic examinations were performed on the injured cornea, the limbus and the bulbar conjunctiva and the images were recorded. The morphology of the injured cornea, the limbus and the bulbar conjunctiva was analyzed and the densities of the inflammatory cells and dendritic cells in the limbus were calculated. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare the means of the inflammatory cells and dendritic cells. Subsequently the data between two groups were analyzed by least significant difference. The corneal epitheliums of the patients in Group A manifested large irregular features with hyperreflective cytoplasm and hyporeflective nuclei, sometimes losing cell features. There were numerous small hyperreflective inflammatory cells in groups beneath the superficial epitheliums. Shallow corneal stroma was edema, and it was hard to discriminate the morphology of the stromal cells. Deep stromal cells were in the activated state. The images of the endothelial layer were unclear. In Group B and Group C, there were the same manifestation of the superficial epitheliums as the group A and it disappeared in Group D. The inflammatory cells beneath the superficial epitheliums reduced and some residual basal epitheliums and hyperreflective conjunctiva-like epitheliums were visible in Group B and Group C. In Group D, there were small oval tight-arranged cells with punctiform hyperreflective nuclei

  19. A new algorithm for mapping burned areas in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico González-Alonso

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Every year, between 2.5 and 4.0 million km² of vegetation are burned around the world, emitting an annual average of 2,013 Tg of C, at least 50% of which is estimated to represent net emissions that are not compensated for by the regeneration of vegetation. In Colombia, the official statistics of burned areas are not well known, but it is estimated that burned areas vary between 15,000 and 20,000 km² per year. The main objective of this study was the development and application of a new algorithm for mapping burned areas in Colombia, using a synergistic combination of reflectance images and thermal anomalies detected by the MODIS sensors installed on NASA 's TERRA and AQUA satellites. Upon applying the developed algorithm, a burned surface area in Orinoquía of 998,473 ha was obtained for the month of February, 2007. The validation of the algorithm was performed using high spatial resolution Landsat images and the comparison of the data with the global MODIS MCD45A1 burned area product. The developed algorithm performed very similar to MCD45A1, with an overall accuracy of 79% in both cases. The new algorithm, which was developed for the mapping of burned areas in Colombia, can be used to complement deforestation and forest degradation monitoring procedures that are being implemented in Colombia in the context of the REDD+ mechanism initiation

  20. Surgical management of burns and our clinical experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Özkan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Burn is defined as a trauma that affects skin, largest organ in human body, and underlying tissue in varying degrees, and its management includes both systemic and local treatment modalities. In the present study, we aimed to review current surgical methods used in burns and patients in our burn unit who underwent surgical treatment. Method: Medical records of 21 patients, who admitted to burn unit of Elazığ Education and Research Hospital between October, 2008 and February, 2011 and underwent surgical treatment, were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Overall, 260 patients were admitted to burn unit and 21 (8% of these patients underwent surgical treatment during 26-months study period. Mean age was 12.2 years in patients underwent surgical treatment. Of these patients, 13 (62% were men. In the burn unit, escharotomy was performed in 5 patients (23% underwent whereas escharotomy plus autografting in 3 patients (14% and early excision plus autografting in 13 patients (63%. Wound healing was achieved in 18 patients (86% by above-mentioned treatments, while 3 patients were referred to tertiary care facility for further management. No mortality was observed. Conclusion: Early excision plus grafting is highly successful in profound burns and improves survival rate and quality of life when performed by experienced team. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (1: 76-79

  1. Antiseptics for burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gill; Christie, Janice; Liu, Zhenmi; Westby, Maggie J; Jefferies, Jayne M; Hudson, Thomas; Edwards, Jacky; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad; Hassan, Ibrahim A; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-07-12

    Burn wounds cause high levels of morbidity and mortality worldwide. People with burns are particularly vulnerable to infections; over 75% of all burn deaths (after initial resuscitation) result from infection. Antiseptics are topical agents that act to prevent growth of micro-organisms. A wide range are used with the intention of preventing infection and promoting healing of burn wounds. To assess the effects and safety of antiseptics for the treatment of burns in any care setting. In September 2016 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations), Ovid Embase, and EBSCO CINAHL. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions based on language, date of publication or study setting. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that enrolled people with any burn wound and assessed the use of a topical treatment with antiseptic properties. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We included 56 RCTs with 5807 randomised participants. Almost all trials had poorly reported methodology, meaning that it is unclear whether they were at high risk of bias. In many cases the primary review outcomes, wound healing and infection, were not reported, or were reported incompletely.Most trials enrolled people with recent burns, described as second-degree and less than 40% of total body surface area; most participants were adults. Antiseptic agents assessed were: silver-based, honey, Aloe Vera, iodine-based, chlorhexidine or polyhexanide (biguanides), sodium hypochlorite, merbromin, ethacridine lactate, cerium nitrate and Arnebia euchroma. Most studies compared antiseptic with a topical antibiotic, primarily silver sulfadiazine (SSD); others compared antiseptic with a non

  2. Ocular burns in eye traumatology emphatically on chemical burns

    OpenAIRE

    Farský, Lukáš

    2008-01-01

    Burns to the sclera, conjunctiva, cornea, and eyelid are considered ocular burns. Ocular burn injuries are classified by etiologic agents as either chemical injuries (ie, acid, alkali) or radiant energy injuries (ie, thermal, ultraviolet). Chemical injuries to the eye represent one of the true ophthalmic emergencies. While almost any chemical can cause ocular irritation, serious damage generally results from either strongly basic (alkaline) compounds or acidic compounds. Alkali injuries are m...

  3. Fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Kudjoi, A.; Hippinen, I.; Heinolainen, A.; Suominen, M.; Lu Yong [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Partial gasification processes have been presented as possibilities for future power production. In the processes, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed material) contain unburnt fuel and the fuel conversion is increased by burning this gasification residue either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. In this project, which is a part of European JOULE 2 EXTENSION research programme, the main research objectives are the behaviour of calcium and sulphur compounds in solids and the emissions of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O) in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residues. (author)

  4. Burn Burn Burn - er du skræmt? - en analyse af Kræftens Bekæmpelses kampagnefilm Burn Burn Burn

    OpenAIRE

    Knigge Kæstel-Hansen, Camilla; Wittrup Stæger, Cæcilie

    2015-01-01

    This project examines how to organize a health campaign to a specific target audience of 15-25 year olds. This audience very quickly filters out information they find irrelevant, and quickly moves on to new things. Thereby, this audience has high demands regarding health campaigns and their relevance. Conclusions will be based on Danish organization Kræftens Bekæmpelse’s campaign film Burn Burn Burn. The film target audience are youths aged 15- 25, and the film’s message is, that the use of t...

  5. Burns injury in children: Is antibiotic prophylaxis recommended?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Chahed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound infection is the most frequent complication in burn patients. There is a lack of guidelines on the use of systemic antibiotics in children to prevent this complication. Patients and Methods: A prospective study is carried out on 80 patients to evaluate the role of antibiotic prophylaxis in the control of infections. Results: The mean age was 34 months (9 months to 8 years. There was a male predominance with sex ratio of 1.66. The mean burn surface size burn was 26.5% with total burn surface area ranging from 5% to 33%, respectively. According to American Burn Association 37% (30/80 were severe burns with second and third degree burns >10% of the total surface body area in children aged <10 years old. Scalds represented 76.2% (61/80 of the burns. Burns by hot oil were 11 cases (13.7%, while 8 cases (10% were flame burns. The random distribution of the groups was as follow: Group A (amoxicilline + clavulanic acid = 25 cases, Group B (oxacilline = 20 cases and Group C (no antibiotics = 35 cases. Total infection rate was 20% (16/80, distributed as follow: 8 cases (50% in Group C, 5 cases (31.2% in Group A and 3 cases in Group B (18.7%. Infection rate in each individual group was: 22.9% (8 cases/35 in Group C, 20% (5 cases/25 in Group A and 15% (3 cases/20 in Group B (P = 0.7. They were distributed as follow: Septicaemia 12 cases/16 (75%, wound infection 4 cases/16 (25%. Bacteria isolated were with a decreasing order: Staphylococcus aureus (36.3%, Pseudomonas (27.2%, Escherichia coli (18.1%, Klebsiella (9% and Enterobacteria (9%. There is a tendency to a delayed cicatrisation (P = 0.07 in case of hot oil burns (65.18 ± 120 days than by flame (54.33 ± 19.8 days than by hot water (29.55 ± 26.2 days. Otherwise no toxic shock syndrome was recorded in this study. Conclusion: It is concluded that adequate and careful nursing of burn wounds seems to be sufficient to prevent complications and to obtain cicatrisation. Antibiotics are

  6. Burns, biofilm and a new appraisal of burn wound sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter; Brammah, Susan; Wills, Edward

    2010-02-01

    Following a burn, the wound may become colonized and septic complications may ensue. Many organisms, commonly isolated from burn wounds produce biofilms, which are defined as a collection of organisms on a surface surrounded by a matrix. Biofilms are associated with development of antibiotic resistant organisms and are refractory to the immune system. The presence of biofilm in the burn wound has not been documented. A study was undertaken using light and electron microscopy to determine the presence of biofilm in the burn wound. Specific stains were used to detect the presence of micro-organisms and associated carbohydrate, a major constituent of the biofilm matrix. A concurrent microbiological study of the burn wound was also carried out. Biofilm was detected in ulcerated areas of the burn wound. Bacterial wound invasion with mixed organisms was also commonly detected. The finding of biofilm in the burn wound has significance in our understanding of burn wound sepsis and supports the evidence for early excision and closure of the burn wound. Due to the recalcitrant nature of biofilm associated sepsis and the difficulty in disrupting biofilm it has implications for the future development of wound care dressings. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Glaucoma in patients with ocular chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Michelle P; Ekşioğlu, Ümit; Mudumbai, Raghu C; Slabaugh, Mark A; Chen, Philip P

    2012-09-01

    To examine the development and management of glaucoma in patients with ocular chemical burns. Retrospective, observational case series. setting: University of Washington Eye Clinics. patient population: Twenty-nine eyes (18 patients) with ocular chemical burns seen between 1997 and 2010 with a minimum of 3 months of follow-up. observation procedure: Eyes were graded using the Roper-Hall scale. main outcome measures: Long-term use of glaucoma medications (3 months or more) and need for glaucoma surgery. The mean age was 45 ± 17 years, with a mean follow-up of 75 ± 47 months (median, 66 months). Roper-Hall grade III or IV eyes (n = 20) had significantly higher intraocular pressure at presentation (35.9 vs 16.4 mm Hg; P = .001) and over follow-up were more likely to require long-term glaucoma medications (P = .003) or to undergo glaucoma surgery (P = .016) than Roper-Hall grade I or II eyes. Thirteen eyes (12 Roper-Hall grade III or IV) underwent glaucoma surgery. Eight eyes underwent glaucoma tube implant surgery; 4 required at least 1 revision. Seven eyes underwent diode laser cyclophotocoagulation; 4 required repeat treatment. Most (89%) eyes had controlled intraocular pressure at the last follow-up. However, 76% of eyes with visual acuity of 20/200 or worse at initial evaluation did not have improved vision at the last follow-up. Eyes with Roper-Hall grade III or IV ocular chemical burns were more likely to have glaucoma and to require surgery for it. Outcomes of glaucoma management generally were good, although tube implant surgeries often had complications requiring revision. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Stanford-ReSurge Burn Scar Contracture Scale for Neck: Development and Initial Validation for Burn Scar Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lawrence; Puri, Vinita; Dangol, Mohan Krishna; Mannan, Iftekhar Ibne; Khundkar, Shafquat Hussain; Le Thua, Trung-Hau; Muguti, Godfrey; Rai, Shankar Man; Karanas, Yvonne; Chang, James

    2016-11-01

    Burn contractures can cause significant disability, particularly in patients in resource-limited settings. However, a gap exists in our ability to measure outcomes in patients with burn contractures of the neck. The objective of this study was to develop and validate the Stanford-ReSurge Burn Scar Contracture Scale-Neck to longitudinally assess functional status and measure functional improvement following contracture release of the neck. A literature review was performed to identify scales used in neck assessment and burn assessment. Items were then removed from the pool based on redundancy, feasibility, cultural appropriateness, and applicability to patients in international resource-limited environments. Remaining items were administered to patients with burn contracture of the neck. The initial literature review found 33 scales that were combined to create an initial pool of 714 items, which was first reduced to 40 items. Feedback from field testing then yielded a 20-item outcome tool to assess appearance, activities of daily living, somatosensation, satisfaction, and range of motion, with a floor of 20 and a ceiling score of 100 points. Preliminary testing with 10 patients showed an average preoperative score of 58 points and an average 1-month postoperative score of 42 points. The authors have created an outcome tool for measuring functional status following burn contracture release of the neck, which can easily be implemented in resource-limited settings where the burden of burn injuries and morbidities is disproportionately high. Ongoing work includes a multicountry study to evaluate validity and reliability.

  9. [The organization of burn care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, Jacques

    2002-12-15

    In 2002, the organisation of burn care is confronted to a great deficiency in burn epidemiological datas. The main mechanisms of hospitalized burns are somehow wellknown in industrialized countries: about 60% scalds and 30% flame burns; as well as the place of occurrence (60% at home, and 20% at work), and the risk groups (3 times more important for the age group 0-4 years old). The incidence of burns needing medical care (all levels) (250/100,000 inh/yr) or hospitalization (15-20/100,000 inh/yr) is much more uncertain. The statistics of Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG), for hospitalized patients will allow in France very shortly to know more about the most rational ways of dispatching and treating them. They already show that only 30% of hospitalized burned patients are treated in specialized facilities.

  10. Perceived fatigue following pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, Moniek; Mouton, Leonora J; Dijkstra, Froukje; Niemeijer, Anuschka S; van Brussel, Marco; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Disseldorp, Laurien M; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    2017-12-01

    Fatigue is a common consequence of numerous pediatric health conditions. In adult burn survivors, fatigue was found to be a major problem. The current cross-sectional study is aimed at determining the levels of perceived fatigue in pediatric burn survivors. Perceived fatigue was assessed in 23 children and adolescents (15 boys and 8 girls, aged 6-18 years, with burns covering 10-46% of the total body surface area, 1-5 years post burn) using both child self- and parent proxy reports of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Multidimensional Fatigue Scale. Outcomes were compared with reference values of non-burned peers. At group level, pediatric burn survivors did not report significantly more symptoms of fatigue than their non-burned peers. Individual assessments showed, however, that four children experienced substantial symptoms of fatigue according to the child self-reports, compared to ten children according to the parent proxy reports. Furthermore, parents reported significantly more symptoms of fatigue than the children themselves. Age, gender, extent of burn, length of hospital stay, and number of surgeries could not predict the level of perceived fatigue post-burn. Our results suggest that fatigue is prevalent in at least part of the pediatric burn population after 1-5 years. However, the fact that parents reported significantly more symptoms of fatigue then the children themselves, hampers evident conclusions. It is essential for clinicians and therapists to consider both perspectives when evaluating pediatric fatigue after burn and to determine who needs special attention, the pediatric burn patient or its parent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. [Epidemiology of burns in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, Jacques; Ravat, François

    2012-01-01

    As with most traumas, the epidemiology of the "burn" health-event has long been neglected by public health doctors and rarely considered by burns specialists. There were therefore few verified data and many approximations and preconceived ideas. The gathering of information recently undertaken in France enables the reliability of the data to be improved and the diagnostic and demographic elements relating to hospitalised patients with burns to be established.

  12. Aquatic ecological risks due to cyanide releases from biomass burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Timothy R; Lutes, Christopher C; Doorn, Michiel R J; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Timmenga, Hubert J; Crouch, Robert L

    2003-01-01

    Aquatic toxicity due to the creation and mobilization of chemical constituents by fire has been little studied, despite reports of post-fire fish kills attributed to unspecified pyrogenic toxicants. We examined releases of cyanides from biomass burning and their effect on surface runoff water. In laboratory test burns, available cyanide concentrations in leachate from residual ash were much higher than in leachate from partially burned and unburned fuel and were similar to or higher than the 96-h median lethal concentration (LC50) for rainbow trout (45 microg/l). Free cyanide concentrations in stormwater runoff collected after a wildfire in North Carolina averaged 49 microg/l, again similar to the rainbow trout LC50 and an order of magnitude higher than in samples from an adjacent unburned area. Pyrogenic cyanide inputs, together with other fire-related stressors, may contribute to post-fire fish mortalities, particularly those affecting salmonids.

  13. Geospatial and epidemiological analysis of severe burns in New South Wales by residential postcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsman, David; Li, Zhe; Bruce, Eleanor; Maitz, Peter K M

    2014-06-01

    Burns are a common trauma, affecting 1% of the Australian population annually and are associated with significant physical, psychological, social and economic burdens for victims and their families. There has been a recent paradigm shift from the treatment of burns to a more preventative approach. To examine the risk of severe burns by geographic region in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, using geospatial analytic techniques. Retrospective analyses were carried out to examine the 2006-2010 NSW burns data collected by the NSW Severe Burns Injury Service. Spatial analysis software was used to map the relative risk of burns by postcode areas. Spatial cluster analyses were then undertaken for the Greater Sydney Area (GSA) using Global Moran's I statistics and Getis-Ord analyses. High- and low-risk populations and areas were examined to ascertain differences by sociodemographic characteristics, etiology and the extent of burn. Scalds were the most common types of burns and men were at greater risk of burns than women. There was significant clustering of burns by postcode area, with a higher relative risk of severe burns seen in Western Sydney area and lower risk observed in Eastern and Southern Sydney. In high-risk areas burns occurred more frequently in the 13-24 months and the 20-29 years age groups, while in low-risk areas burns mostly affect the 20-29 and 30-39 years age groups. High-risk areas were characterized by socioeconomic disadvantage. Mapping the risk of burns is a valuable tool for policy makers to plan and deliver targeted intervention strategies for burns prevention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Kenya cardinal burns condoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-09

    Kenya's top Roman Catholic church official burned condoms and safe sex literature in a ceremony organized by a group opposed to contraception and sex education. About 250 people watched as Cardinal Maurice Otunga and two gynecologists prayed and sang before setting fire to several boxes of condoms and 100 copies of pamphlets promoting safe sex. The pamphlets encouraged condom use to fight the spread of HIV. The World Health Organization has estimated that 1 million of Kenya's 26 million people are infected with HIV or AIDS. full text

  15. Peat Bog Ecosystems: Burning

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, Richard; Birnie, Richard; Clough, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Fires occur naturally on bogs through lightning strikes, but for any given location this is a rare occurrence - perhaps once every 200 or 300 years. Current burning practice for grazing or to encourage grouse means that ground is burnt 10x more frequently than this, resulting in loss of natural peat bog biodiversity and peat-forming species. Full recovery may take considerably more than a century.\\ud \\ud This briefing note is part of a series aimed at policy makers, practitioners and academic...

  16. The Brief Fatigue Inventory is reliable and valid for the burn patient cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Christopher; Li, Marie; Finlay, Vidya; Jackson, Teresa; Burrows, Sally; Wood, Fiona M; Edgar, Dale W

    2015-08-01

    After burn, patients are at risk of fatigue which may influence negatively their capacity to participate in activity, rehabilitation and other treatments. Fatigue may stem from the wound healing and systemic responses to burn which drive a hypermetabolic state that may persist for months. However, an established method is not available for objectively measuring fatigue after burns. The Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) was hypothesised to be an appropriate option for assessments following severe burn. The primary aim of the study was to establish if the BFI was reliable and valid in a burn patient sample. Adult patients admitted between 2009 and 2013 to Royal Perth Hospital Burn Center were included. Patients completed the BFI and Burns Specific Health Scale Brief (BSHS-B) in tandem at one, three, six and 12 months after burn. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha; construct validity using factor analysis and multi-variable regression of BFI; and, criterion validity with longitudinal regression of BFI with BSHS-B. The sample (n=587) had a median TBSA of 3% (range=0.90). The factor analysis confirmed a single-domain construct, centred around the first scale item. Good correlation between BFI and BSHS-B scores (pburn patients and a significant association of fatigue levels over time with TBSA. The BFI is a reliable and valid tool for fatigue measurement in patients during the first 12 months after burn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Ice & Fire: the Burning Question

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    With the Arctic opening up to new shipping routes and increased oil exploration and production due to climate change, the risk of an Arctic oil spill is increasing. Of the classic oil spill response methods (mechanical recovery, dispersants and in-situ burning), in-situ burning is considered...... to be particularly a suitable response method in the Arctic. In-situ burning aims to remove the oil from the marine environment by burning it from the water surface. A recent Ph.D. thesis from the Technical University of Denmark has provided some new insights with respect to the fire science behind this response...

  18. Nutrition Support in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Aydoğan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn trauma causes serious metabolic derangements. Increased metabolic rate which is apart of a pathophysiologic characteristic of burn trauma results in protein-energy malnutrition. This situation causes impaired wound healing, muscle and fat tissue’s breakdown, growth retardation in children and infections. Nutrition support is vital in the treatment strategies of burn victims to prevent high mortal and disabling complications in this devastating trauma. Our aim in this study is to review management of nutrition in burn victims. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 74-83

  19. Carbon dioxide laser ablation with immediate autografting in a full-thickness porcine burn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatter, R D; Goldberg, J S; Schomacker, K T; Compton, C C; Flotte, T J; Bua, D P; Greaves, K W; Nishioka, N S; Sheridan, R L

    1998-08-01

    To compare the long-term clinical and histologic outcome of immediate autografting of full-thickness burn wounds ablated with a high-power continuous-wave CO2 laser to sharply débrided wounds in a porcine model. Continuous-wave CO2 lasers have performed poorly as tools for burn excision because the large amount of thermal damage to viable subeschar tissues precluded successful autografting. However, a new technique, in which a high-power laser is rapidly scanned over the eschar, results in eschar vaporization without significant damage to underlying viable tissues, allowing successful immediate autografting. Full-thickness paravertebral burn wounds measuring 36 cm2 were created on 11 farm swine. Wounds were ablated to adipose tissue 48 hours later using either a surgical blade or a 150-Watt continuous-wave CO2 laser deflected by an x-y galvanometric scanner that translated the beam over the tissue surface, removing 200 microm of tissue per scan. Both sites were immediately autografted and serially evaluated clinically and histologically for 180 days. The laser-treated sites were nearly bloodless. The mean residual thermal damage was 0.18+/-0.05 mm. The mean graft take was 96+/-11% in manual sites and 93+/-8% in laser sites. On postoperative day 7, the thickness of granulation tissue at the graft-wound bed interface was greater in laser-debrided sites. By postoperative day 180, the manual and laser sites were histologically identical. Vancouver scar assessment revealed no differences in scarring at postoperative day 180. Long-term scarring, based on Vancouver scar assessments and histologic evaluation, was equivalent at 6 months in laser-ablated and sharply excised sites. Should this technology become practical, the potential clinical implications include a reduction in surgical blood loss without sacrifice of immediate engraftment rates or long-term outcome.

  20. Friction burns in children: does laser Doppler imaging have a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Seema; Ward, Diane; Harvey, John G; Hei, Erik La; Holland, Andrew J A

    2012-01-01

    Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) has been increasingly used to predict pediatric burn wound outcome. A majority of these wounds are scald, contact, or flame burns. No study has specifically evaluated the use of LDI in pediatric friction burns. Our objective was to critically evaluate LDI assessment of pediatric friction burns to determine its predictive value with this mechanism of injury. We conducted a retrospective review of all LDI scans performed on pediatric friction burns during a 2-year period. We identified 36 patients with a mean age of 3.6 years (range, 19 months to 15 years). LDI accurately predicted burn wound outcome in 23 (64%) cases. In 13 cases, LDI did not correctly predict burn wound outcome. Eight were expected to heal within 14 days, but six of those eight took an average of 20.3 days to heal (range, 18-29 days), and the other two required skin grafting. Of the remaining five incorrect predictions, four were caused by an inability to correlate the flux scan with the clinical appearance of the burn, and one was thought to take more than 21 days to heal but healed within this period. Our data suggest that LDI appears to be a less reliable tool in predicting the outcome of friction burns when compared to other mechanisms of burn injury in children. This may reflect the physical differences in the mechanism of friction burns as opposed to other forms of thermal injury.

  1. Prevention and management of outpatient pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Shannon P; Billmire, David A

    2008-07-01

    Burns are common injuries in the pediatric population, with an estimated 250,000 pediatric burn patients seeking medical care annually. A relative few require inpatient management. This article discusses suggestions for burn prevention, as well as acute burn care and long-term management of small burns.

  2. Oral Rehydration Therapy in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-24

    Burn Any Degree Involving 20-29 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 30-39 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 40-49 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 50-59 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 60-65 Percent of Body Surface

  3. Mineral nutrition and production of beans in areas managed with and without burning of organic residues and different fertilization types/ Nutrição mineral, componentes da produção e produtividade da cultura do feijão em áreas manejadas com e sem queima de resíduos orgânicos e diferentes tipos de adubação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinval Xavier Aguiar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of organic residues in agriculture has motivated the development of researches that seeks for the sustainability of the production. The agricultural use, in nature or in the form of compounds of twigs and branches resulting from the pruning of trees in urban centers can be considered as a source of organic fertilizer to various crops. Through a simulated situation of areas managed using the fire, this work was led to evaluate the effects of doses, burning of organic residues and fertilization types on the components of the production, leaf contents of macronutrients and on the yield of two cultivars of carioca beans (IPR Colibri and IPR Eldorado cultivated in rotation system with corn crop. Two experiments were installed: Experiment I - with the burning of the residues; and Experiment II - without the burning of the residues. For each experiment it was used a randomized block design with three replications in a 4x2 factorial arrangement, in which the factors were four doses of organic residues (0, 15, 30 and 45 Mg ha-1 and two fertilization types (EOF: organic fertilization and OMF: organic mineral fertilization. To evaluate the effect of fire on the productivity of bean cultivars was performed a joint analysis between experiments I and II. The components of production, the leaf nutrients contents and the productivity of bean cultivars IPR and IPR Colibri Eldorado were always higher with organo-mineral fertilization. Comparing the experiments it was found that the productivity of the bean IPR Colibri was higher than on treatment without burning of residues associated with mineral fertilizer. A utilização de resíduos orgânicos na agricultura tem motivado o desenvolvimento de pesquisas que visam a sustentabilidade do processo de produção. O aproveitamento agrícola, in natura ou na forma de compostos, dos ramos e galhos resultantes da poda de árvores dos centros urbanos, pode e deve ser considerado como uma fonte de adubo org

  4. The impact of patient demographics and comorbidities upon burns admitted to Tygerberg Hospital Burns Unit, Western Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloake, T; Haigh, T; Cheshire, J; Walker, D

    2017-03-01

    In South Africa, burns are a major public health problem responsible for significant morbidity and long-term physical disability. This is, in part, due to a significant proportion of the urban population living in poorly constructed, combustible accommodation. The presence of co-morbid diseases such as diabetes and malignancy in patients with burns has been associated with a poorer outcome. The impact of other diseases such as HIV has yet to be defined. A retrospective data collection study analysed the 221 patients admitted to Tygerberg Hospital Burns Unit in 2011 and the first six months of 2013. Using hospital records, patient demographic data was collected alongside burn agent, ICU admission, complications, and patient outcome in terms of length of stay and mortality. The most common burn agent was hot liquid (45.7%). A significant proportion of patients were subject to intentional attacks (34.3%). Shack fires and flame accounted cumulatively for 85% of total inhalational burns, the highest rates of admission to ICU (85.5%), the highest rate of complications, as well as 92.3% of all total fatalities. HIV+ patients had a higher mortality (13.3% vs 5%, p=0.22) and a higher complication rate (46.7% vs 30%, p=0.21). There was no difference in length of stay between the HIV+ and HIV- cohort (12days vs. 15.5 days, p=0.916). Burns are a significant yet preventable cause of mortality and morbidity. The rising number of shack fires, responsible for extensive burns and resultant mortality is concerning and indicates urgent attention and action. HIV complicates the recovery from burn and is responsible for an increased rate of in hospital mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Global Burned Area and Biomass Burning Emissions from Small Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  6. Global burned area and biomass burning emissions from small fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; van der Werf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  7. Fire behavior, weather, and burn severity of the 2007 Anaktuvuk River tundra fire, North Slope, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin M. Jones; Crystal A. Kolden; Randi Jandt; John T. Abatzoglu; Frank Urban; Christopher D. Arp

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the Anaktuvuk River Fire (ARF) became the largest recorded tundra fire on the North Slope of Alaska. The ARF burned for nearly three months, consuming more than 100,000 ha. At its peak in early September, the ARF burned at a rate of 7000 ha d-1. The conditions potentially responsible for this large tundra fire include modeled record high...

  8. Burning more than calories: treadmill friction injuries in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davidson, C C

    2012-02-01

    Treadmill injuries in young children are a serious but little documented problem. Friction burns occur when the hands come into contact with the moving belt resulting in deep burns that often require hospital admission and surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the nature and prevalence of injuries sustained and to highlight treadmill friction burns as a public health issue previously undocumented in Ireland. A retrospective chart review from January 2006 until March 2008 was performed and functional outcome was assessed by the modified Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire. Eight girls and four boys from one year and seven months to seven years and five months were treated. Eight children required admission to hospital and to date three have required surgery for their injuries. This is a new and increasing problem in Ireland which must be highlighted.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile in adults with burn scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyack, Zephanie; Kimble, Roy; McPhail, Steven; Plaza, Anita; Simons, Megan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the longitudinal validity, reproducibility, responsiveness and interpretability of the adult version of the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile, a patient-report measure of health-related quality of life. A prospective longitudinal cohort study of patients with or at risk of burn scarring was conducted at three assessment points (at baseline around the time of wound healing, one to two weeks post-baseline and 1-month post-baseline). Participants attending a major metropolitan adult burn centre at baseline were recruited. Participants completed the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey and Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs), smallest detectable change, percentage of those who improved, stayed the same or worsened and Area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC) were used to test the aim. Data were included for 118 participants at baseline, 68 participants at one to two weeks and 57 participants at 1-month post-baseline. All groups of items had acceptable reproducibility, except for the overall impact of burn scars (ICC = 0.69), the impact of sensations which was not expected to be stable (ICC = 0.63), mobility and daily activities (ICC = 0.63, 0.67 respectively). The responsiveness of six out of seven groups of items able to be tested against external criterion was supported (AUC = 0.72-0.75). Hypothesised correlations of changes in the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile items with changes in criterion measures generally supported longitudinal validity (e.g., nine out of thirteen hypotheses using the SF-36 as an external criterion were supported). Internal consistency estimates, item-total and inter-item correlations indicated there was likely redundancy of some groups of items, particularly in the relationships and social interaction, appearance and emotional reactions items (Chronbach's alpha range = 0.94-0.95). Support was found

  10. Psychometric properties of the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile in adults with burn scars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zephanie Tyack

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the longitudinal validity, reproducibility, responsiveness and interpretability of the adult version of the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile, a patient-report measure of health-related quality of life.A prospective longitudinal cohort study of patients with or at risk of burn scarring was conducted at three assessment points (at baseline around the time of wound healing, one to two weeks post-baseline and 1-month post-baseline. Participants attending a major metropolitan adult burn centre at baseline were recruited. Participants completed the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey and Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs, smallest detectable change, percentage of those who improved, stayed the same or worsened and Area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC were used to test the aim.Data were included for 118 participants at baseline, 68 participants at one to two weeks and 57 participants at 1-month post-baseline. All groups of items had acceptable reproducibility, except for the overall impact of burn scars (ICC = 0.69, the impact of sensations which was not expected to be stable (ICC = 0.63, mobility and daily activities (ICC = 0.63, 0.67 respectively. The responsiveness of six out of seven groups of items able to be tested against external criterion was supported (AUC = 0.72-0.75. Hypothesised correlations of changes in the Brisbane Burn Scar Impact Profile items with changes in criterion measures generally supported longitudinal validity (e.g., nine out of thirteen hypotheses using the SF-36 as an external criterion were supported. Internal consistency estimates, item-total and inter-item correlations indicated there was likely redundancy of some groups of items, particularly in the relationships and social interaction, appearance and emotional reactions items (Chronbach's alpha range = 0.94-0.95.Support

  11. Effects of thinning, residue mastication, and prescribed fire on soil and nutrient budgets in a Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of thinning followed by residue mastication (THIN), prescribed fire (BURN), and thinning plus residue mastication plus burning (T+B) on nutrient budgets and resin-based (plant root simulator [PRS] probe) measurements of soil nutrient availability in a mixed-conifer forest were measured. ...

  12. Timing Constraints on Remote Sensing of Wildland Fire Burned Area in the Southeastern US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Robertson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM satellite imagery is increasingly used for mapping wildland fire burned area and burn severity, owing to its frequency of collection, relatively high resolution, and availability free of charge. However, rapid response of vegetation following fire and frequent cloud cover pose challenges to this approach in the southeastern US. We assessed these timing constraints by using a series of Landsat TM images to determine how rapidly the remotely sensed burn scar signature fades following prescribed burns in wet flatwoods and depression swamp community types in the Apalachicola National Forest, Florida, USA during 2006. We used both the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR of reflectance bands sensitive to vegetation and exposed soil cover, as well as the change in NBR from before to after fire (dNBR, to estimate burned area. We also determined the average and maximum amount of time following fire required to obtain a cloud-free image for burns in each month of the year, as well as the predicted effect of this time lag on percent accuracy of burn scar estimates. Using both NBR and dNBR, the detectable area decreased linearly 9% per month on average over the first four months following fire. Our findings suggest that the NBR and dNBR methods for monitoring burned area in common southeastern US vegetation community types are limited to an average of 78–90% accuracy among months of the year, with individual burns having values as low as 38%, if restricted to use of Landsat 5 TM imagery. However, the majority of burns can still be mapped at accuracies similar to those in other regions of the US, and access to additional sources of satellite imagery would improve overall accuracy.

  13. Timing constraints on remote sensing of wildland fire burned area in the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picotte, Joshua J.; Robertson, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery is increasingly used for mapping wildland fire burned area and burn severity, owing to its frequency of collection, relatively high resolution, and availability free of charge. However, rapid response of vegetation following fire and frequent cloud cover pose challenges to this approach in the southeastern US. We assessed these timing constraints by using a series of Landsat TM images to determine how rapidly the remotely sensed burn scar signature fades following prescribed burns in wet flatwoods and depression swamp community types in the Apalachicola National Forest, Florida, USA during 2006. We used both the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) of reflectance bands sensitive to vegetation and exposed soil cover, as well as the change in NBR from before to after fire (dNBR), to estimate burned area. We also determined the average and maximum amount of time following fire required to obtain a cloud-free image for burns in each month of the year, as well as the predicted effect of this time lag on percent accuracy of burn scar estimates. Using both NBR and dNBR, the detectable area decreased linearly 9% per month on average over the first four months following fire. Our findings suggest that the NBR and dNBR methods for monitoring burned area in common southeastern US vegetation community types are limited to an average of 78–90% accuracy among months of the year, with individual burns having values as low as 38%, if restricted to use of Landsat 5 TM imagery. However, the majority of burns can still be mapped at accuracies similar to those in other regions of the US, and access to additional sources of satellite imagery would improve overall accuracy.

  14. Perceived fatigue following pediatric burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Moniek; Mouton, Leonora J.; Dijkstra, Froukje; Niemeijer, Anuschka S.; van Brussel, Marco; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Disseldorp, Laurien M.; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Fatigue is a common consequence of numerous pediatric health conditions. In adult burn survivors, fatigue was found to be a major problem. The current cross-sectional study is aimed at determining the levels of perceived fatigue in pediatric burn survivors. Methods: Perceived fatigue was

  15. Perceived fatigue following pediatric burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Moniek; Mouton, Leonora J.; Dijkstra, Froukje; Niemeijer, Anuschka S.; van Brussel, Marco|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481962X; Van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Disseldorp, Laurien M.; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Fatigue is a common consequence of numerous pediatric health conditions. In adult burn survivors, fatigue was found to be a major problem. The current cross-sectional study is aimed at determining the levels of perceived fatigue in pediatric burn survivors. Methods Perceived fatigue was

  16. The Burning Truth(s)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burns surgery has traditionally been somewhat of a. “Cinderella” subspecialty, with the burn surgeon regularly being faced with significant physical and emotional demands. In addition, this branch of surgery has neither complicated surgical procedures nor a plethora of technological equipment to pique the interest of ...

  17. Modern management of paediatric burns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... management of burns within a general hospital setting. Causes. About 90% of childhood burns are preventable. Informal housing, overcrowding and lack of electricity are underlying problems.4. The most frequent ... injury is not important from a wound treatment perspective, NAI has far-reaching social and ...

  18. Wood-burning stoves in low-carbon dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; Afshari, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    The European climate change strategy intends to encourage the erection of low-carbon buildings and the upgrading of existing buildings to low-carbon level. At the same time, it is an EU vision to maximise the use of renewable energy resources. In this strategy, small-scale wood-burning is an over......The European climate change strategy intends to encourage the erection of low-carbon buildings and the upgrading of existing buildings to low-carbon level. At the same time, it is an EU vision to maximise the use of renewable energy resources. In this strategy, small-scale wood......-burning is an overlooked source for heating. A wood-burning stove is considered low-carbon technology since its fuel is based on local residual biomass. A field study investigating how modern wood-burning stoves operated in modern single-family houses showed that intermittent heat supply occasionally conflicted...... with the primary heating system and that chimney exhaust occasionally conflicted with the ventilation system causing overheating and particles in the indoor environment. Nonetheless, most of the wood-burning stoves contributed considerably to the total heating. On this background, it was concluded that better...

  19. Evaluating potential benefits of burning lower quality fuel oils using the oil burn optimization model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babilonia, P.

    1995-09-01

    As a result of a 1987 New York State Public Service Commission Audit of Niagara Mohawk`s Fuel Supply operations, Niagara Mohawk (NMPC) became interested in analyzing the plant performance impacts of burning fuels of differing qualities at its various generating stations. Black & Veatch (B&V) had previously developed a computer model for EPRI that analyzed coal quality impacts (i.e., Coal Quality Impact Model). As a result of B&V`s work, NMPC contracted with B&V to first develop custom-designed software for its coal stations (Coal Burn Optimization Model (CBOM)). Subsequently, B&V was retained to develop a similar designed software for its oil stations, Oswego and Albany Steam Stations. The Oil Burn Optimization Model (OBOM) was, therefore, developed. OBOM was designed to be used to evaluate residual fuel oil supply options by predicting their fuel-related plant operating and maintenance costs. Fuel oil-related costs can also be compared to natural gas-related costs. Costs are estimated by predicting performance of various plant equipment. Predictions focus on combustion calculations, material flows, auxiliary power, boiler efficiency, precipitator and fan performance, fuel pumping and preheating requirements, and corrosion considerations. Total costs at the busbar attributed to fuel are calculated from these predictions. OBOM is a PC-based system operating under MS-DOS. The model produces hard copy results for quick comparison of fuels and their potential effects on plant operating and maintenance costs.

  20. The year in burns 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steven E; Phelan, Herbert A; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 3415 research articles were published with burns in the title, abstract, and/or keyword in 2013. We have continued to see an increase in this number; the following reviews articles selected from these by the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and colleagues that in their opinion are most likely to have effects on burn care treatment and understanding. As we have done before, articles were found and divided into the following topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterization, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. The articles are mentioned briefly with notes from the authors; readers are referred to the full papers for details. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Deaths related to chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelites, Joseph J; Kemp, Walter L; Barnard, Jeffrey J; Prahlow, Joseph A

    2011-12-01

    The authors present a series of 6 deaths due to the uncommon cause of chemical burns. Of the 6 deaths due to chemical burns, 4 deaths were due to ingestion of a chemical, 1 death was caused by chemical burns of the skin, and 1 death resulted from rectal insufflation of a chemical. Seven additional cases where chemical burns may have been a contributing factor to the death or an incidental finding are also presented. Four cases are related to an incident involving chemical exposure during an industrial explosion. Three cases involve motor fuel burns of the skin. Two cases concern a plane crash incident, and 1 case involved a vehicular collision. Cases are derived from the records of the Dallas County Medical Examiner's Office and those of the authors' consultation practices. Each of the cases is presented, followed by a discussion of the various mechanisms of chemical injury.

  2. [Investigation and analysis of factors influencing rehabilitation of burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Xu, Le; Wu, Bo-yu; Zheng, You-jin

    2009-12-01

    To study the factors influencing health of burn patients in rehabilitation period. One hundred and one patients hospitalized in burn department of Xiehe Hospital of Fujian Medical University from February 2008 to October 2008 were investigated by means of General Information Questionnaire, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Medical Coping Modes Questionnaire, and the Social Support Rating Scale. Their rehabilitation condition was scored according to the Abbreviated Burn-Specific Health Scale. Investigation data were processed by multiple linear regression analysis in order to find out the factors influencing rehabilitation of burn patients. Patients in this group were scored (57 +/- 16) points in physical function, rate [(actual score/possible highest score) x 100%, the same below] 71.1% (the lowest); (97 +/- 19) points in psychological function, rate 80.6%; (53 +/- 8) points in social function, rate 88.4% (the highest); (45 +/- 11) points in general health, rate 74.5%; (251 +/- 44) points in comprehensive health [standard score (314 +/- 55) points], rate 78.5% (upper middle). The factors included in the comprehensive health regression equation (F = 11.602, P resignation. They accounted for 46.6% of the variance of comprehensive health. Monthly income, size of burn, introverted/extroverted characteristics, living, social support, and resignation are the main factors influencing the rehabilitation level of burn patients.

  3. Why burn patients are referred?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Noor-Ahmad; Karimi, Hamid

    2017-05-01

    Many burn patients are needed to be referred to a tertiary burn hospital according to the American Burn Association (ABA) criteria. The purpose of this study was to verify the reasons for referring of the burn patients to the hospital. For 2 years, we prospectively surveyed the burn patients referred to a tertiary teaching burn hospital. Data for the following variables were collected and analyzed with SPSS software V21.0: causes of burn; age; gender; total body surface area (TBSA) measured at the referring center; TBSA measured at the receiving center; concomitant diseases and traumas; the reason for referral; condition of patients before and during the transportation; transportation time; presence of infection; presence of inhalation injury, electrical injury, and chemical injury; child abuse; insurance coverage; and results and outcomes of patients. A total of 578 burn patients (33.6% of the total admissions) were referred in the study period. Among these patients, 70.9% were females. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 35.3 (19.69) years. The mean (SD) of TBSA was 45.2 (26.3). Of the 578 patients, 45% were referred by request of the family or patients; 9% were referred because lack of diagnostic facility, approximately 43% were referred because of the need to be admitted in a tertiary burn center, 0.7% were referred because of a lack of capacity at other hospitals, and 0.5% were referred because of an error in the estimation of TBSA. A total of 45% of the referrals were by request of the family and patients. Tele-medicine may help to establish a direct contact between expert burn physicians and the patients and thus reduce unnecessary transfers. Approximately 9% of the referrals were because of lack of some diagnostic facilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. The Function and Structure of Peripheral Nerves Following Cutaneous Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-13

    fascial incisions and/or perineurial incisions in the management of the conduction blocks at so-e later phase of this study. For the past several months...that occur at intervals following injury in the burn model and the effect of various manipulations 4. . .. * ..... .... . .. .. . -* 4

  5. The effects of oxandrolone and exercise on muscle mass and function in children with severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przkora, Rene; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E

    2007-01-01

    Severe burns are associated with a significant loss of muscle and strength. Studies have reported that oxandrolone improves lean body mass in muscle-wasting conditions. Also shown previously in burned children is that an exercise program increases lean body mass and muscle strength. We hypothesized that oxandrolone, in combination with exercise, would increase lean body mass and muscle strength in severely burned children more than oxandrolone alone or exercise alone. Fifty-one burned children (> or = 40% total body surface area burned) were randomly assigned to receive oxandrolone alone (0.1 mg/kg per day orally; n = 9), oxandrolone and exercise (n = 14), placebo and no exercise (n = 11), or placebo and exercise (n = 17). Administration of oxandrolone was started at discharge and continued until 1 year after burn. The 12-week exercise training program was started 6 months after burn. Serum hormones, lean body mass, muscle strength, and peak cardiopulmonary capacity were assessed at 6 (baseline) and 9 months after burn. Data were analyzed using a 1-way analysis of variance, and significance was set at P burned children, thus improving their rehabilitation.

  6. Observations of biomass burning tracers in PM2.5 at two megacities in North China during 2014 APEC summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhisheng; Gao, Jian; Zhang, Leiming; Wang, Han; Tao, Jun; Qiu, Xionghui; Chai, Fahe; Li, Yang; Wang, Shulan

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of biomass burning control measures on PM2.5 reduction, day- and nighttime PM2.5 samples were collected at two urban sites in North China, one in Beijing (BJ) and the other in Shijiazhuang (SJZ), during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. Typical biomass burning aerosol tracers including levoglucosan (LG), Mannosan (MN), and water-soluble potassium (K+), together with other water-soluble ions and carbonaceous species were determined. The levels of biomass burning tracers dropped dramatically during the APEC period when open biomass burning activities were well controlled in North China, yet they increased sharply to even higher levels during the post-APEC period. Distinct linear regression relationships between LG and MN were found with lower LG/MN ratios from periods with much reduced open biomass burning activities. This was likely resulted from the reduced open crop residues burning and increased residential wood burning emissions, as was also supported by the simultaneous decrease in K+/LG ratio. The positive matrix factorization and air quality model simulation analyses suggested that PM2.5 concentration produced from biomass burning sources was reduced by 22% at BJ and 46% at SJZ during the APEC period compared to pre-APEC period, although they increased to higher levels after APEC mainly due to increased residential biomass burning emissions in winter heating season. Biomass burning was also found to be the most important contributor to carbonaceous species that might cause significant light extinction in this region. This study not only suggested implementing biomass burning controls measures were helpful to reduce PM2.5 in North China, but also pointed out both open crop residues burning and indoor biomass burning activities could make substantial contributions to PM2.5 and its major components in urban areas in North China.

  7. Effectiveness of basic fibroblast growth factor for pediatric hand burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Kenji; Fujioka, Masaki; Morooka, Shin; Saijo, Hiroto; Akita, Sadanori

    2016-11-01

    Pediatric hand deep dermal and deep burns may lead to serious hand deformity with functional impairment and result in an esthetically unfavorable outcome. Since there is no guideline regarding the use of growth factors for pediatric hand burns, we sought to investigate the effectiveness of an angiogenic and regenerative growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Consecutive series of second degree or third degree palmer burns at less than 3 years of age seen from January 2010 to June 2014 were included for evaluation at 6 months post-wound healing. The bFGF treatment started from just after injury and continued up to 21 days. Each patient had their scars scored using the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) at 6 months after wound healing. There were 34 children with 49 acute palmar burns. The mean healing period was 13.5 ± 4.3 days (7-44 days) and 43 wounds healed within 21 days. There was no need of additional surgery in the 43 wounds, healed within 21 days. In comparison to the wounds for which healing took more than 21 days, the wounds that healed within 21 days demonstrated significantly better pigmentation, pliability, and height according to the VSS (p pediatric palmer burns. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Spectrum and Treatment Approaches in Corneal Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç Müftüoğlu, İlkay; Aydın Akova, Yonca; Çetinkaya, Altuğ

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical findings, treatment modalities and long-term prognosis of chemical and thermal burns of the cornea. Twenty-one patients (27 eyes) who were followed at two centers for corneal chemical and thermal burns between 2001 and 2013 were included. Eyes were grouped into four grades according to the severity of burn using Roper-Hall classification. Age, gender, type of burn, follow-up duration, corrected visual acuity before and after treatment, treatment modalities and complications were recorded. Patients received medical treatment or combined surgical treatment including amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT), conjunctivolimbal autograft/allograft (CLAU/CLAL) transplantation, keratolimbal allograft (KLAL) or penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). Patients had a mean age of 27.1±15.5 years (range, 6 months-56 years) and were followed for a mean 63.2±58.6 weeks (4-160 weeks). Significant improvement was achieved with medical treatment alone in patients with grade I (4 eyes) and 2 burns (8 eyes). Patients with grade III burns (11 eyes) underwent CLAU (6 eyes), combined AMT/CLAU (3 eyes), AMT/CLAL (1 eye), or CLAL+PKP (1 eye), while patients with grade IV burns (4 eyes) had keratectomy+CLAL/AMT (1 eye), keratectomy+CLAL+PKP after recurrence with CLAU/AMT (1 eye), CLAU+PKP (1 eye), and AMT/KLAL+PKP (1 eye). All patients except the latter showed ocular surface stabilization with these procedures. Ocular burns cause severe impairment of the ocular surface. It is possible to achieve good results with appropriate medical treatment and surgeries including ocular surface reconstruction.

  9. Clinical Spectrum and Treatment Approaches in Corneal Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlkay Kılıç Müftüoğlu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the clinical findings, treatment modalities and long-term prognosis of chemical and thermal burns of the cornea. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients (27 eyes who were followed at two centers for corneal chemical and thermal burns between 2001 and 2013 were included. Eyes were grouped into four grades according to the severity of burn using Roper-Hall classification. Age, gender, type of burn, follow-up duration, corrected visual acuity before and after treatment, treatment modalities and complications were recorded. Patients received medical treatment or combined surgical treatment including amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT, conjunctivolimbal autograft/allograft (CLAU/CLAL transplantation, keratolimbal allograft (KLAL or penetrating keratoplasty (PKP. Results: Patients had a mean age of 27.1±15.5 years (range, 6 months-56 years and were followed for a mean 63.2±58.6 weeks (4- 160 weeks. Significant improvement was achieved with medical treatment alone in patients with grade I (4 eyes and 2 burns (8 eyes. Patients with grade III burns (11 eyes underwent CLAU (6 eyes, combined AMT/CLAU (3 eyes, AMT/CLAL (1 eye, or CLAL+PKP (1 eye, while patients with grade IV burns (4 eyes had keratectomy+CLAL/AMT (1 eye, keratectomy+CLAL+PKP after recurrence with CLAU/AMT (1 eye, CLAU+PKP (1 eye, and AMT/KLAL+PKP (1 eye. All patients except the latter showed ocular surface stabilization with these procedures. Conclusion: Ocular burns cause severe impairment of the ocular surface. It is possible to achieve good results with appropriate medical treatment and surgeries including ocular surface reconstruction. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 182-187

  10. Wildlife mitigation burn monitoring program at Teck Coal Limited : Fording River Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, C.R. [Summit Environmental Consultants Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Caldwell, T.; Sword, G. [Teck Coal Ltd., Fording River Operations, Elkford, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This articled discussed a monitoring program evaluating the results of prescribed burns with respect to forest cover reduction, forest production, and wildlife utilization. The burn treatments were undertaken to mitigate the effects of ungulate habitat loss resulting from mine expansion and to increase wildlife habitat suitability and provide winter habitat for elk and moose. Pre-burn and post-burn aerial photographs were used to evaluate the effects of the burn treatments. Data on vegetation, wildlife use, and standing crop production were collected from 36 transects located in paired burned and unburned habitats during the course of the monitoring program, which operated from 1998 to 2007. The mitigation burns were generally found to be successful at improving ungulate habitat. Despite variation among treatment areas and years, the standing crop measurements showed that forest production and animal unit months were greater in the burn treatment areas than in the unburned areas. In particular, the increased cover of palatable grasses and forbs enhanced the elk winter range. The burn treatments altered the stand structure and species dominance. Signs of habitat use showed that elk and mule deer preferentially used the burned sites during the monitoring period. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Success of artificial bird nests in burned Gulf Coast Chenier Plain marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrey, S.W.; Wilson, B.C.; Afton, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    Wildlife managers in the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain of Louisiana and Texas frequently burn marshes during winter to improve habitat for wintering waterfowl and furbearers. Such fires dramatically alter vegetation structure and cover, although such changes are generally temporary. However, if vegetation cover does not recover sufficiently by the start of the subsequent breeding season, nests of marsh birds could be exposed to increased predation rates. We examined effects of burning on 2 measures of vegetation structure and on 2 types of artificial bird nests during breeding seasons (May and June) before and after experimental winter burns (December and January). We found that vegetation structure did not differ between burned and non-burned marshes at 5 months post-burn. Similarly, depredation rates of artificial sparrow and duck nests did not differ between burned and non-burned marshes during the post-burn breeding season. We recommend that managers complete burning programs by the end of January so that sufficient nesting cover develops before the start of the breeding season.

  12. The development and preliminary validation of the Taiwanese Manual Ability Measure for Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Szu-Yen; Chen, Christine C; Mao, Hui-Fen; Hsiao, Fong-Yi; Tu, Vita Yu-Hsien

    2013-09-01

    To develop and validate the Taiwanese Manual Ability Measure for Burns (T-MAM for Burns), a task-oriented functional evaluation tool to assess self-reported manual ability in burn patients. A longitudinal study. A sample of 45 burn patients from burn rehabilitation centers with varying degrees of hand involvement. The preliminary testing version was formed by adding burn specific items to the Taiwanese version of the Manual Ability Measure. A field test was then conducted for item reduction and psychometric properties testing. Out of 55 initial items, 20 were selected into the final version of the T-MAM for Burns. Psychometric analyses indicated that it was reliable (test-retest ICC=.99), with adequate concurrent validity with various other hand function tests (r=-.79 with the short form Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand, or, the QuickDASH) and discriminative validity (significant difference (t=2.99, P=.005) between groups with unilateral vs. bilateral hand burns), and responsive (ES=.24 and .44 at one- and 3-month evaluations). This study shows that the T-MAM for Burns has great potential to be a functional outcome measure for burn rehabilitation. Additional research with a larger sample should be conducted to further confirm its validity and reliability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. Management of Fresh Wheat Residue for Irrigated Winter Canola Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter canola is popular with many irrigated growers as it provides excellent disease control benefits for potatoes grown in rotation. There is a belief among irrigated canola growers that fresh wheat residue must be burned and the soil then heavily tilled before winter canola is planted. These grow...

  14. Outpatient management of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassira, Wrood; Namias, Nicholas

    2008-07-01

    The leading etiologies of pediatric burns are scald, thermal, and electrical injuries. The initial management of burns involves assessment of burn depth and total body surface area (TBSA) affected, a history, and physical examination. Calculation of percent of TBSA affected is an important determinant of the necessity for hospitalization versus outpatient management. Only second- and third-degree burns are included in the calculation. The criteria for outpatient management vary based on the center experience and resources. One such set of criteria in an experienced burn center includes burn affecting less than 15% TBSA, therefore not requiring fluid resuscitation; the ability to take in oral fluids, excluding serious perioral burns; no airway involvement or aspiration of hot liquid; no abuse; and dependable family able to transport the patient for clinic appointments. Once the child is ready to reenter school, the physician must discuss with the family and school staff any needs and expectations for the child, including wound care. Social reintegration can be difficult. Educating the teachers and staff of the child's appearance may help prepare the students.

  15. Sedation and Analgesia in Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Akıncı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is one of the most serious injuries that mankind may face. In addition to serious inflammation, excessive fluid loss, presence of hemodynamic instability due to intercurrent factors such as debridements, infections and organ failure, very different levels and intensities of pain, psychological problems such as traumatic stress disorder, depression, delirium at different levels that occur in patient with severe burn are the factors which make it difficult to provide the patient comfort. In addition to a mild to moderate level of baseline permanent pain in burn patients, which is due to tissue damage, there is procedural pain as well, which occurs by treatments such as grafting and dressings, that are severe, short-term burst style 'breakthrough' pain. Movement and tactile stimuli are also seen in burn injury as an effect to sensitize the peripheral and central nervous system. Even though many burn centers have established protocols to struggle with the pain, studies show that pain relief still inadequate in burn patients. Therefore, the treatment of burn pain and the prevention of possible emergence of future psychiatric problems suc as post-traumatic stress disorder, the sedative and anxiolytic agents should be used as a recommendation according to the needs and hemodynamic status of individual patient. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 26-30

  16. Analysis of the burns profile and the admission rate of severely burned adult patient to the National Burn Center of Chile after the 2010 earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Claudia; Villegas, Jorge; Sylvester, Marilu; Peña, Veronica; Bravo, Iside

    2011-06-01

    Chile is located in the Ring of Fire, in South America. An earthquake 8.8° affected 80% of the population in February 27th, 2010. This study was conducted to assess any change in burns profile caused by the earthquake. This was an ecologic study. We compared the 4 months following the earthquake in 2009 and 2010. age, TBSA, deep TBSA, agent, specific mortality rate and rate of admissions to the National burn Center of Chile. Mann-Whitney test and a Poisson regression were performed. Age, agent, TBSA and deep TBSA percentages did not show any difference. Mortality rate was lower in 2010 (0.52 versus 1.22 per 1,000,000 habitants) but no meaningful difference was found (Poisson regression p = 0.06). Admission rate was lower in 2010, 4.6 versus 5.6 per 1,000,000 habitants, but no differences were found (p = 0.26). There was not any admissions directly related to the earthquake. As we do not have incidence registries in Chile, we propose to use the rate of admission to the National Burn Reference Center as an incidence estimator. There was not any significant difference in the burn profile, probably because of the time of the earthquake (3 am). We conclude the earthquake did not affect the way the Chilean people get burned. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. The use of impression cytology in the follow-up of severe ocular burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquel, Jean-Jacques; Navarre, Renaud; Langman, Maria Elena; Coulon, Alix; Balayre, Stephanie; Milin, Serge; Mercie, Martial; Rossignol, Alexis; Barra, Anne; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Gombert, Jean-Marc; Dighiero, Paul

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate by impression cytology (IC) the expression of the MHC class II inflammatory marker HLA-DR by the conjunctival epithelium, the cytological modifications of the conjunctival surface according to the Nelson's classification, and the eventual correlation between the two after severe ocular burns. A total of 24 patients (24 eyes) who presented with severe ocular burns underwent IC. We compared them with 18 healthy eyes. HLA-DR expression was studied by flow cytometry as well as the conjunctival histology evaluated with the Nelson's classification from 2-24 months after the onset of burns. There was a significant upregulation of the expression of HLA-DR in eyes with burns compared to the healthy population at 2 months (pocular surface inflammation after severe ocular burns.

  18. Burns treatment in ancient times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećanac, Marija; Janjić, Zlata; Komarcević, Aleksandar; Pajić, Milos; Dobanovacki, Dusanka; Misković, Sanja Skeledzija

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of fire at the dawn of prehistoric time brought not only the benefits to human beings offering the light and heat, but also misfortune due to burns; and that was the beginning of burns treatment. Egyptian doctors made medicines from plants, animal products and minerals, which they combined with magic and religious procedures. The earliest records described burns dressings with milk from mothers of male babies. Goddess Isis was called upon to help. Some remedies and procedures proved so successful that their application continued for centuries. The Edwin Smith papyrus (1500 BC) mentioned the treatment of burns with honey and grease. Ebers Papyrus (1500 BC) contains descriptions of application of mud, excrement, oil and plant extracts. They also used honey, Aloe and tannic acid to heal burns. Ancient Egyptians did not know about microorganisms but they knew that honey, moldy bread and copper salts could prevent infections from dirt in burns healing. Thyme, opium and belladona were used for pain relief. In the 4th century BC, Hippocrates recorded that Greek and Roman doctors used rendered pig fat, resin and bitumen to treat burns. Mixture of honey and bran, or lotion of wine and myrrh were used by Celsus. Honey was also known in Ayurveda (Indian medicine) time. Ayurvedic records Characa and Sushruta included honey in their dressing aids to purify sores and promote the healing. Burn treatment in Chinese medicine was traditional. It was a compilation of philosophy, knowledge and herbal medicine. The successful treatment of burns started in recent time and it has been made possible by better knowledge of the pathophysiology of thermal injuries and their consequences, medical technology advances and improved surgical techniques.

  19. Fat Grafting for Neuropathic Pain After Severe Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredman, Rafi; Edkins, Renee E; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2016-06-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain after burn injury is a significant problem that affects up to 29% of burn patients. Neuropathic burn scar pain is a challenge for plastic and burn surgeons, who have limited solutions. Fat grafting, with its mechanical and regenerative qualities, can improve neuropathic pain from various traumatic and postsurgical etiologies, but its effectiveness in neuropathic burn scar pain has yet to be demonstrated. In this study, the possible role of lipotransfer in treating neuropathic burn scar pain is explored, focusing on safety, graft take, and short-term efficacy. We performed an institutional review board-approved, retrospective case review of 7 patients with chronic, refractory neuropathic pain, who underwent fat grafting to burn scars. These patients had failed conventional therapy, which included pharmacologic, medical, and laser treatment of the burn scars. Each patient had 2 sessions of fat grafting, spaced 2 months apart. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was used to assess pain perception, with patients answering the questionnaire before and after fat grafting, to assess subjective outcomes. Six of 7 patients had improvement in neuropathic pain after fat grafting, permitting reduction in their neuropharmacologic regimen. Tinel sign, present in all patients preoperatively, was absent on examination in all patients at follow-up. Three of the 5 patients who completed PROMIS questionnaires had PROMIS scores indicating improvement in pain by 1-year follow-up. One patient had similar preoperative and postoperative PROMIS scores, and 1 patient had an increase in pain at follow-up; however, he had suffered an additional burn to the same extremity. Analysis of pooled mean PROMIS scores reflects a statistically significant improvement in subjective outcomes by 1-year follow-up. Donor-site seroma in 1 patient was the only complication, with no cases of infection, wound breakdown, or graft loss. Adipose tissue can

  20. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protocolized Resuscitation of Burn Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Salinas, Jose; Kramer, George C

    2016-10-01

    Fluid resuscitation of burn patients is commonly initiated using modified Brooke or Parkland formula. The fluid infusion rate is titrated up or down hourly to maintain adequate urine output and other endpoints. Over-resuscitation leads to morbid complications. Adherence to paper-based protocols, flow sheets, and clinical practice guidelines is associated with decreased fluid resuscitation volumes and complications. Computerized tools assist providers. Although completely autonomous closed-loop control of resuscitation has been demonstrated in animal models of burn shock, the major advantages of open-loop and decision-support systems are identifying trends, enhancing situational awareness, and encouraging burn team communication. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... Reservation, Oregon § 49.11021 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and..., 2007, a person must apply for and obtain approval of a permit under § 49.134 Rule for forestry and...

  3. Long-term persistance of the pathophysiologic response to severe burn injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc G Jeschke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Main contributors to adverse outcomes in severely burned pediatric patients are profound and complex metabolic changes in response to the initial injury. It is currently unknown how long these conditions persist beyond the acute phase post-injury. The aim of the present study was to examine the persistence of abnormalities of various clinical parameters commonly utilized to assess the degree hypermetabolic and inflammatory alterations in severely burned children for up to three years post-burn to identify patient specific therapeutic needs and interventions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PATIENTS: Nine-hundred seventy-seven severely burned pediatric patients with burns over 30% of the total body surface admitted to our institution between 1998 and 2008 were enrolled in this study and compared to a cohort non-burned, non-injured children. Demographics and clinical outcomes, hypermetabolism, body composition, organ function, inflammatory and acute phase responses were determined at admission and subsequent regular intervals for up to 36 months post-burn. Statistical analysis was performed using One-way ANOVA, Student's t-test with Bonferroni correction where appropriate with significance accepted at p<0.05. Resting energy expenditure, body composition, metabolic markers, cardiac and organ function clearly demonstrated that burn caused profound alterations for up to three years post-burn demonstrating marked and prolonged hypermetabolism, p<0.05. Along with increased hypermetabolism, significant elevation of cortisol, catecholamines, cytokines, and acute phase proteins indicate that burn patients are in a hyperinflammatory state for up to three years post-burn p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Severe burn injury leads to a much more profound and prolonged hypermetabolic and hyperinflammatory response than previously shown. Given the tremendous adverse events associated with the hypermetabolic and hyperinflamamtory responses, we now identified

  4. Sugarcane rice residue biochars and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sugarcane production in U.S. involves either pre-harvest burning or after-harvest burning of the residue. Approximately 70-90% of the dry matter of harvested sugarcane trash is lost through open field burning. This practice has caused considerable concerns over air quality and soil sustainability. We propose an alternative conservation approach to convert the sugarcane residue to biochar and used as soil amendment to conserve carbon and potentially improve soil fertility. In this study, fundamental properties of biochars made from sugarcane residue along with rice residues were tested for agronomic and environmental benefits. Sugarcane and rice harvest residues and milling processing byproducts bagasse and rice husk were converted to biochars at different pyrolysis temperatures and characterized. In general, sugarcane leave biochar contained more P, K, Ca and Mg than sugarcane bagasse biochar. Rice straw biochar had more S, K Ca but less P than rice husk biochar. Both biochars had higher available fraction of total P than that of total K. Sugarcane leave biochar converted at 450oC was dominated with various lignin derived phenols as well as non-specific aromatic compounds whereas bagasse biochar was with both lignin derived phenol and poly aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Rice straw char was dominated with non-specific aromatic compounds. At 750oC, charred material was dominated with aromatic ethers while losing the aromatic C=C structures. These molecular and surface property differences likely contributed to the difference in water holding capacities observed with these biochars. On the other hand, rice straw biochars produced at different pyrolysis temperatures had no significant effect on rice germination. Soils treated with sugarcane leave/trash biochar significantly enhanced sugarcane growth especially the root length. Treating soil with either sugarcane leave or bagasse char also enhanced soil adsorption capacity of atrazine; a common herbicide used in sugarcane

  5. Impact of hand burns on health-related quality of life in children younger than 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Tina L; Nelson-Mooney, Kate; Kagan, Richard J; Stubbs, Teresa K; Meyer, Walter J; Herndon, David N; Hinson, Michelle I; Lee, Austin F; Li, Nien-Chen; Kazis, Lewis E; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this multicenter study was to evaluate the impact of hand burn injury in preschool children younger than 5 years on health-related quality of life, including both physical and psychosocial function, in the 5 years after burn injury. This prospective case series assessed children younger than 5 years admitted to four pediatric burn centers. Each child's family completed the American Burn Association/Shriners Hospitals for Children Burn Outcome Questionnaire (BOQ), a validated and reliable assessment tool, which measures the physical and psychosocial functioning of the child with burn injury ages 0 year to 5 years, at baseline, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48 months after discharge. Multivariate models controlling for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were developed, and recovery curves were generated for the time since burn using generalized estimating equations with random effects. A cohort of 438 patients was followed up prospectively. Mean (SD) patient age was 2.2 (1.2) years, mean (SD) total body surface area (TBSA) was 28% (22.4%), and 19% had inhalation injury. Children with hand burns had lower scores in most of the areas tested, with the most pronounced and significant differences were in fine motor function, gross motor function, and appearance. These findings applied to both small (burns. The most profound impact of hand burns was noted in fine and gross motor function during the 4 years of follow-up. Children with hand burns have significantly worse outcomes than do children with burns in other areas.

  6. A survey on the current status of burn rehabilitation services in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Li-Tsang, Cecilia W P; Yan, Hong; Liang, Guangping; Tan, Jianglin; Yang, Sisi; Wu, Jun

    2013-03-01

    In China, there is a very long history of burn wound treatment, but the specialised burn care units were set up only from 1958. With more than 50 years of practice, great achievements have been made in burn wound care and operations in the country. However, in terms of burn rehabilitation, the development appears to be slow. In order to determine the current status of burn rehabilitation services in China, a survey was conducted to various burn centres in China. A comprehensive survey was conducted as well as to collect data related to (1) the admissions and staffing of the burn centres; (2) availability of rehabilitation services, number and educational background of specialised personnel dedicated in burn rehabilitation therapy; and (3) the difficulties leading to the lag of the burn rehabilitation services. The survey was sent to the chiefs of 87 burn centres via e-mail and they were requested to fill out the survey questionnaire and to send it back. For those who did not respond within 1 month, a reminder was sent. There are totally 39 (44.8%) burn centres responding to our survey. These centres were geographically distributed in nearly 70% of the administrative provinces in China; hence, the results could well represent the current burn care system. Most centres have recognised the importance of rehabilitation therapy and remarkable improvements of outcome in burn patients have been achieved. There are a very huge number of burn patients that need rehabilitation therapy, but most centres face the problems of shortage of rehabilitation therapists, which apparently could lead to the difficulties in delivering a quality rehabilitation programme for patients. Although the time of rehabilitation therapy is instituted far earlier than before, it is still not widely accepted in the acute burn care stage. There are more specialists joining the burn centre and becoming members of the professional burn team. However, professional education and training in the burn

  7. Honey dressing in pediatric burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangroo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal properties of honey have been recognized since antiquity. Although used as an adjuvant method of accelerating wound healing from ancient times, honey has been sporadically used in the treatment of burns. Honey acts mainly as a hyperosmolar medium and prevents bacterial growth. Because of its high viscosity, it forms a physical barrier, and the presence of enzyme catalase gives honey an antioxidant property. Its high-nutrient content improves substrate supply in local environment promoting epithelialization and angiogenesis. In pediatric burn patients no exclusive study has been conducted using honey as a burn dressing. An attempt is being made to evaluate the effect of honey in the management of burns in pediatric patients.

  8. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Harman Award Hickey Award Advocacy Award Edge Servant Leadership Award Contact Information News & Media Phoenix Blog Who We Are Get Involved Ways to Give Our Vision | Uniting the voice of the burn community around the globe to profoundly advance lifelong ...

  9. Prescribed burning: a topical issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovio G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Prescribed burning is a promising technique for the prevention of forest fires in Italy. The research deepened several ecological and operative aspects. However, legal issues need to be thoroughly investigated.

  10. Chemistry of Cigarette Burning Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen P

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette-burning and the smoke-formation processes and smoke composition are important topics for understanding cigarette performance. This paper proposes the molecular formulas representing the active components of bright, burley, and Oriental tobaccos and a basic chemistry model of the cigarette burning processes. Previous knowledge of the cigarette burning processes and smoke formation helped to establish parameters in deriving the basic chemistry equations. The proposed chemistry provides a brief view of the mechanisms of the cigarette burning during puffing and interpuff smoldering, and can be used to interpret and predict the smoke composition for cigarettes made from bright, burley, and Oriental tobaccos. Based on the proposed chemistry, the effect of ventilation on smoke component deliveries is discussed and the reaction heat of the puffing process is estimated.

  11. Electrothermal Ring Burn - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Çil

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Low-voltage fountainheads such as car, tractor or motorcycle batteries are predisposed to produce large currents. Any metal object that comes into contact with these batteries may result in short-circuit. This may result in rapid and excessive heating of metal object and an electrothermal burn. Herein we presented a motorcycle driver who was 28-year-old man with electrothermal ring burn which was caused by metal chain that was used as a ring.

  12. Chemical burns: pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palao, R; Monge, I; Ruiz, M; Barret, J P

    2010-05-01

    Chemical burns continue to pose a variety of dilemmas to the clinician managing such cases. Assessment of burn depth is often difficult and the decision whether to excise the wound early is not always clear-cut. In this updated review, common agents are classified and the basic principles of management and specific recommendations are examined. The complications arising from exposure to these chemicals and the supportive measures needed during treatment are also described. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of protein farnesylation in burn-induced metabolic derangements and insulin resistance in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harumasa Nakazawa

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Metabolic derangements, including insulin resistance and hyperlactatemia, are a major complication of major trauma (e.g., burn injury and affect the prognosis of burn patients. Protein farnesylation, a posttranslational lipid modification of cysteine residues, has been emerging as a potential component of inflammatory response in sepsis. However, farnesylation has not yet been studied in major trauma. To study a role of farnesylation in burn-induced metabolic aberration, we examined the effects of farnesyltransferase (FTase inhibitor, FTI-277, on burn-induced insulin resistance and metabolic alterations in mouse skeletal muscle. METHODS: A full thickness burn (30% total body surface area was produced under anesthesia in male C57BL/6 mice at 8 weeks of age. After the mice were treated with FTI-277 (5 mg/kg/day, IP or vehicle for 3 days, muscle insulin signaling, metabolic alterations and inflammatory gene expression were evaluated. RESULTS: Burn increased FTase expression and farnesylated proteins in mouse muscle compared with sham-burn at 3 days after burn. Simultaneously, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR, insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, Akt and GSK-3β was decreased. Protein expression of PTP-1B (a negative regulator of IR-IRS-1 signaling, PTEN (a negative regulator of Akt-mediated signaling, protein degradation and lactate release by muscle, and plasma lactate levels were increased by burn. Burn-induced impaired insulin signaling and metabolic dysfunction were associated with increased inflammatory gene expression. These burn-induced alterations were reversed or ameliorated by FTI-277. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that burn increased FTase expression and protein farnesylation along with insulin resistance, metabolic alterations and inflammatory response in mouse skeletal muscle, all of which were prevented by FTI-277 treatment. These results indicate that increased protein farnesylation plays a

  14. Should early amputation impact initial fluid therapy algorithms in burns resuscitation? A retrospective analysis using 3D modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staruch, Robert M T; Beverly, A; Lewis, D; Wilson, Y; Martin, N

    2017-02-01

    While the epidemiology of amputations in patients with burns has been investigated previously, the effect of an amputation on burn size and its impact on fluid management have not been considered in the literature. Fluid resuscitation volumes are based on the percentage of the total body surface area (%TBSA) burned calculated during the primary survey. There is currently no consensus as to whether the fluid volumes should be recalculated after an amputation to compensate for the new body surface area. The aim of this study was to model the impact of an amputation on burn size and predicted fluid requirement. A retrospective search was performed of the database at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham Regional Burns Centre to identify all patients who had required an early amputation as a result of their burn injury. The search identified 10 patients over a 3-year period. Burn injuries were then mapped using 3D modelling software. BurnCase3D is a computer program that allows accurate plotting of burn injuries on a digital mannequin adjusted for height and weight. Theoretical fluid requirements were then calculated using the Parkland formula for the first 24 h, and Herndon formula for the second 24 h, taking into consideration the effects of the amputation on residual burn size. This study demonstrated that amputation can have an unpredictable effect on burn size that results in a significant deviation from predicted fluid resuscitation volumes. This discrepancy in fluid estimation may cause iatrogenic complications due to over-resuscitation in burn-injured casualties. Combining a more accurate estimation of postamputation burn size with goal-directed fluid therapy during the resuscitation phase should enable burn care teams to optimise patient outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. DIFFERENTIATING PERIMORTEM AND POSTMORTEM BURNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmaji Master

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging cases in forensic medicine is ascertaining the cause of death of burnt bodies under suspicious circumstances. The key questions that arise at the time of investigation include: 1  Was the person alive or dead prior to fire accident?  Did the victim die because of burn?  If death was not related to burns, could burns play a role in causing death?  Were the burns sustained accidentally, did the person commit suicide or was the person murdered?  Are the circumstances suggesting an attempt to conceal crime?  How was the fire started?  How was the victim identified?  In case of mass fatalities, who died first? Postmortem burning of corpses is supposed to be one of the ways to hide a crime. Differentiating the actual cause of death in burn patients is therefore important. Medical examiners usually focus on the defining the changes that occur in tissues while forensic anthropologists deal with the changes related to the bone with or without any the influence of other tissues. Under the circumstances of fire, differentiating the perimortem trauma from that of postmortem cause of bone fractures is vital in determining the cause and motive of death

  16. Chemical and Common Burns in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shan

    2017-05-01

    Burns are a common cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in children. Thermal and chemical burns are the most common types of burns. Their clinical appearance can be similar and the treatment is largely similar. Thermal burns in children occur primarily after exposure to a hot surface or liquid, or contact with fire. Burns are typically classified based on the depth and total body surface area, and the severity and onset of the burn can also depend on the temperature and duration of contact. Chemical burns are caused by chemicals-most commonly acids and alkalis-that can damage the skin on contact. In children, the most common cause of chemical burns is from household products such as toilet bowl cleaners, drain cleaners, detergents, and bleaches. Mild chemical burns generally cause redness and pain and can look similar to other common rashes or skin infections, whereas severe chemical burns are more extreme and may cause redness, blistering, skin peeling, and swelling.

  17. Suicidal Behavior in a Patient with Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kontoangelos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic pain of the oral cavity is a long-term condition and like all other types of chronic pain is associated with numerous comorbidities such as depression or anxiety. Case Presentation. This is a case of a 93-year-old patient suffering from chronic oral cavity pain who repeatedly stabbed his palate due to ongoing local pain, over the last few months, which he could not further tolerate. The patient was suffering from depression and also a diagnosis of “burning mouth syndrome” (BMS was made. Discussion. Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is characterized by a burning sensation in the tongue or other oral sites. BMS has high psychiatric comorbidity but can occur in the absence of psychiatric diagnosis. Patients with multiple forms of pain must be considered as potential candidates for underdiagnosed depression (major and suicidal thoughts.

  18. Barriers and facilitators to work reintegration and burn survivors' perspectives on educating work colleagues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Tram; Lorrain, Mélyssa; Pognon-Hanna, Joe Nayima; Elfassy, Caroline; Calva, Valerie; de Oliveira, Ana; Nedelec, Bernadette

    2016-11-01

    Work reintegration constitutes a major milestone in the rehabilitation process of adults who have sustained a burn. Research studies with other conditions demonstrated that open, explicit communication about the worker's condition and potential limitations may facilitate this transition. However, the best approach to enable this discussion to occur has yet to be described. The aim of this exploratory qualitative study was to investigate burn survivors' and clinicians' perspectives of the barriers and facilitators to work reintegration that could be addressed through education of work colleagues, which information to communicate to the workplace and the most effective method to disseminate this knowledge. Five semi-structured focus groups were conducted with three groups of informants including: (1) 13 burn survivors who had already returned to work; (2) 7 who were planning on returning; and (3) 9 burn care professionals. Qualitative data were inductively analyzed employing constant comparative techniques. Key barriers and facilitators that were identified included residual impairments, individual characteristics, support from the social environment, work accommodations and resources from the healthcare and compensation systems. Burn survivors agreed that return to work efforts were not adequately supported and that education should be provided to work colleagues about the burn and rehabilitation process, but that information on residual impairments should be communicated judiciously as it may be used prejudiciously against those seeking new employment. In the latter case, it is preferable to inform the workplace of their strengths and abilities. Extensive literature demonstrating the benefits of educational programs for the peers and teachers of pediatric burn survivors when they return to school already exists. This study provides evidence that there is a need for a similar process for adult burn survivors returning to work. The educational material must be

  19. Heat Emission from a Burning Cigarette

    OpenAIRE

    Miura K; Nagao A; Ueyama K

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the smoldering burn rate and the heat transfer from a burning cigarette by measuring the heat emitted by radiation and convection, separately. The net heat generated and the net heat emitted by a burning cigarette did not vary with a change of the cigarette smoldering burn rate. The total heat emitted from a statically burning cigarette was about 50% of the total combustion heat. About 50% of the heat emitted was released as radiation heat. The smolder...

  20. Chemical burns: Diphoterine untangled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, K Skaria; Wasiak, Jason; Cleland, Heather

    2017-10-10

    Diphoterine is a hypertonic, amphoteric, polyvalent and chelating decontamination solution used in the treatment of cutaneous and ocular chemical burns. Due to infrequent use by emergency physicians along with the small number of available studies, its debate in the literature as to its efficacy and safety remains inconclusive. A structured literature search was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE BIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS and TOXNET to June 2016 for original English-language studies reporting on the safety and effectiveness of Diphoterine. Methodological and reporting quality of pre-clinical animal studies was assessed using the Systematic Review Centre for Laboratory Animal Experimentation (SYRCLE) risk of bias tool and Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines. Clinical studies were assessed using Chambers' criteria. 13 studies (seven in the pre-clinical, five in the clinical setting and one mixed) met the study inclusion criteria. Pre-clinical studies showed a faster resolution of pH and reduced tissue necrosis with Diphoterine. Clinical studies showed reduced tissue necrosis/severity of symptoms, faster pH resolution and a reduction in pain when using Diphoterine. No adverse events were attributable to Diphoterine. Reporting and methodology of the studies was poor or showed a high risk of bias. Diphoterine appears to be safe to use and is probably superior to other rinsing solutions. However, immediate decontamination is imperative and if Diphoterine is not available a different rinsing solution should be used. The methodology of the published literature for Diphoterine is generally poor and future publications should use the frameworks given as templates. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Does prescribed burning affect leaf secondary metabolites in pine stands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoir, A V; Ormeño, E; Pasqualini, V; Ferrat, L; Greff, S; Lecareux, C; Vila, B; Mévy, J P; Fernandez, C

    2013-03-01

    Prescribed burning (PB) is gaining popularity as a low-cost forest protection measure that efficiently reduces fuel build-up, but its effects on tree health and growth are poorly understood. Here, we evaluated the impact of PB on plant defenses in Mediterranean pine forests (Pinus halepensis and P. nigra ssp. laricio). These chemical defenses were estimated based on needle secondary metabolites (terpenes and phenolics including flavonoids) and discussed in terms of chlorophyll fluorescence and soil nutrients. Three treatments were applied: absence of burning (control plots); single burns (plots burned once); and repeated burns (plots burned twice). For single burns, we also explored changes over time. In P. laricio, PB tended to trigger only minor modifications consisting exclusively of short-lived increases (observed within 3 months after PB) in flavonoid index, possibly due to the leaf temperature increase during PB. In P. halepensis, PB had detrimental effects on physiological performance, consisting of (i) significant decreases in actual PSII efficiency (ΦPSII) in light-adapted conditions after repeated PB, and (ii) short-lived decreases in variable-to-maximum fluorescence ratio (Fv/Fm) after single PB, indicating that PB actually stressed P. halepensis trees. Repeated PB also promoted terpene-like metabolite production, which increased 2 to 3-fold compared to control trees. Correlations between terpene metabolites and soil chemistry were found. These results suggest that PB impacts needle secondary metabolism both directly (via a temperature impact) and indirectly (via soil nutrients), and that these impacts vary according to species/site location, frequency and time elapsed since last fire. Our findings are discussed with regard to the use of PB as a forest management technique and its consequences on plant investment in chemical defenses.

  2. Interactive home telehealth and burns: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Sean; Gomez, Jason; Meller, Benjamin; Schneider, Jeffery C; Cheney, Meredith; Nejad, Shamim; Schulz, John; Goverman, Jeremy

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to review our experience incorporating Interactive Home Telehealth (IHT) visits into follow-up burn care. A retrospective review of all burn patients participating in IHT encounters over the course of 15 months was performed. Connections were established through secure video conferencing and call-routing software. Patients connected with a personal computer or tablet and providers connected with a desktop computer with a high-definition web camera. In some cases, high-definition digital images were emailed to the provider prior to the virtual consultation. For each patient, the following was collected: (1) patient and injury demographics (diagnosis, prognosis, and clinical management), (2) total number of encounters, (3) service for each encounter (burn, psychiatry, and rehabilitation), (4) length of visit, including travel distance and time saved and, (5) complications, including re-admissions and connectivity issues. 52 virtual encounters were performed with 31 patients during the first year of the pilot project from March 2015 to June 2016. Mean age of the participant was 44 years (range 18-83 years). Mean total burn surface area of the participant was 12% (range 1-80%). Average roundtrip travel distance saved was 188 miles (range 4-822 miles). Average round trip travel time saved was 201min (range 20-564min). There were no unplanned re-admissions and no complications. Five connectivity issues were reported, none of which prevented completion of the visit. Interactive Home Telehealth is a safe and feasible modality for delivering follow-up care to burn patients. Burn care providers benefit from the potential to improve outpatient clinic utilization. Patients benefit from improved access to multiple members of their specialized burn care team, as well as cost-reductions for patient travel expenses. Future studies are needed to ensure patient and provider satisfaction and to further validate the significance, cost-effectiveness and

  3. Characterization of Phenolic Compounds in Pinus laricio Needles and Their Responses to Prescribed Burnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Ferrat

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Fire is a dominant ecological factor in Mediterranean-type ecosystems. Management strategies include prescribed (controlled burning, which has been used in the management of several species, such as Pinus nigra ssp laricio var. Corsicana, a pine endemic to Corsica of great ecological and economic importance. The effects of prescribed burning on Pinus laricio have been little studied. The first aim of this study was to characterize total and simple phenolic compounds in Pinus laricio. The second aim was to understand: i the short term (one to three months and medium term (three years effects of prescribed burning, and ii the effects of periodic prescribed burning on the production of phenolic compounds in Pinus laricio. The first result of this study is the presence of total and simple phenolic compounds in the needles of Pinus laricio. 3-Vanillyl propanol is the major compound. After a prescribed burning, the synthesis of total phenolic compounds increases in Pinus laricio for a period of three months. Total phenolic compounds could be used as bioindicators for the short-term response of Pinus laricio needles to prescribed burning. Simple phenolic compounds do not seem to be good indicators of the impact of prescribed burning because prescribed burnings are low in intensity.

  4. How Much Global Burned Area Can Be Forecast on Seasonal Time Scales Using Sea Surface Temperatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Morton, Douglas C.; Andela, Niels; Giglio, Louis; Randerson, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sea surface temperature (SST) patterns influence the interannual variability of burned area in many regions by means of climate controls on fuel continuity, amount, and moisture content. Some of the variability in burned area is predictable on seasonal timescales because fuel characteristics respond to the cumulative effects of climate prior to the onset of the fire season. Here we systematically evaluated the degree to which annual burned area from the Global Fire Emissions Database version 4 with small fires (GFED4s) can be predicted using SSTs from 14 different ocean regions. We found that about 48 of global burned area can be forecast with a correlation coefficient that is significant at a p < 0.01 level using a single ocean climate index (OCI) 3 or more months prior to the month of peak burning. Continental regions where burned area had a higher degree of predictability included equatorial Asia, where 92% of the burned area exceeded the correlation threshold, and Central America, where 86% of the burned area exceeded this threshold. Pacific Ocean indices describing the El Nino-Southern Oscillation were more important than indices from other ocean basins, accounting for about 1/3 of the total predictable global burned area. A model that combined two indices from different oceans considerably improved model performance, suggesting that fires in many regions respond to forcing from more than one ocean basin. Using OCI-burned area relationships and a clustering algorithm, we identified 12 hotspot regions in which fires had a consistent response to SST patterns. Annual burned area in these regions can be predicted with moderate confidence levels, suggesting operational forecasts may be possible with the aim of improving ecosystem management.

  5. Outpatient treated burns in infants younger than 1 year in Helsinki during 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitakari, Elina; Koljonen, Virve; Pyörälä, Sari; Rintala, Risto

    2014-05-01

    In general, voluminous data exists concerning burns in children, but the data focusing specially on children less than 1 year of age is sporadic. We therefore focused on examining the special features of burns in children less than 1 year of age. A retrospective study of all outpatient treated burn patients burns, representing 15% of all pediatric burns during the study period. The majority was male and aged 9-12 months. Most of the burns occurred at home, and in most cases a caregiver was present in the injury room. Scalds were the most common type of injury followed by contact burns. The most common source of scald was from cups containing hot drink, and the most common source of contact burn was hot stoves or oven doors. Special attention needs to be targeted toward the prevention of burns in children less than 1 year of age. The majority of the injuries could have been prevented with more vigilance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Fusarium spp infections in a pediatric burn unit: nine years of experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Rosanova

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Fusarium spp are ubiquitous fungi recognized as opportunistic agents of human infections, and can produce severe infections in burn patients. The literature on Fusarium spp infections in pediatric burn patients is scarce. Objectives To describe the clinical and epidemiological features as well as outcome of Fusarium spp infections in pediatric burn patients. Patients and methods Retrospective, descriptive study of Fusarium spp infections in a specialized intensive care burn unit. Results In 15 patients Fusarium spp infections were diagnosed. Median age was 48 months. Direct fire injury was observed in ten patients. The median affected burn surface area was 45%. Twelve patients had a full thickness burn. Fourteen patients had a Garces Index ≥3. Fungal infection developed at a median of 11 days after burn injury. Fungi were isolated from burn wound in 14 patients and from the bone in one patient. Amphotericin B was the drug of choice for treatment followed by voriconazole. Median time of treatment completion was 23 days. One patient (7% died of fungal infection-related causes. Conclusion In our series Fusarium spp was an uncommon pathogen in severely burnt patients. The burn wound was the most common site of infection and mortality was low.

  7. Influence of early childhood burns on school performance: an Australian population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Nadin; Oei, Ju-Lee; Adams, Susan; Bajuk, Barbara; Hilder, Lisa; Mohamed, Abdel-Latif; Wright, Ian M R; Holland, Andrew J A

    2017-11-29

    To determine the influence of burn injuries on childhood performance in national standardised curriculum-based school tests. Birth and health records of 977 children who were hospitalised with a burn injury between 2000 and 2006 in the state of New South Wales, Australia, were linked to performance scores in the National Assessment Program: Literacy and Numeracy test, a compulsory nationwide curriculum-based test (CBT) and compared with children who were not hospitalised for burns and who were matched for birth year, gender, gestation and socioeconomic status. Test scores in years 3 (ages 8-9), 5 (ages 10-11) and 7 (ages 13-14) in numeracy, writing, reading, spelling, grammar and punctuation. Mean age at first burn injury was 28 months (median: 20, range: 0-140). Children with burns were significantly more likely to have younger mothers (28.5 vs 29.6 years) (Pwriting. Most childhood burn injuries occur before the start of formal schooling. Children who are hospitalised for burns perform more poorly in CBT even after accounting for family and socioeconomic disadvantage. Rehabilitation of children with burn injuries must address school performance to decrease any long-term negative societal impact of burns. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Partial-thickness corneal tissue restoration after a chemical burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galan A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro Galan, Anton Giulio Catania, Giuseppe Lo Giudice San Paolo Ophthalmic Center, San Antonio Hospital, Padova, Italy Purpose: We describe a case of full-thickness corneal restoration after an acute corneal burn with an acid agent. Methods: A 32-year-old male reported painful discomfort, redness, photophobia, and a decrease in visual acuity in the left eye after a unilateral burn with an acid agent. Slit-lamp examination revealed massive corneal melting involving necrotic sequestrum of the entire corneal surface. Surgical approach was carried out in order to preserve residual ocular tissues. Results: Extensive corneal–conjunctival layer curettage of the necrotic tissue was performed showing perfectly clear undamaged deep lamellar corneal layers. The patient underwent multilayered amniotic membrane transplantation and total capsular–conjunctival flap in order to preserve ocular tissue from further melting or corneal perforation. A complete and spontaneous “restitutio ad integrum” of the corneal layers was shown during the follow-up. The cornea was perfectly clear with restored normal anatomical architecture. Conclusion: In this case, a spontaneous full-thickness corneal tissue restoration occurred after an acute chemical burn. Studies about the mechanisms whereby different cells interact and replicate within the stroma may unveil the biology behind corneal regeneration and transparency. Keywords: amniotic membrane, chemical burn, corneal healing

  9. Petroleum marketing monthly, December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-14

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  10. Petroleum marketing monthly, February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-25

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  11. Petroleum marketing monthly, January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  12. Petroleum marketing monthly, November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-09

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed costs of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  13. Burn plasma transfer induces burn edema in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Thomas; Abé, Dorotheé; Weihrauch, Marc; Peters, Christopher; Gebhardt, Martha Maria; Germann, Guenter; Heitmann, Christoph; Walther, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    Thermal injuries greater than 20% body surface area (BSA) result in systemic shock with generalized edema in addition to local tissue destruction. Burn shock is induced by a variety of mediators, mainly immunomodulative cytokines. This experimental study evaluates if burn shock can be induced in healthy rats by transfer of burn plasma (BP) with mediators. Thermal injury was induced by hot water (100 degrees C water, 12 s, 30% BSA) in male syngenic Wistar rats. Donor rats were killed 4 h posttrauma, and BP was harvested. Burn plasma was transferred to healthy animals by continuous intravenous infusion in three types of dilution (100%, 10%, and 1%). Positive controls were directly examined 4 h after thermal injury, and negative control rats had a continuous infusion done with sham burn (SB) plasma (37 degrees C water, 12 s, 30% BSA). Afterwards, intravital fluorescence microscopy was performed in postcapillary mesenteric venules at 0, 60, and 120 min. Edema formation was assessed by relative changes over time in fluorescence intensity of fluorescein isothiocyanate-albumin in the intravascular versus the extravascular space. The interactions of leucocytes and endothelium were evaluated by quantification of leukocyte sticking. Additionally, microhemodynamic (volumetric blood flow, erythrocyte velocity, venular wall shear rate, venular diameters) and macrohemodynamic parameters (blood pressure, heart frequency, temperature) were assessed online (arterial catheter). For statistics, an ANOVA was performed with Bonferroni adjustment procedure. Differences were considered significant when P edema formation remains uncertain and requires further investigation.

  14. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umezaki Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yojiro Umezaki,1 Miho Takenoshita,2 Akira Toyofuku2 1Psychosomatic Dentistry Clinic, Dental Hospital, 2Psychosomatic Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS. Keywords: burning mouth syndrome, low-dose aripiprazole, chronic pain

  15. Burn Patient Expectations from Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Yilmaz sahin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Burn is a kind of painful trauma that requires a long period of treatment and also changes patients body image. For this reason, nursing care of burn patients is very important. In this study in order to provide qualified care to the burned patients, patient and #8217;s expectations from nurses were aimed to be established. METHODS: Patients and #8217; expectations were evaluated on 101 patients with burn in Ministry of Health Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital Burn Service and Gulhane Military Medical Academy Education and Research Hospital Burn Center. A questionnaire which was developed by the researchers was used for collecting data. The questions on the questionnaire were classified into four groups to evaluate the patients and #8217; expectations about communication, information, care and discharge. Data was evaluated by using SPSS 12 package software. RESULTS: In this study, 48.5% of patients were at 18-28 age group, 79.2% were male and 51.5% of patients were employed. Almost all of patients expect nurses to give them confidence (98% and to give them information about latest developments with the disease. Patients prior expectation from nurses about care was to do their treatments regularly (100% and to take the necessary precautions in order to prevent infection (100%. 97% of patient expect nurses to give them information about the drugs, materials and equipment that they are going to use while discharge. CONCLUSION: As a result we found that burn patient expectations from nurses about communication, information, care and discharge were high. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(1.000: 37-46

  16. Clinical and demographic features of pediatric burns in the eastern provinces of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Yıldız

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to perform a retrospective analysis of the causes of burns observed in children in the eastern provinces of Turkey. Method In this study, patients were studied retrospectively with regard to their age, sex, cause of burns, seasonal variations, social and economic factors, length of hospital stay, burned body surface area, medical history, site of injury, and mortality. Results A total of 125 patients undergoing inpatient treatment were male, (53.2% and 110 were female (46.8%. The most common causes of burns in patients treated on an inpatient basis were scald burns (65.5% and tandir burns (15.7%. The mean total body surface area of all the patients was 12.17+9.86%. When the patients were grouped according to tandir, cauldron, and others burn causes, a significant difference was seen between the in burn percentages caused by tandir and cauldron burns and other causes (p Pseudomonas aeruginosa (20.4%. Of the 235 patients, 61 were treated in operating rooms. During the 24-month period of the study, 2 of the 235 patients died (0.85%. Conclusion Pediatric burns in the eastern part of Turkey are different from those in other parts of Turkey, as well as in other countries. Due to the lifestyle of the region, tandir and cauldron burns, which cause extensive burn areas and high morbidity, are frequently seen in children. Therefore, precautions and educational programs related to the use of tandirs and cauldrons are needed in this region.

  17. Petroleum marketing monthly, September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum product sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  18. Petroleum marketing monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: Summary Statistics; Crude Oil Prices; Prices of Petroleum Products; Volumes of Petroleum Products; and Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products for Local Consumption. The feature article is entitled ``The Second Oxygenated Gasoline Season.`` 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  19. Petroleum marketing monthly, July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: summary statistics; crude oil prices; prices of petroleum products; volumes of petroleum products; and prime supplier sales volumes of petroleum products for local consumption. 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  20. Monthly Meteorological Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly forms that do not fit into any regular submission. Tabulation sheets and generic monthly forms designed to capture miscellaneous monthly observations.

  1. Exercise behaviors after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Jennifer; Li, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate exercise behaviors in adult burn survivors and to identify barriers to exercise in this population. A two-page questionnaire developed by the authors was administered on a single occasion to adults attending the ambulatory burns clinic at a metropolitan hospital. Data from 68 adult burn survivors were analyzed. Within this cohort, 59% of subjects reported exercising several times per week or more and the remaining 41% exercised once per week or less. There was no correlation among exercise frequency and age, TBSA, or hospital length of stay. Walking was the most common type of exercise, and subjects reported lower compliance with stretching and strengthening exercises. Physical condition and motivation were identified as the main barriers to exercise. Although this preliminary study reveals that a higher proportion of burn survivors engage in exercise compared with their healthy counterparts, a substantial number are exercising just once per week or less, below the recommended guidelines to improve physical fitness. Physical and occupational therapists play an important role in providing exercise prescription and education, as well as addressing barriers to exercise in burn survivors. The potential for further research into physical activity across all domains of life using a validated questionnaire is identified.

  2. Outcomes of outpatient management of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew; Coffee, Tammy; Adenuga, Paul; Yowler, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    The literature surrounding pediatric burns has focused on inpatient management. The goal of this study is to characterize the population of burned children treated as outpatients and assess outcomes validating this method of burn care. A retrospective review of 953 patients treated the burn clinic and burn unit of a tertiary care center. Patient age, burn etiology, burn characteristics, burn mechanism, and referral pattern were recorded. The type of wound care and incidence of outcomes including subsequent hospital admission, infection, scarring, and surgery served as the primary outcome data. Eight hundred and thirty children were treated as outpatients with a mean time of 1.8 days for the evaluation of burn injury in our clinic. Scalds accounted for 53% of the burn mechanism, with burns to the hand/wrist being the most frequent area involved. The mean percentage of TBSA was 1.4% for the outpatient cohort and 8% for the inpatient cohort. Burns in the outpatient cohort healed with a mean time of 13.4 days. In the outpatient cohort, nine (1%) patients had subsequent admissions and three (0.4%) patients had concern for infection. Eight patients from the outpatient cohort were treated with excision and grafting. The vast majority of pediatric burns are small, although they may often involve more critical areas such as the face and hand. Outpatient wound care is an effective treatment strategy which results in low rates of complications and should become the standard of care for children with appropriate burn size and home support.

  3. The changing pattern of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyasundara, Sandun L; Rajan, Vasant; Lam, Lawrence; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2011-01-01

    After scalds, flame burns have been considered the next most common mode of burn injury in childhood. Recent experience in the authors' unit suggested that contact burns were becoming more frequent. The authors sought to determine the contemporary frequency of different burn modalities in children presenting to a burns unit. A retrospective review of 3621 children treated in the burns unit, both ambulatory and inpatient, at the authors' institution between January 2003 and December 2007 was performed. Patients were identified using the Burns Unit database. Data collected included age, gender, burn etiology and site, TBSA, and whether operative surgery was required. Of the 3515 patients eligible for inclusion, scalds accounted for 55.9%, contact 30.5%, and flame 7.9% of all burns. Contact burns were shown to be consistently more frequent than flame burns for every year of the study (z = 17.30, P burns, reflecting the variety of mechanisms involved. The data suggest a change in the historical pattern of pediatric burns previously reported in the literature. These findings have implications for public health awareness and burns prevention campaigns.

  4. Effect of season and interval of prescribed burn on ponderosa pine butterfly defoliation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becky K. Kerns; Douglas J. Westlind

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge concerning the interactions between forest disturbances such as fire and insect defoliation is limited. Wildfires and prescribed burns may influence the intensity and severity of insect outbreaks by affecting the vigor of residual trees, altering aspects of stand structure and abundance of preferred hosts, and by changing the physical environment...

  5. Development of turf-type Poa pratensis l. germplasm for seed production without field burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Open-field burning of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) post- harvest residue, which maintains grass seed yield and stand longevity, has been eliminated in Washington and is restricted in Idaho and Oregon, USA. Our objective was to develop Kentucky bluegrass germplasm that has sustainable seed y...

  6. Effects of trees on the burning of organic layers on permafrost terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric S. Kasischke; Merritt R. Turetsky; Evan S. Kane

    2012-01-01

    We collected data to estimate depth of the remaining (residual) organic layer as well as data to estimate total pre-fire organic layer depth in 99 plots located in mature black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) forests in interior Alaska that burned during the large fire seasons of 2004 and 2005. These data were collected immediately adjacent to...

  7. Seasonal Biennial Burning and Woody Plant Control Influence Native Vegetation in Loblolly Pine Stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Haywood; Alton Martin; Henry A. Pearson; Harold E. Grelen

    1998-01-01

    This paper documents the results of a study to determine the effects of selectedvegetation-management treatments in loblolly pine. Vegetation in precommercially thinned, 6-year-old stands was subjected to five biennial growing season burns in either early March, May, or July coupled with hand felling of residual woody stems. Using a randomized complete block design, we...

  8. Fractional Nonablative 1540 nm Laser Resurfacing for Thermal Burn Scars: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, M.; Moreau, K.E.R.; Beyer, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective: Burn scars cause permanent and disfiguring problems for many patients and limited treatments are available. Nonablative fractional lasers induce a wound healing response, which may lead to remodeling of burn sear texture. This randomized trial evaluates efficacy...... and adverse effects of 1540 nm fractional laser versus untreated control for burn scars. Materials and Methods: Seventeen adult patients with burn scars of 1 year or older and Fitzpatrick skin types I-III were included in the study. Side-by-side test areas were randomized to (i) three monthly 1540 nm.......0015; 12 weeks: 4 (2-5), P = 0.0007). Patients were satisfied with treatments (week 12: 7 (4-8.5)) and 8/17 patients evaluated burn scars to be moderately or significantly improved. Skin redness increased transiently from laser treatments. No significant differences were found in skin pigmentation...

  9. OPTIMIZATION OF RESULTS AND TREATMENT TIMING OF DEEP DERMAL BURNS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Константин Александрович Афоничев

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Untreated deep dermal burns in children are the cause of long-term treatment and severe cicatricial deformities, resulting in poor cosmetic results and greatly impairing functional outcome. The problem of optimizing the results and timing of treatment of deep burns in children in recent years has become particularly urgent. We observed 1853 children with III-A degree burns. Some of the children's burns healed spontaneously, which led to the development of scar deformities during the first six months after injury. Risk factors for their development, depending on the patient's age and location of the lesion, are pointed out. Other children underwent early tangential excision of eschar. The analysis of the treatment results showed that the use of early surgery in children with deep dermal burns can reduce treatment time, as well as significantly to improve the cosmetic and functional outcomes of trauma.

  10. Two cases of burns caused by misuse of coagulation unit and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolly, G

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of severe burns with monitoring apparatus are described. In a female patient of 45 years, a severe third degree burn occurred by misuse of coagulation apparatus (inversion of the poles of an older Bovie apparatus), in the presence of a non-floating ECG monitoring device. A high intensity current was established from the coagulation unit, via the earth plate under the buttocks, to the indifferent electrode placed on the chest, where burns occurred. In an 8 month female baby, having laparotomy for a neuroblastoma, a third degree burn of 5 cm diameter occurred with a non-floating ECG monitor. A twin-wired disposable earth plate was placed just beneath the indifferent ECG electrode on the leg. A burning current was established between the Bovie coagulation unit and the monitor.

  11. Heat Emission from a Burning Cigarette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miura K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the relationship between the smoldering burn rate and the heat transfer from a burning cigarette by measuring the heat emitted by radiation and convection, separately. The net heat generated and the net heat emitted by a burning cigarette did not vary with a change of the cigarette smoldering burn rate. The total heat emitted from a statically burning cigarette was about 50% of the total combustion heat. About 50% of the heat emitted was released as radiation heat. The smoldering burn rate did not affect the total amount of heat emitted nor the ratio of radiated heat to convected heat.

  12. The relationship between behavioural problems in preschool children and parental distress after a paediatric burn event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Anne; van der Heijden, Peter G M; van Son, Maarten J M; van de Schoot, Rens; Vandermeulen, Els; Helsen, Ann; Van Loey, Nancy E E

    2014-09-01

    This study examines mother- and father-rated emotional and behaviour problems in and worries about 0- to 5-year-old children at 3 and 12 months after a burn event and the relation with parental distress. Mothers (n = 150) and fathers (n = 125) representing 155 children participated in this study. Child emotional and behaviour problems and parental worries about the child were assessed with the Child Behavior Checklist at both time points. Parents' level of acute subjective distress was assessed within the first month after the burn event with the Impact of Event Scale. Mothers and fathers held comparable views of their child's emotional and behaviour problems, which were generally within the normal limits. Parents' own acute stress reactions were significantly related to parent-rated child behaviour problems at 3 and 12 months postburn. A substantial part of mothers' and fathers' worries about the child concerned physical and emotional aspects of the burn trauma, and potential future social problems. Parents with high acute stress scores more often reported burn-related concerns about their child at 3 and 12 months postburn. Health-care professionals should be informed that parents' distress in the subacute phase of their child's burn event may be related to subsequent worries about their child and to (parent-observed) child emotional and behaviour problems. The authors recommend a family perspective, with particular attention for the interplay between parents' distress and parent-reported child behaviour problems and worries, in each phase of paediatric burn care.

  13. Mortality rate associated with hospital acquired infections among burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Aslam Bharwana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hospital acquired infections (HAIs are the major contributors of mortality associated with burn injuries. The aim of this research was to document the antecedents affiliated with major burn injuries, hospitalization and mortality in burn patients. We performed a single center prospective study of patients admitted during 3 months period (April-June 2014 in burn wards of government hospital. There were 100 patients in this investigation which were observed weekly. The inclusion criterion was based on the shifting of patients from emergency to the wards after initial treatment of more than 24 h. Variables included were age and gender of the patient, the percent total body surface area (%TBSA burn, the cause of the burn. Mean age of patients was 30.29 years. More females (55.67% were admitted than males (44.32%. The total body surface area (%TBSA burnt were from 15%- 95% respectively moreover children were more sensitive to hospital acquired infections (HAIs and mortality rate was 34% in children with mean age of 5 years and disability of body parts were 42% among 75% were females. Whereas the most common (HAIs were primary blood stream (PBS with mean value of 30.50, wound infections (WIS were at second prevalence with mean value of 27.50, followed by sepsis (S and pneumonia (P 10.33, eye infections (EIs 4.833 and urinary tract infections (UTIs 2.667. Factors significantly (p-value= 0.000 associated with increased duration of hospitalization caught HAIs mortality include the age and gender of the patient, the cause of burn, inhalation injury, the region affected and %TBSA burnt. It concluded that the mortality was very much dependent on age and gender of the patient, burn causes, affected area as well as %TBSA burnt are considerable factors in determining the relationship of HAIs and whether the patients will survive or knuckle to injuries. Better compliance techniques, stricter control over disinfection and sterilization practices and usage of

  14. Wood-burning stoves worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo

    More than any time in our history, the wood-burning stove continues to be the most popular technology used for cooking and heating worldwide. According to the World Health Organization and recent scientific studies, the inefficient use of solid-fuels in traditional stoves constitutes the major...... systems, improved efficient retrofits and advanced stove innovations. In chapter 3, four popular wood-burning practices found in five countries were singled-out to be examined closely in four case studies: “cooking in Brazil”, “cooking and heating in Peru”, “heating in Portugal” and “recreational heat...

  15. [Burn out syndrome in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraub, Simon; Marx, E

    2004-09-01

    SEPS or burnout syndrome was described among health care workers. Oncology care givers--physicians and nurses--can be concerned. Burnout is a chronical stress reaction. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation are more prevalent than low personal accomplishment. Burnout is essentially assessed by questionnaires. Oncologists report an higher level of burnout, than AIDS medical or palliative care staff. Causes of burn out are numerous: insufficient personal time, sense of failure,... followed by poorly management and difficulties in staff or institution relationships. Prevention and therapy of burn out can be considered on three levels: personal, (psychotherapy, advices on health way of life), team (improvement in communication) and institution (support meetings and talking groups).

  16. Bacteriological profile of burn patients at Yekatit 12 Hospital Burn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and methods: A prospective hospital based study was carried out from December 2010 to February 2011 at Yekatit 12 hospital burn center. Periodic wound swabs and blood samples were collected on 1st, 7th, and 14th days of hospital stay and processed with conventional culture and biochemical tests. Isolates ...

  17. Air-freshener burns: A new paradigm in burns etiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umran Sarwar

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of burns as a result of air-fresheners. As they become more ubiquitous, we anticipate the incidence of such cases to increase. As such, they pose a potential public health concern on a massive scale.

  18. Periorbital burns – a 6 year review of management and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald O'Connor, Edmund; Frew, Q; Din, A; Pleat, J; Ashraff, S; Ghazi-Nouri, S; El-Muttardi, N; Philp, B; Dziewulski, P

    2015-05-01

    Periorbital burns are an infrequent but potentially devastating injury. This study aimed to elucidate the spectrum of such injuries presenting to a UK burns centre and the outcome achieved in the cases requiring periorbital reconstruction for the restoration of function and form. Patients admitted to a UK regional burns centre between January 2005 and January 2011 with periorbital burns were identified from the Patient Administration System (PAS), theatre logs and the International Burns Injury database (IBID). Multiple parameters were assessed using patient notes, ITU and hospital image databases. Over 6 years, 167 patients with facial burns requiring surgery were treated, including 103 patients with eyelid burns. The mean burn size was 33% total body surface area. The eyelid burn depth varied; 67% superficial partial thickness, 17% deep dermal and 16% full thickness. Two patients lost complete vision in one eye, one patient underwent amniotic membrane grafting. In total 16 patients required periorbital reconstruction to maintain eye closure, with 1.8 operations on average per patient. Acute surgery was required in 11 patients, whilst late intervention (>3 months) was needed in 5, 2 patients had both acute and delayed surgery. Of the 5 late intervention patients 4 were treated with full thickness skin grafts and 1 with a Z plasty. Average time for final reconstruction with delayed surgery was 4.5 months. The goal in management of periorbital burns is preservation of vision, prevention of future complications and restoration of an acceptable aesthetic outcome. Total visual loss is thankfully rare, but early ophthalmology intervention is vital given the evidence of corneal damage as a brief therapeutic window exists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of released source terms from burning mock combustible waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Koji; Tashiro, Shinsuke; Takada, Junichi; Uchiyama, Gunzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate quantitatively confinement capability of the radioactive materials in the nuclear fuel facility under the fire accident, analysis of accident sequence, including clogging characteristics of the ventilation filters, needs to be performed. For the purpose of the evaluation, accumulation of the source term data such as release rates of the smoke and energy, and particle size distribution of the smoke during the fire accident is necessary. Therefore, experiments for evaluating burning characteristics of combustible solid wastes and recovered solvents, which are disposed from the facilities, have been performed by using the mock combustible wastes and the method for estimating the source terms has been investigated. When mixtures of rubber and cloth gloves as mock combustible solid wastes were burnt, the smoke with above 1 {mu}m in diameter was confined in the carbonized residue of cloth gloves and the release ratio of the smoke in the burning of mixtures was decreased compared with the burning of only rubber gloves. The source terms were evaluated with the cell ventilation system safety analysis code CELVA-1D by using the experimental results as the input, such as temperature of the gas phase, total burnt weight and total collected weight of the smoke under the burning of rubber gloves as mock wastes. The source terms calculated by the CELVA-1D reasonably agreed with the values estimated from the recommended calculation parameters in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility Accident Analysis Handbook (NUREG-1320). Therefore, the present CELVA-1D method for evaluating the source terms during burning is considered to be valid. This means that the source terms can be estimated by using this method if the information such as the temperature of the gas phase, total burnt weight and total collected weight of the smoke are given. (author)

  20. Emissions from biomass burning in the Yucatan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Yokelson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In March 2006 two instrumented aircraft made the first detailed field measurements of biomass burning (BB emissions in the Northern Hemisphere tropics as part of the MILAGRO project. The aircraft were the National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 and a University of Montana/US Forest Service Twin Otter. The initial emissions of up to 49 trace gas or particle species were measured from 20 deforestation and crop residue fires on the Yucatan peninsula. This included two trace gases useful as indicators of BB (HCN and acetonitrile and several rarely, or never before, measured species: OH, peroxyacetic acid, propanoic acid, hydrogen peroxide, methane sulfonic acid, and sulfuric acid. Crop residue fires emitted more organic acids and ammonia than deforestation fires, but the emissions from the main fire types were otherwise fairly similar. The Yucatan fires emitted unusually high amounts of SO2 and particle chloride, likely due to a strong marine influence on this peninsula. As smoke from one fire aged, the ratio ΔO3/ΔCO increased to ~15% in <~1 h similar to the fast net production of O3 in BB plumes observed earlier in Africa. The rapid change in O3 occurs at a finer spatial scale than is employed in global models and is also faster than predicted by micro-scale models. Fast increases in PAN, H2O2, and two organic acids were also observed. The amount of secondary organic acid is larger than the amount of known precursors. Rapid secondary formation of organic and inorganic aerosol was observed with the ratio ΔPM2.5/ΔCO more than doubling in ~1.4±0.7 h. The OH measurements revealed high initial levels (>1×107 molecules/cm3 that were likely caused in part by high initial HONO (~10% of NOy. Thus, more research is needed to understand critical post emission processes for the second-largest trace gas source on Earth. It is estimated that

  1. The epidemiology of pediatric burns undergoing intensive care in Burn Centre Brno, Czech Republic, 1997-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipový, B; Brychta, P; Gregorová, N; Jelínková, Z; Rihová, H; Suchánek, I; Kaloudová, Y; Mager, R; Krupicová, H; Martincová, A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the basic epidemiological characteristics of severely burned children who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), Department of Burns and Reconstructive Surgery Faculty Hospital Brno, Czech Republic in the years 1997-2009. We collected and evaluated epidemiological data such as age, sex, burn etiology, length of hospitalization, duration of the ICU stay, surgical or conservative therapeutic strategies, the use of mechanical ventilation and its duration, day and month of injury and the extent of burned area. In total 383 children (253 boys, 130 girls) aged 0-14 years, underwent intensive care for at least 48h. Male to female ratio was 1.95:1. The average range of burn area in the group was 16.43±12.86% TBSA (total body surface area). During the reporting period, 16 children were admitted with burns over 50% TBSA. 328 children suffered burns indoors, with 55 children being burned outdoors. Indoor/outdoor ratio was set at 5.96:1. The most frequent etiological agent was scalding (hot water, soup, coffee, oil, tea). The total number of scalded children in this group was 312 (81.46%). Mechanical ventilation was used in 96 cases (25.07% of all the admitted patients). The duration of mechanical ventilation in these patients was 8.03±5.67 days in average. The average length of stay in ICU was 10.71±10.92 days and total length of hospital stay was an average of 21.55±14.55 days. A total of 184 patients (48.04%) were treated surgically and therefore required necrectomy and skin grafting. The other 199 (51.96%) patients were treated conservatively. During the reporting period 3 children died (0.78%). In our report we identify basic epidemiological data defined in the aim of this study for burned children requiring intensive care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Pile burning creates a fifty-year legacy of openings in regenerating lodgepole pine forests in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles C. Rhoades; Paula J. Fornwalt

    2015-01-01

    Pile burning is a common means of disposing the woody residues of logging and for post-harvest site preparation operations, in spite of the practice’s potential negative effects. To examine the long-term implications of this practice we established a 50-year sequence of pile burns within recovering clear cuts in lodgepole pine forests. We compared tree, shrub and...

  3. An epidemiological study of 500 paediatric burn patients in Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the epidemiological data of paediatric burn patients to determine the role of demographic distribution and epidemiological parameters for assessment of mortality rate and development of burn prevention strategy. Materials and Methods : Epidemiological data of 500 patients admitted to the Burns and Plastic Surgery Unit of B.J. Wadia Hospital, Mumbai over a period of six years (2000-2005 was reviewed from medical records. Age, sex, demographic distribution, seasonal variation, total body surface area (TBSA involved, type and place of burn injury, parental occupation, family size, first aid and mortality rate were studied. Result: Median age group for patient was 3.44 years (range one month to 14 years. The majority (24% of burns occurred in children between the one to two years age group. Male to female sex ratio was 1.38:1. Most of the patients were from the defined demographic region served by the hospital. A significant number of patients however were from outside this region. Burn injury occurred predominantly during winter. Most common type of burn was scalds which occurred mainly in domestic circumstances. In the majority of patients, less than 10% TBSA was involved. All patients were managed as per the unit protocol. Mortality rate was 10.4%. Mortality rate was high in patients having more than 40% TBSA involvement. Seventy-three per cent of the total deaths occurred in the patients coming from regions outside the demographic region served by the hospital. Parental occupation, family size and the first aid did not affect the mortality rate. Conclusion: Availability of a burn care unit in the vicinity can decrease the mortality rates in the paediatric burn patients. An intense and focused burn prevention campaign to educate the general population about dangerous aetiological factors will decrease the incidence of paediatric burns.

  4. Methods to Reduce Forest Residue Volume after Timber Harvesting and Produce Black Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest restoration often includes thinning to reduce tree density and improve ecosystem processes and function while also reducing the risk of wildfire or insect and disease outbreaks. However, one drawback of these restoration treatments is that slash is often burned in piles that may damage the soil and require further restoration activities. Pile burning is currently used on many forest sites as the preferred method for residue disposal because piles can be burned at various times of the year and are usually more controlled than broadcast burns. In many cases, fire can be beneficial to site conditions and soil properties, but slash piles, with a large concentration of wood, needles, forest floor, and sometimes mineral soil, can cause long-term damage. We describe several alternative methods for reducing nonmerchantable forest residues that will help remove excess woody biomass, minimize detrimental soil impacts, and create charcoal for improving soil organic matter and carbon sequestration.

  5. Protect the Ones You Love: Burns Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the children you love from burns. Key Prevention Tips To prevent burns from fires and scalding: Be " ... file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer ...

  6. Impact of burned area on African seasonal climate in regional modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sales, F.; Xue, Y.; Okin, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    The WRF/SSiB2 model has been employed on a series of regional simulations to investigate the impact of burned areas associated with wildfires on African seasonal climate and surface energy balances. Burned areas are characterized by deposits of charcoal and ash, removal of vegetation, and alteration of the vegetation structure. Burned area information for the experiments was based on the MODIS burn date maps with an 8-day interval on 500m spatial resolution. Monthly burned area maps averaged over 2000-2011, and aggregated from the MODIS resolution, were created and incorporated in the regional model (50km resolution), whereby vegetation was reduced according to the percentage of grid cell area burned and ground albedo was reduced to 0.1 for a 10-day period after burning to reproduce the ground darkening associated with the amount of grid cell burned. Control (unburned) and burned preliminary experiments were carried out between 01 Oct 2010 and 31 Sep 2011 and compared to examine the sensitivity of different wildfire parameters on precipitation and surface fluxes; including sensitivity to ground albedo recovery time and vegetation resistance to fire. Vegetation cover, greenness, and LAI information were taken from the Fourier-Adjusted, Sensor and Solar zenith angle corrected, Interpolated, Reconstructed data set. Analysis of annual burned area maps revealed extensive burning, especially in the Sahel and between latitudes 0° and 15°S (Central Africa), with both regions exhibiting 50% or more of the area of a grid cell burned. Most of burning in Sahel occurred between November and February, while in the southern hemisphere it took place between June and September. Extensive burning was also found along eastern South Africa and Mozambique between 25° and 40° W, where some grid cells were 10% to 30% burned in August and September. Preliminary results indicated that the WRF/SSiB2 is sensitive to the land degradation associated with the burned areas. Areas with

  7. Erosive pustular dermatosis: new description of a possible cause of the non-healing burn wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Benna, Sammy; Johnson, Kirsty; Perkins, William; O'Boyle, Ciaran

    2014-06-01

    Erosive pustular dermatosis (EPD) is a cutaneous condition, characterised by sterile pustular lesions, erosions and crusting. Extensive or infected disease may result in scarring. EPD has never been reported following burn. The aim of this study was to describe the presentation and management of EPD complicating burns wounds. A consecutive series of EPD cases secondary to burn. Six cases were identified. In each case, erosive lesions and crusts were located at the site of burn or at the site of split skin grafting after tangential burn excision. All cases presented as failure to heal or repeated wound breakdown, despite standard burn wound management. Pain was a significant feature in all cases. Microbiological cultures demonstrated either benign colonising bacteria or no pathogens. Time to EPD diagnosis by the interdisciplinary team was 126 ± 27 days (mean ± SEM). Topical therapy with short course, potent corticosteroids resulted in clinical remission in 15 ± 2 days (mean ± SEM) without clinical relapses after 15 ± 4 months (mean ± SEM). EPD may occur following burns. EPD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a non-healing burn wound and resolves readily with topical potent corticosteroid therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Methoxyflurane analgesia for burns dressings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Kathleen J.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for analgesia for burns dressings are discussed. Methoxyflurane has proved satisfactory in a clinical trial, and can be administered by one of two types of vaporizer. The possibility of nephrotoxicity due to methoxyflurane has not been eliminated. PMID:5024149

  9. Burning effigies with Bakhtinian laughter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göttke, F.

    2015-01-01

    The hanging or burning of effigies as an expression of dissent is a well-established genre of playful political protest. It is enacted in a variety of ways, accessing the conventions of various traditional rituals and social practices, and can function either as a progressive force demanding change,

  10. Burning mouth syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS, which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder.

  11. Minor burn - first aid - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100213.htm Minor burn - first aid - series—Procedure, part 1 To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 2 Go to slide 2 out of ...

  12. The Burn-Out Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ruth Christ

    1979-01-01

    An article is presented on the "burn-out" of parents, particularly those of autistic children (i.e., the exhaustion of their psychological and/or physical resources as a result of long and intense caring for their children), along with the comments and responses of five parents and professionals. (DLS)

  13. The Burning Truth(s)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    found outside of the burns theatre. Challenges include airway distortion, pulmonary dysfunction, difficult vascular access, rapid blood loss, problematic monitoring and positioning, impaired temperature regulation, altered drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, renal dysfunction and sepsis.2 To be able to effectively ...

  14. Clinker Burning Kinetics and Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira

    dimensions, rotation velocity, temperature, gas composition, heat transfer phenomena, etc. These conditions can only be partly simulated in ordinary lab-scale experiments. Thus, the objectives of this project have been to establish test equipment to simulate the industrial clinker burning process...

  15. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. A standard experimental 'chemical burn'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Weibel, T J; Carter, E J; Calobrace, M B; Foldi, J F; Zawacki, B E

    1994-06-01

    To establish a standard method for producing experimental cutaneous injuries caused by contact with corrosive liquids, we modified an apparatus and method recommended by Walker and Mason in 1967 to produce experimental thermal burns. The resulting procedure proved to be safe, reproducible, humane and efficient and can be used with a wide variety of corrosive liquids.

  17. Long-term RF burn-in effects on dielectric charging of MEMS capacitive switches

    KAUST Repository

    Molinero, David G.

    2013-03-01

    This paper experimentally quantified the long-term effects of RF burn-in, in terms of burn-in and recovery times, and found the effects to be semipermanent. Specifically, most of the benefit could be realized after approximately 20 min of RF burn-in, which would then last for several months. Additionally, since similar effects were observed on both real and faux switches, the effects appeared to be of electrical rather than mechanical nature. These encouraging results should facilitate the application of the switches in RF systems, where high RF power could be periodically applied to rejuvenate the switches. © 2001-2011 IEEE.

  18. Survey on current hydrotherapy use among North American burn centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Peter G; Loiselle, Frederick B; Nickerson, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    The authors have reviewed hydrotherapy practices in North American burn centers and described the epidemiology of hydrotherapy-associated nosocomial infections. A web-based survey was distributed to the directors of all burn care facilities listed by the American Burn Association. Questions addressed aspects of practice, including the method, additives, disposable liners, decontamination practices, nosocomial pathogens, and perceptions regarding the "ideal" method of hydrotherapy. The response rate was 44%, 59 of 142 centers, or 827 of 1900 beds. Hydrotherapy is regularly used by 83% of centers. Among these centers, 10% use exclusively immersion hydrotherapy (IH), 54% use exclusively shower cart hydrotherapy (SCH), and 35% use a combination of IH and SCH. Disposable liners are used at 80% of centers. Tap water alone is used by 51% of centers, 27% add detergent, 16% chlorhexidine, and 7% povidone-iodine. The majority of centers (57%) do not routinely culture their hydrotherapy equipment, 20% culture weekly, 7% monthly, and 17% less than once per month. Directors believe that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus are the most common nosocomial pathogens, followed by Acinetobacter species and Candida albicans. The relative frequency of occurrence of the first three pathogens did not vary with regard to the hydrotherapy method used. Given the opportunity to redesign, 45% of burn unit directors would implement SCH only, 42% a combination of SCH and IH, 2% exclusively IH, and 11% no hydrotherapy or bedside irrigation only. The prevalence of hydrotherapy use at North American burn centers has decreased since 1990 (83% vs 95%), yet continues to be used at the majority of centers. The use of IH has also declined (55% vs 81%). The trend away from the exclusive use of IH will likely continue, because more centers incorporate showering methods.

  19. Preventing unintentional scald burns: moving beyond tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Gina; Quinlan, Kyran; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    2008-10-01

    The goal was to examine in detail the mechanisms of significant scald burns among children burns between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2004, were identified through the University of Chicago Burn Center database. Demographic data and details of the circumstances and mechanisms of injury were extracted from the medical records. Of 640 admissions to the University of Chicago Burn Center during the 3-year study period, 140 (22%) involved children burns. Of the 137 available charts reviewed, 118 involved unintentional injuries. Of those unintentional injuries, 14 were tap water scalds and 104 were non-tap water scalds. Of the non-tap water scalds, 94 scalds (90.4%) were related to hot cooking or drinking liquids. Two unexpected patterns of injury were discovered. Nine children (8.7%) between the ages of 18 months and 4 years were scalded after opening a microwave oven and removing the hot substance themselves. Seventeen children (16.3%) were scalded while an older child, 7 to 14 years of age, was cooking or carrying the scalding substance or supervising the younger child. Current prevention strategies and messages do not adequately address the most common mechanisms of scald injury requiring hospitalization. Easy access to a microwave oven poses a significant scald risk to children as young as 18 months of age, who can open the door and remove the hot contents. An engineering fix for microwave ovens could help protect young children from this mechanism of scalding. Involvement of older children in a subset of scald injuries is a new finding that may have prevention implications.

  20. Management of post burn hand deformities

    OpenAIRE

    Sabapathy S; Bajantri Babu; Bharathi R

    2010-01-01

    The hand is ranked among the three most frequent sites of burns scar contracture deformity. One of the major determinants of the quality of life in burns survivors is the functionality of the hands. Burns deformities, although largely preventable, nevertheless do occur when appropriate treatment is not provided in the acute situation or when they are part of a major burns. Reconstructive procedures can greatly improve the function of the hands. Appropriate choice of procedures and timing of s...

  1. Vitamin E Supplementation in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    PHHS-BU) in Dallas. 2. Keywords: burn, smoke inhalation, vitamin E, patients, oxidative stress, pulmonary function, ICU days 3. Accomplishments: a...Memorial Hermann Hospital (BICU-MHH) in Houston, and the Parkland Health and Hospital System Burn Unit (PHHS-BU) in Dallas. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16...Galveston, the Burn Intensive Care Unit at Memorial Hermann Hospital (BICU-MHH) in Houston, and the Parkland Health and Hospital System Burn Unit

  2. The use of music therapy to assist children who have severe burns

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Jane

    1994-01-01

    peer-reviewed Music therapy is a valuable tool in distracting children with severe burns for the pain experienced in daily debridement baths. Music therapy allows choice. facilitaling the child's sense of being in control. and provides an atmosphere of safety and comfort. This paper reports on the role of music therapy in assisting children aged from eighteen months to five years during daily debridement procedures in the burns unit of a children's hospital. Songs of the ...

  3. The Fenix II Study: A longitudinal study of psychopathology among burn patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fidel-Kinori, Sara Guila; Eiroá-Orosa, Francisco José; Giannoni-Pastor, Anna; Tasqué-Cebrián, Ruth; Arguello, Jose Maria; Casas, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Psychological symptoms are common among burn survivors. However, knowledge about epidemiology and predictors of psychopathology has shown great heterogeneity in this population. The Fenix-II Project was the first epidemiological study on the psychopathological consequences of burn injuries developed in Spain, providing a detailed analysis of the progression of psychological symptoms during the first six months after injury. Three hundred and thirty-three patients were monitored and 183 were i...

  4. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch this video to learn ... know about burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. Read our burn prevention tips | ...

  5. Domination and Composition Structure Change at Hemic Peat Natural Regeneration Following Burning; A Case Study in Pelalawan, Riau Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAMBANG HERO SAHARJO

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is the burning of the world’s living and dead vegetation, including grasslands, forests and agricultural lands following the harvest for land clearing and land-use change. One of the important information needed following this biomass burning is how long the burnt forest or land can be recovered, and how worst the changing occurred. Repeated burning occurred at the same place trend to clean the vegetation which leads to have the land with lower number and quality of species left. The research objective is to understand the vegetation changing following peat fires in the sapric peat type at the land preparation using belong to the local community located in the Pelalawan district, Riau province, Indonesia during the dry season in the year 2001. Before burning, logging, slashing, drying and burning the site was dominated by Uncaria glabrata at seedling stage, Ficus sundaica at sapling stage, Ficus sundaica at pole stage and Stenochlaena palustris at understorey. After logging, slashing and followed by 4 weeks drying then continued by burning with high flame temperature range from 900-1100oC, it had been found that 3-months following burning the site was dominated by Uncaria glabrata at seedling stage and Nephrolepis flaccigera at understorey while 6-months following burning the site was dominated by Parastemon uruphyllus at seedling stage and Erechites valeriantifolia at understorey stage.

  6. EPIDEMOLOGY OF BURNS IN ENUGU, NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JIBURUM

    Fifteen (5.3%) occurred in vehicles following road traffic accidents. Flame constituted the largest source of burn in 147 (49.1%) patients while scald burn from hot fluids( water, soup, hot tea, pap{custard} )constituted the next large group of 108. (37,9%). Twenty patients (7.0%) were due to chemical burns while electrical ...

  7. Costs of burn care: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hop, M.J.; Polinder, S.; van der Vlies, C.H.; Middelkoop, E.; van Baar, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Burn care is traditionally considered expensive care. However, detailed information about the costs of burn care is scarce despite the increased need for this information and the enhanced focus on healthcare cost control. In this study, economic literature on burn care was systematically reviewed to

  8. Burn Injury Caused by Laptop Computers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    phone have been described.[3]. We report on a case of first‑degree burn due to overheating of. Compaq Presario cq50 on the patient's left foot. So far, there have been a few case reports about portable computer causing burns, but until now burning induced in such a quick succession of time (3 days) has not been reported.

  9. Titanium tetrachloride burns to the eye.

    OpenAIRE

    Chitkara, D. K.; McNeela, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    We present eight cases of chemical burns of the eyes from titanium tetrachloride, an acidic corrosive liquid. However it causes severe chemical burns which have a protracted course and features more akin to severe alkali burns. Injuries related to titanium tetrachloride should be treated seriously and accordingly appropriate management is suggested.

  10. Intentional burns in Nepal: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Bir Bahadur; Duke, Janine M; Sharma, Narayan Prasad; Thapa, Buland; Dahal, Peeyush; Bariya, Nara Devi; Marston, Wendy; Wallace, Hilary J

    2015-09-01

    Intentional burns injuries are associated with high mortality rates, and for survivors, high levels of physical and psychological morbidity. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of intentional burn admissions to the adult Burns Unit at Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal, during the period 2002-2013. A secondary data analysis of de-identified data of patients hospitalized at Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, with a burn during the period of 1 January 2002 to 31 August 2013. Socio-demographic, injury and psychosocial factors of patients with intentional and unintentional burns are described and compared. Chi-square tests, Fisher's exact test and Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used to determine statistical significance. There were a total of 1148 burn admissions of which 329 (29%) were for intentional burn, 293 (26%) were self-inflicted and 36 (3%) were due to assault. Mortality rates for intentional burns were approximately three times those for unintentional burns (60 vs. 22%). When compared to unintentional burns, patients with intentional burns were more likely to be female (79 vs. 48%), married (84 vs. 67%), younger (25 vs. 30 years), have more extensive burns (total body surface area, %: 55 vs. 25) and higher mortality (60 vs. 22%). Intentional burns were more likely to occur at home (95 vs. 67%), be caused by fire (96 vs. 77%), and kerosene was the most common accelerant (91 vs. 31%). A primary psychosocial risk factor was identified in the majority of intentional burn cases, with 60% experiencing adjustment problems/interpersonal conflict and 32% with evidence of a pre-existing psychological condition. A record of alcohol/substance abuse related to the patient or other was associated with a greater proportion of intentional burns when compared with unintentional burns (17 vs. 4%). The majority of intentional burn patients were female. Almost all intentional burns occurred in the home and were caused by fire, with kerosene the most common accelerant used. Underlying

  11. The Fenix II study: A longitudinal study of psychopathology among burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidel-Kinori, Sara Guila; Eiroa-Orosa, Francisco Jose; Giannoni-Pastor, Anna; Tasqué-Cebrián, Ruth; Arguello, Jose Maria; Casas, Miguel

    2016-09-01

    Psychological symptoms are common among burn survivors. However, knowledge about epidemiology and predictors of psychopathology has shown great heterogeneity in this population. The Fenix-II Project was the first epidemiological study on the psychopathological consequences of burns developed in Spain, providing a detailed analysis of the progression of psychological symptoms during the first six months after injury. Three hundred and thirty-three patients were screened and 183 were included in this study. Posttraumatic, depression and anxiety symptoms showed a general decreasing tendency across time. At 6 months, 34 patients showed clinically significant Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms (20.5% of 166 patients reached at 6 months) as assessed with the MINI Neuropsychiatric Interview. Within this group of patients, anxiety, depression and hyperarousal increased at 30 days, and avoidance 90 days after injury. The most accurate predictors of PTSD were found to be being burned in a Motor Vehicle Crash, risk of social exclusion, low body-image adjustment, anterior trunk location of the burn and life threat perception during the burn-shock period. Considering these factors, clinicians may identify patients at risk of PTSD development, allowing an adequate follow up and preventive interventions which may minimize the psychological consequences of burns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Monthly Weather Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supplements to the Monthly Weather Review publication. The Weather Bureau published the Monthly weather review Supplement irregularly from 1914 to 1949. The...

  13. Incidence and characteristics of chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Lee, Sang-Gil; Kim, Hwan-Cheol

    2017-05-01

    Chemical burns can lead to serious health outcomes. Previous studies about chemical burns have been performed based on burn center data so these studies have provided limited information about the incidence of chemical burns at the national level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns using nationwide databases. A cohort representing the Korean population, which was established using a national health insurance database, and a nationwide workers' compensation database were used to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns. Characteristics of the affected body region, depth of burns, industry, task, and causative agents were analyzed from two databases. The incidence of chemical burns was calculated according to employment status. The most common regions involving chemical burns with hospital visits were the skin followed by the eyes. For skin lesions, the hands and wrists were the most commonly affected regions. Second degree burns were the most common in terms of depth of skin lesions. The hospital visit incidence was 1.96 per 10,000 person-year in the general population. The compensated chemical burns incidence was 0.17 per 10,000 person-year. Employees and the self-employed showed a significantly increased risk of chemical burns undergoing hospital visits compared to their dependents. Chemical burns on the skin and eyes are almost equally prevalent. The working environment was associated with increased risk of chemical burns. Our results may aid in estimating the size of the problem and prioritizing prevention of chemical burns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Prescribed burning and its effect on plant biomass and species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three burning regime (fire protected, early burning, late burning) and their effects on plant biomass and species diversity in Dabagi forest Reserve of Sokoto State were investigated. Prescribed burning was carried out on randomly selected plots (10 m x 10 m) in November (early burn) and March (late burn) 2004.

  15. Facial burns from exploding microwaved foods: Case series and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagirathan, Shenbana; Rao, Krishna; Al-Benna, Sammy; O'Boyle, Ciaran P

    2016-03-01

    Microwave ovens allow for quick and simple cooking. However, the importance of adequate food preparation, prior to microwave cooking, and the consequences of inadequate preparation are not well-known. The authors conducted a retrospective outcome analysis of all patients who sustained facial burns from microwaved foods and were treated at a UK regional burns unit over a six-year period. Patients were identified from clinical records. Eight patients presented following inadequate preparation of either tinned potatoes (n=4) or eggs (n=4). All patients sustained burns. Mean age was 41 years (range 21-68 years). Six cases (75%) had associated ocular injury. One received amniotic membrane grafts; this individual's vision remains poor twelve months after injury. Rapid dielectric heating of water within foods may produce high steam and vapour pressure gradients and cause explosive decompression [1,5,11]. Consumers may fail to recognise differential heating and simply cook foods for longer if they remain cool on the outer surface. Education on safe use and risks of microwave-cooked foods may help prevent these potentially serious injuries. Microwave ovens have become ubiquitous. The authors recognise the need for improved public awareness of safe microwave cooking. Burns resulting from microwave-cooked foods may have life-changing consequences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Pediatric burn rehabilitation: Philosophy and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Ohgi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are a huge public health issue for children throughout the world, with the majority occurring in developing countries. Burn injuries can leave a pediatric patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. Rehabilitation is an essential and integral part of pediatric burn treatment. The aim of this article was to review the literature on pediatric burn rehabilitation from the Medline, CINAHL, and Web of Science databases. An attempt has been made to present the basic aspects of burn rehabilitation, provide practical information, and discuss the goals and conceptualization of rehabilitation as well as the development of rehabilitation philosophy and strategies.

  17. The NBT test in burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, E. A.; Jones, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The number of polymorphs which stained with the dye nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBT "Positive") increased sharply during the first week after burning, reaching levels 4--5 times above values for healthy volunteers. In burns of more than 20% of the body surface a second, smaller increase in the number of NBT "positives" occurred 4 to 6 weeks after burning. The high levels of NBT "positive" polymorphs occurred independently of infection on the burns. A burned patient who died from septicaemia had very low numbers of NBT "positive" polymorphs for 3 weeks before death. PMID:444418

  18. Management of post burn hand deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabapathy S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The hand is ranked among the three most frequent sites of burns scar contracture deformity. One of the major determinants of the quality of life in burns survivors is the functionality of the hands. Burns deformities, although largely preventable, nevertheless do occur when appropriate treatment is not provided in the acute situation or when they are part of a major burns. Reconstructive procedures can greatly improve the function of the hands. Appropriate choice of procedures and timing of surgery followed by supervised physiotherapy can be a boon for a burns survivor.

  19. Five-year experience with burns from glass fireplace doors in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryza, Mary Jo; Hinson, Michelle; Conway, Jennifer; Ryan, Colleen M

    2013-01-01

    Burns from contact with glass doors of gas fireplaces have been previously reported. The purpose of this study is to examine the incidence and severity of this injury in our population. Patients were identified for inclusion in the retrospective chart review study using the National Trauma Registry of the American College of Surgeons (NTRACS) and our local outpatient database. Criteria for inclusion were burn injuries sustained from contact with fireplace glass doors treated at our pediatric burn center from 2007 through 2011. Fifty children met these criteria, including two children whose burns were caused by electric fireplace glass doors. BSA burned was 1.5 ± 1.5% (mean ± SD), range 0.5 to 10%. Age was 27.2 ± 27.3 months, range 8 months to 13 years. Forty-five children (90%) had hand burns; of these, 18 children had bilateral hand involvement. Facial burns were found in three children (6%), and eight children (16%) had other areas burned. One patient developed cellulitis. Two patients required surgery. Six children (12%) required hospitalization; mean length of stay was 5.8 ± 5 days, range 1 to 5 days. Although the number of inpatient admissions was relatively few, 329 outpatient visits and 309 rehabilitation visits were required for treatment of these children. Nineteen patients (38%) required splints and six patients (12%) required scar treatment with pressure garments. Burns from contact with fireplace glass doors are a recurring problem. Toddlers are most at risk. Directed preventive strategies including parent education, safety warnings, and design modifications such as temperature sensors and barrier screens could be potentially helpful in reducing the incidence of this injury.

  20. Laser doppler line scan burn imager (LDLS-BI): sideways move or a step ahead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, A J A; Ward, D; La Hei, E R; Harvey, J G

    2014-02-01

    To assess the accuracy of a Laser Doppler Line Scanner (LDLS) in predicting burn wound healing in children compared to conventional Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI). A prospective study comparing a LDLS with a conventional LDI to assess burn wound Healing Potential (HP) was performed in 50 paediatric patients presenting to our institution between February 2010 and March 2011, as part of a multi-centre, international trial. Inclusion criteria were superficial to deep dermal burns that were able to be scanned between 42 h and 5 days of the burn. Of the 50 patients enrolled, one was excluded from subsequent analysis as they were unable to present for wound reviews at 14 and 21 days. Ninety scans were performed of 59 burn wounds in the remaining 49 patients. The mean age was 4 years and 9 months (range 8 months to 16 years) and the mean Total Body Surface Area burnt was 8.3% (range 0.1-15%). The most common mechanism of injury was a scald, followed by contact and flame burns. A limb was the most common site of injury. Overall accuracy of the scanners was 94.5% (LDI) and 95% (LDLS), with accuracy lowest for indeterminate burns that healed within 14-21 days. The LDLS was found to be as accurate as the LDI in predicting burn wound HP in children. Whilst the LDLS scan resolution was lower, with more scans of larger burns required, its smaller size and greater scan speed proved valuable in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Perineal burn care: French working group recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, Julien; Le Floch, Ronan; Bourdais, Ludovic; Gamelin, Alexandre; Lebreton, Françoise; Perro, Gérard

    2014-06-01

    Burns to the perineum are frequently exposed to faeces. Diverting colostomy is often described to prevent faecal soiling. Because this technique is invasive with frequent complications, use of non-surgical devices including specifically designed faecal management systems has been reported in perineal burns. In order to standardise the faecal management strategy in patients with perineal burns, a group of French experts was assembled. This group first evaluated the ongoing practice in France by analysing a questionnaire sent to every French burn centre. Based on the results of this study and on literature data, the experts proposed recommendations on the management of perineal burns in adults. Specifically designed faecal management systems are the first-line method to divert faeces in perineal burns. The working group proposed recommendations and an algorithm to assist in decisions in the management of perineal burns in four categories of patients, depending on total burn skin area, depth and extent of the perineal burn. In France, non-surgical devices are the leading means of faecal diversion in perineal burns. The proposed algorithm may assist in decisions in the management of perineal burns. The expert group emphasises that large clinical studies are needed to better evaluate these devices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical burns in children: Aetiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Rachel; Pang, Tony C Y; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-06-01

    Chemical burns account for a small proportion of total burns in children, but may require specific first aid and different modes of prevention. A retrospective study between 2006 and 2012 of children ≤16 years treated with chemical burns at a specialist paediatric burn centre. Data were extracted from a prospectively maintained database. 56 episodes of chemical burns occurred during the study period. The majority (54%) occurred in boys. There were 39 (72%) patients chemical burns occurred in the domestic setting, especially in the chemicals by an unattended child accounted for half of all (n=22, 49%) chemical burns burns in patients ≥10 years resulted from self-harm. The most common aetiological agents were household cleaners and aerosols in the younger and older age groups respectively. Chemical burns remain infrequent but potentially preventable. These burns mainly occur in the domestic setting due to non-intentional exposure of household chemicals in children burns in children <10. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Burn Severity Mapping in Australia 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, R.; Clark, J.; Lecker, J.

    2012-07-01

    In 2009, the Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment estimated approximately 430,000 hectares of Victoria Australia were burned by numerous bushfires. Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams from the United States were deployed to Victoria to assist local fire managers. The U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (USGS/EROS) and U.S. Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (USFS/RSAC) aided the support effort by providing satellite-derived "soil burn severity " maps for over 280,000 burned hectares. In the United States, BAER teams are assembled to make rapid assessments of burned lands to identify potential hazards to public health and property. An early step in the assessment process is the creation of a soil burn severity map used to identify hazard areas and prioritize treatment locations. These maps are developed primarily using Landsat satellite imagery and the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) algorithm.

  4. BURN SEVERITY MAPPING IN AUSTRALIA 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. McKinley

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment estimated approximately 430,000 hectares of Victoria Australia were burned by numerous bushfires. Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER teams from the United States were deployed to Victoria to assist local fire managers. The U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (USGS/EROS and U.S. Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (USFS/RSAC aided the support effort by providing satellite-derived "soil burn severity " maps for over 280,000 burned hectares. In the United States, BAER teams are assembled to make rapid assessments of burned lands to identify potential hazards to public health and property. An early step in the assessment process is the creation of a soil burn severity map used to identify hazard areas and prioritize treatment locations. These maps are developed primarily using Landsat satellite imagery and the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR algorithm.

  5. Burn severity mapping in Australia 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Randy; Clark, J.; Lecker, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment estimated approximately 430,000 hectares of Victoria Australia were burned by numerous bushfires. Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams from the United States were deployed to Victoria to assist local fire managers. The U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (USGS/EROS) and U.S. Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (USFS/RSAC) aided the support effort by providing satellite-derived "soil burn severity " maps for over 280,000 burned hectares. In the United States, BAER teams are assembled to make rapid assessments of burned lands to identify potential hazards to public health and property. An early step in the assessment process is the creation of a soil burn severity map used to identify hazard areas and prioritize treatment locations. These maps are developed primarily using Landsat satellite imagery and the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) algorithm.

  6. [Burns care following a nuclear incident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargues, L; Donat, N; Jault, P; Leclerc, T

    2010-09-30

    Radiation injuries are usually caused by radioactive isotopes in industry. Detonations of nuclear reactors, the use of military nuclear weapons, and terrorist attacks represent a risk of mass burn casualties. Ionizing radiation creates thermal burns, acute radiation syndrome with pancytopenia, and a delayed cutaneous syndrome. After a latency period, skin symptoms appear and the depth of tissue damages increase with dose exposure. The usual burn resuscitation protocols have to be applied. Care of these victims also requires assessment of the level of radiation, plus decontamination by an experienced team. In nuclear disasters, the priority is to optimize the available resources and reserve treatment to patients with the highest probability of survival. After localized nuclear injury, assessment of burn depth and surgical techniques of skin coverage are the main difficulties in a burn centre. Training in medical facilities and burn centres is necessary in the preparation for management of the different types of burn injuries.

  7. Pediatric hand burns: thermal, electrical, chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mark; Armstrong, Milton B; Panthaki, Zubin J

    2009-07-01

    Young children often use their hands for exploration of their surroundings, and this often leads to the hand being the primary site of injury. Because of this and many associated factors, burns of the pediatric hands are relatively common, with thermal injuries being the most frequent. Electrical and chemical etiologies contribute a minor portion of the burn injuries in the pediatric population. Some key differences should be considered in the management of hand burns in a pediatric patient versus an adult. In general, minor superficial burns will heal satisfactorily only with topical care. Deeper partial-thickness and full-thickness burns, however, require surgical interventions. Special care should always be taken in the management of electrical and chemical burns because the pathophysiology of these injuries are unique. Treatment of pediatric hand burns should also involve close and thorough follow-up to assess not only for healing and restoration of function of the injury but also for psychologic and emotional trauma.

  8. Assessing variability and long-term trends in burned area by merging multiple satellite fire products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Giglio

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Long term, high quality estimates of burned area are needed for improving both prognostic and diagnostic fire emissions models and for assessing feedbacks between fire and the climate system. We developed global, monthly burned area estimates aggregated to 0.5° spatial resolution for the time period July 1996 through mid-2009 using four satellite data sets. From 2001–2009, our primary data source was 500-m burned area maps produced using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS surface reflectance imagery; more than 90% of the global area burned during this time period was mapped in this fashion. During times when the 500-m MODIS data were not available, we used a combination of local regression and regional regression trees developed over periods when burned area and Terra MODIS active fire data were available to indirectly estimate burned area. Cross-calibration with fire observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR allowed the data set to be extended prior to the MODIS era. With our data set we estimated that the global annual area burned for the years 1997–2008 varied between 330 and 431 Mha, with the maximum occurring in 1998. We compared our data set to the recent GFED2, L3JRC, GLOBCARBON, and MODIS MCD45A1 global burned area products and found substantial differences in many regions. Lastly, we assessed the interannual variability and long-term trends in global burned area over the past 13 years. This burned area time series serves as the basis for the third version of the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED3 estimates of trace gas and aerosol emissions.

  9. Burning mouth syndrome: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra G Patil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome is a condition characterized by chronic orofacial pain without any mucosal abnormalities or other organic disease. There are numerous synonyms for this ailment such as stomatodynia, stomatopyrosis, glossodynia, glossopyrosis, sore mouth, sore tongue, oral dysesthesia, and scalding mouth syndrome. Patients usually present with burning, stinging, or numbness on the tongue or other areas of oral mucosa. The complex etiology and lack of characteristic signs and symptoms makes the diagnosis difficult. As a result of which managing such patients become a herculean task. Moreover, lack of understanding of the disease leads to misdiagnosis and unnecessary referral of patients. In this article, the authors have described the etiopathogenesis, diagnostic algorithm and management of this confusing ailment.

  10. Repeated expansion in burn sequela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitanguy, Ivo; Gontijo de Amorim, Natale Ferreira; Radwanski, Henrique N; Lintz, José Eduardo

    2002-08-01

    This paper presents a retrospective study of the use of 346 expanders in 132 patients operated at the Ivo Pitanguy Clinic, between the period of 1985 and 2000. The expanders were used in the treatment of burn sequela. In the majority of cases, more than one expander was used at the same time. In 42 patients, repeated tissue expansion was done. The re-expanded flaps demonstrated good distension and viability. With the increase in area at each new expansion, larger volume expanders were employed, achieving an adequate advancement of the flaps to remove the injured tissue. The great advantage of using tissue re-expansion in the burned patient is the reconstruction of extensive areas with the same color and texture of neighboring tissues, without the addition of new scars.

  11. Energetic residues from field disposal of gun propellants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael R; Walsh, Marianne E; Hewitt, Alan D

    2010-01-15

    Military training with howitzers and mortars produces excess propellant that is burned on the training range and can result in point sources containing high concentrations of unreacted propellant constituents. Propellants contain energetic compounds such as nitroglycerin (NG) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), both of which are found at firing positions and propellant disposal areas. To quantify the mass of residue remaining from the field-expedient disposal of propellants, two mortar propellants and one howitzer propellant were burned under different field conditions. These conditions included burning on a snow pack, at the bottom of a snow pit, and in a pan surrounded by snow for the mortar propellants and on dry and wet sand for the howitzer propellant. For the mortar propellant, the energetics (NG) remaining after burning in the bowl, on frozen ground, and on snow were 0.21%, 5.2% and 18%, respectively. For the howitzer propellant, the difference in energetics (2,4-DNT) remaining after disposal on wet and dry sand was mortar propellant burned in an open container. These tests demonstrate that environmental factors, especially in winter, can play a significant role in the effectiveness of field-expedient disposal of propellants.

  12. The Ocular Surface Chemical Burns

    OpenAIRE

    Medi Eslani; Alireza Baradaran-Rafii; Asadolah Movahedan; Djalilian, Ali R.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular chemical burns are common and serious ocular emergencies that require immediate and intensive evaluation and care. The victims of such incidents are usually young, and therefore loss of vision and disfigurement could dramatically affect their lives. The clinical course can be divided into immediate, acute, early, and late reparative phases. The degree of limbal, corneal, and conjunctival involvement at the time of injury is critically associated with prognosis. The treatment starts wit...

  13. Burn Treatment for the Unburned

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-24

    5. Prasad JK, Feller I, Thomson PD: Use of amnion for the treatment of dressing is more rapid in patients with TEN-simple loss of Stevens - Johnson ...dermatologists, increases the risk of infection, Heimbach et al and other pediatricians, neurologists ( phenytoin [Dilantin] is a common authors quite... syndrome . J Trauma 1986;26:945-946. the epidermis is not the equivalent of a burn. As is the case in 6. Halebian PH, Madden MR, Finklestein JL, et al

  14. Adherence to National Burn Care Review referral criteria in a paediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A M; Hassan, Z; Davenport, K; Evans, N; Falder, S

    2010-12-01

    The National Burn Care Review (NBCR) gives guidance on the recognition of potentially complex burns requiring assessment and management in a burn unit. This guidance provides a referral framework for those initiating assessment and management of burns. The effect of close adherence to NBCR guidance on workload is at present unknown. To audit referral patterns of burns in our paediatric Emergency Department (ED) in comparison to NBCR referral criteria. To identify the type of injuries not referred despite meeting criteria, and their outcomes, to assess whether these patients come to any harm short-term. To estimate the effect that closer adherence would have on workload and how our unit proposes to work with the ED to improve its distribution and our patients care. A retrospective case-note audit of patients presenting to a paediatric ED with a triage diagnosis of "burn/scald" over a 6-month period between 1st April and 29th September 2008. 190 patients presented with burns during this period, of which 126 (66%) had potentially complex burns. Of these, 93 (74%) were not referred to the burns unit i.e. were "under-referred". In this group burns to specialized areas in patients under 5 years of age were particularly prevalent. 78 (84%) were reviewed in the ED and received no specialist input. Seven patients suffered minor complications. Only three of these patients (3.2%) required subsequent referral to the burns unit for opinion. None required any further specialist intervention. Strict adherence to NBCR referral criteria could result in a significant increase in workload for regional burn units with as yet unquantifiable benefit in patient outcomes. Many minor injuries appear to be safely managed in the ED with little adverse outcome. Even small improvements in practice could result in a considerable workload increase for a burns unit. Further prospective research is required, particularly looking at longer-term outcomes. We are hoping to improve educational and

  15. The value of WhatsApp communication in paediatric burn care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, R; Rogers, A D; Numanoglu, A; Rode, H

    2018-01-27

    Telemedicine is increasingly applied in developed settings to facilitate transfer of information to and from burn surgeons across vast geographic areas. WhatsApp is a widely available and extremely user-friendly encrypted smartphone application that does not require the expensive physical and personnel infrastructure that characterizes many of these telemedicine systems. The aim of this study was to review the use of WhatsApp to facilitate paediatric burn injury consultations to a regional burn centre in a developing country, where burn care continues to be thwarted by administrative apathy, poor resource allocation and lack of attention to medical and nursing education at all levels. A retrospective review was undertaken of all consultations using WhatsApp over an 18-month period, received by the burn centre's two senior medical practitioners. The specific origin and nature of the telemedicine requests for advice, transfer or follow-up were collected, as were data relating to the demographics of the patients, the aetiology, mechanism and extent of the burn injury. The impact of the system of communication in terms of reductions in admissions and clinic visits was assessed, and a cost analysis was undertaken. Feedback was also obtained from those health practitioners regularly using the service. 838 communications occurred during the study period, which included 1562 distinct clinical queries. 486 interactions (58%) originated from within the hospital, the majority of which were initiated by surgeons in training or burn nurse practitioners. 352 (42%) consultations were from outside the hospital. Queries related to the full spectrum of burn care, including emergency management and stabilization, triage and transfer, the need for escharotomy, fluid resuscitation, wound care, the timing and nature of surgical intervention, as well as follow-up and rehabilitation. While no significant changes in the number of surgical interventions or admissions were observed when

  16. Ten-year epidemiological study of chemical burns in Jinshan, Shanghai, PR China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wu, Xiaofeng; Gao, Chengjin

    2013-11-01

    The epidemiological pattern of chemical burns varies widely in different areas of the world. To analyse effective preventive approaches, an insight into the pattern of injury is desirable. However, our data are only limited to Shanghai area, China. A 10-year retrospective review includes all patients with chemical burns admitted to the Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery from January 2001 to December 2010; those who were admitted to the ophthalmologic department or other departments were excluded. The data collected included age, gender, injury pattern, patient workplaces, aetiological agents, incidence by month and year, burn size, burn depth and site, time for immediate irrigation, length of hospital stay and outcome. A total of 615 patients admitted to our department for in-hospital treatment of chemical burn injury were included in the study. The mean age was 32.1±12.3 years with a range of 2-66 years. A total of 562 cases (91.4%) were male and 53 cases (8.6%) female. The mean total burn surface area (TBSA) was 30.3±24.7% with a mean full-thickness burn area of 17.5±23.8%. Most chemical burns took place in summer and fall. The majority of chemical burns were work related (93.0%); among them accidents that happened in private factories were predominant (70.8%). Although caustic soda was the leading cause of all chemical burns (15.8%), acid burn was the most common (45.2%). The extremities were the most frequent areas of injuries, followed by head and neck. Most cases had none (30.4%) or insufficient (61.1%) immediate irrigation after injury. In all patients, 47 cases had inhalation injuries, 94 cases accompanying ophthalmologic burns, 51 cases accompanying other associated injuries and 67 cases chemical toxicity. A total of 212 cases (34.5%) underwent early total or tangential excision and skin or skin flap grafting in the first week after injury. The mean length of hospital stay was 44.1±24.7 days. Sixteen cases died of respiratory failure, sepsis or

  17. Thigh burns from exploding e-cigarette lithium ion batteries: First case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, K J; Rose, A M; Khan, M A A; Quaba, O; Lowrie, A G

    2016-06-01

    E-cigarette (EC) use has risen meteorically over the last decade. The majority of these devices are powered by re-chargeable lithium ion batteries, which can represent a fire hazard if damaged, over-heated, over-charged or stored inappropriately. There are currently no reports in the medical literature of lithium ion battery burns related to EC use and no guidance on the appropriate management of lithium ion battery associated injuries. We report two individual cases of burn resulting from explosion of EC re-chargeable lithium ion batteries. Both patients required in-patient surgical management. We provide evidence that lithium ion battery explosions can be associated with mixed thermal and alkali chemical burns, resulting from the significant discharge of thermal energy and the dispersal of corrosive lithium ion compounds. We would recommend, as with other elemental metal exposures, caution in exposing lithium ion battery burns to water irrigation. Early and thorough cleaning and debridement of such burns, to remove residual lithium contamination, may limit the risk of burn wound extension and potentially improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiologic evaluation of patients with major burns and recommendations for burn prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftçi, Ilhan; Arslan, Kemal; Altunbaş, Zeynep; Kara, Fatih; Yilmaz, Hüseyin

    2012-03-01

    Burns are an important health problem in our country and in the world. In our study, we aimed to epidemiologically analyze the patients who were hospitalized in a burn unit that serves 3 million individuals in Central Anatolia. Records of 457 patients who had been hospitalized in the burn unit during the period 2008-2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were assessed in terms of gender, age, burn area, burn depth, admission time to the health center, burn region, and factors causing burns. Most (44.6%) of the patients were in the 0-5 age group. Burn surface area was detected as 11.6 +/- 8.5%. Patients had reached the health center in 252.8 +/- 892.5 minutes. While 82.7% of the patients had second degree bums, 17.3% had third degree burns. Most burns were on the extremities (39.6%). The most common burn agent was scalds with hot liquids (54.1%). In our study, children in the 0-5 age group were found to be the most commonly affected group with respect to indoor burns. The basic contributing factor is that children spend more time in the house and are more active. Scalding burns may be prevented when greater care is taken when using hot liquids that may lead to indoor burns. Informing parents on this issue is of first priority.

  19. Not child's play: National estimates of microwave-related burn injuries among young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Gina; Quinlan, Kyran

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that children as young as 18 months can open a microwave and remove its contents causing sometimes severe scalds. Although this mechanism may be uniquely preventable by an engineering fix, no national estimate of this type of child burn injury has been reported. We analyzed the Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System data on emergency department-treated microwave-related burn injuries from January 2002 through December 2012 in children aged 12 months to 4 years. Based on the narrative description of how the injury occurred, we defined a case as a burn with a mechanism of either definitely or probably involving a child himself or herself opening a microwave oven and accessing the heated contents. National estimates of cases and their characteristics were calculated. During the 11 years studied, an estimated 10,902 (95% confidence interval, 8,231-13,573) microwave-related burns occurred in children aged 12 months to 4 years. Of these, 7,274 (66.7%) (95% confidence interval, 5,135-9,413) were cases of children burned after accessing the contents of the microwave themselves. A total of 1,124 (15.5%) cases required hospitalization or transfer from the treating emergency department. Narratives for children as young as 12 months described the child himself or herself being able to access microwave contents. The most commonly burned body parts were the upper trunk (3,056 cases) and the face (1,039 cases). The most common scalding substances were water (2,863 cases), noodles (1,011 cases), and soup (931 cases). The majority of microwave-related burns in young children occur as a result of the child himself or herself accessing the microwave and removing the contents. More than 600 young children are treated in US emergency departments annually for such burns. Children as young as 12 months sustained burns caused by this mechanism of injury. These burns could be prevented with a redesign of microwaves to

  20. Tissue-engineered epithelium transplantation for severe ocular surface burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Pi, Yuli; Dong, Ying; Zhu, Jing

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of tissue-engineered epithelium transplantation for severe ocular surface burns. This was a retrospective observational case series. From October 2005 to May 2011, 19 eyes of 19 patients with grade IV to VI ocular surface burns (Dua Classification) were treated by autologous transplantation of corneal stem cells cultivated on a fibrin gel membrane, with a mean follow-up of 16.2 months (range 12-36 months). Postoperative corneal surface stability, visual acuity (VA), corneal opacity, and neovascularization were evaluated. No corneal perforations occurred and the entire corneal surface was free from epithelial defects in all eyes. At the final follow-up visit, VA in 17 eyes was improved after surgery, with 6 eyes achieving a VA of 20/100 or better. Corneal vascularization was significantly reduced in 17 (89.5%) eyes. Corneal opacity was also improved in 12 (63.2%) eyes. All donor eyes remained healthy. Tissue-engineered epithelium transplantation can promote rapid reepithelialization of the ocular surface, inhibit corneal neovascularization, and improve vision for patients with severe ocular surface burns.

  1. Energetic Residues and Crater Geometries from the Firing of 120-mm High-Explosive Mortar Projectiles into Eagle River Flats, June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    method, but with three new randomly chosen starting points. Figure 5. Sampling of 200 m × 200 m cell. Each point was cleared with a metal detector for...propellant burn was visible (despite the blackened surface produced by the June burn (Fig. 3e). Because of the uncertainty of the exact location of the...detect a metallic signal, indicating that the projectile penetrated several meters. Analysis for Comp B Residue No high-explosives residues were

  2. Natural gas monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  3. Chemical burns caused by trifluoroacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Jakob; Engfeldt, Malin; Svedman, Cecilia; Mowitz, Martin; Zimerson, Erik; Isaksson, Marléne; Hindsén, Monica; Bruze, Magnus

    2013-09-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid is a very strong carboxylic acid. The acid has been suspected to have similar toxic effects as hydrofluoric acid on skin contact. Hydrofluoric acid is highly toxic, owing to skin penetration by fluoride ions. A spill of hydrofluoric acid on the skin may be fatal. As trifluoroacetic acid contains fluorine, patients with chemical burns caused by trifluoroacetic acid have been given particular attention when treated in the hospital. To gather the known cases of trifluoroacetic acid burns from our department to give an overview of how they were exposed, the clinical presentation, and treatment. Five patients with chemical skin burns caused by trifluoroacetic acid were reviewed with regard to the extent of the burn, treatment, blood samples taken, and systemic effects. The chemical burns reported were limited (burns healed as expected for chemical burns caused by acids. None of the patients showed any symptoms or signs that are typical for hydrofluoric acid burns. Localized chemical burns caused by trifluoroacetic acid should be regarded as being similar to burns from other acids, with the exception of hydrofluoric acid. To our knowledge, there are no indications that trifluoroacetic acid causes the same toxic effects as hydrofluoric acid. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. High-Resolution Mapping of Biomass Burning Emissions in Three Tropical Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yusheng; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Yamaguchi, Yasushi

    2015-09-15

    Biomass burning in tropical regions plays a significant role in atmospheric pollution and climate change. This study quantified a comprehensive monthly biomass burning emissions inventory with 1 km high spatial resolution, which included the burning of vegetation, human waste, and fuelwood for 2010 in three tropical regions. The estimations were based on the available burned area product MCD64A1 and statistical data. The total emissions of all gases and aerosols were 17382 Tg of CO2, 719 Tg of CO, 30 Tg of CH4, 29 Tg of NOx, 114 Tg of NMOC (nonmethane organic compounds), 7 Tg of SO2, 10 Tg of NH3, 79 Tg of PM2.5 (particulate matter), 45 Tg of OC (organic carbon), and 6 Tg of BC (black carbon). Taking CO as an example, vegetation burning accounted for 74% (530 Tg) of the total CO emissions, followed by fuelwood combustion and human waste burning. Africa was the biggest emitter (440 Tg), larger than Central and South America (113 Tg) and South and Southeast Asia (166 Tg). We also noticed that the dominant fire types in vegetation burning of these three regions were woody savanna/shrubland, savanna/grassland, and forest, respectively. Although there were some slight overestimations, our results are supported by comparisons with previously published data.

  5. Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menikoff, R.; Shaw, M. S.

    Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature). This leads to the Ignition & Growth concept, introduced by LeeTarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homo- genized burn rate needs to account for three meso-scale physical effects: (i) the density of active hot spots or burn centers; (ii) the growth of the burn fronts triggered by the burn centers; (iii) a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent burn centers. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable λ = g(s) as a function of a dimensionless reaction length s(t) = rbc/ℓbc, rather than by specifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale ℓbc(Ps) = [Nbc(Ps)]-1/3 is the average distance between burn centers, where Nbc is the number density of burn centers activated by the lead shock. The reaction length rbc(t) = ∫t0 D(P(t'))dt' is the distance the burn front propagates from a single burn center, where D(P) is the deflagration speed as a function of the local pressure and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. We have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

  6. Self-inflicted burns: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Antony; Wijewardena, Aruna; Streimer, Jeff; Vandervord, John

    2013-03-01

    Self-inflicted burns are regularly admitted to burns units worldwide. Most of these patients are referred to psychiatric services and are successfully treated however some return to hospital with recurrent self-inflicted burns. The aim of this study is to explore the characteristics of the recurrent self-inflicted burn patients admitted to the Royal North Shore Hospital during 2004-2011. Burn patients were drawn from a computerized database and recurrent self-inflicted burn patients were identified. Of the total of 1442 burn patients, 40 (2.8%) were identified as self-inflicted burns. Of these patients, 5 (0.4%) were identified to have sustained previous self-inflicted burns and were interviewed by a psychiatrist. Each patient had been diagnosed with a borderline personality disorder and had suffered other forms of deliberate self-harm. Self-inflicted burns were utilized to relieve or help regulate psychological distress, rather than to commit suicide. Most patients had a history of emotional neglect, physical and/or sexual abuse during their early life experience. Following discharge from hospital, the patients described varying levels of psychiatric follow-up, from a post-discharge review at a local community mental health centre to twice-weekly psychotherapy. The patients who engaged in regular psychotherapy described feeling more in control of their emotions and reported having a longer period of abstinence from self-inflicted burn. Although these patients represent a small proportion of all burns, the repeat nature of their injuries led to a significant use of clinical resources. A coordinated and consistent treatment pathway involving surgical and psychiatric services for recurrent self-inflicted burns may assist in the management of these challenging patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Characteristics of fatal and hospital admissions for burns in Fiji: A population-based study (TRIP Project-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoi, Mable; Wainiqolo, Iris; Kafoa, Berlin; Kool, Bridget; Naisaki, Asilika; McCaig, Eddie; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2012-01-01

    Background Over 95% of burn deaths are estimated to occur in low-and-middle-income countries. However, the epidemiology of burn-related injuries in Pacific Island Countries is unclear. This study investigated the incidence and demographic characteristics associated with fatal and hospitalised burns in Fiji. Methods This cross-sectional study utilised the Fiji Injury Surveillance in Hospital database to estimate the population-based incidence and contextual characteristics associated with burns resulting in death or hospital admission (≥12 h) during a 12-month period commencing 1st October 2005. Results 116 people were admitted to hospital or died as a result of burns during the study period accounting for an overall annual incidence of 17.8/100,000 population, and mortality rate of 3.4/100,000. Most (92.2%) burns occurred at home, and 85.3% were recorded as unintentional. Burns were disproportionately higher among Fijian children compared with Fijian–Indian children with the converse occurring in adulthood. In adults, Indian women were at particularly high risk of death from self-inflicted burns as a consequence of ‘conflict situations’. Conclusion Burns are a significant public health burden in Fiji requiring prevention and management strategies informed by important differences in the context of these injuries among the major ethic groups of the country. PMID:22342176

  8. Characteristics of fatal and hospital admissions for burns in Fiji: a population-based study (TRIP Project-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoi, Mable; Wainiqolo, Iris; Kafoa, Berlin; Kool, Bridget; Naisaki, Asilika; McCaig, Eddie; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2012-08-01

    Over 95% of burn deaths are estimated to occur in low-and-middle-income countries. However, the epidemiology of burn-related injuries in Pacific Island Countries is unclear. This study investigated the incidence and demographic characteristics associated with fatal and hospitalised burns in Fiji. This cross-sectional study utilised the Fiji Injury Surveillance in Hospital database to estimate the population-based incidence and contextual characteristics associated with burns resulting in death or hospital admission (≥12h) during a 12-month period commencing 1st October 2005. 116 people were admitted to hospital or died as a result of burns during the study period accounting for an overall annual incidence of 17.8/100,000 population, and mortality rate of 3.4/100,000. Most (92.2%) burns occurred at home, and 85.3% were recorded as unintentional. Burns were disproportionately higher among Fijian children compared with Fijian-Indian children with the converse occurring in adulthood. In adults, Indian women were at particularly high risk of death from self-inflicted burns as a consequence of 'conflict situations'. Burns are a significant public health burden in Fiji requiring prevention and management strategies informed by important differences in the context of these injuries among the major ethic groups of the country. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. What should be the antibiotic prescription protocol for burn patients admitted in the department of burns, plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Mohd Altaf; Khurram, Mohammad Fahud; Khan, Arshad Hafiz

    2017-02-01

    This is a prospective study with the aim to determine specific patterns of burn wound bacterial colonisation and antimicrobial resistance profiles. There is a high incidence of infections and septicaemia in post-burn patients, which, in turn, are associated with high morbidity and mortality, a fact that compelled us to undertake this study. The study was conducted over a period 11 months, from 1 August 2014 to 30 June 2015, in 50 burn patients admitted in our burn unit. Wound cultures were taken after 72 hours of admission from all the patients, and then, empirical systemic antibiotics were administered. For wound cultures; 1 cubic cm tissue was taken and placed in aerobic and anaerobic culture vials and transported to the microbiology lab under all aseptic precautions as soon as possible. At the time of fever any time after 72 hours of admission, 16 ml of blood was drawn under all aseptic precautions. Both aerobic and anaerobic blood culture vials were filled with 8 ml of blood each and transported to the microbiology lab. The results of culture and sensitivity reports of 50 patients were recorded. The data obtained was analysed using appropriate statistical analytical tests. The most common organism responsible for bacteraemia is Pseudomonas (43%). Most of the strains of organisms isolated were resistant to commonly used antibiotics in the hospital; Pseudomonas was found 100% resistant to a combination of ampicillin + sulbactum, ceftriaxone and was most often sensitive to imipenem, amikacin and vancomycin. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was also found resistant to commonly used antibiotics like ceftriaxone, ampicillin + sulbactum and ceftazidime + calvulanic acid. Linzolid and vancomycin were effective in 83% and 100% cases, respectively. We conclude that similar institution-specific studies should be conducted, and such studies will be helpful in providing useful guidelines for choosing effective empirical therapy that will have a great

  10. Modeling of residue stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco-Arjona, A.; Castro, M.D.L. de [Univ. of Cordoba (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry; Izquierdo, A. [Gemasur, Cordoba (Spain). Dept. of R and D

    1999-04-01

    Because of the variety in anthropogenic toxic residues produced by human activity, the establishment of a general procedure for the destruction of these residues or transformation into less toxic materials is difficult. A study was made on the decrease in toxicity of various contaminated residues when treated with three different stabilizers. General criteria of the requirements for stabilization were also established, which depended on both the toxicity and nature of the toxic substances. The modeling of the stabilization process will allow nonspecialized personnel to carry out the operations and will also standardize the modus operandi of such enterprises.

  11. Limbal autograft and allograft transplantations in patients with corneal burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, O; Tekeli, O; Ornek, K; Arslanpençe, A; Yalçindağ, N F

    2004-03-01

    To investigate and compare the surgical outcomes of limbal autograft and limbal allograft transplantations in patients with corneal burns. In total, 20 patients (n=22 eyes) with chemical burn and two patients (n=2 eyes) with thermal burn were included in this study. Limbal autograft or limbal allograft transplantation surgery was performed in all patients. HLA-typing was tested before allograft surgeries. Limbal allografting was performed in all eyes using donor tissue from live relatives. Systemic cyclosporine A was administered for immunosuppression. The corneal surface was successfully reconstructed in all eyes (100%) after limbal autografting, two eyes required additional amniotic membrane transplantation and one eye required allografting. The mean follow-up period for limbal autografts was 13.9 +/- 7.0 months. Limbal allografting failed to reduce corneal vascularity and opacification in five (55.6%) eyes and was successful only in four (44.4%) eyes (mean follow-up 16.2 +/- 11.2 months) (P=0.002). In all, 15 eyes undergoing limbal autografting completed re-epithelialization of the cornea at a mean of 35.6 +/- 60.2 days. The mean epithelial healing time in nine eyes undergoing limbal allografting was 13.0 +/- 7.3 days (P=0.525). After limbal autografting, functional vision (> or =1/10) was attained in 12 (80%) eyes. Only one eye (11.1%) achieved functional vision after limbal allografting (P=0.036). Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in three patients following limbal allografting. No cyclosporine-associated side effects were observed. Limbal autograft transplantation is an effective and safe procedure for unilateral corneal burns. It seems that limbal allograft transplantation is better combined with penetrating keratoplasty for a better visual outcome and higher graft survival rate. Systemic immunosuppression seems to be necessary for limbal allografts even in the presence of HLA-matched donor tissues.

  12. Eyelid reconstruction with acellular human dermal allograft after chemical and thermal burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiaqi, Chen; Zheng, Wang; Jianjun, Gu

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of eyelid reconstruction with acellular dermal allograft in patients with eyelid defect after chemical and thermal burns. Eyelid reconstruction was performed in 15 eyelids of 13 patients during the period of June 2001-October 2004 by a single senior surgeon (Chen). Among them five patients had thermal burns, and eight patients had chemical burns. The acellular dermal allograft was used as a tarsus substitute that was sutured into the place between the levator aponeurosis in upper lid or retractor in lower eyelid and the remaining tarsus. After a mean follow-up of 9 months, satisfactory function and cosmesis were obtained. No implant rejection or severe complications were observed. Acellular dermal allograft may be used safely as a posterior lamellar spacer graft after chemical and thermal burns; the allograft appears to be biocompatible and does not aggravate the inflammation in the injured eyelid.

  13. EXCLUSIVELY FOR SIX MONTHS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Infant feeding practices was studied prospectively among 461 mothers who delivered in JU TH and who initially intended to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months. K. Y Result: Four hundred and twenty two (91.5%) of the recruited mothers continued EBFing practice for 6 months, while 25 (5.4%) dropped out from the ...

  14. Birth Month Affects Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Ernest L.; Kruger, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the association between birth month and longevity for major league baseball players. Players born in the month of November had the greatest longevities whereas those born in June had the shortest life spans. These differences remained after controlling for covariates such as birth year, career length, age at debut, height, and…

  15. Progress report, 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests of ...

  16. Progress report, 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests of ...

  17. Savannah River Technology Center monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    This is a monthly report published by Westinghouse Savannah River Company. Topics discussed in this progress report are: Terrazzo reservoir, Replacement Tritium Facility Final Safety Analysis Report, tritium processing and disposal, separation processes, environmental effects and future impacts, laboratory performance evaluation, groundwater characterization, mixed waste management facility, Raman Spectroscopy, waste processing, Defense Waste Processing Facility, mercury recycling, off-gas components testing, incineration facility blowdown solidification, and weld residual stress minimization study.

  18. Topical and systemic antimicrobial agents in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollstein, R N; McDonald, C

    1980-11-01

    Infection is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in burns. Burn wound infection is defined as burn wound bacterial proliferation in a density equal to or greater than 10(5) bacteria per gram of tissue. Gram-negative bacteria, notably Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as staphylococci and fungal opportunists, have been identified as prominent invaders. Topical and systemic antimicrobial agents are essential adjuncts in the prevention and treatment of burn wound infection. Topical antimicrobial therapy is indicated in all hospitalized burn patients. Short-term use of systemic antimicrobials for prophylaxis and treatment is required in all moderate and major burns, specifically for early prophylaxis, perioperative prophylaxis, and clinical infection. Antimicrobial choice is based on specific patient or environmental bacteriological data.

  19. General surgery resident rotations in surgical critical care, trauma, and burns: what is optimal for residency training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Lena M; Biester, Thomas W; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Buyske, Jo; Malangoni, Mark A; Lewis, Frank R

    2016-10-01

    There are no specific Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education General Surgery Residency Program Requirements for rotations in surgical critical care (SCC), trauma, and burn. We sought to determine the experience of general surgery residents in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations. Data analysis of surgical rotations of American Board of Surgery general surgery resident applicants (n = 7,299) for the last 8 years (2006 to 2013, inclusive) was performed through electronic applications to the American Board of Surgery Qualifying Examination. Duration (months) spent in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations, and postgraduate year (PGY) level were examined. The total months in SCC, trauma and burn rotations was mean 10.2 and median 10.0 (SD 3.9 months), representing approximately 16.7% (10 of 60 months) of a general surgery resident's training. However, there was great variability (range 0 to 29 months). SCC rotation duration was mean 3.1 and median 3.0 months (SD 2, min to max: 0 to 15), trauma rotation duration was mean 6.3 and median 6.0 months (SD 3.5, min to max: 0 to 24), and burn rotation duration was mean 0.8 and median 1.0 months (SD 1.0, min to max: 0 to 6). Of the total mean 10.2 months duration, the longest exposure was 2 months as PGY-1, 3.4 months as PGY-2, 1.9 months as PGY-3, 2.2 months as PGY-4 and 1.1 months as PGY-5. PGY-5 residents spent a mean of 1 month in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations. PGY-4/5 residents spent the majority of this total time in trauma rotations, whereas junior residents (PGY-1 to 3) in SCC and trauma rotations. There is significant variability in total duration of SCC, trauma, and burn rotations and PGY level in US general surgery residency programs, which may result in significant variability in the fund of knowledge and clinical experience of the trainee completing general surgery residency training. As acute care surgery programs have begun to integrate emergency general surgery with SCC, trauma, and burn rotations

  20. Aging of residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, M.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities as a function of time during a period of a month showed an oscillating variation. An explanation of the ageing curves is proposed. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics......Measurements of the residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities as a function of time during a period of a month showed an oscillating variation. An explanation of the ageing curves is proposed. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics...

  1. TENORM: Wastewater Treatment Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water and wastes which have been discharged into municipal sewers are treated at wastewater treatment plants. These may contain trace amounts of both man-made and naturally occurring radionuclides which can accumulate in the treatment plant and residuals.

  2. Convergent and discriminant validity of quality of life measures used in burn populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirte, Jill; Van Daele, Ulrike; Maertens, Koen; Moortgat, Peter; Deleus, Rudi; Van Loey, Nancy E

    2017-02-01

    The primary goal of this study was to investigate convergent validity, i.e. overlapping constructs, of the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B), the Short Form-36 items Health Survey (SF-36) and the European Quality Of Life Five Dimensions (EQ-5D) within the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) framework. A secondary goal was to examine the discriminant validity of the questionnaires according to burn severity (no surgery versus 1 or more surgeries). A prospective multi-centre study in adult patients with burns was conducted. At the 9 months assessment, two generic questionnaires, i.e. the SF-36 and EQ-5D, and the BSHS-B were completed. Pearson correlations were used to evaluate convergent validity. Linear discriminant analysis was used to evaluate discriminant validity. At 9 months post-burn data from 184 persons were available of which 131 (71%) were male, mean TBSA burned was 11.8% (SD=10.2). Sixty five (34%) patients did not need surgery, 128 (66%) patients required one or more surgeries. Higher convergence was shown between the generic SF-36 and the condition specific BSHS-B whereas the EQ-5D showed lower convergence with the BSHS-B especially in the domain Activity. The generic scales discriminated across all scales whereas not all BSHS-B scales were able to differentiate problem levels across burn severity groups. This study demonstrates that the ICF is useful to classify scales in order to identify overlapping areas as well as to uncover gaps in relation to patient reported outcomes. Both the SF-36 and EQ-5D showed the ability to distinguish levels of functioning across burn severity groups. As the BSHS-B performed less well and relevant domains of functioning were not addressed, there is room for improvement and modification of this condition specific questionnaire to better capture burn patients' functioning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth of fungal strains on coffee industry residues with removal of polyphenolic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Ercília M. S.; Rodríguez-Jasso, Rosa María; Teixeira,J. A.; Mussatto, Solange I.

    2012-01-01

    Coffee silverskin (CS) and spent coffee grounds (SCG) are abundant residues generated by the coffee industry, but up till now they are practically unutilized being discharged to the environment or burned for elimination. In the present study, the ability of seven different fungal strains from the genera Aspergillus, Mucor, Penicillium, and Neurospora, to grow and release phenolic compounds from these residues under solid-state cultivation conditions was evaluated. All the strains were able to...

  4. Micronutrients after burn injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlund, Megan J; Pham, Tam N; Gibran, Nicole S

    2014-01-01

    Supplementation of micronutrients after burn injury is common practice in order to fight oxidative stress, support the immune system, and optimize wound healing. Assessing micronutrient status after burn injury is difficult because of hemodilution in the resuscitation phase, redistribution of nutrients from the serum to other organs, and decreases in carrier proteins such as albumin. Although there are many preclinical data, there are limited studies in burn patients. Promising research is being conducted on combinations of micronutrients, especially via the intravenous route.

  5. Infection control in severely burned patients

    OpenAIRE

    Coban, Yusuf Kenan

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, much progress has been made in the control of burn wound infection and nasocomial infections (NI) in severely burned patients. The continiually changing epidemiology is partially related to greater understanding of and improved techniques for burn patient management as well as effective hospital infection control measures. With the advent of antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, infection of the wound site is now not as common as, for example, urinary and blood strea...

  6. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or grabbing hot items such as irons and oven doors. Turn pot handles toward the back of the stove so that children can't grab them and they can't accidentally be knocked over. Place fire extinguishers in key locations at home, work, and school. Remove electrical cords from floors and ...

  7. Impaired respiratory function and heightened pulmonary inflammation in episodic binge ethanol intoxication and burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shults, Jill A; Curtis, Brenda J; Chen, Michael M; O'Halloran, Eileen B; Ramirez, Luis; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2015-11-01

    Clinical data indicate that cutaneous burn injuries covering greater than 10% of the total body surface area are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, in which pulmonary complications, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), contribute to nearly half of all patient deaths. Approximately 50% of burn patients are intoxicated at the time of hospital admission, which increases days on ventilators by 3-fold, and doubles the length of hospitalization, compared to non-intoxicated burn patients. The most common drinking pattern in the United States is binge drinking, where an individual rapidly consumes alcoholic beverages (4 for women, 5 for men) in 2 h. An estimated 38 million Americans binge drink, often several times per month. Experimental data demonstrate that a single binge-ethanol exposure, prior to scald injury, impairs innate and adaptive immune responses, thereby enhancing infection susceptibility and amplifying pulmonary inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and edema, and is associated with increased mortality. Since these characteristics are similar to those observed in ARDS burn patients, our study objective was to determine whether ethanol intoxication and burn injury and the subsequent pulmonary congestion affect physiological parameters of lung function, using non-invasive and unrestrained plethysmography in a murine model system. Furthermore, to mirror young adult binge-drinking patterns, and to determine the effect of multiple ethanol exposures on pulmonary inflammation, we utilized an episodic binge-ethanol exposure regimen, where mice were exposed to ethanol for a total of 6 days (3 days ethanol, 4 days rest, 3 days ethanol) prior to burn injury. Our analyses demonstrate mice exposed to episodic binge ethanol and burn injury have higher mortality, increased pulmonary congestion and neutrophil infiltration, elevated neutrophil chemoattractants, and respiratory dysfunction, compared to burn or ethanol intoxication alone

  8. Risk of hospitalization for fire-related burns during extreme cold weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Aimina; Kosatsky, Tom; Smargiassi, Audrey; Bilodeau-Bertrand, Marianne; Auger, Nathalie

    2017-10-01

    Environmental factors are important predictors of fires, but no study has examined the association between outdoor temperature and fire-related burn injuries. We sought to investigate the relationship between extremely cold outdoor temperatures and the risk of hospitalization for fire-related burns. We carried out a time-stratified case-crossover study of 2470 patients hospitalized for fire-related burn injuries during cold months between 1989 and 2014 in Quebec, Canada. The main exposure was the minimum outdoor temperature on the day of and the day before the burn. We computed odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to evaluate the relationship between minimum temperature and fire-related burns, and assessed how associations varied across sex and age. Exposure to extreme cold temperature was associated with a significantly higher risk of hospitalization for fire-related burns. Compared with 0°C, exposure to a minimum temperature of -30°C was associated with an OR of 1.51 (95% CI 1.22-1.87) for hospitalization for fire-related burns. The associations were somewhat stronger for women, youth, and the elderly. Compared with 0°C, a minimum temperature of -30°C was associated with an OR for fire-related burn hospitalization of 1.65 for women (95% CI 1.13-2.40), 1.60 for age fire-related burns. Measures to prevent fires should be implemented prior to the winter season, and enhanced during extreme cold. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-05-01

    This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

  10. Management of the Chronic Burn Wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins-Williams, Stephen Tyler; Marston, William A; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2017-07-01

    This article reviews the current evidence in using hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in burn wounds. There is also separate consideration of diabetic foot burns and a protocol for use of HBOT in a specific case. The challenges of using HBOT in an acute burn care setting are reviewed. Next the pathophysiology of Marjolin ulcers is reviewed. The current thinking in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Marjolin ulcers is discussed. Finally, a background in using topical growth factors (tGF) is provided, followed by a summary of the current evidence of tGF in burn wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spectral Hole Burning via Kerr Nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anwar Ali; Abdul Jabar, M. S.; Jalaluddin, M.; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Iftikhar, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    Spectral hole burning is investigated in an optical medium in the presence of Doppler broadening and Kerr nonlinearity. The Kerr nonlinearity generates coherent hole burning in the absorption spectrum. The higher order Kerr nonlinearity enhances the typical lamb dip of the hole. Normal dispersion in the hole burning region while Steep anomalous dispersion between the two hole burning regions also enhances with higher order Kerr effect. A large phase shift creates large delay or advancement in the pulse propagation while no distortion is observed in the pulse. These results provide significant steps to improve optical memory, telecom devices, preservation of information and image quality. Supported by Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan

  12. Cutaneous osteosarcoma arising from a burn scar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min A.; Yi, Jaehyuck [Kyungpook National University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Jong Min [Kyungpook National University, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Tumors that develop in old burn scars are usually squamous cell carcinomas. Sarcomas have also been reported, albeit rarely. To our knowledge, there has been only one case report of an extraskeletal osteosarcoma arising in a prior burn scar reported in the English-language literature, mainly discussing the clinicopathological features. Herein, we present a case of cutaneous osteosarcoma visualized as a mineralized soft-tissue mass arising from the scar associated with a previous skin burn over the back. This seems to be the first report describing the imaging features of a cutaneous osteosarcoma from an old burn scar. (orig.)

  13. Deciding Where to Burn: Stakeholder Priorities for Prescribed Burning of a Fire-Dependent Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Costanza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiagency partnerships increasingly work cooperatively to plan and implement fire management. The stakeholders that comprise such partnerships differ in their perceptions of the benefits and risks of fire use or nonuse. These differences inform how different stakeholders prioritize sites for burning, constrain prescribed burning, and how they rationalize these priorities and constraints. Using a survey of individuals involved in the planning and implementation of prescribed fire in the Onslow Bight region of North Carolina, we examined how the constraints and priorities for burning in the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris ecosystem differed among three stakeholder groups: prescribed burn practitioners from agencies, practitioners from private companies, and nonpractitioners. Stakeholder groups did not differ in their perceptions of constraints to burning, and development near potentially burned sites was the most important constraint identified. The top criteria used by stakeholders to decide where to burn were the time since a site was last burned, and a site's ecosystem health, with preference given to recently burned sites in good health. Differences among stakeholder groups almost always pertained to perceptions of the nonecological impacts of burning. Prescribed burning priorities of the two groups of practitioners, and particularly practitioners from private companies, tended to be most influenced by nonecological impacts, especially through deprioritization of sites that have not been burned recently or are in the wildland-urban interface (WUI. Our results highlight the difficulty of burning these sites, despite widespread laws in the southeast U.S. that limit liability of prescribed burn practitioners. To avoid ecosystem degradation on sites that are challenging to burn, particularly those in the WUI, conservation partnerships can facilitate demonstration projects involving public and private burn practitioners on those sites. In summary

  14. Vaporization order and burning efficiency of crude oils during in-situ burning on water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Malmquist, Linus M.V.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve the understanding of the burning efficiency and its observed size dependency of in-situ burning of crude oil on water, the vaporization order of the components in crude oils was studied. The vaporization order of such multicomponent fuels was assessed by studying the surface...... scale fires can overcome these heat losses, as they typically have higher burning rates, which increase the heat feedback to the fuel surface and therefore can result in the higher burning efficiencies....

  15. A Goniometry Paradigm Shift to Measure Burn Scar Contracture in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    objectives were met and study equipment was distributed. • Reliability testing of goniometry measurement methods within and between investigators...1 AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0148 TITLE: A Goniometry Paradigm Shift to Measure Burn Scar Contracture in Burn Patients...SUBTITLE A Goniometry Paradigm Shift to Measure Burn Scar Contracture in Burn Patients 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-2-0148 5c

  16. They're heating up: Internet search query trends reveal significant public interest in heat-not-burn tobacco products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore L Caputi

    Full Text Available Heat-not-burn tobacco products, battery powered devices that heat leaf tobacco to approximately 500 degrees Fahrenheit to produce an inhalable aerosol, are being introduced in markets around the world. Japan, where manufacturers have marketed several heat-not-burn brands since 2014, has been the focal national test market, with the intention of developing global marketing strategies. We used Google search query data to estimate, for the first time, the scale and growth potential of heat-not-burn tobacco products. Average monthly searches for heat-not-burn products rose 1,426% (95%CI: 746,3574 between their first (2015 and second (2016 complete years on the market and an additional 100% (95%CI: 60, 173 between the products second (2016 and third years on the market (Jan-Sep 2017. There are now between 5.9 and 7.5 million heat-not-burn related Google searches in Japan each month based on September 2017 estimates. Moreover, forecasts relying on the historical trends suggest heat-not-burn searches will increase an additional 32% (95%CI: -4 to 79 during 2018, compared to current estimates for 2017 (Jan-Sep, with continued growth thereafter expected. Contrasting heat-not-burn's rise in Japan to electronic cigarettes' rise in the United States we find searches for heat-not-burn eclipsed electronic cigarette searches during April 2016. Moreover, the change in average monthly queries for heat-not-burn in Japan between 2015 and 2017 was 399 (95% CI: 184, 1490 times larger than the change in average monthly queries for electronic cigarettes in the Unites States over the same time period, increasing by 2,956% (95% CI: 1729, 7304 compared to only 7% (95% CI: 3,13. Our findings are a clarion call for tobacco control leaders to ready themselves as heat-not-burn tobacco products will likely garner substantial interest as they are introduced into new markets. Public health practitioners should expand heat-not-burn tobacco product surveillance, adjust existing

  17. They're heating up: Internet search query trends reveal significant public interest in heat-not-burn tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, Theodore L; Leas, Eric; Dredze, Mark; Cohen, Joanna E; Ayers, John W

    2017-01-01

    Heat-not-burn tobacco products, battery powered devices that heat leaf tobacco to approximately 500 degrees Fahrenheit to produce an inhalable aerosol, are being introduced in markets around the world. Japan, where manufacturers have marketed several heat-not-burn brands since 2014, has been the focal national test market, with the intention of developing global marketing strategies. We used Google search query data to estimate, for the first time, the scale and growth potential of heat-not-burn tobacco products. Average monthly searches for heat-not-burn products rose 1,426% (95%CI: 746,3574) between their first (2015) and second (2016) complete years on the market and an additional 100% (95%CI: 60, 173) between the products second (2016) and third years on the market (Jan-Sep 2017). There are now between 5.9 and 7.5 million heat-not-burn related Google searches in Japan each month based on September 2017 estimates. Moreover, forecasts relying on the historical trends suggest heat-not-burn searches will increase an additional 32% (95%CI: -4 to 79) during 2018, compared to current estimates for 2017 (Jan-Sep), with continued growth thereafter expected. Contrasting heat-not-burn's rise in Japan to electronic cigarettes' rise in the United States we find searches for heat-not-burn eclipsed electronic cigarette searches during April 2016. Moreover, the change in average monthly queries for heat-not-burn in Japan between 2015 and 2017 was 399 (95% CI: 184, 1490) times larger than the change in average monthly queries for electronic cigarettes in the Unites States over the same time period, increasing by 2,956% (95% CI: 1729, 7304) compared to only 7% (95% CI: 3,13). Our findings are a clarion call for tobacco control leaders to ready themselves as heat-not-burn tobacco products will likely garner substantial interest as they are introduced into new markets. Public health practitioners should expand heat-not-burn tobacco product surveillance, adjust existing tobacco

  18. Burns: The epidemiological pattern, risk and safety awareness at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Many burns are preventable but there is no published local prospective data on the epidemiological pattern of burns that would form the basis of care and formulation of burn prevention strategies. Objectives: To determine the epidemiological pattern of burns and assess the awareness of burn risk and ...

  19. How Disabling Are Pediatric Burns? Functional Independence in Dutch Pediatric Patients with Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseldorp, Laurien M.; Niemeijer, Anuschka S.; Van Baar, Margriet E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.; Mouton, Leonora J.; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K.

    2013-01-01

    Although the attention for functional outcomes after burn injury has grown over the past decades, little is known about functional independence in performing activities of daily living in children after burn injury. Therefore, in this prospective cohort study functional independence was measured by burn care professionals with the WeeFIM[R]…

  20. Oceanographic Monthly Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Monthly Summary contains sea surface temperature (SST) analyses on both regional and ocean basin scales for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans....

  1. Children's Health Month 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    October is Children's Health month, with information and links that you can use -- in October and throughout the year. We will work with parents, teachers, and health providers to promote healthy environments where children live, learn and play.

  2. CESM Lakes Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains monthly aggregates of 2D near-surface fields from the WRF model simulations labeled "default" (using WRF default approach to setting lake...

  3. TARP Monthly Housing Scorecard

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury — Treasury and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) jointly produce a Monthly Housing Scorecard on the health of the nation’s housing market. The...

  4. Burning mouth syndrome: Clinical dilemma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan R Patil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS is a chronic orofacial burning pain condition usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings that affects many adults worldwide, yet its etiology and treatment remain poorly understood. Though it has been associated with numerous oral and systemic conditions, there has been no clear consensus on its etiology, pathogenesis and treatment. As a result, patients with inexplicable oral complaints are often referred from one health care professional to another without effective management having significant emotional impact on patients. As the dental profession expands its scope of care to oral medicine and geriatrics, BMS will be more effectively diagnosed and managed by these dental surgeons. Hence, they should be more involved in evaluation and management of these patients. The present article provides updated information on BMS including possible etiological factors and current treatment options, although data on the effectiveness of these treatment modalities remain limited. Recently researchers found that treatment with a familiar nutritional supplement- lipoic acid- is of remarkable benefit with minimal adverse effects. ALA (alpha-lipoic acid may be the effective treatment modality in management of BMS.

  5. Arrhenius Rate: constant volume burn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-06

    A constant volume burn occurs for an idealized initial state in which a large volume of reactants at rest is suddenly raised to a high temperature and begins to burn. Due to the uniform spatial state, there is no fluid motion and no heat conduction. This reduces the time evolu tion to an ODE for the reaction progress variable. With an Arrhenius reaction rate, two characteristics of thermal ignition are illustrated: induction time and thermal runaway. The Frank-Kamenetskii approximation then leads to a simple expression for the adiabatic induction time. For a first order reaction, the analytic solution is derived and used to illustrate the effect of varying the activation temperature; in particular, on the induction time. In general, the ODE can be solved numerically. This is used to illustrate the effect of varying the reaction order. We note that for a first order reaction, the time evolution of the reaction progress variable has an exponential tail. In contrast, for a reaction order less than one, the reaction completes in a nite time. The reaction order also affects the induction time.

  6. Canada lynx use of burned areas: Conservation implications of changing fire regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbianchi, Carmen M; Murphy, Melanie A; Hodges, Karen E

    2017-04-01

    A fundamental problem in ecology is forecasting how species will react to major disturbances. As the climate warms, large, frequent, and severe fires are restructuring forested landscapes at large spatial scales, with unknown impacts on imperilled predators. We use the United States federally Threatened Canada lynx as a case study to examine how predators navigate recent large burns, with particular focus on habitat features and the spatial configuration (e.g., distance to edge) that enabled lynx use of these transformed landscapes. We coupled GPS location data of lynx in Washington in an area with several recent large fires and a number of GIS layers of habitat data to develop models of lynx habitat selection in recent burns. Random Forest habitat models showed lynx-selected islands of forest skipped by large fires, residual vegetation, and areas where some trees survived to use newly burned areas. Lynx used burned areas as early as 1 year postfire, which is much earlier than the 2-4 decades postfire previously thought for this predator. These findings are encouraging for predator persistence in the face of fires, but increasingly severe fires or management that reduces postfire residual trees or slow regeneration will likely jeopardize lynx and other predators. Fire management should change to ensure heterogeneity is retained within the footprint of large fires to enable viable predator populations as fire regimes worsen with climate change.

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life in adolescent survivors of burns : Agreement on self-reported and mothers' and fathers' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, R.; Egberts, M.; Nascimento, L.C.; Rossi, L.A.; Vandermeulen, E.; Geenen, R.; Van Loey, N.E.E.

    AIM: This study examined the agreement on self-reported Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) between adolescents with burns and their mother's and father's observation at 6 and 18 months after the burn. Moreover, factors potentially influencing discrepancies between the adolescent and proxy

  8. National programme for prevention of burn injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The estimated annual burn incidence in India is approximately 6-7 million per year. The high incidence is attributed to illiteracy, poverty and low level safety consciousness in the population. The situation becomes further grim due to the absence of organized burn care at primary and secondary health care level. But the silver lining is that 90% of burn injuries are preventable. An initiative at national level is need of the hour to reduce incidence so as to galvanize the available resources for more effective and standardized treatment delivery. The National Programme for Prevention of Burn Injuries is the endeavor in this line. The goal of National programme for prevention of burn injuries (NPPBI would be to ensure prevention and capacity building of infrastructure and manpower at all levels of health care delivery system in order to reduce incidence, provide timely and adequate treatment to burn patients to reduce mortality, complications and provide effective rehabilitation to the survivors. Another objective of the programme will be to establish a central burn registry. The programme will be launched in the current Five Year Plan in Medical colleges and their adjoining district hospitals in few states. Subsequently, in the next five year plan it will be rolled out in all the medical colleges and districts hospitals of the country so that burn care is provided as close to the site of accident as possible and patients need not to travel to big cities for burn care. The programme would essentially have three components i.e. Preventive programme, Burn injury management programme and Burn injury rehabilitation programme.

  9. Increased admissions for diabetes mellitus after burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Janine M; Randall, Sean M; Fear, Mark W; Boyd, James H; O'Halloran, Emily; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M

    2016-12-01

    Currently, limited long-term data on hyperglycaemia and insulin sensitivity in burn patients are available and the data that do exist are primarily related to paediatric severe burns. The aim of this study was to assess if burn is associated with increased post-burn admissions for diabetes mellitus. A population-based longitudinal study using linked hospital morbidity and death data from Western Australia was undertaken of all persons hospitalized for a first burn (n=30,997) in 1980-2012 and a frequency matched non-injury comparison cohort, randomly selected from Western Australia's birth registrations and electoral roll (n=123,399). Crude admission rates and summed length of stay for diabetes mellitus were calculated. Negative binomial and Cox proportional hazards regression modelling were used to generate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and hazard ratios (HR), respectively. After adjustment for socio-demographic factors and pre-existing health status, the burn cohort had 2.21 times (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.36-1.56) as many admissions and almost three times the number of days in hospital with a diabetes mellitus diagnosis (IRR, 95% CI: 2.94, 2.12-4.09) than the uninjured cohort. Admission rates were significantly elevated for those burned during childhood (diabetes mellitus in the burn cohort provide evidence that burns have longer term effects on blood glucose and insulin regulation after wound healing. The first five years after burn discharge appears to be a critical period with significantly elevated incident admissions for diabetes mellitus during this time. Results would suggest prolonged clinical management after discharge and or wound healing to minimise post-burn admissions for diabetes mellitus is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of Critical Burn Injuries: Recent Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Dries

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Burn injury and its subsequent multisystem effects are commonly encountered by acute care practitioners. Resuscitation is the major component of initial burn care and must be managed to restore and preserve vital organ function. Later complications of burn injury are dominated by infection. Burn centers are often called to manage problems related to thermal injury, including lightning and electrical injuries. Methods A selected review is provided of key management concepts as well as of recent reports published by the American Burn Association. Results The burn-injured patient is easily and frequently over resuscitated, with ensuing complications that include delayed wound healing and respiratory compromise. A feedback protocol designed to limit the occurrence of excessive resuscitation has been proposed, but no new “gold standard” for resuscitation has replaced the venerated Parkland formula. While new medical therapies have been proposed for patients sustaining inhalation injury, a paradigm-shifting standard of medical therapy has not emerged. Renal failure as a specific contributor to adverse outcome in burns has been reinforced by recent data. Of special problems addressed in burn centers, electrical injuries pose multisystem physiologic challenges and do not fit typical scoring systems. Conclusion Recent reports emphasize the dangers of over resuscitation in the setting of burn injury. No new medical therapy for inhalation injury has been generally adopted, but new standards for description of burn-related infections have been presented. The value of the burn center in care of the problems of electrical exposure, both manmade and natural, is demonstrated in recent reports.

  11. On the use of the (V,W) Burn-Sensitive Vegetation Index System to monitor the spatiotemporal distribution of burned areas in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaCamara, Carlos; Libonati, Renata; Calado, Teresa; Ermida, Sofia; Nunes, Sílvia

    2017-04-01

    The use of remotely sensed information for burned area detection is well established and there is a general consensus about its usefulness from global down to regional levels. In this particular, the combined use of near and middle infrared (NIR and MIR) channels has shown to be particularly suitable to discriminate burned areas in a variety of ecosystems. The so-called (V,W) system [1,2] is a burn-sensitive vegetation index system defined in a transformed NIR-MIR space that has proven to be capable of discriminating burned pixels in the Brazilian biomes. A procedure based on the (V,W) system is here presented that allows discriminating burned areas and dating burning events. The procedure is tested over Portugal using NIR and MIR data from the Terra/Aqua MODIS Level 1B 1 km V5 product (MOD021/MYD021) together with active fire data from the MODIS V5 product Thermal Anomalies/Fire 5-Min L2 Swath 1km (MOD14/ MYD14). First monthly minimum composites of W are computed for July and August 2015. Burned pixels are then identified as the ones that are located close to hot spots (detected during August) and that present low values of composited minimum of W in August (characteristic of a burning event) together with a sharp decrease of composited minimum of W from July to August (that is expected to occur after a burning event). Burned pixels are then successively identified by a seeded region-growing algorithm. The day of burning of each pixel classified as burned is finally identified as the one that maximizes an index of temporal separability computed along the respective time series of available values of W in August. Results obtained are validated using as reference burned scars and dates as identified by the Rapid Damage Assessment (RDA) module developed by the European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS); the EFFIS mapping process consists of an unsupervised procedure that uses MODIS bands at 250 m resolution combined with information from the CORINE Land Cover

  12. Minimum deltaV Burn Planning for the International Space Station Using a Hybrid Optimization Technique, Level 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station's (ISS) trajectory is coordinated and executed by the Trajectory Operations and Planning (TOPO) group at NASA's Johnson Space Center. TOPO group personnel routinely generate look-ahead trajectories for the ISS that incorporate translation burns needed to maintain its orbit over the next three to twelve months. The burns are modeled as in-plane, horizontal burns, and must meet operational trajectory constraints imposed by both NASA and the Russian Space Agency. In generating these trajectories, TOPO personnel must determine the number of burns to model, each burn's Time of Ignition (TIG), and magnitude (i.e. deltaV) that meet these constraints. The current process for targeting these burns is manually intensive, and does not take advantage of more modern techniques that can reduce the workload needed to find feasible burn solutions, i.e. solutions that simply meet the constraints, or provide optimal burn solutions that minimize the total DeltaV while simultaneously meeting the constraints. A two-level, hybrid optimization technique is proposed to find both feasible and globally optimal burn solutions for ISS trajectory planning. For optimal solutions, the technique breaks the optimization problem into two distinct sub-problems, one for choosing the optimal number of burns and each burn's optimal TIG, and the other for computing the minimum total deltaV burn solution that satisfies the trajectory constraints. Each of the two aforementioned levels uses a different optimization algorithm to solve one of the sub-problems, giving rise to a hybrid technique. Level 2, or the outer level, uses a genetic algorithm to select the number of burns and each burn's TIG. Level 1, or the inner level, uses the burn TIGs from Level 2 in a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm to compute a minimum total deltaV burn solution subject to the trajectory constraints. The total deltaV from Level 1 is then used as a fitness function by the genetic

  13. Alternative treatment of solid waste and energy recovery through burning furnaces: an analysis

    OpenAIRE

    coelho, thaysi castro; Universidade Federal do Tocantins; Serra, Juan Carlos Valdés; Universidade Federal do Tocantins; Lustosa, Jordanna Barreira; Universidade Federal do Tocantins

    2013-01-01

    Currently a new alternative for the treatment of urban solid waste consisting of a technology that promotes reduction of the volume of the solid residues combined with power generation has been observed. Such technology is the waste burning kilns, which had its greatest expansion in Europe and the United States, currently being introduced in Brazil, yet so timid, lacking large plants in operation. Therefore, from a literature review and identification of plants in operation, the proposal was ...

  14. Residual Fragments after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Özdedeli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinically insignificant residual fragments (CIRFs are described as asymptomatic, noninfectious and nonobstructive stone fragments (≤4 mm remaining in the urinary system after the last session of any intervention (ESWL, URS or PCNL for urinary stones. Their insignificance is questionable since CIRFs could eventually become significant, as their presence may result in recurrent stone growth and they may cause pain and infection due to urinary obstruction. They may become the source of persistent infections and a significant portion of the patients will have a stone-related event, requiring auxilliary interventions. CT seems to be the ultimate choice of assessment. Although there is no concensus about the timing, recent data suggests that it may be performed one month after the procedure. However, imaging can be done in the immediate postoperative period, if there are no tubes blurring the assessment. There is some evidence indicating that selective medical therapy may have an impact on decreasing stone formation rates. Retrograde intrarenal surgery, with its minimally invasive nature, seems to be the best way to deal with residual fragments.

  15. Biomass Burning observed during IAGOS - CARIBIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, Marco; Förster, Eric; Bönisch, Harald; Fischbeck, Garlich; Safadi, Layal; Hermann, Markus; Assmann, Denise; Zahn, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Since May 2005 the CARIBIC passenger aircraft (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container - Lufthansa, Airbus 340-600) measures ˜100 trace gases and aerosol components in the UTLS (9-12 km altitude) on 4-6 consecutive long-distance flights per month. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are measured with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). In 2017 the current instrument will be replaced by an improved version, similar to the one operated by our group onboard the HALO research aircraft. Worldwide ˜1.3 Tg/y of acetonitrile (CH3CN) is emitted into the atmosphere almost exclusively from biomass burning (BB) together with other VOCs (e.g. ketones, aldehydes, aromatics), CO, CO2, NOx and aerosol particles. Therefore, and due to its rather long tropospheric lifetime of ˜6 months, acetonitrile constitutes a reliable BB tracer. Based on the signal of acetonitrile and CO, we analyzed the IAGOS-CARIBIC data set with respect to signatures of BB. The most intense but relatively rare BB signals (up to ˜1200 pptV acetonitrile, i.e. ˜8 times the tropospheric background) were sampled ˜3 km above the thermal tropopause over North America and Greenland in boreal summer. However, the largest contribution of BB signatures (˜40%) was observed over the tropics in autumn and winter. In the tropics ECMWF back trajectory calculations show that the upward transport is driven by convection and we found hints for secondary O3 production in BB affected air masses leading to an enhancement of ˜25 ppb O3 relative to the tropospheric background. Based on our applied detection algorithm, ˜8% of the IAGOS-CARIBIC data were identified to be affected by BB.

  16. Genitalia burn: accident or violence? Concerns that transcend injury treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana Lúcia; Ferreira, Juliana Montez; da Silva, Paula Marques C; Constancio, Dilene Francisco

    2014-06-01

    To describe a case of genital burn which raised the suspicion of maltreatment (sexual abuse and neglect by lack of supervision). An infant was taken to the Emergency Room of a pediatric hospital with an extensive burn in the vulva and perineum. The mother claimed the burn had been caused by a sodium-hydroxide-based product. However, the injury severity led to the suspicion of sexual abuse, which was then ruled out by a multidisciplinary team, based on the consistent report by the mother. Besides, the lesion type matched those caused by the chemical agent involved in the accident and the family context was evaluated and considered adequate. The patient had a favorable outcome and was discharged after four days of hospitalization. Outpatient follow-up during six months after the accident enabled the team to rule out neglect by lack of supervision. Accidents and violence are frequent causes of physical injuries in children, and the differential diagnosis between them can be a challenge for healthcare workers, especially in rare clinical conditions involving patients who cannot speak for themselves. The involvement of a multidisciplinary trained team helps to have an adequate approach, ensuring child protection and developing a bond with the family; the latter is essential for a continued patient follow-up.

  17. Genitalia burn: accident or violence? Concerns that transcend injury treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Ferreira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of genital burn which raised the suspicion of maltreatment (sexual abuse and neglect by lack of supervision.CASE DESCRIPTION: An infant was taken to the Emergency Room of a pediatric hospital with an extensive burn in the vulva and perineum. The mother claimed the burn had been caused by a sodium-hydroxide-based product. However, the injury severity led to the suspicion of sexual abuse, which was then ruled out by a multidisciplinary team, based on the consistent report by the mother. Besides, the lesion type matched those caused by the chemical agent involved in the accident and the family context was evaluated and considered adequate. The patient had a favorable outcome and was discharged after four days of hospitalization. Outpatient follow-up during six months after the accident enabled the team to rule out neglect by lack of supervision.COMMENTS: Accidents and violence are frequent causes of physical injuries in children, and the differential diagnosis between them can be a challenge for healthcare workers, especially in rare clinical conditions involving patients who cannot speak for themselves. The involvement of a multidisciplinary trained team helps to have an adequate approach, ensuring child protection and developing a bond with the family; the latter is essential for a continued patient follow-up.

  18. Heterotopic ossification of the elbows in a major petrol burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Shahriar Raj

    2012-08-27

    A case of a young man who developed heterotopic ossification (HO) in his elbows following an accident where he sustained petrol burns to over 60% of his body. His injuries necessitated intubation, escharotomies and a protracted intensive care unit stay that was complicated by septicaemia. Several weeks after the injury, he was diagnosed with HO in his right elbow, followed by the left elbow a week later. He was commenced on an non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, a long-term course of a bisphosphonate and regular physiotherapy. He is now waiting for the HO bone to mature before having definitive excision of his lesions in 12-18 months time.

  19. Osteomyelitis in burn patients requiring skeletal fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Desai, MH; Herndon, DN

    Deep and severe burns often present with the exposure of musculoskeletal structures and severe deformities. Skeletal fixation, suspension and/or traction are part of their comprehensive treatment. Several factors put burn patients at risk for osteomyelitis, osteosynthesis material being one of them.

  20. Intensive Care Management in Pediatric Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Ebru Sakallıoğlu Abalı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. This article aimed to review the current principles of management from initial assessment to early management and intensive care for pediatric burn patients. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 62-9

  1. EPiderniolo y and bacterial colonization of burn

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IKOOl) '. Bacterial isolates. Figure 2 shows the range of bacteria isolated from burn wounds. S. alfl'fl/J', P. mlmlaz'lz's and streptococci were the commonest isolates. The other Gram negatives were. Paeruglnara (4.5%). Salmonella, E. roll and Klebsz'ella app. Discussion. The epidemiology of burns reported from this study is.

  2. Experimental Proteus mirabilis Burn Surface Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    mirabilis Burn Surface Infection Albert T. McManus, PhD; Charles G. McLeod, Jr, DVM; Arthur D. Mason, Jr, MD * We established a human burn Isolate of...William J1. Northam. Peter A. lDorsaneo, and Paulette langlinais MS. model may be useful in evaluation of experimental antibi - prov ided technical support

  3. Zelfzorg als buffer voor burn-out

    OpenAIRE

    Damman, Caroline; Dewaele, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Burn-out komt vaak voor bij hulpverleners. Door hun eigenheid durven ze niet snel hulp vragen. In geen enkele missietekst van een organisatie staat dat de organisatie zelfzorg bij hulpverleners als kerntaak opneemt. Zelfzorg is de beste buffer tegen burn-out.

  4. Burn Injury Arise From Flying Balloon Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Kulahci

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Many of peoples are faced minor or major burn injuries in their life. Even the most widespread burn cause is flame injuries, too different burn cause pointed out in literature like Acetylen burns. The cases which imply in literature, mostly causes from explosion of high pressure acetylene tube, metal oxygene patch flame or carbide lamp using from cave explorers. An interesting acetylene burn cause in Turkey was publised by the authors. This cases was to come into being from flying toy balloons flame. 80 person was injured from flying toy ballons flame in a meeting in 2002. Although this potential risks of acetylene, helium have not any of some risk. But helium was provided from other countries and have more price. The injuries which caused from acetylene burns like 1st -2nd degree burns. Consequently that was known helium is more avaliable for using in toy sector, and never cause burn injuries like this. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 291-296

  5. Pathophysiologic Response to Burns in the Elderly☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Patsouris, David; Stanojcic, Mile; Abdullahi, Abdikarim; Rehou, Sarah; Pinto, Ruxandra; Chen, Peter; Burnett, Marjorie; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades advancements have improved survival and outcomes of severely burned patients except one population, elderly. The Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) burn size in elderly has remained the same over the past three decades, and so has morbidity and mortality, despite the increased demand for elderly burn care. The objective of this study is to gain insights on why elderly burn patients have had such a poor outcome when compared to adult burn patients. The significance of this project is that to this date, burn care providers recognize the extreme poor outcome of elderly, but the reason remains unclear. In this prospective translational trial, we have determined clinical, metabolic, inflammatory, immune, and skin healing aspects. We found that elderly have a profound increased mortality, more premorbid conditions, and stay at the hospital for longer, p elderly, p > 0.05, but a significant increased incidence of multi organ failure, p elderly have substantially different responses to burns when compared to adults associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that these responses are complex and not linear, requiring a multi-modal approach to improve the outcome of severely burned elderly. PMID:26629550

  6. Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; M. J. Germino; B. K. Lamb; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion and aeolian transport processes are largely unstudied in the post-wildfire environment, but recent studies have shown that wind erosion can play a major role in burned landscapes. A wind erosion monitoring system was installed immediately following a wildfire in southeastern Idaho, USA to measure wind erosion from the burned area (Figure 1). This paper...

  7. Burned Oaks: Which Ones Will Survive?

    OpenAIRE

    McCreary, Doug; Nader, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Wildfire in an oak woodland can kill some trees outright and leave others with burn damage that may or may not eventually kill them, too. Here is a quick method for assessing the extent of burn damage and the likelihood that an affected tree will survive.

  8. Prescribed burning in southwestern ponderosa pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen S Sackett; Sally M Haase; Michael G Harrington

    1996-01-01

    Prescribed burning is an effective way of restoring the fire process to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) ecosystems of the Southwest. If used judiciously, fire can provide valuable effects for hazard reduction, natural regeneration, thinning, vegetation revitalization, and in general, better forest health. Relatively short burning...

  9. Acute pain management in burn patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst-Jensen, Hejdi; Vedel, Pernille Nygaard; Lindberg-Larsen, Viktoria Oline

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Burn patients suffer excruciating pain due to their injuries and procedures related to surgery, wound care, and mobilization. Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, chronic pain and depression are highly prevalent among survivors of severe burns. Evidence-based pain...

  10. Mouse Model of Burn Wound and Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2017-01-01

    The immunosuppression induced by thermal injury renders the burned victim susceptible to infection. A mouse model was developed to examine the immunosuppression, which was possible to induce even at a minor thermal insult of 6% total body surface area. After induction of the burn (48 hr) a depres......The immunosuppression induced by thermal injury renders the burned victim susceptible to infection. A mouse model was developed to examine the immunosuppression, which was possible to induce even at a minor thermal insult of 6% total body surface area. After induction of the burn (48 hr......) a depression of leukocytes in the peripheral blood was found of the burned mice. This depression was due to a reduction in the polymorphonuclear cells. The burned mice were not able to clear a Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infection, since the infection spread to the blood as compared to mice only infected...... with P. aeruginosa subcutaneously. The burn model offers an opportunity to study infections under these conditions. The present model can also be used to examine new antibiotics and immune therapy. Our animal model resembling the clinical situation is useful in developing new treatments of burn wound...

  11. Burn out: Cognitieve problemen, stress en vermoeidheid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, A. van; Keijsers, G.P.J.; Eling, P.A.T.M.; Becker, E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Veel burn-out patiënten rapporteren cognitieve problemen. Presteren burn-out patiënten ook minder goed op cognitieve taken? En met welke mechanismen hangen deze problemen samen? Onderzoek laat zien dat deze cognitieve problemen objectief zijn aan te tonen en dat ze meer met stress lijken samen te

  12. Prevention of Burn in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serife Kursun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In the last century, advances in medical care and longevity have resulting in an increase in the elderly population, and the world and Turkey populations have become older. In parallel with the aging population, problems seen in old people have been increasing. Burn, one of these problems, causes more serious injuries and high level of mortality in people aged 65 years and over compared to the general population. Reduction in sensory/cognitive functions, slowing reflexes, limited movements and accompanying situations (chronic diseases, alcoholism, used medication, neurological and psychiatric disorders which are due to physiology of elderly people increase the burn incidence and the severity of burn. In addition, these factors could also raise the ventilation requirement, complications and hospitalization period in burnt patients. Despite the recent developmetns in burn treatment and care, burn is still a serious health problem for elderly people. As the majority of the burn injuries are preventable, the essential point of burn administration in elderly people should be related to the prevention of burn incidence. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 251-254

  13. Thrombocytopenia in the pediatric burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Petra; Fields, Amanda L; Braun, Lindsay C; James, Laura E; Bailey, J Kevin; Yakuboff, Kevin P; Kagan, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is initially seen in patients with burn injury as a transient occurrence during the first week after injury. Subsequent decreases occur later in the course of treatment and are commonly due to sepsis, dilutional effects, and medication exposure. Although studies have demonstrated that thrombocytopenia in the critically ill patients is associated with a worse prognosis, there is limited literature as to the significance of thrombocytopenia in the pediatric burn patients. In this study, the authors evaluate the prognostic implications of thrombocytopenia in the pediatric burn patients. They performed a 5-year retrospective chart of patients aged 18 years or younger with burns >20% TBSA admitted to their institution. Data collected included patient demographics, burn etiology and %TBSA involvement, length of stay, pertinent laboratory values, and in-hospital morbidity and mortality. Of the 187 patients studied, thrombocytopenia occurred in 112 patients. Eighty-two percent demonstrated thrombocytopenia within the first week of injury and 18% demonstrated additional episodes of thrombocytopenia after this time. A reactive thrombocytosis occurred in 130 (70%) patients. The incidence of thrombocytopenia could not be attributed to age, gender, or burn etiology. However, patients with thrombocytopenia were more likely to have inhalation injury and extensive TBSA involvement than those without (P thrombocytosis in the pediatric burn patient is associated with increased mortality risk and is influenced by the extent of burn, inhalation injury, and the development of sepsis.

  14. Nutritional management of the burn patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of these metabolic alterations include increased gluconeogenesis, increased proteolysis, increased ureagenesis, sequestration of micronutrients and altered lipid metabolism. The magnitude of the response parallels the extent of the burn injury and reaches a maximum of about twice normal when the burn size exceeds ...

  15. How Does the Freezer Burn Our Food?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Shelly J.; Lee, Joo Won

    2009-01-01

    Freezer burn is a common problem that significantly affects the color, texture, and flavor of frozen foods. Food science students should be able to clearly explain the causes and consequences of freezer burn. However, it is difficult to find a modern, detailed, accurate, yet concise, explanation of the mechanism and factors influencing the rate of…

  16. Referral patterns in pediatric burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doud, Andrea N; Swanson, John M; Ladd, Mitchell R; Neff, Lucas P; Carter, Jeff E; Holmes, James H

    2014-09-01

    Though multiple studies have demonstrated superior outcomes amongst adult burn patients at verified burn centers (VBCs) relative to nondedicated burn centers (NBCs), roughly half of such patients meeting American Burn Association (ABA) referral guidelines are not sent to these centers. We sought examine referral patterns amongst pediatric burn patients. Retrospective review of a statewide patient database identified pediatric burn patients from 2000 to 2007 using International Classification of Disease (ICD-9) discharge codes. These injuries were crossreferenced with ABA referral criteria to determine compliance with the ABA guidelines. 1831 children sustained burns requiring hospitalization during the study period, of which 1274 (70%) met ABA referral criteria. Of 557 treated at NBCs, 306 (55%) met criteria for transfer. Neither age, gender, nor payer status demonstrated significant association with treatment center. VBCs treated more severely injured patients, but there was no difference in survival or rate of discharge home from NBCs versus VBCs. Studies to evaluate differences in functional outcomes between pediatric burn patients treated at VBCs versus NBCs would be beneficial to ensure optimization of outcomes in this population.

  17. An Approach to Modeling a Burning Cigarette

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muramatsu M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The temperature and smoke components distributions inside a burning cigarette have been briefly reviewed. Then, focusing on our mathematical model to explain the natural smoldering mechanism of a cigarette and new mathematical models recently published by other authors, an approach to modeling a burning cigarette has been outlined.

  18. Emergency burn rehabilitation: cost, risk, effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott R. Miles; Donald M. Haskins; Darrel W. Ranken

    1989-01-01

    The fires of 1987 had a heavy impact on the Hayfork Ranger District. Over 50,000 acres were burned within the South Fork Trinity River watershed, which contains an important anadromous fishery. Major problems within the burned area were found to be: (1) slopes having highly erodible soils where intense wildfire resulted in a total loss of ground cover, and (2) burnout...

  19. Case Records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Case 36-2012. Recovery of a 16-Year-Old Girl from Trauma and Burns After a Car Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-22

    movements of both arms and the left leg. There were burns on the face, vibrissae, eyebrows, eyelashes, hair, and scalp. Full-thickness burns involved...and cardiovascular reserve. Maturation of a residual limb is required before the fitting of a definitive prosthesis . Matu- ration has occurred when...first started going out in public, I hated the stares I got, so I would cover my arm , hand, and legs. But I gradually realized that they are stares

  20. Epidemiology and trends in severe burns in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, J.; Vloemans, A.F.; Beerthuizen, G.I.J.M.; van der Vlies, C.H.; Boxma, H.; Breederveld, R.; Tuinebreijer, W.E.; Middelkoop, E.; van Baar, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to characterize the epidemiology of severe burns in the Netherlands, including trends in burn centre admissions, non burn centre admissions and differences by age.

  1. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risks Burns and Scalds Type Video Audience Parents You are here Home Safety Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch this ...

  2. Burn Prevention for Families with Children with Special Needs

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips Video Special Needs Burns and Scalds Burn Prevention for Families With Children With Special Needs Watch ... learn what you need to know about burn prevention if you have a child with special needs. ...

  3. Preliminary results in single-step wound closure procedure of full-thickness facial burns in children by using the collagen-elastin matrix and review of pediatric facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircan, Mehmet; Cicek, Tugrul; Yetis, Muhammed Ikbal

    2015-09-01

    Management of full-thickness facial burns remains one of the greatest challenges. Controversy exists among surgeons regarding the use of early excision for facial burns. Unfortunately, delayed excision of deeper burns often results in more scarring and subsequent reconstruction becomes more difficult. A collagen-elastin matrix is used to improve the quality of the reconstructed skin, to reduce scarring and to prevent wound contraction. It serves as a foundation for split thickness skin graft and enhances short and long-term results. We report the usage of a collagen-elastin matrix during single-step wound closure technique of severe full-thickness facial burns in 15 children with large burned body surface area, and also we review the literature about pediatric facial burns. There were 15 pediatric patients with severe facial burns, 8 girls and 7 boys ranging in age from 10 months to 12 years, mean age 7 years and 6 months old. The facial burn surface area (FBSA) among the patients includes seven patients with 100%, five with 75%, and three with 50%. The average total body surface area (TBSA) for the patients was 72%, ranging between 50 and 90%. 5 of the patients' admissions were late, more than four days after burns while the rest of the patients were admitted within the first four days (acute admission time). The burns were caused by flame in eight of the patients, bomb blast in four, and scalding in three. All patients were treated by the simultaneous application of the collagen-elastin matrix and an unmeshed split thickness skin graft at Turgut Özal Medical Center, Pediatric Burn Center, Malatya, Turkey. After the treatment only two patients needed a second operation for revision of the grafts. All grafts transplanted to the face survived. The average Vancouver scar scales (VSS) were 2.55±1.42, ranging between one and six, in the first 10 of 15 patients at the end of 6 months postoperatively. VSS measurements of the last 5 patients were not taken since the 6

  4. Design of a cross-sectional study on physical fitness and physical activity in children and adolescents after burn injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disseldorp Laurien M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burn injuries have a major impact on the patient’s physical and psychological functioning. The consequences can, especially in pediatric burns, persist long after the injury. A decrease in physical fitness seems logical as people survive burn injuries after an often extensive period of decreased activity and an increased demand of proteins leading to catabolism, especially of muscle mass. However, knowledge on the possibly affected levels of physical fitness in children and adolescents after burn injury is limited and pertains only to children with major burns. The current multidimensional study aims to determine the level of physical fitness, the level of physical activity, health-related quality of life and perceived fatigue in children after a burn injury. Furthermore, interrelations between those levels will be explored, as well as associations with burn characteristics. Methods/design Children and adolescents in the age range of 6 up to and including 18 years are invited to participate in this cross-sectional descriptive study if they have been admitted to one of the three Dutch burn centers between 6 months and 5 years ago with a burn injury involving at least 10% of the total body surface area and/or were hospitalized ≥ 6 weeks. Physical fitness assessments will take place in a mobile exercise lab. Quantitative measures of cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, body composition and flexibility will be obtained. Outcomes will be compared with Dutch reference values. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and fatigue will be assessed using accelerometry and age-specific questionnaires. Discussion The findings of the current study will contribute to a better understanding of the long-term consequences of burn injury in children and adolescents after burns. The results can guide rehabilitation to facilitate a timely and optimal physical recovery. Trial registration The study is registered in

  5. Stubble Burning and Consciousness Level of Farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülistan Erdal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the consciousness levels, attitudes and behaviours of farmers against stubble burning and the damages of stubble burning which is a part of land misuse. 86 farmers from 9 villages in Zile county of Tokat province were surveyed for the study. These data was used to state farmers' socio-demographical characteristics and their behaviours against stubble burning was analysed. According to the study results, 99% of the farmers says that stubble burning is a wrong application. They states that stubble burning causes natural damages and the most importantly it is harmful by 76% to the living creatures in the nature. 57% of them prefers the method of mixing stubble to the soil.

  6. Prophylactic antibiotic use in pediatric burn units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergün, O; Celik, A; Ergün, G; Ozok, G

    2004-12-01

    Prophylactic antibiotic use in childhood burns is controversial. The efficiency of antibiotic prophylaxis in 77 pediatric burn patients was evaluated. Forty-seven patients received prophylactic antibiotics (Group AP), while 30 patients received no prophylaxis (Group NP). Age, wound depth, day of admission, mechanism of burn injury, type of dressings were similar for both groups (p > 0.05). Wound infection rates were 21.3 % in Group AP and 16.7 % in Group NP (p > 0.05). S. aureus, Enterobacter spp., P. aeruginosa, and E. coli were the most common microorganisms. Patients with wound colonization and infection had a larger burned total body surface area (BTBSA) in both groups (p beneficial and cost-effective results in the treatment of childhood burns is recommended.

  7. Crusted Scabies in the Burned Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jais Oliver; Alsbjørn, Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to describe a case of crusted scabies (CS) in a burned patient, which was primarily undiagnosed and led to a nosocomial outbreak in the burn unit; 2) to analyze and discuss the difficulties in diagnosing and treating this subset of patients with burn injury......; and 3) to design a treatment strategy for future patients. Case analysis and literature review were performed. The index patient had undiagnosed crusted scabies (sive Scabies norvegica) with the ensuing mite hyperinfestation when admitted to the department with minor acute dermal burns. Conservative...... healing and autograft healing were impaired because of the condition. Successful treatment of the burns was only accomplished secondarily to scabicide treatment. An outbreak of scabies among staff members indirectly led to diagnosis. CS is ubiquitous, and diagnosis may be difficult. This is the first...

  8. Sexual Function Following Burn Injuries: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Atisha A; Corkill, Helen A; Goutos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Sexual function is a profound facet of the human personality. Burns due their sudden and devastating nature can have longstanding effects on intimate function by virtue of physical sequelae as well as alterations in body image and perceived desirability. A considerable number of patients encounter problems with intimate function in burns rehabilitation; nevertheless, the topic appears to be poorly addressed in specialist centers worldwide. Review of the literature suggests that a number of parameters can affect the quality of sexual life following burn injuries including age at the time of injury, location, and severity of the burn as well as coping mechanisms employed by the individual survivor. Addressing issues of intimacy relies on awareness, education, and a holistic approach on behalf of the multidisciplinary team members and, to this effect, recommendations are made on managing sexual function concerns in burns rehabilitation.

  9. Early management of the burned pediatric hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Mark E; Evans, Jill; O, Seung-Jun

    2008-07-01

    Unique anatomic and pathophysiologic features of the thermally burned pediatric hand are reviewed, with a focus on direct management of the injured tissue in the early phases of the treatment process. A nonoperative approach to most pediatric hand burns is advocated, and principles of early wound care, including antimicrobial therapy, and escharotomy are described. Specific emphasis is placed on distinctive characteristics of the fifth digit which make it prone to contracture patterns resembling a boutonniere-type deformity and on newer wound care technologies that simplify the application process without loss of antimicrobial and barrier function. The technical principles of full-thickness burn excision, as well as considerations in selecting suitable graft for burn closure, are also discussed. Finally, basic techniques for splinting, positioning, and exercising the burned pediatric hand are described. When properly applied, the principles discussed herein have rendered the severely scarred, functionless hand a rarity after thermal injury.

  10. Modeling thermal burns due to airbag deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, G N; Sidhu, H S

    2005-12-01

    Automotive airbags are now a widely accepted safety measure designed to reduce morbidity associated with motor vehicle accidents. Their usage is increasing with multiple airbags (driver, passenger and side curtain) being fitted to many vehicles. However the deployment of airbags has been identified as causing injuries in some instances including minor burns. There are three mechanisms for thermal burns due to an airbag; contact with the hot expelled gases from the airbag, contact with the hot airbag itself and melting of clothing from either of these contacts. A mathematical model is used here to predict the likelihood and severity of the first two types of burns. It is shown that direct contact with high temperature exhaust gases venting from the airbag can indeed lead to burns and that burns from contacting the hot airbag material are possible but far less likely to occur.

  11. Sharing Residual Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonara, Emanuela; Guerra, Alice; Parisi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of tort law evaluate the efficiency of liability rules in terms of care and activity levels. A liability regime is optimal when it creates incentives to maximize the value of risky activities net of accident and precaution costs. The allocation of primary and residual liability...... allows policy makers to induce parties to undertake socially desirable care and activity levels. Traditionally, tort law systems have assigned residual liability either entirely on the tortfeasor or entirely on the victim. In this paper, we unpack the cheapest-cost-avoider principle to consider...

  12. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A.N.; Webster, G.A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P.J. [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  13. Estrogen treatment of acetic acid burns to the vagina, cervix, and perineum: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Jessica A; Kuykendall, Lauren V; Troy, Jared S; Smith, David J

    2014-01-01

    In colposcopic evaluation of the cervix, acetic acid of 3 to 5% is commonly used for identification of preneoplastic and neoplastic cells. Acetic acid is a known caustic substance and has the potential to cause irritation and chemical burns when there is sufficient concentration or duration of contact. The authors present a unique case of a woman who inadvertently received undiluted acetic acid during a routine colposcopy, resulting in significant chemical burns of the vagina, cervix, and perineum. Her burns were treated with topical estrogen cream of 1 g twice daily applied directly to the wounds. The burn wounds were fully healed within 8 weeks without complication or additional treatment. At 6 months after the injury, the patient was allowed to engage in sexual activity, and vaginal dilation and pelvic floor therapy were initiated. At 12 months postinjury, her only symptomatic scarring at the left vaginal wall continues to improve. Thus, topical estrogen treatment of 1 g applied twice daily should be continued until burn scar maturation is complete and treatment improvement plateaus in cases of burns to the vagina, cervix, and perineum. This case is further clinical evidence of estrogen's positive effect on wound healing and its potential role in burn treatment.

  14. Paediatric Burns in the Acute Phase: Specific Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Grisolia, G.A.; Pinzauti, E.; Pancani, S.; Pavone, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with specific aspects of paediatric burns in the acute phase and considers how the treatment of burned children differs from that of burned adults. The epidemiology of paediatric burns is reviewed. Particular aspects of the treatment of burned children are presented, with regard to treatment at the site of the accident, first aid, resuscitation, and local treatment. The importance of the accurate assessment of paediatric burns is stressed.

  15. Temporary Sutureless Amniotic Membrane Patch for Acute Alkaline Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Johnson, Daniel A.; Paranjpe, Deval R.; Raju, V.K.; Casas, Victoria; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome of a new sutureless approach for a temporary amniotic membrane patch (ProKera; Bio-Tissue, Inc, Miami, Florida) in eyes with acute burns. Methods Retrospective review of 5 eyes of 5 patients with grades I to III acute alkaline burns, receiving ProKera insertion within 8 days of injury. Results These eyes had either total (2 cases) or extensive (60%–75%, 3 cases) corneal epithelial defects with limbal (120°–360°) and conjunctival (30%–60%) epithelial defects. ProKera was inserted within a mean (SD) of 3.7 (3.1) days after burn and repeated 1 to 3 times for 3 cases. Conjunctival defects reepithelialized in 8.2 (5) days (range, 5–17 days), while limbal and corneal defects healed in 13.6 (8.3) days (range, 5–25 days). The latter was completed with circumferential closure of limbal defects followed by centripetal healing of corneal defects. In 3 eyes, early peripheral corneal neovascularization was followed by marked regression on completion of healing. During 16.8 (10.8) months of follow-up, all eyes retained a stable surface with improved corneal clarity, and without limbal deficiency or symblepharon. Conclusion This sutureless application of an amniotic membrane patch allows for early delivery of its biologic actions, which may help preserve remaining limbal stem cells for rapid expansion and prevent late cicatricial complications in eyes with mild and moderate acute alkaline burns. PMID:18695099

  16. The clinical efficacy of Diphoterine® in the management of cutaneous chemical burns: a 2-year evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zack-Williams, S D L; Ahmad, Z; Moiemen, N S

    2015-03-31

    Diphoterine(®) is an amphoteric irrigating agent for the treatment of chemical burns and rapidly neutralises both acids and alkalis faster than water alone. Diphoterine(®) is widely used as a first aid agent in a wide range of industries globally. This is a retrospective review of the clinical use of Diphoterine(®) on chemical burns in an adult tertiary referral burn centre, often with a delay of several hours after the injury. patients admitted with chemical burns within 24 hours of the incident with an abnormal wound pH or in pain, were treated with Diphoterine(®) spray. Over a 32-month period, 1,875 burn referrals were admitted of which 131 (7%) were chemical burns. Diphoterine(®) was used in 47 patients (36%). The male to female ratio for the 131 patients was 4:1. Alkaline burns were the commonest (55%). patients who received Diphoterine(®) were significantly younger (38 vs 43 years; p=0.05) and presented earlier (0.5 vs 2.55 days; p=0.004). There was a significant change in the wound pH pre- and post-application of Diphoterine(®), compared to patients who were treated with water irrigation only, with a pH change of 1.076 vs 0.4 (p burns.

  17. Amnion in the treatment of pediatric partial-thickness facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branski, Ludwik K; Herndon, David N; Celis, Mario M; Norbury, William B; Masters, Oscar E; Jeschke, Marc G

    2008-05-01

    Wound coverage for second-degree burns remains a clinical challenge. Human amniotic membranes have been used for many years in the treatment of burns; however, no large prospective clinical trials have been published. In this article, we present a novel and standardized procurement and processing method for amnion and investigate, whether the use of this biological dressing is safe and may represent a new therapeutic option for children with partial-thickness facial burns compared to standard topical treatment. Patients with partial-thickness burns of the face, neck and head admitted between 2003 and 2005 were included in this study. They were divided into two groups to receive either amnion (n=53) or topical antimicrobials (n=49). Demographics (age, gender, ethnicity, TBSA, burn areas), length of hospital stay (LOS), rate of infections (RI), time to total healing, and frequency of dressing changes were compared between the two groups. The long-term outcome was assessed in nine patients in the amnion group and eight patients in the topical group, who returned for up to 12-month follow-up visits. Patients in the amnion group had significantly less dressing changes then in the control group (pburns compared to the standard topical ointments. Further studies with the use of amniotic membranes on the trunk and the extremities, as well as for coverage of grafted third-degree burns, have yet to be performed.

  18. Burned-out testis tumour that metastasized to retroperitoneal lymph nodes: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Mehmet

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Burned-out testicular tumour is a very rare clinical entity. There is no clinical finding in the testicle, because it regresses spontaneously with no treatment, and generally presents with metastases. Abdominal masses in young male patients may sometimes be caused by a metastatic burned-out testicular tumour. We report a patient with a burned-out testicular tumour that metastasized to retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Case presentation A 28-year-old man complained of an abdominal mass and continuously increasing pain over the previous 2 months. A midabdominal mass, atrophy and minimal induration in the right testis were revealed on physical examination. Ultrasound findings revealed focally increased echogenicity, which is typical of burned-out tumours. Inguinal orchiectomy was performed, and the histological examination of the biopsy specimen revealed a large area of hyalinization, tubular hyalinization, interstitial fibrosis and focal Leydig cell hyperplasia, with no abnormal pathological findings in the epididymis and spermatic cord. The final pathological diagnosis was concluded as "burned-out" testicular tumour. Surgical treatment was followed by appropriate chemotherapy and in the follow-up, the abdominal mass was observed to regress. The patient is currently free of disease 5 years after diagnosis. Conclusion For the detection of intratesticular lesions, especially in patients with extragonadal metastatic involvement and normal palpation findings for the testis, scrotal sonography is very important. A burned-out testicular tumour should be considered and testis biopsies should be performed if there is any risk factor of malignancy.

  19. Methamphetamine laboratory-related burns in Western Australia--why the explosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Tomas B; Rawlins, J M; Rea, S; Wood, F M

    2011-09-01

    With increasing numbers of illicit drug users in both urban and rural communities, users and producers are becoming increasingly enterprising in their sourcing of mind altering drugs. An example of this is the 'amateur' production of methamphetamine in domestic dwellings. We describe the mechanism of burn seen in methamphetamine production, the pattern of clinical injury, and the difficulties in treating these patients. A 12 month retrospective study of five patient groups presenting to our burn service with injuries following methamphetamine laboratory explosion. Out of five patient groups we have treated 9 individual patients (with one patient presenting on two different occasions) with burns following methamphetamine laboratory explosion. All patients were male and required hospital admission. The cause of the explosive injury was initially reported as barbeque or oven related, assault, or accident in all patients. Two patients (in separate events) required intubation for associated inhalation injury. Burn size varied from 1% to 40% BSA. 7 patients required surgical debridement and skin grafting. Injury type was thermal and chemical. All patients had difficult follow-up due to low levels of clinic attendance. Methamphetamine laboratory explosion burns are difficult injuries from the start. Invariably the true circumstances surrounding the injury are not clear, and clinicians should be suspicious of a meth lab explosion in suspect individuals with burns plus airway injury. Patient management is complex and often requires substantial analgesic and anxiolytic medication in conjunction with clinical psychology and psychiatry as an inpatient. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute Deep Hand Burns Covered by a Pocket Flap-Graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradier, Jean-Philippe; Oberlin, Christophe; Bey, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the long-term outcome of the “pocket flap-graft” technique, used to cover acute deep burns of the dorsum of the hand, and analyzed surgical alternatives. Methods: This was a 6-year, retrospective study of 8 patients with extensive burns and 1 patient with a single burn (11 hands in all) treated by defatted abdominal wall pockets. We studied the medical records of the patients, and conducted a follow-up examination. Results: All hands had fourth-degree thermal burns caused by flames, with exposure of tendons, bones, and joints, and poor functional prognosis. One third of patients had multiple injuries. Burns affected an average of 36% of the hand surface, and mean coverage was 92.8 cm2. One patient died. The 8 others were seen at 30-month follow-up: the skin quality of the flap was found to be good in 55% of the cases, the score on the Vancouver Scar Scale was 2.4, the Kapandji score was 4.5, and total active motion was 37% of that of a normal hand. Hand function was limited in only 2 cases, 8 patients were able to drive, and 3 patients had gone back to work. Conclusion: The pocket flap-graft allows preservation of hand function following severe burns, when local or free flaps are impossible to perform. Debulking of the flap at the time of elevation limits the need for secondary procedures. PMID:17268577

  1. [The experimental application of chitosan membrane for treating chemical burns of the skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorielov, M; Kalinkevich, O; Gortinskaya, E; Moskalenko, R; Tkachenko, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The basic method for skin damage treatment, including chemical wounds, is a topical application of different agents. Their objective is to repair structure of the skin and its functions. All dressings for treating wounds are classified as biological, artificial and composites containing both synthetic and natural materials. There are many studies concerning application of chitosan, which is a derivate of natural polymer chitin, as a basis for topical materials to treat burns. However, data are rather limited about application of chitosan for treating acid burns. Thus, the aim of research is to study the morphological futures of skin regeneration after the chemical burn applying chitosan membranes. We performed the experiment on 60 young rats (3 months old) with the chemical burns of third-degree (IIIA degree) to study the morphofunctional features of skin regeneration. Later we applied the chitosan membranes on the burns. We carried out a histologic investigation on the biopsy specimens of wound to determine the morphological features of wound regeneration. The results confirmed that earlier granulation and epithelialization of the skin surface happened as the chitosan membrane was applied on the acid effected surface. The final result of the application of chitosan film is to achieve full epithelialization, preserve the structure of tissues beneath the burn and prevent getting scars.

  2. Pediatric burns in Khuzestan Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyarikhah, Hojjat; Shayestehfard, Marzieh; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir; Cheraghian, Bahman; Latifzadeh, Shila; Madari, Zahra

    2012-04-01

    Burn injuries are the most frequently occurring injuries among pediatric populations worldwide, and they are significant pediatric injuries in Iran. This study was conducted to analyze the pattern of pediatric burns in Khuzestan province in the south-west of Iran from April 2006 to March 2007. The location of the study was Taleghani Hospital, a sole center for burn patients in Khuzestan province. The number of patients with burns admitted to the center in 1 year (from April 2006 to March 2007) was 211. Data were obtained by reviewing the medical records of patients hospitalized at the center. Of the patients, 85 (40.3%) were female and 126 (59.7%) were male. Of the 85 female patients, 50 were from urban areas and 35 were from rural areas. Of the 126 male patients, 68 (54%) were from urban areas and 58 (46%) were from rural areas. The mean ± SE age of the children ranging between 0 and 11 years was 3.20 ± 0.188. Scalding was the predominant cause of burns and caused 86.7% of the burns. The age of the patients with scald injuries (2.95 ± 2.56 years) was significantly lower than that of patients with flame injuries (4.28 ± 3.3 years) (P=0.007). Correlation analysis showed that younger children and urban residents are more vulnerable to scald injuries. The mean body surface area of burns was 20.5 ± 10.26 cm in all patients. Scalding was the most common cause of burns. Age burn accidents in children in Khuzestan. An appropriate burn prevention program, with focus on education, is needed to prevent this injury.

  3. The relationship between behavioural problems in preschool children and parental distress after a paediatric burn event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Anne; van der Heijden, Peter G M; van Son, Maarten J M; van de Schoot, Rens; Vandermeulen, Els; Helsen, Ann; Van Loey, Nancy E E

    2014-01-01

    This study examines mother- and father-rated emotional and behaviour problems in and worries about 0- to 5-year-old children at 3 and 12 months after a burn event and the relation with parental distress. Mothers (n = 150) and fathers (n = 125) representing 155 children participated in this study.

  4. Impact of facial burns : relationship between depressive symptoms, self-esteem and scar severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, Cornelis Johannes; van Baar, Margriet Elisabeth; Middelkoop, Esther; Van Loey, N.E.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the role of self-reported facial scar severity as a possible influencing factor on self-esteem and depressive symptoms in patients with facial burns. METHOD: A prospective multicentre cohort study with a 6 months follow-up was conducted including 132 patients with

  5. The use of diverting colostomies in paediatric peri-anal burns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two children died of established septic shock, compounded by stomal dehiscence in 1 case. Reversal of the colostomy was performed on average at 4 months. Conclusion. Diverting colostomy has therapeutic advantages in a select group of paediatric burns patients in whom continual faecal soiling poses a threat to both ...

  6. An Integrative Suicide Prevention Program for Visitor Charcoal Burning Suicide and Suicide Pact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Paul W. C.; Liu, Patricia M. Y.; Chan, Wincy S. C.; Law, Y. W.; Law, Steven C. K.; Fu, King-Wa; Li, Hana S. H.; Tso, M. K.; Beautrais, Annette L.; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2009-01-01

    An integrative suicide prevention program was implemented to tackle an outbreak of visitor charcoal burning suicides in Cheung Chau, an island in Hong Kong, in 2002. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the program. The numbers of visitor suicides reduced from 37 deaths in the 51 months prior to program implementation to 6 deaths in the 42…

  7. Impact of facial burns: relationship between depressive symptoms, self-esteem and scar severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, C.J.; van Baar, M.E.; Middelkoop, E.; van Loey, N.E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the role of self-reported facial scar severity as a possible influencing factor on self-esteem and depressive symptoms in patients with facial burns. Method: A prospective multicentre cohort study with a 6 months follow-up was conducted including 132 patients with

  8. The ocular surface chemical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslani, Medi; Baradaran-Rafii, Alireza; Movahedan, Asadolah; Djalilian, Ali R

    2014-01-01

    Ocular chemical burns are common and serious ocular emergencies that require immediate and intensive evaluation and care. The victims of such incidents are usually young, and therefore loss of vision and disfigurement could dramatically affect their lives. The clinical course can be divided into immediate, acute, early, and late reparative phases. The degree of limbal, corneal, and conjunctival involvement at the time of injury is critically associated with prognosis. The treatment starts with simple but vision saving steps and is continued with complicated surgical procedures later in the course of the disease. The goal of treatment is to restore the normal ocular surface anatomy and function. Limbal stem cell transplantation, amniotic membrane transplantation, and ultimately keratoprosthesis may be indicated depending on the patients' needs.

  9. The Ocular Surface Chemical Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medi Eslani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular chemical burns are common and serious ocular emergencies that require immediate and intensive evaluation and care. The victims of such incidents are usually young, and therefore loss of vision and disfigurement could dramatically affect their lives. The clinical course can be divided into immediate, acute, early, and late reparative phases. The degree of limbal, corneal, and conjunctival involvement at the time of injury is critically associated with prognosis. The treatment starts with simple but vision saving steps and is continued with complicated surgical procedures later in the course of the disease. The goal of treatment is to restore the normal ocular surface anatomy and function. Limbal stem cell transplantation, amniotic membrane transplantation, and ultimately keratoprosthesis may be indicated depending on the patients’ needs.

  10. MORBIDITY AND SURVIVAL PROBABILITY IN BURN PATIENTS IN MODERN BURN CARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Pinto, Ruxandra; Kraft, Robert; Nathens, Avery B.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Klein, Matthew B.; Arnoldo, Brett D.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Characterizing burn sizes that are associated with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity is critical because it would allow identifying patients who might derive the greatest benefit from individualized, experimental, or innovative therapies. Although scores have been established to predict mortality, few data addressing other outcomes exist. The objective of this study was to determine burn sizes that are associated with increased mortality and morbidity after burn. Design and Patients Burn patients were prospectively enrolled as part of the multicenter prospective cohort study, Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury Glue Grant, with the following inclusion criteria: 0–99 years of age, admission within 96 hours after injury, and >20% total body surface area burns requiring at least one surgical intervention. Setting Six major burn centers in North America. Measurements and Main Results Burn size cutoff values were determined for mortality, burn wound infection (at least two infections), sepsis (as defined by ABA sepsis criteria), pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and multiple organ failure (DENVER2 score >3) for both children (patients were enrolled, of which 226 patients were children. Twenty-three patients were older than 65 years and were excluded from the cutoff analysis. In children, the cutoff burn size for mortality, sepsis, infection, and multiple organ failure was approximately 60% total body surface area burned. In adults, the cutoff for these outcomes was lower, at approximately 40% total body surface area burned. Conclusions In the modern burn care setting, adults with over 40% total body surface area burned and children with over 60% total body surface area burned are at high risk for morbidity and mortality, even in highly specialized centers. PMID:25559438

  11. Construct validity of two pain behaviour observation measurement instruments for young children with burns by Rasch analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, A.E.E.; Tuinebreijer, W.E.; Bremer, M.; van Komen, R.; Middelkoop, E.; van Loey, N.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, construct validity of 2 pain behaviour observation measurement instruments for young children aged 1 to 56 months (mean age was 20 months) with burns is assessed by using Rasch analysis. The Rasch model, wherein data should meet the model expectations, assumes that an instrument

  12. Frequency and characteristics of battered child syndrome in patients on a paediatric burns unit: A clinical case review

    OpenAIRE

    M. Gil-Vargas; Y. Martínez-Tovilla; E. Martín-Zayago; C. Llanos-Herrera; M.Á. Ramírez-Jacinto; A. Ramírez-Servín

    2017-01-01

    Background: Battered child syndrome is any act of physical, sexual or psychological aggression, negligence or intentional neglect against a minor. Objective: To estimate the frequency and characteristics of battered child syndrome in patients on the Paediatric Burns Unit of the Health Services of the State of Puebla. Materials and methods: In a 1 year and 10 month period, 313 patients under 18 years of age admitted to the Paediatric Burns Unit of the Health Services of the State of Pueb...

  13. Characteristics of Ambient Black Carbon Mass and Size-Resolved Particle Number Concentrations during Corn Straw Open-Field Burning Episode Observations at a Rural Site in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsiang Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Information on the effect of open-field burning of agricultural residues on ambient black carbon (BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations is scarce. In this study, to understand the effect of such open-field burning on short-term air quality, real-time variations of the BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations were monitored before and during a corn straw open-field burning episode at a rural site. Correlations between the BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations during the episode were investigated. Moreover, the particle number size distribution and absorption Ångström exponent were determined for obtaining the characteristics of aerosol emissions from the corn straw open-field burning. The results can be used to address public health concerns and as a reference for managing similar episodes of open-field burning of agricultural residues.

  14. Too hot to trot (barefoot)… A study of burns in children caused by sun heated surfaces in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, Catherine; Kimble, Roy; Stockton, Kellie

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and describe the characteristics of burns in children caused by sun heated surfaces. Children presenting between January 2013 and February 2014 with a burn due to sun heated surfaces were included in the study. Fifteen children were identified representing 1.7% of new burns. The mean age was 18.3 months. All burns occurred during the warmer months between 11a.m. and 4p.m. and the feet were commonly involved. Most cases occurred in the child's home garden but six cases occurred in public play areas. Metal was the most common surface involved. Most burns were superficial partial thickness with two burns deep dermal partial thickness and one child needed a skin graft. Burns due to sun heated surfaces are relatively frequent. Parents need to be aware that in summer surfaces can become hot enough to cause burns to bare feet in young children. Play areas need to be shaded or covered in surfaces that do not become hot enough to cause burns and metal objects should not be left in the sun in children's play areas. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transport and scavenging of biomass burning aerosols in the maritime continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. H.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning frequently occurs in summertime over the maritime continent, especially in Malaysia peninsula, Sumatra, and Borneo. Under certain weather conditions, particulate matters emitted from such fires cause degrade of air quality and thus occurrence of often weekly long haze in downwind locations such as Singapore. It is possible that these biomass burning aerosols may have influenced convective clouds in the maritime continent though such cases have not been well simulated and understood. In order to improve understanding of the spatiotemporal coverage and influence of biomass burning aerosols in the maritime continent, we have used the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to study the transport of biomass burning aerosols from Malaysia peninsula, Sumatra, and Borneo, using biomass burning emissions from the Fire INventory from NCAR (FINN) version 1.0. We choose to use emissions from the month of August because the annual emissions peak often occurs within this month. Based on a multi-year ensemble simulation, we have examined the influences of various meteorological regimes on the aerosol transport and wet removal.

  16. Individual-level predictors of inpatient childhood burn injuries: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burn injuries are considered one of the most preventable public health issue among children; however, are a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in Iran. The aim of this study was to assess individual-level predictors of severe burn injuries among children leading to hospitalization, in East Azerbaijan Province, in North-West of Iran. Methods The study was conducted through a hospital based case–control design involving 281 burn victims and 273 hospital-based controls who were frequency matched on age, gender and urbanity. Both bivariate and multivariate methods were used to analyze the data. Results Mean age of the participants was 40.5 months (95 % CI: 37–44 with the majority of burns occurring at ages between 2 months-13.9 years. It was demonstrated that with increase in the caregiver’s age there was a decrease in the odds of burn injuries (OR = 0.94, 95 % CI: 0.92-0.97. According to the multivariate logistic regression there were independent factors associated with burn injuries including childhood ADHD (OR = 2.82, 95 % CI: 1.68 - 4.76, child’s age (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.67 - 0.80, flammability of clothing (OR = 1.60, 95 % CI: 1.12 - 2.28, daily length of watching television (OR = 1.31, 95 % CI: 1.06 - 1.61, playing outdoors (OR = 1.32, 95 % CI: 1.16 - 1.50 and increment in the economic status (OR = 1.37, 95 % CI: 1.18 - 1.60. Conclusion Major risk predictors of burn injuries among the Iranian population included childhood ADHD, child’s age, watching television, playing outdoors, high economic status and flammable clothing.

  17. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - Molecular-Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1303-1306. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Photos of the month

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    Congratulations to Adele Rimoldi, ATLAS physicist from Pavia, who ran her first marathon in New York last month. Adele completed the 42.2 km in a time of 4:49:19. She sure makes it look easy!!! The ATLAS pixel service quarter panel in SR1

  20. Monthly energy review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  1. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Molecule of the Month Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 66-71. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Monthly Energy Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-28

    This publication presents an overview of the Energy information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief ``energy plugs`` (reviews of EIA publications) are included, as well.

  3. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1232-1237. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Clinical evaluation of a silver impregnated foam dressing in paediatric partial-thickness burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glat, P M; Zhang, S H; Burkey, B A; Davis, W J

    2015-04-01

    MepilexAg, a silver-impregnated foam dressing, was introduced to our institution in 2007 and our outcomes in the treatment of paediatric burns were observed to improve significantly. In order to confirm these observations, we wanted to evaluate the results of using the silver-impregnated foam dressing in partial-thickness paediatric burns.Method: In this retrospective, study, the St. Christopher's Hospital burn registry was used to identify subjects, who were otherwise in excellent health at baseline, over an 18-month period,. Outcomes included length of stay, intravenous narcotic use, and time to healing. No direct comparative studies were performed. This was followed by a non-comparative prospective study involving 22 paediatric patients, aged 1-4 years, with partial-thickness burns. This was a sub-study of a larger randomized controlled trial involving adults with partial-thickness burns, comparing the silver-impregnated foam dressing with Silvadene. In the retrospective part of the study, the silver-impregnated foam dressing was used successfully for the treatment of partial-thickness paediatric burns, with few complications and infections, allowing a shorter hospital stay, fewer dressings, and less pain medication than for historical controls. In the non-comparative prospective study, of 22 paediatric patients 50% healed completely within I week of treatment. The mean length of stay was 3.77 days and the mean number of dressings used was 1.64.Aithough narcotic usage was not assessed, patient surveys showed stinging or burning to be recorded as 'never' in 13 patients, 'rarely' in 8 patients, and 'sometimes' in I patient. The silver-impregnated foam dressing is effective and safe for use in partial-thickness paediatric burns, eliminating the need for daily dressings.

  5. Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature. This leads to the Ignition & Growth concept, introduced by LeeTarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homo- genized burn rate needs to account for three meso-scale physical effects: (i the density of active hot spots or burn centers; (ii the growth of the burn fronts triggered by the burn centers; (iii a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent burn centers. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable λ = g(s as a function of a dimensionless reaction length s(t = rbc/ℓbc, rather than by specifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale ℓbc(Ps = [Nbc(Ps]−1/3 is the average distance between burn centers, where Nbc is the number density of burn centers activated by the lead shock. The reaction length rbc(t = ∫t0 D(P(t′dt′ is the distance the burn front propagates from a single burn center, where D(P is the deflagration speed as a function of the local pressure and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. We have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

  6. Designing with residual materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walhout, W.; Wever, R.; Blom, E.; Addink-Dölle, L.; Tempelman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many entrepreneurial businesses have attempted to create value based on the residual material streams of third parties. Based on ‘waste’ materials they designed products, around which they built their company. Such activities have the potential to yield sustainable products. Many of such companies

  7. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-27

    This report compared the composition of samples from Wesseling and Leuna. In each case the sample was a residue from carbonization of the residues from hydrogenation of the brown coal processed at the plant. The composition was given in terms of volatile components, fixed carbon, ash, water, carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, volatile sulfur, and total sulfur. The result of carbonization was given in terms of (ash and) coke, tar, water, gas and losses, and bitumen. The composition of the ash was given in terms of silicon dioxide, ferric oxide, aluminum oxide, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, potassium and sodium oxides, sulfur trioxide, phosphorus pentoxide, chlorine, and titanium oxide. The most important difference between the properties of the two samples was that the residue from Wesseling only contained 4% oil, whereas that from Leuna had about 26% oil. Taking into account the total amount of residue processed yearly, the report noted that better carbonization at Leuna could save 20,000 metric tons/year of oil. Some other comparisons of data included about 33% volatiles at Leuna vs. about 22% at Wesseling, about 5 1/2% sulfur at Leuna vs. about 6 1/2% at Leuna, but about 57% ash for both. Composition of the ash differed quite a bit between the two. 1 table.

  8. The Investigation of Factors Related to Total Body Surface Area and Burn Degree in under 5-year-old Children of Kermanshah, Iran: Using Ordinal Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Karami Matin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The prevalence of burn in children is more than other age groups. This study aimed to "investigate the factors associated with the burn degree and total body surface area (TBSA in under five-year-old children of Kermanshah ".Methods: We studied under five-year-old children hospitalized in the burn center of Imam Khomeini hospital in Kermanshah from September 2014 until March 2016 for 18 months. Required Information extracted by trained staff based on existing data. Researcher-made checklist was used to obtain information. The ordinal regression has been applied to evaluate factors related to TBSA and burn degree in children. Result: In general, 262 children were input of the study so that 226 cases (86.3% were in under two-year-old group. The majority of cases were boys by 66.8% (175 cases. Hot liquid was the most reported cause of burns by 68.7% of all cases. Most of the burn incidents (43.1% with high burn degree occurred at 7 am to 2 pm. Girls were exposed to higher burn degrees more than boys. Factors such as being boy (OR=2.83, less than 2 years old age (OR=4.91 significantly increased TBSA. Also, living in rural (OR=5.17 and delay of treatment (OR=41.35 significantly increased burn degree. Conclusion: To reduce the incidence and complications of burns in children, interventions should be considered to change the environmental and individual factors.

  9. Third-Degree Hindpaw Burn Injury Induced Apoptosis of Lumbar Spinal Cord Ventral Horn Motor Neurons and Sciatic Nerve and Muscle Atrophy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hua Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Severe burns result in hypercatabolic state and concomitant muscle atrophy that persists for several months, thereby limiting patient recovery. However, the effects of burns on the corresponding spinal dermatome remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether burns induce apoptosis of spinal cord ventral horn motor neurons (VHMNs and consequently cause skeletal muscle wasting. Methods. Third-degree hindpaw burn injury with 1% total body surface area (TBSA rats were euthanized 4 and 8 weeks after burn injury. The apoptosis profiles in the ventral horns of the lumbar spinal cords, sciatic nerves, and gastrocnemius muscles were examined. The Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve were marked with S100. The gastrocnemius muscles were harvested to measure the denervation atrophy. Result. The VHMNs apoptosis in the spinal cord was observed after inducing third-degree burns in the hindpaw. The S100 and TUNEL double-positive cells in the sciatic nerve increased significantly after the burn injury. Gastrocnemius muscle apoptosis and denervation atrophy area increased significantly after the burn injury. Conclusion. Local hindpaw burn induces apoptosis in VHMNs and Schwann cells in sciatic nerve, which causes corresponding gastrocnemius muscle denervation atrophy. Our results provided an animal model to evaluate burn-induced muscle wasting, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  10. Carbon fractions and soil fertility affected by tillage and sugarcane residue management an Xanthic Udult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Maria Lopes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The gradual change in management practices in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. production from burning straw to a green harvesting system, as well as the use of minimum soil tillage during field renovation, may affect soil fertility and soil organic matter (SOM contents. The objectives of this work were to investigate the influence of sugar cane production systems on: (1 soil fertility parameters; (2 on physical carbon fractions; (3 and on humic substance fractions, in a long-term experiment, comparing two soil tillage and two residue management systems an Xanthic Udult, in the coastal tableland region of Espírito Santo State, Brazil. The treatments consisted of plots (conventional tillage (CT or minimum tillage (MT and subplots (residue burned or unburned at harvesting, with five replicates The highest values of Ca2+ + Mg2+ and total organic carbon (TOC were observed in the MT system in all soil layers, while high values of K+ were observed in the 0.1-0.2 m layer. The CT associated with the burned residue management negatively influenced the TOC values, especially in the 0.1-0.2 and 0.2-0.4 m layers. The carbon in the humin fraction and organic matter associated with minerals were significantly different among the tillage systems; the MT showed higher values than the CT. However, there were no significant differences between the sugarcane residue management treatments. Overall, fractioning the SOM allowed for a better understanding of tillage and residue management systems effects on the soil properties.

  11. Prevention-oriented epidemiology of burns in Ardabil provincial burn centre, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi Bazargani, H; Arshi, S; Ekman, R; Mohammadi, R

    2011-05-01

    In preventing burns, it is essential to know how they occur and which population groups, environments and heating appliances can be targeted for prevention work. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiological characteristics of burns leading to hospitalisation in the northwest of Iran with a focus on the pre-event phase of injury. Between 2007 and 2008, 237 burn victims hospitalised in Ardabil provincial burn centre were enrolled into a descriptive study. A questionnaire was filled in during hospital stay for all patients, with a focus on obtaining information necessary for prevention purposes. Males constituted 56% of victims. Mean age was 22 years. The most severe burns occurred between the ages of 18 and 32 years, and were mainly flame related. Both in case of flame and non-flame burns, women suffered more severe burns and mortality than men. However, with respect to non-flame burns of which most were scalds, the majority of the severe cases involved children under the age of 5 years. More than 80% of burns occurred at home. The kitchen was the main place of injury in 47% of cases, followed by living rooms in 28%. Nearly 45% of burns were scalds and 47% were flame burns. The main container was the samovar in 37%, followed by kettles in 32% and pots in 22%. The overturning of a container was the major mechanism of contact with hot liquids in 86%. Bumping into a container was the main scenario of a scald injury, constituting nearly 70% of the cases. The difference between flame and non-flame burns in the distribution of burns in extremities was not statistically significant, but head and neck burns were 3.7 times more likely to be caused by flame. The two most important injury patterns, more common among women, were getting burned while using a camping gas stove or while refilling the chamber of kerosene-burning appliances without first extinguishing them. Domestic burns among children and young women are a priority in injury-prevention programmes

  12. Management of difficult pediatric facial burns: reconstruction of burn-related lower eyelid ectropion and perioral contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Brent; More, Sunita; Buchman, Steven R; Cederna, Paul S

    2008-07-01

    Despite significant burn treatment advances, modern multidisciplinary care, and improved survival after burns, facial burn scars remain clinically challenging. Achieving a successful reconstruction requires a comprehensive approach, entailing many advanced techniques with an emphasis on preserving function and balancing intricate aesthetic requirements. Pediatric facial burns present the same reconstructive challenges seen in adults, with additional developmental and psychologic concerns. In this paper, we describe the basic principals of facial burn care in the pediatric burn population, with a specific focus on lower-eyelid burn ectropion and oral commissure burn scar contracture leading to microstomia. Several cases are demonstrated.

  13. Pediatric burn wound impetigo after grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikins, Kimberly; Prasad, Narayan; Menon, Seema; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    Modern burn care techniques have reduced the risk of infection of the acute burn wound, resulting in more rapid healing and a lower incidence of graft loss. Secondary breakdown may still occur. The loss of epithelium in association with multifocal superficial abscesses and ulceration has been termed burns impetigo. This may result in considerable morbidity and require prolonged treatment. The events preceding development, the impact on the patient, and the ideal treatment appear unclear and poorly reported. In 5 years, between 2006 and 2011, 406 pediatric burns were treated with skin grafts, with 7% developing burns impetigo. Time to resolution ranged from 5 to 241 days: the mean time to complete healing was greatest with conservative management (96 days), followed by antibacterial dressings (37 days), oral antibiotics (36 days), topical steroids (16 days), and oral antibiotics in combination with topical steroids (13.5 days). Burns impetigo resulted in significant morbidity, requiring multiple visits to the treatment center and prolonged symptoms. Delay in diagnosis and treatment resulted in worse outcomes. Prompt consideration of burns impetigo should occur when postgraft patients present with suggestive clinical signs and treatment with oral antibiotics plus topical steroids should be considered.

  14. Research in burns - Present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burd Andrew

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available There have been tremendous advances in burns care over the past 50 years. Much of this, but not all, can be attributed to basic science and clinically related research. Out of the best centres in the world, centres that are fully funded and richly resourced, best practice guidelines result in impressive outcomes not only in terms of survival but also in terms of a quality of survival. Indeed the remaining clinical challenges in these centres are the elderly, the inhalational burns, and the very extensive burns. There are however other challenges when looking at burns care in a global context and in particular is the provision of even minimal standards of acceptable care for burns patients in many parts of the world. Whilst the justification for research funding in the wealthy countries becomes increasingly esoteric, for example looking at the immunology of face transplantation, the global health challenges of burns care still remain. Perhaps, the greatest research challenge in burns care in the 21st century lies not in furthering our understanding of the phenomenon we observe but the global application of the knowledge we already possess.

  15. Infections in critically ill burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, F; Mas, D; Rubio, M; Garcia-Hierro, P

    2016-04-01

    Severe burn patients are one subset of critically patients in which the burn injury increases the risk of infection, systemic inflammatory response and sepsis. The infections are usually related to devices and to the burn wound. Most infections, as in other critically ill patients, are preceded by colonization of the digestive tract and the preventative measures include selective digestive decontamination and hygienic measures. Early excision of deep burn wound and appropriate use of topical antimicrobials and dressings are considered of paramount importance in the treatment of burns. Severe burn patients usually have some level of systemic inflammation. The difficulty to differentiate inflammation from sepsis is relevant since therapy differs between patients with and those without sepsis. The delay in prescribing antimicrobials increases morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the widespread use of antibiotics for all such patients is likely to increase antibiotic resistance, and costs. Unfortunately the clinical usefulness of biomarkers for differential diagnosis between inflammation and sepsis has not been yet properly evaluated. Severe burn injury induces physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These alterations impact antimicrobials distribution and excretion. Nevertheless the current available literature shows that there is a paucity of information to support routine dose recommendations. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. Burning characteristics of microcellular combustible objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-tao Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcellular combustible objects for application of combustible case, caseless ammunition or combustible detonator-holding tubes are fabricated through one-step foaming process, in which supercritical CO2 is used as foaming agent. The formulations consist of inert polymer binder and ultra fine RDX. For the inner porous structures of microcellular combustible objects, the cell sizes present a unimodal or bimodal distribution by adjusting the foaming conditions. Closed bomb test is to investigate the influence of both porous structure style and RDX content on burning behavior. The sample with bimodal distribution of cell sizes burns faster than that with unimodal distribution, and the concentration of RDX can influence the burning characteristics in a positive manner. In addition, the translation of laminar burning to convective burning is determined by burning rate versus pressure curves of samples at two different loading densities, and the resulting transition pressure is 30 MPa. Moreover, the samples with bigger sample size present higher burning rate, resulting in providing deeper convective depth. Dynamic vivacity of samples is also studied. The results show that the vivacity increases with RDX content and varies with inner structure.

  17. The trends of burns epidemiology in a tropical regional burns centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwee, Jolie; Song, Christopher; Tan, Kok Chai; Tan, Bien Keem; Chong, Si Jack

    2016-05-01

    Singapore General Hospital (SGH) is a regional burns centre in Southeast Asia and is the only dedicated burns facility providing specialized burns care in Singapore. A cohort study was performed for burns patients admitted to SGH from 2011 to 2013. We compared our data with earlier studies and observed the trends of burns epidemiology in Singapore. Results were analyzed using the SPSS programme. 655 patients were admitted during this study period, a 35.9% increase from 2003 to 2005. Scalding by water and flame injury remain the top causes of burns and the mean extent of burn is 9.5%. TBSA correlates with the incidence of burn infection, bacteremia and mortality. Patients with ≥20% TBSA are at a higher risk of bacteremia, and ≥ 34% TBSA is a predictor of mortality. 4.9% (n=32) of our patients developed bacteremia. Bacteremia was associated with a surgical duration of ≥80min. Patients with bacteremia incurred longer hospitalization, and had higher mortality rates. Overall mortality rate of our burns patients has decreased from 4.5% to 2.7% (n=18). Key factors of mortality include inhalational injury, bacteremia and ≥20% TBSA. This is a large epidemiology study of a tropical region burns centre. A total of 655 burns cases over a 3-year period were analyzed. We analysed the key factors associated with adverse outcomes including burns infection, bacteremia and mortality, factors associated with mortality, and discussed strategies on the optimization of burns care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  19. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  20. Need for Mechanical Ventilation in Pediatric Scald Burns: Why it Happens and Why it Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Michael J; Peter, Tony; Gamelli, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Scald burns are the most common thermal injury among children. A small subset of pediatric scald burns are complicated by the need for mechanical ventilation (MV). Studies suggest that 4 to 5% of pediatric scald burns will require MV, and these patients tend to be younger with larger burns. Identifying why pediatric patients with scald burns require MV has remained unclear, and few studies have sought to elucidate possible mechanisms. After institutional review board approval, a retrospective review of all pediatric patients with scald burns admitted to the Burn Center between 2010 and 2013 was conducted. Variables collected included age, sex, weight, height, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status or type of insurance, hospital length of stay, burn size and location, Department of Child and Family Services (DCFS) involvement, time to intubation from admission, reason for intubation, need for MV, duration of MV, need for operative intervention, 24-hour and 48-hour total fluid intake and urine output, glucose levels, infectious complications, comorbidities, and mortality. Patients who required MV were then compared with those who did not require MV to identify statistically significant differences between groups. The MV patients (n = 6) and nonventilated patients (n = 339) did not show significant differences in regards to gender, body mass index, ethnicity, and type of insurance; however, MV patients were younger and had larger burns. The mean age of MV patients was 8.2 + 5.0 months compared with 40.7 + 45.2 months for non-MV (P = .002). The mean percentage of TBSA burn in MV patients was 17.3 + 9.0% compared with 4.5 + 3.9% for non-MV (P Burn location was significant, and 66.6% of MV patients had burns on the face or neck compared with 23.6% of non-MV (P = .015). MV patients were more likely to have been victims of child abuse, as DCFS was involved in 67% of MV patients vs. 28% of non-MV patients (P = .036). Fifty percent of patients requiring MV had either a