WorldWideScience

Sample records for residual surface stresses

  1. Relationship between ultrasonic Rayleigh waves and surface residual stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, L.; Cook, K.V.; Dewey, B.R.; King, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    Local variations of Rayleigh (surface) circumferential ultrasonic wave velocity near a pipe-girth weld in large-diameter thin-wall type 316H stainless steel pipe were measured. The weldment was similar to those anticipated for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) piping systems. The residual stress distribution was estimated independently from shell theory for an elastic, infinite, thin shell with circumferential line loading. An upper bound on the magnitude of the residual stresses was estimated assuming the deformation of the shell was entirely elastic. The pattern of surface wave velocity variations matches the theoretical residual stress pattern closely. It is suggested that the monitoring of surface wave velocity variations might be used for characterizing residual stress patterns near critical welds in piping, aiding in design calculations, and for in-service monitoring of the state of stress of weldments

  2. Residual stresses estimation in tubes after rapid heating of surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serikov, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented on estimation of residual stresses in tubes of steel types ShKh15, EhP836 and 12KIMF after heating by burning pyrotechnic substance inside tubes. External tube surface was heated up to 400-450 deg C under such treatment. Axial stresses distribution over tube wall thickness was determined for initial state, after routine heat treatment and after heating with the use of fireworks. Inner surface heating was shown to essentially decrease axial stresses in tubes

  3. On machine surface to the unit event causing residual stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunachalama, R.M.; Mannanb, M.A.; Spowageca, A.

    2005-01-01

    Integrity and reduce overall costs. Within the framework of surface integrity investigations, special emphasis is given to the measurement of residual stresses because they contribute directly to premature failure of components. Since the highest residual stresses are to be found in surface layers, these deserve special attention when dealing with dynamically, heavily loaded machine parts such as gas turbine components used in aero engines. Of the many techniques available for the measurement of residual stresses, the most highly developed and widely used non-destructive method is based on X-ray diffraction (XRD). However, it is not possible to use this technique for inspection of all the components, since it is time consuming, complicated as well as expensive. In this paper, a method is being proposed that augments the XRD method but at the same time capable of inspecting all the components. A non-destructive, visual inspection technique has been developed that can correlate the characteristic features on the surface to the unit event causing the residual stress and the type of residual stress generated on the machined surface. Pictures of the machined surfaces have been taken using a digital video microscope at a magnification of 500 and the surface feature correlated to the unit event causing the residual stress. Sharp and well defined long grooves indicate that the plastic deformation is dominated by a mechanical unit event while appearance of streaks and small areas of smeared material indicate that the plastic deformation is dominated by a thermal unit event. These trends have been confirmed by measuring the residual stresses using XRD. The proposed technique is an attempt at establishing a simple methodology that would be useful to industries manufacturing aerospace and other components that require good surface integrity. (Author)

  4. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahotra, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The principal effect of unloading a material strained into the plastic range is to create a permanent set (plastic deformation), which if restricted somehow, gives rise to a system of self-balancing within the same member or reaction balanced by other members of the structure., known as residual stresses. These stresses stay there as locked-in stresses, in the body or a part of it in the absence of any external loading. Residual stresses are induced during hot-rolling and welding differential cooling, cold-forming and extruding: cold straightening and spot heating, fabrication and forced fitting of components constraining the structure to a particular geometry. The areas which cool more quickly develop residual compressive stresses, while the slower cooling areas develop residual tensile stresses, and a self-balancing or reaction balanced system of residual stresses is formed. The phenomenon of residual stresses is the most challenging in its application in surface modification techniques determining endurance mechanism against fracture and fatigue failures. This paper discusses the mechanism of residual stresses, that how the residual stresses are fanned and what their behavior is under the action of external forces. Such as in the case of a circular bar under limit torque, rectangular beam under limt moment, reclaiming of shafts welds and peening etc. (author)

  5. Prediction of residual stress distributions due to surface machining and welding and crack growth simulation under residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Katsuyama, JInya; Onizawa, Kunio; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mikami, Yoshiki; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Residual stress distributions due to welding and machining are evaluated by XRD and FEM. → Residual stress due to machining shows higher tensile stress than welding near the surface. → Crack growth analysis is performed using calculated residual stress. → Crack growth result is affected machining rather than welding. → Machining is an important factor for crack growth. - Abstract: In nuclear power plants, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near the weld zone of the core shroud and primary loop recirculation (PLR) pipes made of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel Type 316L. The joining process of pipes usually includes surface machining and welding. Both processes induce residual stresses, and residual stresses are thus important factors in the occurrence and propagation of SCC. In this study, the finite element method (FEM) was used to estimate residual stress distributions generated by butt welding and surface machining. The thermoelastic-plastic analysis was performed for the welding simulation, and the thermo-mechanical coupled analysis based on the Johnson-Cook material model was performed for the surface machining simulation. In addition, a crack growth analysis based on the stress intensity factor (SIF) calculation was performed using the calculated residual stress distributions that are generated by welding and surface machining. The surface machining analysis showed that tensile residual stress due to surface machining only exists approximately 0.2 mm from the machined surface, and the surface residual stress increases with cutting speed. The crack growth analysis showed that the crack depth is affected by both surface machining and welding, and the crack length is more affected by surface machining than by welding.

  6. INTERFACE DEVICE FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF RESIDUAL SURFACE STRESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady A. Perepelkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the organization of connection of a personal computer with a device for nondestructive testing of residual surface stresses. The device works is based on the phenomenon of diffraction of ionizing radiation from the crystal lattice near the surface of the crystallites. Proposed software interface to the organization for each type of user: the device developers, administrators, users. Some aspects of the organization of communication microcontroller to a PC via USB-port

  7. Investigation of surface residual stress profile on martensitic stainless steel weldment with X-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Ahmed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of residual stresses during fabrication is inevitable and often neglected with dire consequences during the service life of the fabricated components. In this work, the surface residual stress profile following the martensitic stainless steel (MSS pipe welding was investigated with X-ray diffraction technique. The results revealed the presence of residual stresses equilibrated across the weldment zones. Tensile residual stress observed in weld metal was balanced by compressive residual stresses in the parent material on the opposing sides of weld metal. Keywords: Residual stress, Weld, Stainless steel, X-ray, HAZ

  8. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.

    1978-01-01

    Residual stresses are stresses which exist in a material without the influence of external powers and moments. They come into existence when the volume of a material constantly changes its form as a consequence of mechanical, thermal, and/or chemical processes and is hindered by neighbouring volumes. Bodies with residual stress are in mechanical balance. These residual stresses can be manifested by means of all mechanical interventions disturbing this balance. Acoustical, optical, radiological, and magnetical methods involving material changes caused by residual stress can also serve for determining residual stress. Residual stresses have an ambivalent character. In technical practice, they are feared and liked at the same time. They cause trouble because they can be the cause for unexpected behaviour of construction elements. They are feared since they can cause failure, in the worst case with catastrophical consequences. They are appreciated, on the other hand, because, in many cases, they can contribute to improvements of the material behaviour under certain circumstances. But they are especially liked for their giving convenient and (this is most important) mostly uncontrollable explanations. For only in very few cases we have enough knowledge and possibilities for the objective evaluation of residual stresses. (orig.) [de

  9. Effects on Machining on Surface Residual Stress of SA 508 and Austenitic Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Seong Ho; Park, Chi Yong; Yang, Jun Seok; Lee, Jeong Geun; Park, Jai Hak

    2011-01-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking has occurred in dissimilar weld areas in nuclear power plants. Residual stress is a driving force in the crack. Residual stress may be generated by weld or surface machining. Residual stress due to surface machining depends on the machining method, e.g., milling, grinding, or EDM. The stress is usually distributed on or near the surface of the material. We present the measured residual stress for machining on SA 508 and austenitic stainless steels such as TP304 and F316. The residual stress can be tensile or compressive depending on the machining method. The depth and the magnitude of the residual stress depend on the material and the machining method

  10. Application of laser interferometry for assessment of surface residual stress by determination of stress-free state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Won; Kwon, Dong Il; Lee, Nak Kyu; Choi, Tae Hoon; Na, Kyoung Hoan

    2003-01-01

    The total relaxed stress in annealing and the thermal strain/stress were obtained from the identification of the residual stress-free state using Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI). The residual stress fields in case of both single and film/substrate systems were modeled using the thermo-elastic theory and the relationship between relaxed stresses and displacements. We mapped the surface residual stress fields on the indented bulk Cu and the 0.5 μm Au film by ESPI. In indented Cu, the normal and shear residual stress are distributed over -1.7 GPa to 700 MPa and -800 GPa to 600 MPa respectively around the indented point and in deposited Au film on Si wafer, the tensile residual stress is uniformly distributed on the Au film from 500 MPa to 800 MPa. Also we measured the residual stress by the X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) for the verification of above residual stress results by ESPI

  11. X-ray evaluation of residual stress distributions within surface machined layer generated by surface machining and sequential welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Yuu; Okano, Shigetaka; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    The excessive tensile residual stress generated by welding after surface machining may be an important factor to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nuclear power plants. Therefore we need to understand and control the residual stress distribution appropriately. In this study, residual stress distributions within surface machined layer generated by surface machining and sequential welding were evaluated by X-ray diffraction method. Depth directional distributions were also investigated by electrolytic polishing. In addition, to consider the effect of work hardened layer on the residual stress distributions, we also measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) obtained from X-ray diffraction. Testing material was a low-carbon austenitic stainless steel type SUS316L. Test specimens were prepared by surface machining with different cutting conditions. Then, bead-on-plate welding under the same welding condition was carried out on the test specimens with different surface machined layer. As a result, the tensile residual stress generated by surface machining increased with increasing cutting speed and showed nearly uniform distributions on the surface. Furthermore, the tensile residual stress drastically decreased with increasing measurement depth within surface machined layer. Then, the residual stress approached 0 MPa after the compressive value showed. FWHM also decreased drastically with increasing measurement depth and almost constant value from a certain depth, which was almost equal regardless of the machining condition, within surface machined layer in all specimens. After welding, the transverse distribution of the longitudinal residual stress varied in the area apart from the weld center according to machining conditions and had a maximum value in heat affected zone. The magnitude of the maximum residual stress was almost equal regardless of the machining condition and decreased with increasing measurement depth within surface machined layer. Finally, the

  12. Residual stress improved by water jet peening using cavitation for small-diameter pipe inner surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuo, Nakamura; Toshizo, Ohya; Koji, Okimura

    2001-01-01

    As one of degradation conditions on components used in water, the overlapping effect of environment, material and stress might cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Especially, for the tensile residual stress produced by welding, it is particularly effective to reduce the tensile residual stress on the material surface to prevent SCC. In this paper, the residual stress improvement method using cavitation impact generated by a water jet, called Water Jet Peening (WJP), has been developed as the maintenance technology for the inner surfaces of small-diameter Ni-Cr-Fe alloy (Alloy 600) pipes. As the results, by WJP for the inner surface of Alloy 600 pipe (inner diameter; approximately 10-15 mm), we confirmed that the compressive stress generated within the range from the surface to the inner part about 0.5 mm deep and took a maximum value about 350 MPa on the surface. (author)

  13. Effect of Applied Stress and Temperature on Residual Stresses Induced by Peening Surface Treatments in Alloy 600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telang, A.; Gnäupel-Herold, T.; Gill, A.; Vasudevan, V. K.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the effects of applied tensile stress and temperature on laser shock peening (LSP) and cavitation shotless peening (CSP)-induced compressive residual stresses were investigated using neutron and x-ray diffraction. Residual stresses on the surface, measured in situ, were lower than the applied stress in LSP- and CSP-treated Alloy 600 samples (2 mm thick). The residual stress averaged over the volume was similar to the applied stress. Compressive residual stresses on the surface and balancing tensile stresses in the interior relax differently due to hardening induced by LSP. Ex situ residual stress measurements, using XRD, show that residual stresses relaxed as the applied stress exceeded the yield strength of the LSP- and CSP-treated Alloy 600. Compressive residual stresses induced by CSP and LSP decreased by 15-25% in magnitude, respectively, on exposure to 250-450 °C for more than 500 h with 10-11% of relaxation occurring in the first few hours. Further, 80% of the compressive residual stresses induced by LSP and CSP treatments in Alloy 600 were retained even after long-term aging at 350 °C for 2400 h.

  14. An analytical method on the surface residual stress for the cutting tool orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueen; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Wei

    2010-03-01

    The residual stress is measured by choosing 8 kinds orientations on cutting the H13 dies steel on the HSM in the experiment of this paper. The measured data shows on that the residual stress exists periodicity for the different rake angle (β) and side rake angle (θ) parameters, further study find that the cutting tool orientations have closed relationship with the residual stresses, and for the original of the machined residual stress on the surface from the cutting force and the axial force, it can be gained the simply model of tool-workpiece force, using the model it can be deduced the residual stress model, which is feasible to calculate the size of residual stress. And for almost all the measured residual stresses are compressed stress, the compressed stress size and the direction could be confirmed by the input data for the H13 on HSM. As the result, the residual stress model is the key for optimization of rake angle (β) and side rake angle (θ) in theory, using the theory the more cutting mechanism can be expressed.

  15. Finite Element Simulation of Shot Peening: Prediction of Residual Stresses and Surface Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariépy, Alexandre; Perron, Claude; Bocher, Philippe; Lévesque, Martin

    Shot peening is a surface treatment that consists of bombarding a ductile surface with numerous small and hard particles. Each impact creates localized plastic strains that permanently stretch the surface. Since the underlying material constrains this stretching, compressive residual stresses are generated near the surface. This process is commonly used in the automotive and aerospace industries to improve fatigue life. Finite element analyses can be used to predict residual stress profiles and surface roughness created by shot peening. This study investigates further the parameters and capabilities of a random impact model by evaluating the representative volume element and the calculated stress distribution. Using an isotropic-kinematic hardening constitutive law to describe the behaviour of AA2024-T351 aluminium alloy, promising results were achieved in terms of residual stresses.

  16. Effect of processing conditions on residual stress distributions by bead-on-plate welding after surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    Residual stress is important factor for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) that has been observed near the welded zone in nuclear power plants. Especially, surface residual stress is significant for SCC initiation. In the joining processes of pipes, butt welding is conducted after surface machining. Residual stress is generated by both processes, and residual stress distribution due to surface machining is varied by the subsequent butt welding. In previous paper, authors reported that residual stress distribution generated by bead on plate welding after surface machining has a local maximum residual stress near the weld metal. The local maximum residual stress shows approximately 900 MPa that exceeds the stress threshold for SCC initiation. Therefore, for the safety improvement of nuclear power plants, a study on the local maximum residual stress is important. In this study, the effect of surface machining and welding conditions on residual stress distribution generated by welding after surface machining was investigated. Surface machining using lathe machine and bead on plate welding with tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc under various conditions were conducted for plate specimens made of SUS316L. Then, residual stress distributions were measured by X-ray diffraction method (XRD). As a result, residual stress distributions have the local maximum residual stress near the weld metal in all specimens. The values of the local maximum residual stresses are almost the same. The location of the local maximum residual stress is varied by welding condition. It could be consider that the local maximum residual stress is generated by same generation mechanism as welding residual stress in surface machined layer that has high yield stress. (author)

  17. Comparison of residual stress measurement in thin films using surface micromachining method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Q.; Luo, Z.X.; Chen, X.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Conductive, dielectric, semiconducting, piezoelectric and ferroelectric thin films are extensively used for MEMS/NEMS applications. One of the important parameters of thin films is residual stress. The residual stress can seriously affect the properties, performance and long-term stability of the films. Excessive compressive or tensile stress results in buckling, cracking, splintering and sticking problems. Stress measurement techniques are therefore essential for both process development and process monitoring. Many suggestions for stress measurement in thin films have been made over the past several decades. This paper is concentrated on the in situ stress measurement using surface micromachining techniques to determine the residual stress. The authors review and compare several types of stress measurement methods including buckling technique, rotating technique, micro strain gauge and long-short beam strain sensor

  18. Near-surface residual stresses and microstructural changes after turning of a nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlauer, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are precipitation hardened alloys with complex compositions. They are used in aircraft engines and land-based gas turbines in load bearing structural components that are exposed to high temperatures. Failure mechanisms in this environment are high and low cycle fatigue, creep, and corrosion. During manufacturing, residual stresses are often introduced into the material due to inhomogeneous plastic deformations, both intentionally and unintentionally. One such manufacturing process is metal cutting, which introduces residual stresses in the surface layer. The stress state in the near-surface zone of components is of special interest as the surface often experiences peak loads and cracks have their starting point there. In this thesis, near-surface residual stress distributions and microstructural changes are studied in the nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 for two different turning operations, face grooving and facing. Process variables are in both cases cutting speed and feed that have been varied between (10 and 1200) m/min and (0.01 and 0.5) mm, respectively. The first turning technique face grooving, which gives cutting conditions similar to orthogonal cutting, showed a clear dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed. The tensile stress at the surface, the maximum compressive stress below the surface, and the thickness of the affected layer increase with increasing cutting speed. The tensile stresses are constrained to a thin surface layer and compressive residual stresses below the surface dominate the depth profile of the residual stresses. Only at low cutting speed, residual stresses were largely avoided. The second turning technique facing confirmed the dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed and revealed a similar dependency on the feed. Microstructural investigations of near-surface cross-sections by means of transmission electron microscopy showed a zone where the grains had undergone plastic

  19. Study on residual stress across the pipes' thickness using outer surface rapid heating. Development of pipe outer surface irradiated laser stress improvement process (L-SIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takahiro; Terasaki, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    The new process called L-SIP (outer surface irradiated Laser Stress Improvement Process) is developed to improve the tensile residual stress of the inner surface near the butt welded joints of pipes in the compression stress. The temperature gradient occurs in the thickness of pipes in heating the outer surface rapidly by laser beam. By the thermal expansion difference between the inner surface and the outer surface, the compression plastic strain generates near the outer surface and the tensile plastic strain generates near the inner surface of pipes. The compression stress occurs near the inner surface of pipes by the plastic deformation. In this paper, the theoretical equation which calculates residual stress distribution from the inherent strain distribution in the thickness of pipes is derived. And, the relation between the distribution of temperature and the residual stress in the thickness is examined for various pipes size. (1) By rapidly heating from the outer surface, the residual stress near the inner surface of the pipe is improved to the compression stress. (2) Pipes size hardly affects the distribution of the residual stress in the stainless steel pipes for piping (JISG3459). (3) The temperature rising area from the outside is smaller, the area of the compression residual stress near the inner surface becomes wider. (author)

  20. Fatigue behaviour of 304L steel welded structures: influence of residual stresses and surface mechanical finishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnier-Monin, L.

    2007-12-01

    This study focuses on the influence of residual stresses and surface mechanical finishing on lifetime of stainless steel 304L welded structures. Residual stresses are determined on specific specimens of three types: base-metal, as-welded and ground-welded specimens. Each type is submitted to fatigue tests in order to assess the influence of these parameters on the lifetime, and to determine their evolution. The experiments show that an important surface stress concentration is located in the weld root of as-welded structures, which has a negative effect on the fatigue life. The grinding operation generates high-level surface residual stresses but the lifetime is higher thanks to the reduction of the notch effect. The fatigue test results are compared to the nuclear industry best-fit S-N curves. This enables the determination of correction factors related to fatigue test results of polished specimens, and to assess the lifetime of structures. (author)

  1. Eddy current spectroscopy for near-surface residual stress profiling in surface treated nonmagnetic engine alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.

    Recent research results indicated that eddy current conductivity measurements can be exploited for nondestructive evaluation of near-surface residual stresses in surface-treated nickel-base superalloy components. Most of the previous experimental studies were conducted on highly peened (Almen 10-16A) specimens that exhibit harmful cold work in excess of 30% plastic strain. Such high level of cold work causes thermo-mechanical relaxation at relatively modest operational temperatures; therefore the obtained results were not directly relevant to engine manufacturers and end users. The main reason for choosing peening intensities in excess of recommended normal levels was that in low-conductivity engine alloys the eddy current penetration depth could not be forced below 0.2 mm without expanding the measurements above 10 MHz which is beyond the operational range of most commercial eddy current instruments. As for shot-peened components, it was initially felt that the residual stress effect was more difficult to separate from cold work, texture, and inhomogeneity effects in titanium alloys than in nickel-base superalloys. In addition, titanium alloys have almost 50% lower electric conductivity than nickel-base superalloys; therefore require proportionally higher inspection frequencies, which was not feasible until our recent breakthrough in instrument development. Our work has been focused on six main aspects of this continuing research, namely, (i) the development of an iterative inversion technique to better retrieve the depth-dependent conductivity profile from the measured frequency-dependent apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC), (ii) the extension of the frequency range up to 80 MHz to better capture the peak compressive residual stress in nickel-base superalloys using a new eddy current conductivity measuring system, which offers better reproducibility, accuracy and measurement speed than the previously used conventional systems, (iii) the lift-off effect on

  2. Residual stresses relaxation in surface-hardened half-space under creep conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir P. Radchenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed the method for solving the problem of residual stresses relaxation in surface-hardened layer of half-space under creep conditions. At the first stage we made the reconstruction of stress-strain state in half-space after plastic surface hardening procedure based on partial information about distribution for one residual stress tensor component experimentally detected. At the second stage using a numerical method we solve the problem of relaxation of self-balanced residual stresses under creep conditions. To solve this problem we introduce the following Cartesian system: x0y plane is aligned with hardened surface of half-space and 0z axis is directed to the depth of hardened layer. We also introduce the hypotheses of plane sections parallel to x0z and y0z planes. Detailed analysis of the problem has been done. Comparison of the calculated data with the corresponding test data was made for plane specimens (rectangular parallelepipeds made of EP742 alloy during T=650°C after the ultrasonic hardening with four hardening modes. We use half-space to model these specimens because penetration's depth of residual stresses is less than specimen general size in two digit exponent. There is enough correspondence of experimental and calculated data. It is shown that there is a decay (in modulus of pressing residual stresses under creep in 1.4–1.6 times.

  3. On the residual stress modeling of shot-peened AISI 4340 steel: finite element and response surface methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Ali; Dehestani, Pouya; Poruraminaie, Iman

    2018-02-01

    Shot peening is a well-known process in applying the residual stress on the surface of industrial parts. The induced residual stress improves fatigue life. In this study, the effects of shot peening parameters such as shot diameter, shot speed, friction coefficient, and the number of impacts on the applied residual stress will be evaluated. To assess these parameters effect, firstly the shot peening process has been simulated by finite element method. Then, effects of the process parameters on the residual stress have been evaluated by response surface method as a statistical approach. Finally, a strong model is presented to predict the maximum residual stress induced by shot peening process in AISI 4340 steel. Also, the optimum parameters for the maximum residual stress are achieved. The results indicate that effect of shot diameter on the induced residual stress is increased by increasing the shot speed. Also, enhancing the friction coefficient magnitude always cannot lead to increase in the residual stress.

  4. A strategy for accommodating residual stresses in the assessment of repair weldments based upon measurement of near surface stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcdonald, E.J.; Hallam, K.R.; Flewitt, P.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    On many occasions repairs are undertaken to ferritic steel weldments on plant either during construction or to remove service induced defects. These repaired weldments are subsequently put into service with or without a post-weld heat treatment. In either case, but particularly for the latter, there is a need to accommodate the associated residual stresses in structural integrity assessments such as those based upon the R6 failure avoidance procedure. Although in some circumstances the residual macro-stresses developed within weldments of components and structures can be calculated this is not so readily achieved in the case of residual stresses introduced by repair welds. There is a range of physical and mechanical techniques available to undertake the measurement of macro-residual stresses. Of these X-ray diffraction has the advantage that it is essentially non-destructive and offers the potential for evaluating stresses, which exist in the near surface layer. Although for many structural integrity assessments both the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses have to be accommodated it is not practical to make destructive measurements on weld repaired components and structures to establish the through section distribution of stresses. An approach is to derive a description of the appropriate macro-stresses by a combination of measurement and calculation on trial ferritic steel repair weldments. Surface measurements on the plant can then be made to establish the relationship between the repaired component or structure and the trial weld and thereby improve confidence in predicted stresses and their distribution from the near-surface measured values. Hence X-ray diffraction measurements at the near-surface of the plant weldment can be used to underwrite the quality of the repair by confirming the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses used for the integrity assessment to demonstrate continued safe operation

  5. SCC of 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel-Microstructure, Residual Stress and Surface Grinding Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nian; Peng, Ru Lin; Schönning, Mikael; Pettersson, Rachel

    2017-02-23

    The influence of surface grinding and microstructure on chloride induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 2304 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. Grinding operations were performed both parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the material. SCC tests were conducted in boiling magnesium chloride according to ASTM G36; specimens were exposed both without external loading and with varied levels of four-point bend loading. Residual stresses were measured on selected specimens before and after exposure using the X-ray diffraction technique. In addition, in-situ surface stress measurements subjected to four-point bend loading were performed to evaluate the deviation between the actual applied loading and the calculated values according to ASTM G39. Micro-cracks, initiated by grinding induced surface tensile residual stresses, were observed for all the ground specimens but not on the as-delivered surfaces. Loading transverse to the rolling direction of the material increased the susceptibility to chloride induced SCC. Grinding induced tensile residual stresses and micro-notches in the as-ground surface topography were also detrimental.

  6. SCC of 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel—Microstructure, Residual Stress and Surface Grinding Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian Zhou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of surface grinding and microstructure on chloride induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC behavior of 2304 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. Grinding operations were performed both parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the material. SCC tests were conducted in boiling magnesium chloride according to ASTM G36; specimens were exposed both without external loading and with varied levels of four-point bend loading. Residual stresses were measured on selected specimens before and after exposure using the X-ray diffraction technique. In addition, in-situ surface stress measurements subjected to four-point bend loading were performed to evaluate the deviation between the actual applied loading and the calculated values according to ASTM G39. Micro-cracks, initiated by grinding induced surface tensile residual stresses, were observed for all the ground specimens but not on the as-delivered surfaces. Loading transverse to the rolling direction of the material increased the susceptibility to chloride induced SCC. Grinding induced tensile residual stresses and micro-notches in the as-ground surface topography were also detrimental.

  7. SCC of 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel—Microstructure, Residual Stress and Surface Grinding Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nian; Peng, Ru Lin; Schönning, Mikael; Pettersson, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The influence of surface grinding and microstructure on chloride induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 2304 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. Grinding operations were performed both parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the material. SCC tests were conducted in boiling magnesium chloride according to ASTM G36; specimens were exposed both without external loading and with varied levels of four-point bend loading. Residual stresses were measured on selected specimens before and after exposure using the X-ray diffraction technique. In addition, in-situ surface stress measurements subjected to four-point bend loading were performed to evaluate the deviation between the actual applied loading and the calculated values according to ASTM G39. Micro-cracks, initiated by grinding induced surface tensile residual stresses, were observed for all the ground specimens but not on the as-delivered surfaces. Loading transverse to the rolling direction of the material increased the susceptibility to chloride induced SCC. Grinding induced tensile residual stresses and micro-notches in the as-ground surface topography were also detrimental. PMID:28772582

  8. Prediction method of long-term reliability in improving residual stresses by means of surface finishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sera, Takehiko; Hirano, Shinro; Chigusa, Naoki; Okano, Shigetaka; Saida, Kazuyoshi; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Surface finishing methods, such as Water Jet Peening (WJP), have been applied to welds in some major components of nuclear power plants as a counter measure to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). In addition, the methods of surface finishing (buffing treatment) is being standardized, and thus the buffing treatment has been also recognized as the well-established method of improving stress. On the other hand, the long-term stability of peening techniques has been confirmed by accelerated test. However, the effectiveness of stress improvement by surface treatment is limited to thin layers and the effect of complicated residual stress distribution in the weld metal beneath the surface is not strictly taken into account for long-term stability. This paper, therefore, describes the accelerated tests, which confirmed that the long-term stability of the layer subjected to buffing treatment was equal to that subjected to WJP. The long-term reliability of very thin stress improved layer was also confirmed through a trial evaluation by thermal elastic-plastic creep analysis, even if the effect of complicated residual stress distribution in the weld metal was excessively taken into account. Considering the above findings, an approach is proposed for constructing the prediction method of the long-term reliability of stress improvement by surface finishing. (author)

  9. Surface residual stress evaluation in double-electrode butt welded steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estefen, S.F.; Gurova, T.; Castello, X.; Leontiev, A.

    2010-01-01

    Surface residual stress evaluation for double-electrode welding was studied. The stresses were monitored after each operational step: positioning, implementing of constraints, welding and constraints removal. The measurements were performed at the deposited metal, heat affected zone, base metal close to the weld joint and along the plate using the X-ray diffraction method. It was observed differences in the stress evaluations for double-electrode welding which resulted in lower bending distortions and higher values of surface residual stresses, compared with single-electrode welding. This behavior is associated with the stress distribution just after the welding processes in both heat affected zone and base metal close to the fillet for double-electrode welding. The main results from the laboratorial tests indicated lower values of the bending distortions for double-electrode welding compared with the single-electrode. In relation to the residual stress, the double-electrode welding generated, in general, higher stress values in both longitudinal and transversal directions.

  10. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A N; Webster, G A [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P J [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  11. Influence of residual stress on the adhesion and surface morphology of PECVD-coated polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaritz, Montgomery; Hopmann, Christian; Behm, Henrik; Kirchheim, Dennis; Wilski, Stefan; Grochla, Dario; Banko, Lars; Ludwig, Alfred; Böke, Marc; Winter, Jörg; Bahre, Hendrik; Dahlmann, Rainer

    2017-11-01

    The properties of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) coatings on polymer materials depend to some extent on the surface and material properties of the substrate. Here, isotactic polypropylene (PP) substrates are coated with silicon oxide (SiO x ) films. Plasmas for the deposition of SiO x are energetic and oxidative due to the high amount of oxygen in the gas mixture. Residual stress measurements using single Si cantilever stress sensors showed that these coatings contain high compressive stress. To investigate the influence of the plasma and the coatings, residual stress, silicon organic (SiOCH) coatings with different thicknesses between the PP and the SiO x coating are used as a means to protect the substrate from the oxidative SiO x coating process. Pull-off tests are performed to analyse differences in the adhesion of these coating systems. It could be shown that the adhesion of the PECVD coatings on PP depends on the coatings’ residual stress. In a PP/SiOCH/SiO x -multilayer system the residual stress can be significantly reduced by increasing the thickness of the SiOCH coating, resulting in enhanced adhesion.

  12. Modeling and Parameter Optimization for Surface Roughness and Residual Stress in Dry Turning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. El-Axir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of some turning variables and tool overhang on surface roughness parameters and residual stress induced due to machining 6061-T6 aluminum alloy is investigated in this paper. Four input parameters (cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut and tool overhang are considered. Tests are carried out by precision turning operation on a lathe. Design of experiment techniques, i.e. response surface methodology (RSM and Taguchi's technique have been used to accomplish the objective of the experimental study. Surface roughness parameters are measured using a portable surface roughness device while residual stresses are measured employing deflection-etching technique using electrochemical analysis. The results obtained reveal that feed and rotational speed play significant role in determining the average surface roughness. Furthermore, the depth of cut and tool overhang are less significant parameters, whereas tool overhang interacts with feed rate. The best result of surface roughness was obtained using low or medium values of overhang with low speed and /or feed rate. Minimum maximum tensile residual stress can be obtained with a combination of tool overhang of 37 mm with very low depth of cut, low rotational speed and feed rate of 0.188 mm/rev.

  13. Application of X-rays and Synchrotron X Rays to Residual Stress Evaluation Near Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyzalla, Anke

    1999-01-01

    A nondestructive residual stress analysis can be performed using diffraction methods. The easiest accessible radiation is characteristic X radiation that has a penetration depth of ∼10 microm suitable for the determination of the residual stresses in near-surface layers. Special techniques have been developed, e.g., with respect to in situ analyses of the stress state in oxide layers and the residual stress analysis in coarse grained zones of steel welds or annealed Ni-base alloys. Depending on the size of the gauge volume, neutron diffraction can provide information at depths of tens of millimetres of steel and many tens of millimetres of Al. An alternative to the use of the characteristic synchrotron radiation is the use of a high-energy polychromatic beam in an energy dispersive arrangement, which gives access to higher penetration depths at still gauge volumes as small as 100 microm x 100 microm x 1 mm in steel rods of 15-mm diameter. The combination of neutrons with conventional X rays and monochromatic and polychromatic synchrotron radiation allows for a comprehensive investigation of the phase composition, the texture, and the residual stresses

  14. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification on the Residual Stress, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang; Telang, Abhishek; Gill, Amrinder; Wen, Xingshuo; Mannava, Seetha R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) of 304 stainless steel welds was carried out. UNSM effectively eliminates the tensile stress generated during welding and imparts beneficial compressive residual stresses. In addition, UNSM can effectively refine the grains and increase hardness in the near-surface region. Corrosion tests in boiling MgCl2 solution demonstrate that UNSM can significantly improve the corrosion resistance due to the compressive residual stresses and changes in the near-surface microstructure.

  15. A wafer mapping technique for residual stress in surface micromachined films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavone, G; Murray, J; Smith, S; Walton, A J; Desmulliez, M P Y; Mount, A R

    2016-01-01

    The design of MEMS devices employing movable structures is crucially dependant on the mechanical behaviour of the deposited materials. It is therefore important to be able to fully characterize the micromachined films and predict with confidence the mechanical properties of patterned structures. This paper presents a characterization technique that enables the residual stress in MEMS films to be mapped at the wafer level by using microstructures released by surface micromachining. These dedicated MEMS test structures and the associated measurement techniques are used to extract localized information on the strain and Young’s modulus of the film under investigation. The residual stress is then determined by numerically coupling this data with a finite element analysis of the structure. This paper illustrates the measurement routine and demonstrates it with a case study using electrochemically deposited alloys of nickel and iron, particularly prone to develop high levels of residual stress. The results show that the technique enables wafer mapping of film non-uniformities and identifies wafer-to-wafer differences. A comparison between the results obtained from the mapping technique and conventional wafer bow measurements highlights the benefits of using a procedure tailored to films that are non-uniform, patterned and surface-micromachined, as opposed to simple standard stress extraction methods. The presented technique reveals detailed information that is generally unexplored when using conventional stress extraction methods such as wafer bow measurements. (paper)

  16. A countermeasure for external stress corrosion cracking in piping components by means of residual stress improvement on the outer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Umemoto, Tadahiro

    1988-01-01

    Many techniques have been proposed as countermeasures for the External Stress Corrosion Cracking (ESCC) on austenitic stainless steel piping caused by sea salt particles. However, not one seems perfect. The method proposed here is an expansion of IHSI (Induction Heating Stress Improvement) which has been successfully implemented in many nuclear power plants as a remedy for Intergranular Stress Corrossion Cracking. The proposed method named EIHSI (External IHSI) can make the residual stress compressive on the outer surface of the piping components. In order to confirm the effectiveness of EIHSI, one series of tests were conducted on a weld joint between the pipe flange and the straight pipe. The measured residual stresses and also the results of the cracking test revealed that EIHSI is a superior method to suppress the ESCC. The outline of EIHSI and the verification tests are presented in this paper. (author)

  17. Expanded heat treatment to form residual compressive hoop stress on inner surface of zirconium alloy tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    A specific heat treatment process that introduces hoop stress has been developed. This technique can produce zirconium alloy tubing with a residual compressive hoop stress near the inner surface by taking advantage of the mechanical anisotropy in hexagonal close-packed zirconium crystal. Since a crystal having its basal pole parallel to the tangential direction of the tubing is easier to exhibit plastic elongation under the hoop stress than that having its basal pole parallel to the radial direction, the plastic and elastic elongation can coexist under a certain set of temperature and hoop stress conditions. The mechanical anisotropy plays a role to extend the coexistent stress range. Thus, residual compressive hoop stress is formed at the inner surface where more plastic elongation occurs during the heat treatment. This process is referred to as expanded heat treatment. Since this is a fundamental crystallographic principle, it has various applications. The application to improve PCI/SCC (pellet cladding interaction/stress corrosion cracking) properties of water reactor fuel cladding is promising. Excellent results were obtained with laboratory-scale heat treatment and an out-reactor iodine SCC test. These results included an extension of the time to SCC failure. (author)

  18. X-ray fractography by using synchrotron radiation source. Residual stress distribution just beneath fatigue fracture surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Koichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Toshihiko

    2000-01-01

    The residual stress distributions just beneath the fatigue fracture surface were measured using synchrotron radiation with three different wavelengths, i.e., three different penetration depths. The residual stress distributions were estimated from three kinds of diffraction data by the following process. First, a temporary residual stress distribution in the depth direction is assumed. Theoretical 2θ-sin 2 ψ diagrams for each wavelength, where each has a different penetration depth, are calculated by the cosψ method developed by one of the authors. The sum total of the differences between the theoretical and experimental values of the diffraction angle in 2θ-sin 2 ψ diagrams is calculated. This total value is minimized by changing the assumed stress distribution by the quasi-Newton optimization method. Finally, optimized 2θ-sin 2 ψ diagrams for each penetration depth and detailed stress distribution are determined. The true surface residual stress is obtained from this stress distribution. No effect of load ratio R (= P min /P max ) on the residual stresses of the fatigue fracture surfaces in low-carbon steels was observed when the sin 2 ψ method was used for stress measurement. However, the residual stresses became higher with increasing R when these were measured by the proposed method. On the basis of this, the stress intensity factor range, ΔK, can be estimated from the residual stress on the fatigue fracture surface. (author)

  19. Two-step method to evaluate equibiaxial residual stress of metal surface based on micro-indentation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Masaaki; Soyama, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The sensitivity to residual stress was improved by selecting the depth parameter. → Residual stress could be obtained while determining the effect of unknown parameters. → The estimated residual stress agreed well with those of X-ray diffraction. -- Abstract: The present study proposed a method to evaluate the equibiaxial compressive residual stress of a metal surface by means of a depth-sensing indentation method using a spherical indenter. Inverse analysis using the elastic-plastic finite-element model for an indentation test was established to evaluate residual stress from the indentation load-depth curve. The proposed inverse analysis utilizes two indentation test results for a reference specimen whose residual stress is already known and for a target specimen whose residual stress is unknown, in order to exclude the effect of other unknown mechanical properties, such as Young's modulus and yield stress. Residual stress estimated by using the indentation method is almost identical to that measured by X-ray diffraction for indentation loads of 0.49-0.98 N. Therefore, it can be concluded that the proposed method can effectively evaluate residual stress on metal surface.

  20. Residual stress relaxation due to fretting fatigue in shot peened surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, S.A.; Blodgett, M.P.; Mall, S.; Sathish, S.; Namjoshi, S.

    2003-01-01

    Fretting fatigue occurs at locations where the materials are sliding against each other under load. In order to enhance the fatigue life under fretting conditions the surface of the component is shot peened. In general, the shot peening process produces a compressive stress on the surface of the material, thereby increasing the resistance of the material to crack initiation. This paper presents the relaxation of residual stress caused during fretting fatigue. X-ray diffraction has been utilized as the method to measure residual stress in fretting fatigued samples of Ti-6Al-4V

  1. Modelling the Effects of Surface Residual Stresses on Fatigue Behavior of PM Disk Alloys, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A finite element based model will be developed and validated to capture the evolution of residual stresses and cold work at machined features of compressor and...

  2. X-ray stress analysis of residual stress gradients in surface layers of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganev, N.; Kraus, I.; Gosmanova, G.; Pfeiffer, L.; Tietz, H.-D.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the contribution is to present the theoretical possibilities of X-ray non-destructive identification of stress gradients within the penetration depth of used radiation and its utilization for experimental stress analysis. Practical usefullness of outlined speculations is illustrated with results of stress measurements on cut and shot-penned steel samples. (author)

  3. The residual stress distribution in welded pipe inner surface of stainless steel from the nuclear power plant in Ringhals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.E.

    1984-06-01

    The axial residual stress distribution on the inner surface of welded pipes of stainless steel SS 2333 (AISI 304) have been measured using the X-ray diffraction technique. Four halves of two pipes with the outer diameter of 114 mm and wall thickness of 10 mm were investigated. The result on the pipe inner surface shows compressive stresses in the weld metal and tensile stresses within a region between 8-23 mm with a maximum of 180MPa at a distance of 17 mm from the weld centerline. The maximum axial and circumferential residual stresses on the pipe outer surface are of the magnitude of 100 MPa. By cutting the pipes into two halves these stresses are relaxed by about 35 MPa. (author)

  4. Behavior of surface residual stress in explosion hardened high manganese austenitic cast steel due to repeated impact loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Akira; Miyagawa, Hideaki

    1985-01-01

    Explosion hardened high manganese austenitic cast steel is being tried for rail crossing recently. From the previous studies, it became clear that high tensile residual stress was generated in the hardened surface layer by explosion and microcracks were observed. In this study, therefore, the behavior of surface residual stress in explosion hardened steel due to repeated impact loads was examined and compared with those of the original and shot peened steels. The results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) In the initial stage of the repetition of impact, high tensile surface residual stress in explosion hardened steel decreased rapidly with the repetition of impact, while those of the original and shot peened steels increased rapidly. This difference was attributed to the difference in depth of the work hardened layer in three testing materials. (2) Beyond 20 impacts the residual stress of three test specimens decreased gradually, and at more than 2000 impacts the compressive stress of about 500 MPa was produced regardless of the histories of working of testing materials. (3) The linear law in the second stage of residual stress fading was applicable to this case, and the range of the linear relationship was related to the depth of the work hardened layer of testing material. (4) From the changes in half-value breadth and peak intensity of diffraction X-ray, it was supposed that a peculiar microscopic strain exists in explosion hardened steel. (author)

  5. Conductivity Profile Determination by Eddy Current for Shot Peened Superalloy Surfaces Toward Residual Stress Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Y.; Lo, C. C. H.; Frishman, A. M.; Lee, C.; Nakagawa, N.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an eddy current model-based method for inverting near-surface conductivity deviation profiles of surface treated materials from swept-high frequency eddy current (SHFEC) data. This work forms part of our current research directed towards the development of an electromagnetic nondestructive technique for assessing residual stress of shot-peened superalloy components. The inversion procedure is based on the use of a parameterized function to describe the near-surface conductivity as a function of depth for a shot-peened surface, and the laterally uniform multi-layer theory of Cheng, Dodd and Deeds to calculate the resulting coil impedance deviations. The convergence of the inversion procedure has been tested against synthesized eddy current data. As a demonstration, the conductivity deviation profiles of a series of Inconel 718 specimens, shot peened at various Almen intensities, have been obtained by inversion. Several consistency tests were conducted to examine the reliability of the inverted conductivity profiles. The results show that conductivity deviation profiles can be reliably determined from SHFEC data within the accuracy of the current measurement system

  6. Non destructive evaluation of residual stresses in welding and hard-surfacing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J.C.; Fernandez, L.M.; Cruz, C.; Aragon, B.; Merino, F.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper transversal and longitudinal stress profiles in welding and hard-surfacing by welding processes are presented. The stresses were measured by RMS of Barkhausen signal. In this work it is shown that in each case the level of stresses is strongly dependent on the number of weld beads of surfacing layers deposited. The subsequent deposition of new weld beads or surfacing layers produces a stress-relieving effect

  7. Mitigation of inside surface residual stress of type 304 stainless steel pipe welds by inside water cooling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, R.

    1980-01-01

    The weld residual stress distributions, macro- and microstructures of heat affected zone and IGSCC susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel pipe welds by natural and inside water cooling methods have been investigated. The residual stresses of pipe welds by the natural cooling method are high tensile on both the inside and the outside surface. While the residual stresses on the inside surface of pipe welds by the inside water cooling method are compressive in both axial and circumferential directions for each pipe size from 2 to 24 inch diameter. The sensitized zones of welds by the inside water cooling method are closer to the fusion line, much narrower and milder than those by the natural cooling method. According to the constant extension rate test results for specimens taken from the inside surface of pipe welds, the inside water cooled welds are more resistant to IGSCC than naturally cooled ones

  8. Residual stresses in surface induction hardening of steels: Comparison between experiment and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupard, Dominique; Palin-luc, Thierry; Bristiel, Philippe; Ji, Vincent; Dumas, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Deep induction hardening has been performed on two batches of smooth cylindrical specimens with a hardening depth respectively around 2 mm and 3 mm. The distributions of axial and circumferential residual stresses are analysed for the two specimen batches by X-ray diffraction technique. The radial normal stress field is estimated through the use of the well known Moore and Evans correction. Finally, the experimental residual stresses are compared with those obtained from a multiphysic finite element modelling of the whole induction treatment process, including electromagnetic, thermal, metallurgical and mechanical phenomena. The simulated residual stress field is in good agreement with X-ray analysis especially at depths lower than one-tenth the specimen diameter. At deeper depths, a correction of the experimental X-ray analysis has been done to obtain realistic values

  9. Consideration of microstructure evolution and residual stress measurement near severe worked surface using high energy x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mochizuki, Masahito; Shobu, Takahisa

    2012-01-01

    It is necessary to establish a measurement method that can evaluate accurate stress on the surface. However, the microstructure evolution takes place near the surface due to severe plastic deformation, since structural members have been superpositioned a lot of working processes to complete. As well known, a plane stress can't be assumed on the severe worked surface. Therefore we have been proposed the measurement method that can be measured the in-depth distribution of residual stress components by using high energy X-ray from a synchrotron radiation source. There is the combination of the constant penetration depth method and tri-axial stress analysis. Measurements were performed by diffraction planes for the orientation parameter Γ=0.25 of which elastic constants are nearly equal to the mechanical one. The stress components obtained must be converted to the stress components in real space by using optimization technique, since it corresponds to the weighted average stress components associated with the attenuation of X-ray in materials. The predicted stress components distribution agrees very well with the corrected one which was measured by the conventional removal method. To verify the availability of the proposed method, thermal aging variation of residual stress components on the severe worked surface under elevated temperature was investigated using specimen superpositioned working processes (i.e., welding, machining, peening). It is clarified that the residual stress components increase with thermal aging, using the diffraction planes in hard elastic constants to the bulk. This result suggests that the thermal stability of residual stress has the dependence of the diffraction plane. (author)

  10. Residual stresses around Vickers indents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, A.; Guiberteau, F.; Steinbrech, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The residual stresses generated by Vickers indentation in brittle materials and their changes due to annealing and surface removal were studied in 4 mol% yttria partially stabilized zirconia (4Y-PSZ). Three experimental methods to gain information about the residual stress field were applied: (i) crack profile measurements based on serial sectioning, (ii) controlled crack propagation in post indentation bending tests and (iii) double indentation tests with smaller secondary indents located around a larger primary impression. Three zones of different residual stress behavior are deduced from the experiments. Beneath the impression a crack free spherical zone of high hydrostatic stresses exists. This core zone is followed by a transition regime where indentation cracks develop but still experience hydrostatic stresses. Finally, in an outward third zone, the crack contour is entirely governed by the tensile residual stress intensity (elastically deformed region). Annealing and surface removal reduce this crack driving stress intensity. The specific changes of the residual stresses due to the post indentation treatments are described and discussed in detail for the three zones

  11. Determination of the plastic deformation and residual stress tensor distribution using surface and bulk intrinsic magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristoforou, E.; Svec, P. Sr.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an unique method to provide the stress calibration curve in steels: performing flaw-less welding in the under examination steel, we obtained to determine the level of the local plastic deformation and the residual stress tensors. These properties where measured using both the X-ray and the neutron diffraction techniques, concerning their surface and bulk stresses type II (intra-grain stresses) respectively, as well as the stress tensor type III by using the electron diffraction technique. Measuring the distribution of these residual stresses along the length of a welded sample or structure, resulted in determining the local stresses from the compressive to tensile yield point. Local measurement of the intrinsic surface and bulk magnetic property tensors allowed for the un-hysteretic correlation. The dependence of these local magnetic tensors with the above mentioned local stress tensors, resulting in a unique and almost un-hysteretic stress calibration curve of each grade of steel. This calibration integrated the steel's mechanical and thermal history, as well as the phase transformations and the presence of precipitations occurring during the welding process.Additionally to that, preliminary results in different grade of steels reveal the existence of a universal law concerning the dependence of magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of steels on their plastic deformation and residual stress state, as they have been accumulated due to their mechanical and thermal fatigue and history. This universality is based on the unique dependence of the intrinsic magnetic properties of steels normalized with a certain magnetoelastic factor, upon the plastic deformation or residual stress state, which, in terms, is normalized with their yield point of stress. (authors)

  12. Surface preparation for XRD residual stress measurements; Preparacao de superficie para medicao de tensoes residuais em soldagem por DRX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, Andrii; Oliveira, Bruno Jose de; Scotti, Americo, E-mail: asmwelder@gmail.com, E-mail: brunojoliveira7@gmail.com, E-mail: ascotti@mecanica.ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    A characteristic feature of the X Ray Diffraction (XRD) method for stress determination is that measurements occur at a thin surface layer. Steel sheets come with surfaces modified by lamination, cleaning (sandblasting, grinding) and even corrosion, which induce residual stresses or roughness inherent to the material. Therefore, surface preparation prior to the residual stress measurement is essential, although no standard procedure seems to be available. A general recommendation is to remove a thin layer so that only residual stresses related to the welding process will be measured. In this study, the use of portable electrolytic equipment was evaluated for mechanized surface material removal. Chemical compositions of electrolytic solutions and the influence of current on the removed material, removal time and temperature during the process were studied. As a result, a suitable chemical solution for electro etching of low carbon steel was developed and a set of “soft” parameters that allowed the removal of about 300 um in a reasonable time was found. Higher currents reduce the removal time, yet increasing the consumption of the solution and plate temperature (which could adversely alter the microstructure or generate thermal stresses). Furthermore, the influence of these parameters on the operability of the process was demonstrated. (author)

  13. Novel processing of Barkhausen noise signal for assessment of residual stress in surface ground components exhibiting poor magnetic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashista, M.; Paul, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Barkhausen Noise Analysis (BNA) technique has been utilised to assess surface integrity of steels. But the BNA technique is not very successful in evaluating surface integrity of ground steels that exhibit poor micro-magnetic response. A new approach has been proposed for the processing of BN signal and two newly proposed parameters, namely 'count' and 'event', have been shown to correlate linearly with the residual stress upon grinding, with judicious choice of user defined 'threshold', even when the micro-magnetic response of the work material is poor. In the present study, residual stress induced upon conventional plunge surface grinding of hardened bearing steel has been investigated along with unhardened bearing steel for benchmarking. Moreover, similar correlation has been established, when primarily compressive stress is induced upon high speed grinding using cBN wheel with moderately deep cut suppressing the micro-magnetic response from the ground medium carbon steel as the work material. - Highlights: → The problem of work materials exhibiting poor BN response and poor Barkhausen Noise response is identified. → A novel signal processing strategy is introduced to address the issue of poor micro-magnetic response of some ferromagnetic material. → Potential of newly introduced BN parameters has been studied. → These two BN parameters exhibited linear correlation with residual stress for work material with poor micro-magnetic response.

  14. The effect of residual thermal stresses on the fatigue crack growth of laser-surface-annealed AISI 304 stainless steel Part I: computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiue, R.K.; Chang, C.T.; Young, M.C.; Tsay, L.W.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of residual thermal stresses on the fatigue crack growth of the laser-surface-annealed AISI 304 stainless steel, especially the effect of stress redistribution ahead of the crack tip was extensively evaluated in the study. Based on the finite element simulation, the longitudinal residual tensile stress field has a width of roughly 20 mm on the laser-irradiated surface and was symmetric with respect to the centerline of the laser-annealed zone (LAZ). Meanwhile, residual compressive stresses distributed over a wide region away from the LAZ. After introducing a notch perpendicular to the LAZ, the distribution of longitudinal residual stresses became unsymmetrical about the centerline of LAZ. High residual compressive stresses exist within a narrow range ahead of notch tip. The improved crack growth resistance of the laser-annealed specimen might be attributed to those induced compressive stresses. As the notch tip passed through the centerline of the LAZ, the residual stress ahead of the notch tip was completely reverted into residual tensile stresses. The existence of unanimous residual tensile stresses ahead of the notch tip was maintained, even if the notch tip extended deeply into the LAZ. Additionally, the presence of the residual tensile stress ahead of the notch tip did not accelerate the fatigue crack growth rate in the compact tension specimen

  15. Welding-induced local maximum residual stress in heat affected zone of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with machined surface layer and its influential factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Shigetaka; Ihara, Ryohei; Kanamaru, Daisuke; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of work-hardening and pre-existing stress in the machined surface layer of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel on the welding-induced residual stress were experimentally investigated through the use of weld specimens with three different surface layers; as-cutout, mechanically-polished and electrolytically-polished. The high tensile and compressive stresses exist in the work-hardened surface layer of the as-cutout and mechanically-polished specimens, respectively. Meanwhile, no stress and work-hardened surface layer exist in the electrolytically-polished specimen. TIG bead-on-plate welding under the same welding heat input conditions was performed to introduce the residual stress into these specimens. Using these welded specimens, the distributions of welding-induced residual stress were measured by the X-ray diffraction method. Similarly, the distributions of hardness in welds were estimated by the Vickers hardness test. And then, these distributions were compared with one another. Based on the results, the residual stress in the weld metal (WM) is completely unaffected by the machined surface layer because the work-hardened surface layer disappears through the processes of melting and solidification during welding. The local maximum longitudinal tensile residual stress in the heat affected zone (HAZ) depends on the work-hardening but not on the existing stress, regardless of whether tensile or compressive, in the machined surface layer before welding. At the base metal far from WM and HAZ, the residual stress is formed by the addition of the welding-induced residual stress to the pre-existing stress in the machined surface layer before welding. The features of the welding-induced residual stress in low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with the machined surface layer and their influential factors were thus clarified. (author)

  16. Finite element modelling of shot peening process: Prediction of the compressive residual stresses, the plastic deformations and the surface integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frija, M.; Hassine, T.; Fathallah, R.; Bouraoui, C.; Dogui, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation of the shot peening process using finite element method. The majority of the controlling parameters of the process have been taken into account. The shot peening loading has been characterised by using energy equivalence between the dynamic impact and a static indentation of a peening shot in the treated surface. The behaviour of the subjected material is supposed to be elastic plastic with damage. An integrated law of the damage proposed by Lemaitre and Chaboche has been used. The proposed model leads to obtain the residual stress, the plastic deformation profiles and the surface damage. An application on a shot peened Ni-based super alloy Waspaloy has been carried out. The comparison of the residual stresses, obtained by X-ray diffraction method and by finite element calculation, shows a good correlation. The in-depth profile of the plastic deformations and the superficial damage values are in good agreement with the experimental observations

  17. On the Feasibility of Eddy Current Characterization of the Near-Surface Residual Stress Distribution in Nickel-Base Superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blodgett, Mark P.; Nagy, Peter B.

    2004-01-01

    In light of its frequency-dependent penetration depth, the measurement of eddy current conductivity has been suggested as a possible means to allow the nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in shot-peened specimens. This technique is based on the so-called electroelastic effect, i.e., the stress-dependence of the electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, the relatively small (∼1%) change in electrical conductivity caused by the presence of compressive residual stresses is often distorted, or even completely overshadowed, by the accompanying conductivity loss caused by cold work and surface roughness effects. Recently, it was observed that, in contrast with most other materials, shot-peened Waspaloy and IN100 specimens exhibit an apparent increase in electrical conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies. This observation by itself indicates that in these materials the measured conductivity change is probably dominated by residual stress effects, since both surface roughness and increased dislocation density are known to decrease rather than increase the conductivity and the presence of crystallographic texture does not affect the electrical conductivity of these materials, which crystallize in cubic symmetry. Our preliminary experiments indicate that probably there exists a unique 'window of opportunity' for eddy current NDE in nickel-base superalloys. We identified five major effects that contribute to this fortunate constellation of material properties, which will be reviewed in this presentation

  18. The application of white radiation to residual stress analysis in the intermediate zone between surface and volume

    CERN Document Server

    Genzel, C; Wallis, B; Reimers, W

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical surface processing is known to give rise to complex residual stress fields in the near surface region of polycrystalline materials. Consequently, their analysis by means of non-destructive X-ray and neutron diffraction methods has become an important topic in materials science. However, there remains a gap with respect to the accessible near surface zone, which concerns a range between about 10 mu m and 1 mm, where the conventional X-ray methods are no longer and the neutron methods are not yet sensitive. In order to achieve the necessary penetration depth tau to perform residual stress analysis (RSA) in this region, advantageous use can be made of energy dispersive X-ray diffraction of synchrotron radiation (15-60 keV) in the reflection mode. Besides an example concerning the adaptation of methods applied so far in the angle dispersive RSA to the energy dispersive case, the concept of a new materials science beamline at BESSY II for residual stress and texture analysis is presented.

  19. The application of white radiation to residual stress analysis in the intermediate zone between surface and volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genzel, Ch.; Stock, C.; Wallis, B.; Reimers, W.

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical surface processing is known to give rise to complex residual stress fields in the near surface region of polycrystalline materials. Consequently, their analysis by means of non-destructive X-ray and neutron diffraction methods has become an important topic in materials science. However, there remains a gap with respect to the accessible near surface zone, which concerns a range between about 10 μm and 1 mm, where the conventional X-ray methods are no longer and the neutron methods are not yet sensitive. In order to achieve the necessary penetration depth τ to perform residual stress analysis (RSA) in this region, advantageous use can be made of energy dispersive X-ray diffraction of synchrotron radiation (15-60 keV) in the reflection mode. Besides an example concerning the adaptation of methods applied so far in the angle dispersive RSA to the energy dispersive case, the concept of a new materials science beamline at BESSY II for residual stress and texture analysis is presented

  20. Effect of Tip Shape of Frictional Stir Burnishing Tool on Processed Layer’s Hardness, Residual Stress and Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimasa Takada

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir burnishing (FSB is a surface-enhancement method used after machining, without the need for an additional device. The FSB process is applied on a machine that uses rotation tools (e.g., machining center or multi-tasking machine. Therefore, the FSB process can be applied immediately after the cutting process using the same machine tool. Here, we apply the FSB to the shaft materials of 0.45% C steel using a multi-tasking machine. In the FSB process, the burnishing tool rotates at a high-revolution speed. The thin surface layer is rubbed and stirred as the temperature is increased and decreased. With the FSB process, high hardness or compressive residual stress can be obtained on the surface layer. However, when we applied the FSB process using a 3 mm diameter sphere tip shape tool, the surface roughness increased substantially (Ra = 20 µm. We therefore used four types of tip shape tools to examine the effect of burnishing tool tip radius on surface roughness, hardness, residual stress in the FSB process. Results indicated that the surface roughness was lowest (Ra = 10 µm when the tip radius tool diameter was large (30 mm.

  1. Effect of residual stress and hardening on grain boundary sliding in welds of low-carbon stainless steels with surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Katsuyama, Jinya

    2007-01-01

    To clarify the effects of residual stress and hardening on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steels with surface machining, residual stress and hardness were evaluated by 3-dimentional thermo elastic-plastic analysis and grain boundary sliding behavior was examined using a constant strain rate tensile test. It was revealed that grain boundary sliding occurred in the material at 561K by the tensile test with the numerically simulated tensile residual stress due to welding and surface machining. In addition, it was clarified that the grain boundary energy is raised by the grain boundary sliding. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the cause of IGSCC in the welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening is the increase in grain boundary energy due to grain boundary sliding accelerated by residual stress of multi pass welding and surface hardening. (author)

  2. Effect of residual stress and hardening on grain boundary sliding in welds of low-carbon stainless steels with surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Katsuyama, Jinya

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the effects of residual stress and hardening on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steels with surface machining, residual stress and hardness were evaluated by 3-dimentional thermo elastic-plastic analysis and grain boundary sliding behavior was examined using a constant strain rate tensile test. It was revealed that grain boundary sliding occurred in the material at 561K by the tensile test with the numerically simulated tensile residual stress due to multi-pass welding and surface machining. In addition, it was clarified that the grain boundary energy is raised by the grain boundary sliding. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the cause of IGSCC in the welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening is the increase in grain boundary energy due to grain boundary sliding induced by residual stress of multi pass welding and surface hardening. (author)

  3. Atomically flat surface of (0 0 1) textured FePt thin films by residual stress control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, S.N., E-mail: pmami.hsiao@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chou, C.L.; Chen, S.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Lee, H.Y. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • We demonstrate crystallographic structure, (0 0 1) texture, surface roughness, and residual stress in the single-layered FePt thin films annealed at various heating rates (10–110 K/s). • Texture coefficient of (0 0 1)-plane of the samples increases with increasing heating rate from 10 to 40 K/s, which is correlated with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and in-plane tensile stress. • Dewetting phenomenon due to stress relaxation leads to the broadening of [0 0 1] easy axis and degradation of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. • A strong dependence of surface roughness on in-plane residual stress was revealed. • When the samples are RTA at 40 K/s, the enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and atomically surface roughness are achieved. - Abstract: Single-layered Fe{sub 52}Pt{sub 48} films with thickness of 10 nm were sputter-deposited on glass substrates. Rapid thermal annealing with different heating rates (10–110 K/s) was applied to transform as-deposited fcc phase into L1{sub 0} phase and meanwhile to align [0 0 1]-axis of L1{sub 0} crystal along plane normal direction. Based on X-ray diffractometry using synchrotron radiation source, the texture coefficient of (0 0 1)-plane increases with increasing heating rate from 10 to 40 K/s, which is correlated with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and in-plane tensile stress analyzed by asymmetric sin{sup 2} ψ method. Furthermore, it was revealed by atomic force microscopy that the dewetting process occurred as heating rate was raised up to 80 K/s and higher. The change in the microstructure due to stress relaxation leads to the degradation of (0 0 1) orientation and magnetic properties. Surface roughness is closely related to the in-plane tensile stress. Enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and atomically flat surface were achieved for the samples annealed at 40 K/s, which may be suitable for further practical applications. This work also suggests a feasible way for surface

  4. Influence of surface treatments on corrosion resistance of stainless steels. Residual stresses in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, J. Philippe

    1968-05-01

    In a first part, this research thesis proposes presentation of the definition of a surface condition: chemical characteristics such as passivity and contamination, physical characteristics (obtained through micrographic methods, X ray diffusion, magnetic methods), and micro-geometrical characteristics. The author notably discusses the measurement of characteristics either by appropriate conventional methods or by an original method in the case of passivity. In a second part, the author reports the study of the influence of surface condition on different types of corrosion of stainless steels in chemical environments (corrosion in sulphuric acid, intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking in magnesium chloride, pitting corrosion) and of high temperature oxidation (corrosion in pressurized water, oxidation in dry vapour or in carbon dioxide)

  5. Surface mechanical property and residual stress of peened nickel-aluminum bronze determined by in-situ X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengxi; Jiang, Chuanhai; Zhao, Yuantao; Chen, Ming; Ji, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    As one of the most important surface strengthening method, shot peening is widely used to improve the fatigue and stress corrosion crack resistance of components by introducing the refined microstructure and compressive residual stress in the surface layer. However, the mechanical properties of this thin layer are different from the base metal and are difficult to be characterized by conventional techniques. In this work, a micro uniaxial tensile tester equipped with in-situ X-ray stress analyzer was employed to make it achievable on a nickel-aluminum bronze with shot peening treatment. According to the equivalent stress-strain relationship based on Von Mises stress criterion, the Young's modulus and yield strength of the peened layer were calculated. The results showed that the Young's modulus was the same as the bulk material, and the yield strength corresponding to the permanent plastic strain of 0.2% was increased by 21% after SP. But the fractographic analysis showed that the fracture feature of the surface layer was likely to transform from the dimple to the cleavage, indicating the improved strength might be attained at the expense of ductility. The monotonic and cyclic loading were also performed via the same combined set-up. In addition, the specific relaxation behavior of compressive residual stress was quantified by linear logarithm relationship between residual stress and cycle numbers. It was found that the compressive residual stress mainly relaxed in the first few cycles, and then reached steady state with further cycles. The relaxation rate and the stable value were chiefly depended on the stress amplitude and number of cycles. The retained residual stress kept in compressive under all given applied stress levels, suggesting that the shot peening could introduce a more stable surface layer of compressive residual stress other than the elevated strength of nickel-aluminum bronze alloy.

  6. Correlation between residual stress and plastic strain amplitude during low cycle fatigue of mechanically surface treated austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 and ferritic-pearlitic steel SAE 1045

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, I. [Institute of Materials Engineering, University of Kassel, 34125 Kassel, Hessen (Germany)], E-mail: Ivan.Nikitin@infineon.com; Besel, M. [Institute of Materials Engineering, University of Kassel, 34125 Kassel, Hessen (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    Mechanical surface treatments such as deep rolling are known to affect the near-surface microstructure and induce, e.g. residual stresses and/or increase the surface hardness. It is well known that, e.g. compressive residual stress states usually increase the lifetime under fatigue loading. The stress relaxation behaviour and the stability of the residual stress during fatigue loading depend on the mechanical surface treatment method. In this paper three different surface treatments are used and their effects on the low cycle fatigue behaviour of austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304) and ferritic-pearlitic steel (SAE 1045) are investigated. X-ray diffraction is applied for the non-destructive evaluation of the stress state and the microstructure. It is found that consecutive deep rolling and annealing as well as high temperature deep rolling produce more stable near-surface stress states than conventional deep rolling at room temperature. The plastic strain amplitudes during fatigue loading are measured and it is shown that they correlate well with the induced residual stress and its relaxation, respectively. Furthermore, Coffin-Manson plots are presented which clearly show the correlation between the plastic strain amplitude and the fatigue lifetime.

  7. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  8. Theoretical Study on Synchronous Characterization of Surface and Interfacial Mechanical Properties of Thin-Film/Substrate Systems with Residual Stress Based on Pressure Blister Test Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-xin Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, based on the pressure blister test technique, a theoretical study on the synchronous characterization of surface and interfacial mechanical properties of thin-film/substrate systems with residual stress was presented, where the problem of axisymmetric deformation of a blistering film with initial stress was analytically solved and its closed-form solution was presented. The expressions to determine Poisson’s ratios, Young’s modulus, and residual stress of surface thin films were derived; the work done by the applied external load and the elastic energy stored in the blistering thin film were analyzed in detail and their expressions were derived; and the interfacial adhesion energy released per unit delamination area of thin-film/substrate (i.e., energy release rate was finally presented. The synchronous characterization technique presented here has theoretically made a big step forward, due to the consideration for the residual stress in surface thin films.

  9. Effect of Plastic Pre-straining on Residual Stress and Composition Profiles in Low-Temperature Surface-Hardened Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Winther, Grethe

    2016-01-01

    The present work deals with the evaluation of the residual stress profiles in expanded austenite by applying grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) combined with successive sublayer removal. Annealed and deformed (εeq=0.5) samples of stable stainless steel EN 1.4369 were nitrided...... or nitrocarburized. The residual stress profiles resulting from the thermochemical low-temperature surface treatment were measured. The results indicate high-residual compressive stresses of several GPa’s in the nitrided region, while lower-compressive stresses are produced in the carburized case. Plastic...... deformation in the steel prior to thermochemical treatment has a hardly measurable influence on the nitrogen-rich zone, while it has a measurable effect on the stresses and depth of the carbon-rich zone....

  10. The method for measuring residual stress in stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimov, Georgy; Rozenbaum, Mikhail; Serebryakov, Alexandr; Serebryakov, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The main reason of appearance and growth of corrosion damages of the nuclear steam generator heat exchanger tubes is the process of stress-corrosion cracking of metal under the influence of residual tensile stress. Methods used in the production for estimating residual stresses (such as a method of ring samples) allow measuring only the average tangential stress of the pipe wall. The method of ring samples does not allow to assess the level of residual stress in the surface layer of the pipe. This paper describes an experimental method for measuring the residual stresses on the pipe surface by etching a thin surface layer of the metal. The construction and working principle of a trial installation are described. The residual stresses in the wall of the tubes 16 × 1.5 mm (steel AISI 321) for nuclear steam generators is calculated. Keywords: heat exchange pipes, stress corrosion cracking, residual stresses, stress distribution, stress measurement.

  11. Process for measuring residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfinger, F.X.; Peiter, A.; Theiner, W.A.; Stuecker, E.

    1982-01-01

    No single process can at present solve all problems. The complete destructive processes only have a limited field of application, as the component cannot be reused. However, they are essential for the basic determination of stress distributions in the field of research and development. Destructive and non-destructive processes are mainly used if investigations have to be carried out on original components. With increasing component size, the part of destructive tests becomes smaller. The main applications are: quality assurance, testing of manufactured parts and characteristics of components. Among the non-destructive test procedures, X-raying has been developed most. It gives residual stresses on the surface and on surface layers near the edges. Further development is desirable - in assessment - in measuring techniques. Ultrasonic and magnetic crack detection processes are at present mainly used in research and development, and also in quality assurance. Because of the variable depth of penetration and the possibility of automation they are gaining in importance. (orig./RW) [de

  12. Residual stress measurement in 304 stainless steel weld overlay pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, H.J.; Lin, M.C.C.; Chen, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    Welding overlay repair (WOR) is commonly employed to rebuild piping systems suffering from intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). To understand the effects of this repair, it is necessary to investigate the distribution of residual stresses in the welding pipe. The overlay welding technique must induce compressive residual stress at the inner surface of the welded pipe to prevent IGSCC. To understand the bulk residual stress distribution, the stress profile as a function of location within wall is examined. In this study the full destructive residual stress measurement technique -- a cutting and sectioning method -- is used to determine the residual stress distribution. The sample is type 304 stainless steel weld overlay pipe with an outside diameter of 267 mm. A pipe segment is cut from the circular pipe; then a thin layer is removed axially from the inner to the outer surfaces until further sectioning is impractical. The total residual stress is calculated by adding the stress relieved by cutting the section away to the stress relieved by axially sectioning. The axial and hoop residual stresses are compressive at the inner surface of the weld overlay pipe. Compressive stress exists not only at the surface but is also distributed over most of the pipe's cross section. On the one hand, the maximum compressive hoop residual stress appears at the pipe's inner surface. The thermal-mechanical induced crack closure from significant compressive residual stress is discussed. This crack closure can thus prevent IGSCC very effectively

  13. Sustainability of compressive residual stress by stress improvement processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Satoru; Okita, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Atsunori

    2013-01-01

    Stress improvement processes are countermeasures against stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plant components. It is necessary to confirm whether compressive residual stress induced by stress improvement processes can be sustained under operation environment. In order to evaluate stability of the compressive residual stress in 60-year operating conditions, the 0.07% cyclic strains of 200 times at 593 K were applied to the welded specimens, then a thermal aging treatment for 1.66x10 6 s at 673 K was carried out. As the result, it was confirmed that the compressive residual stresses were sustained on both surfaces of the dissimilar welds of austenitic stainless steel (SUS316L) and nickel base alloy (NCF600 and alloy 182) processed by laser peening (LP), water jet peening (WJP), ultrasonic shot peening (USP), shot peening (SP) and polishing under 60-year operating conditions. (author)

  14. The effect of ammonium partial pressure on residual stresses in surface layer of SW7M HSS steel after vacuum nitriding 'NITROVAC'79'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawronski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of the nitriding atmosphere on the residual stresses in the surface layer of the SW7M HSS steel has been investigated in the work. It has been proved that the pressure influences the distribution of those stresses to a great extent. At lower pressures (20 hPa and 40 hPa) at which only one zone is being created - the one of internal nitriding, without that of ε type nitrides on the surface - the highest residual stresses are operating on the HSS steel surface itself or eventually in the subsurface region very close to the surface. In the difference, in case of higher pressure (120 hPa and 240 hPa), the highest stresses are operating at great depth 8-12 μm from the steel surface - depending on the thickness of the ε type nitride layer created on the steel surface at those pressure. All the relevant stresses are compressive one. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF GRINDING CONDITIONS ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF RESIDUAL STRESS IN THE SURFACE LAYER OF 17crni6-6 STEEL AFTER CARBURIZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Sawicki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study aimed at determining the residual stress which results from developing the surface layer by low-pressure and conventional carburizing and grinding of 17CrNi6-6 steel. A synergistic effect of thermochemical and abrasive treatment was examined on ring samples used to study residual stress by Davidenkov’s method. Samples were subjected to vacuum carburizing and conventional carburizing, which was followed by grinding with a 38A60K8V aloxite grinding wheel and a CBN grinding wheel - RNB80/63B75V. The following cutting fluids were used during the grinding process: oil emulsion 5%, supply rate ca. 20 l/min, Micro5000 oil supplied at the minimum quantity lubrication (MQL of ca. 25 ml/h, dry machining. The study determined the effect of the type of grinding wheel and the cooling and lubricating agent on the distribution of residual stress in the sur-face layer. The best effects of grinding with respect to the residual stress were achieved with flood cooling with oil emulsion and grinding with a CBN grinding wheel.

  16. Residual stress in polyethylene pipes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poduška, Jan; Hutař, Pavel; Kučera, J.; Frank, A.; Sadílek, J.; Pinter, G.; Náhlík, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 54, SEP (2016), s. 288-295 ISSN 0142-9418 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : polyethylene pipe * residual stress * ring slitting method * lifetime estimation Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.464, year: 2016

  17. Residual Stresses In 3013 Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-01-01

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  18. Determination of residual stresses in roll compacted titanium strips

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mothosi, KL

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available residual stresses using x-ray diffraction (XRD) surface probing technique. Preliminary results were obtained for the surface residual stress at the center of the titanium strips for the 100 and 325 mesh strips rolled at 0.1 roll gap for 20 and 50 mm set...

  19. Neutron residual stress measurements in linepipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Michael; Gnaepel-Herold, Thomas; Luzin, Vladimir; Bowie, Graham

    2006-01-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines are generated by manufacturing and construction processes and may affect the subsequent pipe integrity. In the present work, the residual stresses in eight samples of linepipe were measured by neutron diffraction. Residual stresses changed with some coating processes. This has special implications in understanding and mitigating stress corrosion cracking, a major safety and economic problem in some gas pipelines

  20. Residual stresses in weld-clad reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, W.

    1975-01-01

    Cladding of low alloy nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel with austenitic stainless steel introduces in heavy section components high residual stresses which may cause microcrack formation in stress relief heat treatment. In this investigation an attempt is made to contribute to the solution of the stress relief cracking problem by determining quantitatively the magnitude and distribution of the residual stresses after cladding and after subsequent stress relief heat treatment. The distribution of residual stresses was determined on the basis of a combined experimental-mathematical procedure. Heavy section plate specimens of low alloy steel as base material were given an austenitic monolayer-cladding using the techniques of strip electrode and plasma hot wire cladding, respectively. A number of plates was stress relief heat treated. Starting from the cladded surface the thickness of the plates was reduced by subsequent removal of layers of material. The elastic strain reaction to the removal of each layer was measured by strain gauges. From the data obtained the biaxial residual stress distribution was computed as a function of thickness using relations which are derived for this particular case. In summary, lower residual stresses are caused by reduced thickness of the components. As the heat input, is decreased at identical base material thickness, the residual stresses are lowered also. The height of the tensile residual stress peak, however, remains approximataly constant. In stress relief annealed condition the residual stresses in the cladding are in tension; in the base material the residual stresses are negligibly small

  1. Numerical analysis of residual stress of Al-Mg-Mn-Sc-Zr alloy subjected to surface strengthening by shot peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Stegliński

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we presented the results of the analysis of the stresses in the Al-Mg5%-Mn1,5%-Sc0,8%-Zr0,4% alloy after shot peening process using solver ANSYSANSYSANSYS LS-Dyna. The computational model illustrates the phenomena occurring as a result of plastic deformation caused by hitting a steel ball on the surface of the analyzed aluminium alloy. We analyzed two input variables: diameter and speed of a ball. The resulting normal stress distribution centred exposes the minimum compressive stress at a position located at a depth point of Belayev 0.125 mm with a value of σ = –345 MPa. Variable parameter shows the correlation of the boundary conditions of minimum stress increase with increasing ball’s diameter and its speed. Selected points of numerical analysis were verified with experimental results.[b]Keywords[/b]: materials science, numerical analysis, metal forming, shot peening, aluminium

  2. Residual stress in ceramics and ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oden, M.

    1992-01-01

    Residual stresses in Si 3 N 4 and SiC have been measured with X-ray diffraction after grinding and thermal shock. The produced surface stresses are compressive after both treatments. The stresses show a strong dependence on the quenching temperature up to a certain temperature when cracks relax the stresses. The influence of the amount of reinforcing phase on the residual stress state in a Al 2 O 3 /SiC whisker composite was investigated and correlated to a modified Eshelby model. The agreement is excellent. The composite was quenched in liquid He (4K) and the stress state measured after show no relaxation of stresses, indicating elastic behaviour. An in situ strain measurement as a function of temperature conducted on a Al 2 O 3 /SiC whisker composite and a SiC/TiB 2 particle composite show very good agreement with the Eshelby model for the Al 2 O 3 /SiC system but not agreement for the SiC/TiB 2 system. The reason is believed to be stress relaxation during sample preparation. (au) (53 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.)

  3. Effect of applied stress on the compressive residual stress introduced by laser peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumiya, Rie; Tazawa, Toshiyuki; Narazaki, Chihiro; Saito, Toshiyuki; Kishimoto, Kikuo

    2016-01-01

    Peening is the process which is able to be generated compressive residual stress and is known to be effective for preventing SCC initiation and improvement of fatigue strength. Laser peening is used for the nuclear power plant components in order to prevent SCC initiation. Although it is reported that the compressive residual stress decreases due to applied stresses under general operating condition, the change of residual stress might be large under excessive loading such as an earthquake. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the relaxation behavior of the compressive residual stress due to laser peening and to confirm the surface residual stress after loading. Therefore laser peened round bar test specimens of SUS316L which is used for the reactor internals of nuclear power plant were loaded at room temperature and elevated temperature and then surface residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction method. In the results of this test, it was confirmed that the compressive residual stress remained after applying uniform stress larger than 0.2% proof stress, and the effect of cyclic loading on the residual stress was small. The effect of applying compressive stress on the residual stress relaxation was confirmed to be less than that of applying tensile stress. Plastic deformation through a whole cross section causes the change in the residual stress distribution. As a result, the surface compressive residual stress is released. It was shown that the effect of specimen size on residual stress relaxation and the residual stress relaxation behavior in the stress concentration region can be explained by assumed stress relaxation mechanism. (author)

  4. Residual Stresses and Other Properties of Teardrops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hill, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rios, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Duque, Juan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-26

    The Department of Energy’s 3013 Standard for packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage up to fifty years specifies a minimum of two individually welded, nested containers herein referred to as the 3013 outer and the 3013 inner.1 Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a potential failure mechanism for 3013 inner containers.2,3 The bagless transfer container (BTC), a 3013 inner container used by Hanford and Savanna River Site (SRS) made from 304L stainless steel (SS), poses the greatest concern for SCC.4,5 The Surveillance and Monitoring Program (SMP) use stressed metal samples known as teardrops as screening tools in SCC studies to evaluate factors that could result in cracks in the 3013 containers.6,7 This report provides background information on the teardrops used in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) SMP studies including method of construction, composition and variability. In addition, the report discusses measurements of residual stresses in teardrops and compares the results with residual stresses in BTCs reported previously.4 Factors affecting residual stresses, including teardrop dimensions and surface finish, are also discussed.

  5. X-ray measurement of residual stress on bolt threads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Nakahara, Kanefumi; Yoshimoto, Isamu.

    1989-01-01

    This study deals with X-ray measurement of residual stress at the local area around the thread root of a bolt. Residual stress in the 0.5 mm x 5 mm area was measured using a method of stepped scanning and parabolic approximation. The conditions of measurement had been determined and evaluated through the preliminary measurement of compressive stress acting on the cylindrical surface. Furthermore, the fatigue strength estimated by applying the residual stress data to the previously presented hypothesis was compared with the experimental results. The main conclusions obtained were as follows: (1) The residual stress in a relatively small area on the cylindrical surface with large curvature can be measured by X-ray using a method of stepped scanning and parabolic approximation; (2) The compressive residual stress measured at the thread root was larger for the bolt manufactured by thread rolling after heat treatment than for one manufactured by thread rolling before heat treatment; (3) The distribution of residual stress along the axial direction from the thread root to the portion under crest did not represent remarkable change in its value; (4) The residual stress of a bolt was somewhat decreased by fatigue loading on the condition of low mean stress; (5) The fatigue strength estimated using residual stress data showed the tendency of experimental results well. (author)

  6. Residual stresses in zircaloy welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R.; Fernandez, L; Vizcaino, P.; Banchik, A.D.; Samper, R; Martinez, R. L; Almer, J; Motta, A.T.; Colas, K.B; Kerr, M.; Daymond, M.R

    2009-01-01

    Welds in Zirconium-based alloys are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, as H enters the material due to dissociation of water. The yield strain for hydride cracking has a complex dependence on H concentration, stress state and texture. The large thermal gradients produced by the applied heat; drastically changes the texture of the material in the heat affected zone, enhancing the susceptibility to delayed hydride cracking. Normally hydrides tend to form as platelets that are parallel to the normal direction, but when welding plates, hydride platelets may form on cooling with their planes parallel to the weld and through the thickness of the plates. If, in addition to this there are significant tensile stresses, the susceptibility of the heat affected zone to delayed hydride cracking will be increased. Here we have measured the macroscopic and microscopic residual stressed that appear after PLASMA welding of two 6mm thick Zircaloy-4 plates. The measurements were based on neutron and synchrotron diffraction experiments performed at the Isis Facility, UK, and at Advanced Photon Source, USA, respectively. The experiments allowed assessing the effect of a post-weld heat treatment consisting of a steady increase in temperature from room temperature to 450oC over a period of 4.5 hours; followed by cooling with an equivalent cooling rate. Peak tensile stresses of (175± 10) MPa along the longitudinal direction were found in the as-welded specimen, which were moderately reduced to (150±10) MPa after the heat-treatment. The parent material showed intergranular stresses of (56±4) MPa, which disappeared on entering the heat-affected zone. In-situ experiments during themal cyclong of the material showed that these intergranular stresses result from the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficient of the hexagonal crystal lattice. [es

  7. Residual stress studies of austenitic and ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrenko, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Residual studies have been made on austenitic and ferritic steels of the types used as structural materials. The residual stress results presented here will include residual stress measurements in the heat-affected zone on butt welded Type 304 stainless steel pipes, and the stresses induced in Type 304 austenitic stainless steel and Type A508 ferritic steel by several surface preparations. Such surface preparation procedures as machining and grinding can induce large directionality effects in the residual stresses determined by X-ray techniques and some typical data will be presented. A brief description is given of the mobile X-ray residual stress apparatus used to obtain most of the data in these studies. (author)

  8. Study on mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking and analysis of residual stress and work hardening in welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with hard surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Toyoda, Masao; Katsuyama, Jinya

    2007-01-01

    In order to make clear the effects of residual stress and hardening on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in the welds of Type 316L low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening, the residual stress and hardness in the butt-joint of pipes as a typical example of the actual structure were estimated and the grain boundary sliding was analyzed from the viewpoint of micro-deformation. On the basis of these results, the mechanism of IGSCC was discussed by the integrated knowledge between metallurgy and mechanics. The relationship between plastic strain and hardness in hard-machined surface near welds was clarified from the experimented relationship and the analysis method by the thermal elastic-plastic analysis. The distributions of hardness and residual stress with the actual surface machining could be simulated. It was made clear that grain boundary sliding occurred in the steel at 561K by a constant strain rate tensile test. From the comparison of grain boundary sliding behavior between solution treated specimen and cold-rolled one, it was found that the grain boundary sliding in cold-rolled one occurs in smaller strain conditions than that in as received one, and the amount of grain boundary sliding in cold-rolled one increases remarkably with increases in rolling reduction. In addition, it was clarified that the grain boundary energy is raised by the grain boundary sliding. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the cause of IGSCC in the welds of Type 316L low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening is the increase in grain boundary energy due to grain boundary sliding induced by residual stress of multi pass welding and surface hardening. (author)

  9. Significance of residual stress on fatigue properties of welded pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, A.; Maeda, Y.; Kanao, M.

    1984-01-01

    The mean stress effect on the fatigue properties of two kinds of welded pipes was investigated in cantilever bending. The fatigue strength changed with the mean stress on fillet welded pipes, but did not change on butt welded pipes. The fatigue crack initiated from the toe of weld on the outer surface of fillet welded pipes and from the undercut on the inner surface of butt welded pipes. The measurement of the fatigue crack propagation rate and the residual stress distribution through the thickness of pipe revealed that the difference in the fatigue properties between fillet and butt welded pipes arose from the weld-induced residual stress, tension on the inner surface and compression on the outer surface. It is suggested that the production of compressive residual stress along the inner surface would be an effective means for improving the fatigue strength of butt welded pipes. (author)

  10. Residual stress analysis in thick uranium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, A.M.; Foreman, R.J.; Gallegos, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    Residual stress analysis was performed on thick, 1-25 μm, depleted uranium (DU) films deposited on an Al substrate by magnetron sputtering. Two distinct characterization techniques were used to measure substrate curvature before and after deposition. Stress evaluation was performed using the Benabdi/Roche equation, which is based on beam theory of a bi-layer material. The residual stress evolution was studied as a function of coating thickness and applied negative bias voltage (0, -200, -300 V). The stresses developed were always compressive; however, increasing the coating thickness and applying a bias voltage presented a trend towards more tensile stresses and thus an overall reduction of residual stresses

  11. Measured residual stresses in overlay pipe weldments removed from service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Surface and throughwall residual stresses were measured on an elbow-to-pipe weldment that had been removed from the Hatch-2 reactor about a year after the application of a weld overlay. The results were compared with experimental measurements on three mock-up weldments and with finite-element calculations. The comparison shows that there are significant differences in the form and magnitude of the residual stress distributions. However, even after more than a year of service, the residual stresses over most of the inner surface of the actual plant weldment with an overlay were strongly compressive. 3 refs., 7 figs

  12. Finite Element Residual Stress Analysis of Planetary Gear Tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A method to simulate residual stress field of planetary gear is proposed. In this method, the finite element model of planetary gear is established and divided to tooth zone and profile zone, whose different temperature field is set. The gear's residual stress simulation is realized by the thermal compression stress generated by the temperature difference. Based on the simulation, the finite element model of planetary gear train is established, the dynamic meshing process is simulated, and influence of residual stress on equivalent stress of addendum, pitch circle, and dedendum of internal and external meshing planetary gear tooth profile is analyzed, according to non-linear contact theory, thermodynamic theory, and finite element theory. The results show that the equivalent stresses of planetary gear at both meshing and nonmeshing surface are significantly and differently reduced by residual stress. The study benefits fatigue cracking analysis and dynamic optimization design of planetary gear train.

  13. Residual stress improving method for reactor structural component and residual stress improving device therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Kunio; Otaka, Masahiro; Kurosawa, Koichi; Saito, Hideyo; Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Tamai, Yasukata; Urashiro, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Masato

    1996-09-03

    The present invention is applied to a BWR type reactor, in which a high speed jetting flow incorporating cavities is collided against the surface of reactor structural components to form residual compression stresses on the surface layer of the reactor structural components thereby improving the stresses on the surface. Namely, a water jetting means is inserted into the reactor container filled with reactor water. Purified water is pressurized by a pump and introduced to the water jetting means. The purified water jetted from the water jetting means and entraining cavities is abutted against the surface of the reactor structural components. With such procedures, since the purified water is introduced to the water jetting means by the pump, the pump is free from contamination of radioactive materials. As a result, maintenance and inspection for the pump can be facilitated. Further, since the purified water injection flow entraining cavities is abutted against the surface of the reactor structural components being in contact with reactor water, residual compression stresses are exerted on the surface of the reactor structural components. As a result, occurrence of stress corrosion crackings of reactor structural components is suppressed. (I.S.)

  14. Residual stress improving method for reactor structural component and residual stress improving device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, Kunio; Otaka, Masahiro; Kurosawa, Koichi; Saito, Hideyo; Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Tamai, Yasukata; Urashiro, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Masato.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is applied to a BWR type reactor, in which a high speed jetting flow incorporating cavities is collided against the surface of reactor structural components to form residual compression stresses on the surface layer of the reactor structural components thereby improving the stresses on the surface. Namely, a water jetting means is inserted into the reactor container filled with reactor water. Purified water is pressurized by a pump and introduced to the water jetting means. The purified water jetted from the water jetting means and entraining cavities is abutted against the surface of the reactor structural components. With such procedures, since the purified water is introduced to the water jetting means by the pump, the pump is free from contamination of radioactive materials. As a result, maintenance and inspection for the pump can be facilitated. Further, since the purified water injection flow entraining cavities is abutted against the surface of the reactor structural components being in contact with reactor water, residual compression stresses are exerted on the surface of the reactor structural components. As a result, occurrence of stress corrosion crackings of reactor structural components is suppressed. (I.S.)

  15. Effect of residual stresses on hydrogen permeation in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouanga, M.; Bercot, P.; Takadoum, J.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of residual stresses on electrochemical permeation in iron membrane was investigated. Four thermal and mechanical treatments were chosen to obtain different surface states in relation to the residual stresses. Residual stresses were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Macherauch and Mueller method. The results were completed by the microhardness measurements. For all iron membranes, compressive residual stresses were obtained. Electrochemical permeation experiments using a Devanathan and Stachurski cell were employed to determine the hydrogen permeation behaviour of the various iron membranes. The latter was charged with hydrogen by galvanostatic cathodic polarization in 0.1 M NaOH at 25 deg. C. The experimental results revealed that hydrogen permeation rate increases with increasing residual stresses introduced in iron membranes.

  16. A proposed residual stress model for oblique turning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkhabeery, M. M.

    2001-01-01

    A proposed mathematical model is presented for predicting the residual stresses caused by turning. Effects of change in tool free length, cutting speed, feed rate, and the tensile strength of work piece material on the maximum residual stress are investigated. The residual stress distribution in the surface region due to turning under unlubricated condition is determined using a deflection etching technique. To reduce the number of experiments required and build the mathematical model for these variables, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is used. In addition, variance analysis and an experimental check are conducted to determine the prominent parameters and the adequacy of the model. The results show that the tensile stress of the work piece material, cutting speed, and feed rate have significant effects on the maximum residual stresses. The proposed model, that offering good correlation between the experimental and predicted results, is useful in selecting suitable cutting parameters for the machining of different materials. (author)

  17. Dependence of magnetic permeability on residual stresses in alloyed steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hristoforou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A method for the monitoring of residual stress distribution in steels has been developed based on non-destructive surface magnetic permeability measurements. In order to investigate the potential utilization of the magnetic method in evaluating residual stresses, the magnetic calibration curves of various ferromagnetic alloyed steels’ grade (AISI 4140, TRIP and Duplex were examined. X-Ray diffraction technique was used for determining surface residual stress values. The overall measurement results have shown that the residual stress determined by the magnetic method was in good agreement with the diffraction results. Further experimental investigations are required to validate the preliminary results and to verify the presence of a unique normalized magnetic stress calibration curve.

  18. Dependence of magnetic permeability on residual stresses in alloyed steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristoforou, E.; Ktena, A.; Vourna, P.; Argiris, K.

    2018-04-01

    A method for the monitoring of residual stress distribution in steels has been developed based on non-destructive surface magnetic permeability measurements. In order to investigate the potential utilization of the magnetic method in evaluating residual stresses, the magnetic calibration curves of various ferromagnetic alloyed steels' grade (AISI 4140, TRIP and Duplex) were examined. X-Ray diffraction technique was used for determining surface residual stress values. The overall measurement results have shown that the residual stress determined by the magnetic method was in good agreement with the diffraction results. Further experimental investigations are required to validate the preliminary results and to verify the presence of a unique normalized magnetic stress calibration curve.

  19. Residual stress concerns in containment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantini, F.; Kulak, R. F.; Pfeiffer, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    The manufacturing of steel containment vessels starts with the forming of flat plates into curved plates. A steel containment structure is made by welding individual plates together to form the sections that make up the complex shaped vessels. The metal forming and welding process leaves residual stresses in the vessel walls. Generally, the effect of metal forming residual stresses can be reduced or virtually eliminated by thermally stress relieving the vesseL In large containment vessels this may not be practical and thus the residual stresses due to manufacturing may become important. The residual stresses could possibly tiect the response of the vessel to internal pressurization. When the level of residual stresses is significant it will affect the vessel's response, for instance the yielding pressure and possibly the failure pressure. The paper will address the effect of metal forming residual stresses on the response of a generic pressure vessel to internal pressurization. A scoping analysis investigated the effect of residual forming stresses on the response of an internally pressurized vessel. A simple model was developed to gain understanding of the mechanics of the problem. Residual stresses due to the welding process were not considered in this investigation

  20. The measurement of residual stresses in claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, G.; Bender, N.

    1978-01-01

    The ring core method, a variation of the hole drilling method for the measurement of biaxial residual stresses, has been extended to measure stresses from depths of about 5 to 25mm. It is now possible to measure the stress profiles of clad material. Examples of measured stress profiles are shown and compared with those obtained with a sectioning technique. (author)

  1. Residual stress measurement in socket welded joints by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto; Ishiwata, Masayuki; Minakawa, Noriaki; Funahashi, Satoru.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements of lattice spacings provide the spatial map of residual stress near welds in ferritic steel socket joints. The high tensile stress greater than 200 MPa was found in the fusion and heat-affected zones in the hoop direction. However, the highest tensile stress in the axial direction at the weld root was about 110 MPa relatively lower than the expected value from the fatigue test results. The balancing compressive stress was found near the surface of the socket weld fusion zone. Heat treatment at 625degC for 2 hours was sufficient for the relief of residual stress in socket welds. (author)

  2. Measurement of residual stresses by the moire method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, C. A.; Albertazzi, A., Jr.

    Three different applications of the moire method to the determination of residual stresses and strains are presented. The three applications take advantage of the property of ratings to record the changes of the surface they are printed on. One of the applications deals with thermal residual stresses, another with contact residual stress and the third one is a generalization of the blind hole technique. This last application is based on a computer assisted moire technique and on the generalization of the quasi-heterodyne techniques of fringe pattern analysis.

  3. Neutron diffraction measurement of residual stress in NPP construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinca, R.; Bokuchava, G.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to study the level of residual stresses induced by the surfacing in the weld deposit zone and in the base metal, where considerable thermal gradients are present. Surfacing high-nickel filler on an austenitic base metal is one of techniques in repair of primary collector the primary circuit of nuclear power plant type VVER. The repair technology was developed at Welding Research Institute Bratislava. Measurements of residual stresses in the weld overlay and the base metal are necessary for approving the mechanical analysis and verifying of residual stresses determination on welded material by numerical weld g computer simulation. Investigations of residual stresses are important for developing optimal welding techniques. (authors)

  4. Investigation of residual stress in laser welding dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirim, Denilson de Camargo; Oliveira, Rene Ramos de; Berretta, Jose Roberto; Rossi, Wagner de; Lima, Nelson Batista de; Delijaicov, Sergio; Gomes, Diego Oliva

    2010-01-01

    One of the most critical problems found in the different materials welding is the residual stress formation, that happens mainly for the fact of those materials they possess coefficients of thermal expansion and different thermal conductivities. Like this in this work the residual tension was evaluated in the technique of welding laser among the steel low carbon, AISI 1010 and AISI 304. The materials were united for it welds autogenous of top with a laser of continuous Nd:YAG in that they were varied the potency, speed and the focus of the laser stayed constant in relation to surface of the sample. The main objective of the study went identification and to analysis of the residual stress in HAZ on both sides of seem. Um planning factorial of two factors at two levels each it was executed for optimization the combination of the factors potency and speed. The obtained answers were the residual stress in different depths in HAZ. In the surface of the sample measures of residual stress were accomplished by the technique of X-ray diffraction. The hole drilling strain gage method it was applied to measure the residual stress on both sides of the union. The results were analyzed using the variance analysis and the statistical regression based on the different influences of the entrance and combination of the factors in the residual stress generated in that union. The results indicate that the development of models can foresee the answers satisfactorily. (author)

  5. Residual stresses in plastic random systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alava, M.J.; Karttunen, M.E.J.; Niskanen, K.J.

    1995-01-01

    We show that yielding in elastic plastic materials creates residual stresses when local disorder is present. The intensity of these stresses grows with the external stress and degree of initial disorder. The one-dimensional model we employ also yields a discontinuous transition to perfect plasticity

  6. Residual stresses in laser direct metal deposited Waspaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moat, R.J.; Pinkerton, A.J.; Li, L.; Withers, P.J.; Preuss, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Neutron diffraction and the contour method show good agreement. → Tensile stresses found parallel to the surfaces. → Compressive stresses within the bulk of the structures. → Residual stress weakly dependent on the laser pulse parameters. → Maximum tensile residual stress unaffected across range of pulse parameters used. - Abstract: This paper reports a study into the effect of laser pulse length and duty cycle on the residual stress distributions in multi-track laser direct metal deposits of Waspaloy onto an Inconel 718 substrate. The residual stresses have been evaluated using neutron diffraction and the contour method, while electron microscopy and micro hardness indentation have been used to map the concomitant microstructural variation. In all cases, near the tops of the deposited walls, the longitudinal stresses are tensile towards the mid-length of the wall, while the stresses perpendicular to the substrate are negligible. By contrast near the base of the walls, the stresses along the direction of deposition are small, while the stresses perpendicular to the substrate are compressive at the centre and tensile towards the ends. Consistent with previous observations, the stresses parallel to free surfaces are tensile, balanced by compressive stresses in the interior (an inverse quench stress profile). These profiles have been found to be weakly dependent on the laser pulse parameters, most notably an increase in tensile stress gradient with increasing duty cycle, but the maximum residual stresses are largely unaffected. Furthermore, microstructural analysis has shown that the effect of laser pulse parameters on grain morphology in multi-track thick walls is less marked than previously reported for single-track wall structures.

  7. Residual stresses in laser direct metal deposited Waspaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moat, R.J., E-mail: richard.moat@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Pinkerton, A.J.; Li, L. [Laser Processing Research Centre, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Withers, P.J.; Preuss, M. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Neutron diffraction and the contour method show good agreement. {yields} Tensile stresses found parallel to the surfaces. {yields} Compressive stresses within the bulk of the structures. {yields} Residual stress weakly dependent on the laser pulse parameters. {yields} Maximum tensile residual stress unaffected across range of pulse parameters used. - Abstract: This paper reports a study into the effect of laser pulse length and duty cycle on the residual stress distributions in multi-track laser direct metal deposits of Waspaloy onto an Inconel 718 substrate. The residual stresses have been evaluated using neutron diffraction and the contour method, while electron microscopy and micro hardness indentation have been used to map the concomitant microstructural variation. In all cases, near the tops of the deposited walls, the longitudinal stresses are tensile towards the mid-length of the wall, while the stresses perpendicular to the substrate are negligible. By contrast near the base of the walls, the stresses along the direction of deposition are small, while the stresses perpendicular to the substrate are compressive at the centre and tensile towards the ends. Consistent with previous observations, the stresses parallel to free surfaces are tensile, balanced by compressive stresses in the interior (an inverse quench stress profile). These profiles have been found to be weakly dependent on the laser pulse parameters, most notably an increase in tensile stress gradient with increasing duty cycle, but the maximum residual stresses are largely unaffected. Furthermore, microstructural analysis has shown that the effect of laser pulse parameters on grain morphology in multi-track thick walls is less marked than previously reported for single-track wall structures.

  8. Development of residual stress prediction model in pipe weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Yun Yong; Lim, Se Young; Choi, Kang Hyeuk; Cho, Young Sam; Lim, Jae Hyuk [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    When Leak Before Break(LBB) concepts is applied to high energy piping of nuclear power plants, residual weld stresses is a important variable. The main purpose of his research is to develop the numerical model which can predict residual weld stresses. Firstly, basic theories were described which need to numerical analysis of welding parts. Before the analysis of pipe, welding of a flat plate was analyzed and compared. Appling the data of used pipes, thermal/mechanical analysis were accomplished and computed temperature gradient and residual stress distribution. For thermal analysis, proper heat flux was regarded as the heat source and convection/radiation heat transfer were considered at surfaces. The residual stresses were counted from the computed temperature gradient and they were compared and verified with a result of another research.

  9. Residual stresses in Inconel 718 engine disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahan Yoann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aubert&Duval has developed a methodology to establish a residual stress model for Inconel 718 engine discs. To validate the thermal, mechanical and metallurgical parts of the model, trials on lab specimens with specific geometry were carried out. These trials allow a better understanding of the residual stress distribution and evolution during different processes (quenching, ageing, machining. A comparison between experimental and numerical results reveals the residual stresses model accuracy. Aubert&Duval has also developed a mechanical properties prediction model. Coupled with the residual stress prediction model, Aubert&Duval can now propose improvements to the process of manufacturing in Inconel 718 engine disks. This model enables Aubert&Duval customers and subcontractors to anticipate distortions issues during machining. It could also be usedt to optimise the engine disk life.

  10. Residual stress in Ni-W electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizushima, Io; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, the residual stress in Ni–W layers electrodeposited from electrolytes based on NiSO4 and Na2WO4, is investigated. Citrate, glycine and triethanolamine were used as complexing agents, enabling complex formation between the nickel ion and tungstate. The results show that the type...... of complexing agent and the current efficiency have an influence on the residual stress. In all cases, an increase in tensile stress in the deposit with time after deposition was observed. Pulse plating could improve the stress level for the electrolyte containing equal amounts of citrate...

  11. On residual stresses and fatigue of laser hardened steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ru.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with studies on residual stresses and fatigue properties of laser-transformation hardened steels. Two types of specimens, cylinders and fatigue specimens were used in the studies. The cylinders, made of Swedish steels SS 2244 and SS 2258 which correspond to AISI 4140 and AISI 52100 respectively, were locally hardened by a single scan of laser beam in the longitudinal direction, with various laser parameters. Residual stress distributions across the hardened tracks were measured by means of X-ray diffraction. The origins of residual stresses were investigated and discussed. For the fatigue specimens, including smooth and notched types made of Swedish steels SS 2244, SS 2225 and SS 1572 (similar to AISI 4140, AISI 4130 and AISI 1035, respectively), laser hardening was carried out in the gauge section. The residual stress field induced by the hardening process and the fatigue properties by plane bending fatigue test were studied. In order to investigate the stability of the residual stress field, stress measurements were also made on specimens being loaded near the fatigue limits for over 10 7 cycles. Further the concept of local fatigue strength was employed to correlate quantitatively the effect of hardness and residual stress field on the fatigue limits. In addition a group of smooth specimens of SS 2244 was induction hardened and the hardening results were compared with the corresponding laser hardened ones in terms of residual stress and fatigue behaviour. It has been found that compressive stresses exist in the hardened zone of all the specimens studied. The laser hardening condition, the specimen and how the hardening is carried out can significantly affect the residual stress field. Laser hardening can greatly improve the fatigue properties by inducing a hardened and compressed surface layer. (112 refs.)(au)

  12. On residual stresses and fatigue of laser hardened steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ru.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with studies on residual stresses and fatigue properties of laser-transformation hardened steels. Two types of specimens, cylinders and fatigue specimens were used in the studies. The cylinders, made of Swedish steels SS 2244 and SS 2258 which correspond to AISI 4140 and AISI 52100 respectively, were locally hardened by a single scan of laser beam in the longitudinal direction, with various laser parameters. Residual stress distributions across the hardened tracks were measured by means of X-ray diffraction. The origins of residual stresses were investigated and discussed. For the fatigue specimens, including smooth and notched types made of Swedish steels SS 2244, SS 2225 and SS 1572 (similar to AISI 4140, AISI 4130 and AISI 1035, respectively), laser hardening was carried out in the gauge section. The residual stress field induced by the hardening process and the fatigue properties by plane bending fatigue test were studied. In order to investigate the stability of the residual stress field, stress measurements were also made on specimens being loaded near the fatigue limits for over 10[sup 7] cycles. Further the concept of local fatigue strength was employed to correlate quantitatively the effect of hardness and residual stress field on the fatigue limits. In addition a group of smooth specimens of SS 2244 was induction hardened and the hardening results were compared with the corresponding laser hardened ones in terms of residual stress and fatigue behaviour. It has been found that compressive stresses exist in the hardened zone of all the specimens studied. The laser hardening condition, the specimen and how the hardening is carried out can significantly affect the residual stress field. Laser hardening can greatly improve the fatigue properties by inducing a hardened and compressed surface layer. (112 refs.)(au).

  13. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  14. Residual-stress distributions near stainless steel butt weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elligson, W.A.; Shack, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    Concern for the integrity of stainless steel butt-weldments in boiling-water-reactor (BWR) piping systems has stimulated study of the conditions that cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the heat-affected zones (HAZ) of the weldments. It is generally agreed that a high stress exceeding the initial yield strength is one of the essential elements for crack initiation. Since design procedures usually ensure that load stresses are below initial yield, the source of the high stresses necessary to produce SCC is thought to be the residual stresses due to welding. To examine the level of residual stresses in the weldments of interest, bulk residual stresses were measured on 100 mm (4-in.) and 254 mm (10-in.) diameter Schedule 80 piping weldments using strain relief techniques. Both laboratory welded specimens and field welded specimens from reactors in service were studied. Axial bulk residual stress distributions were obtained at 45 0 intervals around the circumference. At each azimuthal position, the residual stresses were measured at seven axial positions: on the weld centerline and 13, 20, and 25 mm on either side of the weld centerline on both the inside and outside surfaces

  15. Diffraction measurements of residual stress in titanium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.R.; Bourke, M.A.; Goldstone, J.A.; Lawson, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    Metal matrix composites develop residual strains after consolidation due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the reinforcement fiber and the matrix. X-ray and neutron diffraction measured values for the longitudinal residual stress in the matrix of four titanium MMCs are reported. For thick composites (> 6 plies) the surface stress measured by x-ray diffraction matches that determined by neutron diffraction and therefore represents the stress in the bulk region consisting of the fibers and matrix. For thin sheet composites, the surface values are lower than in the interior and increase as the outer rows of fibers are approached. While a rationale for the behavior in the thin sheet has yet to be developed, accounting for composite thickness is important when using x-ray measured values to validate analytic and finite element calculations of the residual stress state

  16. Residual Stress Testing of Outer 3013 Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, K.

    2004-01-01

    A Gas Tungsten Arc Welded (GTAW) outer 3013 container and a laser welded outer 3013 container have been tested for residual stresses according to the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard G-36-94 [1]. This ASTM standard describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in boiling magnesium chloride (MgCl2) solution. Container sections in both the as-fabricated condition as well as the closure welded condition were evaluated. Significantly large residual stresses were observed in the bottom half of the as-fabricated container, a result of the base to can fabrication weld because through wall cracks were observed perpendicular to the weld. This observation indicates that regardless of the closure weld technique, sufficient residual stresses exist in the as-fabricated container to provide the stress necessary for stress corrosion cracking of the container, at the base fabrication weld. Additionally, sufficiently high residual stresses were observed in both the lid and the body of the GTAW as well as the laser closure welded containers. The stresses are oriented perpendicular to the closure weld in both the container lid and the container body. Although the boiling MgCl2 test is not a quantitative test, a comparison of the test results from the closure welds shows that there are noticeably more through wall cracks in the laser closure welded container than in the GTAW closure welded container

  17. Residual stresses evaluation in a gas-pipeline crossing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Maria Cindra [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Manoel Messias [COMPAGAS, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Rebello, Joao Marcos Alcoforado [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Souza Filho, Byron Goncalves de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The X-rays diffraction technique is a well established and effectiveness method in the determination of the residual and applied stresses in fine grained crystalline materials. It allows to characterize and to quantify the magnitude and direction of the existing surface stresses in the studied point of the material. The objective of this work is the evaluation of the surface stresses in a 10 in diameter Natural Gas Distribution Pipeline manufactured from API 5 L Gr B steel of COMPAGAS company, in a crossing with a Natural Gas Transportation Pipeline, in Araucaria-PR. This kind of evaluation is important to establish weather you have to perform a repositioning of one of the pipeline or not. The measurements had been made in two transversal sections of the pipe, the one upstream (170 mm of the external wall of the pipeline) and another one downstream (840 mm of the external wall of the pipeline). Each transversal section measurements where carried out in 3 points: 9 hours, 12 hours and 3 hours. In each measured point of the pipe surface, the longitudinal and transversal stresses had been measured. The magnitude of the surface residual stresses in the pipe varied of +180 MPa at the -210 MPa. The residual stress state on the surface of the points 12 hours region is characterized by tensile stresses and by compressive stresses in the points of 3 and 9 hours region. The surface residual stresses in gas-pipeline have been measured using X-ray diffraction method, by double exposure technique, using a portable apparatus, with Cr-K-alpha radiation. (author)

  18. A system for the determination of surface strain in the measurement of residual stress in structural elements in mechanical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, W.; Stuecker, E.; Wolf, H.

    1975-01-01

    The device is made up of an integrated module which can be glued to the measuring point. It consists of a strain gauge rosette system to determine surface strains which is installed on a baseplate. Each of the strain gauges of the system has two connection wires. One of these connection wires each is led to a common connection point, whilst the others lead to separate connection points. The layer of strain gauges is covered with a cover plate equipped with openings which leave open the connection points. The connection wires leading from the connection points are soldered into these openings, the solder in addition arresting the baseplate and the cover plate relative to each other. In addition, the solder constitutes soldered support points for the feeder lines. The cover plate may be transparent or have a coordinate system to indicate the locations of the strain gauges. (DG/RF) [de

  19. Analysis of the ways to decrease residual stresses on heat exchanging tubes and steam generator collector surfaces for reducing the material corrosion damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, G.V.; Kharchenko, V.V.; Shatco, A.A.; Dranchenko, V.V.; Titov, V.F.

    1994-01-01

    Computer simulations have been carried out to analyze the effect of heat exchanger tube pressing forming process into a steam generator collector, on its residual stresses and strains. The program takes into consideration kinetic process peculiarities, material non-linear rheological properties, separate deformation of tubes and collectors in the presence of a clearance and their contact interaction, damage and crack appearance. 4 figs

  20. Methods of measuring residual stresses in components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossini, N.S.; Dassisti, M.; Benyounis, K.Y.; Olabi, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Defining the different methods of measuring residual stresses in manufactured components. ► Comprehensive study on the hole drilling, neutron diffraction and other techniques. ► Evaluating advantage and disadvantage of each method. ► Advising the reader with the appropriate method to use. -- Abstract: Residual stresses occur in many manufactured structures and components. Large number of investigations have been carried out to study this phenomenon and its effect on the mechanical characteristics of these components. Over the years, different methods have been developed to measure residual stress for different types of components in order to obtain reliable assessment. The various specific methods have evolved over several decades and their practical applications have greatly benefited from the development of complementary technologies, notably in material cutting, full-field deformation measurement techniques, numerical methods and computing power. These complementary technologies have stimulated advances not only in measurement accuracy and reliability, but also in range of application; much greater detail in residual stresses measurement is now available. This paper aims to classify the different residual stresses measurement methods and to provide an overview of some of the recent advances in this area to help researchers on selecting their techniques among destructive, semi destructive and non-destructive techniques depends on their application and the availabilities of those techniques. For each method scope, physical limitation, advantages and disadvantages are summarized. In the end this paper indicates some promising directions for future developments.

  1. Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique

  2. Residual stresses under quasi-static and cyclic loading in shot peened Inconel 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Juergen; Schulze, Volker [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials; Hessert, Roland; Koenig, Gerhard [MTU Aero Engines, Munich (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    The residual stress state induced by shot peening should be taken into account in the dimensioning of turbine components. Understanding the changes in the residual stress state caused by the application of quasi-static and cyclic loads is a prerequisite. In order to describe the residual stress state after quasi-static loading, several different shot peened Inconel 718 specimens were loaded isothermally up to specific tensile loadings. To analyze the residual stress state after cyclic loading, isothermal low cycle fatigue tests were performed. These tests were stopped after a defined number of cycles. Finally, after the specimens had been subjected to different loads, the surface residual stresses and - for special loadings - the residual stress depth distributions were determined experimentally by using X-ray diffraction. The surface - core model was adapted so that the complete residual stress depth distribution after quasi-static and cyclic loading can now be described. (orig.)

  3. Mapping residual stress by ultrasonic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, B.P.; Harrington, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    It is known that internal stress concentrations can give rise to microcracks which then grow when the structure is subjected to external forces. It has also been found that the velocity of sound is altered as it propagates through a region of stress. In this paper a technique called Computer-Assisted Tomography (CAT) is discussed and an application that provides pictures of stress fields is described. The results of both simulated and experimental models used to evaluate the technique are reported. It is concluded that the CAT approach has great potential for locating and mapping residual stress in metals. (author)

  4. Residual stress analysis of drive shafts after induction hardening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos, Guilherme Vieira Braga; Rocha, Alexandre da Silva; Nunes, Rafael Menezes, E-mail: lemos_gl@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Algre, RS (Brazil); Hirsch, Thomas Karl [Stiftung Institut für Werkstofftechnik (IWT), Bremen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Typically, for automotive shafts, shape distortion manifests itself in most cases after the induction hardening by an effect known as bending. The distortion results in a boost of costs, especially due to machining parts in the hardened state to fabricate its final tolerances. In the present study, residual stress measurements were carried out on automotive drive shafts made of DIN 38B3 steel. The samples were selected in consequence of their different distortion properties by an industrial manufacturing line. One tested shaft was straightened, because of the considerable dimensional variation and the other one not. Firstly, the residual stress measurements were carried out by using a portable diffractometer, in order to avoid cutting the shafts and evaluate the original state of the stresses, and afterwards a more detailed analysis was realized by a conventional stationary diffractometer. The obtained results presented an overview of the surface residual stress profiles after induction hardening and displayed the influence of the straightening process on the redistribution of residual stresses. They also indicated that the effects of the straightening in the residual stresses cannot be neglected. (author)

  5. Residual stresses determination in an 8 mm Incoloy 800H weld via neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xizhang; Zhang, Shu Yan; Wang, Jingjun; Kelleher, Joe F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Stress through thickness at 5 mm from weld centerline indicates a “U” distribution. • Declining of tensile stress through thickness occurred at weld centerline. • Residual stress between layers is the lowest. - Abstract: To investigate the distribution of residual stresses, the 8 mm 800H alloy was joined by multi-layer butt TIG process. Residual stresses in the longitudinal, transverse and normal directions were measured via neutron diffraction. These residual stress measurements were taken at a series of points 2 mm below the top surface, covering the fusion zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. In addition, two lines of longitudinal residual stress values at the weld centerline and 5 mm from weld centerline through thickness were measured. Results show that both the longitudinal and transverse stresses from the weld centerline to base metal are mainly tensile stresses. The longitudinal residual stress is the largest, with a maximum value of 330 MPa. As for the normal residual stress, the weld zone shows tensile stress, while the HAZ shows compressive stress. The middle of the thickness shows compressive residual stress along the thickness direction. The longitudinal stress at weld centerline through thickness reveals the interlayer heat treat effects leads to a declining of tensile stress. While the stress at 5 mm from weld centerline indicates a “U” distribution due to the mixed microstructure close to fusion line. With the increasing distance from weld seam, the residual stress decreases gradually

  6. Reduction method for residual stress of welded joint using random vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeru; Nishimura, Tadashi; Hiroi, Tetsumaro

    2005-01-01

    Welded joints are used for construction of many structures. Residual stress is induced near the bead caused by locally given heat. Tensile residual stress on the surface may reduce fatigue strength. In this paper, a new method for reduction of residual stress using vibration during welding is proposed. As vibrational load, random vibration, white noise and filtered white noise are used. Two thin plates are butt-welded. Residual stress is measured with a paralleled beam X-ray diffractometer with scintillation counter after removing quenched scale chemically. It is concluded that tensile residual stress near the bead is reduced by using random vibration during welding

  7. Residual stress measurements by means of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintschovius, L.; Jung, V.; Macherauch, E.; Voehringer, O.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of multiaxial residual stress states is presented, which is based on high resolution neutron diffraction. It is analogous to X-ray stress analysis, but the use of neutrons instead of X-rays allows the analysis of the stress distributions also in the interior of technical components in a non-destructive way. To prove the feasibility of the method, investigations of the loading stress distributions of an aluminium bar subjected to purely elastic bending were performed. Limiting factors due to the volume of the internal probe region and the sample thickness are discussed. Complete neutron residual stress analyses were carried out for a plastically deformed bending bar and a transformation-free water-quenched steel cylinder. The results are in fairly good agreement with theoretical expectations and with X-ray control measurements at the surface of the objects. (Auth.)

  8. Measurement of residual stresses in welded sample of dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, Tanius Rodrigues; Gomes, Paulo de Tarso Vida; Scaldaferri, Denis Henrique Bianchi; Martins, Geraldo Antonio Scoralick; Atanazio Filho, Nelson do Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    The welding of dissimilar metals has several applications in the industry. Especially in the nuclear industry, this joint type, common between carbon steel and stainless steel, it is always reason of analysis and special cares tends in view the need to maintain the integrity of the equipment. Residual stresses are introduced in the material as a result of processes as welding, machining, sanding and polishing that can to produce deformation in the proximities of the surface of the material. Residual compressive stresses can be introduced in the material through the jetting process (bombardment of the surface for small glass spheres, dry sand or steel). That procedure allows a fine subsurface layer to suffer yielding, compressing the superficial layer and reducing the formation of areas of concentration of traction stresses, increasing the resistance of the material to the fatigue. The welding process introduces residual stresses due to the geometry resulting from the fusion of the material welded and of the heterogeneous cooling. Besides the microstructural alteration and chemical composition of the material in the affected area for the heat, introduced by the welding, it is also had the effect of the discontinuity of the passes and the formation of bubbles and emptiness that can contribute to the cracks nucleation, reducing the resistance to the fatigue. In the great majority of the times residual stresses are harmful and there are many documented cases which US these stresses went predominant factors for the failure for fatigue. A particularly dangerous aspect of the residual stresses is that their presence is not usually observed, what usually happens with an applied load to the structure. The knowledge of the surface residual stresses is important to predict the emergence of failure when the component or structure is requested. In nuclear power plants it is common to welding of piping of stainless steels with mouthpieces of carbon steel of pressure vases of

  9. Control of welding residual stress for ensuring integrity against fatigue and stress-corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito

    2007-01-01

    The availability of several techniques for residual stress control is discussed in this paper. The effectiveness of these techniques in protecting from fatigue and stress-corrosion cracking is verified by numerical analysis and actual experiment. In-process control during welding for residual stress reduction is easier to apply than using post-weld treatment. As an example, control of the welding pass sequence for multi-pass welding is applied to cruciform joints and butt-joints with an X-shaped groove. However, residual stress improvement is confirmed for post-weld processes. Water jet peening is useful for obtaining a compressive residual stress on the surface, and the tolerance against both fatigue and stress-corrosion cracking is verified. Because cladding with a corrosion-resistant material is also effective for preventing stress-corrosion cracking from a metallurgical perspective, the residual stress at the interface of the base metal is carefully considered. The residual stress of the base metal near the clad edge is confirmed to be within the tolerance of crack generation. Controlling methods both during and after welding processes are found to be effective for ensuring the integrity of welded components

  10. Recent advances in residual stress measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, P.J.; Turski, M.; Edwards, L.; Bouchard, P.J.; Buttle, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Until recently residual stresses have been included in structural integrity assessments of nuclear pressure vessels and piping in a very primitive manner due to the lack of reliable residual stress measurement or prediction tools. This situation is changing the capabilities of newly emerging destructive (i.e. the contour method) and non-destructive (i.e. magnetic and high-energy synchrotron X-ray strain mapping) residual stress measurement techniques for evaluating ferritic and austenitic pressure vessel components are contrasted against more well-established methods. These new approaches offer the potential for obtaining area maps of residual stress or strain in welded plants, mock-up components or generic test-pieces. The mapped field may be used directly in structural integrity calculations, or indirectly to validate finite element process/structural models on which safety cases for pressurised nuclear systems are founded. These measurement methods are complementary in terms of application to actual plant, cost effectiveness and measurements in thick sections. In each case an exemplar case study is used to illustrate the method and to highlight its particular capabilities

  11. Experimental Investigation of Principal Residual Stress and Fatigue Performance for Turned Nickel-Based Superalloy Inconel 718.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yang; Liu, Zhanqiang

    2018-05-24

    Residual stresses of turned Inconel 718 surface along its axial and circumferential directions affect the fatigue performance of machined components. However, it has not been clear that the axial and circumferential directions are the principle residual stress direction. The direction of the maximum principal residual stress is crucial for the machined component service life. The present work aims to focuses on determining the direction and magnitude of principal residual stress and investigating its influence on fatigue performance of turned Inconel 718. The turning experimental results show that the principal residual stress magnitude is much higher than surface residual stress. In addition, both the principal residual stress and surface residual stress increase significantly as the feed rate increases. The fatigue test results show that the direction of the maximum principal residual stress increased by 7.4%, while the fatigue life decreased by 39.4%. The maximum principal residual stress magnitude diminished by 17.9%, whereas the fatigue life increased by 83.6%. The maximum principal residual stress has a preponderant influence on fatigue performance as compared to the surface residual stress. The maximum principal residual stress can be considered as a prime indicator for evaluation of the residual stress influence on fatigue performance of turned Inconel 718.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Principal Residual Stress and Fatigue Performance for Turned Nickel-Based Superalloy Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hua

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses of turned Inconel 718 surface along its axial and circumferential directions affect the fatigue performance of machined components. However, it has not been clear that the axial and circumferential directions are the principle residual stress direction. The direction of the maximum principal residual stress is crucial for the machined component service life. The present work aims to focuses on determining the direction and magnitude of principal residual stress and investigating its influence on fatigue performance of turned Inconel 718. The turning experimental results show that the principal residual stress magnitude is much higher than surface residual stress. In addition, both the principal residual stress and surface residual stress increase significantly as the feed rate increases. The fatigue test results show that the direction of the maximum principal residual stress increased by 7.4%, while the fatigue life decreased by 39.4%. The maximum principal residual stress magnitude diminished by 17.9%, whereas the fatigue life increased by 83.6%. The maximum principal residual stress has a preponderant influence on fatigue performance as compared to the surface residual stress. The maximum principal residual stress can be considered as a prime indicator for evaluation of the residual stress influence on fatigue performance of turned Inconel 718.

  13. Structure, microstructure and residual stresses in borided steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pala, Z.; Mušálek, Radek; Kyncl, J.; Harcuba, P.; Stráský, J.; Kolařík, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2013), s. 93-95 ISSN 1211-5894. [Struktura 2013 - Kolokvium Krystalografické společnosti. Češkovice (Blansko), 09.09.2013-13.09.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : boriding * surface hardening * iron borides * tooth-shaped microstructure * residual stresses Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://www.xray.cz/ms/bul2013-2/s6.pdf

  14. Analysis of residual stress in subsurface layers after precision hard machining of forging tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czan Andrej

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on analysis of residual stress of functional surfaces and subsurface layers created by precision technologies of hard machining for progressive constructional materials of forging tools. Methods of experiments are oriented on monitoring of residual stress in surface which is created by hard turning (roughing and finishing operations. Subsequently these surfaces were etched in thin layers by electro-chemical polishing. The residual stress was monitored in each etched layer. The measuring was executed by portable X-ray diffractometer for detection of residual stress and structural phases. The results significantly indicate rise and distribution of residual stress in surface and subsurface layers and their impact on functional properties of surface integrity.

  15. Estimation of stress intensity factors for circumferential cracked pipes under welding residual stress filed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Oh, Young Jin; Song, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yong Beum; Oh, Young Jin; Song, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yong Beum

    2012-01-01

    Recently, stress corrosion cracking(SCC) have been found in dissimilar metal welds of nozzles in some pressurized water reactors and on low carbon stainless steel piping systems of boiling water reactors. The important factor of SCC is the residual stress field caused by weld. For the evaluation of crack growth analysis due to SCC, stress intensity factor under a residual stress field should be estimated. Several solutions for stress intensity factor under residual stress field were recommended in flaw assessment codes such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section XI, R6, American Petroleum Institute (API579). Some relevant works have been studied. Dong et al. evaluated stress intensity factors in welded structures. Miyazaki et al. estimated stress intensity factors of surface crack in simple stress fields. This paper presents a simple method to estimate stress intensity factors in welding residual stress field. For general application, results of structure integrity assessment codes KI solutions were compared Finite element analyses of welding simulation and cracked pipes are described. Comparison results of KI solutions and proposed simplified solution are presented in the works

  16. Residual stresses in a weldment of pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gott, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    A study was made of the distribution of residual stresses around a typical weld from a light water reactor pressure vessel by an X-ray double-exposure camera technique. So that the magnitude, sign, and distribution of the residual stresses were as similar as possible to those found in practice, a wide, full-thickness specimen of A533B Cl 1 steel containing a submerged-arc weld was stress-relief annealed. To obtain a three-dimensional distribution of the stresses the specimen was examined at different levels through the thickness. Following the removal of material by milling, the specimen surface was electropolished to free it from cold work. Corrections have been made to take into account specimen relaxation. To completely define the original stress system it is desirable also to measure the change in curvature on removing a layer of material. Unless this is done assumptions must be made which complicate the calculations unnecessarily. This became apparent after the experimental work was completed. In the centre of the plate the methods of correction which can be used are sensitive to errors in the measurements. The corrected results show that the dominant residual stress is perpendicular to the weld. It is positive at the surfaces and negative in the centre of the plate. The maximum value can reach the yield stress. The residual stresses in the weld metal can locally vary considerably: from 100 to 350N/mm 2 over a distance of 5mm. Such large variations have been found to coincide with the heat-affected zones of the individual weld runs. (author)

  17. Modeling of residual stress state in turning of 304L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiorgue, F.; Rech, J.; Bergheau, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Research presented in this paper aims to link machining parameters to residual stress state and helps understanding mechanisms responsible of machined surface properties modifications. The first presented works are based on an experimental campaign. They reproduce the finishing turning operation of 304L and allow observing the residual stress state evolution at the work piece surface and for an affected depth of 0.2 mm for such processes. Then, the finishing turning operation is simulated numerically in order to realize the same sensitivity study to cutting parameters. This simulation is based on an hybrid approach mixing experimental data and numerical simulation. This method allows getting round the classical difficulties of turning simulation by applying equivalent thermo mechanical loadings onto the work piece surface without modeling the material separation phenomena. Moreover the numerical model uses an hardening law taking into account dynamic recrystallization phenomena. (authors)

  18. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer......, developing at the surfce and consisting of iron-based (carbo)nitrides, and the diffusion zone underneath, consisting of iron and alloying element nitrides dispersed in af ferritic matrix. Microstructural features are related directly to the origins of stress buildup and stres relief....

  19. Residual stress evaluation by neutron and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodini, A.

    2000-01-01

    This lecture is dedicated to the residual stress evaluation using neutron and X ray synchrotron radiation. Residual stress evaluation is an important step for the improvement or the performance of materials, the control of the deformation of the components and the understanding of industrial process. In general, residual stress has various origins: mechanical, thermal, thermomechanical or thermochemical. In general, these residual stresses are caused by plastic deformation, or some source of local incompatibilities and are generated by three fundamental physical origins: plastic flow, volume change and thermal dilatation. These incompatibilities are compensated for partly by the elastic deformation that generates some internal stresses. In the solid, these local incompatibilities are caused by crystal defects. The exact origin of a stress is going to depend on the scale of observation. A classification of the residual stresses in three orders, related to the scale on which one considers materials, is proposed. The diffraction method for determination of macrostresses is based on the measurement of interplanar spacing for various direction in a diffraction experiment. Different examples are proposed. Polycrystalline grains or composite have different physical and elastic properties hence the stress for a particular grains or phase differs from the average value (value of macrostress). This difference is defined as the second order stress. The second order stresses occur because of small scale anisotropy or inhomogeneity in the material : for example, due to mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic constants or plastic flow. However, the second order stress averaged over all grains or phase is not equal to zero and this average is called the mismatch stress. Using the experimental macro stress it is possible to calculate the mismatch stresses. More recently, this technique of diffraction has also been applied for the determination of microstrain (third

  20. Stability of machining induced residual stresses in Inconel 718 under quasi-static loading at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madariaga, A.; Esnaola, J.A.; Arrazola, P.J.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Muñoz, P.; Ostolaza, K.

    2015-01-01

    Tensile residual stresses are very often generated on the surface when machining nickel alloys. In order to determine their influence on the final mechanical behaviour of the component residual stress stability should be considered. In the present work the evolution of surface residual stresses induced by machining in Inconel 718 under static loading at room temperature was studied experimentally and numerically. An Inconel 718 disc was face turned employing industrial working conditions and specimens for tensile tests were extracted from the disc. Surface residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction for initial state and after applying different loads over the material's yield stress. Then, a finite element model based on the surface–core approach was fitted to experimental results and the study was extended to analyse the influence of load level, degree of work-hardening and initial surface conditions. For the studied case, initial tensile surface residual stress (776 MPa) became even more tensile when applying loads higher than the material yield stress, but a shift was observed at the highest applied load (1350 MPa) and initial residual stress was relaxed about 170 MPa. This particular behaviour is associated to the modified stress–strain properties of the machined affected surface layer which was strongly work-hardened. Moreover, if the work-hardened properties are not considered in the finite element model results differ substantially from experiments. Surface residual stress stability also depends on the initial surface residual stress, but the degree of work-hardening induced by the machining process must be considered as well. If the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the yield stress of the core is lower than the initial surface residual stress, the surface begins yielding first and consequently the surface residual stress is decreased. In contrast, if the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the

  1. Stability of machining induced residual stresses in Inconel 718 under quasi-static loading at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madariaga, A., E-mail: amadariaga@mondragon.edu [Mechanical and Industrial Production Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mondragon Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, Mondragon 20500 Gipuzkoa (Spain); Esnaola, J.A.; Arrazola, P.J. [Mechanical and Industrial Production Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mondragon Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, Mondragon 20500 Gipuzkoa (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Muñoz, P. [Departamento Ciencia de Materiales, ETSI Caminos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, c/Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Ostolaza, K. [Materials and Processes Technology Department, ITP S.A., Parque Tecnológico, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio (Spain)

    2015-01-03

    Tensile residual stresses are very often generated on the surface when machining nickel alloys. In order to determine their influence on the final mechanical behaviour of the component residual stress stability should be considered. In the present work the evolution of surface residual stresses induced by machining in Inconel 718 under static loading at room temperature was studied experimentally and numerically. An Inconel 718 disc was face turned employing industrial working conditions and specimens for tensile tests were extracted from the disc. Surface residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction for initial state and after applying different loads over the material's yield stress. Then, a finite element model based on the surface–core approach was fitted to experimental results and the study was extended to analyse the influence of load level, degree of work-hardening and initial surface conditions. For the studied case, initial tensile surface residual stress (776 MPa) became even more tensile when applying loads higher than the material yield stress, but a shift was observed at the highest applied load (1350 MPa) and initial residual stress was relaxed about 170 MPa. This particular behaviour is associated to the modified stress–strain properties of the machined affected surface layer which was strongly work-hardened. Moreover, if the work-hardened properties are not considered in the finite element model results differ substantially from experiments. Surface residual stress stability also depends on the initial surface residual stress, but the degree of work-hardening induced by the machining process must be considered as well. If the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the yield stress of the core is lower than the initial surface residual stress, the surface begins yielding first and consequently the surface residual stress is decreased. In contrast, if the difference between the yield stress of the surface and the

  2. Residual stress measurement in veneering ceramic by hole-drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie K; Schajer, Gary S; Vanheusden, Alain J; Sadoun, Michaël J

    2011-05-01

    Mismatch in thermal expansion properties between veneering ceramic and metallic or high-strength ceramic cores can induce residual stresses and initiate cracks when combined with functional stresses. Knowledge of the stress distribution within the veneering ceramic is a key factor for understanding and predicting chipping failures, which are well-known problems with Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal based fixed partial dentures. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for measuring the stress profile in veneering ceramics and to compare ceramic-fused-to-metal compounds to veneered Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal ceramic. The hole-drilling method, often used for engineering measurements, was adapted for use with veneering ceramic. Because of the high sensitivity needed in comparison with industrial applications, a high sensitivity electrical measurement chain was developed. All samples exhibited the same type of stress vs. depth profile, starting with compressive at the ceramic surface, decreasing with depth and becoming tensile at 0.5-1.0mm from the surface, and then becoming slightly compressive again. The zirconia samples exhibited a stress depth profile of larger magnitude. The hole drilling method was shown be a practical tool for measuring residual stresses in veneering ceramics. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Residual stress reduction in the penetration nozzle weld joint by overlay welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wenchun; Luo, Yun; Wang, B.Y.; Tu, S.T.; Gong, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Residual stress reduction in penetration weld nozzle by overlay welding was studied. • The overlay weld can decrease the residual stress in the weld root. • Long overlay welding is proposed in the actual welding. • Overlay weld to decrease residual stress is more suitable for thin nozzle. - Abstract: Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the penetration nozzle weld joint endangers the structural reliability of pressure vessels in nuclear and chemical industries. How to decrease the residual stress is very critical to ensure the structure integrity. In this paper, a new method, which uses overlay welding on the inner surface of nozzle, is proposed to decrease the residual stresses in the penetration joint. Finite element simulation is used to study the change of weld residual stresses before and after overlay welding. It reveals that this method can mainly decrease the residual stress in the weld root. Before overlay welding, large tensile residual stresses are generated in the weld root. After overlay weld, the tensile hoop stress in weld root has been decreased about 45%, and the radial stress has been decreased to compressive stress, which is helpful to decrease the susceptibility to SCC. With the increase of overlay welding length, the residual stress in weld root has been greatly decreased, and thus the long overlay welding is proposed in the actual welding. It also finds that this method is more suitable for thin nozzle rather than thick nozzle

  4. Measurement of residual stresses using fracture mechanics weight functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A residual stress measurement method has been developed to quantify through-the-thickness residual stresses. Accurate measurement of residual stresses is crucial for many engineering structures. Fabrication processes such as welding and machining generate residual stresses that are difficult to predict. Residual stresses affect the integrity of structures through promoting failures due to brittle fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear. In this work, the weight function theory of fracture mechanics is used to measure residual stresses. The weight function theory is an important development in computational fracture mechanics. Stress intensity factors for arbitrary stress distribution on the crack faces can be accurately and efficiently computed for predicting crack growth. This paper demonstrates that the weight functions are equally useful in measuring residual stresses. In this method, an artificial crack is created by a thin cut in a structure containing residual stresses. The cut relieves the residual stresses normal to the crack-face and allows the relieved residual stresses to deform the structure. Strain gages placed adjacent to the cut measure the relieved strains corresponding to incrementally increasing depths of the cut. The weight functions of the cracked body relate the measured strains to the residual stresses normal to the cut within the structure. The procedure details, such as numerical integration of the singular functions in applying the weight function method, will be discussed

  5. Measurement of residual stresses using fracture mechanics weight functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.

    2001-01-01

    A residual stress measurement method has been developed to quantify through-the-thickness residual stresses. Accurate measurement of residual stresses is crucial for many engineering structures. Fabrication processes such as welding and machining generate residual stresses that are difficult to predict. Residual stresses affect the integrity of structures through promoting failures due to brittle fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear. In this work, the weight function theory of fracture mechanics is used to measure residual stresses. The weight function theory is an important development in computational fracture mechanics. Stress intensity factors for arbitrary stress distribution on the crack faces can be accurately and efficiently computed for predicting crack growth. This paper demonstrates that the weight functions are equally useful in measuring residual stresses. In this method, an artificial crack is created by a thin cut in a structure containing residual stresses. The cut relieves the residual stresses normal to the crack-face and allows the relieved residual stresses to deform the structure. Strain gages placed adjacent to the cut measure the relieved strains corresponding to incrementally increasing depths of the cut. The weight functions of the cracked body relate the measured strains to the residual stresses normal to the cut within the structure. The procedure details, such as numerical integration of the singular functions in applying the weight function method, will be discussed. (author)

  6. Residual stress analysis in BWR pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Leung, C.P.; Pont, D.

    1992-06-01

    Residual stresses from welding processes can be the primary driving force for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR components. Thus, a better understanding of the causes and nature of these residual stresses can help assess and remedy SCC. Numerical welding simulation software, such as SYSWELD, and material property data have been used to quantify residual stresses for application to SCC assessments in BWR components. Furthermore, parametric studies using SYSWELD have revealed which variables significantly affect predicted residual stress. Overall, numerical modeling techniques can be used to evaluate residual stress for SCC assessments of BWR components and to identify and plan future SCC research

  7. Residual stresses in U-bending deformations and expansion joints of heat exchanger tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, Sun Jae; Jang, Jin Sung; Kuk, Ii Hiun; Bae, Kang Gug; Kim, Sung Chung

    2000-01-01

    Residual stress induced in U-bending and tube-to-tubesheet joint processes of PWR's rew-1 heat exchanger tube was measured by X-ray method and Hole-Drilling Method(HDM). Compressive residual stresses(-) at the extrados surface were induced in U-bending, and its maximum value reached -319MPa in axial direction at the position of ψ=0 deg. Tensile residual stresses (+) of 0σ zz =45 MPa and σ θθ =25MPa were introduced in the intrados surface at the position of ψ=0 deg. Maximum tensile residual stress of 170 MPa was measured at the flank side at the position of ψ=90 deg, i.e., at apex region. It was observed that higher stress gradient was generated at the irregular transition regions (ITR). The trend of residual stress induced by U-bending process of the tubes was found to be related with the change of ovality. The residual stress induced by the explosive joint method was found to be lower than that by the mechanical roll method. The gradient of residual stress along the expanded tube was highest at the transition region (TR), and the residual stress in circumferential direction was found to be higher than the residual stress in axial direction

  8. Minimization of Residual Stress in an Al-Cu Alloy Forged Plate by Different Heat Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ya-Bo; Shao, Wen-Zhu; Jiang, Jian-Tang; Zhang, Bao-You; Zhen, Liang

    2015-06-01

    In order to improve the balance of mechanical properties and residual stress, various quenching and aging treatments were applied to Al-Cu alloy forged plate. Residual stresses determined by the x-ray diffraction method and slitting method were compared. The surface residual stress measured by x-ray diffraction method was consistent with that measured by slitting method. The residual stress distribution of samples quenched in water with different temperatures (20, 60, 80, and 100 °C) was measured, and the results showed that the boiling water quenching results in a 91.4% reduction in residual stress magnitudes compared with cold water quenching (20 °C), but the tensile properties of samples quenched in boiling water were unacceptably low. Quenching in 80 °C water results in 75% reduction of residual stress, and the reduction of yield strength is 12.7%. The residual stress and yield strength level are considerable for the dimensional stability of aluminum alloy. Quenching samples into 30% polyalkylene glycol quenchants produced 52.2% reduction in the maximum compressive residual stress, and the reduction in yield strength is 19.7%. Moreover, the effects of uphill quenching and thermal-cold cycling on the residual stress were also investigated. Uphill quenching and thermal-cold cycling produced approximately 25-40% reduction in residual stress, while the effect on tensile properties is quite slight.

  9. Residual stress in deuterium implanted nominal copper coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inal, M. Y.; Alam, M.; Peascoe, R. A.; Watkins, T. R.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of deuterium (D) implantation on the residual stresses in Cu and CuAl 2 phases present in nominal Cu coatings (containing Al) deposited on Al-alloy (Al-6061) substrates were measured using an x-ray diffraction technique. The coatings were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering of a pure Cu target under identical conditions and Al was incorporated in the coatings during growth by diffusion from the substrate. Deuterium was implanted in the coatings at energies of 40 or 40+120 keV with fluences of 1x10 21 , 2x10 21 , or 3x10 21 D + /m 2 . Pole figures of the Cu phase in the coatings prior to and after implantation indicated no effect of implantation on the fibrous texture. Triaxial stress analysis indicated the surface normal stress component to be negligible in Cu and slightly tensile in CuAl 2 under all conditions. Furthermore, under all conditions, the in-plane residual stresses in both phases were found to be compressive and nearly isotropic. The magnitude of the isotropic compressive stress was always higher in CuAl 2 as compared to Cu. The compressive residual stresses in the Cu phase changed only mildly with increasing coating weight, ion energy, and fluence. However, in the CuAl 2 phase the compressive residual stresses changed markedly with increasing ion energy (initial decrease followed by leveling off) and increasing ion fluence (initial decrease followed by an increase), but remained unaffected by increasing coating weight. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  10. Optical residual stress measurement in TFT-LCD panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chung; Sung, Po-Chi

    2017-06-01

    The residual stress of the glass substrate might be one of causes to produce the non-uniform light distribution defect, i.e. Mura, in thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) panels. Glass is a birefringent material with very low birefringence. Furthermore, the thinner and thinner thickness request from the market makes the traditional photoelasticity almost impossible to measure the residual stresses produced in thin glass plates. Recently, a low-level stress measurement method called transmissivity extremities theory of photoelasticity (TEToP) was successfully developed to measure the residual stress in glass plate. Besides, to measure the stress of the glass plate in the TFT-LCD panel whose rear surface may has different kinds of coatings, an advanced reflection photoelasticity was also developed. In this paper, three commercially available glass plates with 0.33mm nominal thickness and three glass circular disks with different coatings were inspected to verify the feasibility of the TEToP and the advanced reflection photoelasticity, respectively.

  11. X-ray residual stress analysis on machined and tempered HPSN-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Immelmann, S.; Welle, E.; Reimers, W. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1997-11-15

    The residual stress state induced by grinding and tempering of hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN) samples is studied by X-ray diffraction. The results reveal that the residual stress values at the surface of the samples as well as their gradient within the penetration depth of the X-rays depend on the sintering aid and thus, on the glassy phase content of the HPSN. Tempering of the ground HPSN reduces the residual stress values due to microplastic deformation, whereas an oxidation of the glassy phase leads to the formation of compressive residual stresses. (orig.) 35 refs.

  12. Measurements of three dimensional residual stress distribution on laser irradiated spot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hirotomo; Akita, Koichi; Ohya, Shin-ichi; Sano, Yuji; Naito, Hideki

    2004-01-01

    Three dimensional residual stress distributions on laser irradiated spots were measured using synchrotron radiation to study the basic mechanism of laser peening. A water-immersed sample of high tensile strength steel was irradiated with Q-switched and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The residual stress depth profile of the sample was obtained by alternately repeating the measurement and surface layer removal by electrolytic polishing. Tensile residual stresses were observed on the surface of all irradiated spots, whereas residual stress changed to compressive just beneath the surface. The depth of compressive residual stress imparted by laser irradiation and plastic deformation zone increased with increasing the number of laser pulses irradiated on the same spot. (author)

  13. Study on the residual stress relaxation in girth-welded steel pipes under bending load using diffraction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, Nico; Nitschke-Pagel, Thomas; Dilger, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    This research is dedicated to the experimental investigation of the residual stress relaxation in girth-welded pipes due to quasi-static bending loads. Ferritic-pearlitic steel pipes are welded with two passes, resulting in a characteristic residual stress state with high tensile residual stresses at the weld root. Also, four-point bending is applied to generate axial load stress causing changes in the residual stress state. These are determined both on the outer and inner surfaces of the pipes, as well as in the pipe wall, using X-ray and neutron diffraction. Focusing on the effect of tensile load stress, it is revealed that not only the tensile residual stresses are reduced due to exceeding the yield stress, but also the compressive residual stresses for equilibrium reasons. Furthermore, residual stress relaxation occurs both parallel and perpendicular to the applied load stress.

  14. X-ray study of residual stress distribution of ground ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaida, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Keisuke; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Suzuki, Kenzi.

    1997-01-01

    The residual stress distribution of ground ceramics was determined from the eigen strain existing in the ground surface. The eigen strain of ground ceramics was tensile, and exponentially decreased with the distance from the surface. The residual stress distribution is given as a superposition of an exponential function of compression and a linear function. It is found that the actual residual stress distribution can be approximated by a compressive exponential function because the magnitude of tensile residual stress is negligibly small compared to the compressive residual stress. In the experiments, the diffraction angle was measured on ground silicon nitride for a wide range of sin 2 ψ using the glancing incidence X-ray diffraction technique. A strong nonlinearity was found in the 2θ-sin 2 ψ diagram at very high ψ-angles. From the analysis of nonlinearity, the residual stress distribution was determined. The residual stress distribution of silicon nitride coincided with the distribution calculated from the eigen strain distribution. Transmission electron microscopy was used to clarify the origin of generation of the residual stress. Both strain contrasts and microcracks were observed below the ground surface ; straight dislocations were also observed within silicon nitride grains near the ground surface. (author)

  15. Modelling of the Residual Stress State in a new Type of Residual Stress Specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Andreasen, Jens Henrik

    2014-01-01

    forms the experimental case which is analysed. A FE model of the specimen is used for analysing the curing history and the residual stress build up. The model is validated against experimental strain data which are recorded by a Fibre Brag Grating sensor and good agreement has been achieved.......The paper presents a study on a new type residual stress specimen which is proposed as a simple way to conduct experimental validation for model predictions. A specimen comprising of a steel plate with circular hole embedded into a stack of CSM glass fibre and further infused with an epoxy resin...

  16. Laser quench hardening of steel: Effects of superimposed elastic pre-stress on the hardness and residual stress distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meserve, Justin

    Cold drawn AISI 4140 beams were LASER surface hardened with a 2 kW CO2 LASER. Specimens were treated in the free state and while restrained in a bending fixture inducing surface tensile stresses of 94 and 230 MPa. Knoop hardness indentation was used to evaluate the through thickness hardness distribution, and a layer removal methodology was used to evaluate the residual stress distribution. Results showed the maximum surface hardness attained was not affected by pre-stress during hardening, and ranged from 513 to 676 kg/mm2. The depth of effective hardening varied at different magnitudes of pre-stress, but did not vary proportionately to the pre-stress. The surface residual stress, coinciding with the maximum compressive residual stress, increased as pre-stress was increased, from 1040 MPa for the nominally treated specimens to 1270 MPa for specimens pre-stressed to 230 MPa. The maximum tensile residual stress observed in the specimens decreased from 1060 MPa in the nominally treated specimens to 760 MPa for specimens pre-stressed to 230 MPa. Similarly, thickness of the compressive residual stress region increased and the depth at which maximum tensile residual stress occurred increased as the pre-stress during treatment was increased Overall, application of tensile elastic pre-stress during LASER hardening is beneficial to the development of compressive residual stress in AISI 4140, with minimal impact to the hardness attained from the treatment. The newly developed approach for LASER hardening may support efforts to increase both the wear and fatigue resistance of parts made from hardenable steels.

  17. The influence of quench sensitivity on residual stresses in the aluminium alloys 7010 and 7075

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.S.; Tanner, D.A.; Truman, C.E.; Paradowska, A.M.; Wimpory, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    The most critical stage in the heat treatment of high strength aluminium alloys is the rapid cooling necessary to form a supersaturated solid solution. A disadvantage of quenching is that the thermal gradients can be sufficient to cause inhomogeneous plastic deformation which in turn leads to the development of large residual stresses. Two 215 mm thick rectilinear forgings have been made from 7000 series alloys with widely different quench sensitivity to determine if solute loss in the form of precipitation during quenching can significantly affect residual stress magnitudes. The forgings were heat treated and immersion quenched using cold water to produce large magnitude residual stresses. The through thickness residual stresses were measured by neutron diffraction and incremental deep hole drilling. The distribution of residual stresses was found to be similar for both alloys varying from highly triaxial and tensile in the interior, to a state of biaxial compression in the surface. The 7010 forging exhibited larger tensile stresses in the interior. The microstructural variation from surface to centre for both forgings was determined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. These observations were used to confirm the origin of the hardness variation measured through the forging thickness. When the microstructural changes were accounted for in the through thickness lattice parameter, the residual stresses in the two forgings were found to be very similar. Solute loss in the 7075 forging appeared to have no significant effect on the residual stress magnitudes when compared to 7010. - Highlights: ► Through thickness residual stress measurements made on large Al alloy forgings. ► Residual stress characterised using neutron diffraction and deep hole drilling. ► Biaxial compressive surface and triaxial subsurface residual stresses. ► Quench sensitivity of 7075 promotes significant microstructural differences to 7010. ► When precipitation is

  18. Welding residual stress improvement in internal components by water jet peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, K.; Hirano, K.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, E.

    1996-01-01

    Cavitations are generated when highly pressurized water is jetted in water. Surface residual stress is improved remarkably due to the peening effect of extremely high pressure caused by the collapse of cavitation bubbles. This technique is called water jet peening (WJP). WJP is expected to be an effective maintenance technique for the prevention of stress corrosion cracking caused by residual stress in various components of power generating plants. Various kinds of specimens were water jet peened to evaluate the fundamental characteristics of WJP and to select the most appropriate conditions for the residual stress improvement. Test results showed that WJP markedly improved the tensile residual stress caused by welding and grinding to the high compressive residual stress and seems to prevent the stress corrosion cracking

  19. Thermal residual stresses in amorphous thermoplastic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    An attempt to calculate the internal stresses in a cylindrically shaped polycarbonate (LEXAN-GE) component, subjected to an arbitrary cooling rate, will be described. The differential volume relaxation arising as a result of the different thermal history suffered by each body point was considered as the primary source of stresses build up [1-3]. A numerical routine was developed accounting for the simultaneous stress and structural relaxation processes and implemented within an Ansys® environment. The volume relaxation kinetics was modeled by coupling the KAHR (Kovacs, Aklonis, Hutchinson, Ramos) phenomenological theory [4] with the linear viscoelastic theory [5-7]. The numerical algorithm translates the specific volume theoretical predictions at each body point as applied non-mechanical loads acting on the component. The viscoelastic functions were obtained from two simple experimental data, namely the linear viscoelastic response in shear and the PVT (pressure volume temperature) behavior. The dimensionless bulk compliance was extracted from PVT data since it coincides with the memory function appearing in the KAHR phenomenological theory [7]. It is showed that the residual stress scales linearly with the logarithm of the Biot's number.

  20. Effects of Cutting Edge Microgeometry on Residual Stress in Orthogonal Cutting of Inconel 718 by FEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qi; Liu, Zhanqiang; Hua, Yang; Zhao, Jinfu; Lv, Woyun; Mohsan, Aziz Ul Hassan

    2018-06-14

    Service performance of components such as fatigue life are dramatically influenced by the machined surface and subsurface residual stresses. This paper aims at achieving a better understanding of the influence of cutting edge microgeometry on machined surface residual stresses during orthogonal dry cutting of Inconel 718. Numerical and experimental investigations have been conducted in this research. The cutting edge microgeometry factors of average cutting edge radius S¯, form-factor K , and chamfer were investigated. An increasing trend for the magnitudes of both tensile and compressive residual stresses was observed by using larger S¯ or introducing a chamfer on the cutting edges. The ploughing depth has been predicted based on the stagnation zone. The increase of ploughing depth means that more material was ironed on the workpiece subsurface, which resulted in an increase in the compressive residual stress. The thermal loads were leading factors that affected the surface tensile residual stress. For the unsymmetrical honed cutting edge with K = 2, the friction between tool and workpiece and tensile residual stress tended to be high, while for the unsymmetrical honed cutting edge with K = 0.5, the high ploughing depth led to a higher compressive residual stress. This paper provides guidance for regulating machine-induced residual stress by edge preparation.

  1. Prediction of residual stresses in electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lianyong; Ge, Keke; Jing, Hongyang; Zhao, Lei; Lv, Xiaoqing [Tianjin Univ. (China); Han, Yongdian [Tianjin Univ. (China). Key Lab. of Advanced Joining Technology

    2017-05-01

    A thermo-metallurgical procedure based on the SYSWELD code was developed to predict welding temperature field, microstructure and residual stress in butt-welded Ti-6Al-4V plate taking into account phase transformation. The formation of martensite was confirmed by the CCT diagram and microstructure in the weld joint, which significantly affects the magnitude of residual stress. The hole drilling procedure was utilized to measure the values of residual stress at the top surface of the specimen, which are in well agreement with the numerical results. Both simulated and test results show that the magnitude and distribution of residual stress on the surface of the plate present a large gradient feature from the weld joint to the base metal. Moreover, the distribution law of residual stresses in the plate thickness was further analyzed for better understanding of its generation and evolution.

  2. Evaluation of Residual Stresses using Ring Core Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holý S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The method for measuring residual stresses using ring-core method is described. Basic relations are given for residual stress measurement along the specimen depth and simplified method is described for average residual stress estimation in the drilled layer for known principal stress directions. The estimation of calculated coefficients using FEM is described. Comparison of method sensitivity is made with hole-drilling method. The device for method application is described and an example of experiment is introduced. The accuracy of method is discussed. The influence of strain gauge rosette misalignment to the evaluated residual stresses is performed using FEM.

  3. Residual stress measurement with focused acoustic waves and direct comparison with X-ray diffraction stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathish, Shamachary; Moran, Thomas J.; Martin, Richard W.; Reibel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The technique of measuring small changes in acoustic wave velocity due to external or internal stress has been used for quantitative determination of residual stress in materials during the last decade. Application of similar methodology with focused acoustic waves leads to residual stress measurement with spatial resolution of a few millimeters to a few microns. The high spatial resolution residual stress measurement required development of new methodologies in both the design of acoustic lenses and the instrumentation for acoustic wave velocity determination. This paper presents two new methodologies developed for the measurement of residual stress with spatial resolution of a few millimeters. The design of new type of acoustic lens for achieving higher spatial resolution in residual stress measurement is introduced. Development of instrumentation for high precision local surface wave velocity measurement will be presented. Residual stresses measured around a crack tip in a sample of Ti-6A1-4V using a focused beam will be compared with X-ray diffraction measurements performed on the same region of the sample. Results of residual stress measurements along a direction perpendicular to the electron beam weld in a sample of Ti-6A1-4V, determined using focused acoustic waves and X-ray diffraction technique, are also presented. The spatial resolution and penetration depth of X-rays and focused acoustic beams with reference to residual stress measurements are discussed

  4. Convenient measurement of the residual stress using X-ray penetration depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Takayoshi; Shibano, Junichi

    1994-01-01

    The residual stress measured with a characteristic X-ray is usually evaluated as a surface stress. However, it is a weighted mean value over all penetration depth of X-ray. Thus, the classical sin 2 Ψ method with the characteristic X-ray is difficult to use for measuring the steep gradient of residual stress that occurs along the depth direction in a subsurface layer of the material after cold rolling and grinding. This paper presents a convenient method of the residual stress measurement along the depth direction in a subsurface layer using the penetration depth depending on a characteristic X-ray. The residual stress distribution of JIS SKS51 steel plate was measured as an example of applying this method. As a result, it could be confirmed that a residual stress distribution along the depth direction in a subsurface layer could be evaluated nondestructively by this convenient method. (author)

  5. Estimation of residual stress distribution for pressurizer nozzle of Kori nuclear power plant considering safe end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    In nuclear power plants, ferritic low alloy steel nozzle was connected with austenitic stainless steel piping system through alloy 82/182 butt weld. Accurate estimation of residual stress for weldment is important in the sense that alloy 82/182 is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. There are many results which predict residual stress distribution for alloy 82/182 weld between nozzle and pipe. However, nozzle and piping system usually connected through safe end which has short length. In this paper, residual stress distribution for pressurizer nozzle of Kori nuclear power plant was predicted using FE analysis, which considered safe end. As a result, existing residual stress profile was redistributed and residual stress of inner surface was decreased specially. It means that safe end should be considered to reduce conservatism when estimating the piping system.

  6. Residual stress evaluation in brittle coatings using indentation technique combined with in-situ bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Steinbrech, R.W.; Tanabe, Yuji; Hara, Toshiaki

    2000-01-01

    The indentation crack length approach was adopted and further elaborated to evaluate residual stress and toughness of the brittle coatings: two kinds of glass coatings on steel. The influence of the residual stress on indentation cracking was examined in as-received coating condition and by in-situ superimposing a counteracting tensile stress. For purpose of providing reference toughness values stress-free pieces of separated coating material have also been examined. Thus results of the two complementary sets of experiments were assumed to prove self-consistently toughness and residual stress data of the coating. In particular, the in-situ bending of specimen in combination with the indentation test allowed us to vary deliberately the residual stress situation in glass coating. Thus experiments which utilized the combination of bending test and micro-indentation were introduced as a method to provide unambiguous information about residual compressive stress. Toughness and residual compressive stress of glass coatings used in this study were 0.46-0.50 MPa·m 1/2 and 94-111 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, a thermoelastic calculation of the residual compressive stress was performed and it is found that the value of residual compressive stress at coating surface of specimen was 90-102 MPa. (author)

  7. A Note on the Inverse Reconstruction of Residual Fields in Surface Peened Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ali Faghidian

    Full Text Available Abstract A modified stress function approach is developed here to reconstruct induced stress, residual stress and eigenstrain fields from limited experimental measurements. The present approach is successfully applied to three experimental measurements set in surface peened plates with shallow shot peening affected zone. The well-rehearsed advantage of the proposed approach is that it not only minimizes the deviation of measurements from its approximations but also will result in an inverse solution satisfying a full range of continuum mechanics requirements. Also, the effect of component thickness as a geometric parameter influencing the residual stress state is comprehensively studied. A key finding of present study is that the plate thickness has no influence on the maximum magnitude of eigenstrain profile and compressive residual stresses within the shot peening affected zone while having a great influence on the magnitude of tensile residual stress and the gradient of linear residual stresses present in deeper regions.

  8. Residual stress determination of rail tread using a laser ultrasonic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jing; Feng, Qibo

    2015-01-01

    A non-destructive method for measuring the residual stress on rail tread that uses a laser-generated ultrasonic technique is proposed. The residual stress distribution of different parts on both the new rail and used rail were examined. The surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are excited by a scanning line laser and detected by a laser ultrasonic detection system. A digital correlation method was used for calculating the changes in velocity of SAWs, which reflects the stress distribution. A wavelet de-noising technique and a least square fit were used for signal processing to improve the measurement accuracy. The effects of ultrasonic propagation distance and surface roughness on the determination of residual stress were analyzed and simulated. Results from the study demonstrate that the stress distribution results are accordant with the practical situation, and the laser-generated SAWs technique is a promising tool for the determination of residual stress in the railway inspection and other industrial testing fields. (paper)

  9. Modelling Of Residual Stresses Induced By High Speed Milling Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmaison, Olivier; Mocellin, Katia; Jardin, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance processes used in heavy industries often include high speed milling operations. The reliability of the post-process material state has to be studied. Numerical simulation appears to be a very interesting way to supply an efficient residual stresses (RS) distribution prediction.Because the adiabatic shear band and the serrated chip shaping are features of the austenitic stainless steel high speed machining, a 2D high speed orthogonal cutting model is briefly presented. This finite element model, developed on Forge registered software, is based on data taken from Outeiro and al.'s paper [1]. A new behaviour law fully coupling Johnson-Cook's constitutive law and Latham and Cockcroft's damage model is detailed in this paper. It ensures results that fit those found in literature.Then, the numerical tools used on the 2D model are integrated to a 3D high speed milling model. Residual stresses distribution is analysed, on the surface and into the depth of the material. Various revolutions and passes of the two teeth hemispheric mill on the workpiece are simulated. Thus the sensitivity of the residual stresses generation to the cutting conditions can be discussed. In order to validate the 3D model, a comparison of the cutting forces measured by EDF R and D to those given by numerical simulations is achieved.

  10. A review of residual stress analysis using thermoelastic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, A F; Dulieu-Barton, J M; Quinn, S [University of Southampton, School of Engineering Sciences, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Burguete, R L [Airbus UK Ltd., New Filton House, Filton, Bristol, BS99 7AR (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) is a full-field technique for experimental stress analysis that is based on infra-red thermography. The technique has proved to be extremely effective for studying elastic stress fields and is now well established. It is based on the measurement of the temperature change that occurs as a result of a stress change. As residual stress is essentially a mean stress it is accepted that the linear form of the TSA relationship cannot be used to evaluate residual stresses. However, there are situations where this linear relationship is not valid or departures in material properties due to manufacturing procedures have enabled evaluations of residual stresses. The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of using a TSA based approach for the evaluation of residual stresses and to provide some examples of where promising results have been obtained.

  11. A review of residual stress analysis using thermoelastic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A F; Dulieu-Barton, J M; Quinn, S; Burguete, R L

    2009-01-01

    Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) is a full-field technique for experimental stress analysis that is based on infra-red thermography. The technique has proved to be extremely effective for studying elastic stress fields and is now well established. It is based on the measurement of the temperature change that occurs as a result of a stress change. As residual stress is essentially a mean stress it is accepted that the linear form of the TSA relationship cannot be used to evaluate residual stresses. However, there are situations where this linear relationship is not valid or departures in material properties due to manufacturing procedures have enabled evaluations of residual stresses. The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of using a TSA based approach for the evaluation of residual stresses and to provide some examples of where promising results have been obtained.

  12. X-ray measurement of residual stress in metals at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winegar, J.E.

    1980-06-01

    X-ray diffraction is used at CRNL to measure residual stress in metals. This report summarizes the basic principles of stress measurement, and reviews factors affecting accuracy of measurement. The technique and equipment described were developed at CRNL to give reliable measurements. Accuracy of measurement is achieved by using fixed-count step-scanning and by computer analysis of intensity data using a cubic spline curve smoothing routine. Specific reference is made to the measurement of residual stress in Inconel-600 and Incoloy-800 boiler tubing. Because it measures stress in thin surface layers, the X-ray method can also be used to measure the depth profile of stresses. As there are no standardized procedures for measuring residual stress, this report will be useful both to those unfamiliar with the measurement of residual stress and to those already making such measurements in other laboratories. (auth)

  13. The influence of alloy composition on residual stresses in heat treated aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.S., E-mail: jeremy.robinson@ul.ie [Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Limerick (Ireland); Redington, W. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    The as quenched properties of eight different heat treatable aluminium alloys are related to residual stress magnitudes with the objective being to establish if there is a relationship between the residual stress and the as quenched alloy hardness and strength. Near surface residual stresses were assessed with X-ray diffraction using both the established sin{sup 2}ψ method and the more recent cos α technique. Through thickness residual stresses were also characterised using neutron diffraction. The alloys were chosen to encompass a wide range of strengths. The low to medium strength alloys were 6060 and 6082, medium to high strength 2618A, 2014A, 7075, 7010 and two variants of 7449, while the very high strength alloy was the powder metallurgy alloy N707. To assess the as quenched strength, dynamic hardness and tensile properties were determined from samples tested immediately after quenching to minimise the influence of precipitation hardening by natural aging. In addition, hot hardness measurements were made in situ on samples cooled to simulate quench paths. Within the experimental constraints of the investigation, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness was found to follow the same pattern for all the alloys investigated, varying from tensile in the interior to surface compression. The influence of alloy strength was manifested as a change in the observed residual stress magnitudes, and surface residual stresses were found to vary linearly with as quenched hardness and strength. - Highlights: • As quenched aluminium alloys contain high magnitude residual stresses. • Surface is compressive balance by a tensile core. • As quenched surface residual stress is linear function of alloy strength. • In situ hot hardness demonstrates rapid change in intrinsic hardness during rapid cooling.

  14. On the Stress Transfer of Nanoscale Interlayer with Surface Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved shear-lag model is proposed to investigate the mechanism through which the surface effect influences the stress transfer of multilayered structures. The surface effect of the interlayer is characterized in terms of interfacial stress and surface elasticity by using Gurtin–Murdoch elasticity theory. Our calculation result shows that the surface effect influences the efficiency of stress transfer. The surface effect is enhanced with decreasing interlayer thickness and elastic modulus. Nonuniform and large residual surface stress distribution amplifies the influence of the surface effect on stress concentration.

  15. Assessment of residual stress of 7050-T7452 aluminum alloy forging using the contour method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zheng [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Yang, Yinfei, E-mail: yyfgoat@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Li, Liang [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Chen, Bo; Tian, Hui [Xi’an Aircraft Industrial (Group) Co. Ltd., Xi’an 710000 (China)

    2015-09-17

    The cold-compression stress relief process has been used to reduce the quench-induced stresses in high-strength aerospace aluminum alloy forgings. However, this method does not completely relieve the stress. Longitudinal residual stresses in 7050-T7452 aluminum alloy forging were measured with contour method. The measuring procedure of the contour method including specimen cutting under clamps with a wire electrical discharge machine, contour measurement of the cut surface with a laser scanner, careful data processing and elastic finite element analysis was introduced in detail. In addition, multiple cuts were used to map cross sectional stress at different cut surfaces. Finally, the longitudinal residual stress throughout the cut plane was mapped, and through thickness longitudinal stress profiles were also analyzed. Investigated results suggest that spatial variation of stress distribution can be attributed to the non-uniform plastic deformation of the cold-compression stress relief process. The overall reduction of peak stress magnitudes is approximately 43–79%.

  16. Assessment of residual stress of 7050-T7452 aluminum alloy forging using the contour method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Yang, Yinfei; Li, Liang; Chen, Bo; Tian, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The cold-compression stress relief process has been used to reduce the quench-induced stresses in high-strength aerospace aluminum alloy forgings. However, this method does not completely relieve the stress. Longitudinal residual stresses in 7050-T7452 aluminum alloy forging were measured with contour method. The measuring procedure of the contour method including specimen cutting under clamps with a wire electrical discharge machine, contour measurement of the cut surface with a laser scanner, careful data processing and elastic finite element analysis was introduced in detail. In addition, multiple cuts were used to map cross sectional stress at different cut surfaces. Finally, the longitudinal residual stress throughout the cut plane was mapped, and through thickness longitudinal stress profiles were also analyzed. Investigated results suggest that spatial variation of stress distribution can be attributed to the non-uniform plastic deformation of the cold-compression stress relief process. The overall reduction of peak stress magnitudes is approximately 43–79%

  17. Analytical and Experimental Study of Residual Stresses in CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chin Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber Bragg Grating sensors (FBGs have been utilized in various engineering and photoelectric fields because of their good environment tolerance. In this research, residual stresses of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites (CFRP were studied using both experimental and analytical approach. The FBGs were embedded inside middle layers of CFRP to study the formation of residual stress during curing process. Finite element analysis was performed using ABAQUS software to simulate the CFRP curing process. Both experimental and simulation results showed that the residual stress appeared during cooling process and the residual stresses could be released when the CFRP was machined to a different shape.

  18. Residual Stress Analysis Based on Acoustic and Optical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanichiro Yoshida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Co-application of acoustoelasticity and optical interferometry to residual stress analysis is discussed. The underlying idea is to combine the advantages of both methods. Acoustoelasticity is capable of evaluating a residual stress absolutely but it is a single point measurement. Optical interferometry is able to measure deformation yielding two-dimensional, full-field data, but it is not suitable for absolute evaluation of residual stresses. By theoretically relating the deformation data to residual stresses, and calibrating it with absolute residual stress evaluated at a reference point, it is possible to measure residual stresses quantitatively, nondestructively and two-dimensionally. The feasibility of the idea has been tested with a butt-jointed dissimilar plate specimen. A steel plate 18.5 mm wide, 50 mm long and 3.37 mm thick is braze-jointed to a cemented carbide plate of the same dimension along the 18.5 mm-side. Acoustoelasticity evaluates the elastic modulus at reference points via acoustic velocity measurement. A tensile load is applied to the specimen at a constant pulling rate in a stress range substantially lower than the yield stress. Optical interferometry measures the resulting acceleration field. Based on the theory of harmonic oscillation, the acceleration field is correlated to compressive and tensile residual stresses qualitatively. The acoustic and optical results show reasonable agreement in the compressive and tensile residual stresses, indicating the feasibility of the idea.

  19. Design of specimen for weld residual stress simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Weon; Park, Jong Sun; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to design a laboratory specimen for simulating residual stress of circumferential butt welding of pipe. Specimen type and method for residual stress generation were proposed based on the review of prior studies and parametric finite element simulation. To prove the proposed specimen type and loading method, the residual stress was generated using the designed specimen by applying proposed method and was measured. The measured residual stress using X-ray diffraction reasonably agreed with the results of finite element simulation considered in the specimen design. Comparison of residual strains measured at several locations of specimen and given by finite element simulation also showed good agreement. Therefore, it is indicated that the designed specimen can reasonably simulate the residual stress of circumferential butt welding of pipe

  20. Residual stress distribution in carbon steel pipe welded joint measured by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto; Ishiwata, Masayuki; Morii, Yukio; Minakawa, Nobuaki

    2000-01-01

    In order to estimate crack growth behavior of fatigue and stress corrosion cracking in pipes, the residual stress distribution near the pipe weld region has to be measured through the wall thickness. Since the penetration depth of neutron is deep enough to pass through the thick pipe wall, the neutron diffraction technique for the residual stress measurement is effective for this purpose. At the first step the residual stress distribution near the weld region in a butt-welded carbon steel pipe was measured by the neutron diffraction. Significant stresses extended only to a distance of 30 mm from the center of the weld. The major tensile stresses occurred in the hoop direction in the fusion and heat affected zones of the weldment, and they attained a level greater than 200 MPa through the thickness. While the axial residual stress at the inside surface was 50 MPa, the stress at the outside surface was -100 MPa. The comparison of residual stress distributions measured by the neutron diffraction, the X-ray diffraction and the strain gauge method reveals that the neutron diffraction is the most effective for measuring the residual stress inside the structural components. (author)

  1. Investigation into Variations of Welding Residual Stresses and Redistribution Behaviors for Different Repair Welding Widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chiyong; Lee, Hweesueng; Huh, Namsu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the variations in welding residual stresses in dissimilar metal butt weld due to width of repair welding and re-distribution behaviors resulting from similar metal welding (SMW) and mechanical loading. To this end, detailed two-dimensional axi-symmetric finite element (FE) analyses were performed considering five different repair welding widths. Based on the FE results, we first evaluated the welding residual stress distributions in repair welding. We then investigated the re-distribution behaviors of the residual stresses due to SMW and mechanical loads. It is revealed that large tensile welding residual stresses take place in the inner surface and that its distribution is affected, provided repair welding width is larger than certain value. The welding residual stresses resulting from repair welding are remarkably reduced due to SMW and mechanical loading, regardless of the width of the repair welding

  2. Evaluation of residual stresses for the multipass welds of 316L stainless steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Joo, Y. S.; Lee, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    It is necessary to evaluate the influence of the residual stress and distortion in the design and fabrication of welded structure and the sound welded structure can be maintained by this consideration. Multipass welds of the 316L stainless steel have been widely employed in the pipes of Liquid Metal Reactor. In this study, the residual stresses in the 316L stainless steel pipe welds were calculated by the finite element method using ANSYS code. Also, the residual stresses both on the surface and in the interior of the thickness were measured by HRPD(High Resolution Powder Diffractometer) instrumented in HANARO Reactor. The residual stresses were measured for each 18 points in small(t/d=0.075) and large pipe specimens (t/d=0.034). The experimental and calculated results were compared and the characteristics of the distribution of the residual stress discussed

  3. Residual stress improvement for pipe weld by means of induction heating pre-flawed pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemoto, T.; Yoshida, K.; Okamoto, A.

    1980-01-01

    The intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) has been found in type 304 stainless steel piping of several BWR plants. It is already well known that IGSCC is most likely to occur when three essential factors, material sensitization, high tensile stress and corrosive environment, are present. If the welding residual stress is sufficiently high (200 to approximately 400 MPa) in the inside piping surface near the welded joint, then it may be one of the biggest contributors to IGSCC. If the residual stress is reduced or reversed by some way, the IGSCC will be effectively mitigated. In this paper a method to improve the residual stress named IHSI (Induction Heating Stress Improvement) is explained. IHSI aims to improve the condition of residual stress in the inside pipe surface using the thermal stress induced by the temperature difference in pipe wall, that is produced when the pipe is heated from the outside surface by an induction heating coil and cooled on the inside surface by water simultaneously. This method becomes more attractive when it can be successfully applied to in-service piping which might have some pre-flaw. In order to verify the validity of IHSI for such piping, some experiments and calculations using finite element method were conducted. These results are mainly discussed in this paper from the view-points of residual stress, flaw behaviour during IHSI and material deterioration. (author)

  4. Feasibility of ultrasonic and eddy current methods for measurement of residual stress in shot peened metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrentyev, Anton I.; Stucky, Paul A.; Veronesi, William A.

    2000-01-01

    Shot peening is a well-known method for extending the fatigue life of metal components by introducing compressive residual stresses near their surfaces. The capability to nondestructively evaluate the near surface residual stress would greatly aid the assurance of proper fatigue life in shot-peened components. This paper presents preliminary results from a feasibility study examining the use of ultrasonic and eddy current NDE methods for residual stress measurement in components where the stress has been introduced by shot peening. With an ultrasonic method, a variation of ultrasonic surface wave speed with shot peening intensity was measured. Near surface conductivity was measured by eddy current methods. Since the effective penetration depth of both methods employed is inversely related to the excitation frequency, by making measurements at different frequencies, each method has the potential to provide the stress-depth profile. Experiments were conducted on aluminum specimens (alloy 7075-T7351) peened within the Almen peening intensity range of 4C to 16C. The experimental results obtained demonstrate a correlation between peening intensity and Rayleigh wave velocity and between peening intensity and conductivity. The data suggests either of the methods may be suitable, with limitations, for detecting unsatisfactory levels of shot peening. Several factors were found to contribute to the measured responses: surface roughness, near surface plastic deformation (cold work) and residual stress. The contribution of each factor was studied experimentally. The feasibility of residual stress determination from the measured data is discussed

  5. Effect of residual stresses on fatigue strength of plasma nitrided 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghazadeh, J.; Amidi, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    Almost every method that has been presented to determine residual stress has some limitation and complexities. The aim of this work is to present a new, yet simple method so called strain indentation for measuring the residual stresses particularly in thin layers. In this method in addition to the precision measurements, components of residual stress at different directions may be determined. AISI 4140 steel specimens nitrided at 350 d ig C , 450 d ig C and 550 d ig C for 5 hours in the mixture of 75% nitrogen- 25% hydrogen gas. The, components of residual stress in the radials axial and hoop directions in the nitrided layer were determined considering the elastic strain recovery after removal of residual stress inducer(i.e. the nitrided layer). Fatigue strength of the nitrided specimens was obtained by plotting the S-N curves and fractographic studies carried out on the fracture surface of the specimens. The effect of residual stress on the stress pattern was simulated. The calculated residual stress components were in the range of 40-210 Mpa and the radial components of residual stress were more than the other two directions. Maximum fatigue strength improvement of up to 110% was observed in the plasma nitrided specimens at 550 d ig C and also 40% improvement in fatigue strength was detected by increasing the nitriding temperature from 350 d ig C to 550 d ig C . This was due to 100% increase in residual stress. Fatigue crack growth velocity in the hoop direction was more than that of radial direction. This seems to be due to higher radial residual stress component compared with the hoop stress component in the sub layer

  6. Controlling BWR pipe cracking by residual stress modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, J.D.; Giannuzzi, A.J.; Childs, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking may occur in the weld heat-affected zone of susceptible stainless steel materials which have been used in some boiling water reactor piping systems. One of the prerequisite conditions for stress corrosion attack is a high tensile stress in the exposed, locally sensitized material near the weld root. Several processes have been developed which can deter stress corrosion attack by altering the residual stress distributions near the welds to ensure that low stresses prevail in critical locations. These residual stress modification remedies and their qualification testing are described in this paper. (author)

  7. finite element model for predicting residual stresses in shielded

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    This paper investigates the prediction of residual stresses developed ... steel plates through Finite Element Model simulation and experiments. ... The experimental values as measured by the X-Ray diffractometer were of ... Based on this, it can be concluded that Finite Element .... Comparison of Residual Stresses from X.

  8. Simulation of Residual Stresses at Holes in Tempered Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a full 3D numerical study of the residual stresses in tempered (toughened) glass near holes using Narayanaswamy’s model for the tempering process. It is the objective of the paper to elucidate the influence on the minimal residual compressive stresses at holes from variations in...

  9. Residual Stress Distribution In Heat Affected Zone Of Welded Steel By Means Of Neutron Diffraction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajar, Andika; Prasuad; Gunawan; Muslich, M. Rifai

    1996-01-01

    Three dimensional residual stress distribution in the heat affected zone of 10 mm thick welded steel by means of neutron diffraction technique has been measured. The results showed that the residual stress was distributed near the welded metal, namely within about 46,25 mm. The major tensile stresses occurred in the X-direction, and they attained a level greater than 2000 MPa through the position far away fram the weld. The tensile stresses in the Y and Z- directions lied between 500 and 1500 MPa, The results also suggest that the stress in the surface was greater than that in the middle of the sample

  10. Residual stresses generated in F-522 steel by different machining processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracia-Navas, V.; Ferreres, I.; Maranon, J. A.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Gil-Sevillano, J.

    2005-01-01

    Machining operations induce plastic deformation and heat generation in the near surface area of the machined part, giving rise to residual stresses. Depending on their magnitude and sign, these stresses can be detrimental or beneficial to the service life of the part. The final stress state depends on the machining process applied, as well as on the machining parameters. Therefore, the establishment of adequate machining guidelines requires the measurement of the residual stresses generated both at the surface and inside the material. in this work, the residual stresses generated in F-522 steel by two hard turning (conventional and laser assisted) and two grinding (production and finishing) processes were measured by X-ray diffraction. Additionally, depth profiles of the volume fraction of retained austenite, microstructure and nano hardness were obtained in order to correlate those results with the residual stress state obtained for each machining process. It has been observed that turning generates tensile stresses in the surface while grinding causes compressive stresses. Below the surface grinding generates weak tensile or nearly null stresses whereas turning generates strong compressive stresses. These results show that the optimum mechanising process (disregarding economical considerations) implies the combination of turning plus elimination of a small thickness by final grinding. (Author) 19 refs

  11. Evaluation of residual stress in sputtered tantalum thin-film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-masha’al, Asa’ad, E-mail: asaad.al@ed.ac.uk; Bunting, Andrew; Cheung, Rebecca

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Tantalum thin-films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering system. • Thin-film stress is observed to be strongly influenced by sputtering pressure. • Transition towards the compressive stress is ascribed to the annealing at 300 °C. • Expose thin-film to air ambient or ion bombardment lead to a noticeable change in the residual stress. - Abstract: The influence of deposition conditions on the residual stress of sputtered tantalum thin-film has been evaluated in the present study. Films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and curvature measurement method has been employed to calculate the residual stress of the films. Transitions of tantalum film stress from compressive to tensile state have been observed as the sputtering pressure increases. Also, the effect of annealing process at temperature range of 90–300 °C in oxygen ambient on the residual stress of the films has been studied. The results demonstrate that the residual stress of the films that have been deposited at lower sputtering pressure has become more compressive when annealed at 300 °C. Furthermore, the impact of exposure to atmospheric ambient on the tantalum film stress has been investigated by monitoring the variation of the residual stress of both annealed and unannealed films over time. The as-deposited films have been exposed to pure Argon energy bombardment and as result, a high compressive stress has been developed in the films.

  12. Residual stress in spin-cast polyurethane thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Li, E-mail: lizhang@mae.cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin N.T., Hong Kong (China); Chow Yuk Ho Technology Centre for Innovative Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin N.T., Hong Kong (China)

    2015-01-19

    Residual stress is inevitable during spin-casting. Herein, we report a straightforward method to evaluate the residual stress in as-cast polyurethane thin films using area shrinkage measurement of films in floating state, which shows that the residual stress is independent of radial location on the substrate and decreased with decreasing film thickness below a critical value. We demonstrate that the residual stress is developed due to the solvent evaporation after vitrification during spin-casting and the polymer chains in thin films may undergo vitrification at an increased concentration. The buildup of residual stress in spin-cast polymer films provides an insight into the size effects on the nature of polymer thin films.

  13. The significance of residual stresses in relation to the integrity of LWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidbury, D.P.G.

    1984-01-01

    The level and distribution of residual stresses in heavy section weldments and the factors affecting their relaxation with post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) are discussed; residual stresses are also considered in relation to the deposition of austenitic strip cladding and repair welding. A brief survey is made of currently available methods of measuring surface and sub-surface residual stresses in heavy section weldments; the effects of compressive residual stresses on the detection and sizing of planar defects are similarly considered. Available fracture mechanics methodologies with the capability of evaluation defect significance in the presence of residual and other secondary stresses are reviewed in some detail. On-going experimental investigations of the effects of residual stresses on structural integrity are also described. Following a general discussion, the desirability of internationally agreed Codes and Methods for assessing defects in the presence of residual and other self-limiting stresses is pointed out. It is argued that before such agreement could be achieved, however, further work is necessary, and a number of recommendations are given. (author)

  14. Modelling of Tool Wear and Residual Stress during Machining of AISI H13 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outeiro, José C.; Umbrello, Domenico; Pina, José C.; Rizzuti, Stefania

    2007-05-01

    Residual stresses can enhance or impair the ability of a component to withstand loading conditions in service (fatigue, creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc.), depending on their nature: compressive or tensile, respectively. This poses enormous problems in structural assembly as this affects the structural integrity of the whole part. In addition, tool wear issues are of critical importance in manufacturing since these affect component quality, tool life and machining cost. Therefore, prediction and control of both tool wear and the residual stresses in machining are absolutely necessary. In this work, a two-dimensional Finite Element model using an implicit Lagrangian formulation with an automatic remeshing was applied to simulate the orthogonal cutting process of AISI H13 tool steel. To validate such model the predicted and experimentally measured chip geometry, cutting forces, temperatures, tool wear and residual stresses on the machined affected layers were compared. The proposed FE model allowed us to investigate the influence of tool geometry, cutting regime parameters and tool wear on residual stress distribution in the machined surface and subsurface of AISI H13 tool steel. The obtained results permit to conclude that in order to reduce the magnitude of surface residual stresses, the cutting speed should be increased, the uncut chip thickness (or feed) should be reduced and machining with honed tools having large cutting edge radii produce better results than chamfered tools. Moreover, increasing tool wear increases the magnitude of surface residual stresses.

  15. Non-destructive measurement of residual stresses in U-0.8 wt.% Ti by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas-Rodriguez, A.; Root, J.H.; Holden, T.M.; Macewen, S.R.; Ludtka, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The macroscopic residual stress distribution in γ-quenched and stress levelled U-0.8wt% Ti alloy tubes was studied using neutron diffraction techniques. Residual strains were evaluated from the difference in d-spacings measured in the tubes and in small reference samples machined from each tube. Residual stresses were calculated with the isotropic bulk value of the elastic constraints for polycrystalline α-U. Quenching from the γ field resulted in a nearly equi-biaxial stress state at every point across the wall thickness of the tube. The magnitude of the radial stress was very small compared with that of the axial and hoop stresses which were compressive at the surfaces and tensile in the interior. Stress levelling relieved almost completely the hoop residual stress without affecting the radial stress. The axial residual stress becomes tensile through the wall thickness and remains constant at about 20% of its magnitude in the as-quenched condition

  16. Residual stresses of manufacture on the PWR vessel head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Hong, S.; Todeschini, P.; Ternon, F.; Cipiere, M.F.; Gimond, C.; Faure, F.

    1997-01-01

    Since the detection in September 1991 of a leakage on a vessel head adapter of Bugey 3 during the decadal hydro-test, a study has been led by Framatome and EDF on the phenomenon, which has been identified as a stress corrosion cracking. The stress parameter particularly is an important factor in regard to the behaviour of the Alloy 600 in primary water. It has been the subject of a calculation program, which is not presented here, and of an experimental program which contents: 1 - the determination of residual stresses on the inner surface of the adapter and on the weld metal by the hole method and the diffraction of X-Rays on representative mock-ups and on a vessel head during manufacturing; 2 - the visualization of the stress field at the surface by corrosion tests on representative mock-ups in sodium hydroxide at 350 o C. The results are globally consistent with each other and give an important contribution to the interpretation of the results of the controls on site. (authors)

  17. Residual stress evaluation and curvature behavior of aluminium 7050 peen forming processed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, R.R. de; Lima, N.B.; Braga, A.P.V.; Goncalves, M.

    2010-01-01

    Shot peening is a superficial cold work process used to increase the fatigue life evaluated by residual stress measurements. The peen forming process is a variant of the shot peening process, where a curvature in the plate is obtained by the compression of the grains near to the surface. In this paper, the influence of the parameters such as: pressure of shot, ball shot size and thickness of aluminum 7050 samples with respect to residual stress profile and resulting arc height was studied. The evaluation of the residual stress profile was obtained by sin 2 Ψ method. (author)

  18. Study of residual stresses generated in machining of AISI 4340 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, W.P. dos; Fonseca, M.P. Cindra; Serrao, L.F.; Chuvas, T.C.; Oliveira, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Among the mechanical construction steels, AISI 4340 has good harden ability, while combining high strength with toughness and good fatigue strength, making it excellent for application in the metalworking industry, where it can work at different levels and types of requests. Residual stresses are generated in almost all processes of mechanical manufacturing. In this study, the residual stresses generated in different machining processes and heat treatment hardening of AISI 4340 were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, by the sen 2 ψ method, using Crκβ radiation and compared. All samples, except for turned and cut by EDM, presented compressive residual stresses in the surface with various magnitudes. (author)

  19. Evaluation of machining effect for the residual stress of SA508 by hole drilling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Kun; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Song, Ki O; Kim, Young Shin

    2009-01-01

    Residual stresses on a surface of the material are welcome or undesirable since it's direction, compression or tensile. But especially for the fatigue, it is not negligible effect on the material strength. These residual stresses developed during the manufacturing processes involving material deformation, heat treatment, machining. The object of this paper is verifying the effect of machining what is mostly used for SA508. For verifying the effect of machining, three different kind of machining have been achieved, milling, grinding, wire cutting. Also to measure the residual stress, hole drill method and indentation method are used.

  20. Residual stress effects on the K parameter of the fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Maria da Conceiccao B. Vieira; Andrade, Arnaldo H. Paes de

    1996-01-01

    Compressive residual stresses are beneficial and improve resistance to fracture and crack growth. Residual stresses can be introduced in fabricated components by a variety of means and a number of methods such as laser surface treatment, cold expanded hole, and shot peening. Neutrons diffraction measurements of residual stress were performed at a pulsed neutron source (ISIS, Didcot, UK), on shot peened plates of nickel base superalloy Udimet 720 and titanium alloy IMI 834. The stress intensity factor (K) of residual stress was evaluated by finite element modeling and weight function method. Finite element modeling of a 2D plate with a single edge-notch was applied and, due to symmetry only half of the plate was actually modeled. The stress intensity factor (K) was evaluated for both case of remote tension stress and residual stress. Crack surface overlapping, which is physically unacceptable, was noted for small cracks under residual and boundary lading. Overlap correction was proposed and applied in order to obtain reliable values for (K). (author)

  1. Effects of induction heating parameters on controlling residual stress in intermediate size pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, E.F.; McGuire, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    Induction heating for stress improvement (IHSI) is a method for reducing the tensile weld induced stresses on the inner surfaces of the girth welded pipes. The process entails inductively heating the outside of a welded pipe while cooling the inner surface with flowing water. A 10-inch schedule 80 Type 304 stainless steel pipe was selected for this study. Residual stresses due to welding were first determined using a finite element computational model. 26 refs

  2. Residual stress analysis in reactor pressure vessel attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, R.J.; Pont, D.

    1991-08-01

    Residual stresses in cladding and welded attachments could contribute to the problem of stress-corrosion cracking in boiling-water reactors (BWR). As part of a larger program aimed at quantifying residual stress in BWR components, models that would be applicable for predicting residual stress in BWR components are reviewed and documented. The review includes simple methods of estimating residual stresses as well as advanced finite-element software. In general, simple methods are capable of predicting peak magnitudes of residual stresses but are incapable of adequately characterizing the distribution of residual stresses. Ten groups of researchers using finite-element software are reviewed in detail. For each group, the assumptions of the model, possible simplifications, material property data, and specific applications are discussed. The most accurate results are obtained when a metallurgical simulation is performed, transformation plasticity effects are included, and the heating and cooling parts of the welding thermal cycle are simulated. Two models are identified which can provide these features. The present state of these models and the material property data available in the literature are adequate to quantify residual stress in BWR components

  3. Ceramic laminates with tailored residual stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baudín, C.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe environments imposed by new technologies demand new materials with better properties and ensured reliability. The intrinsic brittleness of ceramics has forced scientists to look for new materials and processing routes to improve the mechanical behaviour of ceramics in order to allow their use under severe thermomechanical conditions. The laminate approach has allowed the fabrication of a new family of composite materials with strength and reliability superior to those of monolithic ceramics with microstructures similar to those of the constituent layers. The different ceramic laminates developed since the middle 1970´s can be divided in two large groups depending on whether the development of residual stresses between layers is the main design tool. This paper reviews the developments in the control and tailoring of residual stresses in ceramic laminates. The tailoring of the thickness and location of layers in compression can lead to extremely performing structures in terms of strength values and reliability. External layers in compression lead to the strengthening of the structure. When relatively thin and highly compressed layers are located inside the material, threshold strength, crack bifurcation and crack arrest during fracture occur.

    Las severas condiciones de trabajo de las nuevas aplicaciones tecnológicas exigen el uso de materiales con mejores propiedades y alta fiabilidad. La potencialidad de uso de materiales frágiles, como los cerámicos, en estas aplicaciones exige el desarrollo de nuevos materiales y métodos de procesamiento que mejoren su comportamiento mecánico. El concepto de material laminado ha permitido la fabricación de una nueva familia de materiales con tensiones de fractura y fiabilidad superiores a las de materiales monolíticos con microestructuras similares a las de las láminas que conforman el laminado. Los distintos materiales laminados desarrollados desde mediados de los años 70 se pueden

  4. Residual stresses measurement by using ring-core method and 3D digital image correlation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhenxing; Xie, Huimin; Zhu, Jianguo; Wang, Huaixi; Lu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Ring-core method/three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D DIC) residual stresses measurement is proposed. Ring-core cutting is a mechanical stress relief method, and combining with 3D DIC system the deformation of the specimen surface can be measured. An optimization iteration method is proposed to obtain the residual stress and rigid-body motion. The method has the ability to cut an annular trench at a different location out of the field of view. A compression test is carried out to demonstrate how residual stress is determined by using 3D DIC system and outfield measurement. The results determined by the approach are in good agreement with the theoretical value. Ring-core/3D DIC has shown its robustness to determine residual stress and can be extended to application in the engineering field. (paper)

  5. NUMERICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF RESIDUAL STRESSES GENERATED DURING HARDENING OFAISI 4140 BAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwan Anderson Ariza Echeverri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyze the distribution of residual stresses resulting from the combination of volumetric changes due to heat gradients and phase changes occurring during the quenching process of an AISI/SAE 4140 steel cylinder. The mathematical model used for this objective is the AC3 modeling software of thermal treatments (transformation curves, cooling curves and microstructure, whose results were input in an finite element model, considering thermalmechanical coupling and non-linear elastic-plastic behavior, aiming the assessment of residual stresses in quenched 4140 steel cylinders. The observed microstructure confirms quantitatively and qualitatively the previsions of the AC3 Software. The results of the modeling are compared with the residual stresses measurements made using X-Ray diffraction techniques. The finite element numerical simulation shows the existence of 350 MPa compressive residual stresses in the surface region and indicates that the most significant stresses are tangential.

  6. Improvement and Validation of Weld Residual Stress Modelling Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Weilin; Gunnars, Jens; Dong, Pingsha; Hong, Jeong K.

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this work is to identify and evaluate improvements for the residual stress modelling procedure currently used in Sweden. There is a growing demand to eliminate any unnecessary conservatism involved in residual stress assumptions. The study was focused on the development and validation of an improved weld residual stress modelling procedure, by taking advantage of the recent advances in residual stress modelling and stress measurement techniques. The major changes applied in the new weld residual stress modelling procedure are: - Improved procedure for heat source calibration based on use of analytical solutions. - Use of an isotropic hardening model where mixed hardening data is not available. - Use of an annealing model for improved simulation of strain relaxation in re-heated material. The new modelling procedure is demonstrated to capture the main characteristics of the through thickness stress distributions by validation to experimental measurements. Three austenitic stainless steel butt-welds cases are analysed, covering a large range of pipe geometries. From the cases it is evident that there can be large differences between the residual stresses predicted using the new procedure, and the earlier procedure or handbook recommendations. Previously recommended profiles could give misleading fracture assessment results. The stress profiles according to the new procedure agree well with the measured data. If data is available then a mixed hardening model should be used

  7. Improvement and Validation of Weld Residual Stress Modelling Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Weilin; Gunnars, Jens (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Dong, Pingsha; Hong, Jeong K. (Center for Welded Structures Research, Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States))

    2009-06-15

    The objective of this work is to identify and evaluate improvements for the residual stress modelling procedure currently used in Sweden. There is a growing demand to eliminate any unnecessary conservatism involved in residual stress assumptions. The study was focused on the development and validation of an improved weld residual stress modelling procedure, by taking advantage of the recent advances in residual stress modelling and stress measurement techniques. The major changes applied in the new weld residual stress modelling procedure are: - Improved procedure for heat source calibration based on use of analytical solutions. - Use of an isotropic hardening model where mixed hardening data is not available. - Use of an annealing model for improved simulation of strain relaxation in re-heated material. The new modelling procedure is demonstrated to capture the main characteristics of the through thickness stress distributions by validation to experimental measurements. Three austenitic stainless steel butt-welds cases are analysed, covering a large range of pipe geometries. From the cases it is evident that there can be large differences between the residual stresses predicted using the new procedure, and the earlier procedure or handbook recommendations. Previously recommended profiles could give misleading fracture assessment results. The stress profiles according to the new procedure agree well with the measured data. If data is available then a mixed hardening model should be used

  8. Effect of residual stress on fatigue crack propagation at 200 C in a welded joint austenitic stainless steel - ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahouane, A.I.; Gauthier, J.P.; Petrequin, P.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue resistance of heterogeneous welded joints between austenitic stainless steels and ferritic steels is evaluated for reactor components and more particularly effect of residual stress on fatigue crack propagation in a heterogeneous welded joint. Residual stress is measured by the hole method in which a hole is drilled through the center of a strain gage glued the surface of the materials. In the non uniform stress field a transmissibility function is used for residual stress calculation. High compression residual stress in the ferritic metal near the interface ferritic steel/weld slow down fatigue crack propagation. 5 tabs., 15 figs., 19 refs [fr

  9. Residual stress in ion implanted titanium nitride studied by parallel beam glancing incidence x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, D.E.; Perry, A.J.; Treglio, J.R.; Valvoda, V.; Rafaja, D.

    1995-01-01

    Ion implantation is known to increase the lifetime of cutting tools. Current theories are the increase in lifetime is caused by an increase in the residual stress, or by work hardening of the surface associated with the implantation. In this work the effect of ion implantation on the residual stress in titanium nitride coatings made by the standard industrial methods of chemical and physical vapor deposition (CVD and PVD) is studied. It is found in the as-received condition (unimplanted), the residual stress levels are near zero for CVD materials and highly compressive, of the order of 6 GPa, for PVD materials. Ion implantation has no effect on the residual stress in the coatings made by CVD. Nitrogen does increase the compressive residual stress by some 10% in the near surface regions of PVD coatings, while nickel-titanium dual metal ion implantation does not have any effect. It appears that the lifetime increase is not associated with residual stress effects

  10. Analytic examination of mechanism for compressive residual stress introduction with low plastic strain using peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Ryo; Hato, Hisamitsu; Miyazaki, Katsumasa; Yoshikubo, Fujio

    2016-01-01

    Our goal for this study was to understand the cause of the differences in surface properties between surfaces processed using water jet peening (WJP) and shot peening (SP) and to examine the compressive residual stress introduction process with low plastic strain using SP. The dynamic behaviors of stress and strain in surfaces during these processes were analyzed through elasto-plastic calculations using a finite-element method program, and the calculated results were compared with measured results obtained through experiments. Media impacting a surface results in a difference in the hardness and microstructure of the processed surface. During SP, a shot deforms the surface locally with stress concentration in the early stages of the impact, while shock waves deform the surface evenly throughout the wave passage across the surface during WJP. A shot with a larger diameter creates a larger impact area on the surface during shot impact. Thus, SP with a large-diameter shot suppresses the stress concentration under the same kinetic energy condition. As the shot diameter increases, the equivalent plastic strain decreases. On the other hand, the shot is subject to size restriction since the calculated results indicate the compressive residual stress at the surface decreased and occasionally became almost zero as the shot diameter increased. Thus, compressive residual stress introduction with low plastic strain by using SP is considered achievable by using shots with a large diameter and choosing the appropriate peening conditions. (author)

  11. Standard test method for determining residual stresses by the hole-drilling strain-gage method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 Residual Stress Determination: 1.1.1 This test method specifies a hole-drilling procedure for determining residual stress profiles near the surface of an isotropic linearly elastic material. The test method is applicable to residual stress profile determinations where in-plane stress gradients are small. The stresses may remain approximately constant with depth (“uniform” stresses) or they may vary significantly with depth (“non-uniform” stresses). The measured workpiece may be “thin” with thickness much less than the diameter of the drilled hole or “thick” with thickness much greater than the diameter of the drilled hole. Only uniform stress measurements are specified for thin workpieces, while both uniform and non-uniform stress measurements are specified for thick workpieces. 1.2 Stress Measurement Range: 1.2.1 The hole-drilling method can identify in-plane residual stresses near the measured surface of the workpiece material. The method gives localized measurements that indicate the...

  12. Relation between psi-splitting and microscopic residual shear stresses in x-ray stress measurement on uni-directionally deformed layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanabusa, Takao; Fujiwara, Haruo

    1982-01-01

    The psi-splitting behaviors were investigated for the ground and the milled surface layers of both iron and high speed steel in order to find out the relation among microscopic residual shear stresses. For the high speed steel, the X-ray elastic constants and the residual strains were measured on the carbide phase as well as on the matrix phase. It was clarified that the psi-splitting was caused by a combination of the selective nature of X-ray diffractions and the microscopic residual shear stresses within the interior of cells and the carbide particles. The volume fraction occupied by the cell walls and the residual shear stresses sustained by them were estimated from the equilibrium condition of the microscopic residual shear stresses. The distributions of residual stresses over the deformed layers indicate that the thermal effect is dominant in grinding and the mechanical effect is dominant in milling for forming residual stresses. (author)

  13. Investigating Resulting Residual Stresses during Mechanical Forming Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlabi, Stephen A.; Fatoba, Olawale S.; Mashinini, Peter M.; Akinlabi, Esther T.

    2018-03-01

    Most manufacturing processes such as machining, welding, heat treatment, laser forming, laser cladding and, laser metal deposition, etc. are subjected to a form of heat or energy to change the geometrical shape thus changing the inherent engineering and structural properties of the material. These changes often cause the development of locked up stresses referred to as residual stresses as a result of these activities. This study reports on the residual stresses developed due to the mechanical forming process to maintain a suitable structural integrity for the formed components. The result of the analysis through the X-ray diffraction confirmed that residual stresses were induced in the manufactured parts and further revealed that residual stresses were compressive in nature as found in the parent material but with values less than the parent material.

  14. Features of residual stresses in duplex stainless steel butt welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Chin-Hyung; Chang, Kyong-Ho; Nguyen Van Do, Vuong

    2018-04-01

    Duplex stainless steel finds increasing use as an alternative to austenitic stainless steel, particularly where chloride or sulphide stress corrosion cracking is of primary concern, due to the excellent combination of strength and corrosion resistance. During welding, duplex stainless steel does not create the same magnitude or distribution of weld-induced residual stresses as those in welded austenitic stainless steel due to the different physical and mechanical properties between them. In this work, an experimental study on the residual stresses in butt-welded duplex stainless steel is performed utilizing the layering technique to investigate the characteristics of residual stresses in the weldment. Three-dimensional thermos-mechanical-metallurgical finite element analysis is also performed to confirm the residual stress measurements.

  15. Finite element analysis for prediction of the residual stresses induced by shot peening II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol; Seok, Chang Sung; Yang, Won Ho; Ryu, Myung Hai

    2002-01-01

    Shot peening is a surface impact treatment widely used to improve the performance of metal parts and welded details subjected to fatigue loading, contact fatigue, stress corrosion and other damage mechanisms. The better performance of the peened parts is mainly due to the residual stresses resulting from the plastic deformation of the surface layers of the material caused by the impact of the shot. In this paper the simulation technique is applied to predict the magnitude and distribution of the residual stress and plastic deformation caused by shot peening with the help of finite element analysis

  16. A residual life prediction model based on the generalized σ -N curved surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongwen AN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate change rule of the residual life of structure under random repeated load, firstly, starting from the statistic meaning of random repeated load, the joint probability density function of maximum stress and minimum stress is derived based on the characteristics of order statistic (maximum order statistic and minimum order statistic; then, based on the equation of generalized σ -N curved surface, considering the influence of load cycles number on fatigue life, a relationship among minimum stress, maximum stress and residual life, that is the σmin(n- σmax(n-Nr(n curved surface model, is established; finally, the validity of the proposed model is demonstrated by a practical case. The result shows that the proposed model can reflect the influence of maximum stress and minimum stress on residual life of structure under random repeated load, which can provide a theoretical basis for life prediction and reliability assessment of structure.

  17. Research on Formation Mechanism of Dynamic Response and Residual Stress of Sheet Metal Induced by Laser Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Aixin; Cao, Yupeng; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Zhengang

    2018-01-01

    In order to reveal the quantitative control of the residual stress on the surface of metal materials, the relevant theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to investigate the dynamic response of metal thin plates and the formation mechanism of residual stress induced by laser shock wave. In this paper, the latest research trends on the surface residual stress of laser shock processing technology were elaborated. The main progress of laser shock wave propagation mechanism and dynamic response, laser shock, and surface residual stress were discussed. It is pointed out that the multi-scale characterization of laser and material, surface residual stress and microstructure change is a new hotspot in laser shock strengthening technology.

  18. Residual Stress Studies Using the Cairo Fourier Diffractometer Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maayouf, R.M.A.; El-Shaer, Y.H.

    2002-01-01

    The present paper deals with residual stress studies using the Cairo Fourier diffractometer facility CFDF. The CFDF is a reverse - time of -flight (RTOF) diffractometer; applies a Fourier chopper. The measurements were performed for copper samples in order to study the residual stress after welding. The maximum modulation of the Fourier chopper during the measurements was 136 khz; leading to a time resolution half-width of about 7 μ s. It has been found from the present measurements that, the resulting diffraction spectra could be successfully used for studying the residual stress; in the wavelength range between 0.7-2.9 A degree at ∼ 0.45 % relative resolution

  19. Nonlinear morphoelastic plates I: Genesis of residual stress

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, J.

    2011-04-28

    Volumetric growth of an elastic body may give rise to residual stress. Here a rigorous analysis is given of the residual strains and stresses generated by growth in the axisymmetric Kirchhoff plate. Balance equations are derived via the Global Constraint Principle, growth is incorporated via a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient, and the system is closed by a response function. The particular case of a compressible neo-Hookean material is analyzed, and the existence of residually stressed states is established. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  20. Nonlinear morphoelastic plates I: Genesis of residual stress

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, J.; Goriely, A.; Tabor, M.

    2011-01-01

    Volumetric growth of an elastic body may give rise to residual stress. Here a rigorous analysis is given of the residual strains and stresses generated by growth in the axisymmetric Kirchhoff plate. Balance equations are derived via the Global Constraint Principle, growth is incorporated via a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient, and the system is closed by a response function. The particular case of a compressible neo-Hookean material is analyzed, and the existence of residually stressed states is established. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  1. Sensitivity Analysis for Residual Stress on DVI (Direct Vessel Injection) Nozzle Welded Joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Byeong Wook; Chung, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Hun; Kim, Oak Sug [DOOSAN Heavy Industries and Construction Co. LTD, Reactor Design Team, 555 Guygok-dong Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Generally, any welding process produces high compressive or tensile residual stresses in the heat affected zone depending on the method, shape and procedures of the weldment. In particular, the tensile residual stresses have a considerable effect on the material strength, fatigue strength and corrosion cracking. For this reason, it is important that some knowledge of the internal stress state be deduced either from measurements or from modeling predictions. In this study, the residual stresses after a multi-pass welding process for DVI nozzle welding joint were evaluated by a numerical simulation method. The welding joint considered three weld joint angles of 40 deg., 6 deg. and 2 deg. Computations were made using a 2-D finite element model based on the simulation of cooling from the heat treatment temperature to room temperature with two cooling conditions at the inside surface. In these results, it is shown that the residual stress increased at the inner surface, when water cooling was applied to the inner surface, and axial compressive residual stress increased at the inner surface when the joint angle was decreased. (authors)

  2. Sensitivity Analysis for Residual Stress on DVI (Direct Vessel Injection) Nozzle Welded Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Byeong Wook; Chung, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Hun; Kim, Oak Sug

    2008-01-01

    Generally, any welding process produces high compressive or tensile residual stresses in the heat affected zone depending on the method, shape and procedures of the weldment. In particular, the tensile residual stresses have a considerable effect on the material strength, fatigue strength and corrosion cracking. For this reason, it is important that some knowledge of the internal stress state be deduced either from measurements or from modeling predictions. In this study, the residual stresses after a multi-pass welding process for DVI nozzle welding joint were evaluated by a numerical simulation method. The welding joint considered three weld joint angles of 40 deg., 6 deg. and 2 deg. Computations were made using a 2-D finite element model based on the simulation of cooling from the heat treatment temperature to room temperature with two cooling conditions at the inside surface. In these results, it is shown that the residual stress increased at the inner surface, when water cooling was applied to the inner surface, and axial compressive residual stress increased at the inner surface when the joint angle was decreased. (authors)

  3. Induced surface stress at crystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmen, K.

    2002-05-01

    Changes of the surfaces stress Δτ (s) can be studied by observing the bending of thin crystalline plates. With this cantilever method one can gain the induced change of surface stress Δτ (s) from the bending of plates with the help of elasticity theory. For elastic isotropic substrates the relevant relations are known. Here the relations are generalized to elastic anisotropic crystals with a C 2v - Symmetry. The equilibrium shapes of crystalline plates oriented along the (100)-, (110)-, or (111)-direction which are clamped along one edge are calculated with a numeric method under the load of a homogeneous but pure isotropic or anisotropic surface stress. The results can be displayed with the dimensionality, so that the effect of clamping can be described in a systematic way. With these tabulated values one can evaluate cantilever experiments exactly. These results are generalized to cantilever methods for determining magnetoelastic constants. It is shown which magnetoelastic constants are measured in domains of thin films with ordered structures. The eigenshape and the eigenfrequency of plates constraint through a clamping at one side are calculated. These results give a deeper understanding of the elastic anisotropy. The induced surface stress of oxygen on the (110)-surface of molybdenum is measured along the principle directions Δτ [001] and Δτ [ anti 110] . The anisotropy of the surface stress is found for the p(2 x 2)-reconstruction. Lithium induces a tensile surface stress on the Molybdenum (110)-surface up to a coverage of Θ = 0, 3 monolayer. For a higher coverage the induced stress drops and reaches a level of less than -1, 2 N/m at one monolayer. It is shown, that cobalt induces a linear increasing stress with respect to the coverage on the (100)-surface of copper with a value of 2, 4GPa. The copper (100)-surface is bombarded with accelerated ions in the range between 800-2200 eV. The resulting induced compressive stress (Δτ (s) < 0) of the order

  4. Influence of ion irradiation on internal residual stress in DLC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaseov, Platon A., E-mail: platon.karaseov@rphf.spbstu.r [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya St. 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Podsvirov, Oleg A.; Karabeshkin, Konstantin V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya St. 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, Andrei Ya. [Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute RAS, Polytechnicheskaya 26, 195252 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Azarov, Alexander Yu. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya St. 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Karasev, Nikita N. [State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Sablinskaya Str. 14, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Titov, Andrei I.; Smirnov, Alexander S. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya St. 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-01

    The dependence of internal residual stress in thin diamond-like carbon films grown on Si substrate by PECVD technique on most important growth parameters, namely RF-power, DC bias voltage and substrate temperature, is described. Results show that compressive stress reaches the highest value of 2.7 GPa at low RF-power and DC bias. Increase of substrate temperature from 250 to 350 {sup o}C leads to nonlinear increase of stress value. Inhomogeneity of residual stress along the film surface disappears when film is deposited at temperatures above 275 {sup o}C. Post-growth film irradiation by P{sup +} and In{sup +} ions cause decrease of compressive stress followed by its inversion to tensile. For all ion energy combinations used residual stress changes linearly with normalized fluence up to 0.2 DPA with slope (8.7 {+-} 1.3) GPa/DPA.

  5. Evaluation of stress intensity factors due to welding residual stresses for circumferential cracked pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang-Young; Kim, Yun-Jae; Oh, Young-Jin; Kim, Jong-Sung; Song, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Yong-Beum

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the applicability of existing methods to estimate stress intensity factors due to welding residual stresses, comparisons with finite element (FE) solutions are made for two types of generic welding residual stress profiles, generated by simulating repair welds. It is found that fitting residual stresses over the crack depth using third-order polynomials gives good estimates of stress intensity factors but fitting over the entire thickness can result in inaccurate estimates even with fourth-order polynomials. Noting that welding residual stresses are often determined from FE analyses, linearization of residual stresses to estimate stress intensity factors is proposed. Comparison with FE solutions shows good agreements. -- Highlights: ► Applicability of K estimation methods is investigated for welding residual stresses. ► Two types of generic residual stress profiles with repair welds are considered. ► Fitting residual stresses over the crack depth gives good estimates of K. ► A method to estimate K by linearising residual stress profiles is proposed

  6. Compressive residual stresses as a preventive measure against stress corrosion cracking on turbine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Ewald, J.; Fischer, K.; Gruendler, O.; Potthast, E.; Stuecker, E.; Winzen, G.

    1987-01-01

    Disk type low pressure turbine rotors have been designed for a large variety of power plant applications. Developing disk type rotors required a concerted effort to design a shaft/disk shrink fit with a minimum of tensile stress concentrations in order to aim for the lowest possible susceptibility to corrosive attack, i.e. stress corrosion cracking. As a result of stresses, the regions of greatest concern are the shrink fit boundaries and the keyways of turbine disks. These stresses are caused by service loading, i.e. centrifugal and shrinkage stresses and by manufacturing procedure, i.e. residual stresses. The compressive residual stresses partly compensate the tensile service stresses so that an increase of compressive residual stresses decreases the whole stress state of the component. Special manufacturing procedures, e.g. accelerated cooling after tempering can induce compressive residual stresses up to about 400 MPa in the hub bore region of turbine disk

  7. Residual Stress Evaluation of Weld Inlay Process on Reactor Vessel Nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kihyun; Cho, Hong Seok [KEPCO KPS, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Weld overlay, weld inlay and stress improvement are mitigation technologies for butt joints. Weld overlay is done on pressurizer nozzles which are the highest potential locations occurring PWSCC due to high temperature in Korea. Reactor vessel nozzles are other big safety concerns for butt joints. Weld overlay and stress improvement should be so difficult to apply to those locations because space is too limited. Weld inlay should be one of the solutions. KEPCO KPS has developed laser welding system and process for reactor nozzles. Welding residual stress analysis is necessary for flaw evaluation. United States nuclear regulatory commission has calculated GTAW(Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) residual stress using ABAQUS. To confirm effectiveness of weld inlay process, welding residual stress analysis was performed. and difference between GTAW and LASER welding process was compared. Evaluation of weld inlay process using ANSYS and ABAQUS is performed. All of the both results are similar. The residual stress generated after weld inlay was on range of 450-500 MPa. Welding residual stresses are differently generated by GTAW and LASER welding. But regardless of welding process type, residual tensile stress is generated on inside surface.

  8. Application of x-ray residual stress measurement to products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, T.; Iwamura, T.

    1975-01-01

    The X-ray residual stress measuring method is the only nondestructive method for measuring residual stress in polycrystalline materials. It is capable of obtaining information not only on macroscopic stress but also microscopic stress. The authors are employing this method for the development of pre-service and in-service inspection methods and for the improvement of various manufacturing techniques. In this paper, the results of measurement of some products as examples of its application are described. The examples introduced concern the following: (1) Selection of optimum conditions in heat treatment and stress-relief treatment. (2) Residual stress produced by mechanical processes such as autofrettage and flow form. (3) Check of manufacturing processes of rotary shaft and welded parts. (4) Estimation of fatigue strength of shot-peened part. (5) Detection of fatigue damage of shot-peened part. (auth.)

  9. Modeling of CMUTs with Multiple Anisotropic Layers and Residual Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Mathias; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2014-01-01

    Usually the analytical approach for modeling CMUTs uses the single layer plate equation to obtain the deflection and does not take anisotropy and residual stress into account. A highly accurate model is developed for analytical characterization of CMUTs taking an arbitrary number of layers...... and residual stress into account. Based on the stress-strain relation of each layer and balancing stress resultants and bending moments, a general multilayered anisotropic plate equation is developed for plates with an arbitrary number of layers. The exact deflection profile is calculated for a circular...... clamped plate of anisotropic materials with residual bi-axial stress. From the deflection shape the critical stress for buckling is calculated and by using the Rayleigh-Ritz method the natural frequency is estimated....

  10. Eddy Current Nondestructive Residual Stress Assessment in Shot-Peened Nickel-Base Superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blodgett, M.P.; Yu, F.; Nagy, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Shot peening and other mechanical surface enhancement methods improve the fatigue resistance and foreign-object damage tolerance of metallic components by introducing beneficial near-surface compressive residual stresses and hardening the surface. However, the fatigue life improvement gained via surface enhancement is not explicitly accounted for in current engine component life prediction models because of the lack of accurate and reliable nondestructive methods that could verify the presence of compressive near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened hardware. In light of its frequency-dependent penetration depth, the measurement of eddy current conductivity has been suggested as a possible means to allow the nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in surface-treated components. This technique is based on the so-called piezoresistivity effect, i.e., the stress-dependence of electrical resistivity. We found that, in contrast with most other materials, surface-treated nickel-base superalloys exhibit an apparent increase in electrical conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies, i.e., at decreasing penetration depths. Experimental results are presented to illustrate that the excess frequency-dependent apparent eddy current conductivity of shot-peened nickel-base superalloys can be used to estimate the absolute level and penetration depth of the compressive residual stress layer both before and after partial thermal relaxation

  11. Residual stress in silicon wafer using IR polariscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhijia; Wang, Pin; Asundi, Anand

    2008-09-01

    The infrared phase shift polariscope (IR-PSP) is a full-field optical technique for stress analysis in Silicon wafers. Phase shift polariscope is preferred to a conventional polariscope, as it can provide quantitative information of the normal stress difference and the shear stress in the specimen. The method is based on the principles of photoelasticity, in which stresses induces temporary birefringence in materials which can be quantitatively analyzed using a phase shift polariscope. Compared to other stress analysis techniques such as x-ray diffraction or laser scanning, infrared photoelastic stress analysis provides full-field information with high resolution and in near real time. As the semiconductor fabrication is advancing, larger wafers, thinner films and more compact packages are being manufactured. This results in a growing demand of process control. Residual stress exist in silicon during semiconductor fabrication and these stresses may make cell processing difficult or even cause the failure of the silicon. Reducing these stresses would improve manufacturability and reliability. Therefore stress analysis is essential to trace the root cause of the stresses. The polariscope images are processed using MATLAB and four-step phase shifting method to provide quantitative as well as qualitative information regarding the residual stress of the sample. The system is calibrated using four-point bend specimen and then the residual stress distribution in a MEMS sample is shown.

  12. The nev diffractometer ARES for the analysis of residual stresses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staron, P.; Ruhnau, H. U.; Marmotti, M.; Mikula, Pavol; Kampmann, R.

    276/278, - (2000), s. 158-159 ISSN 0921-4526 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : neutron instruments * residual stress Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.893, year: 2000

  13. Analysis of residual stresses in a long hollow cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokovyy, Yuriy V.; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for solving the axisymmetric stress problem for a long hollow cylinder subjected to locally-distributed residual (incompatible) strains. This method is based on direct integration of the equilibrium and compatibility equations, which thereby have been reduced to the set of two governing equations for two key functions with corresponding boundary and integral conditions. The governing equations were solved by making use of the Fourier integral transformation. Application of the method is illustrated with an analysis of the welding residual stresses in a butt-welded thick-walled pipe. - Highlights: → A solution to the axisymmetric stress problem for a hollow cylinder is constructed. → The cylinder is subjected to a field of locally-distributed residual strains. → The method is based on direct integration of the equilibrium equations. → An application of our solution to analysis of welding residual stresses is considered.

  14. An investigation of the residual stress characterization and relaxation in peened friction stir welded aluminum-lithium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Rivero, Iris V.; Swain, Shayla E.

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation the residual stresses generated from friction stir welded (FSW) 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy joints were characterized. The results derived from this research revealed significant levels of tensile residual stresses at the surface and throughout the thickness of the FSW samples. Furthermore, residual stress relaxation at the surface and throughout the thickness of the samples was assessed for laser peened friction stir welded aluminum-lithium joints. To do so the samples were cycled several times at a constant amplitude load. The results indicated that most of the relaxation for the surface residual stresses took place during the first cycle of loading. Also, residual stresses relaxation throughout the thickness of the welded region of unpeened samples significantly exceeded the relaxation exhibited by the laser peened samples.

  15. A coupled creep plasticity model for residual stress relaxation of a shot-peened nickel-based superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Dennis J.; John, Reji; Brockman, Robert A.; Rosenberger, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Shot peening is a commonly used surface treatment process that imparts compressive residual stresses into the surface of metal components. Compressive residual stresses retard initiation and growth of fatigue cracks. During component loading history, shot-peened residual stresses may change due to thermal exposure, creep, and cyclic loading. In these instances, taking full credit for compressive residual stresses would result in a nonconservative life prediction. This article describes a methodical approach for characterizing and modeling residual stress relaxation under elevated temperature loading, near and above the monotonic yield strength of INI 00. The model incorporates the dominant creep deformation mechanism, coupling between the creep and plasticity models, and effects of prior plastic strain to simulate surface treatment deformation.

  16. Standard practice for estimating the approximate residual circumferential stress in straight thin-walled tubing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 A qualitative estimate of the residual circumferential stress in thin-walled tubing may be calculated from the change in outside diameter that occurs upon splitting a length of the tubing. This practice assumes a linear stress distribution through the tube wall thickness and will not provide an estimate of local stress distributions such as surface stresses. (Very high local residual stress gradients are common at the surface of metal tubing due to cold drawing, peening, grinding, etc.) The Hatfield and Thirkell formula, as later modified by Sachs and Espey, provides a simple method for calculating the approximate circumferential stress from the change in diameter of straight, thin-walled, metal tubing. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. Residual stress measurement inside a dissimilar metal weld mock-up of the pressurizer safety and relief nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Silva, Luiz L.; Mansur, Tanius R., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvall@cdtn.br, E-mail: tanius@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Servico de Integridade Estrutural; Martins, Ketsia S., E-mail: ketshinoda@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Nelo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica

    2015-07-01

    Residual stresses are present in materials or structural component in the absence of external loads or changes in temperatures. The most common causes of residual stresses being present are the manufacturing or assembling processes. All manufacturing processes, such as casting, welding, machining, molding, heat treatment, among others, introduces residual stresses into the manufactured object. The residual stresses effects could be beneficial or detrimental, depending on its distribution related to the component or structure, its load service and if it is compressive or tensile. In this work, the residual strains and stresses inside a mock-up that simulates the safety and relief nozzle of Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant pressurizer were studied. The current paper presents a blind hole-drilling method residual stress measurements both at the inner surface of dissimilar metal welds of dissimilar metal weld nozzle mock-up. (author)

  18. Residual stress measurement inside a dissimilar metal weld mock-up of the pressurizer safety and relief nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Silva, Luiz L.; Mansur, Tanius R.; Martins, Ketsia S.

    2015-01-01

    Residual stresses are present in materials or structural component in the absence of external loads or changes in temperatures. The most common causes of residual stresses being present are the manufacturing or assembling processes. All manufacturing processes, such as casting, welding, machining, molding, heat treatment, among others, introduces residual stresses into the manufactured object. The residual stresses effects could be beneficial or detrimental, depending on its distribution related to the component or structure, its load service and if it is compressive or tensile. In this work, the residual strains and stresses inside a mock-up that simulates the safety and relief nozzle of Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant pressurizer were studied. The current paper presents a blind hole-drilling method residual stress measurements both at the inner surface of dissimilar metal welds of dissimilar metal weld nozzle mock-up. (author)

  19. Residual stress analysis in carbon fiber-reinforced SiC ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, M.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic residual stress analyses are reported, carried out in long-fiber reinforced SiC ceramics. The laminated C fiber /SiC matrix specimens used were prepared by polymer pyrolysis, and the structural component specimens used are industrial products. Various diffraction methods have been applied for non-destructive evaluation of residual stress fields, so as to completely detect the residual stresses and their distribution in the specimens. The residual stress fields at the surface (μm) have been measured using characteristic X-radiation and applying the sin 2 ψ method as well as the scatter vector method. For residual stress field analysis in the mass volume (cm), neutron diffraction has been applied. The stress fields in the fiber layers (approx. 250μm) have been measured as a function of their location within the laminated composite by using an energy-dispersive method and synchrotron radiation. By means of the systematic, process-accompanying residual stress and phase analyses, conclusions can be drawn as to possible approaches for optimization of fabrication parameters. (orig./CB) [de

  20. Modeling of plates with multiple anisotropic layers and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Mathias; Pedersen, Thomas; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2016-01-01

    Usually the analytical approach for modeling of plates uses the single layer plate equation to obtain the deflection and does not take anisotropy and residual stress into account. Based on the stress–strain relation of each layer and balancing stress resultants and bending moments, a general...... multilayered anisotropic plate equation is developed for plates with an arbitrary number of layers. The exact deflection profile is calculated for a circular clamped plate of anisotropic materials with residual bi-axial stress.From the deflection shape the critical stress for buckling is calculated......, and an excellent agreement between the two models is seen with a relative difference of less than 2% for all calculations. The model was also used to extract the cell capacitance, the parasitic capacitance and the residual stress of a pressure sensor composed of a multilayered plate of silicon and silicon oxide...

  1. Residual stress relief in MAG welded joints of dissimilar steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seodek, P.; Brozda, J.; Wang, L.; Withers, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the relief of residual stress in welded joints between austenitic and non-alloyed ferritic-pearlitic steels. A series of similar and dissimilar steel joints based on the 18G2A (ferritic-pearlitic) and 1H18N10T (austenitic) steels were produced, some of which were stress relieved by annealing and some by mechanical prestressing. For the as-welded and stress relieved test joints the residual stresses were measured by trepanning. To aid the interpretation of these results, 2D plane stress finite element analysis has been performed to simulate the residual stress relieving methods. Analysis of the results has shown that thermal stress relieving of welded joints between dissimilar steels is not effective and may even increase residual stresses, due to the considerable difference in thermal expansion of the joined steels. It was found that, for the loads imposed, the effectiveness of the mechanical stress relieving of dissimilar steel welded joints was much lower than that of similar steel joints

  2. The finite element analysis for prediction of residual stresses induced by shot peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol; Yang, Won Ho; Sung, Ki Deug; Cho, Myoung Rae; Ko, Myung Hoon

    2000-01-01

    The shot peening is largely used for a surface treatment in which small spherical parts called shots are blasted on a surface of a metallic components with velocities up to 100m/s. This treatment leads to an improvement of fatigue behavior due to the developed compressive residual stresses, and so it has gained widespread acceptance in the automobile and aerospace industries. The residual stress profile on surface layer depends on the parameters of shot peening, which are, shot velocity, shot diameter, coverage, impact angle, material properties etc. and the method to confirm this profile is only measurement by X-ray diffractometer. Despite its importance to automobile and aerospace industries, little attention has been devoted to the accurate modeling of the process. In this paper, the simulation technique is applied to predict the magnitude and distribution of the residual stress and plastic deformation caused by shot peening with the help of the finite element analysis

  3. Effects of residual stress on irradiation hardening in stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, N.; Kondo, K.; Kaji, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Miwa, Y. [Nuclear Energy and Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Structural materials in fusion reactor with water cooling system will undergo corrosion in aqueous environment and heavier irradiation than that in LWR. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion (IASCC) may be induced in stainless steels exposed in these environment for a long term of reactor operation. The IASCC is considered to be caused in a welding zone. It is difficult to predict and estimate the IASCC, because several irradiation effects (irradiation hardening, swelling, irradiation induced stress relaxation, etc) work intricately. Firstly, effects of residual stress on irradiation hardening were investigated in stainless steels. Specimens used in this study were SUS316 and SUS316L. By bending deformation, the specimens with several % plastic strain, which corresponds to weld residual stress, were prepared. Ion irradiations of 12 MeV Ni{sup 3+} were performed at 330, 400 and 550 deg. C to 45 dpa in TIARA facility at JAEA. No bent specimen was simultaneously irradiated with the bent specimen. The residual stress was estimated by X-ray residual stress measurements before and after the irradiation. The micro-hardness was measured by using nano-indenter. The irradiation hardening and the stress relaxation were changed by irradiation under bending deformation. The residual stress did not relax even for the case of the higher temperature aging at 500 deg. C for the same time of irradiation. The residual stress after ion irradiation, however, relaxed at these experimental temperatures in SUS316L. The hardness was obviously suppressed in bent SUS316L irradiated at 300 deg. C to 6 or 12 dpa. It was evident that irradiation induced stress relaxation occasionally suppressed the irradiation hardening in SUS316L. (authors)

  4. Residual stresses in a cast iron automotive brake disc rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripley, Maurice I.; Kirstein, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Runout, and consequent juddering and pulsation through the brake pedal, is a multi-million dollar per year warranty problem for car manufacturers. There is some suspicion that the runout can be caused by relaxation of residual casting stresses when the disc is overheated during severe-braking episodes. We report here neutron-diffraction measurements of the levels and distribution of residual strains in a used cast iron brake disc rotor. The difficulties of measuring stresses in grey cast iron are outlined and three-dimensional residual-strain distributions are presented and their possible effects discussed

  5. Residual stress investigation of copper plate and canister EB-Welds Complementary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gripenberg, H.

    2009-03-01

    The residual stresses in copper as induced by EB-welding were studied by specimens where the weld had two configurations: either a linear or a circumferential weld. This report contains the residual stress measurements of two plates, containing linear welds, and the full-scale copper lid specimen to which a hollow cylinder section had been joined by a circumferential EB-weld. The residual stress state of the EB-welded copper specimens was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), hole drilling (HD) ring core (RC) and contour method (CM). Three specimens, canister XK010 and plates X251 and X252, were subjected to a thorough study aiming at quantitative determination of the residual stress state in and around the EB-welds using XRD for surface and HD and RC for spatial stress analysis. The CM maps one stress component over a whole cross section. The surface residual stresses measured by XRD represent the machined condition of the copper material. The XRD study showed that the stress changes towards compression close to the weld in the hollow cylinder, which indicates shrinkage in the hoop direction. According to the same analogy, the shrinkage in the axial direction is much smaller. The HD measurements showed that the stress state in the base material is bi-axial and, in terms of von Mises stress, 50 MPa for the plates and 20 MPa for the cylinder part of the canister. The stress state in the EB-welds of all specimens differs clearly from the stress state in the base material being more tensile, with higher magnitudes of von Mises stress in the plate than in the canister welds. The HD and RC results were obtained using linear elastic theory. The RC measurements showed that the maximum principal stress in the BM is close to zero near the surface and it becomes slightly tensile, 10 MPa, deeper under the surface. Welding pushed the general stress state towards tension with the maximum principal stress reaching 50 MPa, deeper than 5 mm below the surface in the weld. The

  6. Numerical investigation on residual stress distribution and evolution during multipass narrow gap welding of thick-walled stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Zhang, J.X.; Xue, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We performed pass-by-pass simulation of stresses for welding of thick-walled pipes. → The distributions and evolution of the residual stresses are demonstrated. → After the groove is filled to a height, the through-wall stress is almost unchanged. - Abstracts: The detailed pass-by-pass finite element (FE) simulation is presented to investigate the residual stresses in narrow gap multipass welding of pipes with a wall thickness of 70 mm and 73 weld passes. The simulated residual stress on the outer surface is validated with the experimental one. The distribution and evolution of the through-wall residual stresses are demonstrated. The investigated results show that the residual stresses on the outer and inner surfaces are tensile in the weld zone and its vicinity. The through-wall axial residual stresses at the weld center line and the HAZ line demonstrate a distribution of bending type. The through-wall hoop residual stress within the weld is mostly tensile. After the groove is filled to a certain height, the peak tensile stresses and the stress distribution patterns for both axial and hoop stresses remain almost unchanged.

  7. INTERFACE RESIDUAL STRESSES IN DENTAL ZIRCONIA USING LAUE MICRO-DIFFRACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bale, H. A.; Tamura, N.; Coelho, P.G.; Hanan, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Due to their aesthetic value and high compressive strength, dentists have recently employed ceramics for restoration materials. Among the ceramic materials, zirconia provides high toughness and crack resistant characteristics. Residual stresses develop in processing due to factors including grain anisotropy and thermal coefficient mismatch. In the present study, polychromatic X-ray (Laue) micro-diffraction provided grain orientation and residual stresses on a clinically relevant zirconia model ceramic disk. A 0.5 mm x 0.024 mm region on zirconia was examined on a 500 nm scale for residual stresses using a focused poly-chromatic synchrotron X-ray beam. Large stresses ranging from - to + 1GPa were observed at some grains. On average, the method suggests a relatively small compressive stress at the surface between 47 and 75 MPa depending on direction

  8. Residual stress measurements in the dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Mansur, Tanius R.; Scaldaferri, Denis H.B.; Paula, Raphael G.; Souto, Joao P.R.S.; Carvalho Junior, Ideir T.

    2013-01-01

    Weld residual stresses have a large influence on the behavior of cracking that could possibly occur under normal operation of components. In case of an unfavorable environment, both stainless steel and nickel-based weld materials can be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). Stress corrosion cracks were found in dissimilar metal welds of some pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear plants. In the nuclear reactor primary circuit the presence of tensile residual stress and corrosive environment leads to so-called Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). The PWSCC is a major safety concern in the nuclear power industry worldwide. PWSCC usually occurs on the inner surface of weld regions which come into contact with pressurized high temperature water coolant. However, it is very difficult to measure the residual stress on the inner surfaces of pipes or nozzles because of inaccessibility. A mock-up of weld parts of a pressurizer safety nozzle was fabricated. The mock-up was composed of three parts: an ASTM A508 C13 nozzle, an ASTM A276 F316L stainless steel safe-end, an AISI 316L stainless steel pipe and different filler metals of nickel alloy 82/182 and AISI 316L. This work presents the results of measurements of residual strain from the outer surface of the mock-up welded in base metals and filler metals by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. (author)

  9. Proposed residual stress model for roller bent wide flange sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, R.C.; Snijder, H.H.; Hoenderkamp, J.C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process of structural wide flange steel sections introduces residual stresses in the material. These stresses due to hot-rolling or welding influence the inelastic buckling response of structural steel members and need to be taken into account in the design. Based on experimental

  10. Residual stresses in non-symmetrical carbon-epoxy laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijskamp, Sebastiaan; Akkerman, Remko; Lamers, E.A.D.; Martin, M.J.; Hahn, H.T.

    2003-01-01

    The curvature of unsymmetrical [0/90] laminates moulded from AS4/8552 uni-directional tape has been measured. A linear thermoelastic approach has been applied to predict the related residual stress state before demoulding, giving an estimate of the stress induced by polymerisation strain. The

  11. The effect of residual stresses induced by prestraining on fatigue life of notched specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeler, R.; Ozel, A.; Kaymaz, I.; Totik, Y.

    2005-06-01

    The effect of tensile prestraining-induced residual stress on the fatigue life of notched steel parts was investigated. The study was performed on AISI 4140 steel. Rotating bending fatigue tests were carried out on semicircular notched specimens with different notch radii in the as-quenched and tempered conditions. Metallography of the specimens was performed by means of light optical microscopy. The finite-element method was used to evaluate the residual stress distribution near the notch region. Fatigue tests revealed fatigue life improvement for notched specimens, which changes depending on the notch radii and applied stress. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the fracture surfaces of the specimens.

  12. Systematic Review of Uit Parameters on Residual Stresses of Sensitized AA5456 and Field Based Residual Stress Measurements for Predicting and Mitigating Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    University Press, 2009, pp. 820–824. [30] S. Kou, Welding Metallurgy , 2nd ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2003. [31] M. N.James et al...around welds in aluminum ship structures both in the laboratory and in the field. Tensile residual stresses are often generated during welding and, in...mitigate and even reverse these tensile residual stresses. This research uses x-ray diffraction to measure residual stresses around welds in AA5456 before

  13. Influence of treatment by vibration in residual stress generated in the laser welding of HSLA and IF steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuvas, T.C.; Fonseca, M.P. Cindra; Castello, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The stress relieving treatment by vibration is a new technology under development, which has many advantages over thermal methods. In this work was analyzed the surface residual stress generated in the laser welding of biphasic HSLA and IF steels, both used in the automotive industry. Residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction, by the sen 2 Ψ method. Residual stresses generated in the welding of the samples were tensile at all points measured. After welding, the samples were submitted to the mechanical vibration treatment. Some samples presented a significant reduction in the stress values. The welded joints were also characterized by optical microscopy. (author)

  14. Residual stress evaluation and curvature behavior of aluminium 7050 peen forming processed; Avaliacao da tensao residual em aluminio 7050 conformado pelo processo peen forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R.R. de; Lima, N.B., E-mail: rolivier@ipen.b, E-mail: nblima@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Braga, A.P.V.; Goncalves, M., E-mail: anapaola@ipt.b, E-mail: mgoncalves@ipt.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Shot peening is a superficial cold work process used to increase the fatigue life evaluated by residual stress measurements. The peen forming process is a variant of the shot peening process, where a curvature in the plate is obtained by the compression of the grains near to the surface. In this paper, the influence of the parameters such as: pressure of shot, ball shot size and thickness of aluminum 7050 samples with respect to residual stress profile and resulting arc height was studied. The evaluation of the residual stress profile was obtained by sin{sup 2} {Psi} method. (author)

  15. Residual stresses in 2 1/4Cr1Mo welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, R.; Jerram, K.

    1978-01-01

    Two separate investigations, initiated in an attempt to explain the large amount of residual stress scatter previously observed in the weld metal of eighteen nominally identical thick-section 2 1/4Cr1Mo butt welds, are described in this paper. The first examined the detailed surface residual stress distributions in 2 1/4Cr1Mo manual arc circumferential butt welds in 80mm and 100mm thick 1/2Cr1/2Mo1/4V steam pipe. High residual stresses were found in the regions of overlap between adjacent weld beads, with low values in virgin weld metal. The second utilised single pass manual metal arc bead-in-groove welds to investigate the effects of preheat and weld metal composition on weld metal residual stresses. In four weld metals, mild steel, 1/2Cr1/2Mo1/4V, 1Cr1/2Mo, and 2 1/4Cr1Mo, the residual stresses were very similar, becoming less tensile (or more compressive) with increase of preheat, while the residual stresses in the fifth weld metal (12Cr) were significantly different, being compressive and less affected by preheat. In both investigations the effects have been described in terms of the basic metallurgical phenomena occurring in the weld metal. (author)

  16. Effect of cryogenic treatment on distribution of residual stress in case carburized En 353 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensely, A.; Venkatesh, S.; Mohan Lal, D.; Nagarajan, G.; Rajadurai, A.; Junik, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    The effect of cryogenic treatment on the distribution of residual stress in the case carburized steel (En 353) was studied using X-ray diffraction technique. Two types of cryogenic treatment: shallow cryogenic treatment (193 K) and deep cryogenic treatment (77 K) were adopted, as a supplement to conventional heat treatment. The amount of retained austenite in conventionally heat-treated, shallow cryogenically treated and deep cryogenically treated samples was found to be 28%, 22% and 14%, respectively. The conventionally heat-treated, shallow cryogenically treated and deep cryogenically treated samples in untempered condition had a surface residual stress of -125 MPa, -115 MPa and -235 MPa, respectively. After tempering the conventionally heat-treated, shallow cryogenically treated and deep cryogenically treated samples had a surface residual stress of -150 MPa, -80 MPa and -80 MPa, respectively. A comparative study of the three treatments revealed that there was an increase in the compressive residual stress in steel that was subjected to cryogenic treatment prior to tempering. The experimental investigation revealed that deep cryogenically treated steel when subjected to tempering has undergone a reduction in compressive residual stress. Such stress relieving behaviour was mainly due to the increased precipitation of fine carbides in specimens subjected to DCT with tempering

  17. Normalized Rotational Multiple Yield Surface Framework (NRMYSF) stress-strain curve prediction method based on small strain triaxial test data on undisturbed Auckland residual clay soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, M. J. Md; Ibrahim, A.; Rahman, A. S. A.

    2018-04-01

    Small strain triaxial test measurement is considered to be significantly accurate compared to the external strain measurement using conventional method due to systematic errors normally associated with the test. Three submersible miniature linear variable differential transducer (LVDT) mounted on yokes which clamped directly onto the soil sample at equally 120° from the others. The device setup using 0.4 N resolution load cell and 16 bit AD converter was capable of consistently resolving displacement of less than 1µm and measuring axial strains ranging from less than 0.001% to 2.5%. Further analysis of small strain local measurement data was performed using new Normalized Multiple Yield Surface Framework (NRMYSF) method and compared with existing Rotational Multiple Yield Surface Framework (RMYSF) prediction method. The prediction of shear strength based on combined intrinsic curvilinear shear strength envelope using small strain triaxial test data confirmed the significant improvement and reliability of the measurement and analysis methods. Moreover, the NRMYSF method shows an excellent data prediction and significant improvement toward more reliable prediction of soil strength that can reduce the cost and time of experimental laboratory test.

  18. Numerical analysis of residual stresses reconstruction for axisymmetric glass components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Bo; Xu, Shuang; Yao, Honghui

    2018-01-01

    A non-destructive measurement method for 3D stress state in a glass cylinder using photoelasticity has been analyzed by simulation in this research. Based on simulated stresses in a glass cylinder, intensity of the cylinder in a circular polariscope can be calculated by Jones calculus. Therefore, the isoclinic angle and optical retardation can be obtained by six steps phase shifting technique. Through the isoclinic angle and optical retardation, the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses inside the glass cylinder in cylindrical coordinate system can be reconstructed. Comparing the reconstructed stresses with numerical simulated stresses, the results verify this non-destructive method can be used to reconstruct the 3D stresses. However, there are some mismatches in axial stress, radial stress and circumferential stress.

  19. Thermal input control and enhancement for laser based residual stress measurements using liquid temperature indicating coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, Martin J.

    1999-01-01

    An improved method for measuring residual stress in a material comprising the steps of applying a spot of temperature indicating coating to the surface to be studied, establishing a speckle pattern surrounds the spot of coating with a first laser then heating the spot of coating with a far infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress during heating and enables calculation of the stress.

  20. Prediction of residual stress using explicit finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Siswanto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the residual stress behaviour under various values of friction coefficients and scratching displacement amplitudes. The investigation is based on numerical solution using explicit finite element method in quasi-static condition. Two different aeroengine materials, i.e. Super CMV (Cr-Mo-V and Titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-4V, are examined. The usage of FEM analysis in plate under normal contact is validated with Hertzian theoretical solution in terms of contact pressure distributions. The residual stress distributions along with normal and shear stresses on elastic and plastic regimes of the materials are studied for a simple cylinder-on-flat contact configuration model subjected to normal loading, scratching and followed by unloading. The investigated friction coefficients are 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9, while scratching displacement amplitudes are 0.05 mm, 0.10 mm and 0.20 mm respectively. It is found that friction coefficient of 0.6 results in higher residual stress for both materials. Meanwhile, the predicted residual stress is proportional to the scratching displacement amplitude, higher displacement amplitude, resulting in higher residual stress. It is found that less residual stress is predicted on Super CMV material compared to Ti-6Al-4V material because of its high yield stress and ultimate strength. Super CMV material with friction coefficient of 0.3 and scratching displacement amplitude of 0.10 mm is recommended to be used in contact engineering applications due to its minimum possibility of fatigue.

  1. Analysis of macro and micro residual stresses in functionally graded materials by diffraction methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dantz, D; Reimers, W

    1999-01-01

    The residual stress state in microwave sintered metal-ceramic functionally graded materials (FGM) consisting of 8Y-ZrO/sub 2//Ni and 8Y-ZrO/sub 2//NiCr8020, respectively, was analysed by non- destructive diffraction methods. In $9 order to get knowledge of the complete residual stress state in the near surface region as well as in the interior of the material, complementary methods were applied. Whereas the surface was characterised by X-ray techniques using $9 conventional sources, the stresses within the bulk of the material were investigated by means of high energy synchrotron radiation. The stress state was found to obey the differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion $9 (micro-stresses) on the one hand and the inhomogeneous cooling conditions (macrostresses) on the other hand. (7 refs).

  2. Isolation of residuals using trend surface analysis to magnetic data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polynomial surfaces of various degrees are fitted to a magnetic data of Awo area, southwestern Nigeria with the aim of isolating the residuals of the area associated with mineralogy. The fourth degree surface correlates better with the magnetic map of the study area. The residualized data were obtained by subtracting the ...

  3. Comparison of welding induced residual stresses austenitic and ferritic steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkumar, K.V.; Arun Kumar, S.; Mahadevan, S.; Manojkumar, R.; Rao, B. Purna Chandra; Albert, Shaju K.; Murugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a well established technique for measurement of residual stresses in components and is being widely used. In XRD technique, the distance between the crystallographic planes (d spacing) is measured from peak position (2è) at various ø angles, where ø is the angle between the normal to the sample and the bisector of the incident and diffracted beam. From the slope of sin2ø vs. d spacing plot, the residual stresses are arrived by assuming a plane stress model. Welding induced residual stresses is of high importance as it is a major cause of failure in components. Surface compressive stresses improve the fatigue strength, whereas tensile residual stresses tend to decrease the fatigue strength. The present study compares the residual stresses that develop in 3 mm thick SS 316 and P91 TIG weld joints using the XRD technique. This study is aimed at understanding the influence of shrinkage during cooling and the effect of phase transformation induced volume changes on residual stress development in these two steels. While the first effect is predominant in the SS 316 weld, both the effects are present in the P91 welds. Stress measurements on SS 316 and P91 were carried out using Cr Kâ (λ-2.0840 Å) and Cr Ká (λ-2.2896 Å) radiations respectively. Typical 'M' type stress profile was observed across the weld centre line in both the welds. The variation and similarities between the longitudinal stress profiles observed in these two weld joints would be discussed. (author)

  4. Effect of shot peening treatment in the behavior of residual stress in duplex stainless steel during medium cycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, Peter D.S.; Rebello, Joao Marcos A.; Fonseca, Maria P. Cindra

    2010-01-01

    The lifetime of duplex stainless steel parts experiencing cyclic fatigue is directly influenced by the residual stresses present in the ferrite and austenite phases. The motivation for this work was to analyze the behaviour of the residual stresses fields introduced by shot peening treatment in both phases, in the sample surface as in the subsurface layers, in low fatigue cycles, using the X-rays diffraction technique. The results shows that the compressive residual stresses introduced by the shot peening treatment in both phases improved fatigue life of the material. However, the cyclical loads produce partial or total relief in these residual stresses fields. It was verified that the shot peening process induced the formation of microcracks only in the ferrite phase. The largest variations in the total compressive residual stresses fields also occurred in this phase. The samples surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. (author)

  5. Residual stress effects in LMFBR fracture assessment procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooton, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    Two post-yield fracture mechanics methods, which have been developed into fully detailed failure assessment procedures for ferritic structures, have been reviewed from the point of view of the manner in which as-welded residual stress effects are incorporated, and comparisons then made with finite element and theoretical models of centre-cracked plates containing residual/thermal stresses in the form of crack-driving force curves. Applying the procedures to austenitic structures, comparisons are made in terms of failure assessment curves and it is recommended that the preferred method for the prediction of critical crack sizes in LMFBR austenitic structures containing as-welded residual stresses is the CEGB-R6 procedure based on a flow stress defined at 3% strain in the parent plate. When the prediction of failure loads in such structures is required, it is suggested that the CEGB-R6 procedure be used with residual/thermal stresses factored to give a maximum total stress of flow stress magnitude

  6. FIB-based measurement of local residual stresses on microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Dietmar; Sabate, Neus; Gollhardt, Astrid; Keller, Juergen; Auersperg, Juergen; Michel, Bernd

    2006-03-01

    The paper comprises research results obtained for stress determination on micro and nanotechnology components. It meets the concern of controlling stresses introduced to sensors, MEMS and electronics devices during different micromachining processes. The method bases on deformation measurement options made available inside focused ion beam equipment. Removing locally material by ion beam milling existing stresses / residual stresses lead to deformation fields around the milled feature. Digital image correlation techniques are used to extract deformation values from micrographs captured before and after milling. In the paper, two main milling features have been analyzed - through hole and through slit milling. Analytical solutions for stress release fields of in-plane stresses have been derived and compared to respective experimental findings. Their good agreement allows to settle a method for determination of residual stress values, which is demonstrated for thin membranes manufactured by silicon micro technology. Some emphasis is made on the elimination of main error sources for stress determination, like rigid body object displacements and rotations due to drifts of experimental conditions under FIB imaging. In order to illustrate potential application areas of the method residual stress suppression by ion implantation is evaluated by the method and reported here.

  7. Residual stress analysis on materials with steep stress gradient by using X-ray incidence at higher angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, Shin-ichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Maeno, Shigeki

    1996-01-01

    X-ray stress measurements for isotropic polycrystalline are materials are usually carried out by the sin 2 ψ method under the assumption of no stress gradient in X-ray penetration depth. When a steep stress gradient exists in the vicinity of surface layer, however, non-linear sin 2 ψ relation is observed and the sin 2 ψ method cannot be applied on such cases. Although several X-ray stress analyzers have been developed for materials with steep stress gradient in the surface layer, it is desirable to use diffraction data at higher incident angles of ψ 0 as possible as close on 90 degrees in order to determine the both values of surface stress and stress gradient with high accuracy. In the present study, an X-ray stress analyzer based on Ω geometry was fabricated to enable X-ray incidence at higher angle of ψ 0 . The X-ray detector was positioned on -η side against X-ray incident beam. Both of the residual surface stress and stress gradient were determined by use of the COSψ method on shot-peened steel and silicon nitride specimens. This prototype stress analyzer was found effective to perform a biaxial or triaxial stress analysis. (author)

  8. Residual Stress Analysis of Aircraft Part using Neutron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Eun Joo; Seong, Baek Seok; Sim, Cheul Muu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A precise measurement of the residual stress magnitude and distribution is an important factor to evaluate the lifetime or safety of the materials, because the residual stress affects the material properties, such as the strength, fatigue, etc. In the case of a fighter jet, the lifetime and safety of the parts of the landing gear are more important than that of a passenger airplane because of its frequent take offs and landings. In particular in the case of training a fighter jet, a precise evaluation of life time for the parts of the landing gear is strongly required for economic reason. In this study, the residual stress of a part of the landing gear of the training fighter jet which is used to fix the landing gear to the aircraft body was investigated. The part was used for 2000 hours of flight, which corresponds to 10 years. During this period, the fighter jet normally takes off and lands more than 2000 times. These frequent take off and landing can generate residual stress and cause a crack in the part. By measuring the neutron diffraction peaks, we evaluated the residual stress of the landing gear part

  9. Residual stresses and mechanical properties of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Christer.

    1993-01-01

    The large difference in coefficient of thermal expansion of the matrix and particles in a metal matrix composite will introduce residual stresses during cooling from process temperature. These stresses are locally very high, and are known to influence the mechanical behaviour of the material. Changes in the stress state will occur during heat treatments and when the material is loaded due to different elastic, plastic, and creep properties of the constituents. The change of residual stresses in an Al-SiC particulate composite after different degree of plastic straining has been studied. The effect of plastic straining was modelled by an Eshelby model. The model and the measurements both show that the stress in the loading direction decreases for a tensile plastic strain and increases for a compressive plastic strain. By x-ray diffraction the stress response in the matrix and particles can be measured independently. This has been used to determine the stress state under and after heat treatments and under mechanical loading in two Al 15% SiC metal matrix composites. By analysing the line width from x-ray experiment the changes in the microstrains in the material were studied. A finite element model was used to model the generation of thermal residual stresses, stress relaxation during heat treatments, and load sharing during the first load cycle. Calculated stresses and microstrains were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. The elastic behaviour of the composite can be understood largely in terms of elastic load transfer between matrix and particles. However, at higher loads when the matrix becomes plastic residual stresses also become important. 21 refs

  10. Experimental analysis of residual stresses in pre-straightened SAE 1045 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Carla Adriana Theis Soares; Rocha, Alexandre da Silva, E-mail: carla.adriana@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Laboratorio de Formacao de Metais; Epp, Jérémy; Zoch, Hans-Werner [Stiftung Institut für Werkstofftechnik IWT, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    This paper aims at analyzing the effects of the roller pre-straightening of wire-rods on residual stress distributions in SAE 1045 steel bars. The combined drawing process is used in industrial production of bars in order to obtain a good surface quality and improved mechanical properties complying with specifications of the final products. In this process, prior to the drawing step, a roller straightening of the steel wire-rod is essential, because it provides the minimum straightness necessary for drawing. Metallographic analysis and hardness test were done for selected samples after different processing steps. Also, residual stress analysis of pre-straightened wire-rods by X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction were carried out. The hardness tests show higher values near the surface and lower in the center of the wire-rod. Besides, the residual stresses results show a big inhomogeneity from one peripheral position to another and also in the evaluated cross section. (author)

  11. Experimental analysis of residual stresses in pre-straightened SAE 1045 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, Carla Adriana Theis Soares; Rocha, Alexandre da Silva

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at analyzing the effects of the roller pre-straightening of wire-rods on residual stress distributions in SAE 1045 steel bars. The combined drawing process is used in industrial production of bars in order to obtain a good surface quality and improved mechanical properties complying with specifications of the final products. In this process, prior to the drawing step, a roller straightening of the steel wire-rod is essential, because it provides the minimum straightness necessary for drawing. Metallographic analysis and hardness test were done for selected samples after different processing steps. Also, residual stress analysis of pre-straightened wire-rods by X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction were carried out. The hardness tests show higher values near the surface and lower in the center of the wire-rod. Besides, the residual stresses results show a big inhomogeneity from one peripheral position to another and also in the evaluated cross section. (author)

  12. Analysis of residual stresses in welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, F.L. de.

    1984-01-01

    The study of two stress measurements techniques is presented showing experimental results that allows to evaluate its reliability. These two methods are 'The Center Hole Drilling Method' and 'The Overcoring' and they are considered semi-destructive methods. (E.G.) [pt

  13. Forging And Milling Contribution On Residual Stresses For A Textured Biphasic Titanium Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleuze, C.; Fabre, A.; Barrallier, L.; Molinas, O.

    2011-01-01

    Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al is a biphasic titanium alloy (α+β) used in aeronautical applications for its mechanical properties, such as its yield strength of 1200 MPa and it weighs 40% less than steel. This alloy is particularly useful for vital parts with complex geometry, because of its high forging capability. In order to predict the capability for fatigue lifetime, the designers need to know the residual stresses. X-Ray diffraction is the main experimental technique used to determine residual stresses on the surface. In this case, stress levels are primarily influenced by the complex forging and milling process. On this alloy in particular, it may be difficult to characterize stress due to modification of the microstructure close to the surface. Results obtained by x-ray analysis depend on the correct definition of the shape of the diffraction peaks. The more precisely defined the position of the peak, the more accurately the stresses are evaluated. This paper presents a method to detect if residual stresses can be characterized by x-ray diffraction. The characterization of hardness seems to be a relevant technique to quickly analyze the capability of x-ray diffraction to determine residual stresses.

  14. Study on production mechanism of welding residual stress at the juncture of a pipe penetrating a thick plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Enomoto, Kunio; Okamoto, Noriaki; Saitoh, Hideyo; Hayashi, Eisaku.

    1994-01-01

    This paper studies welding residual stresses at the intersection of a small diameter pipe penetrating a thick plate. The pipe is welded to the plate, and Tungsten Innert Gas (TIG) cladding is melted on the inner surface of the pipe to protect it from stress corrosion cracking due to long operation in nuclear power plants. Stresses are calculated by heat conduction analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis, and also measured by strain gauges. Welding residual stresses are shown to have no corrosive influence on the inner pipe surface, and the stresses are compressed enough to protect the pipe against stress corrosion cracking on the outer surface. It was also studied to make clear the production mechanism of the residual stresses which were generated by welding processes at the pipe. (author)

  15. Reduction of tensile residual stresses during the drawing process of tungsten wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Ripoll, Manel; Weygand, Sabine M.; Riedel, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    Tungsten wires are commonly used in the lighting industry as filaments for lamps. During the drawing process, the inhomogeneous deformation imparted by the drawing die causes tensile residual stresses at the wire surface in circumferential direction. These stresses have a detrimental effect for the wire because they are responsible for driving longitudinal cracks, known as splits. This work proposes two methods for reducing the residual stresses during wire drawing, namely applying an advanced die geometry and performing an inexpensive post-drawing treatment based on targeted bending operations. These two methods are analyzed with finite element simulations using material parameters obtained by mechanical tests on tungsten wires at different temperatures as input data. The computed results predict a substantial reduction of the circumferential residual stresses, thus reducing the risk of splitting.

  16. Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier coatings under thermal shock loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier ceramic coatings (TBCs under different cycles of thermal shock loading of 1100°C was investigated by the microscopic digital image correlation (DIC and micro-Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The obtained results showed that, as the cycle number of the thermal shock loading increases, the evolution of the residual stress undergoes three distinct stages: a sharp increase, a gradual change, and a reduction. The extension stress near the TBC surface is fast transformed to compressive one through just one thermal cycle. After different thermal shock cycles with peak temperature of 1100°C, phase transformation in TBC does not happen, whereas the generation, development, evolution of the thermally grown oxide (TGO layer and micro-cracks are the main reasons causing the evolution regularity of the residual stress.

  17. Residual Stress Analysis of Severe Plastic Deformed Materials using the Finite Element Method and the Neutron Diffraction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Mi Hyun; Seong, Back Suck; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2009-01-01

    Severe plastic deformation (SPD) is one of the most promising top-down techniques, moving towards industrialization to fabricate bulk ultrafine grain materials. The strain distribution and deformation behavior during the ECAP (equal channel angular pressing), influenced by tool angles, friction and material behavior, was studied through experimental and numerical analyses. The residual stress of work piece which was straight before ECAP produces many serious problems in the next processing e.g. input of the work piece for the next ECAP. The bent work piece needs additional straightening or surface polishing even if the amount of bending is small, and residual stress need to be released before service applications. Residual stress, particularly tensile residual stress can be a very important factor in affecting the reliability and integrity of working parts. The formation of tensile residual stress may result in initiation of fatigue cracks, stress corrosion cracking, or other types of fracture. Hence, residual stress and resulting bending need to be controlled during ECAP. Thus, in current study the bending behavior and the residual stress of the work piece in ECAP are analyzed through experimental and finite element analyses by considering the effects of material, geometric, and processing parameters individually. The stress states in the ECAP processed work piece were measured by the non-destructive way using neutron diffraction. Efforts were made to suggest the alternate routes to reduce the residual stress and bending of work piece in ECAP

  18. Characterization of residual stresses generated during inhomogeneous plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T.; Faurholdt, T.; Clausen, B.

    1998-01-01

    Residual stresses generated by macroscopic inhomogeneous plastic deformation are predicted by an explicit finite element (FE) technique. The numerical predictions are evaluated by characterizing the residual elastic strains by neutron diffraction using two different (hkl) reflections. Intergranular...... compare well and verify the capability of the numerical technique as well as the possibilities of experimental validation using neutron diffraction. The presented experimental and numerical approach will subsequently be utilized for the evaluation of more complicated plastic deformation processes...

  19. Residual analysis applied to S-N data of a surface rolled cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Maluf

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface rolling is a process extensively employed in the manufacture of ductile cast iron crankshafts, specifically in regions containing stress concentrators with the main aim to enhance fatigue strength. Such process hardens and introduces compressive residual stresses to the surface as a result of controlled strains, reducing cyclic tensile stresses near the surface of the part. The main purpose of this work was to apply the residual analysis to check the suitability of the S-N approach to describe the fatigue properties of a surface rolled cast iron. The analysis procedure proved to be very efficient and easy to implement and it can be applied in the verification of any other statistical model used to describe fatigue behavior. Results show that the conventional S-N methodology is able to model the high cycle fatigue behavior of surface rolled notch testpieces of a pearlitic ductile cast iron submitted to rotating bending fatigue tests.

  20. Neutron measurement of residual stresses in a used railway rail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, P.J.; Low, K.S.; Mills, G.; Webster, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The high resolution neutron diffraction technique has been applied to determine, non-destructively, the residual stress distribution developed in the head of a railway rail after normal service. Measurements were made, using the neutron strain scanner at the Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, on a transverse slice of rail 12mm thick taken from a section of straight track. The rail head was scanned in the three principal orientations in a series of parallel traverses sufficiently close to enable a two-dimensional matrix of data to be accumulated and vertical, transverse and longitudinal residual stress contours to be drawn. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and unique characteristics of the neutron technique to determine nondestructively and continuously the residual stresses inside engineering components

  1. Benchmark on residual stress modeling in fracture mechanics assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Deschanels, H.; Chapuliot, S.; Le Delliou, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of development in analytical defect assessment methods for the RSE-M and RCC-MRx codes, new work on the consideration of residual stresses is initiated by AREVA, CEA and EDF. The first step of this work is the realization of a database of F.E. reference cases. To validate assumptions and develop a good practice guideline for the consideration of residual stresses in finite element calculations, a benchmark between AREVA, CEA and EDF is going-on. A first application presented in this paper focuses on the analysis of the crack initiation of aged duplex stainless steel pipes submitted to an increasing pressure loading. Residual stresses are related to pipe fabrication process and act as shell bending condition. Two tests were performed: the first with an internal longitudinal semi-elliptical crack and the second with an external crack. The analysis first focuses on the ability to accurately estimate the measured pressure at the crack initiation of the two tests. For that purpose, the comparison of results obtained with different methods of taking into account the residual stresses (i.e. thermal fields or initial strain field). It then validates post-treatment procedures for J or G determination, and finally compares of the results obtained by the different partners. It is then shown that the numerical models can integrate properly the impact of residual stresses on the crack initiation pressure. Then, an excellent agreement is obtained between the different numerical evaluations of G provided by the participants to the benchmark so that best practice and reference F.E. solutions for residual stresses consideration can be provided based on that work. (authors)

  2. Residual stresses associated with welds in austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, R.

    1978-01-01

    Two exploratory welds have been made with AISI 316 austenitic steel and Armex GT electrodes by the manual metal-arc process, and residual stress measurements made in the as-welded condition and after various periods of stress relief. The results show that substantial stress relief occurs at temperatures of 850 0 and 750 0 C after 1 hr, but is not complete. The stress distributions are compared with those obtained from ferritic welds and the effect of differences in thermal expansion coefficients is examined using finite element analysis. (author)

  3. Residual stresses analysis in ball end milling of nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junteng; Zhang, Dinghua; Wu, Baohai; Luo, Ming [Key Laboratory of Contemporary Design and Integrated Manufacturing Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University (China)

    2017-11-15

    Inconel 718 is widely used in the aviation, space, automotive and biomedical industries because of its outstanding properties. Near-surface residual stresses that are induced by ball end milling in Inconel 718 can be crucial for the performance and service time of the machined parts. In this paper, the influences of cutting conditions, including the use of cutting parameters, cutting fluid and spindle angles, on the residual stresses in the ball end milling process of Inconel 718 alloy were investigated experimentally. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that residual stress distributions are highly influenced by cutting parameters, especially the depth of cut and cutting speed. The milling operation with cooling induces more compressive stresses trend and the magnitude of the residual stresses increases in the tensile direction with the increase of spindle angles. These cutting induced effects were further discussed with respect to thermal- mechanical coupling theory and some observations made by optical microscopy. From this investigation, it is suggested that the machining process parameters are not the smaller the better for the control of residual stresses in the ball end milling process of Inconel 718. (author)

  4. Residual stresses and critical diameter in vitreous matrix materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastelaro, Valmor R.; Zanotto, Edgar D.

    1995-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to test the validity of existing models for: i) the residual internal stresses which arise due to thermal and elastic mismatch in duplex systems, and ii) the critical particle diameter for spontaneous cracking. Partially crystallized 1,07 Na 2 O-2 Ca O-3 Si O 2 - 6% P 2 O 5 glasses were studied. The experimental residual stress was in excellent agreement with the calculated value, however, the critical particle diameter, estimated by an energy balance approach, was more than ten times smaller than the experimental value. This discrepancy indicates that the energy model is not applicable in this case. (author)

  5. On Taylor-Series Approximations of Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Although subgrid-scale models of similarity type are insufficiently dissipative for practical applications to large-eddy simulation, in recently published a priori analyses, they perform remarkably well in the sense of correlating highly against exact residual stresses. Here, Taylor-series expansions of residual stress are exploited to explain the observed behavior and "success" of similarity models. Until very recently, little attention has been given to issues related to the convergence of such expansions. Here, we re-express the convergence criterion of Vasilyev [J. Comput. Phys., 146 (1998)] in terms of the transfer function and the wavenumber cutoff of the grid filter.

  6. Influence of veneer thickness on residual stress profile in veneering ceramic: measurement by hole-drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie K; Schajer, Gary S; Vanheusden, Alain J; Sadoun, Michaël J

    2012-02-01

    The veneering process of frameworks induces residual stresses and can initiate cracks when combined with functional stresses. The stress distribution within the veneering ceramic as a function of depth is a key factor influencing failure by chipping. This is a well-known problem with Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal based fixed partial dentures. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of veneer thickness on the stress profile in zirconia- and metal-based structures. The hole-drilling method, often used for engineering measurements, was adapted for use with veneering ceramic. The stress profile was measured in bilayered disc samples of 20 mm diameter, with a 1 mm thick zirconia or metal framework. Different veneering ceramic thicknesses were performed: 1 mm, 1.5 mm, 2 mm, 2.5 mm and 3 mm. All samples exhibited the same type of stress vs. depth profile, starting with compressive at the ceramic surface, decreasing with depth up to 0.5-1.0 mm from the surface, and then becoming compressive again near the framework, except for the 1.5 mm-veneered zirconia samples which exhibited interior tensile stresses. Stresses in the surface of metal samples were not influenced by veneer thickness. Variation of interior stresses at 1.2 mm from the surface in function of veneer thickness was inverted for metal and zirconia samples. Veneer thickness influences in an opposite way the residual stress profile in metal- and in zirconia-based structures. A three-step approach and the hypothesis of the crystalline transformation are discussed to explain the less favorable residual stress development in zirconia samples. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Surface stress-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Wendong; Li, Pengwei; Hu, Jie; Li, Gang

    2014-01-15

    Surface stress-based biosensors, as one kind of label-free biosensors, have attracted lots of attention in the process of information gathering and measurement for the biological, chemical and medical application with the development of technology and society. This kind of biosensors offers many advantages such as short response time (less than milliseconds) and a typical sensitivity at nanogram, picoliter, femtojoule and attomolar level. Furthermore, it simplifies sample preparation and testing procedures. In this work, progress made towards the use of surface stress-based biosensors for achieving better performance is critically reviewed, including our recent achievement, the optimally circular membrane-based biosensors and biosensor array. The further scientific and technological challenges in this field are also summarized. Critical remark and future steps towards the ultimate surface stress-based biosensors are addressed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fatigue life estimation of welded components considering welding residual stress relaxation and its mean stress effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seung Ho; Han, Jeong Woo; Shin, Byung Chun; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2003-01-01

    The fatigue life of welded joints is sensitive to welding residual stress and complexity of their geometric shapes. To predict the fatigue life more reasonably, the effects of welding residual stress and its relaxation on their fatigue strengths should be considered quantitatively, which are often regarded to be equivalent to the effects of mean stresses by external loads. The hot-spot stress concept should be also adopted which can reduce the dependence of fatigue strengths for various welding details. Considering the factors mentioned above, a fatigue life prediction model using the modified Goodman's diagram was proposed. In this model, an equivalent stress was introduced which is composed of the mean stress based on the hot-spot stress concept and the relaxed welding residual stress. From the verification of the proposed model to real welding details, it is proved that this model can be applied to predict reasonably their fatigue lives

  9. Fatigue life estimation considering welding residual stress and hot-spot stress of welded components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S. H.; Lee, T. K.; Shin, B. C.

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue life of welded joints is sensitive to welding residual stress and complexity of their geometric shapes. To predict the fatigue life more reasonably, the effects of welding residual stress and its relaxation have to be considered quantitatively which are equivalent to mean stress by external loads. The hot-spot stress concept should be also adopted which can be reduce the dependence of fatigue strengths for various welding details. Considering the factors mentioned above, a fatigue life prediction model using the modified Goodman's diagram was proposed. In this model, an equivalent stress was introduced which are composed of the mean stress based on the hot-spot stress concept and the relaxed welding residual stress. From the verification of the proposed model to real welding details, it is confirmed that this model can be applied to predict reasonably their fatigue lives

  10. Residual Stress Distribution and Microstructure of a Multiple Laser-Peened Near-Alpha Titanium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umapathi, A.; Swaroop, S.

    2018-04-01

    Laser peening without coating (LPwC) was performed on a Ti-2.5 Cu alloy with multiple passes (1, 3 and 5), using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) at a constant overlap rate of 70% and power density of 6.7 GW cm-2. Hardness and residual stress profiles indicated thermal softening near the surface (hardness (235 HV at 500 μm) and maximum residual stress (- 890 MPa at 100 μm) were observed for LPwC with 1 pass. Surface roughness and surface 3-D topography imaging showed that the surface roughness increased with the increase in the number of passes. XRD results indicated no significant β phases. However, peak shifts, broadening and asymmetry were observed and interpreted based on dislocation activity. Microstructures indicated no melting or resolidification or refinement of grains at the surface. Twin density was found to increase with the increase in the number of passes.

  11. The maximum possible stress intensity factor for a crack in an unknown residual stress field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coules, H.E.; Smith, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Residual and thermal stress fields in engineering components can act on cracks and structural flaws, promoting or inhibiting fracture. However, these stresses are limited in magnitude by the ability of materials to sustain them elastically. As a consequence, the stress intensity factor which can be applied to a given defect by a self-equilibrating stress field is also limited. We propose a simple weight function method for determining the maximum stress intensity factor which can occur for a given crack or defect in a one-dimensional self-equilibrating stress field, i.e. an upper bound for the residual stress contribution to K I . This can be used for analysing structures containing defects and subject to residual stress without any information about the actual stress field which exists in the structure being analysed. A number of examples are given, including long radial cracks and fully-circumferential cracks in thick-walled hollow cylinders containing self-equilibrating stresses. - Highlights: • An upper limit to the contribution of residual stress to stress intensity factor. • The maximum K I for self-equilibrating stresses in several geometries is calculated. • A weight function method can determine this maximum for 1-dimensional stress fields. • Simple MATLAB scripts for calculating maximum K I provided as supplementary material.

  12. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas; Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-03-01

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth.

  13. Process induced residual stresses and distortions in pultrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baran, Ismet; Tutum, Cem Celal; Nielsen, Michael Wenani

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a coupled 3D transient Eulerian thermo-chemical analysis together with a 2D plane strain Lagrangian mechanical analysis of the pultrusion process, which has not been considered until now, is carried out. The development of the process induced residual stresses and strains...... together with the distortions are predicted during the pultrusion in which the cure hardening instantaneous linear elastic (CHILE) approach is implemented. At the end of the process, tension stresses prevail for the inner region of the composite since the curing rate is higher here as compared to the outer...... regions where compression stresses are obtained. The separation between the heating die and the part due to shrinkage is also investigated using a mechanical contact formulation at the die-part interface. The proposed approach is found to be efficient and fast for the calculation of the residual stresses...

  14. Residual stress measurement of large scaled welded pipe using neutron diffraction method. Effect of SCC crack propagation and repair weld on residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Katsuyama, Jinya; Tobita, Tohru; Morii, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The RESA-1 neutron engineering diffractometer in the JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor No.3) at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, which is used for stress measurements, was upgraded to realize residual stress measurements of large scaled mechanical components. A series of residual stress measurements was made to obtain through-thickness residual stress distributions in a Type 304 stainless steel butt-welded pipe of 500A-sch.80 using the upgraded RESA-1 diffractometer. We evaluated effects of crack propagation such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and a part-circumference repair weld on the residual stress distributions induced by girth welding. Measured residual stress distributions near original girth weld revealed good agreement with typical results shown in some previous works using finite element method, deep hole drilling as well as neutron diffraction. After introducing a mock crack with 10 mm depth in the heat affected zone on the inside wall of the pipe by electro discharge machining, the axial residual stresses were found to be released in the part of the mock crack. However, changes in the through-wall bending stress component and the self-equilibrated stress component were negligible and hence the axial residual stress distribution in the ligament was remained in the original residual stresses near girth weld without the mock crack. Furthermore, changes in hoop and radial residual stress were also small. The residual stress distributions after a part repair welding on the outer circumference of the girth weld were significantly different from residual stress distributions near the original girth weld. The through-thickness average axial residual stress was increased due to increase of the tensile membrane stress and mitigation of the bending stress after repair welding. Throughout above studies, we evidenced that the neutron diffraction technique is useful and powerful tool for measuring residual stress distributions in large as well as thick mechanical

  15. Investigation of residual stress in laser welding between carbon steel AISI 1010 and stainless AISI 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirim, Denilson de Camargo

    2011-01-01

    The dissimilar materials union has the residual stress formation as one of the most critical problems, which occurs mainly because these materials have both different thermal expansion coefficients and thermal conductivities. In this study, it was investigated the laser welding technique between steels, AISI 1010 and AISI 304. The materials were joined by butt autogenous welding with a continuous Nd:YAG laser. The main objective was to identify the welding parameters influence by the residual stresses analysis in the heat affected zone (HAZ). It was executed a factorial design with three-factor at two levels with a replica, which were varied power, welding speed and focal position of the laser beam. Residual stress measurements by the diffraction of X-rays were performed on the sample surface, to study their variation as a function of the parameters investigated. The blind hole method was also used to evaluate the residual stress along the samples depth, up to depth of 1mm. Besides residual stress measurement, weld seams were evaluated by optical and scanned electron microscopy, which were aimed to determine the weld geometry and changes in the microstructure. It was also made Vickers hardness measurements to evaluate the extent of HAZ. To evaluate the mechanical properties of the union were performed tensile and fatigue test. The MINITAB 15 software was used to analyze the residual stresses obtained by the blind hole method at different depths of the HAZ. It was also used statistical regression based on both the influences different and the combination of this input factors, in the residual stress of union. The results indicate that the models can satisfactorily predict the responses and provide users a guide to better define the welding parameters. (author)

  16. X-ray diffraction and measurement of residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, G.; Lebrun, J.L.; Corcaud, L.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray diffraction technique is a non destructive method for measuring the residual stresses in mechanical parts. This method, called sin 2 PSI method is investigated. It is applied to the measurement of elastic constants in different directions of crystals of Zr alloy (Zircaloy 4) and Ti alloy (TA6V). Stresses in TA6V sheets welded by TIG and electron beam processes are also studied [fr

  17. Residual stress stability and alternating bending strength of AISI 4140 after shot peening and successive annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menig, R.; Schulze, V.; Voehringer, O. [Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde I, Univ. of Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Increases of residual stress stability and alternating bending strength of shot peened AISI 4140 are obtained by successive annealing treatments. This is caused by static strain aging effects, which lead to pinning of dislocations by carbon atoms and finest carbides. It will be shown that by short-time annealing of a quenched and tempered AISI 4140 it is possible to maximize the positive effect of static strain aging, while minimizing the detrimental effect of thermal residual stress relaxation, which was measured by X-ray diffraction method. Static strain aging effects were also found to be responsible for an increase of the quasi static and cyclic surface yield strengths. (orig.)

  18. Residual stress control and design of next-generation ultra-hard gear steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yana

    In high power density transmission systems, Ni-Co secondary hardening steels have shown great potential for next-generation gear applications due to their excellent strength, toughness and superior fatigue performance. Study of residual stress generation and evolution in Ferrium C61 and C67 gear steels revealed that shot peening and laser peening processes effectively produce desired beneficial residual stress in the steels for enhanced fatigue performance. Surface residual stress levels of -1.4GPa and -1.5GPa were achieved in shot peened C61 and laser peened C67, respectively, without introducing large surface roughness or defects. Higher compressive residual stress is expected in C67 according to a demonstrated correlation between attainable residual stress and material hardness. Due to the lack of appropriate shot media, dual laser peening is proposed for future peening optimization in C67. A novel non-destructive synchrotron radiation technique was implemented and applied for the first time for residual stress distribution analysis in gear steels with large composition and property gradients. Observed substantial residual stress redistribution and material microstructure change during the rolling contact fatigue screening test with extremely high 5.4GPa load indicates the unsuitability of the test as a fatigue life predictor. To exploit benefits of higher case hardness and associated residual stress, a new material and process (CryoForm70) aiming at 70Rc surface hardness was designed utilizing the systems approach based on thermodynamics and secondary hardening mechanisms. The composition design was first validated by the excellent agreement between experimental and theoretical core martensite start temperature in the prototype. A novel cryogenic deformation process was concurrently designed to increase the case martensite volume fraction from 76% to 92% for enhanced strengthening efficiency and surface hardness. High temperature vacuum carburizing was

  19. Fatique crack propagation in bimetallic welds influence of residual stresses and metallurgical look

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahouane, A.I.

    1988-06-01

    Generally, in nuclear power plants, many components made of austenitic stainless steels are very often replaced by low alloyed steels cladded with stainless steels, mainly for economical reasons. Due to cracks existing at the limit of the two kinds of steel, it is interesting to try to understand how they appear. Residual stresses are generally identified as one of the factors which act to produce these cracks. Measurements of such residual stresses have been performed, using the hole drilling method (drilling of a hole at the center of a gauge roset stuck at the surface of the material). Owing to the obtained results, it is possible to explain the decrease in the crack propagation rate observed, on fatigue crack growth test performed on specimens taken in the transition ferritic/austenitic zone. The stress intensity factor due to the residual stresses is valued by weight function method. It is possible to explain qualitatively the phenomena observed under cyclic loading when using the obtained value of this stress intensity factor. A more quantitative approach based on the use of an efficient stress intensity factor, allow to better describe the effect of residual stresses on the fatigue crack propagation in bimetallic welds [fr

  20. Temperature dependence of residual stress in TiC coated Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, I.; Fukutomi, M.; Kamada, K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of fabrication temperature and heat treatment on the residual stress in TiC coated Mo have been studied by using X-ray diffractometry. TiC coatings on Mo single crystal substrates with (100) and (111) surfaces were carried out with the Activated Reactive Evaporation (ARE) method. It was found that all Mo substrates measured show tensile residual stresses, and their values decrease as the fabrication temperature increases from 300 to 700 0 C. On the other hand, TiC films measured showed compressive residual stresses, for both TiC/Mo(100) and TiC/Mo(111) specimens. These compressive stresses also decreased with increasing the fabrication temperature. The residual stresses measured were higher in TiC/Mo(100) than in TiC/Mo(111). It was found that the compressive stresses in as-grown TiC films change to the tensile stresses after annealing at 1700 0 C for 30 min. The preferred orientations of TiC films were observed to depend on the fabrication temperature. However, no epitaxial growth of TiC films was found as far as the present experiment was concerned. (orig.)

  1. Residual stress in a thick section high strength T-butt weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, S.V.; Linton, V.M.; Oliver, E.C.

    2008-01-01

    Residual stresses in a structure are generated as a result of the various fabrication and welding processes used to make the component. Being able to quantify these residual stresses is a key step in determining the continuing integrity of a structure in service. In this work, the residual stresses around a high strength, quenched and tempered steel T-butt web to curved plate weld have been measured using neutron strain scanning. The results show that the residual stresses near the weld were dominated by the welding residual stresses, while the stresses further from the weld were dominated by the bending residual stresses. The results suggest that the combination of welding-induced residual stress and significant pre-welding residual stress, as in the case of a thick bent section of plate can significantly alter the residual stress profile from that in a flat plate

  2. Ultrasonic measurements on residual stress in autofrettged thick walled petroleum pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woias, G.; Mizera, J.

    2008-01-01

    The residual stresses in a component or structure are caused by incompatible permanent deformation and related gradient of plastic/elastic strains. They may be generated or modified at every stage in the components life cycle, from original material production to final disposal. Residual stresses can be measured by non-destructive techniques, including X-ray and neutron diffraction, magnetic and ultrasonic methods. The selection of the optimum measurement technique should take account volumetric resolution, material, geometry and access to the component. For large metallic components neutron diffraction is of prime importance as it provides quantitative information on stresses in relatively large volume of methods disregarding its shape complexity. Residual stresses can play a significant role in explaining or preventing failure of components of industrial installations. One example of residual stresses preventing failure are the ones generated by shot peening, inducing surface compressive stresses that improve the fatigue life. Petroleum refinery piping is generally characterized by large-diameters, operated at elevated temperature and under high pressure. Pipelines of a polyethylene plant working in one of the Polish refineries are subjected to pressures exceeding 300 MPa at temperatures above 200 o C. The pipes considered here were pressurized with pressure of 600 MPa. The wall thickness of the pipes is 27 mm and pipe dimensions are 46 x 100 mm. The material is steel with Re=580 MPa. Due to pressurizing, the components retain compressive stresses at the internal surface. These stresses increase resistance to cracking of the pipes. Over the period of exploitation these stresses diminish due to temperature activated relaxation or creep. The purpose of the project is to verify kinetics of such a relaxation process and calibrate alternative methods of their measurements. To avoid stress relaxation, numerical analysis from Finite Element Modelling (FEM)gave an

  3. Modeling of residual stress mitigation in austenitic stainless steel pipe girth weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; West, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    This study provides numerical procedures to model 40-cm-diameter, schedule 40, Type 304L stainless steel pipe girth welding and a newly proposed post-weld treatment. The treatment can be used to accomplish the goal of imparting compressive residual stresses at the inner surface of a pipe girth weldment to prevent/retard the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of the piping system in nuclear reactors. This new post-weld treatment for mitigating residual stresses is cooling stress improvement (CSI). The concept of CSI is to establish and maintain a certain temperature gradient across the pipe wall thickness to change the final stress state. Thus, this process involves sub-zero low temperature cooling of the inner pipe surface of a completed girth weldment, while simultaneously keeping the outer pipe surface at a slightly elevated temperature with the help of a certain heating method. Analyses to obtain quantitative results on pipe girth welding and CSI by using a thermo-elastic-plastic finite element model are described in this paper. Results demonstrate the potential effectiveness of CSI for introducing compressive residual stresses to prevent/retard IGSCC. Because of the symmetric nature of CSI, it shows great potential for industrial application

  4. Investigation of Performance and Residual Stress Generation of AlSi10Mg Processed by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianfeng Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the selective laser melting (SLM process, the scanned layers are subjected to rapid thermal cycles. By working on the mechanical properties, residual stress, and microstructure, the high-temperature gradients can have significant effect on the proper functioning and the structural integrity of built parts. This work presents a comprehensive study on the scanning path type and preheating temperature for AlSi10Mg alloy during SLM. According to the results, SLM AlSi10Mg parts fabricated in chessboard scanning strategy have higher mechanical properties or at least comparable to the parts fabricated in uniformity scanning strategy. In the SLM processing, the residual stress in different parts of the specimen varies with temperature gradient, and the residual stress at the edge of the specimen is obviously larger than that at the center. Under the chessboard scanning and preheating temperature 160°C, the residual stress in each direction of the specimens reaches the minimum. Under different forming processes, the morphology of the microstructure is obviously different. With the increase of preheating temperature, the molten pool in the side surface is obviously elongated and highly unevenly distributed. From the coupling relationship between the residual stress and microstructure, it can be found that the microstructure of top surface is affected by residual stresses σx and σy. But the side surface is mainly governed by residual stress σy; moreover, the greater the residual stress, the more obvious the grain tilt. In the XY and XZ surfaces, the scanning strategy has little influence on the tilt angle of the grain. But, the tilt angle and morphology of the microstructure are obviously affected by the preheating temperature. The results show that the residual stresses can effectively change the properties of the materials under the combined influence of scanning strategy and preheating temperature.

  5. Viscoelastic finite element analysis of residual stresses in porcelain-veneered zirconia dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongho; Dhital, Sukirti; Zhivago, Paul; Kaizer, Marina R; Zhang, Yu

    2018-06-01

    The main problem of porcelain-veneered zirconia (PVZ) dental restorations is chipping and delamination of veneering porcelain owing to the development of deleterious residual stresses during the cooling phase of veneer firing. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effects of cooling rate, thermal contraction coefficient and elastic modulus on residual stresses developed in PVZ dental crowns using viscoelastic finite element methods (VFEM). A three-dimensional VFEM model has been developed to predict residual stresses in PVZ structures using ABAQUS finite element software and user subroutines. First, the newly established model was validated with experimentally measured residual stress profiles using Vickers indentation on flat PVZ specimens. An excellent agreement between the model prediction and experimental data was found. Then, the model was used to predict residual stresses in more complex anatomically-correct crown systems. Two PVZ crown systems with different thermal contraction coefficients and porcelain moduli were studied: VM9/Y-TZP and LAVA/Y-TZP. A sequential dual-step finite element analysis was performed: heat transfer analysis and viscoelastic stress analysis. Controlled and bench convection cooling rates were simulated by applying different convective heat transfer coefficients 1.7E-5 W/mm 2 °C (controlled cooling) and 0.6E-4 W/mm 2 °C (bench cooling) on the crown surfaces exposed to the air. Rigorous viscoelastic finite element analysis revealed that controlled cooling results in lower maximum stresses in both veneer and core layers for the two PVZ systems relative to bench cooling. Better compatibility of thermal contraction coefficients between porcelain and zirconia and a lower porcelain modulus reduce residual stresses in both layers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Strength and residual stress of Mg-PSZ after grinding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, P.H.J.; With, de G.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of grinding with two grinding wheels, differing mainly in diamond-grain size, on the properties of MgO-partially stabilized ZrO2 ceramics (Mg-PSZ) was examd. The residual stress, the amt. of monoclinic zirconia, and the strength of the material were detd. From these measurements, depth

  7. Residual stresses in multilayer ceramic capacitors: measurement and computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toonder, den J.M.J.; Rademaker, C.W.; Hu, C.L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a combined experimental and computational study of the thermomechanical reliability of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC's). We focus on residual stresses introduced into the components during the cooling down step of the sintering process. The technique of

  8. Effect of geometric construction on residual stress distribution in designing a nuclear rotor joined by multipass narrow gap welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Long; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun; Zhuang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The internal stress of the pipe is measured using local material removal method. • Bottom protrusion at weld seam can release the stress and mitigate stress evolution. The through-wall axial stress is bending type under the effect of the rotor discs. • The impact of geometric construction on the stress evolution begins after pass 15. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of geometric construction on the distribution of residual stresses before and after heat treatment in designing a nuclear welded rotor. The local material removal method was used to measure internal residual stress of the experimental pipe after post weld heat treatment. Three finite element models were employed as follows: a model of experimental pipe, a model with a bottom protrusion existed at the weld region, and a model of two rotor discs butt-welded with a bottom protrusion at the weld region. Investigated results showed that the bottom protrusion existed at the weld region can decrease the residual stress and mitigate the stress evolution significantly on the inner surface. Under the binding effect of the rotor discs, the axial stress of inner surface region is compressive stress; the through-wall axial stress at the weld center line can be deemed to a bending type; both the hoop stress and axial stress at the weld center line on the inner surface are compressive. The impact of geometric construction on the stress evolution at the root bead begins after pass 15 deposited

  9. Predictions and measurements of residual stress in repair welds in plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.B. [Mitsui Babcock Energy Limited, Technology and Engineering, Porterfield Road, Renfrew, PA4 8DJ, Scotland (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: bbrown@mitsuibabcock.com; Dauda, T.A. [Mitsui Babcock Energy Limited, Technology and Engineering, Porterfield Road, Renfrew, PA4 8DJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Truman, C.E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR, England (United Kingdom); Smith, D.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Memhard, D. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik, Freiburg (Germany); Pfeiffer, W. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik, Freiburg (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    This paper presents the work, from the European Union FP-5 project ELIXIR, on a series of rectangular repair welds in P275 and S690 steels to validate the numerical modelling techniques used in the determination of the residual stresses generated during the repair process. The plates were 1,000 mm by 800 mm with thicknesses of 50 and 100 mm. The repair welds were 50%, 75% and 100% through the plate thickness. The repair welds were modelled using the finite element method to make predictions of the as-welded residual stress distributions. These predictions were compared with surface-strain measurements made on the parent plates during welding and found to be in good agreement. Through-thickness residual stress measurements were obtained from the test plates through, and local to, the weld repairs using the deep hole drilling technique. Comparisons between the measurements and the finite element predictions generally showed good agreement, thus providing confidence in the method.

  10. Predictions and measurements of residual stress in repair welds in plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.B.; Dauda, T.A.; Truman, C.E.; Smith, D.J.; Memhard, D.; Pfeiffer, W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the work, from the European Union FP-5 project ELIXIR, on a series of rectangular repair welds in P275 and S690 steels to validate the numerical modelling techniques used in the determination of the residual stresses generated during the repair process. The plates were 1,000 mm by 800 mm with thicknesses of 50 and 100 mm. The repair welds were 50%, 75% and 100% through the plate thickness. The repair welds were modelled using the finite element method to make predictions of the as-welded residual stress distributions. These predictions were compared with surface-strain measurements made on the parent plates during welding and found to be in good agreement. Through-thickness residual stress measurements were obtained from the test plates through, and local to, the weld repairs using the deep hole drilling technique. Comparisons between the measurements and the finite element predictions generally showed good agreement, thus providing confidence in the method

  11. Effects of organic additives on preferred plane and residual stress of copper electroplated on polyimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Heesan

    2010-01-01

    Effects of the preferred plane and the residual stress of an electroplated copper on polyethylene glycol (PEG) and 3-N,N-dimethylaminodithiocarbamoyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (DPS) were studied. Polyimide film coated with sputtered copper was used as a substrate. Preferred plane, residual stress, and impurity level in the electroplated copper were measured by an X-ray diffractometry (XRD), calculated by Stoney's equation, and analyzed with secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SMS), respectively. With increasing the concentration of PEG, the preferred plane changed in the order (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) while with increasing the concentration of DPS, the preferred plane changed in the order (1 1 0), (1 0 0), and (1 1 1). Based on the modified preferred growth model, where the amount of additive adsorbed on a plane is newly assumed to be proportional to its surface energy in vacuum, the predicted preferred planes correspond to the experimental results. The residual stress of the electroplated copper depended on the type of additive as well as its concentration but was independent of the preferred plane. For example, PEG and DPS induced tensile and compressive residual stresses in the electroplated copper, respectively, and their magnitudes increased with their concentrations. The dependency of residual stress on the additives was explained by the incorporated additives into the electroplated copper.

  12. An analytical model to predict and minimize the residual stress of laser cladding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanna, N.; Crouch, R.; Kabir, I. R.; Naher, S.

    2018-02-01

    Laser cladding is one of the advanced thermal techniques used to repair or modify the surface properties of high-value components such as tools, military and aerospace parts. Unfortunately, tensile residual stresses generate in the thermally treated area of this process. This work focuses on to investigate the key factors for the formation of tensile residual stress and how to minimize it in the clad when using dissimilar substrate and clad materials. To predict the tensile residual stress, a one-dimensional analytical model has been adopted. Four cladding materials (Al2O3, TiC, TiO2, ZrO2) on the H13 tool steel substrate and a range of preheating temperatures of the substrate, from 300 to 1200 K, have been investigated. Thermal strain and Young's modulus are found to be the key factors of formation of tensile residual stresses. Additionally, it is found that using a preheating temperature of the substrate immediately before laser cladding showed the reduction of residual stress.

  13. Effect of prior machining deformation on the development of tensile residual stresses in weld-fabricated nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevey, P.S.; Mason, P.W.; Hornbach, D.J.; Molkenthin, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Austenitic alloy weldments in nuclear systems may be subject to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) failure if the sum of residual and applied stresses exceeds a critical threshold. Residual stresses developed by prior machining and welding may either accelerate or retard SCC, depending on their magnitude and sign. A combined x-ray diffraction and mechanical procedure was used to determine the axial and hoop residual stress and yield strength distributions into the inside-diameter surface of a simulated Alloy 600 penetration J-welded into a reactor pressure vessel. The degree of cold working and the resulting yield strength increase caused by prior machining and weld shrinkage were calculated from the line-broadening distributions. Tensile residual stresses on the order of +700 MPa were observed in both the axial and the hoop directions at the inside-diameter surface in a narrow region adjacent to the weld heat-affected zone. Stresses exceeding the bulk yield strength were found to develop due to the combined effects of cold working of the surface layers during initial machining and subsequent weld shrinkage. The residual stress and cold work distributions produced by prior machining were found to influence strongly the final residual stress state developed after welding

  14. Influence of cooling rate on residual stress profile in veneering ceramic: measurement by hole-drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie K; Schajer, Gary S; Vanheusden, Alain J; Sadoun, Michaël J

    2011-09-01

    The manufacture of dental crowns and bridges generates residual stresses within the veneering ceramic and framework during the cooling process. Residual stress is an important factor that control the mechanical behavior of restorations. Knowing the stress distribution within the veneering ceramic as a function of depth can help the understanding of failures, particularly chipping, a well-known problem with Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal based fixed partial dentures. The objective of this study is to investigate the cooling rate dependence of the stress profile in veneering ceramic layered on metal and zirconia frameworks. The hole-drilling method, often used for engineering measurements, was adapted for use with veneering ceramic. The stress profile was measured in bilayered disc samples 20 mm in diameter, with a 0.7 mm thick metal or Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal framework and a 1.5mm thick veneering ceramic. Three different cooling procedures were investigated. The magnitude of the stresses in the surface of the veneering ceramic was found to increase with cooling rate, while the interior stresses decreased. At the surface, compressive stresses were observed in all samples. In the interior, compressive stresses were observed in metal samples and tensile in zirconia samples. Cooling rate influences the magnitude of residual stresses. These can significantly influence the mechanical behavior of metal-and zirconia-based bilayered systems. The framework material influenced the nature of the interior stresses, with zirconia samples showing a less favorable stress profile than metal. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electromagnetic Detection of Stress Gradients at the Surfaces of Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, William F.; Zinke, Otto H.

    2004-01-01

    A general, integral expression is developed which relates measurements of the variations of the imaginary component of complex- reluctance with frequency to stress profiles near the surfaces of metals. The technique should yield either applied or residual stress profiles produced, for example, by heat-treating, metal-working, fatigue, or peening. It may even be applicable to carburizing. The technique of measurement cancels out the effects of any pre-treatment residual-stress profile (subject to the assumption of superposition). The general, integral expression is induced from the results of measurements on a steel bar which is subjected to both tensile tests and bending tests

  16. Effectiveness of stress release geometries on reducing residual stress in electroforming metal microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chang; Du, Liqun; Zhao, Wenjun; Zhu, Heqing; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Weitai

    2018-04-01

    Micro electroforming, as a mature micromachining technology, is widely used to fabricate metal microdevices in micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). However, large residual stress in the local positions of the micro electroforming layer often leads to non-uniform residual stress distributions, dimension accuracy defects and reliability issues during fabrication of the metal microdevice. To solve this problem, a novel design method of presetting stress release geometries in the topological structure of the metal microstructure is proposed in this paper. First, the effect of stress release geometries (circular shape, annular groove shape and rivet shape) on the residual stress in the metal microstructure was investigated by finite element modeling (FEM) analysis. Two evaluation parameters, stress concentration factor K T and stress non-uniformity factor δ were calculated. The simulation results show that presetting stress release geometries can effectively reduce and homogenize the residual stress in the metal microstructures were measured metal microstructure. By combined use with stress release geometries of annular groove shape and rivet shape, the stress concentration factor K T and the stress non-uniformity factor δ both decreased at a maximum of 49% and 53%, respectively. Meanwhile, the average residual stress σ avg decreased at a maximum of 20% from  -292.4 MPa to  -232.6 MPa. Then, micro electroforming experiments were carried out corresponding to the simulation models. The residual stresses in the metal microstructures were measured by micro Raman spectroscopy (MRS) method. The results of the experiment proved that the stress non-uniformity factor δ and the average residual stress σ avg also decreased at a maximum with the combination use of annular groove shape and rivet shape stress release geometries, which is in agreement with the results of FEM analysis. The stress non-uniformity factor δ has a maximum decrease of 49% and the

  17. Aging of residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, M.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities as a function of time during a period of a month showed an oscillating variation. An explanation of the ageing curves is proposed. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics......Measurements of the residual surface resistance of superconducting lead cavities as a function of time during a period of a month showed an oscillating variation. An explanation of the ageing curves is proposed. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics...

  18. Residual stress in thick low-pressure chemical-vapor deposited polycrystalline SiC coatings on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D.; Shinavski, R. J.; Steffier, W. S.; Spearing, S. M.

    2005-04-01

    Residual stress in thick coatings of polycrystalline chemical-vapor deposited SiC on Si substrates is a key variable that must be controlled if SiC is to be used in microelectromechanical systems. Studies have been conducted to characterize the residual stress level as a function of deposition temperature, Si wafer and SiC coating thickness, and the ratios of methyltrichlorosilane to hydrogen and hydrogen chloride. Wafer curvature was used to monitor residual stress in combination with a laminated plate analysis. Compressive intrinsic (growth) stresses were measured with magnitudes in the range of 200-300MPa; however, these can be balanced with the tensile stress due to the thermal-expansion mismatch to leave near-zero stress at room temperature. The magnitude of the compressive intrinsic stress is consistent with previously reported values of surface stress in combination with the competition between grain-boundary energy and elastic strain energy.

  19. Effects of post weld heat treatment and weld overlay on the residual stress and mechanical properties in dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Ribeiro, Vladimir S.; Vilela, Alisson H.F.; Almeida, Camila R.O.; Rabello, Emerson G., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: camilarezende.cr@gmail.com, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: vladimirsoler@hotmail.com, E-mail: ahfv02@outlook.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The object of this work is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe joint between carbon steel (A-106 Gr B) and stainless steel (A-312 TP316L) pipes and filler metals of Nickel alloy (82/182), which find wide application in the field of chemical, oil, petroleum industries, fossil fuel and nuclear power plant. A lot of the failures that have occurred in dissimilar metal welded are affected greatly by residual stresses. Residual stress is often a cause of premature failure of critical components under normal operation of welded components. Several methods have been tested and developed for removing the tensile residual stresses. The aim of the methods is to reduce the tensile stress state or to create compressive stresses at a predefined area, such as the inner surface of a welded pipe joint. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and weld overlay (WOL) are two of the residual stress mitigation methods which reduce the tensile residual stress, create compressive stresses and arrest crack initiation and crack growth. The technique used to substantially minimized or eliminated this failure development in the root weld is the post weld heat treatments (stress relief heat treatment) or the weld overlay. In this work was studied the effectiveness in reducing internal residual stress in dissimilar metal welded pipe joints subjected to post weld heat treatment and weld overlay, measurement by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. Also held was mechanical characterization of the welded pipe joint itself. (author)

  20. Effects of post weld heat treatment and weld overlay on the residual stress and mechanical properties in dissimilar metal weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Ribeiro, Vladimir S.; Vilela, Alisson H.F.; Almeida, Camila R.O.; Rabello, Emerson G.

    2017-01-01

    The object of this work is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe joint between carbon steel (A-106 Gr B) and stainless steel (A-312 TP316L) pipes and filler metals of Nickel alloy (82/182), which find wide application in the field of chemical, oil, petroleum industries, fossil fuel and nuclear power plant. A lot of the failures that have occurred in dissimilar metal welded are affected greatly by residual stresses. Residual stress is often a cause of premature failure of critical components under normal operation of welded components. Several methods have been tested and developed for removing the tensile residual stresses. The aim of the methods is to reduce the tensile stress state or to create compressive stresses at a predefined area, such as the inner surface of a welded pipe joint. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and weld overlay (WOL) are two of the residual stress mitigation methods which reduce the tensile residual stress, create compressive stresses and arrest crack initiation and crack growth. The technique used to substantially minimized or eliminated this failure development in the root weld is the post weld heat treatments (stress relief heat treatment) or the weld overlay. In this work was studied the effectiveness in reducing internal residual stress in dissimilar metal welded pipe joints subjected to post weld heat treatment and weld overlay, measurement by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. Also held was mechanical characterization of the welded pipe joint itself. (author)

  1. Residual Stresses in SAVY 4000 and Hagan Container Bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hill, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tokash, Justin Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Forsyth, Robert Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyer, Holden Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been investigated as a potential failure mechanism for the SAVY 4000 and the Hagan containers used to store plutonium-bearing materials at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report discusses the regions of the container bodies most susceptible to SCC and the magnitude of the residual stresses in those regions. Boiling MgCl2 testing indicated that for both containers the region near the top weld was most susceptible to SCC. The Hagan showed through wall cracking after 22-24 hours of exposure both parallel (axial stresses) and perpendicular (hoop stresses) to the weld. The SAVY 4000 container showed significant cracking above and below the weld after 47 hours of exposure but there was no visual evidence of a through wall crack and the cracks did not leak water. Two through wall holes formed in the bottom of the SAVY 4000 container after 44-46 hours of exposure. For both containers, average “through wall” residual stresses were determined from hole drilling data 4 mm below the weld. In the Hagan body, average tensile hoop stresses were 194 MPa and average compressive axial stresses were -120 MPa. In the SAVY 4000 body, average compressive hoop stresses were 11 MPa and average tensile axial stresses were 25 MPa. Results suggest that because the Hagan container exhibited through wall cracking in a shorter time in boiling MgCl2 and had the higher average tensile stress, 194 MPa hoop stress, it is more susceptible to SCC than the SAVY 4000 container.

  2. Analytical study of residual stress improvement method, delta-T process for small-diameter pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruki, Masaki; Aoike, Satoru; Okido, Shinobu; Fukuda, Yuka; Oritani, Naohiko

    2012-01-01

    In order to prevent initiation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at the inner surface of the butt-weld region of a small-diameter pipe, a residual stress improvement process called delta-T process has been developed. During delta-T process, the outer surface of pipe is heated by an external device and the inner surface is rapidly cooled by flashing water. The large thermal stress due to temperature difference between outer and inner surface could improve tensile stress to compressive one at inner surface. In this paper, the thermal elasto-plastic finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to clarify the mechanism of delta-T process for piping system with 50A schedule 80 in nominal pipe size. The FEA results showed good agreements with experimentally measurements of temperature and residual stress in delta-T process. In addition, the management criterion to verify the application of delta-T process to piping system by measurement of temperature at outer surface of pipe was discussed by various parametric numerical analyses. (author)

  3. Analysis and measurement of residual stress distribution of vanadium/ceramics joints for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Y.; Ueda, K.

    1998-01-01

    Vanadium alloys are considered as candidate structural materials for fusion reactor system. When vanadium alloys are used in fusion reactor system, joining with ceramics for insulating is one of material issues to be solved to make component of fusion reactor. In the application of ceramics/metal jointing and coating, residual stress caused by difference of thermal expansion rate between ceramics and metals is an important factor in obtaining good bonding strength and soundness of coating. In this work, residual stress distribution in direct diffusion bonded vanadium/alumina joint (jointing temperature: 1400 C) was measured by small area X-ray diffraction method. And the comparison of finite element method (FEM) analysis and actual stress distribution was carried out. Tensile stress concentration at the edge of the boundary of the joint in alumina was observed. The residual stress concentration may cause cracks in alumina, or failure of bonding. Actually, cracks in alumina caused by thermal stress after bonding at 1500 C was observed. The stress concentration of the joint must be reduced to obtain good bonded joint. Lower bonding temperature or to devise the shape of the outer surface of the joint will reduce the stress concentration. (orig.)

  4. Role of residual stresses induced by double peening on fatigue durability of automotive leaf springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scuracchio, Bruno Geoffroy; Batista de Lima, Nelson; Schön, Cláudio Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Proper choice of peening media is needed for higher fatigue strength in leaf springs. ► Optimum double-peening condition for leaf springs: 0.8 mm shot, followed by 0.3 mm. ► Fatigue life correlates with residual stress levels at the surface (up to 0.02 mm). ► Residual stress profile below 0.02 mm has no measurable effect over fatigue life. ► Failure of the investigated parts is nucleation-controlled. - Abstract: Improvement of fatigue life in parts subjected to cyclic stresses by application of mechanical surface treatment processes is already well known, both in the industry and in the academy. Dealing with automotive springs, the shot peening process becomes an essential step in manufacturing. In the case of leaf springs, however, a systematic investigation of the effect of shot peening on fatigue life is still required. The aim of the present work is to improve the knowledge on the role of shot peening in manufacturing leaf springs for vehicles, through the analysis of residual stresses by X-ray diffraction and fatigue tests on a series of samples that were subject to ten different peening schedules. Among the investigated processes, the usage of 0.8 mm diameter cast steel shot followed by a second peening with 0.3 mm diameter cast steel shot leads to optimal performance, regarding fatigue life. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that this improved performance may be attributed to residual compressive stress maintained until a depth of 0.02 mm below the surface, which directly influences fatigue crack nucleation. Residual stresses induced by shot peening in larger depths have no influence on the sample’s fatigue life

  5. A Numerical Model for Prediction of Residual Stress Using Rayleigh Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Mao Dan; Kang, To; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a numerical model is proposed for the relation between the magnitudes and the depth residual stress with the velocity of Rayleigh wave. Three cases, stress-free, uniform stress and layered stress, are investigated for the change tendency of the Rayleigh wave speed. Using the simulated signal with variation of residual stress magnitude and depth, investigation of the parameters for fitting residual stress and velocity change are performed. The speed change of Rayleigh wave shows a linear relation with the magnitude and an exponential relation with the depth of residual stress. The combination of these two effects could be used for the depth profile evaluation of the residual stress

  6. Simulation of residual stresses and deformations in electron beam-welded copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronen, A.; Leikko, J.; Taskinen, P.; Karvinen, R.

    2013-07-01

    This report presents the modelling of residual stresses and deformations of an EB-welded copper canister. Two different mock-up lengths are modelled with the Abaqus FEA program, and the similarity of those results is studied. Canister mock-ups of 450 mm and 915 mm were chosen for the test cases. The heat treatment results presented in Taskinen 2009 are used as input data for the mechanical model. For the mechanical analysis some simplifications were made to the model. The contact surface between pipe and lid is assumed to be tied and support from the bottom surface is provided with four support points. Results show that, due to the similarity of 450 mm and 915 mm canisters, the short mock-up can be used to predict the stresses and deformation on a full-length canister (5000 mm). The similarity of the temperature fields has already been shown in the previous reports (Taskinen 2009). The main result in the deformation is the shape of the canister in the residual state. The top of the canister tries to shrink, resulting in the lid buckling inwards. The deformation of the lid of the canister is about 2.2 mm at the centre of the lid. The main results in the stresses are the stress level on the surface, the deviation of stresses over the circle and the stresses near the welding. On the surface there are areas where the circumferential stress is at tension. However, radial and axial stresses are usually in compression on the surface. The deviation of the stress level over the circle is quite small, except in the overlap area and near it. The residual stresses from 0 deg C to 45 deg C change remarkably, but over the rest of the area the stresses are more constant. Near the welding the stresses on the top surface are in compression, but in the centre of the welding the stresses are in tension. In the modelling, the possibility of calculating a mechanical model with the contact surface between pipe and lid, so that they could be separated during the welding, was also tested

  7. Simulation of residual stresses and deformations in electron beam-welded copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronen, A.; Leikko, J.; Taskinen, P.; Karvinen, R. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    This report presents the modelling of residual stresses and deformations of an EB-welded copper canister. Two different mock-up lengths are modelled with the Abaqus FEA program, and the similarity of those results is studied. Canister mock-ups of 450 mm and 915 mm were chosen for the test cases. The heat treatment results presented in Taskinen 2009 are used as input data for the mechanical model. For the mechanical analysis some simplifications were made to the model. The contact surface between pipe and lid is assumed to be tied and support from the bottom surface is provided with four support points. Results show that, due to the similarity of 450 mm and 915 mm canisters, the short mock-up can be used to predict the stresses and deformation on a full-length canister (5000 mm). The similarity of the temperature fields has already been shown in the previous reports (Taskinen 2009). The main result in the deformation is the shape of the canister in the residual state. The top of the canister tries to shrink, resulting in the lid buckling inwards. The deformation of the lid of the canister is about 2.2 mm at the centre of the lid. The main results in the stresses are the stress level on the surface, the deviation of stresses over the circle and the stresses near the welding. On the surface there are areas where the circumferential stress is at tension. However, radial and axial stresses are usually in compression on the surface. The deviation of the stress level over the circle is quite small, except in the overlap area and near it. The residual stresses from 0 deg C to 45 deg C change remarkably, but over the rest of the area the stresses are more constant. Near the welding the stresses on the top surface are in compression, but in the centre of the welding the stresses are in tension. In the modelling, the possibility of calculating a mechanical model with the contact surface between pipe and lid, so that they could be separated during the welding, was also tested

  8. The influence of residual stresses on small through-clad cracks in pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deLorenzi, H.G.; Schumacher, B.I.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of cladding residual stresses on the crack driving force for shallow cracks in the wall of a nuclear pressure vessel is investigated. Thermo-elastic-plastic analyses were carried out on long axial through-clad and sub-clad flaws on the inside of the vessel. The depth of the flaws were one and three times the cladding thickness, respectively. An analysis of a semielliptical axial through-clad flaw was also performed. It was assumed that the residual stresses arise due to the difference in the thermal expansion between the cladding and the base material during the cool down from stress relieving temperature to room temperature and due to the subsequent proof test before the vessel is put into service. The variation of the crack tip opening displacement during these loadings and during a subsequent thermal shock on the inside wall is described. The analyses for the long axial flaws suggest that the crack driving force is smaller for this type of flaw if the residual stresses in the cladding are taken into account than if one assumes that the cladding has no residual stresses. However, the analysis of the semielliptical flaw shows significantly different results. Here the crack driving force is higher than when the residual stresses are not taken into account and is maximum in the cladding at or near the clad/base material interface. This suggests that the crack would propagate along the clad/base material interface before it would penetrate deeper into the wall. The elastic-plastic behavior found in the analyses show that the cladding and the residual stresses in the cladding should be taken into acocunt when evaluating the severity of shallow surface cracks on the inside of a nuclear pressure vessel

  9. Residual transpiration as a component of salinity stress tolerance mechanism: a case study for barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanuzzaman, Md; Davies, Noel W; Shabala, Lana; Zhou, Meixue; Brodribb, Tim J; Shabala, Sergey

    2017-06-19

    While most water loss from leaf surfaces occurs via stomata, part of this loss also occurs through the leaf cuticle, even when the stomata are fully closed. This component, termed residual transpiration, dominates during the night and also becomes critical under stress conditions such as drought or salinity. Reducing residual transpiration might therefore be a potentially useful mechanism for improving plant performance when water availability is reduced (e.g. under saline or drought stress conditions). One way of reducing residual transpiration may be via increased accumulation of waxes on the surface of leaf. Residual transpiration and wax constituents may vary with leaf age and position as well as between genotypes. This study used barley genotypes contrasting in salinity stress tolerance to evaluate the contribution of residual transpiration to the overall salt tolerance, and also investigated what role cuticular waxes play in this process. Leaves of three different positions (old, intermediate and young) were used. Our results show that residual transpiration was higher in old leaves than the young flag leaves, correlated negatively with the osmolality, and was positively associated with the osmotic and leaf water potentials. Salt tolerant varieties transpired more water than the sensitive variety under normal growth conditions. Cuticular waxes on barley leaves were dominated by primary alcohols (84.7-86.9%) and also included aldehydes (8.90-10.1%), n-alkanes (1.31-1.77%), benzoate esters (0.44-0.52%), phytol related compounds (0.22-0.53%), fatty acid methyl esters (0.14-0.33%), β-diketones (0.07-0.23%) and alkylresorcinols (1.65-3.58%). A significant negative correlation was found between residual transpiration and total wax content, and residual transpiration correlated significantly with the amount of primary alcohols. Both leaf osmolality and the amount of total cuticular wax are involved in controlling cuticular water loss from barley leaves under well

  10. A residual life prediction model based on the generalized σ -N curved surface

    OpenAIRE

    Zongwen AN; Xuezong BAI; Jianxiong GAO

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate change rule of the residual life of structure under random repeated load, firstly, starting from the statistic meaning of random repeated load, the joint probability density function of maximum stress and minimum stress is derived based on the characteristics of order statistic (maximum order statistic and minimum order statistic); then, based on the equation of generalized σ -N curved surface, considering the influence of load cycles number on fatigue life, a relation...

  11. Experimental residual stress evaluation of hydraulic expansion transitions in Alloy 690 steam generator tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, R.; Doherty, P.; Hornbach, D.; Abdelsalam, U.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Steam Generator (SG) service reliability and longevity have been seriously affected worldwide by corrosion at the tube-to-tubesheet joint expansion. Current SG designs for new facilities and replacement projects enhance corrosion resistance through the use of advanced tubing materials and improved joint design and fabrication techniques. Here, transition zones of hydraulic expansions have undergone detailed experimental evaluation to define residual stress and cold-work distribution on and below the secondary-side surface. Using X-ray diffraction techniques, with supporting finite element analysis, variations are compared in tubing metallurgical condition, tube/pitch geometry, expansion pressure, and tube-to-hole clearance. Initial measurements to characterize the unexpanded tube reveal compressive stresses associated with a thin work-hardened layer on the outer surface of the tube. The gradient of cold-work was measured as 3% to 0% within .001 inch of the surface. The levels and character of residual stresses following hydraulic expansion are primarily dependent on this work-hardened surface layer and initial stress state that is unique to each tube fabrication process. Tensile stresses following expansion are less than 25% of the local yield stress and are found on the transition in a narrow circumferential band at the immediate tube surface (< .0002 inch/0.005 mm depth). The measurements otherwise indicate a predominance of compressive stresses on and below the secondary-side surface of the transition zone. Excellent resistance to SWSCC initiation is offered by the low levels of tensile stress and cold-work. Propagation of any possible cracking would be deterred by the compressive stress field that surrounds this small volume of tensile material

  12. Optimum injection pressure of a cavitating jet on introduction of compressive residual stress into stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyama, Hitoshi; Nagasaka, Kazuya; Takakuwa, Osamu; Naito, Akima

    2011-01-01

    In order to mitigate stress corrosion cracking of components used for nuclear power plants, introduction of compressive residual stress into sub-surface of the components is an effective maintenance method. The introduction of compressive residual stress using cavitation impact generated by injecting a high speed water jet into water was proposed. Water jet peening is now applying to reduce stress corrosion cracking of shrouds in the nuclear power plants. However, accidental troubles such as dropping off the components and cutting of the pipes by the jet occurred at the maintenance. In order to peen by the jet without damage, optimum injection pressure of the jet should be revealed. In the case of 'cavitation peening', cavitation is generated by injecting the high speed water jet into water. As working pressure at the cavitation peening is the pressure at cavitation bubble collapse, the injection pressure of the jet is not main parameter. The cavitation impact is increasing with the scale of the jet, i.e., scaling effect of the cavitation. It was revealed that the large scale jet at low injection pressure can introduce compressive residual stress into stainless steel comparing with the small scale jet at high injection pressure. As expected, a water jet at high injection pressure might make damage of the components. Namely, in order to avoid damage of the components, the jet at the low injection pressure will be suit for the introduction of compressive residual stress. In the present paper, in order to make clear optimum injection pressure of the cavitating jet for the introduction of compressive residual stress without damage, the residual stress of stainless steel treated by the jet at various injection pressure was measured by using an X-ray diffraction method. The injection pressure of the jet p 1 was varied from 5 MPa to 300 MPa. The diameter of the nozzle throat of the jet d was varied from 0.35 mm to 2.0 mm. The residual stress changing with depth was

  13. An Evaluation on the Residual Stresses Induced by EFR Welding of CEDM Nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Park, Gi Yeol; Kim, Tae Ryong [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, carried out the welding analysis to use the SYSWELD as welding interpretation code based on the reactor upper head nozzle. In this paper, evaluated the residual stress in CEDM nozzle by EFR through the SYSWELD which is the welding interpretation code. The conclusion are same as below. 1) When comparing with Hoop Stress and Axial Stress by J-Groove and EFR, after welding residual stress by EFR is lower than after J-Groove. 2) After EFR, it was confirmed that the tensile stress is reduced after increasing over the point3. The PWSCC of Dissimilar Metal Zone of reactor can degrade the integrity of the main device in nuclear power plant, and according to the power plant stopped for inspection, it can cause an enormous amount of lost sales when the crack is occurred. Various methods have been developed to reduce residual stress to prevent the PWSCC like Weld Overlay (WOL), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (Msp), Laser Peening, Inlay Weld, etc. Among them, Wol is the most commonly used welding method in nuclear power plant. When performing a Wol, structure rigidity will be increase, and residual stress of welding zone will be changed into compressive stress from the tensile stress. This has the advantage that improved resistance to PWSCC. The most commonly used material in nuclear power plant is Inconel 600. Inconel 600 consist of a Ni-Cr-Fe and it has 14-17% of Cr content, 10% of Fe content and susceptible to PWSCC. The more Cr content is more stronger against PWSCC. Inconel 690 which has 2 times more Cr content than Inconel 600 has very strong resistance to PWSCC than Inconel 600. Embedded Flaw Repair (EFR) has been developed in Westinghouse by 1994. The welding metal with high corrosion resistance is embedded on the surface of component, and could protect cracking part from the PWSCC. It is permanent repair method that isolates the flaw from the environment, eliminating further crack propagation due to PWSCC. EFR method is that at least three layers

  14. Influence of cold rolling and fatigue on the residual stress state of a metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanus, E.; Ericsson, T.; Lu, J.; Decomps, F.

    1993-01-01

    The large difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the matrix alloy and the particle in a metal matrix composite gives rise to residual stresses in the material. In the present work the effect of cold rolling and four-point bending fatigue on the residual stress state of a silicon carbide particle reinforced aluminium alloy (AA 2014) has been investigated. The three dimensional stress state measured in both phases: matrix and reinforcement, has been determined by using an X-ray diffraction technique. It was found that cold rolling induces surface compressive macrostresses of about -250 MPa, with a penetration depth around 2 mm. The absolute values of the pseudomacrostresses in both phases are significantly reduced due to the single track rolling. Stress relaxation occurs during four-point bending fatigue. (orig.)

  15. Residual stress distribution of a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy under shear deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, C.; Figueroa, I.A.; Braham, C.; Cabrera, J.M.; Zanellato, O.; Baiz, S.; Gonzalez, G.

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of information with regards to the friction effect in ECAPed aluminum alloys, even though it might substantially modify the deformation at the surface. In this work, the friction effect at the surface and the deformation heterogeneity in the ECAPed aluminum alloy 6061-T6 were characterized. X-Ray diffraction was used to determine residual stresses (RS) on the sample surface. The volumetric sections were characterized by Synchrotron diffraction at ESRF beamline ID15B (Grenoble, France). It was found that the microhardness mapping and residual stress results showed a good agreement with the finite element analysis for the first layer studied. Minor strain variation, Δd/d as a function of (hkl) planes, for the different analyzed sections was found. The study also showed that there was an incomplete symmetry in the residual stress near the surface, even at up to a depth of 400 µm. The regions with higher deformation were found to be at the top and bottom parts of the sample, while the central region showed stress variations of up to 50 MPa.

  16. Residual stress distribution of a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy under shear deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Ruiz, C.; Figueroa, I.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito exterior S/N, Cd. Universitaria, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacán C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Braham, C. [Laboratoire Procédés et Ingénierie Mécanique et Matériaux, CNRS UMR 8006, ENSAM-CNAM, 151, Bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris (France); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica, ETSEIB-Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña, Av Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundació CTM Centre Tecnológic, Pl. de la Ciencia 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Zanellato, O.; Baiz, S. [Laboratoire Procédés et Ingénierie Mécanique et Matériaux, CNRS UMR 8006, ENSAM-CNAM, 151, Bd de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris (France); Gonzalez, G., E-mail: joseggr@unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito exterior S/N, Cd. Universitaria, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacán C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2016-07-18

    There is a lack of information with regards to the friction effect in ECAPed aluminum alloys, even though it might substantially modify the deformation at the surface. In this work, the friction effect at the surface and the deformation heterogeneity in the ECAPed aluminum alloy 6061-T6 were characterized. X-Ray diffraction was used to determine residual stresses (RS) on the sample surface. The volumetric sections were characterized by Synchrotron diffraction at ESRF beamline ID15B (Grenoble, France). It was found that the microhardness mapping and residual stress results showed a good agreement with the finite element analysis for the first layer studied. Minor strain variation, Δd/d as a function of (hkl) planes, for the different analyzed sections was found. The study also showed that there was an incomplete symmetry in the residual stress near the surface, even at up to a depth of 400 µm. The regions with higher deformation were found to be at the top and bottom parts of the sample, while the central region showed stress variations of up to 50 MPa.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Analysis of Residual Stress by Diffraction Using Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, ed M. E.; Lodini, A.

    2003-09-01

    The presence of residual stresses within engineering components is often a key feature in determining their usable lifetimes and failure characteristics. Residual surface compression can, for example, restrict the propagation of surface cracks through the bulk. As a consequence, it is essential to characterize the magnitude and spatial distribution of residual stresses and, at least for non-destructive testing, this is most widely achieved using diffraction of neutron and high energy synchrotron radiations. This book aims to provide a detailed description of the methodology used to determine residual stresses. The major emphasis is placed on the neutron method, this being the more widely established approach at present. It contains 20 chapters contributed by 23 authors, divided into five major parts. The overall layout is very logical, with the first part giving a general introduction to the use of neutrons and x-rays for materials research and summarizing the methods used for their production. Part 2 considers the more specific aspects of extracting the residual stress distribution within a bulk sample and includes some valuable comments on a number of potential experimental problems, such as the determination of the stress-free lattice parameter and the effects of broadening of the Bragg peaks. The experimental facilities currently available or under development are described in part 3, with the remaining two parts devoted to general and specific applications of the residual stress measurement technique. As expected with such a large number of different authors, there is some variation in style and quality. However, the text is generally easy to follow and, more importantly, it is largely free of the problems of inconsistent notation and dupication of material that can afflict multi-authored texts. My only negative comment concerns the latter portion of the book devoted to specific applications of the technique, which is illustrative rather than comprehensive. In

  18. Stress and Fatigue Life Modeling of Cannon Breech Closures Including Effects of Material Strength and Residual Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Underwood, John

    2000-01-01

    ...; overload residual stress. Modeling of applied and residual stresses at the location of the fatigue failure site is performed by elastic-plastic finite element analysis using ABAQUS and by solid...

  19. The influence of texture on residual stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, N.B. de.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the orientation distribution function (ODF) from incomplete pole figures has been developed for rolled materials with a cubic structure. This program is based on Bunge's series expansion. The use of incomplete pole figures results in the loss of orthogonality among symmetric spherical harmonic functions and makes it necessary to explicitly evaluate the integrals. The ODF has been used to quantitatively evaluate the influence of texture in determining residual stresses. This has been done by calculating theoretically the strain undergone by each cell as a function of its orientation to residual stress relationship. To test the ODF program, cold rolled Cu and Al specimens were used and to evaluate residual stresses as a function of texture, cold rolled AISI 430 and 324 specimens were used. Simulations have also be presented based on the texture for each of the materials, to verify the nature of the curve d x sin 2 ψ as a function of each stress tensor components. (author)

  20. In-situ X-ray residual stress measurement on a peened alloy 600 weld metal at elevated temperature under tensile load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunomura, Tomoaki; Maeguchi, Takaharu; Kurimura, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    In order to verify stability of residual stress improvement effect of peeing for mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in components of PWR plant, relaxation behavior of residual stress induced by water jet peening (WJP) on surface of alloy 600 weld metal (alloy 132) was investigated by in-situ X-ray residual stress measurement under thermal aging and stress condition considered for actual plant operation. Surface residual stress change was observed at the early stage of thermal aging at 360°C, but no significant further stress relaxation was observed after that. Applied stress below yield stress does not significantly affect stress relaxation behavior of surface residual stress. For the X-ray residual stress measurement, X-ray stress constant at room temperature for alloy 600 was determined experimentally with several surface treatment and existence of applied strain. The X-ray stress constant at elevated temperatures were extrapolated theoretically based on the X-ray stress constant at room temperature for alloy 600. (author)

  1. Simulation of stresses, residual stresses, and distortion in stepped cylinders of AISI 4140 due to martensitical hardening by immersion cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlers, M.; Mueller, H.; Loehe, D. [Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Materials Science and Engineering I

    1999-09-01

    Heat treatment improves mechanical properties of steel parts, but also causes residual stresses and distortion. Stresses and deformation occurring during heat treatment can not be measured in-situ with appropriate temporal and spatial resolution. In order to evaluate the processes occurring in the workpiece during quenching as well as the residual stresses and distortions, numerical methods have to be used. Heat conduction, phase transformations, and mechanical behaviour of the material as well as the couplings between the processes such as transformation plasticity have to be modeled for the simulation of steel hardening. Temperature and phase dependent properties (including TTT-data) have to incorporated into calculations. One of the major factors determining the evolution of stress and deformation is the heat-transfer coefficient between component and quenching medium. For vapourizing liquids, heat transfer depends on temperature and location. But heat transfer is not only influenced by the quenchant but also by part geometry and size. Stepped cylinders of AISI 4140 steel were quenched in water and oil. Both experimental measurements and numerical calculations were carried out. The variation of dive-in direction strongly influences the rewetting of the specimen surface and therefore the cooling behaviour, stress and deformation evolution, and resultant residual stresses and distortion. Excellent agreement is obtained between calculated and experimental results. (orig.)

  2. Residual stresses and fatigue in a duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels, consisting of approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite, often combine the best features of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. They generally have good mechanical properties, including high strength and ductility, and the corrosion resistance is often better than conventional austenitic grades. This has lead to a growing use of duplex stainless steels as a material in mechanically loaded constructions. However, detailed knowledge regarding its mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms are still lacking. In this thesis special emphasis has been placed on the residual stresses and their influence on mechanical behaviour of duplex stainless steels. Due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion between the two phases, tensile microstresses are found in the austenitic phase and balancing compressive microstresses in the ferritic phase. The first part of this thesis is a literature survey, which will give an introduction to duplex stainless steels and review the fatigue properties of duplex stainless steels and the influence of residual stresses in two-phase material. The second part concerns the evolution of the residual stress state during uniaxial loading. Initial residual stresses were found to be almost two times higher in the transverse direction compared to the rolling direction. During loading the absolute value of the microstresses increased in the macroscopic elastic regime but started to decrease with increasing load in the macroscopic plastic regime. A significant increase of the microstresses was also found to occur during unloading. Finite element simulations also show stress variation within one phase and a strong influence of both the elastic and plastic anisotropy of the individual phases on the simulated stress state. In the third part, the load sharing between the phases during cyclic loading is studied. X-ray diffraction stress analysis and transmission electron microscopy show that even if

  3. Residual stresses and fatigue in a duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Johan

    1999-05-01

    Duplex stainless steels, consisting of approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite, often combine the best features of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. They generally have good mechanical properties, including high strength and ductility, and the corrosion resistance is often better than conventional austenitic grades. This has lead to a growing use of duplex stainless steels as a material in mechanically loaded constructions. However, detailed knowledge regarding its mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms are still lacking. In this thesis special emphasis has been placed on the residual stresses and their influence on mechanical behaviour of duplex stainless steels. Due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion between the two phases, tensile microstresses are found in the austenitic phase and balancing compressive microstresses in the ferritic phase. The first part of this thesis is a literature survey, which will give an introduction to duplex stainless steels and review the fatigue properties of duplex stainless steels and the influence of residual stresses in two-phase material. The second part concerns the evolution of the residual stress state during uniaxial loading. Initial residual stresses were found to be almost two times higher in the transverse direction compared to the rolling direction. During loading the absolute value of the microstresses increased in the macroscopic elastic regime but started to decrease with increasing load in the macroscopic plastic regime. A significant increase of the microstresses was also found to occur during unloading. Finite element simulations also show stress variation within one phase and a strong influence of both the elastic and plastic anisotropy of the individual phases on the simulated stress state. In the third part, the load sharing between the phases during cyclic loading is studied. X-ray diffraction stress analysis and transmission electron microscopy show that even if

  4. Welding induced residual stress evaluation using laser-generated Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chong; Zhou, Yuanlai; Reddy, Vishnu V. B.; Mebane, Aaron; Ume, I. Charles

    2018-04-01

    Welding induced residual stress could affect the dimensional stability, fatigue life, and chemical resistance of the weld joints. Ultrasonic method serves as an important non-destructive tool for the residual stress evaluation due to its easy implementation, low cost and wide application to different materials. Residual stress would result in the ultrasonic wave velocity variation, which is the so called acoustoelastic effect. In this paper, Laser/EMAT ultrasonic technique was proposed to experimentally study the relative velocity variation ΔV/V of Rayleigh wave, which has the potential to evaluate surface/subsurface longitudinal residual stress developed during the Gas Metal Arc Welding process. Broad band ultrasonic waves were excited by pulsed Q-Switched Nd: YAG laser. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) attached to the welded plates was used to capture the Rayleigh wave signals propagating along the weld seam direction. Different time of flight measurements were conducted by varying the distance between the weld seam and Rayleigh wave propagating path in the range of 0 to 45 mm. The maximum relative velocity difference was found on the weld seam. With the increasing distance away from the weld seam, the relative velocity difference sharply decreased to negative value. With further increase in distance, the relative velocity difference slowly increased and approached zero. The distribution of relative velocity variations indicates that tensile stress appears in the melted zone as it becomes compressive near the heat-affected zone.

  5. Residual Stresses in a NiCrY-Coated Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Rogers, Richard B.; Nesbitt, James A.; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Miller, Robert A.; Telesman, Ignacy; Draper, Susan L.; Locci, Ivan E.

    2017-01-01

    Protective ductile coatings will be necessary to mitigate oxidation and corrosion attack on superalloy disks exposed to increasing operating temperatures in some turbine engine environments. However, such coatings must be resistant to harmful surface cracking during service. The objective of this study was to investigate how residual stresses evolve in such coatings. Cylindrical gage fatigue specimens of powder metallurgy-processed disk superalloy LSHR were coated with a NiCrY coating, shot peened, and then subjected to fatigue in air at room and high temperatures. The effects of shot peening and fatigue cycling on average residual stresses and other aspects of the coating were assessed. Shot peening did induce beneficial compressive residual stresses in the coating and substrate. However, these stresses became more tensile in the coating with subsequent heating and contributed to cracking of the coating in long intervals of cycling at 760 C. Substantial compressive residual stresses remained in the substrate adjacent to the coating, sufficient to suppress fatigue cracking. The coating continued to protect the substrate from hot corrosion pitting, even after fatigue cracks initiated in the coating.

  6. Effects of ion implantation on the microstructure and residual stress of filter arc CrN films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, K.-W.; Chen, Y.-C.; Han Sheng; Hsu, C.-S.; Chen, Y.-L.; Wang, D.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    Chromium nitride coatings were deposited using a hybrid physical vapor deposition (PVD) system containing a filter arc deposition (FAD) and a metal plasma ion implantation source (MPII). Exactly how surface residual stress affects film characteristics is investigated using glancing incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and pole figure analyses. Compared with unimplanted CrN, implanted carbon typically increases compressive residual stress and hardness. Wear resistance was also improved by implanted carbon

  7. Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in NPP construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinca, R.; Bokuchava, G.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is one of the most powerful methods for condensed matter studies. This method is used for non-destructive determination of residual stresses in material. The fundamental aspects of neutron diffraction are discussed, together with a brief description of the experimental facility. The principal advantage of using neutrons rather than the more conventional X-rays is the fact that neutron can penetrate deeply (2-4 cm for steel and more than 10 cm for aluminium) into metals to determine internal parameters within the bulk of materials. We present results of measurements residual stresses in NPP construction material - austenitic stainless steel (Cr-18%, Ni-10%, Ti-1%) coated with high-nickel alloy. (authors)

  8. A primary simulation for residual stress neutron diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuying; Liu Lijuan; Sun Liangwei

    2012-01-01

    At present, neutron diffraction method is the unique and nondestructive method that can directly measure the residual stress distribution in deep materials and engineering components. It has an important application in engineering. A simulation of the flux at the position of the sample table was reported, and the resolution of the residual stress instrument was computed at the same time. The effect of the parameters of the second collimator on the flux at the sample position and the resolution of the instrument have been analyzed. The result indicated that the second collimator empress much on the neutron flux and the instrument resolution is well when the sample's diffraction angle is less than 120°. (authors)

  9. Determination of global and local residual stresses in SOFC by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanova, Julie; Sicardy, Olivier; Fortunier, Roland; Micha, Jean-Sebastien; Bleuet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is a high-performance electrochemical device for energy conversion. A single cell is composed of five layers made of different ceramic materials: anode support, anode functional layer, electrolyte, cathode functional layer and cathode. The mechanical integrity of the cell is a major issue during its lifetime, especially for the electrolyte layer. Damage of the cells is mainly due to the high operating temperature, the 'redox' behaviour of the anode and the brittleness of the involved materials. Since residual stresses are known to play a significant role in the damage evolution, it is important to determine them. For this purpose, residual stresses in an anode-supported planar SOFC were measured by X-ray diffraction. Firstly, macroscopic stresses in each phase of each layer were studied using the sin 2 ψ method on a laboratory X-ray goniometer at room temperature. This technique enables the calculation of residual stress of the material from the measurement of the crystal lattice deformation. The electrolyte has been found under bi-axial compressive stress of -920 MPa. Secondly, X-ray measurements controlling depth penetration were made in the electrolyte using grazing incidence method. The results show that the stress is not homogenous in the layer. The first five micrometers of the electrolyte have been found less constrained (-750 MPa) than the complete layer, suggesting a gradient of deformation in the electrolyte from the interface with the Anode Functional Layer to the free surface. Finally, local stress measurements were made on the electrolyte layer by X-ray synchrotron radiation that allows high accuracy measurement on the (sub-) micrometer scale. Polychromatic and monochromatic beams are used to determine the complete strain tensor from grain to grain in the electrolyte. First results confirm the macroscopic stress trend of the electrolyte. These X-ray techniques at different scales will contribute to a better understanding

  10. Residual stress measurements by X-ray and neutron diffractions in heat-treated SiCw/A2014 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Takahisa; Fujita, Motoo; Tomota, Yo; Ono, Masayoshi

    1998-01-01

    Residual stresses due to various heat treatments in a 22 volume percent SiC whisker/A2014 metal matrix composite (MMC) were measured by using X-ray and neutron diffractions. Micro residual stresses generated from the differences in thermal expansion coefficients of the constituents and macro residual stresses associated with different cooling rates in the outer and inner regions of an MMC specimen must be distinguished in X-ray stress measurements. The conventional sin 2 ψ method under an assumption of plane stress condition has been found not to be applicable to the present MMC, because interactions among whiskers in the X-ray penetrating area yields σ 33 where the x 3 -axis is normal with respect to specimen's surface. An average value of σ 33 can be measured by X-ray diffraction technique, but does not seem enough to evaluate micro residual stresses. It is found that neutron diffraction is the most powerful method to measure micro residual stresses in the constituents. Elastic residual strains obtained by neutron diffraction in solution treated or T6 heat treated samples show good agreements with predictions calculated by using Eshelby inclusion theory coupled with the Mori-Tanaka mean field concept, indicating that the influence of stress relaxation is negligible. In addition, internal stresses relaxations during holding at room temperature, slow cooling from solution treatment temperature, or subzero cooling are discussed. (author)

  11. Prediction of Weld Residual Stress of Narrow Gap Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Huh, Nam Su

    2010-01-01

    The conventional welding technique such as shield metal arc welding has been mostly applied to the piping system of the nuclear power plants. It is well known that this welding technique causes the overheating and welding defects due to the large groove angle of weld. On the other hand, the narrow gap welding(NGW) technique has many merits, for instance, the reduction of welding time, the shrinkage of weld and the small deformation of the weld due to the small groove angle and welding bead width comparing with the conventional welds. These characteristics of NGW affect the deformation behavior and the distribution of welding residual stress of NGW, thus it is believed that the residual stress results obtained from conventional welding procedure may not be applied to structural integrity evaluation of NGW. In this paper, the welding residual stress of NGW was predicted using the nonlinear finite element analysis to simulate the thermal and mechanical effects of the NGW. The present results can be used as the important information to perform the flaw evaluation and to improve the weld procedure of NGW

  12. Stress-Softening and Residual Strain Effects in Suture Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Elías-Zúñiga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the experimental characterization of suture material samples of MonoPlus, Monosyn, polyglycolic acid, polydioxanone 2–0, polydioxanone 4–0, poly(glycolide-co-epsilon-caprolactone, nylon, and polypropylene when subjected to cyclic loading and unloading conditions. It is found that all tested suture materials exhibit stress-softening and residual strain effects related to the microstructural material damage upon deformation from the natural, undistorted state of the virgin suture material. To predict experimental observations, a new constitutive material model that takes into account stress-softening and residual strain effects is developed. The basis of this model is the inclusion of a phenomenological nonmonotonous softening function that depends on the strain intensity between loading and unloading cycles. The theory is illustrated by modifying the non-Gaussian average-stretch, full-network model to capture stress-softening and residual strains by using pseudoelasticity concepts. It is shown that results obtained from theoretical simulations compare well with suture material experimental data.

  13. Measurement of residual stress in a sphere by x-ray under the consideration of its penetration depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Osamu; Ukai, Takayoshi

    1981-01-01

    It was pointed out in the case of a plate that when stress gradient is large, the use of the X-ray with large penetration depth caused large measurement error. In this paper, the theoretical equations for measuring the residual stress in a sphere with X-ray, taking penetration depth into account, are proposed, and the example of application is shown. As the method of measuring the residual stress in a hollow sphere with X-ray, only the method of combining external surface removal and external surface irradiation is practically in use. It was assumed that a sphere is isotropic, and that the residual stress is a function of the radius only. First, the theory of measuring the residual stress in a sphere with X-ray taking penetration depth into account is explained, and the equations for calculating the residual stresses in tangential and radial directions are derived. As the example of applying this theory, the distribution of the residual stress in a steel ball for a ball bearing was measured with Cr characteristic X-ray. The ball of 30 mm diameter was made of high-carbon chromium bearing steel, grade 2, (JIS SUJ2) and quenched and tempered. The removal of the thin layer was made by chemical etching and electrolysis. The measured values and the calculated values are shown. (Kako, I.)

  14. Effect of laser shock peening on residual stress and fatigue life of clad 2024 aluminium sheet containing scribe defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorman, M.; Toparli, M.B.; Smyth, N.; Cini, A.; Fitzpatrick, M.E.; Irving, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effect of laser peen intensity on local residual stress fields in 2024 aluminium. ► Peening induces significant changes in surface topography and local hardness. ► Residual stress at peen spot centre in tension, spot overlap in compression. ► Notched fatigue lives increased; crack morphology correlated to residual stress field. ► Large peening power densities can cause fatigue life reduction in notched samples. - Abstract: Laser peening at a range of power densities has been applied to 2 mm-thick sheets of 2024 T351 aluminium. The induced residual stress field was measured using incremental hole drilling and synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques. Fatigue samples were subjected to identical laser peening treatments followed by scribing at the peen location to introduce stress concentrations, after which they were fatigue tested. The residual stresses were found to be non-biaxial: orthogonal to the peen line they were tensile at the surface, moving into the desired compression with increased depth. Regions of peen spot overlap were associated with large compression strains; the centre of the peen spot remaining tensile. Fatigue lives showed moderate improvement over the life of unpeened samples for 50 μm deep scribes, and slight improvement for samples with 150 μm scribes. Use of the residual stress intensity K resid approach to calculate fatigue life improvement arising from peening was unsuccessful at predicting the relative effects of the different peening treatments. Possible reasons for this are explored.

  15. Characterization of residual stress as a function of friction stir welding parameters in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel MA956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, L.N., E-mail: lnbrewer1@eng.ua.edu [Naval Postgraduate School (United States); Bennett, M.S.; Baker, B.W. [Naval Postgraduate School (United States); Payzant, E.A.; Sochalski-Kolbus, L.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Friction stir welding (FSW) can generate large residual stresses during solid state joining of oxide dispersion strengthened steels. In this work, a plate of MA956 steel was friction stir welded at three conditions: 500 rpm/25 mm per minute (mmpm), 400 rpm/50 mmpm and 400 rpm/100 mmpm. The residual stresses across these welds were measured using both x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. The distribution and magnitude of the residual stresses agreed well between the two techniques. Longitudinal residual stresses up to eighty percent of the yield strength were observed for the 400 rpm/100 mmpm condition. The surface residual stresses were somewhat larger on the root side of the weld than on the crown side. Increases in the relative heat input during FSW decreased the measured residual stresses in the stir zone and the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ). Increasing the traverse rate while holding the rotational speed fixed increased the residual stress levels. The fatigue strength of the material is predicted to decrease by at least twenty percent with cracking most likely in the TMAZ.

  16. Residual stress improvement in multi-layer welded plates using water-shower cooling during welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Nobuyoshi; Koide, Hiroo

    2006-01-01

    To reduce tensile residual stress in a welded region, we developed a new welding method that applies a water-shower behind the welding torch. When this method is applied to welding of austenitic stainless steel plates, cooling conditions mainly determine how much the residual stress can be reduced. To determine the conditions, we first used FEM to evaluate the effects of interpass temperature on the residual stress. And we found effective conditions for reducing tensile residual stress. To verify the validity of the conditions, specimens welded with or without water shower cooling were manufactured. Residual stresses of the specimens were experimentally measured. It was found that tensile residual stresses were generated on the surface of the welds and those were reduced in the case that the water-shower was applied. These measurement results agree well with the FEM analyses. It can therefore be concluded that the water-shower cooling during welding is appropriate for reducing tensile residual stress in austenitic stainless steel welding. (author)

  17. Characterization of residual stress as a function of friction stir welding parameters in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel MA956

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, L.N.; Bennett, M.S.; Baker, B.W.; Payzant, E.A.; Sochalski-Kolbus, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) can generate large residual stresses during solid state joining of oxide dispersion strengthened steels. In this work, a plate of MA956 steel was friction stir welded at three conditions: 500 rpm/25 mm per minute (mmpm), 400 rpm/50 mmpm and 400 rpm/100 mmpm. The residual stresses across these welds were measured using both x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. The distribution and magnitude of the residual stresses agreed well between the two techniques. Longitudinal residual stresses up to eighty percent of the yield strength were observed for the 400 rpm/100 mmpm condition. The surface residual stresses were somewhat larger on the root side of the weld than on the crown side. Increases in the relative heat input during FSW decreased the measured residual stresses in the stir zone and the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ). Increasing the traverse rate while holding the rotational speed fixed increased the residual stress levels. The fatigue strength of the material is predicted to decrease by at least twenty percent with cracking most likely in the TMAZ.

  18. On the thermally-induced residual stresses in thick fiber-thermoplastic matrix (PEEK) cross-ply laminated plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shoufeng; Nairn, John A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical method for calculating thermally-induced residual stresses in laminated plates is applied to cross-ply PEEK laminates. We considered three cooling procedures: slow cooling (uniform temperature distribution); convective and radiative cooling; and rapid cooling by quenching (constant surface temperature). Some of the calculated stresses are of sufficient magnitude to effect failure properties such as matrix microcracking.

  19. Method for evaluationo of the 3D residual stress field from X-ray diffraction measurements on heavy weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.E.; Sandstroem, R.

    1982-03-01

    A method for evaluation of the three dimensional residual 30 stress distribution in heavy weldmwents has been developed. The evaluation is based on measured stress data at a number of depth levels below the plate surface. The method has been applied to two measurements on heavy weldments of A 553 B steel. Comparison to a previous evaluation shows good agreement. (Authors)

  20. Influence of Hardening Model on Weld Residual Stress Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    This study is the third stage of a project sponsored by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) to improve the weld residual stress modelling procedures currently used in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine which material hardening model gave the best agreement with experimentally measured weld residual stress distributions. Two girth weld geometries were considered: 19mm and 65mm thick girth welds with Rin/t ratios of 10.5 and 2.8, respectively. The FE solver ABAQUS Standard v6.5 was used for analysis. As a preliminary step some improvements were made to the welding simulation procedure used in part one of the project. First, monotonic stress strain curves and a mixed isotropic/kinematic hardening model were sourced from the literature for 316 stainless steel. Second, more detailed information was obtained regarding the geometry and welding sequence for the Case 1 weld (compared with phase 1 of this project). Following the preliminary step, welding simulations were conducted using isotropic, kinematic and mixed hardening models. The isotropic hardening model gave the best overall agreement with experimental measurements; it is therefore recommended for future use in welding simulations. The mixed hardening model gave good agreement for predictions of the hoop stress but tended to under estimate the magnitude of the axial stress. It must be noted that two different sources of data were used for the isotropic and mixed models in this study and this may have contributed to the discrepancy in predictions. When defining a mixed hardening model it is difficult to delineate the relative contributions of isotropic and kinematic hardening and for the model used it may be that a greater isotropic hardening component should have been specified. The kinematic hardening model consistently underestimated the magnitude of both the axial and hoop stress and is not recommended for use. Two sensitivity studies were also conducted. In the first the effect of using a

  1. Influence of Hardening Model on Weld Residual Stress Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, Jonathan; Gunnars, Jens

    2009-06-01

    This study is the third stage of a project sponsored by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) to improve the weld residual stress modelling procedures currently used in Sweden. The aim of this study was to determine which material hardening model gave the best agreement with experimentally measured weld residual stress distributions. Two girth weld geometries were considered: 19mm and 65mm thick girth welds with Rin/t ratios of 10.5 and 2.8, respectively. The FE solver ABAQUS Standard v6.5 was used for analysis. As a preliminary step some improvements were made to the welding simulation procedure used in part one of the project. First, monotonic stress strain curves and a mixed isotropic/kinematic hardening model were sourced from the literature for 316 stainless steel. Second, more detailed information was obtained regarding the geometry and welding sequence for the Case 1 weld (compared with phase 1 of this project). Following the preliminary step, welding simulations were conducted using isotropic, kinematic and mixed hardening models. The isotropic hardening model gave the best overall agreement with experimental measurements; it is therefore recommended for future use in welding simulations. The mixed hardening model gave good agreement for predictions of the hoop stress but tended to under estimate the magnitude of the axial stress. It must be noted that two different sources of data were used for the isotropic and mixed models in this study and this may have contributed to the discrepancy in predictions. When defining a mixed hardening model it is difficult to delineate the relative contributions of isotropic and kinematic hardening and for the model used it may be that a greater isotropic hardening component should have been specified. The kinematic hardening model consistently underestimated the magnitude of both the axial and hoop stress and is not recommended for use. Two sensitivity studies were also conducted. In the first the effect of using a

  2. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegemann, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Stegemann@bam.de [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko [HZB Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Kreutzbruck, Marc [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); IKT, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth. - Highlights: • Comparison of magnetic microstructure with neutron diffraction stress analysis. • High spatial resolution magnetic stray field images of hypereutectoid TIG welds. • Spatial variations of the stray fields are below the magnetic field of the earth. • GMR spin valve gradiometer arrays adapted for the evaluation of magnetic microstructures. • Magnetic stray fields are closely linked to microstructure of the material.

  3. Effects of LSP on micro-structures and residual stresses in a 4 mm CLAM steel weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xizhang, E-mail: chenxizhang@wzu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wenzhou University., Wenzhou 325035 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Fang, Yuanyuan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Shuyan; Kelleher, Joe F. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Zhou, Jianzhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-05-15

    The effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on the distribution of residual stress and micro-structure of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel weldment were investigated via neutron diffraction and optical microscope (OM). A pair of 4 mm CLAM steel plates joined by GTA welding. Special attention is paid to the generation of high level compressive residual stresses introduced by LSP. Residual stress in longitudinal, normal and transversal direction at weldment surface and longitudinal stress through thickness are evaluated via neutron diffraction. Compressive residual stress after LSP occurred at more than 90% areas within the weld joint, it is almost double the areas of compressive stress compare to weldment surface before LSP. The maximum compressive normal residual stress becomes to −183 MPa after LSP from −63 MPa before LSP. The Modification of surface micro-structures including weld zone (WZ), heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal (BM) are also discussed. Results to date demonstrate that laser shock processing has been a great potential method for the improvement of mechanical performance of components.

  4. Mapping residual and internal stress in materials by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, Ph.J.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron diffraction provides one of the few means of mapping residual stresses deep within the bulk of materials and components. This article reviews the basic scientific methodology by which internal strains and stresses are inferred from recorded diffraction peaks. Both conventional angular scans and time-of-flight measurements are reviewed and compared. Their complementarity with analogous synchrotron X-ray methods is also highlighted. For measurements to be exploited in structural integrity calculations underpinning the safe operation of engineering components, measurement standards have been defined and the major findings are summarised. Examples are used to highlight the unique capabilities of the method showing how it can provide insights ranging from the basic physics of slip mechanisms in hexagonal polycrystalline materials, through the materials optimisation of stress induced transformations in smart nano-materials, to the industrial introduction of novel friction welding processes exploiting stress residual measurements transferred from prototype sub-scale tests to the joining of full-scale aero-engine assemblies. (author)

  5. Principles of the measurement of residual stress by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, G A; Ezeilo, A N [Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-11-01

    The presence of residual stresses in engineering components can significantly affect their load carrying capacity and resistance to fracture. In order to quantify their effect it is necessary to know their magnitude and distribution. Neutron diffraction is the most suitable method of obtaining these stresses non-destructively in the interior of components. In this paper the principles of the technique are described. A monochromatic beam of neutrons, or time of flight measurements, can be employed. In each case, components of strain are determined directly from changes in the lattice spacings between crystals. Residual stresses can then be calculated from these strains. The experimental procedures for making the measurements are described and precautions for achieving reliable results discussed. These include choice of crystal planes on which to make measurements, extent of masking needed to identify a suitable sampling volume, type of detector and alignment procedure. Methods of achieving a stress free reference are also considered. A selection of practical examples is included to demonstrate the success of the technique. (author) 14 figs., 1 tab., 18 refs.

  6. Quantification of Residual Stress from Photonic Signatures of Fused Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Hayward, Maurice; Yost, William E.

    2013-01-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 +/- 0.54 x 10(exp -12)/Pa. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA's Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented. Keywords: Glass, fused silica, photoelasticity, residual stress

  7. Principles of the measurement of residual stress by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, G.A.; Ezeilo, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of residual stresses in engineering components can significantly affect their load carrying capacity and resistance to fracture. In order to quantify their effect it is necessary to know their magnitude and distribution. Neutron diffraction is the most suitable method of obtaining these stresses non-destructively in the interior of components. In this paper the principles of the technique are described. A monochromatic beam of neutrons, or time of flight measurements, can be employed. In each case, components of strain are determined directly from changes in the lattice spacings between crystals. Residual stresses can then be calculated from these strains. The experimental procedures for making the measurements are described and precautions for achieving reliable results discussed. These include choice of crystal planes on which to make measurements, extent of masking needed to identify a suitable sampling volume, type of detector and alignment procedure. Methods of achieving a stress free reference are also considered. A selection of practical examples is included to demonstrate the success of the technique. (author) 14 figs., 1 tab., 18 refs

  8. Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress in a powder metallurgy component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, L.C.R.; Hainsworth, S.V.; Cocks, A.C.F.; Fitzpatrick, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Residual stresses in a typical industrial green component were determined using neutron diffraction. The measured residual stresses were found to correlate with cross-sectional variations. Residual stress at the edge of the compact in contact with the die wall during compaction reached up to +80 MPa (tension) and -100 MPa (compression)

  9. A neutron diffraction study of residual stress and plastic strain in welded beryllium rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.W.; Varma, R.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Holden, T.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ely, T.; Spooner, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2002-07-01

    We present a study of residual stresses associated with the welding of beryllium rings. Using novel analysis techniques, information about residual stresses and plastic deformation of the base metal were obtained. In the post-welded state, the rings have a strong tensile circumferential residual stress and show evidence of significant plastic deformation. (orig.)

  10. Numerical analysis of drilling hole work-hardening effects in hole-drilling residual stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Liu, Y. H.

    2008-11-01

    The hole-drilling strain gage method is an effective semi-destructive technique for determining residual stresses in the component. As a mechanical technique, a work-hardening layer will be formed on the surface of the hole after drilling, and affect the strain relaxation. By increasing Young's modulus of the material near the hole, the work-hardening layer is simplified as a heterogeneous annulus. As an example, two finite rectangular plates submitted to different initial stresses are treated, and the relieved strains are measured by finite element simulation. The accuracy of the measurement is estimated by comparing the simulated residual stresses with the given initial ones. The results are shown for various hardness of work-hardening layer. The influence of the relative position of the gages compared with the thickness of the work-hardening layer, and the effect of the ratio of hole diameter to work-hardening layer thickness are analyzed as well.

  11. The effect of Residual Stress on the Stress Intensity Factor of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Taek Ho

    2008-01-01

    As NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) gets aged, the importance of the pressure boundary integrity increases very much to those who are trying to operate their plant beyond its design life. Not long ago, Boric acid crystal was found at the RPV outlet nozzle of V.C. Summer plant during the visual examination in 2000. After this finding, non-destructive examination was taken to find out what's taken place. As a result of this examination, circumferential and axial cracks were found. With Metallurgical structure examination, it was shown that crack had been developed at the mid-point between Inco-alloy buttering and weld metal. It was turned out that high welding residual stress was the main cause of the cracking. Because of the through wall crack, nozzle and welding parts were replaced. Many other nuclear power plants experienced similar pressure boundary stress corrosion cracks (SCCs). KEPRI (Korea Electric Power Research Institute) has carried out research projects for managing and preventing these kinds of cracks in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The titles of these research projects are 'Development of Stress Corrosion Cracking Management Technology and Aging Monitor for NPP Main Components' and 'Development of Analysis Technology for Crack Management of Dissimilar Metal Weld'. Through these projects, residual stress measurement techniques have been exercised at various points in mock-up test specimens to simulate nuclear power plant dissimilar base metal and weldment residual stress. X-ray test and hole drilling method have been reviewed to measure residual stresses of the dissimilar metal welds. This paper shows some point of view in residual stress measurement. Fracture mechanics analysis has been performed to explain the importance of residual stress measurement in association with nuclear power plant safety

  12. Investigation of the Effect of Residual Stress Gradient on the Wear Behavior of PVD Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, B.; Nouveau, C.; Guillemot, G.; Besnard, A.; Barkaoui, A.

    2018-02-01

    The control of residual stresses has been seldom investigated in multilayer coatings dedicated to improvement of wear behavior. Here, we report the preparation and characterization of superposed structures composed of Cr, CrN and CrAlN layers. Nano-multilayers CrN/CrAlN and Cr/CrN/CrAlN were deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) onto Si (100) and AISI4140 steel substrates. The Cr, CrN and CrAlN monolayers were developed with an innovative approach in PVD coatings technologies corresponding to deposition with different residual stresses levels. Composition and wear tracks morphologies of the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and 3D-surface analyzer. The mechanical properties (hardness, residual stresses and wear) were investigated by nanoindentation, interferometry and micro-tribometry (fretting-wear tests). Observations suggest that multilayer coatings are composed mostly of nanocrystalline. The residual stresses level in the films has practically affected all the physicochemical and mechanical properties as well as the wear behavior. Consequently, it is demonstrated that the coating containing moderate stresses has a better wear behavior compared to the coating developed with higher residual stresses. The friction contact between coated samples and alumina balls shows also a large variety of wear mechanisms. In particular, the abrasive wear of the coatings was a combination of plastic deformation, fine microcracking and microspallation. The application of these multilayers will be wood machining of green wood.

  13. Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T.; Hayward, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10 −12 Pa −1 . Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented

  14. Residual stresses due to weld repairs, cladding and electron beam welds and effect of residual stresses on fracture behavior. Annual report, September 1, 1977--November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, E.F.

    1978-11-01

    The study is divided into three tasks. Task I is concerned with predicting and understanding the effects of residual stresses due to weld repairs of pressure vessels. Task II examines residual stresses due to an electron beam weld. Task III addresses the problem of residual stresses produced by weld cladding at a nozzle vessel intersection. The objective of Task I is to develop a computational model for predicting residual stress states due to a weld repair of pressure vessel and thereby gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved in the creation of the residual stresses. Experimental data from the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) is used to validate the computational model. In Task II, the residual stress model is applied to the case of an electron beam weld of a compact tension freacture specimen. The results in the form of residual stresses near the weld are then used to explain unexpected fracture behavior which is observed in the testing of the specimen. For Task III, the residual stress model is applied to the cladding process used in nozzle regions of nuclear pressure vessels. The residual stresses obtained from this analysis are evaluated to determine their effect on the phenomena of under-clad cracking

  15. Nondestructive Induced Residual Stress Assessment in Superalloy Turbine Engine Components Using Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rideout, C. A.; Ritchie, S. J.; Denison, A.

    2007-01-01

    Induced Positron Analysis (IPA) has demonstrated the ability to nondestructively quantify shot peening/surface treatments and relaxation effects in single crystal superalloys, steels, titanium and aluminum with a single measurement as part of a National Science Foundation SBIR program and in projects with commercial companies. IPA measurement of surface treatment effects provides a demonstrated ability to quantitatively measure initial treatment effectiveness along with the effect of operationally induced changes over the life of the treated component. Use of IPA to nondestructively quantify surface and subsurface residual stresses in turbine engine materials and components will lead to improvements in current engineering designs and maintenance procedures

  16. Finite element analysis and measurement for residual stress of dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle mockup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, W.; Lee, Jeong Geun; Park, Chi Yong; Yang, Jun Seok; Kim, Tae Ryong; Park, Jai Hak

    2009-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis and experiment for weld residual stress (WRS) in the pressurizer safety nozzle mockup is described in various processes and results. Foremost of which is the dissimilar simulation metal welding (DMW) between carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel. Thermal and structural analyses were compared with actual residual stress, and actual measurements of. Magnitude and distribution of WRS in the nozzle mockup were assessed. Two measurement methods were used: hole-drilling method (HDM) with strain gauge for residual stress on the surface of the mockup, and block removal and splitting layer (BRSL) method for through-thickness. FE analysis and measurement data showed good agreement. In conclusion, the characteristics of weld residual stress of DMW could be well understood and the simplified FE analysis was verified as acceptable for estimating WRS

  17. Finite element analysis and measurement for residual stress of dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle mockup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, W.; Lee, Jeong Geun; Park, Chi Yong; Yang, Jun Seok; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-15

    Finite element (FE) analysis and experiment for weld residual stress (WRS) in the pressurizer safety nozzle mockup is described in various processes and results. Foremost of which is the dissimilar simulation metal welding (DMW) between carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel. Thermal and structural analyses were compared with actual residual stress, and actual measurements of. Magnitude and distribution of WRS in the nozzle mockup were assessed. Two measurement methods were used: hole-drilling method (HDM) with strain gauge for residual stress on the surface of the mockup, and block removal and splitting layer (BRSL) method for through-thickness. FE analysis and measurement data showed good agreement. In conclusion, the characteristics of weld residual stress of DMW could be well understood and the simplified FE analysis was verified as acceptable for estimating WRS

  18. Evaluation of the residual stress field in a steam generator end tube after hydraulic expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiel, F.; Kang, S.; Chabrerie, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element elastoplastic model of a nuclear steam generator end tube, used to evaluate the residual stress field existing after hydraulic expansion of the tube into the tubesheet of the heat exchanger. This model has been tested against an experimental hydraulic expansion, carried out on full scale end tubes. The operation was monitored thanks to strain gages localized on the outer surface of the tubes, subjected to elastoplastic deformations. After a presentation of the expansion test and the description of the numerical model, the authors compare the stress fields issues from the gages and from the model. The comparison shows a good agreement. These results allow them to calculate the stress field resulting from normal operating conditions, while taking into account a correct initial state of stress. Therefore the authors can improve the understanding of the behavior of a steam generator end tube, with respect to stress corrosion cracking and crack growth

  19. Residual stress measurement in worked and heat treated steel by X-ray diffractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, V.K.; Godaba, V.S.

    2008-01-01

    Investigations were made for residual stress measurement by X-ray diffractometry in the 1.14% C, 0.46% Mn, 0.16% Si, 0.11% S and 0.04% P steel samples subjected to inhomogeneous plastic deformation (cold upsetting in the range 7.7-21%), thermal gradient (quenching from 630 deg. C) and phase transformation (quenching from 850 deg. C), respectively. The results indicated that compressive residual stress at the surface increased in the samples with increasing deformation acquiring values in the range, -269.5 MPa to -374.7 MPa. In the samples quenched from 630 deg. C, the thermal stresses acquired increasing values in the range -83.9 MPa (compressive) to -188.1 MPa (compressive) with increased cooling rate. In the samples quenched from 850 deg. C, volume increase on account of austenite to martensite phase transformation ultimately dominated the thermal contraction resulting in residual stress at the surface from -329.3 MPa (compressive) to +61.7 MPa (tensile)

  20. Effect of surface treatments on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanami, Masaru; Kaneda, Junya; Tamako, Hiroaki; Hato, Hisamitsu; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    Effect of surface treatment on SCC susceptibility of Ni base alloys was investigated. Cracks were observed in all grinding specimens in a creviced bent beam (CBB) test. On the other hand, no cracks occurred in shot peening (SP), water jet peening (WJP) specimens. It was indicated that these surface treatments effectively reduced the SCC susceptibility of nickel-base alloys. As a result of a residual stress test, the surface of specimens with grinding had high tensile residual stress. However, SP and WJP improved surface residual stress to compressive stress. The depth of the compressive effect of WJP was almost the same as that of SP. However, the surface hardness of WJP specimens differed from that of SP and it was found that WJP had less impact on surface hardening. This difference was consistent with their surface microstructures. The surface of SP specimens had clearly the deformation region, but the surface of WJP specimens was localized. (author)

  1. Residual Stresses in DC cast Aluminum Billet: Neutron Diffraction Measurements and Thermomechanical Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Evans, A.; Pirling, T.

    2011-01-01

    Thermally-induced residual stresses, generated during the industrial Direct Chill casting process of aluminum alloys, can cause both significant safety concerns as well as the formation of defects during down-stream processing. Although these thermally induced strains can be partially relieved by permanent deformation, cracks will be generated either during solidification (hot tears) or post-solidification cooling (cold cracks) when stresses exceed the deformation limit of the alloy. Furthermore, the thermally induced strains result in the presence of large internal stresses within the billet before further processing steps. Although numerical models have been previously developed to compute these residual stresses, most of the computations have been validated only against measured surface distortions. In the present work, the variation in residual elastic strains and stresses in the steady state regime of casting has been measured as a function of radial position using neutron diffraction in an AA6063 grain-refined cylindrical billet. These measurements have been carried out on the same billet section at Poldi at PSI-Villigen and at Salsa at ILL-Grenoble and compare favorably. The results are used to validate a thermo-mechanical finite element casting model and to assess the level of stored elastic energy within the billet.

  2. Residual-stresses in austenitic stainless-steel primary coolant pipes and welds of pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, F.; Leggatt, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Surface and through thickness residual stress measurements were performed on an aged cast austenitic-ferritic stainless steel pipe and on an orbital TIG weld representative of those of primary coolant pipes in pressurized water reactors. An abrasive-jet hole drilling method and a block removal and layering method were used. Surface stresses and through thickness stress profiles are strongly dependent upon heat treatments, machining and welding operations. In the aged cast stainless steel pipe, stresses ranged between -250 and +175 MPa. On and near the orbital TIG weld, the outside surface of the weld was in tension both in the axial and hoop directions, with maximum values reaching 420 MPa in the weld. On the inside surface, the hoop stresses were compressive, reaching -300 MPa. However, the stresses in the axial direction at the root of the weld were tensile within 4 mm depth from the inside surface, locally reaching 280 MPa. (author)

  3. Effects of shot peening on the residual stress of welded SS400 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Man; Kim, Tae Hyung; Cheong, Seong Kyun; Lee, Seung Ho

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue life of structures is usually determined by welding zone. The tensile residual stress, which is induced by welding, reduces the fatigue life and fatigue strength of welded structures. If we remove the tensile residual stress or induce the compressive residual stress, the fatigue life of welded structures will be improved. The change of hardness and compressive residual stress of welded zone after shot peening was investigated in this paper. The results show that the hardness was increased by shot peening. The residual stress was reduced by shot peening

  4. Effects of location, thermal stress and residual stress on corner cracks in nozzles with cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, J.L.; Cohen, L.M.; Besuner, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    The stress intensity factors (K 1 ) for corner cracks in a boiling water reactor feedwater nozzle with stainless steel cladding are obtained for loading by internal pressure and a fluid quench in the nozzle. Conditions both with and without residual stress in the component are considered. The residual stress is simulated by means of a reference temperature change. The stress distribution for the uncracked structure is obtained from a three-dimensional finite element model. A three-dimensional influence function (IF) method, in conjunction with the boundary-integral equation method for structural analysis, is employed to compute K 1 values from the uncracked stress distribution. For each type of loading K 1 values are given for cracks at 15 nozzle locations and for 6 crack depths. Reasonable agreement is noted between calculated and previously published pressure-induced K 1 values. Comparisons are made to determine the effect on K 1 of crack location, thermal stress and residual stress, as compared with pressure stress. For the thermal transient it is shown that K 1 for small crack depths is maximised early in the transient, while K 1 for large cracks is maximised later under steady state conditions. Computation should, therefore, be made for several transient time points and the maximum K 1 for a given crack depth should be used for design analysis. It is concluded that the effects on K 1 of location, thermal stresses and residual stresses are significant and generally too complex to evaluate without advanced numerical procedures. The utilised combination of finite element analysis of the uncracked structure and three-dimensional influence function analysis of the cracked structure is demonstrated and endorsed. (author)

  5. The effects of location, thermal stress, and residual stress on corner cracks in nozzles with cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besuner, P.M.; Cohen, L.M.; McLean, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    The stress intensity factors (Ksub(I)) for corner cracks in a boiling water reactor feedwater nozzle with stainless steel cladding are obtained for loading by internal pressure, and a fluid quench in the nozzle. Conditions with and without residual stress in the component are considered. The residual stress is simulated by means of a reference temperature change. The stress distribution for the uncracked structure is obtained from a three-dimensional finite element model. A three-dimensional influence function (IF) method, in conjunction with the boundary-integral equation method for structural analysis, is employed to compute Ksub(I) values from the uncracked structure's stress distribution. For each type of loading Ksub(I) values are given for cracks at 15 nozzle locations and for six crack depths. Reasonable agreement is noted between calculated and previously published pressure-induced Ksub(I) values. Comparisons are made to determine the effect on Ksub(I) of crack location, thermal stress, and residual stress as compared to pressure stress. For the thermal transient it is shown that Ksub(I) for small crack depths is maximized early in the transient while Ksub(I) for large cracks is maximized later, under steady state conditions. Ksub(I) computations should, therefore, be made for several transient time points and the maximum Ksub(I) for a given crack depth should be used for design analysis. It is concluded that the effects on Ksub(I) of location, thermal stresses, and residual stresses are significant and generally too complex to evalute without advanced numerical procedures. The utilized combination of finite element analysis of the uncracked structure and three-dimensional influence function analysis of the cracked structure is demonstrated

  6. Residual Stress Developed During the Cure of Thermosetting Polymers: Optimizing Cure Schedule to Minimize Stress.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Stavig, Mark E.; Jaramillo, Rex

    2016-06-01

    When thermosetting polymers are used to bond or encapsulate electrical, mechanical or optical assemblies, residual stress, which often affects the performance and/or reliability of these devices, develops within the structure. The Thin-Disk-on-Cylinder structural response test is demonstrated as a powerful tool to design epoxy encapsulant cure schedules to reduce residual stress, even when all the details of the material evolution during cure are not explicitly known. The test's ability to (1) distinguish between cohesive and adhesive failure modes and (2) demonstrate methodologies to eliminate failure and reduce residual stress, make choices of cure schedules that optimize stress in the encapsulant unambiguous. For the 828/DEA/GMB material in the Thin-Disk-on-Cylinder geometry, the stress associated with cure is significant and outweighs that associated with cool down from the final cure temperature to room temperature (for measured lid strain, Scure I > I I e+h erma * II) * The difference between the final cure temperature and 1 1 -- the temperature at which the material gels, Tf-T ge i, was demonstrated to be a primary factor in determining the residual stress associated with cure. Increasing T f -T ge i leads to a reduction in cure stress that is described as being associated with balancing some of the 828/DEA/GMB cure shrinkage with thermal expansion. The ability to tune residual stress associated with cure by controlling T f -T ge i would be anticipated to translate to other thermosetting encapsulation materials, but the times and temperatures appropriate for a given material may vary widely.

  7. Measuring multiple residual-stress components using the contour method and multiple cuts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swenson, Hunter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pagliaro, Pierluigi [U. PALERMO; Zuccarello, Bernardo [U. PALERMO

    2009-01-01

    The conventional contour method determines one component of stress over the cross section of a part. The part is cut into two, the contour of the exposed surface is measured, and Bueckner's superposition principle is analytically applied to calculate stresses. In this paper, the contour method is extended to the measurement of multiple stress components by making multiple cuts with subsequent applications of superposition. The theory and limitations are described. The theory is experimentally tested on a 316L stainless steel disk with residual stresses induced by plastically indenting the central portion of the disk. The stress results are validated against independent measurements using neutron diffraction. The theory has implications beyond just multiple cuts. The contour method measurements and calculations for the first cut reveal how the residual stresses have changed throughout the part. Subsequent measurements of partially relaxed stresses by other techniques, such as laboratory x-rays, hole drilling, or neutron or synchrotron diffraction, can be superimposed back to the original state of the body.

  8. Influences of Processing and Fatigue Cycling on Residual Stresses in a NiCrY-Coated Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, T. P.; Rogers, R. B.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Miller, R. A.; Puleo, B. J.; Johnson, D.; Telesman, J.; Draper, S. L.; Locci, I. E.

    2017-11-01

    Oxidation and corrosion can attack superalloy disk surfaces exposed to increasing operating temperatures in some turbine engine environments. Any potential protective coatings must also be resistant to harmful fatigue cracking during service. The objective of this study was to investigate how residual stresses evolve in one such coating. Fatigue specimens of a powder metallurgy-processed disk superalloy were coated with a NiCrY coating, shot peened, and then subjected to fatigue in air at room and high temperatures. The effects of this processing and fatigue cycling on axial residual stresses and other aspects of the coating were assessed. While shot peening did induce beneficial compressive residual stresses in the coating and substrate, these stresses relaxed in the coating with subsequent heating. Several cast alloys having compositions near the coating were subjected to thermal expansion and tensile stress relaxation tests to help explain this response of residual stresses in the coating. For the coated fatigue specimens, this response contributed to earlier cracking of the coating than for the uncoated surface during long intervals of cycling at 760 °C. Yet, substantial compressive residual stresses still remained in the substrate adjacent to the coating, which were sufficient to suppress fatigue cracking there. The coating continued to protect the substrate from hot corrosion pitting, even after fatigue cracks initiated in the coating.

  9. Effect of residual stress induced by cold expansion on fatigue crack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fatigue life and fatigue crack growth rate are controlled by stress ratio, stress level, orientation of crack, temper-ature, residual stress, corrosion, etc. The effects of residual stress on fatigue crack growth in aluminium (Al) alloy 2024-T351 by Mode I crack were investigated by applying constant amplitude cycles based on ...

  10. Differential RF MEMS interwoven capacitor immune to residual stress warping

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    A RF MEMS capacitor with an interwoven structure is designed, fabricated in the PolyMUMPS process and tested in an effort to address fabrication challenges usually faced in MEMS processes. The interwoven structure was found to offer several advantages over the typical MEMS parallel-plate design including eliminating the warping caused by residual stress, eliminating the need for etching holes, suppressing stiction, reducing parasitics and providing differential capability. The quality factor of the proposed capacitor was higher than five throughout a 2–10 GHz range and the resonant frequency was in excess of 20 GHz.

  11. Differential RF MEMS interwoven capacitor immune to residual stress warping

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2012-07-27

    A RF MEMS capacitor with an interwoven structure is designed, fabricated in the PolyMUMPS process and tested in an effort to address fabrication challenges usually faced in MEMS processes. The interwoven structure was found to offer several advantages over the typical MEMS parallel-plate design including eliminating the warping caused by residual stress, eliminating the need for etching holes, suppressing stiction, reducing parasitics and providing differential capability. The quality factor of the proposed capacitor was higher than five throughout a 2–10 GHz range and the resonant frequency was in excess of 20 GHz.

  12. The effect of residual stress on polymer pipe lifetime

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutař, Pavel; Ševčík, Martin; Frank, A.; Náhlík, Luboš; Kučera, J.; Pinter, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 108, SI (2013), s. 98-108 ISSN 0013-7944. [Crack paths 2012. Gaeta, 19.09.2012-21.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1560; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Residual stress * Linear elastic fracture mechanics * Lifetime estimation * Polyethylene pipes * Slow crack growth Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.662, year: 2013

  13. Residual stress of particulate polymer composites with reduced thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, T; Kotera, M; Sugiura, Y

    2009-01-01

    Thermal expansion behavior was investigated for tangusten zirconium phosphate (Zr 2 (WO 4 )(PO 4 ) 2 (ZWP)) particulate filled poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) composite. ZWP is known as ceramic filler with a negative thermal expansion. By incorporating ZWP with 40 volume %, the linear thermal expansion coefficient of the PEEK composite was reduced to almost same value (2.53 X 10 -5 K -1 ) with that of aluminum. This decrease was found to be quite effective for the decrease of the residual stress at the interface between aluminum plate and the composite.

  14. Reduction of Residual Stresses in Sapphire Cover Glass Induced by Mechanical Polishing and Laser Chamfering Through Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Jeh Wu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sapphire is a hard and anti-scratch material commonly used as cover glass of mobile devices such as watches and mobile phones. A mechanical polishing using diamond slurry is usually necessary to create mirror surface. Additional chamfering at the edge is sometimes needed by mechanical grinding. These processes induce residual stresses and the mechanical strength of the sapphire work piece is impaired. In this study wet etching by phosphate acid process is applied to relief the induced stress in a 1” diameter sapphire cover glass. The sapphire is polished before the edge is chamfered by a picosecond laser. Residual stresses are measured by laser curvature method at different stages of machining. The results show that the wet etching process effectively relief the stress and the laser machining does not incur serious residual stress.

  15. Effect of thermal exposure on the residual stress relaxation in a hardened cylindrical sample under creep conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, V. P.; Saushkin, M. N.; Tsvetkov, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the effect of thermal exposure (high-temperature exposure) ( T = 675°C) on the residual creep stress relaxation in a surface hardened solid cylindrical sample made of ZhS6UVI alloy. The analysis is carried out with the use of experimental data for residual stresses after micro-shot peening and exposures to temperatures equal to T = 675°C during 50, 150, and 300 h. The paper presents the technique for solving the boundary-value creep problem for the hardened cylindrical sample with the initial stress-strain state under the condition of thermal exposure. The uniaxial experimental creep curves obtained under constant stresses of 500, 530, 570, and 600 MPa are used to construct the models describing the primary and secondary stages of creep. The calculated and experimental data for the longitudinal (axial) tensor components of residual stresses are compared, and their satisfactory agreement is determined.

  16. Experimental stress analysis for determination of residual stresses and integrity monitoring of components and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    For an analysis of the safety-related significance of residual stresses, mechanical, magnetic as well as ultrasonic and diffraction methods can be applied as testing methods. The results of an interlaboratory test concerning the experimental determination of residual stresses in a railway track are included. Further, questions are analyzed concerning the in-service inspections of components and systems with regard to their operational safety and life. Measurement methods are explained by examples from power plant engineering, nuclear power plant engineering, construction and traffic engineering as well as aeronautics. (DG) [de

  17. Development of an on-site measurement method for residual stress in primary system piping of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Akira; Takahashi, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    In residual stress measurement for large-scale pipes and vessels in high radiation areas and highly contaminated areas of nuclear plants, it is difficult to bring the radioactivated pipes and vessels out of the areas as they are. If they can brought out, it is very burdensome to handle them for the measurement. Development of an on-site measurement method of residual stress which can be quickly applied and has sufficient measurement accuracy is desirable. In this study, a new method combining an electric discharge skim-cut method with a microscopic strain measurement method using markers was proposed to realize the on-site residual stress measurement on pipes in high radiation areas and highly contaminated areas. In the electric discharge skim-cut method, a boat-type sample is skimmed out of a pipe outer/inner surface using electric discharge machining and released residual stress is measured. The on-site measurement of residual stress by the method can be done using a small, portable electric discharge machine. In the microscopic strain measurement method using markers, the residual stress is estimated by microscopic measurement of the distance between markers after the stress release. The combination of both methods can evaluate the residual stress with the same accuracy as conventional methods offer and it can achieve reduction of radiation exposure in the measurement because the work is done simply and rapidly. In this study, the applicability of the electric discharge skim-cut method was investigated because the applicability of the microscopic strain measurement method using markers was confirmed previously. The experimental examination clarified the applicable conditions for the residual stress measurement with the same accuracy as the conventional methods. Furthermore, the electric discharge machining conditions using pure water as the machining liquid was found to eliminate the amount of liquid radioactive waste completely. (author)

  18. The effects of location, thermal stress, and residual stress on corner cracks in nozzles with cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besuner, P.M.; Cohen, L.M.; McLean, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    The stress intensity factors (Ksub(I)) for corner cracks in a boiling water reactor feedwater nozzle with stainless steel cladding are obtained for loading by internal pressure, and a fluid quench in the nozzle. Conditions with and without residual stress in the component are considered. The residual stress is simulated by means of a reference temperature change. The stress distribution for the uncracked structure is obtained from a three-dimensional finite element model. A three-dimensional influence function (IF) method, in conjunction with the boundary-integral equation method for structural analysis is employed to compute Ksub(I) values from the uncracked structure's stress distribution. It is concluded that the effects on Ksub(I) of location, thermal stresses, and residual stresses are significant and generally too complex to evaluate without advanced numerical procedures. The ulilized combination of finite element analysis of the uncracked structure and three-dimensional influence function analysis of the cracked structure is demonstrated and endorsed. (Auth.)

  19. Residual and operating stresses in welded Alloy 600 penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, E.S.; Gross, D.J.; Pathania, R.

    1995-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite element model has been developed for calculating residual and operating stresses in Alloy 600 penetrations which are installed in pressure vessel shells by J-groove welds. The welding process is simulated by multiple passes of heat input with heat transfer into the adjacent parts during welding and cooling. Analysis results are presented for CRDM nozzles, pressurizer instrument nozzles and pressurizer heater sleeves. The effect of several key variables such as nozzle material yield strength, angle of the nozzle relative to the vessel shell, weld size, presence of counterbores, etc. are explored. Results of the modelling are correlated with field and laboratory data. Application of the stress analysis results to PWSCC predictive modeling is discussed. (author). 6 refs, 12 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Residual stress measurements in coil, linepipe and girth welded pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M.; Prask, H.; Luzin, V.; Gnaeupel-Herold, T.

    2006-01-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines come from forming operations in producing the coil and pipe, seam welding the pipe, and girth welding pipes together to form a gas pipeline. Welding is used extensively in gas pipelines, the welds are made without post weld heat treatment. The three normal stresses were measured by neutron diffraction for three types of sample: coil, unwelded rings cut from the pipe made from this coil, and girth welded rings cut from linepipe. All three specimens came from three thicknesses of manufacture (5.4, 6.4, and 7.1 mm). The welds are manual metal arc cellulosic electrode welds made in X70 linepipe, these were measured at 5 through-thickness positions at 19 locations (from the center of the weld up to 35 mm away from the weld) with a spatial resolution of 1 mm 3 . The coil and unwelded rings were measured at the same five through-thickness positions

  1. Numerical and Experimental Analyses of Residual Stresses in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Hattel, Jesper; Lorentzen, Torben

    1999-01-01

    Butt-welding in one pass with SMAW of two 10mm mild steel plates is investigated. In order to predict the residual stress fields associated with the welding procedure, a finite element model in 3D has been developed in ABAQUS. This model applies a sequential thermal and mechanical numerical...... analysis. In order to evaluate and refine the model parameters for the thermal analysis, the numerical results from this analysis are compared with experimental measurements of the temperature. To evaluate the predicted stress/strain fields, the mechanical model has been validated experimentally. This has...... been done using the novel non-destructive technique of neutron diffraction.The thermal model takes into account the moving heat source in the V-shaped weld. The heat source is modelled by filler material being added continuously in connection with a body flux. In order to obtain a more realistic weld...

  2. Residual stress measurement using the pulsed neutron source at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A.; Holden, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of residual stress in engineering components can effect their mechanical properties and structural integrity. Neutron diffraction is the only measuring technique which can make spatially resolved non-destructive strain measurements in the interior of components. By recording the change in the crystalline interplanar spacing, elastic strains can be measured for individual lattice reflections. Using a pulsed neutron source, all the lattice reflections are recorded in each measurement which allows anisotropic effects to be studied. Measurements made at the Manuel Lujan Jr Neutron Scattering Centre (LANSCE) demonstrate the potential for stress measurements on a pulsed source and indicate the advantages and disadvantages over measurements made on a reactor. 15 refs., 7 figs

  3. Residual stress improvement mechanism on metal material by underwater laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Yuji; Yoda, Masaki; Mukai, Naruhiko; Obata, Minoru; Kanno, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    Residual stress improvement technology for component surface by underwater pulsed laser irradiation has been developed as a method of preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of core components in nuclear reactors. In order to optimize the laser irradiation conditions based on a complete understanding of the mechanism, the propagation of a shock wave induced by the impulse of laser irradiation and the dynamic response of the irradiated material were analyzed through time-dependent elasto-plastic calculations with a finite element program. The calculated results are compared with the measured results obtained by experiments in which laser pulses with an energy of 200 mJ are focused to a diameter of 0.8 mm on a water-immersed test piece of 20% cold-worked Type 304 austenitic stainless steel to simulate neutron irradiation hardening. A residual compressive stress, which is nearly equivalent to the yield stress of the processed material, remains on the material surface after passage of the shock wave with enough amplitude to induce a permanent strain. Multiple irradiation of laser pulses extends the stress-improved depth to about 1 mm, which would be the limit corresponding to the three-dimensional dispersion effect of the shock wave. (author)

  4. Macroscopic and microscopic determinations of residual stresses in thin oxide dispersion strengthened steel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechade, J.L.; Toualbi, L.; Bosonnet, S.; Carlan, Y. de; Castelnau, O.

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of components operating at high temperatures, many efforts are deployed to develop new materials. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) materials could be used for heat exchangers or cladding tubes for the new GENIV nuclear reactors. This type of materials are composed with a metallic matrix (usually iron base alloy for nuclear applications or nickel base alloy for heat exchangers) reinforced by a distribution of nano-oxides. They are obtained by powder metallurgy and mechanical alloying. The creep resistance of these materials is excellent, and they usually exhibit a high tensile strength at room temperature. Depending on the cold working and/or the heat treatments, several types of microstructure can be obtained: recrystallised, stress relieved. One of the key challenges is to transform ODS materials into thin tubes (up to 500 microns thick) within a robust fabrication route while keeping the excellent mechanical properties. To prevent cracking during the process or to obtain a final product with low residual stresses, it is important to quantify the effect of the heat treatments on the release of internal stresses. The aim of this study is to show how residual stresses can be determined on different thin tubes using two complementary approaches: (i) macroscopic stresses determination in the tube using beam theory (small cuts along the longitudinal and circumferential directions and measurements of the deflection), (ii) stress determination from x-ray diffraction analyses (surface analyses, using 'sin"2ψ' method with different hypothesis). Depending on the material and the heat treatment, residual stresses vary dramatically and can reach 800 MPa which is not far from the yield stress; comparisons between both methods are performed and suggestions are given in order to optimize the thermo-mechanical treatment of thin ODS tubes. (authors)

  5. Comparison of Measured Residual Stress in an Extra Thick Multi-pass Weld Using Neutron Diffraction Method and Inherent Strain Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, JeongUng; An, GyuBaek; Woo, Wan Chuck

    2015-01-01

    With the increase of large-scale containership, a large amount of high-strength steels with extra thick plates is being extensively used. The welding stress existing in the extra thick welded plates has a significant effect on the integrity of the component in terms of brittle fracture and fatigue behavior. It has been reported that welding residual stress distribution in an extra thick plate can affect the propagation path of the crack. Therefore, it is important to measure the distribution of welding residual stresses for the reliable design of the welded structures. So far various researches have been carried out for the determination of residual stresses on the surface of steels. In this paper, the total residual stresses in the 70 mm thick multipass FACW butt joint were measured by integrating initial stress into ISM. Concretely, two methods named as initial stress integrated ISM and initial inherent strain integrated ISM were employed to determine the total residual stresses. Furthermore, the distributions of residual stresses were compared with the results of the Neutron Diffraction Method(NDM). In order to measure the three dimensional residual stresses in the welded joint with initial stresses existing before welding, initial stress integrated ISM and initial inherent strain integrated ISM were developed. The residual stresses in 70 mm-thick butt joint by flux cored arc welding were carried out with a good accuracy using the two developed methods. The residual stresses in welded joint using both initial stress integrated ISM and initial inherent strain integrated ISM agreed well with the results measured by Neutron Diffraction Method. This suggests that the integrated ISM is a reliable method for residual stress measurement if initial stress existed

  6. Pattern formation under residual compressive stress in free sustained aluminum films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Senjiang; Ye Quanlin; Zhang Yongju; Cai Pinggen; Xu Xiaojun; Chen Jiangxing; Ye Gaoxiang

    2005-01-01

    A nearly free sustained aluminum (Al) film system has been successfully fabricated by vapor phase deposition of Al atoms on silicone oil surfaces and an unusual type of ordered patterns at the micrometer scale has been systematically studied. The ordered patterns are composed of a large number of parallel key-shaped domains and possess a sandwiched structure. The nucleation and growth of the patterns are very susceptible to the growth period, deposition rate, nominal film thickness and location of the film. The experiment shows that the ordered patterns are induced by the residual compressive stress in the film owing to contraction of the liquid surface after deposition. The appearance of these stress relief patterns generally represents the stress distribution in the nearly free sustained Al films, which mainly results from the characteristic boundary condition and the nearly zero adhesion of the solid-liquid interface

  7. Residual stresses in a bulk metallic glass-stainless steel composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydiner, C.C. [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Uestuendag, E. [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Clausen, B. [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hanan, J.C. [Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Winholtz, R.A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Research Reactor Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Peker, A. [Liquidmetal Technologies, Lake Forest, CA 92630 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are new structural materials with impressive mechanical properties. They can now be cast into large dimensions, which can lead to significant residual stress generation due to thermal tempering. In this process, a surface compression develops balanced with tension in the interior. To evaluate this phenomenon non-destructively, a model cylindrical stainless steel (SS)-BMG composite was prepared and studied using neutron diffraction and finite element (FE) modeling. The residual strain data from the SS obtained by diffraction were used in modeling calculations to show that significant tempering could be achieved in the composite (about -200 MPa surface compression in the SS). The strong bond between the SS and BMG allowed efficient load transfer and facilitated stress generation. The final values of the residual stresses were seen to be relatively insensitive to the high temperature constitutive behavior of the SS due to the physics of the thermal tempering in BMGs. The approach presented here constitutes an effective means to study non-destructively thermal tempering in BMGs.

  8. Residual stresses in a bulk metallic glass-stainless steel composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydiner, C.C.; Uestuendag, E.; Clausen, B.; Hanan, J.C.; Winholtz, R.A.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Peker, A.

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are new structural materials with impressive mechanical properties. They can now be cast into large dimensions, which can lead to significant residual stress generation due to thermal tempering. In this process, a surface compression develops balanced with tension in the interior. To evaluate this phenomenon non-destructively, a model cylindrical stainless steel (SS)-BMG composite was prepared and studied using neutron diffraction and finite element (FE) modeling. The residual strain data from the SS obtained by diffraction were used in modeling calculations to show that significant tempering could be achieved in the composite (about -200 MPa surface compression in the SS). The strong bond between the SS and BMG allowed efficient load transfer and facilitated stress generation. The final values of the residual stresses were seen to be relatively insensitive to the high temperature constitutive behavior of the SS due to the physics of the thermal tempering in BMGs. The approach presented here constitutes an effective means to study non-destructively thermal tempering in BMGs

  9. Residual stress change by thermal annealing in amorphous Sm-Fe-B thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, S.M.; Suh, S.J.; Kim, H.J.; Lim, S.H.

    2002-01-01

    The change in the residual stress and its effect on mechanical bending and magnetic properties of sputtered amorphous Sm-Fe-B thin films are investigated as a function of annealing temperature. Two stress components of intrinsic compressive stress and tensile stress due to the difference of the thermal expansion coefficients between the substrate and thin film are used to explain the stress state in as-deposited thin films, and the annealing temperature dependence of residual stress, mechanical bending and magnetic properties

  10. Prediction of residual stresses in the heat affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleb, L.; Petit, S.; Jullien, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the behavior of a disc made up of carbon manganese steel and subjected to an axisymmetric heating in its middle zone is considered. The applied thermal cycle generates localized metallurgical solid-solid phase transformations. Contrary to the study performed some years ago, the present work is concerned with relatively thick discs that lead to variable behavior according to axial direction. Experimentally, temperature and axial displacement of the face below have continuously been measured during tests. At the end of tests, the nature and the proportions of the final phases as well as residual stresses on both faces of the discs has also been assessed. These experimental results have been compared to numerical simulations using the finite element code ASTER, developed by EDF (Electricity of France), ASTER enables us to take into account the main mechanical consequences of phase transformations. From the obtained results it can be pointed out the significant importance to take into account the transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) phenomenon for better estimation of residual stresses. (authors)

  11. Effect of residual stresses induced by prestressing on rolling element fatigue life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    A mechanical prestress cycle suitable to induce compressive stress beneath the surface of the inner race of radially loaded 207-size bearings was determined. Compressive residual stress in excess 0.69 x 10 to the 9th power N/sq m (100,000 psi), as measured by X-ray diffraction, were induced at the depth of maximum shearing stress. The prestress cycle consisted of running the bearings for 25 hours at 2750 rpm at a radial load which produced a maximum Hertz stress of 3.3 x 10 to the 9th power N/sq m (480,000 psi) at the contact of the inner race and the heaviest loaded ball. Bearings subjected to this prestress cycle and subsequently fatigue tested gave a 10 percent fatigue life greater than twice that of a group of baseline bearings.

  12. Investigation of effect of post weld heat treatment conditions on residual stress for ITER blanket shield blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hun-Chea, E-mail: hcjung@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sa-Woong [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Hee [Division of Convergence Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Seung-Wook [Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Min-Su; Shim, Hee-Jin [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • PWHT for ITER blanket shield block should be performed for dimensional stability. • Investigation of the effect of PWHT conditions on properties was performed. • Instrumented indentation method for evaluation of properties was used. • Residual stress and hardness decreased with increasing PWHT temperature. • Optimization of PWHT conditions would be needed for satisfaction of requirement. - Abstract: The blanket shield block (SB) shall be required the tight tolerance because SB interfaces with many components, such as flexible support keypads, First Wall (FW) support contact surfaces, FW central bolt, electrical strap contact surfaces and attachment inserts for both FW and Vacuum Vessel (VV). In order to fulfil the tight tolerance requirement, stress relieving shall be performed for dimensional stability after cover welding operation. In this paper, effect of Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) conditions, temperature and holding time, was investigated on the residual stress and hardness. The 316L Stainless Steel (SS) was prepared and welded by manual TIG welding by using filler material with 2.4 mm of diameter. Welded 316L SS plate was machined to prepare the specimen for PWHT. PWHT was implemented at 250, 300, 400 °C for 2 and 3 h (400 °C only) and residual stress after relaxation were determined. The evaluation of residual stress and hardness for each specimen was carried out by instrumented indentation technique. The residual stress and hardness were decreased with increasing the heat treatment temperature and holding time.

  13. Assessment of interplay between UV wavelengths, material surfaces and food residues in open surface hygiene validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abban, Stephen; Jakobsen, Mogens; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    The use of UV-visible radiation for detecting invisible residue on different surfaces as a means of validating cleanliness was investigated. Wavelengths at 365, 395, 435, 445, 470 and 490 nm from a monochromator were used to detect residues of beef, chicken, apple, mango and skim milk. These were....... It is important when UV-systems are used as real-time tools for assessing cleanliness of surfaces that the surface materials being illuminated are taken into account in the choice of lamp wavelength, in addition to expected residue. This will ensure higher confidence in results during the use of UV-light for real...

  14. Residual stress evaluation and curvature behavior of aluminum 7050 peen forming processed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Rene Ramos de

    2011-01-01

    Shot peening is a superficial cold work process used to increase the fatigue life evaluated by residual stress measurements. The peen forming process is a variant of the shot peening process, where a curvature in the plate is obtained by the compression of the grains near to the surface. In this paper, the influence of the parameters such as: pressure of shot, ball shot size and thickness of aluminum 7050 samples with respect to residual stress profile and resulting arc height was studied. The evaluation of the residual stress profile was obtained by sin 2 ψ method. The results show that the formation of the curvature arc height is proportional to the shot peening pressure, of spheres size and inversely proportional to the thickness of the sample, and that stress concentration factor is larger for samples shot peened with small balls. On final of this paper presents an additional study on micro strain and average crystallite size, which can evaluate the profile of the samples after blasting. (author)

  15. The effects of machine parameters on residual stress determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of machine parameters on residual stresses in single point diamond turned silicon and germanium have been investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Residual stresses were sampled across ductile feed cuts in < 100 > silicon and germanium which were single point diamond turned using a variety of feed rates, rake angles and clearance angles. High spatial resolution micro-Raman spectra (1{mu}m spot) were obtained in regions of ductile cutting where no visible surface damage was present. The use of both 514-5nm and 488.0nm excitation wavelengths, by virtue of their differing characteristic penetration depths in the materials, allowed determinations of stress profiles as a function of depth into the sample. Previous discussions have demonstrated that such Raman spectra will exhibit asymmetrically broadened peaks which are characteristic of the superposition of a continuum of Raman scatterers from the various depths probed. Depth profiles of residual stress were obtained using computer deconvolution of the resulting asymmetrically broadened raman spectra.

  16. The residual stress evaluation for expansion process of steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.-S.; Lee, S.-C.; Shim, D.-N.

    2004-01-01

    The reliability of a nuclear power plant is affected by the reliability of steam generator tube and the reliability of steam generator tube is affected by stress corrosion cracking(SCC). Many steam generator tubes were experiencing stress corrosion cracking and stress corrosion cracking is affected material characteristics, corrosive environments and added stresses. The added stresses have the manufacturing stresses and operating stresses, the manufacturing stresses include the residual stresses generating in the tube manufacture and tube expanding procedure. We will investigate for influence which affected to residual stresses with tube plastic deformation method and measurement region. (author)

  17. Measurement and prediction of residual stress in a bead-on-plate weld benchmark specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficquet, X.; Smith, D.J.; Truman, C.E.; Kingston, E.J.; Dennis, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents measurements and predictions of the residual stresses generated by laying a single weld bead on a flat, austenitic stainless steel plate. The residual stress field that is created is strongly three-dimensional and is considered representative of that found in a repair weld. Through-thickness measurements are made using the deep hole drilling technique, and near-surface measurements are made using incremental centre hole drilling. Measurements are compared to predictions at the same locations made using finite element analysis incorporating an advanced, non-linear kinematic hardening model. The work was conducted as part of an European round robin exercise, coordinated as part of the NeT network. Overall, there was broad agreement between measurements and predictions, but there were notable differences

  18. INFLUENCE OF MACHINING TECHNOLOGIES ON VALUES OF RESIDUAL STRESSES OF OXIDE CUTTING CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Němeček

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the intensive development of engineering ceramic and effort to replace sintered carbides as cutting materials are in progress. With the development of the sintering technology it is now possible to produce compact ceramic cutting samples with very good mechanical properties. The advantage of these materials is their easy accessibility and low purchase price. In this work, the influence of the finishing machine technology on the values of surface residual stresses of cutting ceramic samples Al2O3+TiC were studying. The samples were supplied by Moscow State University of Technology STANKIN. Measurements made in the X-ray diffraction laboratory at the Department of solid state engineering were performed for both the phases. The influence of the parameters of machining to residual stresses was studied and the resulting values were compared with each other.

  19. Effects on residual stresses of aluminum alloy LC4 by laser shock processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-kang; Lu, Jin-zhong; Kong, De-jun; Yao, Hui-xue; Yang, Chao-jun

    2007-12-01

    The influences of processing parameters on laser-induced shock waves in metal components are discussed and analyzed. The effects of different parameters of laser shock processing (LSP) on residual stress of aerospace aluminum alloy LC4 were investigated. LSP was performed by using an Nd: glass phosphate laser with 23 ns pulse width and up to ~45 J pulse energy at power densities above GW/mm -2. Special attention is paid to the residual stresses from laser shock processing. Modification of microstructure, surface morphology by laser shock processing is also discussed. Results to date indicate that laser shock processing has great potential as a means of improving the mechanical performance of components.

  20. Thermal Aging Effects on Residual Stress and Residual Strain Distribution on Heat Affected Zone of Alloy 600 in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Junhyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Dissimilar metal weld (DMW), consisting of Alloy 600, Alloy 182, and A508 Gr.3, has been widely used as a joining material of the reactor pressure vessel penetration nozzle and the steam generator tubing for pressurized water reactors (PWR) because of its good mechanical strength, thermal conductivity, and corrosion resistance. Residual tensile stress is mainly nominated as a cause of SCC in light water reactors by IAEA report. So, to relax the residual stress, post-weld heat treatment is required after manufacturing process such as welding. However, thermal treatment has a great effect on the microstructure and the chromium depletion profile on Alloy 600, so called sensitization. By this reason, HAZ on Alloy 600 is critical to crack. According to G.A. Young et al., Crack growth rates (CGR) in the Alloy 600 HAZ were about 30 times faster than those in the Alloy 600 base metal tested under the same conditions. And according to Z.P. Lu et al., CGR in the Alloy 600 HAZ can be more than 20 times higher than that in its base metal. There are some methods to measure the exact value of residual stress on the material surface. The most common way is X-ray diffraction method (XRD). The principle of XRD is based on lattice strains and depends on the changes in the spacing of the atomic planes in material. And there is a computer simulation method to estimate residual stress distribution which is called ANSYS. This study was conducted to investigate how thermal aging affects residual stress and residual strain distribution of Alloy 600 HAZ. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. According to preceding researches and this study, both the relaxation of residual stress and the change of residual strain follow as similar way, spreading out from concentrated region. The result of Vickers micro-hardness tester shows that tensile residual stresses are distributed broadly on the material aged by 15 years. Therefore, HT400{sub Y}15 material is weakest state for PWSCC. The

  1. The role and effect of residual stress on pore generation during anodization of aluminium thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, M.W.; Chung, C.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Al films of varying residual stress were prepared by sputtering. •Variation of the residual stress in the Al films influences pore growth during anodization. •The change in average pore size with residual stress is fairly small. •Interaction of residual stress with oxide growth stress leads to change in structure. •Residual tensile stress increases the pore density of porous alumina. -- Abstract: The role and effect of residual stress on pore generation of anodized aluminium oxide (AAO) have been investigated into anodizing the various-residual-stresses aluminium films. The plane stresses were characterised by X-ray diffraction with sin 2 ψ method. The pore density roughly linearly increased with residual stress from 64.6 (−132.5 MPa) to 90.5 pores/μm 2 (135.9 MPa). However, the average pore size around 40 nm was not changed significantly except for the rougher film. The tensile residual stress lessened the compressive oxide growth stress to reduce AAO plastic deformation for higher pore density. The findings provide new foundations for realizing AAO films on silicon

  2. Comparison of neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements of residual stress in bead-on-plate weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradowska, A.M.; Price, J.W.; Finlayson, T.R.; Lienert, U.; Ibrahim, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the use of neutron and synchrotron diffractions for the evaluation of residual stresses in welded components. It has been shown that it is possible to achieve very good agreement between the two independent diffraction techniques. This study shows the significance of the weld start and end sites on the residual strain/stress distribution. Quantitative evaluation of the residual stress development process for multibead weldments has been presented. Some measurements were also taken before and after postweld stress relieving to establish the reduction and redistribution of the residual stress. The detailed measurements of residual stress around the weld achieved in this work significantly improve the knowledge and understanding of residual stress in welded components.

  3. Residual stress measurement of the jacket material for ITER coil by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Nickel-Iron based super alloy INCOLOY 908 is used for the jacket of a central solenoid coil (CS coil) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). INCOLOY 908, however, has a possibility of fracture due to Stress Accelerated Grain Boundary Oxidation (SAGBO) under a tensile residual stress beyond 200MPa. Therefore it is necessary to measure the residual stress of the jacket to avoid SAGBO. We performed residual stress measurement of the jacket by neutron diffraction using the neutron diffractometer for residual stress analysis (RESA) installed at JRR-3M in JAERI. A sample depth dependence of internal strain was obtained from the (111) plane spacing. A residual stress distribution was calculated from the strain using Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio that were evaluated by a tensile test with neutron diffraction. The result shows that the tensile residual stress exceeds 200MPa of the SAGBO condition in some regions inside the jacket. (author)

  4. Effect of residual stress on the integrity of a branch connection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M.; Kirstein, O.; Luzin, V.

    2012-01-01

    A new connection to an existing gas pipeline was made by hot-tapping, welding directly onto a pressurised pipeline. The welds were not post-weld heat treated, causing significant residual stresses. The critical weld had residual stresses determined by neutron diffraction using ANSTO's residual stress diffractometer, Kowari. The maximum measured residual stress (290 MPa) was 60% of the yield strength. The magnitudes of errors from a number of sources were estimated. An integrity assessment of the welded branch connection was performed with the measured residual stress values and with residual stress distributions from the BS 7910 and API 579 analysis codes. Analysis using estimates of residual stress from API 579 overestimated the critical crack size. Highlights: ► Residual stresses were measured by neutron diffraction in a thick section, non post-weld heat treated ferritic weld. ► There is little published data on these welds. ► The work compares the measured residual stresses with code-based residual stress distributions.

  5. On residual stress prescriptions for fitness for service assessment of pipe girth welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Pingsha; Song, Shaopin; Zhang, Jinmiao; Kim, Myung H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a detailed assessment of some of the existing residual stress profiles stipulated in widely used fitness-for-service assessment codes and standards, such as BS 7910 Appendix Q and API 579 RP Annex E, by taking advantage of some comprehensive residual stress studies that have recently become available. After presenting a case study on which residual stress measurements are available for validating finite element based residual stress analysis procedure, residual stress profiles stipulated in BS 7910 for pipe girth welds are selected for detailed evaluation by comparing residual stress distribution characteristics shown in parametric finite element results. A shell theory based full-field residual stress profile estimation scheme is then presented to illustrate how an improved estimation of residual stress profiles can be achieved in light of some of the deficiencies in BS 7910 and API 579 identified in this study. - Highlights: • Critically assessed girth weld residual stress profiles in major FFS Codes and Standards. • Identified deficiencies in relating to pipe geometry, heat input, and axial distance from weld. • Presented a shell theory based scheme for prescribing full-field residual stress profiles

  6. Influence of repair length on residual stress in the repair weld of a clad plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Wenchun; Xu, X.P.; Gong, J.M.; Tu, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Residual stress in the repair weld of a stainless steel clad plate is investigated. ► The effect of repair length on residual stress has been studied. ► Large tensile residual stress is generated in the repair weld and heat affected zone. ► With the increase of repair length, transverse stress is decreased. ► Repair length has little effect on longitudinal stress. - Abstract: A 3-D sequential coupling finite element simulation is performed to investigate the temperature field and residual stress in the repair weld of a stainless steel clad plate. The effect of repair length on residual stress has been studied, aiming to provide a reference for repairing the cracked clad plate. The results show that large tensile residual stresses are generated in the repair weld and heat affected zone (HAZ), and then decrease gradually away from the weld and HAZ. The residual stresses through thickness in the clad layer are relative uniform, while they are non-uniform in the base metal. A discontinuous stress distribution is generated across the interface between weld metal and base metal. The repair length has a great effect on transverse stress. With the increase of repair length, the transverse stress is decreased. When the repair length is increased to 14 cm, the peak of transverse stress has been decreased below yield strength, and the transverse stress in the weld and HAZ has also been greatly decreased. But the repair length has little effect on longitudinal stress.

  7. Development of a measuring and evaluation method for X-ray analysis of residual stresses in the surface region of polycrystalline materials; Entwicklung eines Mess- und Auswerteverfahrens zur roentgenographischen Analyse des Eigenspannungszustandes im Oberflaechenbereich vielkristalliner Werkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genzel, C.

    2000-11-01

    The topic of the habilitation thesis is the development of an X-ray diffraction method for measurement and depth-resolved analysis of internal stresses in the surface region of polycrystalline materials. The method relies on the basic approach of varying {tau}, the penetration depth of the X-rays in the materials, by the scattering vector g{sub theta{psi}} via stepwise specimen rotation. Thus, depth profiles of the interlattice plane distances d(hkl) in the specimen system can be derived for given direction and inclination angles {theta} and {psi} of the scattering vector. This offers the possibility to identify individual components of the stress tensors of the basic equation of the X-ray diffraction analysis, and to perform separate analyses of those components. For calculation of the relevant internal stress distributions {sigma}{sub ij}({tau}) using the interlattice plane distance profiles, a self-consistent method is established which takes into account the high sensitivity of the derived internal stresses in relation to the interlattice plane distance d{sub 0}(hkl) in the stress-free crystal lattice. The evaluation yields results describing the depth profiles as well as the strain-free interlattice plane distance d{sub 0}(hkl), so that a quantitative analysis is possible of tri-axial internal stress states in the surface region of the materials. (orig./CB) [German] Den Gegenstand der vorliegenden Arbeit bildet die Entwicklung eines roentgenographischen Mess- und Auswerteverfahrens zur tiefenaufgeloesten Analyse des oberflaechennahen Eigenspannungszustandes in vielkristallinen Werkstoffen. Der Grundgedanke der Methode besteht darin, die Eindringtiefe {tau} der Roentgenstrahlung in den Werkstoff durch schrittweise Drehung der Probe um den Streuvektor g{sub {theta}}{sub {psi}} zu variieren. Damit koennen Tiefenprofile der Netzebenenabstaende d(hkl) fuer fest vorgegebene Azimut- und Neigungswinkel {theta} und {psi} des Streuvektors im Probensystem ermittelt

  8. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  9. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the three-dimensional residual stresses method based on the eigenstrain methodology via x-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masaru; Ishii, Takehiro; Furusako, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    In order to prevent fractures caused by fatigue or stress corrosion cracking in welded structures, it is important to predict crack propagation for cracks observed during in-service inspections. However, it is difficult to evaluate three-dimensional welding residual stresses non-destructively. Today, it is possible to measure residual stresses just on surface by X-ray diffraction. Neutron diffraction makes it possible to measure welding residual stresses non-destructively even in the thickness direction but it is only available in special irradiation facilities. Therefore, it is impossible to use neutron diffraction as an on-site measurement technique. As non-destructive method of three-dimensional welding residual stresses based on the eigenstrain methodology, the bead flush method has been proposed. In this method, three-dimensional welding residual stresses are calculated by an elastic FEM (Finite Element Method) analysis from eigenstrain distributions which are estimated by an inverse analysis from released strains by strain gauges in the removal of the weld reinforcement. Here, the removal of the excess metal contributes inhibition of crack initiation. Therefore, the bead flush method is a non-destructive technique essentially. However, estimation accuracy of this method becomes relatively poor when processing strains are added on the machined surface. The first author has been developed the bead flush method to be free from the influence of the processing strains. In this method, eigenstrains are estimated not from released strains but from residual strains on surface by X-ray diffraction. In this study, welding residual stresses on the bottom surface in an actual welded plate are estimated from elastic strains measured on the top surface using this method. To evaluate estimation accuracy, estimated residual stresses on the bottom surface are compared with residual stresses measured by X-ray diffraction. Here, eigenstrain distributions not only in the welding

  10. Interaction of stress and phase transformations during thermochemical surface engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard

    and diffusion kinetics to simulate the evolution of composition-depth and stress-depth profiles resulting from nitriding of austenitic stainless steel. The model takes into account a composition-dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite, short range ordering (trapping) of nitrogen atoms......Low temperature nitriding of austenitic stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. During nitriding huge residual stresses are introduced in the treated zone, arising from the volume...... expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high nitrogen contents in expanded austenite. An intriguing phenomenon during low-temperature nitriding, is that the residual stresses evoked by dissolution of nitrogen in the solid state, affect the thermodynamics and the diffusion kinetics of nitrogen...

  11. Analysis of residual stress state in sheet metal parts processed by single point incremental forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, F.; Gies, S.; Dobecki, M.; Brömmelhoff, K.; Tekkaya, A. E.; Reimers, W.

    2018-05-01

    The mechanical properties of formed metal components are highly affected by the prevailing residual stress state. A selective induction of residual compressive stresses in the component, can improve the product properties such as the fatigue strength. By means of single point incremental forming (SPIF), the residual stress state can be influenced by adjusting the process parameters during the manufacturing process. To achieve a fundamental understanding of the residual stress formation caused by the SPIF process, a valid numerical process model is essential. Within the scope of this paper the significance of kinematic hardening effects on the determined residual stress state is presented based on numerical simulations. The effect of the unclamping step after the manufacturing process is also analyzed. An average deviation of the residual stress amplitudes in the clamped and unclamped condition of 18 % reveals, that the unclamping step needs to be considered to reach a high numerical prediction quality.

  12. Novel approaches to determining residual stresses by ultramicroindentation techniques: Application to sandblasted austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutos, E.; Multigner, M.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    This research addresses the determination of residual stresses in sandblasted austenitic steel by ultramicroindentation techniques using a sharp indenter, of which the sensitivity to residual stress effects is said to be inferior to that of spherical ones. The introduction of an angular correction in the model of Wang et al. which relates variations in the maximum load to the presence of residual stresses is proposed. Similarly, the contribution to the hardness of grain size refinement and work hardening, developed as a consequence of the severe plastic deformation during blasting, is determined in order to avoid overestimation of the residual stresses. Measurements were performed on polished cross sections along a length of several microns, thus obtaining a profile of the residual stresses. Results show good agreement with those obtained by synchrotron radiation on the same specimens, which validates the method and demonstrates that microindentation using sharp indenters may be sensitive to the residual stress effect.

  13. Novel approaches to determining residual stresses by ultramicroindentation techniques: Application to sandblasted austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frutos, E. [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Multigner, M. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L., E-mail: jlg@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    This research addresses the determination of residual stresses in sandblasted austenitic steel by ultramicroindentation techniques using a sharp indenter, of which the sensitivity to residual stress effects is said to be inferior to that of spherical ones. The introduction of an angular correction in the model of Wang et al. which relates variations in the maximum load to the presence of residual stresses is proposed. Similarly, the contribution to the hardness of grain size refinement and work hardening, developed as a consequence of the severe plastic deformation during blasting, is determined in order to avoid overestimation of the residual stresses. Measurements were performed on polished cross sections along a length of several microns, thus obtaining a profile of the residual stresses. Results show good agreement with those obtained by synchrotron radiation on the same specimens, which validates the method and demonstrates that microindentation using sharp indenters may be sensitive to the residual stress effect.

  14. Improvement of residual stress in stainless steel by cavitating jet; Cavitation funryu ni yoru stainless ko no zanryu oryoku kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyama, H.; Saka, M. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)] Park, J. [Kyung Nam Junior College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of). Dept. Vehicle Eng.] Abe, H. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-08-15

    In order to strengthen materials, the improvement of residual stress in stainless steel by using a cavitating jet was investigated. In case of cavitating jet, the cavitation intensity can be controlled by hydraulic parameters such as upstream pressure and downstream pressure. In general, cavitation produces damage on hydraulic machinery. However, at the initial stage of cavitation erosion process, plastic deformation takes place on the material surface, then it is possible to do peening without damage considering the cavitation intensity and the exposure time. In order to evidence the suitable condition on the improvement of residual stress by the cavitating jet, the residual stress in SUS304 and SUS316 was examined. The three normal stresses in different directions were measured by X-ray diffraction method, then the principal stresses were calculated. Both principal stresses were changed from tension to compression within 10 seconds by the cavitating jet. The compressive stress resulted by the cavitating jet was saturated after a certain time. It was concluded that the cavitating jet improved the residual stress in stainless steel SUS316 as well as SUS304. 24 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Numerical methods for calculating thermal residual stresses and hydrogen diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, J.B.; Devaux, J.; Dubois, D.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal residual stresses and hydrogen concentrations are two major factors intervening in cracking phenomena. These parameters were numerically calculated by a computer programme (TITUS) using the FEM, during the deposition of a stainless clad on a low-alloy plate. The calculation was performed with a 2-dimensional option in four successive steps: thermal transient calculation, metallurgical transient calculation (determination of the metallurgical phase proportions), elastic-plastic transient (plain strain conditions), hydrogen diffusion transient. Temperature and phase dependence of hydrogen diffusion coefficient and solubility constant. The following results were obtained: thermal calculations are very consistent with experiments at higher temperatures (due to the introduction of fusion and solidification latent heats); the consistency is not as good (by 70 degrees) for lower temperatures (below 650 degrees C); this was attributed to the non-introduction of gamma-alpha transformation latent heat. The metallurgical phase calculation indicates that the heat affected zone is almost entirely transformed into bainite after cooling down (the martensite proportion does not exceed 5%). The elastic-plastic calculations indicate that the stresses in the heat affected zone are compressive or slightly tensile; on the other hand, higher tensile stresses develop on the boundary of the heat affected zone. The transformation plasticity has a definite influence on the final stress level. The return of hydrogen to the clad during the bainitic transformation is but an incomplete phenomenon and the hydrogen concentration in the heat affected zone after cooling down to room temperature is therefore sufficient to cause cold cracking (if no heat treatment is applied). Heat treatments are efficient in lowering the hydrogen concentration. These results enable us to draw preliminary conclusions on practical means to avoid cracking. (orig.)

  16. Numerical weld modeling - a method for calculating weld-induced residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, S.; Keim, E.; Schmidt, J.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, weld-induced residual stresses caused damage to numerous (power) plant parts, components and systems (Erve, M., Wesseling, U., Kilian, R., Hardt, R., Bruemmer, G., Maier, V., Ilg, U., 1994. Cracking in Stabilized Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping of German Boiling Water Reactors - Characteristic Features and Root Causes. 20. MPA-Seminar 1994, vol. 2, paper 29, pp.29.1-29.21). In the case of BWR nuclear power plants, this damage can be caused by the mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in austenitic piping or the core shroud in the reactor pressure vessel and is triggered chiefly by weld-induced residual stresses. One solution of this problem that has been used in the past involves experimental measurements of residual stresses in conjunction with weld optimization testing. However, the experimental analysis of all relevant parameters is an extremely tedious process. Numerical simulation using the finite element method (FEM) not only supplements this method but, in view of modern computer capacities, is also an equally valid alternative in its own right. This paper will demonstrate that the technique developed for numerical simulation of the welding process has not only been properly verified and validated on austenitic pipe welds, but that it also permits making selective statements on improvements to the welding process. For instance, numerical simulation can provide information on the starting point of welding for every weld bead, the effect of interpass cooling as far as a possible sensitization of the heat affected zone (HAZ) is concerned, the effect of gap width on the resultant weld residual stresses, or the effect of the 'last pass heat sink welding' (welding of the final passes while simultaneously cooling the inner surface with water) producing compressive stresses in the root area of a circumferential weld in an austenitic pipe. The computer program FERESA (finite element residual stress analysis) was based on a commercially

  17. Final Report: Characterization of Canister Mockup Weld Residual Stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enos, David; Bryan, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of interim storage containers has been indicated as a high priority data gap by the Department of Energy (DOE) (Hanson et al., 2012), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI, 2011), the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (NWTRB, 2010a), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, 2012a, 2012b). Uncertainties exist in terms of the environmental conditions that prevail on the surface of the storage containers, the stress state within the container walls associated both with weldments as well as within the base metal itself, and the electrochemical properties of the storage containers themselves. The goal of the work described in this document is to determine the stress states that exists at various locations within a typical storage canister by evaluating the properties of a full-diameter cylindrical mockup of an interim storage canister. This mockup has been produced using the same manufacturing procedures as the majority of the fielded spent nuclear fuel interim storage canisters. This document describes the design and procurement of the mockup and the characterization of the stress state associated with various portions of the container. It also describes the cutting of the mockup into sections for further analyses, and a discussion of the potential impact of the results from the stress characterization effort.

  18. Final Report: Characterization of Canister Mockup Weld Residual Stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enos, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of interim storage containers has been indicated as a high priority data gap by the Department of Energy (DOE) (Hanson et al., 2012), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI, 2011), the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (NWTRB, 2010a), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, 2012a, 2012b). Uncertainties exist in terms of the environmental conditions that prevail on the surface of the storage containers, the stress state within the container walls associated both with weldments as well as within the base metal itself, and the electrochemical properties of the storage containers themselves. The goal of the work described in this document is to determine the stress states that exists at various locations within a typical storage canister by evaluating the properties of a full-diameter cylindrical mockup of an interim storage canister. This mockup has been produced using the same manufacturing procedures as the majority of the fielded spent nuclear fuel interim storage canisters. This document describes the design and procurement of the mockup and the characterization of the stress state associated with various portions of the container. It also describes the cutting of the mockup into sections for further analyses, and a discussion of the potential impact of the results from the stress characterization effort.

  19. Residual stress determination in thermally sprayed metallic deposits by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Thomas; Margadant, Nikolaus; Pirling, Thilo; Riegert-Escribano, Maria J.; Wagner, Werner

    2004-01-01

    Neutron diffraction was used to obtain spatially resolved strain and stress profiles in thermally sprayed metallic 'NiCrAlY' deposits (chemical composition 67 wt.% Ni, 22 wt.% Cr, 10 wt.% Al, 1 wt.% Y) and the underlying steel substrates. Samples of four different spray techniques were analyzed: atmospheric and water stabilized plasma spraying (APS and WSP), flame spraying (FS) and wire arc spraying (WAS). The results are quantitatively compared with the average in-plane residual stress determined by complementary bending tests and the hole drilling technique. While the stress profiles from the surface to the interface in the deposits are similar for all investigated spray techniques, their absolute values and gradients vary strongly. This is attributed to different quenching stresses from the impinging particles, different thermal histories the deposit/substrate systems undergo during the spraying and subsequent cooling, and also to different coating properties. In the water stabilized plasma sprayed and the wire arc sprayed deposits, a gradient in the stress-free lattice parameter was observed. Crack formation is found to be a dominant mechanism for stress relaxation in the surface plane

  20. Residual stress determination in thermally sprayed metallic deposits by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Thomas; Margadant, Nikolaus; Pirling, Thilo; Riegert-Escribano, Maria J.; Wagner, Werner

    2004-05-25

    Neutron diffraction was used to obtain spatially resolved strain and stress profiles in thermally sprayed metallic 'NiCrAlY' deposits (chemical composition 67 wt.% Ni, 22 wt.% Cr, 10 wt.% Al, 1 wt.% Y) and the underlying steel substrates. Samples of four different spray techniques were analyzed: atmospheric and water stabilized plasma spraying (APS and WSP), flame spraying (FS) and wire arc spraying (WAS). The results are quantitatively compared with the average in-plane residual stress determined by complementary bending tests and the hole drilling technique. While the stress profiles from the surface to the interface in the deposits are similar for all investigated spray techniques, their absolute values and gradients vary strongly. This is attributed to different quenching stresses from the impinging particles, different thermal histories the deposit/substrate systems undergo during the spraying and subsequent cooling, and also to different coating properties. In the water stabilized plasma sprayed and the wire arc sprayed deposits, a gradient in the stress-free lattice parameter was observed. Crack formation is found to be a dominant mechanism for stress relaxation in the surface plane.

  1. Modeling and experimental study of residual stresses in NOREM hardfacing coatings used in valve parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaurin, G.

    2012-01-01

    Hardfacing coatings are widely used on the surfaces of parts subjected to drastic loadings. Norem02 alloy, Fe-based, is used in PWR nuclear power plants on valves seating surfaces. Its microstructure consists of a dendritic austenite structure with ferrite islets and carbides. This work tends to demonstrate that for this alloy, metallurgical evolution during the welding process has very little influence on mechanical properties. Tensile behavior was characterized and completed by dilatometry tests in welding process temperature range until 1000 Celsius degrees, in order to identify an elastoplastic model with non linear kinematic hardening rule. Temperature, displacements, distortions and residual stresses were measured during the PTAW (Plasma Transferred Arc Welding) process and used to identify an equivalent thermal loading by solving an inverse problem. Finally, the numerical simulation of the whole process using the EDF FEM software Code-Aster is presented. Predicted temperatures are consistent with experimental ones. In the same way, predicted displacements, residual distortions and residual stresses at the end of the cooling phase are close to experimental measures, validating the modeling strategy presented in this work. (author)

  2. Variation behavior of residual stress distribution by manufacturing processes in welded pipes of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near heat affected zone (HAZ) of primary loop recirculation pipes made of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel type 316L in the nuclear power plants. For the non-sensitization material, residual stress is the important factor of SCC, and it is generated by machining and welding. In the actual plants, welding is conducted after machining as manufacturing processes of welded pipes. It could be considered that residual stress generated by machining is varied by welding as a posterior process. This paper presents residual stress variation due to manufacturing processes of pipes using X-ray diffraction method. Residual stress distribution due to welding after machining had a local maximum stress in HAZ. Moreover, this value was higher than residual stress generated by welding or machining. Vickers hardness also had a local maximum hardness in HAZ. In order to clarify hardness variation, crystal orientation analysis with EBSD method was performed. Recovery and recrystallization were occurred by welding heat near the weld metal. These lead hardness decrease. The local maximum region showed no microstructure evolution. In this region, machined layer was remained. Therefore, the local maximum hardness was generated at machined layer. The local maximum stress was caused by the superposition effect of residual stress distributions due to machining and welding. Moreover, these local maximum residual stress and hardness are exceeded critical value of SCC initiation. In order to clarify the effect of residual stress on SCC initiation, evaluation including manufacturing processes is important. (author)

  3. Residual stresses analysis of friction stir welding using one-way FSI simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon; Song, Ha Cheol

    2015-01-01

    When certain mechanisms, such as plastic deformations and temperature gradients, occur and are released in a structure, stresses remain because of the shape of the structure and external constraints. These stresses are referred to as residual stresses. The base material locally expands during heating in the welding process. When the welding is completed and cooled to room temperature, the residual stresses are left at nearly the yield strength level. In the case of friction stir welding, the maximum temperature is 80% to 90% of the melting point of the materials. Thus, the residual stresses in the welding process are smaller than those in other fusion welding processes; these stresses have not been considered previously. However, friction stir welding residual stresses are sometimes measured at approximately 70% or above. These residual stresses significantly affect fatigue behavior and lifetime. The present study investigates the residual stress distributions in various welding conditions and shapes of friction stir welding. In addition, the asymmetric feature is considered in temperature and residual stress distribution. Heat transfer analysis is conducted using the commercial computational fluid dynamics program Fluent, and results are used in the finite element structural analysis with the ANSYS Multiphysics software. The calculated residual stresses are compared with experimental values using the X-ray diffraction method.

  4. Residual stress development and relief in high strength aluminium alloys using standard and retrogression thermal treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, J.S; Tanner, D.A

    2003-01-01

    peer-reviewed Residual stresses develop in the aluminium alloy 7010 when the material is quenched from the solution heat treatment temperature. Residual stress measurements have been made using the X-ray diffraction technique and a longitudinal split sawcut method to determine the magnitude of residual stress that develops in specimens sectioned from large open die forgings as a result of (a) quenching these specimens into water at different temperatures, and (b) cold water quenching from ...

  5. Effect of process parameters on the residual stresses in AA5083-H321 friction stir welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombard, H. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Hattingh, D.G. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Steuwer, A. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); FaME38 at the ILL-ESRF, 6 rue J Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steuwer@ill.fr; James, M.N. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    This paper investigates the effect of varying welding parameters on the residual stress profiles in friction stir welds of aluminium alloy AA5083-H321, which were created on a fully instrumented friction welding machine. The residual stresses were determined non-destructively using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The width and maximum of the residual stress profile show clear correlation with the heat input, and in particular feed rate, which was found to be the dominant parameter.

  6. Analytical description of fatigue crack propagation regularities taking into account residual welding stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trufyakov, V.I.; Knysh, V.V.; Mikheev, P.P.; Kuz'menko, A.Z.

    1983-01-01

    The procedure, accounting the effect of residual stresses on crack resistance of welded constructions under cyclic loads, is described. The procedure is based on the Paris equation modified by the introduction of the coefficient of residual stress intensity through the functional dependence. The dependence is determined for cases of residual stresses of tension and compression. The experimental data for the 15KhSND steel are presented

  7. Analysis and modeling of simulated residual stress of mold injected plastic parts by using robust correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Carlos; Sierra, Juan; Posada, Juan; Botero-Cadavid, Juan F.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The injection molding process is the most widely used processing technique for polymers. The analysis of residual stresses generated during this process is crucial for the part quality assessment. The present study evaluates the residual stresses in a tensile strength specimen using the simulation software Moldex3D for two polymers, polypropylene and polycarbonate. The residual stresses obtained under a simulated design of experiment were modeled using a robust multivariable regressi...

  8. Residual stress and microstructural behaviour of a shot peened steel in fatigue. An X-ray diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, J.

    1986-01-01

    The surface residual stress behaviour during fatigue of the quenched and tempered medium strength low-alloyed steel SS 2244-05, equivalent to AISI 4140, has been investigated. Notched specimens of shot peened and ground surface conditions were used. The residual stresses were measured by the X-ray diffraction sin/sup 2/psi-method at intervals in the fatigue tests. Fatigue testing was performed with constant load amplitude at nominal pull-push and pull-pull cycling. The effects of peak-load and variable amplitude were also examined. It was found that the residual stress relaxation could be linked to a total mean stress relaxation towards zero, to an extent which is ruled by a softening criteria. Fatigue test data of the shot peened and ground surface conditions are also given. An X-ray diffraction line broadening analysis was undertaken to examine the microstructural behaviour due to fatigue loading and its correlation to the residual stress behaviour. Single-peak analysis with a Voigt-function method was used to estimate the microstructural parameters, domain size and microstrain. Multiple-peak analysis according to the Warren-Averbach method was used to verify the single-peak analysis. The dislocation density was found to decrease depending on the load amplitude, while the dislocation arrangement follows a pattern depending on yield history.

  9. Analysis of Metal Flow Behavior and Residual Stress Formation of Complex Functional Profiles under High-Speed Cold Roll-Beating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengkui Cui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a good surface layer performance of the complex functional profile during the high-speed cold roll-beating forming process, this paper analyzed the metal plastic flow and residual stress-formed mechanism by using a theoretical model of the metal flow and residual stress generation. By using simulation software, the cold roll-beating forming process of a spline shaft was simulated and analyzed. The metal flow and residual stress formation law in the motion were researched. In a practical experiment, the changes in the grains in the spline tooth profile section and the residual stress distribution on the tooth profile were studied. A microcorrespondence relationship was established between the metal plastic flow and the residual stress generation. The conclusions indicate that the rate at which the metal flow decreases changes gradually at different metal layers. The residual stress value is directly related to the plastic flow difference. As the roll-beating speed increases, the uneven degree of plastic deformation at the workpiece surface increases, and the residual stress in the tooth profile is generally greater. At the same roll-beating speed, the rate change trend of the metal flow decreases gradually from the surface to the inner layer and from the dedendum to the addendum. The residual stress distribution on the surface of the tooth profile decreases from the dedendum to the addendum. These findings provide a basis and guidance for the controlled use of residual stress, obtaining better surface layer quality in the high-speed cold roll-beating process of the complex functional profile.

  10. Relaxation of Shot-Peened Residual Stresses Under Creep Loading (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buchanan, Dennis J; John, Reji; Brockman, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    .... Compressive residual stresses retard initiation and growth of fatigue cracks. During the component loading history, loading, or during elevated temperature static loading, such as thermal exposure and creep...

  11. Measurement of edge residual stresses in glass by the phase-shifting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajovalasit, A.; Petrucci, G.; Scafidi, M.

    2011-05-01

    Control and measurement of residual stress in glass is of great importance in the industrial field. Since glass is a birefringent material, the residual stress analysis is based mainly on the photoelastic method. This paper considers two methods of automated analysis of membrane residual stress in glass sheets, based on the phase-shifting concept in monochromatic light. In particular these methods are the automated versions of goniometric compensation methods of Tardy and Sénarmont. The proposed methods can effectively replace manual methods of compensation (goniometric compensation of Tardy and Sénarmont, Babinet and Babinet-Soleil compensators) provided by current standards on the analysis of residual stresses in glasses.

  12. The influence of long-range residual stress on plastic collapse of pressurised pipes with and without flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Gui-Yi; Smith, David J.; Pavier, Martyn J.

    2013-01-01

    Structural integrity assessments of pressurised pipes include plastic collapse as a potential failure mode. This paper uses analytical and numerical models to explore the effect of the end conditions of the pipe on the collapse pressure. The pipe is open-ended and two bounding conditions are addressed: one where axial loading is applied to the ends of the pipe and the other where a fixed axial displacement is applied. The fixed axial displacement condition represents long-range or fit-up residual stress. It is common practice to treat long-range residual stress in the same way as axial loading, leading to the conclusion that such long-range residual stress reduces the collapse pressure. Pipes in a number of states are considered: pipes with no flaws, pipes with fully circumferential flaws and pipes with part circumferential flaws. The flaws consist of either a crack or a slot on the external surface of the pipe. For the axial load condition, the collapse pressure for a flawed pipe is reduced when higher magnitudes of tensile or compressive axial loads are applied. For the fixed displacement condition however, the magnitude of the displacement may have little or no effect on the collapse pressure. The results of the work indicate that substantially conservative assessments may be made of the collapse pressures of pipes containing flaws, when long-range residual stress is taken to be a form of axial loading. -- Highlights: • The effect of end conditions on the collapse pressure of a pipe has been explored. • Fixed displacement conditions represent long-range residual stress. • Long-range residual stress is commonly thought to contribute to plastic collapse. • We show long-range residual stress has no influence on collapse for flawed pipes. • It is therefore possible to reduce conservatism in structural integrity assessment

  13. High energy x-ray synchrotron radiation analysis of residual stress distribution of shot-peened steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Kimachi, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Kenji; Yanase, Etsuya; Nishio, Kouji; Kusumi, Yukihiro

    2001-01-01

    A high energy X-ray beam from synchrotron radiation source SPring-8 was used to determine the residual stress distribution beneath the shot-peened surface of carbon steel plates. By using the monochromatic X-ray beam with an energy of 72 keV, the relation between 2θ and sin 2 ψ was obtained by the side-inclination method upto sin 2 ψ = 0.9. The distribution of the residual stress was determined from the non-linearity of the relation between 2θ and sin 2 ψ. (author)

  14. Neutron diffraction measurements for the determination of heat treatment effectiveness in generating compressive residual stress in an automotive crown gear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertini, G.; Fiori, F.; Girardin, E.; Giuliani, A.; Pyzalla, A.; Quadrini, E.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Thermal austenitizing and tempering treatments are being developed in automotive industry to prevent crack initiation and avoid crack propagation, especially in components where stress intensity factors influence the stress field and then the fatigue life of the component itself. This is the case of crown gears, where the teeth root undergoes frequently to cracking when tensile residual stresses are present at the surface, as typical loads are impulsive and very high. The sign reversal of these stresses is the aim of austenitizing and tempering treatments. In this work residual stress measurements carried out at HMI-BENSC are presented, in a UNI55Cr3 steel crown gear submitted to such kind of treatments, performed with a new multi-frequency induction technique whose effectiveness is checked. (author)

  15. The effect of initial stress induced during the steel manufacturing process on the welding residual stress in multi-pass butt welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-ung Park

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A residual stress generated in the steel structure is broadly categorized into initial residual stress during manufacturing steel material, welding residual stress caused by welding, and heat treatment residual stress by heat treatment. Initial residual stresses induced during the manufacturing process is combined with welding residual stress or heat treatment residual stress, and remained as a final residual stress. Because such final residual stress affects the safety and strength of the structure, it is of utmost importance to measure or predict the magnitude of residual stress, and to apply this point on the design of the structure. In this study, the initial residual stress of steel structures having thicknesses of 25 mm and 70 mm during manufacturing was measured in order to investigate initial residual stress (hereinafter, referred to as initial stress. In addition, thermal elastic plastic FEM analysis was performed with this initial condition, and the effect of initial stress on the welding residual stress was investigated. Further, the reliability of the FE analysis result, considering the initial stress and welding residual stress for the steel structures having two thicknesses, was validated by comparing it with the measured results. In the vicinity of the weld joint, the initial stress is released and finally controlled by the weld residual stress. On the other hand, the farther away from the weld joint, the greater the influence of the initial stress. The range in which the initial stress affects the weld residual stress was not changed by the initial stress. However, in the region where the initial stress occurs in the compressive stress, the magnitude of the weld residual compressive stress varies with the compression or tension of the initial stress. The effect of initial stress on the maximum compression residual stress was far larger when initial stress was considered in case of a thickness of 25 mm with a value of 180

  16. Neutron and ultrasonic determination of residual stress in an aluminum ring-plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prask, H.J.; Gnaeupel-Herold, T.; Clark, A.V.; Hehman, C.S.; Nguyen, T.N.

    2000-01-01

    Stress is a principal cause of material failure. This has been a well-recognized problem for decades, yet--in general--neutron diffraction remains the only way to measure sub-surface residual stresses without destroying the component. A field-portable ultrasonic strain-meter is being developed at NIST (Boulder) to determine residual stresses in engineering specimens, nondestructively. To test this and other techniques an array of stress-measurement standards are being prepared. These will be characterized by neutron diffraction and then used to evaluate, quantitatively, the potential of new methods. The first standard specimen produced for this purpose is a large shrink-fit ring-plug of 2024 aluminum (305 mm OD, 25.4 mm thick, 101.6 mm diameter plug). Because of large grain size, a sample-rotation averaging technique was developed to make reliable neutron measurements possible. A comparison of the neutron diffraction and ultrasonic results for this specimen will be presented, along with strain gauge results

  17. Residual stress effects on the impact resistance and strength of fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Equations have been derived to predict degradation effects of microresidual stresses on impact resistance of unidirectional fiber composites. Equations also predict lamination residual stresses in multilayered angle ply composites.

  18. Residual stresses in a co-sintered SOC half-cell during post-sintering cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlas, Benoit; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Brodersen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    .e. the reference temperature (Tref) or the strain difference based on the curvature. This approximation gives good results for bilayers with a defined cooling temperature profile, where the curvature of the bilayer defines a unique balance between the two unknown residual stress states in the two layers......Due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the layers of a Solid Oxide Cell, residual stresses (thermal stresses) develop during the cooling after sintering. Residual stresses can induce cell curvature for asymmetric cells but more importantly they also result in more fragile cells. Depending...... on the loading conditions, the additional stress needed to break the cells can indeed be smaller due to the initial thermo-mechanical