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Sample records for residual plutonium pu

  1. Plutonium (Pu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the properties and uses of plutonium: where does it come from, the history of its discovery, its uses and energy content, its recycling and reuse in MOX fuels, its half-life, toxicity and presence in the environment. (J.S.)

  2. Disposition of transuranic residues from plutonium isentropic compression experiment (Pu-ICE) constucted at Z machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Kapil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; French, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphrey, Betty J [WESTON SOLUTIONS INC.; Gluth, Jeffry [SNL

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Congress passed legislation to discontinue above- and below-ground testing of nuclear weapons. Because of this, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must rely on laboratory experiments and computer-based calculations to verify the reliability of the nuclear stockpile. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Z machine was developed to support the science-based approach for mimicking nuclear explosions and stockpile stewardship. Plutonium (Pu) isotopes with greater than ninety-eight percent enrichment were used in the experiments. In May 2006, SNL/NM received authority that the Z Machine Isentropic Compression Experiments could commence. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided the plutonium targets and loaded the target assemblies provided by SNL/NM. Three experiments were conducted from May through July 2006. The residues from each experiment, which weighed up to 913 pounds, were metallic and were packaged into a 55-gallon drum each. SNL/NM conducts the experiments and provides temporary storage for the drums until shipment to LANL for final waste certification for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. This paper presents a comprehensive approach for documenting generator knowledge for characterization of waste in cooperation with scientists at the two laboratories and addresses a variety of essential topics.

  3. Disposition of transuranic residues from plutonium isentropic compression experiment (Pu-ice) conducted at Z machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Kapil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; French, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphrey, Betty J [WESTON SOLUTIONS INC.; Gluth, Jeffry [SNL

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Congress passed legislation to discontinue above- and below-ground testing of nuclear weapons. Because of this, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must rely on laboratory experiments and computer-based calculations to verify the reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Z machine was developed by the DOE to support its science-based approach to stockpile stewardship. SNL/NM researchers also use the Z machine to test radiation effects on various materials in experiments designed to mimic nuclear explosions. Numerous components, parts, and materials have been tested. These experiments use a variety of radionuclides; however, plutonium (Pu) isotopes with greater than ninety-eight percent enrichment are the primary radionuclides used in the experiments designed for stockpile stewardship. In May 2006, SNL/NM received authority that the Z Machine Isentropic Compression Experiments could commence. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided the plutonium targets and loaded the target assemblies, which were fabricated by SNL/NM. LANL shipped the loaded assemblies to SNL/NM for Z machine experiments. Three experiments were conducted from May through July 2006. The residues from each experiment, which weighed up to 913 pounds, were metallic and packaged into a respective 55-gallon drum each. Based on a memorandum of understanding between the two laboratories, LANL provides the plutonium samples and the respective radio-isotopic information. SNL/NM conducts the experiments and provides temporary storage for the drums until shipment to LANL for final waste certification for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. This paper presents a comprehensive approach for documenting generator knowledge for characterization of waste in cooperation with scientists at the two laboratories and addresses a variety of topics such as material control and accountability

  4. Criticality of plutonium nitrate solutions (19% 240Pu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colomb, Guy; Mangin, Daniel; Maubert, Louis.

    1976-09-01

    The results of a critical approach performed on plutonium nitrate solutions containing 19% of 240 Pu in two geometrical shapes are presented; the first one is annular cylinders with diameters of 200 and 500 mm, the second one is a parallelepiped of great dimension: 1300x1300x1000mm 3 . A total plutonium concentration range from 13.2 to 105 g/l has been examined. Various calculation methods are compared to experiment. A formula has been established which gives the critical limit concentration for a plutonium nitrate solution as a function of acidity and of the 240 Pu and 241 Pu percentages [fr

  5. DOE plutonium disposition study: Pu consumption in ALWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE's System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE's Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document Volume 2, provides a discussion of: Plutonium Fuel Cycle; Technology Needs; Regulatory Considerations; Cost and Schedule Estimates; and Deployment Strategy

  6. Determination of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu) in environmental samples using radiochemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an analytical method for the determination of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu) in environmental samples using anion exchange chromatography in combination with extraction chromatography for chemical separation of Pu. Both radiometric methods (liquid scintillation......, this is critical for the measurement of plutonium isotopes using mass spectrometric technique. Although the chemical yield of Pu in the entire procedure is about 55%, the analytical results of IAEA soil 6 and IAEA-367 in this work are in a good agreement with the values reported in the literature or reference...... counting and alpha spectrometry) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied for the measurement of plutonium isotopes. The decontamination factors for uranium were significantly improved up to 7.5×105 for 20 g soil compared to the level reported in the literature...

  7. Migration of plutonium from freshwater ecosystem at Hanford. [/sup 238/Pu, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, R. M.; Klopfer, D. C.; McShane, M. C.

    1977-09-01

    A reprocessing waste pond at Hanford has been inventoried to determine quantities of plutonium (Pu) that have been accumulated since its formation in 1944. Expressions of export were developed from these inventory data and from informed assumptions about the vectors which act to mobilize material containing Pu. This 14-acre pond provides a realistic illustration of the mobility of Pu in a lentic ecosystem. The ecological behavior of Pu in this pond is similar to that in other contaminated aquatic systems having widely differing limnological characteristics. Since its creation, this pond has received about one Ci of /sup 239/,/sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu, most of which has been retained by its sediments. Submerged plants, mainly diatoms and Potamogeton, accumulate >95% of the Pu contained in biota. Emergent insects are the only direct biological route of export, mobilizing about 5 x 10/sup 3/ nCi of Pu annually, which is also the estimated maximum quantity of the Pu exported by waterfowl, birds and mammals collectively. There is no apparent significant export by wind, and it is not likely that Pu has migrated to the ground water below U-Pond via percolation. Although this pond has a rapid flushing rate, a eutrophic nutrient supply with a diverse biotic profile, and interacts with an active terrestrial environment, it appears to effectively bind Pu and prevent it from entering pathways to man and other life.

  8. DOE Plutonium Disposition Study: Pu consumption in ALWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE's System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE's Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document, Volume 1, presents a technical description of the various elements of the System 80 + Standard Plant Design upon which the Plutonium Disposition Study was based. The System 80 + Standard Design is fully developed and directly suited to meeting the mission objectives for plutonium disposal. The bass U0 2 plant design is discussed here

  9. Aqueous recovery of plutonium from pyrochemical processing residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Gray, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Pyrochemical processes provide rapid methods to reclaim plutonium from scrap residues. Frequently, however, these processes yield an impure plutonium product and waste residues that are contaminated with actinides and are therefore nondiscardable. The Savannah River Laboratory and Plant and the Rocky Flats Plant are jointly developing new processes using both pyrochemistry and aqueous chemistry to generate pure product and discardable waste. An example of residue being treated is that from the molten salt extraction (MSE), a mixture of NaCl, KCl, MgCl 2 , PuCl 3 , AmCl 3 , PuO 2 , and Pu 0 . This mixture is scrubbed with molten aluminum containing a small amount of magnesium to produce a nonhomogeneous Al-Pu-Am-Mg alloy. This process, which rejects most of the NaCl-KCl-MgCl 2 salts, results in a product easily dissolved in 6M HNO 3 -0.1M HF. Any residual chloride in the product is removed by precipitation with Hg(I) followed by centrifuging. Plutonium and americium are then separated by the standard Purex process. The americium, initially diverted to the solvent extraction waste stream, can either be recovered or sent to waste

  10. Determination of isotope fractionation effect using a double spike (242Pu+240Pu) during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitambar, S.A.; Parab, A.R.; Khodade, P.S.; Jain, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Isotope fractionation effect during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium has been investigated using a double spike ( 242 Pu+ 240 Pu) and the determination of concentration of plutonium in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel is reported. (author). 6 refs., 2 tables

  11. Pu(V) as the stable form of oxidized plutonium in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlandini, K.A.; Penrose, W.R.; Nelson, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    This work presents analytical evidence supporting the proposition that Pu(V) is the sole or predominant form of oxidized plutonium in natural waters. Two independent methods, the selective adsorption of Pu(VI) by silica gel, and the somewhat less selective coprecipitation of Pu(V) with calcium carbonate, were developed to separate Pu(V) from Pu(VI). Measurements of ambient plutonium in several natural waters by these methods found only Pu(V). In laboratory tracer studies, Pu(VI) was shown to be highly unstable in dilute bicarbonate solution and in Lake Michigan water, reducing in first-order fashion to Pu(V). (orig.)

  12. Presence of plutonium isotopes, 239Pu and 240Pu, in soils from Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamizo, E.; García-León, M.; Peruchena, J.I.; Cereceda, F.; Vidal, V.; Pinilla, E.; Miró, C.

    2011-01-01

    Plutonium is present in every environmental compartment, due to a variety of nuclear activities. The Southern Hemisphere has received about 20% of the global 239 Pu and 240 Pu environmental inventory, with an important contribution of the so-called tropospheric fallout from both the atmospheric nuclear tests performed in the French Polynesia and in Australia by France and United Kingdom, respectively. In this work we provide new data on the impact of these tests to South America through the study of 239 Pu and 240 Pu in soils from different areas of Northern, Central and Southern Chile. The obtained results point out to the presence of debris from the French tests in the 20–40° Southern latitude range, with 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atomic ratios quite heterogeneous and ranging from 0.02 to 0.23. They are significantly different from the expected one for the global fallout in the Southern Hemisphere for the 30–53°S latitude range (0.185 ± 0.047), but they follow the same trend as the reported values by the Department of Energy of United States for other points with similar latitudes. The 239+240 Pu activity inventories show as well a wider variability range in that latitude range, in agreement with the expected heterogeneity of the contamination.

  13. Presence of plutonium isotopes, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu, in soils from Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamizo, E., E-mail: echamizo@us.es [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Avda. Thomas Alba Edison, 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Garcia-Leon, M., E-mail: manugar@us.es [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes sn, 41012 Seville (Spain); Peruchena, J.I., E-mail: jiperuchena@gmail.com [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Avda. Thomas Alba Edison, 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Cereceda, F., E-mail: francisco.cereceda@usm.cl [Laboratorio de Quimica Ambiental, Centro de Tecnologias Ambientales (CETAM), Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Vidal, V., E-mail: victor.vidal@usm.cl [Laboratorio de Quimica Ambiental, Centro de Tecnologias Ambientales (CETAM), Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Pinilla, E., E-mail: epinilla@unex.es [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. de Elvas sn, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Miro, C., E-mail: cmiro@unex.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. de la Universidad sn, 10071 Caceres (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    Plutonium is present in every environmental compartment, due to a variety of nuclear activities. The Southern Hemisphere has received about 20% of the global {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu environmental inventory, with an important contribution of the so-called tropospheric fallout from both the atmospheric nuclear tests performed in the French Polynesia and in Australia by France and United Kingdom, respectively. In this work we provide new data on the impact of these tests to South America through the study of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu in soils from different areas of Northern, Central and Southern Chile. The obtained results point out to the presence of debris from the French tests in the 20-40 Degree-Sign Southern latitude range, with {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratios quite heterogeneous and ranging from 0.02 to 0.23. They are significantly different from the expected one for the global fallout in the Southern Hemisphere for the 30-53 Degree-Sign S latitude range (0.185 {+-} 0.047), but they follow the same trend as the reported values by the Department of Energy of United States for other points with similar latitudes. The {sup 239+240}Pu activity inventories show as well a wider variability range in that latitude range, in agreement with the expected heterogeneity of the contamination.

  14. Oxidation behaviour of plutonium rich (U, Pu)C and (U, Pu)O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sali, S.K., E-mail: sksali@barc.gov.in [Fuel Chemistry Division (India); Kulkarni, N.K.; Phatak, Rohan [Fuel Chemistry Division (India); Agarwal, Renu [Product Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-10-15

    Oxidation behaviour of (U{sub 0.3}Pu{sub 0.7})C{sub 1.06} was investigated in air by heating samples up to 1073 K and 1273 K. Thermogravimetry (TG) of the samples and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) of the intermediate products were used to understand the phenomenon taking place during this process. Theoretical calculations were carried out to understand the multiple phase changes taking place during oxidation of carbide. Theoretical results were validated by XRD analysis of the products obtained at different stages of oxidation. The final oxidized products were found to be a single FCC phase with O/M = 2.15 (M = U + Pu). Oxidation kinetic studies of (U{sub 0.3}Pu{sub 0.7})O{sub 2} and (U{sub 0.47}Pu{sub 0.53})O{sub 2} were carried out in dry air, using thermogravimetry, under non-isothermal conditions. The activation energy of oxidation was found to be 49 and 70 kJ/mol, respectively. Lattice parameter dependence on Pu/M and O/M of plutonium rich mixed oxide (MOX) was established using combined results of XRD and TG analysis of (U{sub 0.3}Pu{sub 0.7})O{sub 2+x} and (U{sub 0.47}Pu{sub 0.53})O{sub 2+x}.

  15. Analysis of plutonium isotope ratios including238Pu/239Pu in individual U-Pu mixed oxide particles by means of a combination of alpha spectrometry and ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Yasuda, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2017-04-01

    Isotope ratio analysis of individual uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) mixed oxide particles contained within environmental samples taken from nuclear facilities is proving to be increasingly important in the field of nuclear safeguards. However, isobaric interferences, such as 238 U with 238 Pu and 241 Am with 241 Pu, make it difficult to determine plutonium isotope ratios in mass spectrometric measurements. In the present study, the isotope ratios of 238 Pu/ 239 Pu, 240 Pu/ 239 Pu, 241 Pu/ 239 Pu, and 242 Pu/ 239 Pu were measured for individual Pu and U-Pu mixed oxide particles by a combination of alpha spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). As a consequence, we were able to determine the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu, 241 Pu/ 239 Pu, and 242 Pu/ 239 Pu isotope ratios with ICP-MS after particle dissolution and chemical separation of plutonium with UTEVA resins. Furthermore, 238 Pu/ 239 Pu isotope ratios were able to be calculated by using both the 238 Pu/( 239 Pu+ 240 Pu) activity ratios that had been measured through alpha spectrometry and the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu isotope ratios determined through ICP-MS. Therefore, the combined use of alpha spectrometry and ICP-MS is useful in determining plutonium isotope ratios, including 238 Pu/ 239 Pu, in individual U-Pu mixed oxide particles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Concentration of (236)Pu Daughters in Plutonium for Application to MOX Production from Plutonium from Dismantled US Nuclear Weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, T.E.; Cremers, T.L.

    2001-05-01

    The isotope {sup 236}Pu in the weapons-grade plutonium to be used in the US MOX (mixed-oxide) plant is of concern because the daughter products of {sup 236}Pu are sources of high-energy gamma rays. The {sup 208}Tl daughter of {sup 236}Pu emits intense, high-energy gamma rays that are important for radiation exposure calculations for plant design. It is generally thought that the concentrations of {sup 236}Pu and its daughters are well below 10{sup {minus}10}, but these concentrations are generally below the detection limits of most analytical techniques. One technique that can be used to determine the concentration {sup 208}Tl is the direct measurement of the intensity of the {sup 208}Tl gamma rays in the gamma-ray spectrum from plutonium. Thallium-208 will be in equilibrium with {sup 228}Th, and may very well be in equilibrium with {sup 232}U for most aged plutonium samples. We have used the FRAM isotopic analysis software to analyze dozens of archived high-resolution gamma ray spectra from various samples of US and foreign plutonium. We are able to quantify the ratio of minor isotopes with measurable gamma-ray emissions to the major isotope of plutonium and hence, through the measurement of the plutonium isotopic distribution of the sample, to elemental plutonium itself. Excluding items packaged in fluoropolymer vials, all samples analyzed with {sup 240}Pu < 9% gave {sup 228}Th/Pu ratios < 3.4 e-012 and all samples of US-produced plutonium, including {sup 240}Pu values up to 16.4%, gave {sup 228}Th/Pu ratios < 9.4 e-012. None of these values is significant from a radiation dose standpoint.

  17. Water Solubility of Plutonium and Uranium Compounds and Residues at TA-55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Jarvinen, Gordon D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Prochnow, David Adrian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; DeBurgomaster, Paul Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Fife, Keith William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Rubin, Jim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States; Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States

    2016-06-13

    Understanding the water solubility of plutonium and uranium compounds and residues at TA-55 is necessary to provide a technical basis for appropriate criticality safety, safety basis and accountability controls. Individual compound solubility was determined using published solubility data and solution thermodynamic modeling. Residue solubility was estimated using a combination of published technical reports and process knowledge of constituent compounds. The scope of materials considered includes all compounds and residues at TA-55 as of March 2016 that contain Pu-239 or U-235 where any single item in the facility has more than 500 g of nuclear material. This analysis indicates that the following materials are not appreciably soluble in water: plutonium dioxide (IDC=C21), plutonium phosphate (IDC=C66), plutonium tetrafluoride (IDC=C80), plutonium filter residue (IDC=R26), plutonium hydroxide precipitate (IDC=R41), plutonium DOR salt (IDC=R42), plutonium incinerator ash (IDC=R47), uranium carbide (IDC=C13), uranium dioxide (IDC=C21), U3O8 (IDC=C88), and uranium filter residue (IDC=R26). This analysis also indicates that the following materials are soluble in water: plutonium chloride (IDC=C19) and uranium nitrate (IDC=C52). Equilibrium calculations suggest that PuOCl is water soluble under certain conditions, but some plutonium processing reports indicate that it is insoluble when present in electrorefining residues (R65). Plutonium molten salt extraction residues (IDC=R83) contain significant quantities of PuCl3, and are expected to be soluble in water. The solubility of the following plutonium residues is indeterminate due to conflicting reports, insufficient process knowledge or process-dependent composition: calcium salt (IDC=R09), electrorefining salt (IDC=R65), salt (IDC=R71), silica (IDC=R73) and sweepings/screenings (IDC=R78). Solution thermodynamic modeling also indicates that fire suppression water buffered with a

  18. Reclamation of plutonium from pyrochemical processing residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Gray, J.H.; Holcomb, H.P.; Chostner, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) have jointly developed a process to recover plutonium from molten salt extraction residues. These NaCl, KCL, and MgCl 2 residues, which are generated in the pyrochemical extraction of 241 Am from aged plutonium metal, contain up to 25 wt % dissolved plutonium and up to 2 wt % americium. The overall objective was to develop a process to convert these residues to a pure plutonium metal product and discardable waste. To meet this objective a combination of pyrochemical and aqueous unit operations was used. The first step was to scrub the salt residue with a molten metal (aluminum and magnesium) to form a heterogeneous ''scrub alloy'' containing nominally 25 wt % plutonium. This unit operation, performed at RFP, effectively separated the actinides from the bulk of the chloride salts. After packaging in aluminum cans, the ''scrub alloy'' was then dissolved in a nitric acid - hydrofluoric acid - mercuric nitrate solution at SRP. Residual chloride was separated from the dissolver solution by precipitation with Hg 2 (NO 3 ) 2 followed by centrifuging. Plutonium was then separated from the aluminum, americium and magnesium using the Purex solvent extraction system. The 241 Am was diverted to the waste tank farm, but could be recovered if desired

  19. Bulk characterization of (U, Pu) mixed carbide fuel for distribution of plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, K. V. Vrinda, E-mail: kvvdevi@barc.gov.in; Khan, K. B. [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400094 (India); Biju, K. [Health physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400094 (India); Kumar, Arun [Nuclear fuels group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400094 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Homogeneous distribution of plutonium in (U, Pu) mixed fuels is important from fuel performance as well as reprocessing point of view. Radiation imaging and assay techniques are employed for the detection of Pu rich agglomerates in the fuel. A simulation study of radiation transport was carried out to analyse the technique of autoradiography so as to estimate the minimum detectability of Pu agglomerates in MC fuel with nominal PuC content of 70% using Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. An isotopic analysis system for plutonium samples enriched in 238Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.D.; Camp, D.C.

    1991-08-01

    We have designed and built a gamma-ray spectrometer system that measures the relative plutonium isotopic abundances of plutonium oxide enriched in 238 Pu. The first system installed at Westinghouse Savannah River Company was tested and evaluated on plutonium oxide in stainless steel EP60/61 containers. 238 Pu enrichments ranged from 20% to 85%. Results show that 200 grams of plutonium oxide in an EP60.61 container can be measured with ±0.3% precision and better than ±1.0% accuracy in the specific power using a counting time of 50 minutes. 3 refs., 2 figs

  1. The controlled-potential coulometric determination of plutonium based upon cerium oxidation and the Pu022+/Pu4+ valency change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.; Crossley, D.; Venkataramana, P.

    1977-09-01

    Conditions have been established enabling plutonium to be oxidised quantitatively to the hexavalent state in the working compartment of a controlled-potential coulometric cell using electrogenerated ceric ion or excess ceric nitrate. The excess ceric ion is reduced in situ electrochemically without reduction of the hexavalent plutonium. The plutonium is then determined controlled-potential coulometrically by reduction to Pu 3+ followed by oxidation to Pu 4+ . The first oxidation step is conducted in molar nitric acid solution containing sulphamic acid but the coulometric determination step is conducted in molar sulphuric acid solution. The results obtained in the coulometric determination step were less satisfactory following oxidation with electrogenerated ceric ion rather than with chemically added ceric nitrate. Using the recommended conditions, 6 mg quantities of plutonium can be determined with an accuracy of 100.06% and a precision of 0.12% (coefficient of variation). The behaviour of chromium, manganese and vanadium impurity is reported. (author)

  2. Plutonium fuel fabrication residues and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnal, T.; Cousinou, G.; Desille, H.

    1982-04-01

    This paper discusses the current situation in the fabrication plant at Cadarache with an annual plutonium throughput of several tons. Three major fabrication byproduct categories are defined in this plant: 1) scraps, directly recycled at the fabrication input station; 2) residues, byproducts recycled by chemical processes, or processed in washing and incineration stations; 3) wastes, placed in drums and evacuated directly to a waste conditioning station. The borderline between residues and wastes has yet to be precisely determined

  3. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J.; Heslop, M.

    1999-01-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible 238 Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na 2 SO 4 , Na 3 PO 4 and NaAsO 2 or Na 3 AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the 238 Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox

  4. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heslop, M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (United States). Indian Head Div.; Wernly, K. [Molten Salt Oxidation Corp. (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible {sup 238}Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaAsO{sub 2} or Na{sub 3}AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the {sup 238}Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox.

  5. Determination of 238Pu in plutonium bearing fuels by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Alamelu, D.; Khodade, P.S.; Shah, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of 238 Pu in plutonium bearing fuels is required as a part of the chemical quality assurance of nuclear fuels. In addition, the determination of 238 Pu is required in nuclear technology for many other applications, e.g., for developing isotope correlations and while using 238 Pu as a spike (tracer) in isotope dilution α-spectrometry (IDAS). This determination usually involves the use of α-spectrometry on purified Pu sample. In view of the random errors associated with the counting statistics and the systematic errors due to (1) in-growth of 241 Am in purified Pu sample and (2) tail contribution correction methodology in α-spectrometry, the precision and accuracy obtainable by α-spectrometry are limited. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is generally used for the determination of different Pu isotopes other than 238 Pu. This is due to the ubiquitous isobaric interference from 238 U at 238 Pu in TIMS. Recently, we have carried out studies on the formation of atomic and oxide ions of U and Pu by TIMS and developed a novel approach using interfering element correction methodology to account for the isobaric interference of 238 U at 238 Pu in TIMS. This methodology is based on the addition of 235 U (enrichment >90 atom%) to Pu sample followed by the determination of 238 U/ 235 U atom ratio using UO + ion and determination of Pu isotope ratios using Pu + ion, from the same filament loading. The TIMS methodology was used for the determination of 238 Pu in different Pu samples in U based nuclear fuels from PHWRs with 238 Pu content about 0.2 atom%. The 238 Pu determination was also carried out using α-spectrometry. This paper reports the results obtained by the two methods and presents the merits and shortcomings of the two approaches. (author)

  6. Nondestructive assay of plutonium residue in horizontal storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.

    1985-01-01

    Aqueous plutonium recovery and purification processes often involve the temporary storage of plutonium solutions in holding tanks. Because plutonium is known to precipitate from aqueous solutions under certain conditions, there is a continuing need to assay emptied tanks for plutonium residue. A portable gamma spectrometer system, specifically designed for this purpose, provides rapid assay of such plutonium residues in horizontal storage tanks. A means is thus available for the nondestructive analysis of these tanks on a regular schedule to ensure that significant deposits of plutonium are not allowed to accumulate. 5 figs

  7. Plutonium(IV) peroxide formation in nitric medium and kinetics Pu(VI) reduction by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, C.; Adnet, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Reduction of plutonium (VI) to Pu(IV) with hydrogen peroxide is a step in industrial processes used to purify plutonium nitrate solutions. This operation must be carefully controlled, in order to avoid any formation of the Pu(IV) peroxide green precipitate and to obtain exclusively Pu(IV). This led us to study the acidity and Pu and H 2 O 2 concentrations influences on the precipitate appearance and to perform a Pu(VI) reduction kinetic study on a wide range of acidities ([HNO 3 ]: 0.5 to 8 M), plutonium concentrations ([Pu(VI)]: 0.1 to 0.8 M) and [H 2 O 2 ]/[Pu(VI)] ratio (from 1 to 8). Thus, the domain of Pu(IV) peroxide formation and the reactional paths were established. With the exception of 0.5 M nitric acid medium, the kinetic curves show two distinct regims: the first one corresponds to an induction period where the Pu(VI) concentration doesn't change, the second corresponds to a linear decrease of Pu(VI). An increase of the temperature greatly accelerates the Pu(VI) reduction rate while [H 2 O 2 ]/[Pu(VI)] has almost no influence. The Pu(VI) total reduction time decreases when initial concentration of plutonium increases. By increasing nitric acid concentration from 0.5 M to 6 M, the total Pu(VI) reduction time decreases. This time increases when [HNO 3 ] varies from 6 M to 8 M. (orig.)

  8. Flexible process options for the immobilisation of residues and wastes containing plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.W.A.; Moricca, S.A.; Day, R. A.; Begg, B. D.; Scales, C. R.; Maddrell, E. R.; Eilbeck, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Residues and waste streams containing plutonium present unique technical, safety, regulatory, security, and socio-political challenges. In the UK these streams range from lightly plutonium contaminated materials (PCM) through to residue s resulting directly from Pu processing operations. In addition there are potentially stocks of Pu oxide powders whose future designation may be either a waste or an asset, due to their levels of contamination making their reuse uneconomic, or to changes in nuclear policy. While waste management routes exist for PCM, an immobilisation process is required for streams containing higher levels of Pu. Such a process is being developed by Nexia Solutions and ANSTO to treat and immobilise Pu waste and residues currently stored on the Sellafield site. The characteristics of these Pu waste streams are highly variable. The physical form of the Pu waste ranges from liquids, sludges, powders/granules, to solid components (e.g., test fuels), with the Pu present as an ion in solution, as a salt, metal, oxide or other compound. The chemistry of the Pu waste streams also varies considerably with a variety of impurities present in many waste streams. Furthermore, with fissile isotopes present, criticality is an issue during operations and in the store or repository. Safeguards and security concerns must be assessed and controlled. The process under development, by using a combination of tailored waste form chemistry combined with flexible process technology aims to develop a process line to handle a broad range of Pu waste streams. It aims to be capable of dealing with not only current arisings but those anticipated to arise as a result of future operations or policy changes. (authors)

  9. DOE plutonium disposition study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document Volume 2, provides a discussion of: Plutonium Fuel Cycle; Technology Needs; Regulatory Considerations; Cost and Schedule Estimates; and Deployment Strategy.

  10. Uncertainty propagation for the coulometric measurement of the plutonium concentration in MOX-PU4.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-11-07

    This GUM WorkbenchTM propagation of uncertainty is for the coulometric measurement of the plutonium concentration in a Pu standard material (C126) supplied as individual aliquots that were prepared by mass. The C126 solution had been prepared and as aliquoted as standard material. Samples are aliquoted into glass vials and heated to dryness for distribution as dried nitrate. The individual plutonium aliquots were not separated chemically or otherwise purified prior to measurement by coulometry in the F/H Laboratory. Hydrogen peroxide was used for valence adjustment. The Pu assay measurement results were corrected for the interference from trace iron in the solution measured for assay. Aliquot mass measurements were corrected for air buoyancy. The relative atomic mass (atomic weight) of the plutonium from X126 certoficate was used. The isotopic composition was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) for comparison but not used in calculations.

  11. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Plutonium, Pu(+V), in Saturated Alluvium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, A. I.; Reimus, P. W.; Ware, S.; Haga, M. H.

    2004-12-01

    Natural groundwater colloids can facilitate the subsurface transport of strongly-sorbing radionuclides, such as plutonium (Pu). To evaluate this mechanism, packed-bed column experiments were conducted, comparing the simultaneous transport of dissolved plutonium (Pu-239) of an initial oxidation state (+V), Pu sorbed onto natural colloids, 190-nm and 500-nm diameter fluorescent Carboxylate Modified Latex (CML) microspheres, and tritium, as a conservative tracer, in saturated alluvium. The experiments were conducted in two columns having slightly different porosities at two flow rates, resulting in average linear velocities, v, of 0.6 to 3.65 cm/hr in one column and 0.57 to 2.85 cm/hr in the other. In all experiments, Pu associated with natural colloids transported through alluvium essentially unretarded, while dissolved Pu was entirely retained. These results were consistent with the strong sorption of Pu to alluvium and the negligible desorption from natural colloids, observed in separate batch experiments, over time scales exceeding those of the column experiments. The breakthrough of natural colloids preceded that of tritium in all experiments, indicating a slightly smaller effective pore volume for the colloids. The enhancement of colloids' transport over tritium decreased with v, implying ~40% enhancement at v = 0. The 500-nm CML microspheres were significantly attenuated in the column experiments compared to the 190-nm microspheres, which exhibited slightly more attenuation than natural colloids.

  12. DOE Plutonium Disposition Study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document, Volume 1, presents a technical description of the various elements of the System 80 + Standard Plant Design upon which the Plutonium Disposition Study was based. The System 80 + Standard Design is fully developed and directly suited to meeting the mission objectives for plutonium disposal. The bass U0{sub 2} plant design is discussed here.

  13. Plutonium diffusion in advanced fuels (U,Pu)(C,O) and (U,Pu)(C,N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Matzke, H.

    1983-01-01

    The self-diffusion of 238 Pu was measured in an oxicarbide (U,Pu)(C,O) and a carbonitride (U,Pu) (C,N). The activation enthalpies were 447 and 347 kJ mol -1 , respectively. The carbonitrides were confirmed to fall into three classes: carbide-like compositions with less than 30% nitrogen in the metalloid lattice, nitride-like composition with more than 70% nitrogen and with reduced atomic mobilities, and carbonitrides with about 50% nitrogen showing an intermediate behavior. The oxicarbide showed diffusion coefficients slightly larger than those of pure carbides

  14. Plutonium {sup 241}Pu in tissues and organs of Cervidae from Northern Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struminska-Parulska, Dagmara I.; Skwarzec, Bogdan [Gdansk Univ. (Poland). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry and Radiochemistry

    2015-07-01

    Livers, kidneys and muscles of large herbivorous animals: roe deer, red deer and fallow deer, collected in Northern Poland, were the subject of the investigation. The concentration of {sup 241}Pu ranged widely between 1.31 ± 0.28 and 214.5 ± 25.8 mBq kg{sup -1} ww and decreased in the order kidney > liver > muscle. The average values of the activity concentrations of {sup 241}Pu were 11.5 ± 1.8 mBq kg{sup -1} ww in muscles, 14.0 ± 2.25 mBq kg{sup -1} ww in liver and 85.5 ± 9.7 mBq kg{sup -1} ww in kidneys. As statistically checked the sampling location, sex, age and species of animals did not influence on plutonium concentrations of the analyzed samples. Only the organ type significantly influenced {sup 241}Pu content. The values of {sup 241}Pu/{sup 29+240}Pu activity ratio in analyzed samples ranged from 7.12 ± 2.15 to 99.3 ± 16.4 and the results showed the main source of plutonium in analyzed organs could be the Chernobyl accident.

  15. Plutonium 241Pu in tissues and organs of Cervidae from Northern Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struminska-Parulska, Dagmara I.; Skwarzec, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Livers, kidneys and muscles of large herbivorous animals: roe deer, red deer and fallow deer, collected in Northern Poland, were the subject of the investigation. The concentration of 241 Pu ranged widely between 1.31 ± 0.28 and 214.5 ± 25.8 mBq kg -1 ww and decreased in the order kidney > liver > muscle. The average values of the activity concentrations of 241 Pu were 11.5 ± 1.8 mBq kg -1 ww in muscles, 14.0 ± 2.25 mBq kg -1 ww in liver and 85.5 ± 9.7 mBq kg -1 ww in kidneys. As statistically checked the sampling location, sex, age and species of animals did not influence on plutonium concentrations of the analyzed samples. Only the organ type significantly influenced 241 Pu content. The values of 241 Pu/ 29+240 Pu activity ratio in analyzed samples ranged from 7.12 ± 2.15 to 99.3 ± 16.4 and the results showed the main source of plutonium in analyzed organs could be the Chernobyl accident.

  16. Determination of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu at femtogram and attogram levels - evidence for the migration of fallout plutonium in an ombrotrophic peat bog profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto, Francesca; Hrnecek, Erich; Krachler, Michael; Shotyk, William; Steier, Peter; Winkler, Stephan R

    2013-04-01

    The isotopic composition of plutonium ((239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu) was investigated in a ∼0.5 m long peat core from an ombrotrophic bog (Black Forest, Germany) using clean room procedures and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This sophisticated analytical approach was ultimately needed to detect reliably the Pu concentrations present in the peat samples at femtogram (fg) and attogram (ag) levels. The mean (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratio of 0.19 ± 0.02 (N = 32) in the peat layers, representing approximately the last 80 years, was in good agreement with the accepted value of 0.18 for the global fallout in the Northern Hemisphere. This finding is largely supported by the corresponding and rather constant (241)Pu/(239)Pu (0.0012 ± 0.0005) and (242)Pu/(239)Pu (0.004 ± 0.001) ratios. Since the Pu isotopic composition characteristic of the global fallout was also identified in peat samples pre-dating the period of atmospheric atom bomb testing (AD 1956-AD 1980), migration of Pu within the peat profile is clearly indicated. These results highlight, for the first time, the mobility of Pu in a peat bog with implications for the migration of Pu in other acidic, organic rich environments such as forest soils and other wetland types. These findings constitute a direct observation of the behaviour of Pu at fg and ag levels in the environment. The AMS measurements of Pu concentrations (referring to a corresponding activity of (240+239)Pu from 0.07 mBq g(-1) to 5 mBq g(-1)) essentially confirm our a priori estimates based on existing (241)Am and (137)Cs data in the investigated peat core and agree well with the global fallout levels from the literature. Exclusively employing the Pu isotope ratios established for the peat samples, the date of the Pu irradiation (AD 1956, correctable to AD 1964) was calculated and subsequently compared to the (210)Pb age of the peat layers; this comparison provided an additional hint that global fallout derived Pu is not fixed in

  17. Recent animal studies on the deposition, retention and translocation of plutonium compounds. [/sup 238/Pu, /sup 239/Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    In recent years experimental animal studies have been extended to include transuranics other than plutonium. The results of these experiments indicate that americium and curium, regardless of the chemical form in which they are inhaled, are largely translocated to liver and skeleton and do not accumulate in thoracic lymph nodes as does /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/. There is evidence that /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ also translocates to liver and skeleton, although in lesser amounts than Am and Cm. When considering possible biological effects resulting from inhalation of transuranic elements, therefore, these findings shift some of the emphasis from the lungs to other tissues. These translocation patterns apply when the transuranics are inhaled individually; they may not apply when transuranics are inhaled in mixed oxides with uranium, a likely form in the developing breeder reactor program, or in any of the other exotic fuel forms. Biological studies of mixed transuranium oxides and possibly of other fuel forms are urgently needed to determine this. The finding that americium, curium, and sometimes /sup 238/Pu deposits in liver and skeleton emphasizes the need for continued development of therapeutic measures to remove the transuranics from blood, skeleton and soft tissue. Of course, we must continue to emphasize the need to develop measures for removing transuranics promptly from the lungs.

  18. Results of the international Pu-2000 exercise for plutonium isotopic composition measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.; Bickel, M.; Hill, C.; Verbruggen, A.

    2004-01-01

    An international comparison for plutonium isotopic composition measurement, known as the Pu-2000 exercise, was organized by the ESARDA NDA-WG (European Safeguards Research and Development Association, Working Group on Techniques and Standards for Non-Destructive Assay). The aim of this comparison was to test X- and γ-ray spectrometry methods over a large range of isotopic ratios. These methods are based on the complex analysis of several X- and γ-rays in the KX region of the plutonium spectrum and also in the 120-700 keV energy range. The results obtained by the participants with their corresponding uncertainties are presented in this document and compared to the declared values. The main conclusions of the work are also given. No important bias due to an inadequate knowledge of the nuclear data for plutonium isotopes was observed

  19. Salt stripping: a pyrochemical approach to the recovery of plutonium electrorefining salt residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, D.C.; Mullins, L.J.

    1982-10-01

    A pyrochemical process has been developed to take the salt residue from the plutonium electrorefining process and strip the plutonium from it. The process, called salt stripping, uses calcium as a reducing/coalescing agent. In a one-day operation, greater than 95% of the plutonium can be recovered as a metallic button. As much as 88% of the residue is either reused as metal or discarded as a clean salt. A thin layer of black salts, which makes up the bulk of the unrecovered Pu, is a by-product of the initial reductions. A number of black salts can be collected together and re-reduced in a second step. Greater than 88% of this plutonium can be successfully recovered in this second stage with the resulting residues being discardable. The processing time, number of processor hours, and the volume of secondary residues are greatly reduced over the classical aqueous recovery methods. In addition, the product metal is of sufficient quality to be fed directly to the electrorefining process for purification. 8 figures, 7 tables

  20. Bulging of cans containing plutonium residues. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Wood, D.H.; Condit, R.H.; Shikany, S.D.

    1996-03-01

    In 1994, two cans in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Plutonium Facility were found to be bulging as a result of the generation of gases form the plutonium ash residues contained in the cans. This report describes the chronology of this discovery, the response actions that revealed other pressurized cans, the analysis of the causes, the short-term remedial action, a followup inspection of the short-term storage packages, and a review of proposed long-term remedial options

  1. Synthesis of garnet/perovskite-based ceramic for the immobilization of Pu-residue wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burakov, B.E.; Anderson, E.B.; Knecht, D.A.; Zamoryanskaya, M.A.; Strykanova, E.E.; Yagovkina, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The use of garnet/perovskite-based ceramic, with formula type (Y, Gd,hor e llipsis) 3 (Al,Ga,hor e llipsis) 5 O 12 /(Y,Gd,hor e llipsis)(Al,Ga, hor e llipsis)O 3 , was tested for immobilizing plutonium residue wastes. Pu residue wastes originate from nuclear weapons production and can contain more than 50% of impurities including such elements as Am, Al, Mg, Ga, Fe, K, La, Na, Mo, Nd, Si, Ta, Ce, Ba, B, W, Zn, Zr, C and Cl. While for some of these residues, direct conversion to typical glass or ceramic forms may be difficult, ceramic forms based on durable actinide host-phases are preferred for Pu, Am and other actinides immobilization. Garnet/perovskite crystalline host-phases are chemically and mechanically durable and desirable for the incorporation of Pu and most of the impurity elements in the Pu residue wastes in the lattices of host-phases in the form of solid solutions. Experiments on the synthesis of garnet/perovskite ceramic samples were carried out using melting in air at temperatures from 1,300 C (for samples doped with 10 wt.% Pu residue waste simulant) to 2,000 C (for samples doped with 10 wt.% Ce or U). Samples were studied by XRD, SEM and cathodoluminescence techniques. It was found that the garnet phase can incorporate up to 6 wt.% Ce and up to 4.0--5.5 wt.% U, which is correlated with the increase of Ga content and decrease of Al content in the melt. In one of the features of the melt, the perovskite phase formation substitutes for the formation of garnet. The capacity of the perovskite lattice to accommodate Ce and U is higher than the capacity of garnet, reaching about 8 and 7 wt.%, respectively. It was shown that cathodoluminescence can be effectively used to determine the valence state of Ce and U, an important step to optimize the starting precursor preparation. In case of U 4+ in the melt, the charge-compensating elements (Sn 2+ , Ca 2+ hor e llipsis) are needed to successfully incorporate U in the garnet lattice

  2. Determination of thorium and plutonium in AHWR experimental (Th, 1%Pu)O2 MOX fuel after microwave dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulzele, Ajit K.; Malav, R.K.; Pandey, Ashish; Kapoor, Y.S.; Kumar, Manish; Singh, Mamta; Das, D.K.; Prakash, Amrit; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes determination of thorium and plutonium in experimental (Th, 1%Pu)O 2 AHWR (Advanced Heavy Water Reactor) MOX fuel samples after dissolution by microwave. Time taken to dissolve ∼ 2g of MOX sample by conventional IR heating technique in conc. HNO 3 + 0.05 M HF mixture is about 35-40 hours while using microwave dissolution technique it is ∼ 2 hours. Hence, with the help of microwave dissolution technique analysis time for each sample has been reduced from week to a day. The PuO 2 content (wt%) in the MOX pellets was within specification limit, (1.0±0.1)%. (author)

  3. Hydride-catalyzed corrosion of plutonium by air: Initiation by plutonium monoxide monohydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.H.; Haschke, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    Chemistry and kinetics of air reactions with plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH) and with mixtures of the oxide hydride and plutonium metal are defined by results of pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) measurements. Test with specimens prepared by total and partial corrosion of plutonium in 0.05 M sodium chloride solution show that reaction of residual water continues to generate H 2 after liquid water is removed by evacuation. Rapid exposure of PuOH to air at room temperature does not produce a detectable reaction, but similar exposure of a partially corroded metal sample containing Pu and PuOH results in hydride (PuH x )-catalyzed corrosion of the residual Pu. Kinetics of he first-order reaction resulting in formation of the PuH x catalyst and of the indiscriminate reaction of N 2 and O 2 with plutonium metal are defined. The rate of the catalyzed Pu+air reaction is independent of temperature (E a = 0), varies as the square of air pressure, and equals 0.78 ± 0.03 g Pu/cm 2 min in air at one atmosphere. The absence of pyrophoric behavior for PuOH and differences in the reactivities of PuOH and PuOH + Pu mixtures are attributed to kinetic control by gaseous reaction products. Thermodynamic properties of the oxide hydride are estimated, particle size distributions of corrosion products are presented, and potential hazards associated with products formed by aqueous corrosion of plutonium are discussed

  4. An ab initio study of plutonium oxides surfaces; Etude ab initio des surfaces d'oxydes de Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jomard, G.; Bottin, F.; Amadon, B

    2007-07-01

    By means of first-principles calculations, we have studied the atomic structure as well as the thermodynamic stability of various plutonium dioxide surfaces in function of their environment (in terms of oxygen partial pressure and temperature). All these simulations have been performed with the ABINIT code. It is well known that DFT fails to describe correctly plutonium-based materials since 5f electrons in such systems are strongly correlated. In order to go beyond DFT, we have treated PuO{sub 2} and {beta}-Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} in a DFT+U framework. We show that the couple of parameters (U,J) that works well for pure Pu is also well designed for describing ground state (GS) properties of these two oxides. The major improvement with respect with DFT is that we are able to predict an insulating GS in agreement with experiments. The presence of a gap in the DOS (Density of States) of plutonium oxides should play a significant role in the predicted surface reactivity. However, performing DFT+U calculations on surfaces of plutonium oxide from scratch was too ambitious. That is why we decided, as a first step, to study the stability of the (100), (110) and (111) surfaces of PuO{sub 2} in a DFT-GGA framework. For each of these orientations, we considered various terminations. These ab initio results have been introduced in a thermodynamic model which allows us to predict the relative stability of the different terminations as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure (p{sub O{sub 2}}). We conclude that at room temperature and for p{sub O{sub 2}}{approx}10 atm., the polar O{sub 2}-(100) termination is favoured. The stabilization of such a polar stoichiometric surface is surprising and should be confirmed by DFT+U calculations before any final conclusion. (authors)

  5. Microwave calcination for plutonium immobilization and residue stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Rising, T.L.; Roushey, W.J.; Sprenger, G.S.

    1995-01-01

    In the late 1980's development was begun on a process using microwave energy to vitrify low level mixed waste sludge and transuranic mixed waste sludge generated in Building 374 at Rocky Flats. This process was shown to produce a dense, highly durable waste form. With the cessation of weapons production at Rocky Flats, the emphasis has changed from treatment of low level and TRU wastes to stabilizaiton of plutonium oxide and residues. This equipment is versatile and can be used as a heat source to calcine, react or vitrify many types of residues and oxides. It has natural economies in that it heats only the material to be treated, significantly reducing cycle times over conventional furnaces. It is inexpensive to operate in that most of the working components remain outside of any necessary contamination enclosure and therefore can easily be maintained. Limited testing has been successfully performed on cerium oxide (as a surrogate for plutonium oxide), surrogate electrorefining salts, surrogate residue sludge and residue ash. Future plans also include tests on ion exchange resins. In an attempt to further the usefullness of this technology, a mobile, self-contained microwave melting system is currently under development and expected to be operational at Rocky Flats Enviromental Technology Site by the 4th quarter of FY96

  6. Reactivity of the uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) and the plutonium (Pu(III)/Pu(IV)) in nitric aqueous solution under ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venault, L.

    1998-01-01

    To minimize the volumes of solid waste and industrial effluents generated at the end of cycle, particularly in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing industry, research is currently under way on so-called innovative processes, designed to induce chemical reactions without adding reagent to the media. Among these processes, the use of ultrasound can prove advantageous, and the purpose of this study is to assess accurately the potential for its application. In the present context, this work shows that the transmission of an ultrasonic wave in aqueous nitric acid solution leads to: the accumulation of nitrous acid in solution, until a steady-sate concentration is reached; the removal of nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in the gas stream. The initial kinetics of the formation of HNO 2 in solution was quantified as a function of the nitric acid concentration and the ultrasound intensity. It was also shown than an excess of nitrous acid in nitric solution decomposes under the effect of ultrasound. It is also possible to accumulate hydrogen peroxide in solution during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions in the presence of a chemical species N 2 H 5 + , NH 2 SO 3 H...) which reacts rapidly with HNO 2 , preventing the reduction of H 2 O 2 by HNO 2 . The mechanisms of HNO 2 formation and decomposition, and the mechanism of H 2 O 2 formation during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions, are presented. Control of H 2 O 2 or HNO 2 in a nitric acid medium under the effect of an ultrasonic wave can be exploited to control redox reactions of uranium and plutonium ions, particularly with respect to the oxidation of U and Pu (U(IV)→ U(IV) or Pu(III) → Pu(IV)) and the reduction of Pu (Pu(IV)→ Pu(III). The redox behavior of uranium and plutonium ions in aqueous nitric solution subject to an ultrasonic flux is interpreted in term of effects induced on the reaction medium, and reveals the potential for using ultrasound to cause

  7. DFT and two-dimensional correlation analysis methods for evaluating the Pu{sup 3+}–Pu{sup 4+} electronic transition of plutonium-doped zircon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Liang, E-mail: bianliang@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, South West University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); Dong, Fa-qin; Song, Mian-xin [Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, South West University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); Dong, Hai-liang [Department of Geology and Environmental Earth Science, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Li, Wei-Min [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Duan, Tao; Xu, Jin-bao [Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, South West University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); Zhang, Xiao-yan [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, South West University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Effect of Pu f-shell electron on the electronic property of zircon is calculated via DFT and 2D-CA techniques. • Reasons of Pu f-shell electron influencing on electronic properties are systematically discussed. • Phase transitions are found at two point 2.8 mol% and 7.5 mol%. - Abstract: Understanding how plutonium (Pu) doping affects the crystalline zircon structure is very important for risk management. However, so far, there have been only a very limited number of reports of the quantitative simulation of the effects of the Pu charge and concentration on the phase transition. In this study, we used density functional theory (DFT), virtual crystal approximation (VCA), and two-dimensional correlation analysis (2D-CA) techniques to calculate the origins of the structural and electronic transitions of Zr{sub 1−c}Pu{sub c}SiO{sub 4} over a wide range of Pu doping concentrations (c = 0–10 mol%). The calculations indicated that the low-angular-momentum Pu-f{sub xy}-shell electron excites an inner-shell O-2s{sup 2} orbital to create an oxygen defect (V{sub O-s}) below c = 2.8 mol%. This oxygen defect then captures a low-angular-momentum Zr-5p{sup 6}5s{sup 2} electron to form an sp hybrid orbital, which exhibits a stable phase structure. When c > 2.8 mol%, each accumulated V{sub O-p} defect captures a high-angular-momentum Zr-4d{sub z} electron and two Si-p{sub z} electrons to create delocalized Si{sup 4+} → Si{sup 2+} charge disproportionation. Therefore, we suggest that the optimal amount of Pu cannot exceed 7.5 mol% because of the formation of a mixture of ZrO{sub 8} polyhedral and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedral phases with the orientation (10-1). This study offers new perspective on the development of highly stable zircon-based solid solution materials.

  8. DFT and two-dimensional correlation analysis methods for evaluating the Pu(3+)-Pu(4+) electronic transition of plutonium-doped zircon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liang; Dong, Fa-qin; Song, Mian-xin; Dong, Hai-liang; Li, Wei-Min; Duan, Tao; Xu, Jin-bao; Zhang, Xiao-yan

    2015-08-30

    Understanding how plutonium (Pu) doping affects the crystalline zircon structure is very important for risk management. However, so far, there have been only a very limited number of reports of the quantitative simulation of the effects of the Pu charge and concentration on the phase transition. In this study, we used density functional theory (DFT), virtual crystal approximation (VCA), and two-dimensional correlation analysis (2D-CA) techniques to calculate the origins of the structural and electronic transitions of Zr1-cPucSiO4 over a wide range of Pu doping concentrations (c=0-10mol%). The calculations indicated that the low-angular-momentum Pu-fxy-shell electron excites an inner-shell O-2s(2) orbital to create an oxygen defect (VO-s) below c=2.8mol%. This oxygen defect then captures a low-angular-momentum Zr-5p(6)5s(2) electron to form an sp hybrid orbital, which exhibits a stable phase structure. When c>2.8mol%, each accumulated VO-p defect captures a high-angular-momentum Zr-4dz electron and two Si-pz electrons to create delocalized Si(4+)→Si(2+) charge disproportionation. Therefore, we suggest that the optimal amount of Pu cannot exceed 7.5mol% because of the formation of a mixture of ZrO8 polyhedral and SiO4 tetrahedral phases with the orientation (10-1). This study offers new perspective on the development of highly stable zircon-based solid solution materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Redox thermodynamic data of plutonium in acidic and carbonate media. Pu(V) stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, H.

    1992-01-01

    Pu redox equilibria are studied in acidic and carbonate media in this thesis, to build a thermodynamic data bank consistent with the TDB (NEA-OECD) one and in connection with radioactive waste disposal programs. Literature is discussed and reinterpreted. The experimental method is tested with Uranium preliminary measurements. The reversible redox potentials (PuO 2 + and Pu 4+ /Pu 3+ ) are measured using the cyclic voltametric technique in perchloric media at several ionic strengths (from 0.5 to 3M) and temperatures (from 0 to 70 deg C). The Specific Interaction Theory (SIT) is used to measured activity coefficients and to extrapolate data to the standard conditions. The potentials variations versus temperature are linear in first approximation: the entropy changes are found constant from 0 to 70 deg C and the heat capacity changes are within uncertainties. The standard constant of PuO 2 + disproportionation into PuO 2 2+ and Pu 3+ is deduced from spectrophotometric measurements performed in perchloric media around pH=1 where Pu 4+ hydrolysis is discussed. The Pu non-reversible standard potentials (PuO 2 2+ /Pu 4+ for instance) are then calculated and validated with a spectrophotometric study of Pu 4+ formation from PuO 2 2+ and Pu 3+ in a 1M perchloric acidic solution. The Pu(VI/V) redox potential, activity coefficients and entropies are measured using the same technique in concentrated carbonate media. The limiting complex standard formation constants and the redox potential shifts (between acidic and carbonate media) are then discussed among the U, Np, Pu and Am actinides. A spectrophotometric study of the equilibrium between the complexes with 5 and 4 carbonate ligands allowed to measure Pu(IV) limiting complex stability at several ionic strengths. (author). 26 tabs., 46 figs., 95 refs

  10. Aqueous Chloride Operations Overview: Plutonium and Americium Purification/Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, David Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Skidmore, Bradley Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Acqueous Chloride mission is to recover plutonium and americium from pyrochemical residues (undesirable form for utilization and storage) and generate plutonium oxide and americium oxide. Plutonium oxide is recycled into Pu metal production flowsheet. It is suitable for storage. Americium oxide is a valuable product, sold through the DOE-OS isotope sales program.

  11. The U-Pu inspector, a new instrument to determine the isotopic compositions of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verplancke, J.; Van Dyck, R.; Tench, O.; Sielaff, B.

    1994-01-01

    The U/Pu-InSpector is a new integrated, portable instrument that can measure the isotopic composition of samples containing uranium and/or plutonium without prior calibration and without the need for skilled operators. It consists of a Low Energy Germanium detector in a Multi-attitude Cryostat (MAC). A shield and collimator are built-in, directly around the detector element, reducing the weight of this detector and shield to approximately 8 kg with a full dewar. The dewar can quickly and easily be filled with a self-pressurizing funnel. The detector is connected to a small portable battery operated analyzer and a Notebook computer. The spectra are automatically stored and analyzed with the help of the MGA codes for plutonium and/or for uranium. 5 refs., 1 fig

  12. Study of the Effect of (U0.8Pu0.2O2 Uranium–Plutonium Mixed Fuel Fission Products on a Living Organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayagoz Baimukhanova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the results of experiments conducted on pigs to determine the effect of plutonium, which is the most radiotoxic and highly active element in the range of mixed fuel (U0.8Pu0.2O2 fission products, on living organisms. The results will allow empirical prediction of the emergency plutonium radiation dose for various organs and tissues of humans in case of an accident in a reactor running on mixed fuel (U0.8Pu0.2O2.

  13. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: creation (fuel cycle, Pu formed in thermal reactors); properties; Pu in fast reactors; fast reactor experience; radioactivity; handling; Pu and weapons. (U.K.)

  14. Simultaneous measurement of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 242}Pu by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR ICP-MS) in marine sediments; Mesure des isotopes du plutonium des sediments marins par spectrometrie de masse a plasma couple inductivement haute resolution (HR ICP-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneau, F

    1999-07-01

    Transuranics elements are of particular interest in radioecological studies because of their radiotoxicity and their potential use to decipher source fingerprints and transport processes. The simultaneous measurement of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 242}Pu in environmental samples requires a specific chemical procedure. This work deals with an analytical procedure which yields a very high grade of purification of Pu suitable for ultra low level detection by HR ICP-MS, from marine sediments. After the elimination of major elements (Fe, Al, Mg...) by a first chromatographic separation, a new device of purification by solvent extraction and concentration by a second chromatographic separation is used to obtain a concentrated and high purified solution of plutonium. The chemical procedure have been validated on IAEA certified sediment samples and on sediment samples collected in the roads of Cherbourg which had been previously analysed by other techniques (a spectrometry and thermo-ionisation mass spectrometer). (author)

  15. Plutonium-239, 240Pu and 210Po contents of tobacco and cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H.; Jaakkola, T.

    1985-01-01

    The 239 Pu and 240 Pu found in the environment has mainly been produced by atmospheric nuclear tests. The accumulation of fallout Pu in man from inhalation and ingestion and its distribution in the body has previously been studied. Information about the accumulation is needed because of the expanding production of this highly radiotoxic substance. In the present work the Pu content of tobacco and cigarette smoke was determined to evaluate the contribution of smoking to total Pu intake by man. For comparison the 210 Po content of tobacco and smoke were analyzed. The release of 210 Po in tobacco smoke and the radiation dose for man have been widely studied because of the high incidence of lung cancer among smokers

  16. Reactivity of the uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) and the plutonium (Pu(III)/Pu(IV)) in nitric aqueous solution under ultrasound; De l'influence des ultrasons sur la reactivite de l'uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) et du plutonium (PU(III)/PU(IV)) en solution aqueuse nitrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venault, L

    1998-07-01

    To minimize the volumes of solid waste and industrial effluents generated at the end of cycle, particularly in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing industry, research is currently under way on so-called innovative processes, designed to induce chemical reactions without adding reagent to the media. Among these processes, the use of ultrasound can prove advantageous, and the purpose of this study is to assess accurately the potential for its application. In the present context, this work shows that the transmission of an ultrasonic wave in aqueous nitric acid solution leads to: the accumulation of nitrous acid in solution, until a steady-sate concentration is reached; the removal of nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in the gas stream. The initial kinetics of the formation of HNO{sub 2} in solution was quantified as a function of the nitric acid concentration and the ultrasound intensity. It was also shown than an excess of nitrous acid in nitric solution decomposes under the effect of ultrasound. It is also possible to accumulate hydrogen peroxide in solution during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions in the presence of a chemical species (N{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup +}, NH{sub 2}SO{sub 3}H...) which reacts rapidly with HNO{sub 2}, preventing the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by HNO{sub 2}. The mechanisms of HNO{sub 2} formation and decomposition, and the mechanism of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions, are presented. Control of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or HNO{sub 2} in a nitric acid medium under the effect of an ultrasonic wave can be exploited to control redox reactions of uranium and plutonium ions, particularly with respect to the oxidation of U and Pu (U(IV){yields} U(IV) or Pu(III) {yields} Pu(IV)) and the reduction of Pu (Pu(IV){yields} Pu(III). The redox behavior of uranium and plutonium ions in aqueous nitric solution subject to an ultrasonic flux is interpreted in term of effects

  17. Decommissioning of the Plutonium Purification and Residues Recovery Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    British Nuclear Group is continuing to build on BNFL's successful record of decommissioning redundant nuclear facilities. Challenging radiological conditions and complex technical problems have been overcome to reduce the hazard associated with the UK's nuclear legacy. The former Plutonium Purification and Residues Recovery Plant at Sellafield operated from 1954 through to 1987. This is the only plant to have experienced an uncontrolled criticality incident in the UK, in August 1970 during operations. The plant comprised of two mirror image cells approximately 6.5 m x 13.5 m x 16 m, constructed of bare brick. The cell structure provided secondary containment, the process vessels and pipes within the cell providing primary containment. The plant utilized a solvent extraction process to purify the plutonium stream. Surrounding the two process cells to the north, east and south is an annulus area that housed the operational control panels, feed and sample glove-boxes, and ancillary equipment. The building was ventilated by an unfiltered extract on the process cells and a filtered extract from the vessels and glove-boxes. During the long operational lifetime of the plant, the primary containment deteriorated to such an extent that the process cells eventually became the main containment, with levels of radioactive contamination in excess of 14,256 pCi alpha. This led to significant aerial effluent discharges towards the end of the plant's operational life and onerous working conditions during decommissioning. Implementation of a phased decommissioning strategy from 1991 has led to: - A reduction of approximately 60% in the Sellafield site's aerial alpha discharges following installation of a new ventilation system, - Removal of 12 plutonium contaminated glove-boxes and sample cabinets from the building, - Disposal of the approximately 500 m 2 of asbestos building cladding, - Removal of over 90% of the active pipes and vessels from the highly contaminated process cells

  18. Pu and Am determination in the environment method development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afonin, M.; Simonoff, M.; Donard, O.; Michel, H.; Ardisson, G.

    2002-01-01

    A few articles were published in the recent years regarding the application of ICP MS HR to the determination of ultratrace Pu in the environment. Si removal was not applied in recent publications. It is well known from marine biology that some microorganisms use Si derivatives in their metabolism. This implies that important amounts of Pu will not be dissolved and instead will rest in the solid residue. In our work we chose a combination of methods from EML-300 Handbook: Pu-02-RC Plutonium in Soil Samples, Pu-03-RC Plutonium in Soil Residue - Total Dissolution Method, Pu-11-RC Plutonium Purification - Ion Exchange Technique, Pu-12-RC Plutonium and/or Americium in Soil or Sediments. A high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric method was developed for the determination of Am and the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu isotope ratio. The total plutonium concentrations ( 239+240 Pu) measured in environmental samples by this method were in good agreement with recommended data obtained from alpha-spectrometry. A reduction in the time of analysis over 33% was achieved

  19. Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Christopher E.; Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brooks, Antone L.; McCord, Stacey; Dagle, Gerald E.; James, Anthony C.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; Thrall, Brian D.; Morgan, William F.

    2012-11-01

    The long-term retention of inhaled soluble forms of plutonium raises concerns as to the potential health effects in persons working in nuclear energy or the nuclear weapons program. The distributions of long-term retained inhaled plutonium-nitrate [239Pu (NO3)4] deposited in the lungs of an accidentally exposed nuclear worker (Human Case 0269) and in the lungs of experimentally exposed beagle dogs with varying initial lung depositions were determined via autoradiographs of selected histological lung, lymph node, trachea, and nasal turbinate tissue sections. These studies showed that both the human and dogs had a non-uniform distribution of plutonium throughout the lung tissue. Fibrotic scar tissue effectively encapsulated a portion of the plutonium and prevented its clearance from the body or translocation to other tissues and diminished dose to organ parenchyma. Alpha radiation activity from deposited plutonium in Human Case 0269 was observed primarily along the sub-pleural regions while no alpha activity was seen in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of this individual. However, relatively high activity levels in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of the beagles indicated the lymphatic system was effective in clearing deposited plutonium from the lung tissues. In both the human case and beagle dogs, the appearance of retained plutonium within the respiratory tract was inconsistent with current biokinetic models of clearance for soluble forms of plutonium. Bound plutonium can have a marked effect on the dose to the lungs and subsequent radiation exposure has the potential increase in cancer risk.

  20. Could weapon-grade plutonium be an asset for managing Pu inventories?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, H.; Bemden, E. van den

    1997-01-01

    Due to the temporary shortage of MOX fuel fabrication facilities, the stockpile of separated civilian grade Pu (CPu) is predicted to increase up to the turn of the century. An additional quantity of weapon grade Pu (WPu) will be progressively isolated at the same period. Both CPu and WPu surpluses require disposition as soon as feasible. Although non-proliferation concerns, established national policies, public acceptance problems and other considerations largely complicate the aspect of the use of WPu, it is worth examining the advantages which could result from a synergetic management of: LWR grade Pu to which AGR grade Pu might be associated; WPu; GCR grade Pu which should be considered as a Pu variety situated between the two first ones as far as their physical and neutronic characteristics are concerned. Two scenarios of integrated managements of the CPu varieties and WPu are being considered. They indicate several technical and economical advantages but also important problems to be resolved, mainly from the non-proliferation point of view. In that respect, it is concluded that, although no reasonable perspective exists to resolve these problems easily (or at all), the advantages justify an effort of the international community to consider how it could be implemented. (author). 24 refs, 2 figs, 5 tabs

  1. Conversion of plutonium scrap and residue to boroilicate glass using the GMODS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.; Elam, K.R.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Plutonium scrap and residue represent major national and international concerns because (1) significant environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) problems have been identified with their storage; (2) all plutonium recovered from the black market in Europe has been from this category; (3) storage costs are high; and (4) safeguards are difficult. It is proposed to address these problems by conversion of plutonium scrap and residue to a CRACHIP (CRiticality, Aerosol, and CHemically Inert Plutonium) glass using the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS). CRACHIP refers to a set of requirements for plutonium storage forms that minimize ES ampersand H concerns. The concept is several decades old. Conversion of plutonium from complex chemical mixtures and variable geometries into a certified, qualified, homogeneous CRACHIP glass creates a stable chemical form that minimizes ES ampersand H risks, simplifies safeguards and security, provides an easy-to-store form, decreases storage costs, and allows for future disposition options. GMODS is a new process to directly convert metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidize organics with the residue converted to glass; and convert chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, and other materials to glass. GMODS is an enabling technology that creates new options. Conventional glassmaking processes require conversion of feeds to oxide-like forms before final conversion to glass. Such chemical conversion and separation processes are often complex and expensive

  2. Three-component U-Pu-Th fuel for plutonium irradiation in heavy water reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Ross

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses concepts for three-component fuel bundles containing plutonium, uranium and thorium for use in pressurised heavy water reactors, and cases for and against implementation of such a nuclear energy system in the United Kingdom. Heavy water reactors are used extensively in Canada, and are deploying within India and China, whilst the UK is considering the use of heavy water reactors to manage its plutonium inventory of 140 tonnes. The UK heavy water reactor proposal uses a mixed oxide (MOX fuel of plutonium in depleted uranium, within the enhanced CANDU-6 (EC-6 reactor. This work proposes an alternative heterogeneous fuel concept based on the same reactor and CANFLEX fuel bundle, with eight large-diameter fuel elements loaded with natural thorium oxide and 35 small-diameter fuel elements loaded with a MOX of plutonium and reprocessed uranium stocks from UK MAGNOX and AGR reactors. Indicative neutronic calculations suggest that such a fuel would be neutronically feasible. A similar MOX may alternatively be fabricated from reprocessed <5% enriched light water reactor fuel, such as the fuel of the AREVA EPR reactor, to consume newly produced plutonium from reprocessing, similar to the DUPIC (direct use of PWR fuel in CANDU process.

  3. Matrix Characterization of Plutonium Residues by Alpha-Particle Self-Interrogation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Foster, L.A.; Staples, P.

    1998-01-01

    Legacy plutonium residues often have inadequate item descriptions. Nondestructive characterization can help segregate these items for reprocessing or provide information needed for disposal or storage. Alpha particle-induced gamma-ray spectra contain a wealth of information that can be used for matrix characterization. We demonstrate how this information can be used for item identification. Gamma-ray spectra were recorded at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility from a variety of legacy, plutonium-processing residues and product materials. The comparison and analysis of these spectra are presented

  4. Determination of Pu-238 Abundance in a Plutonium Standard by an Advanced Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, P.; Thomas, R.

    2006-12-01

    New developments in thermal ionization mass spectrometers allow for the determination of very small minor isotope ratios. The new hardware and software capabilities require attention to detail and accounting for additional sources of measurement uncertainty. The Pu-238 isotopic composition in New Brunswick Laboratory plutonium metal standard CRM 126-A was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry using combined Faraday cup and ion counting detection. A dynamic acquisition scheme was employed which provided for near real-time mass fractionation correction and ion counter/Faraday detector inter-calibration. Steps taken to minimize or eliminate isobaric U-238 interferences will be described, and an evaluation detailing contributions to the uncertainty, including SEM non-linearity, will be presented.

  5. Extraction of plutonium from lean residues by room temperature fluoride volatility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.M.; Foropoulos, J.; Kennedy, R.C.; Dye, B.A.; Behrens, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The use of dioxygen difluoride (FOOF) and KrF 2 for the recovery of Pu from lean residues by conversion to gaseous PuF 6 is being investigated. The greater stability of PuF 6 at room temperature allows much more extensive removal of Pu from contaminated wastes, when compared to the high temperature fluoride volatility process. The process also requires fewer additive chemicals than aqueous processes, thus minimizing the amount of material that must be disposed of as radioactive waste. The transportability of gaseous PuF 6 allows much of the process to be automated, reducing operator exposure to radiation. Removal of PuF 6 decomposition product is easily facilitated by the use of these fluorinating agents. 9 refs., 8 figs

  6. Hydride-catalyzed corrosion of plutonium by air: Initiation by plutonium monoxide monohydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, T.H.; Haschke, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    Chemistry and kinetics of air reactions with plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH) and with mixtures of the oxide hydride and plutonium metal are defined by results of pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) measurements. Test with specimens prepared by total and partial corrosion of plutonium in 0.05 M sodium chloride solution show that reaction of residual water continues to generate H{sub 2} after liquid water is removed by evacuation. Rapid exposure of PuOH to air at room temperature does not produce a detectable reaction, but similar exposure of a partially corroded metal sample containing Pu and PuOH results in hydride (PuH{sub x})-catalyzed corrosion of the residual Pu. Kinetics of he first-order reaction resulting in formation of the PuH{sub x} catalyst and of the indiscriminate reaction of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} with plutonium metal are defined. The rate of the catalyzed Pu+air reaction is independent of temperature (E{sub a} = 0), varies as the square of air pressure, and equals 0.78 {+-} 0.03 g Pu/cm{sup 2} min in air at one atmosphere. The absence of pyrophoric behavior for PuOH and differences in the reactivities of PuOH and PuOH + Pu mixtures are attributed to kinetic control by gaseous reaction products. Thermodynamic properties of the oxide hydride are estimated, particle size distributions of corrosion products are presented, and potential hazards associated with products formed by aqueous corrosion of plutonium are discussed.

  7. Progress on immobilisation of plutonium residues and shredded plutonium contaminated materials in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landles, A.J.; Awmack, A.F.; Baxter, W.

    1987-03-01

    Laboratory scale experiments have been carried out to study the feasibility of encapsulating plutonium contaminated materials in cement. A proposed grout of a 3:1 PFA/OPC mixture has been tested and some product evaluation carried out. (author)

  8. Calorimetric measurements on plutonium rich (U,Pu)O2 solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandan, R.; Babu, R.; Nagarajan, K.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Enthalpy increments of U (1-y) Pu y O 2 solid solutions with y = 0.45, 0.55 and 0.65 were measured using a high-temperature differential calorimeter by employing the method of inverse drop calorimetry in the temperature range 956-1803 K. From the fit equations for the enthalpy increments, other thermodynamic functions such as heat capacity, entropy and Gibbs energy function have been computed in the temperature range 298-1800 K. The results are presented and compared with the data available in the literature. The results indicate that the enthalpies of U (1-y) Pu y O 2 solid solutions with y = 0.45, 0.55 and 0.65 obey the Neumann-Kopp's molar additivity rule

  9. Radiolysis of Salts and Long-Term Storage Issues for Both Pure and Impure PuO{sub 2} Materials in Plutonium Storage Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lav Tandon

    2000-05-01

    The Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) project sponsored a literature search on the effects of radiation on salts, with focus on alkali chlorides. The goal of the survey was to provide a basis for estimating the magnitude of {alpha} radiation effects on alkali chlorides that can accompany plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) into storage. Chloride radiolysis can yield potentially corrosive gases in plutonium storage containers that can adversely affect long-term stability. This literature search was primarily done to provide a tutorial on this topic, especially for personnel with nonradiation chemistry backgrounds.

  10. Absorption, transport, and chemical fate of plutonium in soybean plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, T.R.; Cataldo, D.A.; Wildung, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Absorption of plutonium (Pu) by soybean plants (Glycine max cv. Williams) is limited by Pu solubility in soils. Changes in Pu concentration in different tissues with time to senescence indicate Pu is freely transported through the xylem during growth but not subject to remobilization on flowering. Studies in which the DTPA complex of 238 Pu was supplied to the plant suggest a change in chemical form following root absorption. Of the Pu in roots, stems, and leaves at senescence, 28, 54, and 67%, respectively, were soluble. The Pu in the solluble fraction was primarily associated with components of >10000 equivalent molecular weight in leaves and roots, whereas stems exhibited an equal distribution between components in the >10000 and <500 molecular weight fractions. Plutonium associated with mature seeds is concentrated in the seed hull (85%) and cotyledons (14%). The Pu associated with the cotyledon was primarily in the insoluble residues and soluble soy whey

  11. Plutonium oxychalcogenides Pu2O2X (X=O, S, Se, Te) crystal chemistry, magnetic and electrical properties. 5f electrons delocalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc.

    1980-05-01

    We have studied the influence of the chalcogen X on the bonding and on the magnetic and electrical properties of the oxychalcogenides Pu 2 O 2 X. These compounds are isostructural with hexagonal La 2 O 3 for X=O, S, Se and with tetragonal La 2 O 2 Te for X=Te. Comparison of Nd 2 O 2 X and Pu 2 O 2 X cell volumes showed that plutonium crystal radius decreases from Pu 2 O 3 through Pu 2 O 2 Te with increasing 5f electrons delocalization and 5f-np overlap. Superexchange interactions through O 2- and X 2- were thought to be responsible for the observed antiferromagnetic ordering. Neel temperatures increase from Pu 2 O 3 through Pu 2 O 2 Te showing that these interactions and subsequent 5f-np covalency are strengthened as chalcogen electronegativity decreases. Hexagonal Pu 2 O 3 is an insulator while the other compounds are semi-conductors with energy gaps around 0.6 eV which were interpreted as the separation between the 6d-7s conduction band and the np valence band. The localized 5f states were located just below the np band, partially overlapping it [fr

  12. Higher plutonium isotopes studies - Results and interpretation of UO2-PuO2 fuel lattices with K close to 1, in the MINERVE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrouzet, Michel; Martin-Deidier, Loic.

    1978-11-01

    The integral measurement of the higher plutonium isotopes reaction rates, and specially of the 240 Pu and 241 Pu reaction rates in spectra that do not differ very much from the spectrum of a fast neutron power reactor, was performed in six lattices with K close to unity. These lattice were investigated in the fast-thermal critical facility ERMINE installed in the reactor MINERVE. Four standard fuels were used: three consisted of depleted uranium and plutonium with different isotopic compositions, and one consisted of enriched uranium oxyde. The fission rates were measured with the help of miniature fission chambers. The capture rates are derived from the comparison of the reactivity balances of the cells in different lattices. These balances were obtained by oscillation measurement of central cell worth [fr

  13. Evolution Of Chemical Conditions And Estimated Plutonium Solubility In The Residual Waste Layer During Post-Closure Aging Of Tank 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, M.

    2012-01-01

    This document updates the Eh-pH transitions from grout aging simulations and the plutonium waste release model of Denham (2007, Rev. 1) based on new data. New thermodynamic data for cementitious minerals are used for the grout simulations. Newer thermodynamic data, recommended by plutonium experts (Plutonium Solubility Peer Review Report, LA-UR-12-00079), are used to estimate solubilities of plutonium at various pore water compositions expected during grout aging. In addition, a new grout formula is used in the grout aging simulations and apparent solubilities of coprecipitated plutonium are estimated using data from analysis of Tank 18 residual waste. The conceptual model of waste release and the grout aging simulations are done in a manner similar to that of Denham (2007, Rev. 1). It is assumed that the pore fluid composition passing from the tank grout into the residual waste layer controls the solubility, and hence the waste release concentration of plutonium. Pore volumes of infiltrating fluid of an assumed composition are reacted with a hypothetical grout block using The Geochemist's Workbench(reg s ign) and changes in pore fluid chemistry correspond to the number of pore fluid volumes reacted. As in the earlier document, this results in three states of grout pore fluid composition throughout the simulation period that are termed Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. The one major difference from the earlier document is that pyrite is used to account for reducing capacity of the tank grout rather than pyrrhotite. This poises Eh at -0.47 volts during Reduced Region II. The major transitions in pore fluid composition are shown. Plutonium solubilities are estimated for discrete PuO2(am,hyd) particles and for plutonium coprecipitated with iron phases in the residual waste. Thermodynamic data for plutonium from the Nuclear Energy Agency are used to estimate the solubilities of the discrete particles for the three stages of pore fluid

  14. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Discovery of the neutron made it easy to create elements which do not exist in nature. One of these is plutonium, and its isotope with mass number 239 has nuclear properties which make it both a good fuel for nuclear power reactors and a good explosive for nuclear weapons. Since it was discovered during a war the latter characteristic was put to use, but it is now evident that use of plutonium in a particular kind of nuclear reactor, the fast breeder reactor, will allow the world's resources of uranium to last for millennia as a major source of energy. Plutonium is very radiotoxic, resembling radium in this respect. Therefore the widespread introduction of fast breeder reactors to meet energy demands can be contemplated only after assurances on two points; that adequate control of the radiological hazard resulting from the handling of very large amounts of plutonium can be guaranteed, and that diversion of plutonium to illicit use can be prevented. The problems exist to a lesser degree already, since all types of nuclear reactor produce some plutonium. Some plutonium has already been dispersed in the environment, the bulk of it from atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons. (author)

  15. Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, William N

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet discusses plutonium from discovery to its production, separation, properties, fabrication, handling, and uses, including use as a reactor fuel and use in isotope power generators and neutron sources.

  16. Stabilization of Rocky Flats combustible residues contaminated with plutonium metal and organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, S.M.; Cisneros, M.R.; Jacobson, L.L.; Schroeder, N.C.; Ames, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes tests on a proposed flowsheet designed to stabilize combustible residues that were generated at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during the machining of plutonium metal. Combustible residues are essentially laboratory trash contaminated with halogenated organic solvents and plutonium metal. The proposed flowsheet, designed by RFETS, follows a glovebox procedure that includes (1) the sorting and shredding of materials, (2) a low temperature thermal desorption of solvents from the combustible materials, (3) an oxidation of plutonium metal with steam, and (4) packaging of the stabilized residues. The role of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in this study was to determine parameters for the low temperature thermal desorption and steam oxidation steps. Thermal desorption of carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) was examined using a heated air stream on a Rocky Flats combustible residue surrogate contaminated with CCl 4 . Three types of plutonium metal were oxidized with steam in a LANL glovebox to determine the effectiveness of this procedure for residue stabilization. The results from these LANL experiments are used to recommend parameters for the proposed RFETS stabilization flowsheet

  17. Formation of plutonium(IV) colloid by the alpha-reduction of aqueous solutions of Pu(V) and Pu(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    We describe concentration changes caused by chemical and alpha-induced radiolytic reactions in various oxidation state pure solutions of Pu(VI), Pu(V), or Pu(IV) colloid or mixtures of these oxidation states at pH values > 1 for a period of nearly two years. The rates of approach to steady-states and the resulting experimental concentration quotient values were determined in order to find the conditions under which equilibrium in 2PuO 2 + + PuO 2 2+ + PuO/sub 2(coll)/ reaction might be attained and to learn about the underlying reactions. Computer calculations were used to compare the data with the results required from proposed reaction schemes

  18. A survey of the Maralinga atomic weapons testing range for residual plutonium contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, W.R.

    1979-06-01

    Residual plutonium levels in soil, flora, fauna and the air of the Maralinga (South Australia) Atomic Weapons Testing Range are presented and discussed. It is shown that only on rare occasions (and possibly never) would the plutonium concentration in air from wind resuspended dust exceed the maximum allowable concentration for continuous exposure of the general public. In the case of artificially resuspended dust, this maximum concentration could be exceeded for short periods, but the accompanying dust level would be such that working conditions would be uncomfortable, if not intolerable. Potential hazards from other possible exposure routes are so low that they are of no consequence

  19. QA Objectives for NDA with the Residues Segmented Gamma Scan Assay System at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WESTSIK, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    The PFP facility utilizes a Segmented Gamma Scanner Assay System (SGSAS) to perform assays on cans of ash for WIPP characterization measurements. This report documents the conformance of SGSAS to the precision and accuracy radioassay QAOs, and reports the minimum detectable concentration (MDC). The QAO measurement runs supplied in this document were for a billet can geometry. The measurements were performed in August 2000. This document covers assays performed until October 27, 2000. The billet cans containing stabilized residues will be loaded into pipe overpack containers (POC) for shipment to WIPP. The WIPP-WAC defines four nominal test levels for NDA, which are in alpha curies and grams of weapons grade (WG) Pu. Due to intended utilization of the SGSAS system for the materials mentioned above, it is presently only being qualified for the two highest QAO ranges. The sources used for the QAO measurements are plutonium standards, which have been calibrated using calorimetry techniques. This report documents the analysis of test data for the SGSAS system at the nominal 10 gram and 160 gram levels. The MDC was determined using a billet can filled with diatomaceous earth but no plutonium present. Since the system is not being qualified for TRU vs low-level waste (LLW) sorting the MDC will primarily provide verification that the detection level for the system is well below the QAO ranges for which the system is being qualified. The MDC reflects the best sensitivity for a particular assay system and specific assay conditions (i.e. count time, sample configuration) when no added radioactivity is present. As such, no radioactive sources were required for the MDC determination. As with the accuracy and precision QAOs, the MDC is valid for the billet cans

  20. Effect of TiO2 additive on the sintering of nuclear fuel (U,Pu)O2. Contribution of surface diffusion to plutonium distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremier, Stephane

    1997-01-01

    This thesis has as objective the study of the effect of TiO 2 additive on the development of MOX fuel microstructure during sintering in reducing atmosphere. To understand better the mechanisms governing the evolution of microstructure, the behavior of UO 2 in the presence of TiO 2 has been established and the influence of the PuO 2 distribution in the initial state of the material was taken into account. The chapter II is devoted to the bibliographic study of the transport mechanisms responsible of the sintering in the ceramics UO 2 and UO 2 -PuO 2 . The results concerning the influence of TiO 2 upon density, grain size and homogenization are discussed. The following chapter describes the characteristics of initial powder, the procedures and installations of heat treatment, as well as the techniques of characterization used. Then the sintering features of UO 2 alone or in the presence of TiO 2 are presented. It appears that in the last case the surface diffusion becomes sufficient fast so that the distribution of the additive occurs naturally during a slow temperature increase. The fifth chapter treats the effect of UO 2 -PuO 2 preparation upon the initial microstructure of the materials and the role played by the PuO 2 grains in sintering. The potentiality of surface diffusion as a means of PuO 2 spreading in the UO 2 is evaluated and correlated with the reduced capacity of sintering the UO 2 ceramics containing PuO 2 . The last chapter deals with the influence of TiO 2 on the development of microstructure in UO 2 -PuO 2 ceramics. While at temperatures below 1500 deg.C the TiO 2 additive affects the surface diffusion and so the plutonium distribution, at values T≥ 1600 deg.C the additive gives rise to a dissolution-reprecipitation process taking place in a intergranular liquid phase appeared between UO 2 , PuO 2 and titanium oxide. Thus the objective is the optimizing the temperature conditions, the oxygen potential as sintering gas and the additive

  1. Plutonium isotopes in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.

    1977-12-01

    Determination of plutonium and americium by ion exchange and alpha-spectrometry. Deposition of global fall-out and accumulated area-content of 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Pu, 242 Pu and 241 Am in central Sweden (62.3 deg N, 12.4 deg E), by using the lichen species Cladonia alpestris as bioindicator. Retention and distribution of plutonium in carpets of lichen and soil. Transfer of plutonium from lichen to reindeer and man. Absorbed dose in reindeer and man from plutonium. Basic studies of plutonium and americium in the western Mediterranean surface waters, with emphases on particulate form of the transuranics. (author)

  2. Stability constants important to the understanding of plutonium in environmental waters, hydroxy and carbonate complexation of PuO2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.A.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1990-01-01

    The formation constants for the reactions PuO 2 + + H 2 O = PuO 2 (OH) + H + and PuO 2 + + CO 3 2 = PuO 2 (CO 3 ) - were determined in aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy. The molar absorptivity of the PuO 2 + band at 569 nm decreased with increasing hydroxide concentration. Similarly, spectral changes occurred between 540 and 580 nm as the carbonate concentration was increased. The absorption data were analyzed by the non-linear least-squares program SQUAD to yield complexation constants. Using the specific ion interaction theory, both complexation constants were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. These thermodynamic complexation constants were combined with the oxidation-reduction potentials of Pu to obtain Eh versus pH diagrams. 120 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs

  3. Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs

  4. Study of the effect of (U{sub 0.8}Pu{sub 0.2})O{sub 2} Uranium-Plutonium mixed fuel fission products on a living organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baimukhanova, Ayagoz; Kim, Dmitriy [Dept. of Radiation Protection, Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Ministry of Energy of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Zhumagulova, Roza; Tazhigulova, Bibnur; Zharaspayeva, Gulzhanar; Azhiyeva, Galiya [Faculty of Engineering Technologies, Infrastructure and Management, International Educational Corporation, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-08-15

    The article describes the results of experiments conducted on pigs to determine the effect of plutonium, which is the most radiotoxic and highly active element in the range of mixed fuel (U{sub 0.8}Pu{sub 0.2})O{sub 2} fission products, on living organisms. The results will allow empirical prediction of the emergency plutonium radiation dose for various organs and tissues of humans in case of an accident in a reactor running on mixed fuel (U{sub 0.8}Pu{sub 0.2})O{sub 2}.

  5. Final report on production of Pu-238 in commercial power reactors: target fabrication, postirradiation examination, and plutonium and neptunium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pobereskin, M.; Langendorfer, W.; Lowry, L.; Farmelo, D.; Scotti, V.; Kruger, O.

    1975-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated in more extensive applications of radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) systems. This raises questions concerning the availability of 238 Pu to supply an expanding demand. The development of much of this demand will depend upon a considerable reduction in cost of 238 Pu. Two neptunia--zirconia--fuel target rods, containing four sections each of different NpO 2 concentrations, were irradiated in the Connecticut Yankee Reactor for approximately one year. Following irradiation both target rods were subjected to nondestructive examination. One rod was chosen for destructive testing and analysis. Post-irradiation chemical analyses included total Pu and Np, ppM 236 Pu/ 238 Pu, and Pu isotopic abundance. The results of these analyses and of electron microprobe analysis which provided the relative Pu concentration across the pellet diameters are tabulated. It was concluded that the feasibility of all operations involved in the production of 238 Pu by irradiation of 237 NpO 2 targets in commercial nuclear power reactors was demonstrated and that the demonstration should be extended to a pilot-scale leading to installation of a full production capacity. (U.S.)

  6. The Raman fingerprint of plutonium dioxide: Some example applications for the detection of PuO2 in host matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manara, D; Naji, M.; Mastromarino, S.; Elorrieta, J. M.; Magnani, Nicola; Martel, L.; Colle, J-Y

    2018-01-01

    Some example applications are presented, in which the peculiar Raman fingerprint of PuO2 can be used for the detection of crystalline Pu4+ with cubic symmetry in an oxide environment in various host materials, like mixed oxide fuels, inert matrices and corium sub-systems.

  7. Minimization of the volume and Pu content of the waste generated at a plutonium fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, H.

    1992-01-01

    The amounts of waste generated during 1987, 1989 and a past reference period have been reported in great detail. The main conclusions which can be drawn from these figures are: (i) for all kinds of waste, the waste-to-product ratio has decreased very substantially during the past few years. This reduction results partly from a scale effect, i.e. the better load factor of the plant, and partly from Belgonucleare's continuous effort to minimize the radioactive waste arisings; (ii) the ratio of the Pu content of the waste to the total Pu throughput of the plant has also decreased substantially; (iii) the mean Pu content of the solid Pu contaminated waste equals 1.39 g Pu per unit volume of 25 l. Only for a small fraction of this waste (<5% by volume) does the Pu content exceed 5 g per unit volume of 25 l; (iv) even after the implementation of waste reducing measures, some 45% of the solid Pu contaminated waste is generated by operations which involve the handling and transfer of powders. Finally, some 63% of the total amount of Pu in the waste can be imputed to these operations

  8. Completion of Milestone 2.2.4.2.2/FY01/A ''Completion of Mechanical Assembly of PuCTF in the Plutonium Facility''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brummond, W; Armantrout, G

    2001-01-01

    The subject milestone was completed on March 1st. This milestone signifies the completion the mechanical installation and assembly of PuCTF in room 1345 in the LLNT Plutonium Facility. This installation included equipment both in room 1345 and in the loft, As reported in the last milestone, ''LLNL Pu Facility space prepared for installation of PUCTF'', milestone 6.2.2/Fy00/c, steel plates had been installed on the floor to support the PuCTF glovebox and equipment. The steel plate system was a substantial help in completing the mechanical installation reported here. The glovebox sections were brought into the room and attached together. Temporary seismic tie-down straps were used to brace the assembly. This temporary tie-down also provided Flexibility for alignment and adjustment. The internal equipment, (attritors, granulator, press feed shoe and die set, furnace, robot and powder transport system) were subsequently installed. The glovebox was then welded to the steel plates for permanent seismic anchoring. The control racks were attached to the floor and are ready for wiring and the press hydraulic power unit has been installed in the loft

  9. Status of plutonium recycle from mixed oxide fuel fabrication wastes (U,Pu)O2 facility activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada, Calixto A.; Adelfang, Pablo; Greiner, G.; Orlando, Oscar S.; Mathot, Sergio R.

    1999-01-01

    Within the specific subject of mixed oxides corresponding to the Fuel Cycle activities performed at CNEA, the recovery of plutonium from wastes originated during tests and pre-fabrication stages is performed. (author)

  10. The Raman fingerprint of plutonium dioxide: Some example applications for the detection of PuO2 in host matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, D.; Naji, M.; Mastromarino, S.; Elorrieta, J. M.; Magnani, N.; Martel, L.; Colle, J.-Y.

    2018-02-01

    Some example applications are presented, in which the peculiar Raman fingerprint of PuO2 can be used for the detection of crystalline Pu4+ with cubic symmetry in an oxide environment in various host materials, like mixed oxide fuels, inert matrices and corium sub-systems. The PuO2 Raman fingerprint was previously observed to consist of one main T2g vibrational mode at 478 cm-1 and two crystal electric field transition lines at 2130 cm-1 and 2610 cm-1. This particular use of Raman spectroscopy is promising for applications in nuclear waste management, safety and safeguard.

  11. Rebaselining of the plutonium residue elimination project at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailor, W.C.; Catlett, D.S.; Burns, T.P. [and others

    1997-03-01

    Systems Engineering and Value Engineering principles were put into practice in rebaselining the Pu Residue Stabilization and Elimination Project at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Tradeoff studies were conducted as to how to best rebaseline the system under the new Safeguards Termination Limits (STSs) issued by the Department of Energy. Through the use of a computerized database, the means by which Stakeholder values and other high-level requirements have been included in the tradeoff studies were documented. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Quality Assurance Objectives for Nondestructive Assay with the Residues Segmented Gamma Scan Assay System at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WESTSIK, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    The PFP facility utilizes a Segmented Gamma Scanner Assay System (SGSAS) to perform assays on cans of ash for WIPP characterization measurements. This report documents the conformance of SGSAS to the precision and accuracy radioassay QAOs, and reports the minimum detectable concentration (MDC). The QAO measurement runs supplied in this document were for a billet can geometry. The billet cans containing stabilized residues will be loaded into pipe overpack containers (POC) for shipment to WIPP. The measurements were performed in March, 2001 following a system reconfiguration which occurred on October 27, 2000. The actual system recalibration was performed in March 2001. The new calibration will be used for all assay data collected after October 27, 2000. No parameter changes have been made and the system has been in measurement control during this period of time. The WIPP-WAC defines four nominal test levels for NDA, which are in alpha curies and grams of weapons grade (WG) Pu. Due to intended utilization of the SGSAS system for the materials mentioned above, it is presently only being qualified for the two highest QAO ranges. The sources used for the QAO measurement are the WPP NDA Performance Demonstration Project working reference materials. This report documents the analysis of test data for the SGSAS system at the nominal 10 gram and 160 gram levels. The MDC was determined using a billet can filled with diatomaceous earth but no plutonium present. Since the system is not being qualified for TRU vs low-level waste (LLW) sorting the MDC will primarily provide verification that the detection level for the system is well below the QAO ranges for which the system is being qualified. The MDC reflects the best sensitivity for a particular assay system and specific assay conditions (i.e. count time, sample configuration) when no added radioactivity is present. As such, no radioactive sources were required for the MDC determination. As with the accuracy and precision

  13. Plutonium in coniferous forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, A.; Kostiainen, E.

    2002-01-01

    Our aim was to study the uptake of plutonium by trees, undervegetation and some wild foods. The ratio of 238 Pu/ 239,240 Pu in soil samples was determined for comparisons of the fallout origin. In twelve years the Chernobyl derived plutonium has not reached the mineral soil. This refers to a very slow downward migration in podsolic soil. The study confirmed also the low Pu uptake by vegetation and an insignificant contribution to human doses through wild foods. (au)

  14. Toxicology of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    Data are reviewed from studies on the toxicity of Pu in experimental animals. Of the several plutonium isotopes, only 238 Pu and 239 Pu have been studied well. Sufficient results have been obtained to show that the behavior of 238 Pu in biological systems and the resulting biological effects cannot be precisely predicted from studies of 239 Pu. This probably applies also to other radiologically important plutonium isotopes which have half-lives ranging from 45 days to 10 7 years and decay by β-emission, electron capture, and spontaneous fission, as well as by emission of α-particles. All the biological effects of plutonium described in this review are attributed to alpha-particle radiation emitted by the plutonium. However, since plutonium is a chemically active heavy metal, one cannot ignore the possibility of chemical toxicity of the low-specific-activity isotopes, 239 Pu, 242 Pu, and 244 Pu. The preponderance of our knowledge of plutonium toxicology has come from short-term studies of relatively high dosage levels in several animal species. The consequences of high-level internal exposures can be predicted with confidence in experimental animals and probably also in man. However, considering the care with which plutonium is handled in the nuclear industry, a high-level contamination event is unlikely. Considerably less is known about the long-term effects of low levels of contamination. (250 references) (U.S.)

  15. Geochemical association of plutonium in marine sediments from Palomares (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.P.; Gasco, C.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Pujol, L.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical association of plutonium in sediments from the marine ecosystem of Palomares has been studied. A sequential leaching technique using selective extractants has been employed to determine the percentages of Pu in the following forms: (a) readily available, (b) exchangeable and adsorbed to specific sites, (c) associated with organic matter, (d) sesquioxides, (e) residual. Plutonium was found to be associated mainly with phases (c), (d) and (e), and therefore, appears to be relatively immobile and not readily available to bottom feeding biota. The effect of different source terms on Pu distribution is also discussed. (orig.)

  16. Form And Aging Of Plutonium In Savannah River Site Waste Tank 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, D.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the effects of aging on and the expected forms of plutonium in Tank 18 waste residues. The findings are based on available information on the operational history of Tank 18, reported analytical results for samples taken from Tank 18, and the available scientific literature for plutonium under alkaline conditions. These findings should apply in general to residues in other waste tanks. However, the operational history of other waste tanks should be evaluated for specific conditions and unique operations (e.g., acid cleaning with oxalic acid) that could alter the form of plutonium in heel residues. Based on the operational history of other tanks, characterization of samples from the heel residues in those tanks would be appropriate to confirm the form of plutonium. During the operational period and continuing with the residual heel removal periods, Pu(IV) is the dominant oxidation state of the plutonium. Small fractions of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) could be present as the result of the presence of water and the result of reactions with oxygen in air and products from the radiolysis of water. However, the presence of Pu(V) would be transitory as it is not stable at the dilute alkaline conditions that currently exists in Tank 18. Most of the plutonium that enters Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) tanks is freshly precipitated as amorphous plutonium hydroxide, Pu(OH) 4(am) or hydrous plutonium oxide, PuO 2(am,hyd) and coprecipitated within a mixture of hydrous metal oxide phases containing metals such as iron, aluminum, manganese and uranium. The coprecipitated plutonium would include Pu 4+ that has been substituted for other metal ions in crystal lattice sites, Pu 4+ occluded within hydrous metal oxide particles and Pu 4+ adsorbed onto the surface of hydrous metal oxide particles. The adsorbed plutonium could include both inner sphere coordination and outer sphere coordination of the plutonium. PuO 2(am,hyd) is also likely to be

  17. Pu(V) and Pu(IV) sorption to montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Zhao, Pihong; Tumey, Scott J; Powell, Brian; Kersting, Annie B

    2013-05-21

    Plutonium (Pu) adsorption to and desorption from mineral phases plays a key role in controlling the environmental mobility of Pu. Here we assess whether the adsorption behavior of Pu at concentrations used in typical laboratory studies (≥10(-10) [Pu] ≤ 10(-6) M) are representative of adsorption behavior at concentrations measured in natural subsurface waters (generally diaspore, and quartz) found that minerals containing significant Fe and Mn (hematite, goethite, magnetite, and groutite) adsorbed Pu(V) faster than those which did not, highlighting the potential importance of minerals with redox couples in increasing the rate of Pu(V) removal from solution.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of crystalline phosphates of plutonium(III) and plutonium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, C.E.; Haire, R.G.; Hellwege, H.E.; Begun, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    The formation of both PuPO 4 and PuP 2 O 7 from reactions of PuO 2 with (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 or BPO 4 was studied by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The oxidation of plutonium(III), in PuPO 4 , to plutonium(IV), in PuP 2 O 7 by air in the presence of BPO 4 and the thermal reduction of PuP 2 O 7 to PuPO 4 were demonstrated. In addition plutonium(III) trimetaphosphate Pu(PO 3 ) 3 was synthesized and characterized. Attempts to prepare plutonium(IV) orthophosphate, Pu 3 (PO 4 ) 4 , by high temperature reactions were unsuccessful; instead, mixtures of PuP 2 O 7 and a new phase identified tentatively as (PuO) 2 P 2 O 7 were obtained. (Auth.)

  19. Aerosol Physics Considerations for Using Cerium Oxide CeO2 as a Surrogate for Plutonium Oxide PuO2 in Airborne Release Fraction Measurements for Storage Container Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tao, Yong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-16

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) dust is recommended as a surrogate for plutonium oxide (PuO2) in airborne release fraction experiments. The total range of applicable particle sizes for PuO2 extends from 0.0032 μm (the diameter of a single PuO2 molecule) to 10 μm (the defined upper boundary for respirable particles). For particulates with a physical particle diameter of 1.0 μm, the corresponding aerodynamic diameters for CeO2 and PuO2 are 2.7 μm and 3.4 μm, respectively. Cascade impactor air samplers are capable of measuring the size distributions of CeO2 or PuO2 particulates. In this document, the aerodynamic diameters for CeO2 and PuO2 were calculated for seven different physical diameters (0.0032, 0.02, 0.11, 0.27, 1.0, 3.2, and 10 μm). For cascade impactor measurements, CeO2 and PuO2 particulates with the same physical diameter would be collected onto the same or adjacent collection substrates. The difference between the aerodynamic diameter of CeO2 and PuO2 particles (that have the same physical diameter) is 39% of the resolution of a twelve-stage MSP Inc. 125 cascade impactor, and 34% for an eight-stage Andersen impactor. An approach is given to calculate the committed effective dose (CED) coefficient for PuO2 aerosol particles, compared to a corresponding aerodynamic diameter of CeO2 particles. With this approach, use of CeO2 as a surrogate for PuO2 material would follow a direct conversion based on a molar equivalent. In addition to the analytical information developed for this document, several US national labs have published articles about the use of CeO2 as a PuO2 surrogate. Different physical and chemical aspects were considered by these investigators, including thermal properties, ceramic formulations, cold pressing, sintering, molecular reactions, and mass loss in high temperature gas flows. All of those US national lab studies recommended the use of CeO2 as a surrogate material for PuO2.

  20. Plutonium spectrophotometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Cassaniti, P.; Orosco, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    Plutonium ions in solution have absorption spectra so different that it is possible to use them for analytical purposes. Detailed studies have been performed in nitric solutions. Some very convenient methods for the determination of plutonium and its oxidation states, especially the ratios Pu(III):Pu(IV) and Pu(IV):Pu(VI) in a mixture of both, have been developed. These methods are described in this paper, including: a) Absorption spectra for plutonium (III), (IV), (VI) and mixtures. b) Relative extinction coefficients for the above mentioned species. c) Dependences of the relative extinction coefficients on the nitric acid concentration and the plutonium VI deviation from the Beer-Lambert law. The developed methods are simple and rapid and then, suitable in process control. Accuracy is improved when relative absorbance measurements are performed or controlled the variables which have effect on the spectra and extinction coefficients. (Author) [es

  1. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2005-04-18

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH){sub 3}(s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop

  2. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, H. Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2005-01-01

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and 60 Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH) 3 (s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop Pu

  3. Actinide Oxidation State and O/M Ratio in Hypostoichiometric Uranium-Plutonium-Americium U0.750Pu0.246Am0.004O2-x Mixed Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauchy, Romain; Belin, Renaud C; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Lebreton, Florent; Aufore, Laurence; Scheinost, Andreas C; Martin, Philippe M

    2016-03-07

    Innovative americium-bearing uranium-plutonium mixed oxides U1-yPuyO2-x are envisioned as nuclear fuel for sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors (SFRs). The oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio, directly related to the oxidation state of cations, affects many of the fuel properties. Thus, a thorough knowledge of its variation with the sintering conditions is essential. The aim of this work is to follow the oxidation state of uranium, plutonium, and americium, and so the O/M ratio, in U0.750Pu0.246Am0.004O2-x samples sintered for 4 h at 2023 K in various Ar + 5% H2 + z vpm H2O (z = ∼ 15, ∼ 90, and ∼ 200) gas mixtures. The O/M ratios were determined by gravimetry, XAS, and XRD and evidenced a partial oxidation of the samples at room temperature. Finally, by comparing XANES and EXAFS results to that of a previous study, we demonstrate that the presence of uranium does not influence the interactions between americium and plutonium and that the differences in the O/M ratio between the investigated conditions is controlled by the reduction of plutonium. We also discuss the role of the homogeneity of cation distribution, as determined by EPMA, on the mechanisms involved in the reduction process.

  4. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, A.G.; Smith, F.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for separating plutonium from uranium and fission products by treating a nitrate solution of fission products, uranium, and hexavalent plutonium with a relatively water-insoluble fluoride to adsorb fission products on the fluoride, treating the residual solution with a reducing agent for plutonium to reduce its valence to four and less, treating the reduced plutonium solution with a relatively insoluble fluoride to adsorb the plutonium on the fluoride, removing the solution, and subsequently treating the fluoride with its adsorbed plutonium with a concentrated aqueous solution of at least one of a group consisting of aluminum nitrate, ferric nitrate, and manganous nitrate to remove the plutonium from the fluoride.

  5. Plutonium-236 traces determination in plutonium-238 by α spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena, M.L.; Pottier, R.; Berger, R.

    1969-01-01

    Two methods are described in this report for the determination of plutonium-236 traces in plutonium-238 by a spectrometry using semi-conductor detectors. The first method involves a direct comparison of the areas under the peaks of the α spectra of plutonium-236 and plutonium-238. The electrolytic preparation of the sources is carried out after preliminary purification of the plutonium. The second method makes it possible to determine the 236 Pu/ 238 Pu ratio by comparing the areas of the α peaks of uranium-232 and uranium-234, which are the decay products of the two plutonium isotopes respectively. The uranium in the source, also deposited by electrolysis, is separated from a 1 mg amount of plutonium either by a T.L.A. extraction, or by the use of ion-exchange resins. The report ends with a discussion of the results obtained with plutonium of two different origins. (authors) [fr

  6. Recovery of plutonium from HEPA filters by Ce(IV)-promoted dissolution of PuO2 and recycle of the cerium promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuze, R.E.; Bond, W.D.; Scheitlin, F.M.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental studies carried out included (1) the electrolytic production of Ce(IV) from Ce(III), (2) the leaching of refractory PuO 2 from HEPA filter materials with maintenance of Ce(IV) concentrations by anodic oxidation during leaching, and (3) evaluation of methods for contacting the HEPA solids with the leaching solution and for separating the solid residue from the leaching liquor. Anodic oxidation of Ce(III) was accomplished with an electric current efficiency of about 85% at current densities of 0.04 to 0.4 A/dm 2 at a platinum anode. Refractory PuO 2 was dissolved by a 4.0 M HNO 3 - 0.1 M Ce(IV) solution in 1.5 h at 100 0 C using stirred-contact leaching of the solids or by recirculating the leachant through a packed column of the solids. Cerium (IV) concentrations were maintained continuously by anodic oxidation throughout leaching. Dissolution times up to 10 h were required unless the HEPA media were oxidized initially in air at 300 0 C to destroy carbonaceous species which consumed Ce(IV) more rapidly than it could be regenerated by anodic oxidation. Leaching solids in packed columns avoided the relatively difficult liquid-solids separation by centrifugation which was required after stirred-contact leaching; however, the solids handling difficulties associated with charging and discharging of the packed columns in a remote environment remain a significant design obstacle. A chemical flowsheet is proposed for the recovery of actinides from HEPA filters. A 4 M HNO 3 - 0.1 M Ce(IV) nitrate solution is used as the leachant and the Ce(III) is recycled to the leaching operation using bidentate solvent extraction

  7. PLUTONIUM ELECTROREFINING CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, L.J. Jr.; Leary, J.A.; Bjorklund, C.W.; Maraman, W.J.

    1963-07-16

    Electrorefining cells for obtaining 99.98% plutonium are described. The cells consist of an impure liquid plutonium anode, a molten PuCl/sub 3/-- alkali or alkaline earth metal chloanode, a molten PuCl/sub 3/-alkali or alkaline earth metal chloride electrolyte, and a nonreactive cathode, all being contained in nonreactive ceramic containers which separate anode from cathode by a short distance and define a gap for the collection of the purified liquid plutonium deposited on the cathode. Important features of these cells are the addition of stirrer blades on the anode lead and a large cathode surface to insure a low current density. (AEC)

  8. Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Moretti, E.S.; Austin, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the effect of the oxidation state of plutonium on its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. For mice and rats that have been starved prior to gastrointestinal administration, there is no significant difference between the absorption factors for Pu(IV) and Pu(VI). The value obtained for Pu(VI) is an order of magnitude lower than that reported previously. The value obtained for Pu(IV) is two orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously for nitrate solutions and the same as those reported for citrate solutions

  9. Modifications to LLNL Plutonium Packaging Systems (PuPS) to achieve ASME VIII UW-13.2(d) Requirements for the DOE Standard 3013-00 Outer Can Weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, D; Dodson, K

    2001-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Packaging System (PuPS) prepares packages to meet the DOE Standard 3013 (Reference 1). The PuPS equipment was supplied by the British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL). The DOE Standard 3013 requires that the welding of the Outer Can meets ASME Section VIII Division 1 (Reference 2). ASME Section VIII references to ASME Section IX (Reference 3) for most of the welding requirements, but UW-13.2 (d) of Section VIII requires a certain depth and width of the weld. In this document the UW-13.2(d) requirement is described as the (a+b)/2t s ratio. This ratio has to be greater than or equal to one to meet the requirements of UW-13.2(d). The Outer Can welds had not been meeting this requirement. Three methods are being followed to resolve this issue: (1) Modify the welding parameters to achieve the requirement, (2) Submit a weld case to ASME that changes the UW-13.2(d) requirement for their review and approval, and (3) Change the requirements in the DOE-STD-3013. Each of these methods are being pursued. This report addresses how the first method was addressed for the LLNL PuPS. The experimental work involved adjusting the Outer Can rotational speed and the power applied to the can. These adjustments resulted in being able to achieve the ASME VIII, UW-13.2(d) requirement

  10. CSER 00-006 Storage of Plutonium Residue Containers in 55 Gallon Drums at the PFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOBBIN, K.D.

    2000-05-24

    This criticality safety evaluation report (CSER) provides the required limit set and controls for safe transit and storage of these drums in the 234-5Z Building at the PFP. A mass limit of 200 g of plutonium or fissile equivalent per drum is acceptable

  11. Preparation and characterisation of ammonium plutonium (III) sulphate tetrahydrate NH4Pu(SO4)2.4H2O (Preprint No. AL.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, P.N.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    Ammonium plutonium (III) sulphate tetrahydrate has been prepared and characterised by chemical and thermal analysis. X-ray powder diffraction studies showed the compound to be isostructural to ammonium samarium sulphate tetrahydrate. (author)

  12. Molten salt extraction (MSE) of americium from plutonium metal in CaCl2-KCl-PuCl3 and CaCl2-PuCl3 salt systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    Molten salt extraction (MSE) of americium-241 from reactor-grade plutonium has been developed using plutonium trichloride salt in stationary furnaces. Batch runs with oxidized and oxide-free metal have been conducted at temperature ranges between 750 and 945C, and plutonium trichloride concentrations from one to one hundred mole percent. Salt-to-metal ratios of 0.10, 0.15, and 0 30 were examined. The solvent salt was either eutectic 74 mole percent CaCl 2 endash 26 mole percent KCl or pure CaCl 2 . Evidence of trivalent product americium, and effects of temperature, salt-to-metal ratio, and oxide contamination on the americium extraction efficiency are given. 24 refs, 20 figs, 13 tabs

  13. Analysis of {sup 236}U and plutonium isotopes, {sup 239,240}Pu, on the 1 MV AMS system at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, as a potential tool in oceanography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamizo, Elena; López-Lora, Mercedes [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (Universidad de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Junta de Andalucía), Thomas Alva Edison 7, 41092 Seville (Spain); Villa, María [Departamento de Física Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 4A, 41012 Seville (Spain); Servicio de Radioisótopos, Centro de Investigación, Tecnología e Innovación, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 4B, 41012 Seville (Spain); Casacuberta, Núria [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zürich, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); López-Gutiérrez, José María [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (Universidad de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Junta de Andalucía), Thomas Alva Edison 7, 41092 Seville (Spain); Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica, Universidad de Sevilla, Virgen de África 7, 41011 Seville (Spain); Pham, Mai Khanh [IAEA-Environment Laboratories, Monte Carlo 98000 (Monaco)

    2015-10-15

    The performance of the 1 MV AMS system at the CNA (Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Seville, Spain) for {sup 236}U and {sup 239,240}Pu measurements has been extensively investigated. A very promising {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U abundance sensitivity of about 3 × 10{sup −11} has been recently achieved, and background figures for {sup 239}Pu of about 10{sup 6} atoms were reported in the past. These promising results lead to the use of conventional low energy AMS systems for the analysis of {sup 236}U and {sup 239}Pu and its further application in environmental studies. First {sup 236}U results obtained on our AMS system for marine samples (sediments and water) are presented here. Results of two new IAEA reference materials (IAEA-410 and IAEA-412, marine sediments from Pacific Ocean) are reported. The obtained {sup 236}U/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, of 0.12 and 0.022, respectively, show a dependency with the contamination source (i.e. local fallout from the US tests performed at the Bikini Atoll and general fallout). The results obtained for a third IAEA reference material (IAEA-381, seawater from the Irish Sea), are also presented. In the following, the uranium and plutonium isotopic compositions obtained on a set of 5 intercomparison seawater samples from the Arctic Ocean provided by the ETH Zürich are discussed. By comparing them with the obtained results on the 600 kV AMS facility Tandy at the ETH Zürich, we demonstrate the solidity of the CNA technique for {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U determinations at, at least, 7 × 10{sup −10} level. Finally, these results are discussed in their environmental context.

  14. Stability constants important to the understanding of plutonium in environmental waters, hydroxy and carbonate complexation of PuO2+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Dianne Angelo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1990-04-20

    The formation constants for the reactions PuO2+ + H2O = PuO2(OH) + H+ and PuO2+ + CO32- = PuO2(CO3)- were determined in aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy. The molar absorptivity of the PuO2+ band at 569 nm decreased with increasing hydroxide concentration. Similarly, spectral changes occurred between 540 and 580 nm as the carbonate concentration was increased. The absorption data were analyzed by the non-linear least-squares program SQUAD to yield complexation constants. Using the specific ion interaction theory, both complexation constants were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. These thermodynamic complexation constants were combined with the oxidation-reduction potentials of Pu to obtain Eh versus pH diagrams.

  15. Real-time monitoring of plutonium content in uranium-plutonium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shelly Xiaowei; Westphal, Brian Robert; Herrmann, Steven Douglas

    2015-09-01

    A method and device for the real-time, in-situ monitoring of Plutonium content in U--Pu Alloys comprising providing a crucible. The crucible has an interior non-reactive to a metallic U--Pu alloy within said interior of said crucible. The U--Pu alloy comprises metallic uranium and plutonium. The U--Pu alloy is heated to a liquid in an inert or reducing atmosphere. The heated U--Pu alloy is then cooled to a solid in an inert or reducing atmosphere. As the U--Pu alloy is cooled, the temperature of the U--Pu alloy is monitored. A solidification temperature signature is determined from the monitored temperature of the U--Pu alloy during the step of cooling. The amount of Uranium and the amount of Plutonium in the U--Pu alloy is then determined from the determined solidification temperature signature.

  16. Density of Plutonium Turnings Generated from Machining Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, John Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vigil, Duane M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jachimowski, Thomas A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Archuleta, Alonso [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Arellano, Gerald Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Melton, Vince Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-20

    The purpose of this project was to determine the density of plutonium (Pu) turnings generated from the range of machining activities, using both surrogate material and machined Pu turnings. Verify that 500 grams (g) of plutonium will fit in a one quart container using a surrogate equivalent volume and that 100 grams of Pu will fit in a one quart Savy container.

  17. Direct conversion of plutonium metal, scrap, residue, and transuranic waste to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Malling, J.F.; Rudolph, J.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the direct conversion of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids to borosilicate glass has been invented. The process is called the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS). Traditional glass-making processes can convert only oxide materials to glass. However, many wastes contain complex mixtures of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids. Conversion of such mixtures to oxides followed by their conversion to glass is often impractical. GMODS may create a practical method to convert such mixtures to glass. Plutonium-containing materials (PCMS) exist in many forms, including metals, ceramics, organics, amorphous solids, and mixtures thereof. These PCMs vary from plutonium metal to filters made of metal, organic binders, and glass fibers. For storage and/or disposal of PCMS, it is desirable to convert PCMs to borosilicate glass. Borosilicate glass is the preferred repository waste form for high-level waste (HLW) because of its properties. PCMs converted to a transuranic borosilicate homogeneous glass would easily pass all waste acceptance and storage criteria. Conversion of PCMs to a glass would also simplify safeguards by conversion of heterogeneous PCMs to homogeneous glass. Thermodynamic calculations and proof-of-principle experiments on the GMODS process with cerium (plutonium surrogate), uranium, stainless steel, aluminum, Zircaloy-2, and carbon were successfully conducted. Initial analysis has identified potential flowsheets and equipment. Major unknowns remain, but the preliminary data suggests that GMODS may be a major new treatment option for PCMs

  18. The determination of Plutonium content in urine using anion exchange resin method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukh-Syaifudin

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of internal contamination by plutonium is usually determined through urine analysis. The technique involved the co-precipitation of plutonium with rhodizonic acid by the addition of sodium hydroxide, the re-extraction of Pu into concentrated HCl, dissolution of Pu in 8 N HCI + Cl 2 solution, and the purification of plutonium through AGI-X8 anion exchange resin in columns with a diameter of 4 and 7 mm. The eluent was evaporated and the residu was dissolved in 8 N HCI and then deposited directly onto a Lexan slide or electrodeposited onto a stainless steel disc and the alpha emission of Pu was counted by using alpha spectrometry. The results showed that the recoveries of Pu-242 tracer by using column 7 mm and direct deposition and electrodeposition methods were 28.783% and 16.444%, respectively. The recoveries of Pu-242 by using column 4 mm and direct deposition and electrodeposition methods were 64.834% and 55.661%, respectively. From the percentage of recovery, it can be concluded that the direct deposition method was relatively better than the electrodeposition method. The recovery of Pu-242 by using column of 4 mm in diameter was higher than that of column 7 mm

  19. Reversed phase chromatographic behaviour of Pu (III), Pu (IV) and Pu (VI) in presence of α-hydroxyisobutyric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaison, P.G.; Telmore, V.M.; Kumar, Pranaw

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the aqueous chemistry of plutonium is important in process conditions as well as in environmental conditions. Since plutonium possesses multiple oxidation states which can coexist in solution, a reliable method for the identification of these oxidation states is essential to understand its physical and chemical processes. The identification of plutonium oxidation states is conventionally determined through a series of liquid-liquid extraction procedures using selective extractants. Spectroscopic and laser based techniques also have been used for the identification of its oxidation state in solutions. Liquid chromatographic behavior of different oxidation states of Pu and other actinide ions is reported to correlate their retention behaviour with stability constants. Objective of the present work is to study the reversed phase chromatography behavior of the three oxidation states of plutonium viz. Pu(III), Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) in presence of á-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA) as an eluent

  20. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  1. Precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and calcination to plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Orosco, E.H.; Cassaniti, P.; Greco, L.; Adelfang, P.

    1989-01-01

    The plutonium based fuel fabrication requires the conversion of the plutonium nitrate solution from nuclear fuel reprocessing into pure PuO2. The conversion method based on the precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and subsequent calcination has been studied in detail. In this procedure, plutonium (III) oxalate is precipitated, at room temperature, by the slow addition of 1M oxalic acid to the feed solution, containing from 5-100 g/l of plutonium in 1M nitric acid. Before precipitation, the plutonium is adjusted to trivalent state by addition of 1M ascorbic acid in the presence of an oxidation inhibitor such as hydrazine. Finally, the precipitate is calcinated at 700 deg C to obtain PuO2. A flowsheet is proposed in this paper including: a) A study about the conditions to adjust the plutonium valence. b) Solubility data of plutonium (III) oxalate and measurements of plutonium losses to the filtrate and wash solution. c) Characterization of the obtained products. Plutonium (III) oxalate has several potential advantages over similar conversion processes. These include: 1) Formation of small particle sizes powder with good pellets fabrication characteristics. 2) The process is rather insensitive to most process variables, except nitric acid concentration. 3) Ambient temperature operations. 4) The losses of plutonium to the filtrate are less than in other conversion processes. (Author) [es

  2. Purification of 238PuO2 scrap for heat source fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, L.D.; Purdy, G.M.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ramsey, K.; Silver, G.L.; Espinoza, J.; Rinehart, G.H.

    1997-10-01

    The Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a development program to recover and purify plutonium-238 oxide from impure feed sources in a glove box environment. A glove box line has been designed and a chemistry flowsheet developed to perform this recovery task at large scale. The initial demonstration effort focused on purification of 238 PuO 2 fuel by HNO 3 /HF dissolution, followed by plutonium(III) oxalate precipitation and calcination to an oxide. Decontamination factors for most impurities of concern in the fuel were very good, producing 238 PuO 2 fuel significantly better in purity than specified by General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fuel powder specifications. A sufficient quantity of purified 238 PuO 2 fuel was recovered from the process to allow fabrication of a GPHS unit for testing. The results are encouraging for recycle of relatively impure plutonium-238 oxide and scrap residue items into fuel for useful applications. The high specific activity of plutonium-238 magnifies the consequences and concerns of radioactive waste generation. This work places an emphasis on development of waste minimization technologies to complement the aqueous processing operation. Results from experiments on neutralized solutions of plutonium-238 resulted in decontamination to about 1 millicurie/L. Combining ultrafiltration treatment with addition of a water soluble polymer designed to coordinate Pu, allowed solutions to be decontaminated to about 1 microcurie/L. Efforts continue to develop a capability for efficient, safe, cost effective, and environmentally acceptable methods to recover and purify 238 PuO 2 fuel

  3. The toxicity of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Shipments of plutonium occasionally pass around the Cape coastal waters on its way to Japan from Europe. This invariably leads to a great deal of speculation of the dangers involved and of the extreme toxicity of plutonium, with the media and environmental groups claiming that (a) plutonium is the most toxic substance known to man, and that (b) a few kilograms of plutonium ground finely and dispersed in the atmosphere could kill every human being on earth. Comparisons with other poisons are drawn, e.g. common inorganic chemicals and biological agents. The original scare around the extraordinary toxicity of Pu seems to have started in 1974 with the claims of Tamplin and Cochran's hot particle theory about plutonium lodging in the sensitive portions of the lungs in small concentrated aggregates where they are much more effective in producing cancers. This theory, however, is regarded as thoroughly discredited by the experts in the field of radiotoxicity. 8 refs

  4. Contamination of living environment and human organism with plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, J.

    1981-01-01

    The applicability of 239 Pu in nuclear power is discussed. The radiotoxic properties of plutonium, its tissue distribution and the effects of internal and external contamination are described. The contamination of the atmosphere, water, and soil with plutonium isotopes is discussed. Dosimetry is described of plutonium in the living and working environments as is plutonium determination in the human organism. (H.S.)

  5. Research Program to Determine Redox Reactions and Their Effects on Speciation and Mobility of Plutonium in DOE Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.; Rai, D.

    2000-01-01

    Plutonium in geologic matrices undergoes a variety of complex reactions which complicate its environmental behavior. These complexities in plutonium chemistry whereby a large variety of precipitation, dissolution, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions control plutonium speciation and concentrations, result in the need for a rather large amount of reliable, fundamental data to predict Pu behavior in geologic media. These data are also needed for evaluation of remediation strategies that involve removing most of the contaminants by selective methods, followed by in situ immobilization of residual contaminants. Two areas were studied during this project: (1) thermodynamic data for Th(IV) and Pu(IV) complexes of EDTA and for Pu(V) interactions with chloride; (2) kinetic data for redox reactions of Pu in the presence of common redox agents (e.g., H 2 O 2 , MnO 2 , and NaOCl) encountered under waste disposal conditions. These studies are relevant to understanding Pu behavior in wastes disposed of in diverse geologic conditions (e.g., at the WIPP and YUCCA Mountain repositories and in contaminated sediments at many different DOE sites) and also for developing effective remediation strategies (e.g., processing of high level waste tanks). These studies have yielded data to address redox reactions of plutonium in the presence of environmentally important agents (e.g. organic and inorganic oxidants/reductants)

  6. Report of an investigation into deterioration of the Plutonium Fuel Form Fabrication Facility (PuFF) at the DOE Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    This investigations of the Savannah River Site's Plutonium Fuel Form fabrication facility located in Building 235-F was initiated in April 1991. The purpose of the investigation was to determine whether, as has been alleged, operation of the facility's argon inert gas system was terminated with the knowledge that continued inoperability of the argon system would cause accelerated corrosion damage to the equipment in the plutonium 238 processing cells. The investigation quickly established that the decision to discontinue operation of the argon system, by not repairing it, was merely one of the measures, and not the most important one, which led to the current deteriorated state of the facility. As a result, the scope of the investigation was broadened to more identify and assess those factors which contributed to the facility's current condition. This document discusses the backgrounds, results, and recommendations of this investigation

  7. Report of an investigation into deterioration of the Plutonium Fuel Form Fabrication Facility (PuFF) at the DOE Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This investigations of the Savannah River Site's Plutonium Fuel Form fabrication facility located in Building 235-F was initiated in April 1991. The purpose of the investigation was to determine whether, as has been alleged, operation of the facility's argon inert gas system was terminated with the knowledge that continued inoperability of the argon system would cause accelerated corrosion damage to the equipment in the plutonium 238 processing cells. The investigation quickly established that the decision to discontinue operation of the argon system, by not repairing it, was merely one of the measures, and not the most important one, which led to the current deteriorated state of the facility. As a result, the scope of the investigation was broadened to more identify and assess those factors which contributed to the facility's current condition. This document discusses the backgrounds, results, and recommendations of this investigation.

  8. Separation of plutonium oxidation states by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Jun, Kwan Sik; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2001-01-01

    The ion chromatography for the separation of plutonium species which are suggested to be Pu 3+ , Pu 4+ PuO 2 + and PuO 2 2+ in natural water was studied. Two separation methods were performed; 1) two-column method containing each of SiO - and SiO-SO 3 - cation exchanger, 2) IC with an AG11 column and the eluent of oxalate/nitric acid. Separation conditions for Eu 3+ , Th 4+ , NpO 2 + and UO 2 2+ in place of plutonium species were acquired from preliminary tests. When these conditions were applied to separate the plutonium species, two-column method was separated them successfully. However, the IC method with oxalate eluent was difficult in the separation of plutonium species due to the change of Pu 3+ and PuO 2 2+ to Pu 4+ and PuO 2 + , respectively. (author)

  9. Direct spectrophotometric analysis of low level Pu (III) in Pu(IV) nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mageswaran, P.; Suresh Kumar, K.; Kumar, T.; Gayen, J.K.; Shreekumar, B.; Dey, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Among the various methods demonstrated for the conversion of plutonium nitrate to its oxide, the oxalate precipitation process either as Pu (III) or Pu (IV) oxalate gained wide acceptance. Since uranous nitrate is the most successful partitioning agent used in the PUREX process for the separation of Pu from the bulk amount of U, the Pu (III) oxalate precipitation of the purified nitrate solution will not give required decontamination from U. Hence Pu IV oxalate precipitation process is a better option to achieve the end user's specified PuO 2 product. Prior to the precipitation process, ensuring of the Pu (IV) oxidation state is essential. Hence monitoring of the level of Pu oxidation state either Pu (III) or Pu (IV) in the feed solution plays a significant role to establish complete conversion of Pu (III). The method in vogue to estimate Pu(lV) content is extractive radiometry using Theonyl Trifluoro Acetone (TTA). As the the method warrants a sample preparation with respect to acidity, a precise measurement of Pu (IV) without affecting the Pu(III) level in the feed sample is difficult. Present study is focused on the exploration of direct spectrophotometry using an optic fiber probe of path length of 40mm to monitor the low level of Pu(III) after removing the bulk Pu(lV) which interfere in the Pu(III) absorption spectrum, using TTA-TBP synergistic mixture without changing the sample acidity

  10. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bridgewater, Jon S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, John W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH{sub 2}). The heats of solution for PuH{sub s} and PuD{sub s} are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

  11. Reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzelli, R.; Martin, A.; Schickel, R.

    1966-03-01

    Uranium and plutonium carbides react with nitrogen during the grinding process preceding the final sintering. The reaction occurs even in argon atmospheres containing a few percent of residual nitrogen. The resulting contamination is responsible for the appearance of an equivalent quantity of higher carbide in the sintered products; nitrogen remains quantitatively in the monocarbide phase. UC can be transformed completely into nitride under a nitrogen pressure, at a temperature as low as 400 C. The reaction is more sluggish with PuC. The following reactions take places: UC + 0,8 N 2 →> UN 1.60 + C and PuC + 0,5 N 2 → PuN + C. (authors) [fr

  12. Stop plutonium; Stop plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    This press document aims to inform the public on the hazards bound to the plutonium exploitation in France and especially the plutonium transport. The first part is a technical presentation of the plutonium and the MOX (Mixed Oxide Fuel). The second part presents the installation of the plutonium industry in France. The third part is devoted to the plutonium convoys safety. The highlight is done on the problem of the leak of ''secret'' of such transports. (A.L.B.)

  13. PU-ICE Summary Information.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Generator Knowledge Report for the Plutonium Isentropic Compression Experiment Containment Systems (GK Report) provides information for the Plutonium Isentropic Compression Experiment (Pu- ICE) program to support waste management and characterization efforts. Attachment 3-18 presents generator knowledge (GK) information specific to the eighteenth Pu-ICE conducted in August 2015, also known as ‘Shot 18 (Aug 2015) and Pu-ICE Z-2841 (1).’ Shot 18 (Aug 2015) was generated on August 28, 2015 (1). Calculations based on the isotopic content of Shot 18 (Aug 2015) and the measured mass of the containment system demonstrate the post-shot containment system is low-level waste (LLW). Therefore, this containment system will be managed at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico (SNL/NM) as LLW. Attachment 3-18 provides documentation of the TRU concentration and documents the concentration of any hazardous constituents.

  14. Evaluation of the neutron self-interrogation approach for assay of plutonium in high materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, P.A.; Menlove, H.O.; Fife, K.W.; West, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    The pyrochemical scrap recovery processes, designed to extract impurities from plutonium metal and compounds, generate a variety of plutonium-laden residues consisting of high (α,n) matrices of varying chemical composition, and often containing grams to tens of grams of americium. For such materials, multiplication corrections based on real neutron coincidence count rate, R, and total neutron count rate, T, measurements cannot be applied because of the large, unknown, and variable (α,n) component in the total neutron emission rate. A study of the prototype self-interrogation assay method is in progress at the Los Alamos plutonium facility. In the self-interrogation approach, the assay signature R(IF)/T is a function of effective fissile plutonium content, where R(IF) is the induced fission component of the measured reals rate, and T is the measured, (α,n)-dominated totals rate. The present study includes a calibration effort using standards consisting of mixtures of PuO 2 and PuF 4 in a salt-strip matrix. The neutron measurements of the standards and the process materials have been performed at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The precision and accuracy of the self-interrogation method applied to pyrochemical residues is examined in this study

  15. Recycle of scrap plutonium-238 oxide fuel to support future radioisotope applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, L.D.; Espinoza, J.M.; Ramsey, K.B.; Rinehart, G.H.; Silver, G.L.; Purdy, G.M.; Jarvinen, G.D.

    1997-11-01

    The Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a development program to recover and purify plutonium-238 oxide from impure feed sources in a glove box environment. A glove box line has been designed and a chemistry flowsheet developed to perform this recovery task at large scale. The initial demonstration effort focused on purification of 238 PuO 2 fuel by HNO 3 /HF dissolution, followed by plutonium(III) oxalate precipitation and calcination to an oxide. Decontamination factors for most impurities of concern in the fuel were very good, producing 238 PuO 2 fuel significantly better in purity than specified by General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fuel powder specifications. The results are encouraging for recycle of relatively impure plutonium-238 oxide and scrap residue items into fuel for useful applications. A sufficient quantity of purified 238 PuO 2 fuel was recovered from the process to allow fabrication of a GPHS unit for testing. The high specific activity of plutonium-238 magnifies the consequences and concerns of radioactive waste generation. This work places an emphasis on development of waste minimization technologies to complement the aqueous processing operation. Results from experiments allowing more time for neutralized solutions of plutonium-238 to precipitate resulted in decontamination to about 1 millicurie/L. Combining ultrafiltration treatment with addition of a water-soluble polymer designed to coordinate Pu, allowed solutions to be decontaminated to about 1 microcurie/L. Efforts continue to develop a capability for efficient, safe, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable methods to recover and purify 238 PuO 2 fuel

  16. Recycle of scrap plutonium-238 oxide fuel to support future radioisotope applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, L.D.; Espinoza, J.M.; Ramsey, K.B.; Rinehart, G.H.; Silver, G.L.; Purdy, G.M.; Jarvinen, G.D.

    1997-11-01

    The Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a development program to recover and purify plutonium-238 oxide from impure feed sources in a glove box environment. A glove box line has been designed and a chemistry flowsheet developed to perform this recovery task at large scale. The initial demonstration effort focused on purification of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel by HNO{sub 3}/HF dissolution, followed by plutonium(III) oxalate precipitation and calcination to an oxide. Decontamination factors for most impurities of concern in the fuel were very good, producing {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel significantly better in purity than specified by General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fuel powder specifications. The results are encouraging for recycle of relatively impure plutonium-238 oxide and scrap residue items into fuel for useful applications. A sufficient quantity of purified {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel was recovered from the process to allow fabrication of a GPHS unit for testing. The high specific activity of plutonium-238 magnifies the consequences and concerns of radioactive waste generation. This work places an emphasis on development of waste minimization technologies to complement the aqueous processing operation. Results from experiments allowing more time for neutralized solutions of plutonium-238 to precipitate resulted in decontamination to about 1 millicurie/L. Combining ultrafiltration treatment with addition of a water-soluble polymer designed to coordinate Pu, allowed solutions to be decontaminated to about 1 microcurie/L. Efforts continue to develop a capability for efficient, safe, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable methods to recover and purify {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel.

  17. Biological behaviour of plutonium given as a trilaurylamine complex. Comparison with plutonium-tributylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolibe, D.; Duserre, C.; Gil, I.; Rateau, G.; Metivier, H.

    1989-01-01

    The biokinetics of plutonium (Pu) were compared in rats after its administration by inhalation or intramuscular injection as Pu-trilaurylamine (Pu-TLA) or Pu-tri-n-butylphosphate (Pu-TBP). To study the mass effect, 238 Pu and 239 Pu were used. Translocation from the lungs and injection site was faster for 238 Pu than 239 Pu, and faster for Pu-TLA than Pu-TBP. The skeleton was always the main organ of deposition of the transferable Pu fraction. At 50 days after inhalation, the skeletal content, in per cent of the body content at death was 10% for 239 Pu-TBP, 54% for 238 Pu-TBP, 24% for 239 Pu-TLA and 62% for 238 Pu-TLA. The amounts in the liver were respectively 2, 6, 3, and 10% of the body content. Thirty days after intramuscular injection of 239 Pu-TLA, more Pu was translocated than after 239 Pu-TBP (26% versus 16%) and the skeletal deposit was 10 times the deposit in the liver. DTPA therapy after inhalation or injection of 238 Pu-TLA reduced the skeletal content by 35-58% with a corresponding increase in urinary excretion. (author)

  18. Assay of low-level plutonium effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsue, S.T.; Hsue, F.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    In the plutonium recovery section at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, an effluent solution is generated that contains low plutonium concentration and relatively high americium concentration. Nondestructive assay of this solution is demonstrated by measuring the passive L x-rays following alpha decay. Preliminary results indicate that an average deviation of 30% between L x-ray and alpha counting can be achieved for plutonium concentrations above 10 mg/L and Am/Pu ratios of up to 3; for plutonium concentrations less than 10 mg/L, the average deviation is 40%. The sensitivity of the L x-ray assay is approx. 1 mg Pu/L

  19. Plutonium fallout at Fayetteville, AR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, D.N.; Essien, I.O.; Kuroda, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    It is well established that atmospheric Pu fallout has its origin in the testing of nuclear devices and satellite accidents. Monitoring injections of Pu during the testing of nuclear devices can be useful in characterizing the detonation and subsequently tagging its global fallout. Since Pu uptake pathway into humans is mainly through the respiratory and digestive systems, it is important to know about the behavior of Pu in the atmosphere. Snow and rain samples were collected between Jan 1981 and April 1983, and analyzed for plutonium

  20. Adsorption and diffusion of plutonium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.A.

    The behavior of plutonium (Pu) was studied in three soils that varied in texture, CEC, pH, organic matter content and mineralogy (Fuquay, Muscatine, Burbank). Two isotopes, 238 Pu and 239 Pu, were used in order to detect Pu over a range of several orders of magnitude. Unless added in a chelated form, Pu was added to the soil as a nitrate in .01 N HNO 3 to simulate the release of acidic waste on the soil and to prevent rapid Pu hydrolysis or polymerization

  1. Light water breeder reactor using a uranium-plutonium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radkowsky, A.; Chen, R.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a light water receptor (LWR) for breeding fissile material using a uranium-plutonium cycle. It comprises: a prebreeder section having plutonium fuel containing a Pu-241 component, the prebreeder section being operable to produce enriched plutonium having an increased Pu-241 component; and a breeder section for receiving the enriched plutonium from the prebreeder section, the breeder section being operable for breeding fissile material from the enriched plutonium fuel. This patent describes a method of operating a light water nuclear reactor (LWR) for breeding fissile material using a uranium-plutonium cycle. It comprises: operating the prebreeder to produce enriched plutonium fuel having an increased Pu-241 component; fueling a breeder section with the enriched plutonium fuel to breed the fissile material

  2. Estimate of the Sources of Plutonium-Containing Wastes Generated from MOX Fuel Production in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudinov, K. G.; Tretyakov, A. A.; Sorokin, Yu. P.; Bondin, V. V.; Manakova, L. F.; Jardine, L. J.

    2002-01-01

    In Russia, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel is produced in a pilot facility ''Paket'' at ''MAYAK'' Production Association. The Mining-Chemical Combine (MCC) has developed plans to design and build a dedicated industrial-scale plant to produce MOX fuel and fuel assemblies (FA) for VVER-1000 water reactors and the BN-600 fast-breeder reactor, which is pending an official Russian Federation (RF) site-selection decision. The design output of the plant is based on a production capacity of 2.75 tons of weapons plutonium per year to produce the resulting fuel assemblies: 1.25 tons for the BN-600 reactor FAs and the remaining 1.5 tons for VVER-1000 FAs. It is likely the quantity of BN-600 FAs will be reduced in actual practice. The process of nuclear disarmament frees a significant amount of weapons plutonium for other uses, which, if unutilized, represents a constant general threat. In France, Great Britain, Belgium, Russia, and Japan, reactor-grade plutonium is used in MOX-fuel production. Making MOX-fuel for CANDU (Canada) and pressurized water reactors (PWR) (Europe) is under consideration in Russia. If this latter production is added, as many as 5 tons of Pu per year might be processed into new FAs in Russia. Many years of work and experience are represented in the estimates of MOX fuel production wastes derived in this report. Prior engineering studies and sludge treatment investigations and comparisons have determined how best to treat Pu sludges and MOX fuel wastes. Based upon analyses of the production processes established by these efforts, we can estimate that there will be approximately 1200 kg of residual wastes subject to immobilization per MT of plutonium processed, of which approximately 6 to 7 kg is Pu in the residuals per MT of Pu processed. The wastes are various and complicated in composition. Because organic wastes constitute both the major portion of total waste and of the Pu to be immobilized, the recommended treatment of MOX-fuel production waste is

  3. Determination of uranium and plutonium in plutonium based fuels by sequential amperometric titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, P.R.; Lohithakshan, K.V.; Xavier, M.; Marathe, S.G.; Jain, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for the sequential determination of uranium and plutonium in plutonium bearing fuel materials. Uranium and plutonium are reduced to U(IV) and Pu(III) with titanous chloride and then titrated with dichromate to two end points which are detected amperometrically using two polarized platinum electrodes. Uranium-plutonium solutions of known concentrations containing plutonium in the proportions of 4, 30, 50, and 70% were analyzed with precisions better than 0.3%, maintaining the amounts of plutonium per aliquot in the range of 2-10 mg. No significant bias could be detected. Several samples of (U,Pu)O 2 and (U,Pu)C were analyzed by this procedure. The effects of iron, fluoride, oxalic acid and mellitic acid on the method were also studied. (author) 5 refs.; 6 tabs

  4. AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O' Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

    2014-07-02

    In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95°C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling

  5. Plutonium uptake by the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus (Turp) Kutz, as a function of isotope and oxidation state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkacik, M.F.

    1977-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of plutonium chemical valence state on the availability of small concentrations of /sup 238/Pu and /sup 239/Pu to algae. The uptake experiments involved the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, grown in batch cultures. Plutonium concentrations accumulated by this alga were linearly related to plutonium concentrations. There was no significant difference (rho = 0.05) in algal plutonium accumulations, on a mass basis, of either /sup 238/Pu or /sup 239/Pu in either Pu/sup +4/ or Pu/sup +6/ oxidation state at the concentrations studied.

  6. Plutonium uptake by the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus (Turp) Kutz, as a function of isotope and oxidation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkacik, M.F.

    1977-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of plutonium chemical valence state on the availability of small concentrations of 238 Pu and 239 Pu to algae. The uptake experiments involved the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, grown in batch cultures. Plutonium concentrations accumulated by this alga were linearly related to plutonium concentrations. There was no significant difference (rho = 0.05) in algal plutonium accumulations, on a mass basis, of either 238 Pu or 239 Pu in either Pu +4 or Pu +6 oxidation state at the concentrations studied

  7. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  8. Automated amperometric plutonium assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burt, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The amperometric titration for plutonium assay has been used in the nuclear industry for over twenty years and has been in routine use at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory since 1976 for the analysis of plutonium oxide and mixed oxide fuel material for the Fast Flux Test Facility. It has proven itself to be an accurate and reliable method. The method may be used as a direct end point titration or an excess of titrant may be added and a back titration performed to aid in determination of the end point. Due to the slowness of the PuVI-FeII reaction it is difficult to recognize when the end point is being approached and is very time consuming if the current is allowed to decay to the residual value after each titrant addition. For this reason the back titration in which the rapid FeII-CrVI reaction occurs is used by most laboratories. The back titration is performed by the addition of excess ferrous solution followed by two measured aliquots of standard dichromate with measurement of cell current after each addition

  9. Alternating layers of plutonium and lead or indium as surrogate for plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, Sven Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Elemental plutonium (Pu) assumes more crystal structures than other elements, plausibly due to bonding f electrons becoming non-bonding. Complex geometries hamper understanding of the transition in Pu, but calculations predict this transition in a system with simpler geometry: alternating layers either of plutonium and lead or of plutonium and indium. Here the transition occurs via a pairing-up of atoms within Pu layers. Calculations stepping through this pairing-up reveal valuable details of the transition, for example that the transition from bonding to non-bonding proceeds smoothly.

  10. Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

    1999-03-01

    The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

  11. A novel analytical method for the determination of residual moisture in plutonium dioxide: Supercritical fluid extraction/Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.M.; Hollis, W.K.; Rubin, J.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Jasperson, M.N.; Vance, D.E.; Rodriguez, J.B.

    1999-02-01

    A novel approach has been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for the quantitative determination of moisture content in impure plutonium oxide. The method combines a commercial supercritical fluid extraction instrument using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) with on-line detection using a high-pressure Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) cell. The combined SCCO{sub 2}/FTIR system has been modified for use inside a fully enclosed glove box. A series of validation experiments were performed using a pure, surrogate oxide (ThO{sub 2}) and an inorganic hydrate (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O). The level of agreement between LOI and SCCO{sub 2}/FTIR for the surrogate oxide is excellent. The results for the inorganic hydrate showed excellent correlation with the known amount of water present. Results obtained for a group of nominally pure PuO{sub 2} samples were verified by independent measurement. The results of SCCO{sub 2}/FTIR for impure PuO{sub 2} samples is consistently lower than the results of obtained from the current analytical method (Loss On Ignition), indicating that the current method is inadequate for analytical purposes. While further verification experiments of the SCCO{sub 2}/FTIR method are underway, these initial results suggest that SCCO{sub 2}/FTIR could be used as an alternative analytical method for the Materials Identification and Surveillance program.

  12. Plutonium storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Spanish study gives a more detailed analysis of a possible store for plutonium oxide. The capacity of the store is assumed to be 30 t Pu and the minimum storage time 2 years. The study includes a general description of the store and its design philosophy; comments on the quality and properties of the material stored; a detailed criticality study and comments on gas and heat generation and shielding requirements; and a brief cost evaluation. Costs are estimated to be about $110/kg PuO 2 /year

  13. Toxicity of inhaled 238PuO2 I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diel, J.H.; Mewhinney, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The deposition, retention, translocation and microscopic distribution of inhaled 238 PuO 2 particles were studied to better define the organs at risk and uniformity of dose and cell types or structures at risk in the lung. Beagle dogs were exposed once by inhalation to an aerosol of 238 PuO 2 with particle aerodynamic diameters of 0.7, 1.4, or 2.7 μm (+-10%). Initial burdens averaged about 700 nCi, a level not expected to induce life-shortening effects in Beagle dogs. Animals were sacrificed at times from 4 hours to 2 years after exposure. Whole body retention of plutonium and its distribution among organs in the sacrificed animals was determined by radiochemical analysis for plutonium content of excreta and tissue samples. The distribution of particles in lung was determined using autoradiographs of lung tissue sections and computer-assisted data collection and analysis. Soon after exposure, PuO 2 was relatively insoluble in lung with individual particles being randomly distributed throughout the lung. A distinct change in the rate of dissolution from lung occurred at about 100 days after exposure resulting in decreased pulmonary retention and increased uptake by liver and skeleton. Particle breakup was observed in autoradiographs for time periods in excess of 128 days after exposure. Broken up particles dissolved rapidly leaving little residue in the lung. The remaining particles were randomly distributed in the lung. These results are discussed in relation to current radiation protection guides for plutonium radionuclides. (author)

  14. Plutonium speciation affected by environmental bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, M.P.; Icopini, G.A.; Boukhalfa, H.

    2005-01-01

    Plutonium has no known biological utility, yet it has the potential to interact with bacterial cellular and extracellular structures that contain metal-binding groups, to interfere with the uptake and utilization of essential elements, and to alter cell metabolism. These interactions can transform plutonium from its most common forms, solid, mineral-adsorbed, or colloidal Pu(IV), to a variety of biogeochemical species that have much different physico-chemical properties. Organic acids that are extruded products of cell metabolism can solubilize plutonium and then enhance its environmental mobility, or in some cases facilitate plutonium transfer into cells. Phosphate- and carboxylate-rich polymers associated with cell walls can bind plutonium to form mobile biocolloids or Pu-laden biofilm/mineral solids. Bacterial membranes, proteins or redox agents can produce strongly reducing electrochemical zones and generate molecular Pu(III/IV) species or oxide particles. Alternatively, they can oxidize plutonium to form soluble Pu(V) or Pu(VI) complexes. This paper reviews research on plutonium-bacteria interactions and closely related studies on the biotransformation of uranium and other metals. (orig.)

  15. Sorption of 237Pu by the diatom Asterionella formosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, H.L.; Wahlgren, M.A.; Peterson, N.; Nelson, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of the man-made radionuclide plutonium within aquatic environments is of fundamental importance in assessing its potential hazards and ecological impact. The sorption of plutonium by phytoplankton and other algae is the dominant factor in the biological transport of plutonium in the aquatic environment, and it has been suggested that sorption by phytoplankton may be responsible for the seasonal loss of plutonium from the epilimnion of Lake Michigan. A unialgal diatom culture was spiked with 237 Pu tracer solution in an attempt to simulate the behavior of fallout plutonium observed in field studies. The results were encouraging in that the 237 Pu in the filtered lake water medium exhibited strongly anionic properties similar to fallout plutonium in Lake Michigan, with limited sorption on container walls. The purpose of the present study was to extend the investigations of the sorption of plutonium by phytoplankton in a controlled environment using continuous culture techniques

  16. Insights into the sonochemical synthesis and properties of salt-free intrinsic plutonium colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalodière, Elodie; Virot, Matthieu; Morosini, Vincent; Chave, Tony; Dumas, Thomas; Hennig, Christoph; Wiss, Thierry; Dieste Blanco, Oliver; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszcak, Tolek; Venault, Laurent; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2017-03-01

    Fundamental knowledge on intrinsic plutonium colloids is important for the prediction of plutonium behaviour in the geosphere and in engineered systems. The first synthetic route to obtain salt-free intrinsic plutonium colloids by ultrasonic treatment of PuO2 suspensions in pure water is reported. Kinetics showed that both chemical and mechanical effects of ultrasound contribute to the mechanism of Pu colloid formation. In the first stage, fragmentation of initial PuO2 particles provides larger surface contact between cavitation bubbles and solids. Furthermore, hydrogen formed during sonochemical water splitting enables reduction of Pu(IV) to more soluble Pu(III), which then re-oxidizes yielding Pu(IV) colloid. A comparative study of nanostructured PuO2 and Pu colloids produced by sonochemical and hydrolytic methods, has been conducted using HRTEM, Pu LIII-edge XAS, and O K-edge NEXAFS/STXM. Characterization of Pu colloids revealed a correlation between the number of Pu-O and Pu-Pu contacts and the atomic surface-to-volume ratio of the PuO2 nanoparticles. NEXAFS indicated that oxygen state in hydrolytic Pu colloid is influenced by hydrolysed Pu(IV) species to a greater extent than in sonochemical PuO2 nanoparticles. In general, hydrolytic and sonochemical Pu colloids can be described as core-shell nanoparticles composed of quasi-stoichiometric PuO2 cores and hydrolyzed Pu(IV) moieties at the surface shell.

  17. Production and characterization of plutonium dioxide particles as a quality control material for safeguards purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinonaga, Taeko; Donohue, David; Aigner, Helmut; Bürger, Stefan; Klose, Dilani; Kärkelä, Teemu; Zilliacus, Riitta; Auvinen, Ari; Marie, Olivier; Pointurier, Fabien

    2012-03-20

    Plutonium (Pu) dioxide particles were produced from certified reference material (CRM) 136 solution (CRM 136-plutonium isotopic standard, New Brunswick Laboratory, Argonne, IL, U.S.A., 1987) using an atomizer system on December 3, 2009 after chemical separation of americium (Am) on October 27, 2009. The highest density of the size distribution of the particles obtained from 312 particles on a selected impactor stage was in the range of 0.7-0.8 μm. The flattening degree of 312 particles was also estimated. The isotopic composition of Pu and uranium (U) and the amount of Am were estimated by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), and α-spectrometry. Within uncertainties the isotopic composition of the produced particles is in agreement with the expected values, which were derived from the decay correction of the Pu isotopes in the CRM 136. The elemental ratio of Am to Pu in the produced particles was determined on the 317th and 674th day after Am separation, and the residual amount of Am in the solution was estimated. The analytical results of single particles by micro-Raman-scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) indicate that the produced particles are Pu dioxide. Our initial attempts to measure the density of two single particles gave results with a spread value accompanied by a large uncertainty.

  18. Thermochromatographic volatility studies of plutonium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebener, S.; Taut, S.; Vahle, A.; Fanghaenel, Th.

    2002-01-01

    The volatility of plutonium oxides in the O 2 -H 2 O (g) /SiO 2(s) system has been studied by thermochromatography. The experimental results indicate the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) by moist oxygen. (orig.)

  19. Using magnetization measurements to detect small amounts of plutonium hydride formation in plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Wook [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Mielke, Charles H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zapf, Vivien [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baiardo, Joseph P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mun, Eun D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Alice Iulia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 atomic % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here we use magnetization, X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuHx, largely on the surface of the sample with x ~ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with precipitates of ferromagnetic PuH1.9.

  20. Waste forms for plutonium disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.G.; O'Holleran, T.P.; Frank, S.M.; Meyer, M.K.; Hanson, M.; Staples, B.A.; Knecht, D.A.; Kong, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    The field of plutonium disposition is varied and of much importance, since the Department of Energy has decided on the hybrid option for disposing of the weapons materials. This consists of either placing the Pu into mixed oxide fuel for reactors or placing the material into a stable waste form such as glass. The waste form used for Pu disposition should exhibit certain qualities: (1) provide for a suitable deterrent to guard against proliferation; (2) be of minimal volume, i.e., maximize the loading; and (3) be reasonably durable under repository-like conditions. This paper will discuss several Pu waste forms that display promising characteristics

  1. Assessment of 238Pu and 239+240Pu, in marine sediments of the oceans Atlantic and Pacific of Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Ochaita, L.

    2000-01-01

    In this investigation samples of marine sediments were taken from 14 places representatives of the oceans coast of Guatemala. For the assesment of 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu in sediments a radiochemical method was used to mineralize sediments and by ionic interchange it was separated from other elements, after that an electrodeposition of plutonium was made in metallic discs. The radioactivity of plutonium was measured by alpha spectrometry system and the alpha spectrums were obtained. The levels of plutonium are not higher than other countries that shown contamination. The contamination of isotope of 239+240 Pu is higher than 238 Pu and the contamination by two isotopes of plutonium is higher in the Atlantic than the Pacific ocean

  2. F. Biological hazards of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Plutonium is an unavoidable result of present nuclear power programmes. Its predominant isotopes are extremely long-lived and very toxic if absorbed in the body. In view of the increasing potential for plutonium and man to come into contact, the consequences of any plutonium release into the environment should be scientifically examined. This report is an attempt to place in one document a fully referenced account of the on-going work in many areas. There are three sections. Part 1 deals with the amounts of plutonium available in the fuel cycle, its properties and the probability of routine or accidental release. Part 2 examines the ways in which plutonium can reach man, in particular through food chains or inhalation. Part 3 details the biological effects of plutonium once it is absorbed into the body, assesses the amounts likely to be harmful and discusses the adequacy of present standards for plutonium burdens. There are two appendices. The likely differences between Pu-239, the most studied isotope, and other plutonium isotopes or transuranic nuclides are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B contains a fuller account of the ways in which the fate of ingested or inhaled plutonium have been determined

  3. Determination of plutonium-238 in plutonium by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Jain, H.C.; Mathews, C.K.; Ramaniah, M.V.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of 238 Pu in plutonium samples by alpha spectrometry. Various factors attributing towards the energy degradation, a problem usually encountered in alpha spectrometry, are discussed. A computer programme is given for the evaluation of peak areas when the alpha spectrum is degraded. The results are compared with those obtained by mass spectrometry. (author)

  4. Hydrometallurgical treatment of plutonium. Bearing salt baths waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, P.; Gozlan, J.P.; Lecomte, M.; Bourges, J.

    1993-01-01

    The salt flux issuing from the electrorefining of plutonium metal alloy in salt baths (KCI + NaCI) poses a difficult problem of the back-end alpha waste management. An alternative to the salt process promoted by Los Alamos Laboratory is to develop a hydrometallurgical treatment. A new process based on the electrochemistry technique in aqueous solution has been defined and tested successfully in the CEA. The diagram of the process exhibits two principal steps: in the head-end, a dissolution in HNO 3 medium accompanied with an electrolytic dechlorination leading to a quantitative elimination of chloride as CI 2 gas followed by its trapping one soda lime cartridge, a complete oxidative dissolution of the refractory Pu residues by electrogenerated Ag(II), in the back-end: the Pu and Am recoveries by chromatographic extractions. (authors). 10 figs., 9 refs

  5. Hematologic effects of inhaled plutonium in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragan, H.A.; Buschbom, R.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.; Weller, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Beagle dogs were exposed, by inhalation, 5 to 11 years ago, to aerosols of 239 PuO 2 , 238 PuO 2 , or 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , at six dose levels resulting in initial lung burdens ranging from ∼2 to ∼5500 nCi. Translocation of the plutonium to extrapulmonary sites was related to the physical-chemical characteristics of the plutonium compound. The highly insoluble 239 PuO 2 was retained primarily in the lung and associated lymph nodes, whereas 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 was much more soluble and translocated relatively rapidly to the skeleton and other extrapulmonary tissues. The 238 PuO 2 was intermediate in solubility and translocation characteristics. The hematologic effects of plutonium inhalation were most pronounced on lymphocyte populations. Evidence suggests that these effects result from irradiation of lymphocytes via the pulmonary lymph nodes with insoluble 239 PuO 2 , and via these same lymph nodes, extrapulmonary lymph nodes, and bone marrow lymphocytes with the more soluble forms, i.e., 238 PuO 2 and 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 . There is no evidence suggesting that these exposures increase the risk of developing myeloid or lymphoid neoplasia. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Cancer hazard from inhaled plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofman, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    The best estimate of the lung cancer potential in humans for inhaled insoluble compounds of plutonium (such as PuO 2 particles) has been grossly underestimated by such authoritative bodies as the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the British Medical Research Council. Calculations are presented of lung cancer induction by 239 Pu as insoluble particles and for deposited reactor-grade Pu. The reason for the gross underestimate of the carcinogenic effects of Pu by ICRP or the British Medical Research Council (BMRC) is their use of a totally unrealistic idealized model for the clearance of deposited Pu from the lungs and bronchi plus their non-recognition of the bronchi as the true site for most human lung cancers. The erroneous model used by such organizations also fails totally to take into account the effect of cigarette-smoking upon the physiological function of human lungs. Plutonium nuclides, such as 239 Pu, or other alpha particle-emitting nuclides, in an insoluble form represent an inhalation cancer hazard in a class some 100,000 times more potent than the potent chemical carcinogens, weight for weight. The already-existing lung cancer data for beagle dogs inhaling insoluble PuO 2 particles is clearly in order of magnitude agreement with calculations for humans

  7. Solution species of 239Pu [V] in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, D.; Serne, R.J.; Swanson, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Information regarding the oxidation states of Pu in environmental samples is needed for estimating its migration through the geologic media. Thermodynamic data were used to develop stability fields for different Pu species. The data indicate that in the Eh-pH range of natural aqueous environments, the dominant species of Pu is likely to be Pu[V] in relatively oxidizing environments and Pu[III] in reducing environments. Because of the lack of methods of determining Pu[V] in environmental samples containing trace concentrations of Pu, Pu[V] has not been previously identified in these samples. Plutonium [VI] is generally assumed to be the dominant species in relatively oxidizing environments. However, a combination of solvent extraction and spectrophotometric techniques used in this study show that solutions (> 10 -5 4 M Pu) in equilibrium with 239 Pu[IV] hydroxide contain Pu[V], which is in agreement with the thermodynamic predictions. Although this method could not be used conclusively with the remaining solutions ( -5 4 M Pu) contacting 239 Pu[IV] hydroxide and 239 PuO 2 , the solvent extraction and Eh-pH results are similar for all the samples suggesting the strong possibility that all samples contain Pu[V]. Thus the possibility, ignored in the past, that Pu[V] may be the dominant species in relatively oxidizing environments should be considered

  8. Plutonium in the atmosphere: A global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, P; Khaing, H; Salminen-Paatero, S

    2017-09-01

    A number of potential source terms have contributed plutonium isotopes to the atmosphere. The atmospheric nuclear weapon tests conducted between 1945 and 1980 and the re-entry of the burned SNAP-9A satellite in 1964, respectively. It is generally believed that current levels of plutonium in the stratosphere are negligible and compared with the levels generally found at surface-level air. In this study, the time trend analysis and long-term behavior of plutonium isotopes ( 239+240 Pu and 238 Pu) in the atmosphere were assessed using historical data collected by various national and international monitoring networks since 1960s. An analysis of historical data indicates that 239+240 Pu concentration post-1984 is still frequently detectable, whereas 238 Pu is detected infrequently. Furthermore, the seasonal and time-trend variation of plutonium concentration in surface air followed the stratospheric trends until the early 1980s. After the last Chinese test of 1980, the plutonium concentrations in surface air dropped to the current levels, suggesting that the observed concentrations post-1984 have not been under stratospheric control, but rather reflect the environmental processes such as resuspension. Recent plutonium atmospheric air concentrations data show that besides resuspension, other environmental processes such as global dust storms and biomass burning/wildfire also play an important role in redistributing plutonium in the atmosphere. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stop plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This press document aims to inform the public on the hazards bound to the plutonium exploitation in France and especially the plutonium transport. The first part is a technical presentation of the plutonium and the MOX (Mixed Oxide Fuel). The second part presents the installation of the plutonium industry in France. The third part is devoted to the plutonium convoys safety. The highlight is done on the problem of the leak of ''secret'' of such transports. (A.L.B.)

  10. Plutonium determination by isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.

    1980-01-01

    The principle is to add to a known amount of the analysed solution a known amount of a spike solution consisting of plutonium 242. The isotopic composition of the resulting mixture is then determined by surface ionization mass spectrometry, and the plutonium concentration in the solution is deduced, from this measurement. For irradiated fuels neutronic studies or for fissile materials balance measurements, requiring the knowledge of the ratio U/Pu or of concentration both uranium and plutonium, it is better to use the double spike isotope dilution method, with a spike solution of known 233 U- 242 Pu ratio. Using this method, the ratio of uranium to plutonium concentration in the irradiated fuel solution can be determined without any accurate measurement of the mixed amounts of sample and spike solutions. For fissile material balance measurements, the uranium concentration is determined by using single isotope dilution, and the plutonium concentration is deduced from the ratio Pu/U and U concentration. The main advantages of isotope dilution are its selectivity, accuracy and very high sensitivity. The recent improvements made to surface ionization mass spectrometers have considerably increased the precision of the measurements; a relative precision of about 0.2% to 0.3% is obtained currently, but it could be reduced to 0.1%, in the future, with a careful control of the experimental procedures. The detection limite is around 0.1 ppb [fr

  11. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, Volume 17: Plutonium-239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. P. Adams; M. L. Carboneau

    1999-03-01

    This report, Volume 17 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of plutonium-239 (Pu-239). This report also discusses waste types and forms in which Pu-239 can be found, waste and disposal information on Pu-239, and Pu-239 behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  12. Review of thermal expansion and density of uranium and plutonium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, J.F.; Latimer, T.W.

    1975-07-01

    The published literature on linear thermal expansion and density of uranium and plutonium carbide nuclear fuels, including UC, PuC, (U,Pu)C, U 2 C 3 , Pu 2 C 3 , and (U,Pu) 2 C 3 , is critically reviewed. Recommended values are given in tabular form and additional experimental studies needed for completeness are outlined. 16 tables, 52 references

  13. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, Volume 17: Plutonium-239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.P.; Carboneau, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report, Volume 17 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of plutonium-239 (Pu-239). This report also discusses waste types and forms in which Pu-239 can be found, waste and disposal information on Pu-239, and Pu-239 behavior in the environment and in the human body

  14. Distribution of Pu isotopes and {sup 137}Cs in and around the former soviet union`s Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi [Kanazawa Univ., Tatsunokuchi, Ishikawa (Japan). Low Level Radioactivity Laboratory; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Tsukatani, Tsuneo; Sekerbaev, A.Kh.; Busev, B.I.

    1999-03-01

    This paper is a report on our survey of residual radioactivity, Pu isotopes and {sup 137}Cs, within and without the territory of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site. Soil samples within the test site were collected at approximately 30 sites along the roads connecting Kurchatov City, ground zero for the first USSR nuclear test, Balapan, Degelen Mountain and Salzhal settlement. Furthermore, outside the test site, the soil was sampled at about 20 sites, including some settlements (Mostik, Dolon, Tchagan, etc.), forest and pasture areas, along the roads from Semipalatinsk City to Kurchatov City and north Korosteli settlement. The contamination levels of long-lived radionuclides, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239,240}Pu as well as {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratio in the soil were determined by non-destructive {gamma}-spectrometric method and radiochemical separation followed by {alpha}-spectrometric and/or ICP-MS methods, respectively. The results showed that although {sup 137}Cs was within typical environmental levels except for an areas near ground zero and Balapan, {sup 239,240}Pu was elevated levels contaminated with weapons-grade plutonium in all area we visited. From the stepwise leaching of Pu from the soil, 50-80% of total {sup 239,240}Pu in most samples was found to be tightly incorporated into the soil components which might have been melted at time of detonation. (author)

  15. Liquid chromatographic studies on the behaviour of Pu(III), Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) on a RP stationary phase in presence of α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as a chelating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaison, P.G.; Kumar, Pranaw; Telmore, Vijay M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Fuel Chemistry Division

    2017-06-01

    Since plutonium possesses multiple oxidation states which can coexist in solution, a method for the identification of these oxidation states is important to understand its chemical processes. Liquid chromatographic studies were carried out to compare the chromatographic behaviour of different oxidation states of Pu in presence of the eluent, α-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA). The three oxidation states of Pu viz. Pu(III), Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) were separated under optimised conditions. It was seen that the presence of the complexing agent influences the equilibrium of Pu(III)/(IV) as well as Pu(IV)/(VI) systems. Pu(III) to Pu(IV) conversion was found to be enhanced by high pH and concentration of HIBA whereas a relatively low pH and high concentration of HIBA promotes the conversion of Pu(VI) to Pu(IV).

  16. Plutonium Focus Area research and development plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) committed to a research and development program to support the technology needs for converting and stabilizing its nuclear materials for safe storage. The R and D Plan addresses five of the six material categories from the 94-1 Implementation Plan: plutonium (Pu) solutions, plutonium metals and oxides, plutonium residues, highly enriched uranium, and special isotopes. R and D efforts related to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stabilization were specifically excluded from this plan. This updated plan has narrowed the focus to more effectively target specific problem areas by incorporating results form trade studies. Specifically, the trade studies involved salt; ash; sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C); combustibles; and scrub alloy. The plan anticipates possible disposition paths for nuclear materials and identifies resulting research requirements. These requirements may change as disposition paths become more certain. Thus, this plan represents a snapshot of the current progress and will continue to be updated on a regular basis. The paper discusses progress in safeguards and security, plutonium stabilization, special isotopes stabilization, highly-enriched uranium stabilization--MSRE remediation project, storage technologies, engineered systems, core technology, and proposed DOE/Russian technology exchange projects.

  17. Estimate of the Sources of Plutonium-Containing Wastes Generated from MOX Fuel Production in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudinov, K.G.; Tretyakov, A.A.; Sorokin, Y.P.; Bondin, V.V.; Manakova, L.F.; Jardine, L.J.

    2001-01-01

    In Russia, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel is produced in a pilot facility ''Paket'' at ''MAYAK'' Production Association. The Mining-Chemical Combine (MCC) has developed plans to design and build a dedicated industrial-scale plant to produce MOX fuel and fuel assemblies (FA) for VVER-1000 water reactors and the BN-600 fast-breeder reactor, which is pending an official Russian Federation (RF) site-selection decision. The design output of the plant is based on production capacity of 2.75 tons of weapons plutonium per year to produce the resulting fuel assemblies: 1.25 tons for the BN-600 reactor FAs and the remaining 1.5 tons for VVER-1000 FAs. It is likely the quantity of BN-600 FAs will be reduced in actual practice. The process of nuclear disarmament frees a significant amount of weapons plutonium for other uses, which, if unutilized, represents a constant general threat. In France, Great Britain, Belgium, Russia, and Japan, reactor-grade plutonium is used in MOX-fuel production. Making MOX-fuel for CANDU (Canada) and pressurized water reactors (PWR) (Europe) is under consideration Russia. If this latter production is added, as many as 5 tons of Pu per year might be processed into new FAs in Russia. Many years of work and experience are represented in the estimates of MOX fuel production wastes derived in this report. Prior engineering studies and sludge treatment investigations and comparisons have determined how best to treat Pu sludges and MOX fuel wastes. Based upon analyses of the production processes established by these efforts, we can estimate that there will be approximately 1200 kg of residual wastes subject to immobilization per MT of plutonium processed, of which approximately 6 to 7 kg is Pu in the residuals per MT of Pu processed. The wastes are various and complicated in composition. Because organic wastes constitute both the major portion of total waste and of the Pu to be immobilized, the recommended treatment of MOX-fuel production waste is incineration

  18. Development of plutonium: Fast Neutrons Reactors option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 - Marcoule (France). Dept. de la Centrale Phenix)" data-affiliation=" (CEA Centre dEtudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 - Marcoule (France). Dept. de la Centrale Phenix)" >Elie, X.

    1994-01-01

    Phenix reactor is shortly described with combustible assembly with some operational data. 'CAPRA'(Plutonium Enhance Consumption in Fast Reactors) is an R and D program for the development of an optimized combustible for fast reactors for burning more plutonium. Three ways are tested: a 45% Pu concentration in an oxide fuel keeping actual fabrication and reprocessing options giving a 80 kg/TWh Pu consumption, a fuel without U 238 but with a W or a Mo matrix with problems of reprocessing and core reactivity giving a 110 kg/TWh Pu consumption, and a nitride fuel with an up to 65% Pu concentration giving a 90 to 100 kg/TWh Pu consumption. (A.B.)

  19. Plutonium in Southern Hemisphere ocean Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirose, K.; Aoyama, M.; Gastaud, J.

    2013-01-01

    Plutonium in seawater collected by the BEAGLE2003 cruise was determined using ICP- SF-MS and alpha spectrometry after Fe co-precipitation and radiochemical purification. Levels and distributions of dissolved plutonium activity concentrations in Southern Hemisphere ocean waters are summarized here......, including historical data. Pu-239 concentrations in surface water----of the central South Pacific (32.5 °S) in 2003 were around 1 mBq/m3. The 239Pu concentrations in the Indian Ocean surface waters (20°S) were similar to that in the South Pacific, whereas the 239Pu concentrations in the South Atlantic...... surface waters (30°S) were markedly lower than those in the South Pacific and Indian Oceans. The 239Pu vertical profile pattern was similar to that in the North Pacific subtropical gyre, although 239Pu concentrations in the deep South Pacific were significantly lower than those in the North Pacific. One...

  20. Chemical speciation of Pu in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.M.; Larsen, R.P.; Penrose, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of plutonium in natural waters is determined to a major degree by the chemical forms which are present. We have characterized the ambient Pu in a number of surface waters with regard to its oxidation state and association with natural colloidal organic carbon compounds using a combination of field measurements and laboratory experiments. Both of these factors are shown to have a profound effect on the adsorption of Pu to natural sediments, since both complexation with organic matter and oxidation compete with adsorption. The concentration of organic carbon in the water is the key variable influencing both oxidation state and organic binding. The adsorption process conforms to the laws applicable to a reversible equilibrium with values of the distribution coefficient, K/sub D/, measured in laboratory experiments being similar to those observed for ambient Pu. Experiments using natural waters and sediments in which the Pu concentration was varied show the forms present at typical ambient concentrations (10 -17 - 10 -14 M) are the same as those found at concentrations up to 10 -7 M. Moreover, the affinity for sediments did not change with concentration indicating the binding sites for Pu had not become saturated. Thus, the behavior observed for Pu at ultratrace concentrations should remain unchanged throughout this concentration range. The studies in this report all deal with Pu in exchangeable (and hence source independent) forms and should therefore reflect the behavior toward which the plutonium from any source will tend with time. 13 references, 7 figures, 10 tables

  1. Americium and plutonium in phosphates of trigonal structure (NZP type) Am1/3[Zr2(PO4)3] and Pu1/4[Zr2(PO4)3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, D.M.; Orlova, A.I.; Tomilin, S.V.; Lizin, A.A.; Lukinykh, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    Am 1/3 [Zr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 ] and Pu 1/4 [Zr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 ] phosphates are synthesized and are investigated by X-ray diffraction method. Compounds have triclinic lattices and lattice parameters are determined. Possibility of actinide inclusion into hollows of framework of NZP type is shown for the first time. It is proposed that inclusion of Pu and Am highly-charged cations into framework hollows decreases crystal structure symmetry up to primitive trigonal one. Rate of Pu leaching from ceramics on Pu 1/4 [Zr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 ] basis are measured [ru

  2. Simultaneous measurement of 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, and 242Pu by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR ICP-MS) in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneau, F.

    1999-01-01

    Transuranics elements are of particular interest in radioecological studies because of their radiotoxicity and their potential use to decipher source fingerprints and transport processes. The simultaneous measurement of 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Pu, and 242 Pu in environmental samples requires a specific chemical procedure. This work deals with an analytical procedure which yields a very high grade of purification of Pu suitable for ultra low level detection by HR ICP-MS, from marine sediments. After the elimination of major elements (Fe, Al, Mg...) by a first chromatographic separation, a new device of purification by solvent extraction and concentration by a second chromatographic separation is used to obtain a concentrated and high purified solution of plutonium. The chemical procedure have been validated on IAEA certified sediment samples and on sediment samples collected in the roads of Cherbourg which had been previously analysed by other techniques (a spectrometry and thermo-ionisation mass spectrometer). (author)

  3. The plutonium-oxygen and uranium-plutonium-oxygen systems: A thermochemical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The report of a panel of experts convened by the IAEA in Vienna in March 1964. It reviews the structural and thermodynamic data for the Pu-O and U-Pu-O systems and presents the conclusions of the panel. The report gives information on preparation, phase diagrams, thermodynamic and vaporization behaviour of plutonium oxides, uranium-plutonium oxides and PuO 2 -MeO x (Me=Be, Mg, Al, Si, W, Th, Eu, Zr, Ce) systems. 167 refs, 27 figs, 17 tabs

  4. Application of molten salt oxidation for the minimization and recovery of plutonium-238 contaminated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the technical and economic feasibility of molten salt oxidation technology as a volume reduction and recovery process for 238 Pu contaminated waste. Combustible low-level waste material contaminated with 238 Pu residue is destroyed by oxidation in a 900 C molten salt reaction vessel. The combustible waste is destroyed creating carbon dioxide and steam and a small amount of ash and insoluble 2328 Pu in the spent salt. The valuable 238 Pu is recycled using aqueous recovery techniques. Experimental test results for this technology indicate a plutonium recovery efficiency of 99%. Molten salt oxidation stabilizes the waste converting it to a non-combustible waste. Thus installation and use of molten salt oxidation technology will substantially reduce the volume of 238 Pu contaminated waste. Cost-effectiveness evaluations of molten salt oxidation indicate a significant cost savings when compared to the present plans to package, or re-package, certify and transport these wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for permanent disposal. Clear and distinct cost advantages exist for MSO when the monetary value of the recovered 238 Pu is considered

  5. Vertical distribution of 241Pu in the southern Baltic Sea sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The unique study on 241 Pu in sediments from the southern Baltic Sea was presented. • 241 Pu was determined using alpha spectrometry by indirect method. • The biggest amount of 241 Pu existed in the surface layers of all analyzed sediments. • The highest 241 Pu amount comes from the Chernobyl accident. - Abstract: The vertical distribution of plutonium 241 Pu in marine sediments can assist in determining the deposition history and sedimentation process of analyzed regions. In addition, 241 Pu/ 239+240 Pu activity ratio could be used as a sensitive fingerprint for radioactive source identification. The present preliminary studies on vertical distribution of 241 Pu in sediments from four regions of the southern Baltic Sea are presented. The distribution of 241 Pu was not uniform and depended on sediment geomorphology and depth as well as location. The highest concentrations of plutonium were found in the surface layers of all analyzed sediments and originated from the Chernobyl accident

  6. Plutonium-238 Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Mike; Lechel, David J.; Leigh, C.D.

    1999-01-01

    Five transuranic (TRU) waste sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, collectively, have more than 2,100 cubic meters of Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) TRU waste that exceed the wattage restrictions of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-11). The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is being developed by the DOE as a repository for TRU waste. With the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opening in 1999, these sites are faced with a need to develop waste management practices that will enable the transportation of Pu-238 TRU waste to WIPP for disposal. This paper describes a decision analysis that provided a logical framework for addressing the Pu-238 TRU waste issue. The insights that can be gained by performing a formalized decision analysis are multifold. First and foremost, the very process. of formulating a decision tree forces the decision maker into structured, logical thinking where alternatives can be evaluated one against the other using a uniform set of criteria. In the process of developing the decision tree for transportation of Pu-238 TRU waste, several alternatives were eliminated and the logical order for decision making was discovered. Moreover, the key areas of uncertainty for proposed alternatives were identified and quantified. The decision analysis showed that the DOE can employ a combination approach where they will (1) use headspace gas analyses to show that a fraction of the Pu-238 TRU waste drums are no longer generating hydrogen gas and can be shipped to WIPP ''as-is'', (2) use drums and bags with advanced filter systems to repackage Pu-238 TRU waste drums that are still generating hydrogen, and (3) add hydrogen getter materials to the inner containment vessel of the TRUPACT-11to relieve the build-up of hydrogen gas during transportation of the Pu-238 TRU waste drums

  7. Preliminary trials of the decontamination of plutonium contaminated material with arklone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudie, S.C.; Wilkins, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    The use of Arklone (1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane) as a decontamination reagent in conjunction with an ultrasonic bath for plutonium contaminated non-combustible wastes has been investigated. For stainless and mild steel contaminated with PuO 2 , the surface contamination can be reduced to 5 to 10 μg Pu/cm 2 , while for painted steel the final level is 1 to 2 μg Pu/cm 2 . Aqueous reagents (e.g. H 2 O 1M NaOH) tend to give better results with the stainless steel, particularly if a surface active reagent is used, giving a residual level of 1 to 2 μg Pu/cm 2 . A wide range of additives have been tried in conjunction with the Arklone to improve its effectiveness (e.g. anionic, cationic and neutral surface active reagents) with little success. A commercial mixture, Arklone W, which is an Arklone/water/surfactant emulsion gave the best results. With the exception of Arklone W, very poor results were obtained with Arklone (and various additives) with plutonium nitrate contamination. (author)

  8. Plutonium isotope measurements from across continental Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tims, Stephen G.; Fifield, L. Keith; Hancock, Gary J.; Lal, Rajeev R.; Hoo, Wee T.

    2013-01-01

    The 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio of the global plutonium fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing is typically in the range 0.17–0.19. However, the influence of regional nuclear installations or nearby weapons test sites can lead to local values outside this range. We report 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratios at 14 representative sites across Australian continent, and find that the weapons tests carried out in Australia appear to have made a significant contribution to the total fallout in the center of the continent, despite their relatively small explosive yield.

  9. Plutonium isotope measurements from across continental Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tims, Stephen G., E-mail: steve.tims@anu.edu.au [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Fifield, L. Keith [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Hancock, Gary J. [CSIRO Land and Water, Black Mountain Laboratories, GPO Box 1666, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Lal, Rajeev R.; Hoo, Wee T. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    The {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratio of the global plutonium fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing is typically in the range 0.17-0.19. However, the influence of regional nuclear installations or nearby weapons test sites can lead to local values outside this range. We report {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratios at 14 representative sites across Australian continent, and find that the weapons tests carried out in Australia appear to have made a significant contribution to the total fallout in the center of the continent, despite their relatively small explosive yield.

  10. Plutonium controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of plutonium is discussed, particularly in relation to controversies surrounding the setting of radiation protection standards. The sources, amounts of, and exposure pathways of plutonium are given and the public risk estimated. (ACR)

  11. Plutonium controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of plutonium is discussed, particularly in relation to controversies surrounding the setting of radiation protection standards. The sources, amounts of, and exposure pathways of plutonium are given and the public risk estimated

  12. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong [and others

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  13. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation's defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO 2 feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO 2 dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides

  14. Electrochemistry of plutonium in molten halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurry, L.E.; Moy, G.M.M.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The electrochemistry of plutonium in molten halides is of technological importance as a method of purification of plutonium. Previous authors have reported that plutonium can be purified by electrorefining impure plutonium in various molten haldies. Work to eluciate the mechanism of the plutonium reduction in molten halides has been limited to a chronopotentiometric study in LiCl-KCl. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the standard reduction potential for the plutonium (III) couple in various molten alkali metal halides. Initial cyclic voltammetric experiments were performed in molten KCL at 1100 K. A silver/silver chloride (10 mole %) in equimolar NaCl-KCl was used as a reference electrode. Working and counter electrodes were tungsten. The cell components and melt were contained in a quartz crucible. Background cyclic voltammograms of the KCl melt at the tungsten electrode showed no evidence of electroactive impurities in the melt. Plutonium was added to the melt as PuCl/sub 3/, which was prepared by chlorination of the oxide. At low concentrations of PuCl/sub 3/ in the melt (0.01-0.03 molar), no reduction wave due to the reduction of Pu(III) was observed in the voltammograms up to the potassium reduction limit of the melt. However on scan reversal after scanning into the potassium reduction limit a new oxidation wave was observed

  15. Production of Plutonium Metal from Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, D.A.

    2003-01-16

    The primary separation of plutonium from irradiated uranium by the Purex solvent extraction process at the Savannah River Plant produces a dilute plutonium solution containing residual fission products and uranium. A cation exchange process is used for concentration and further decontamination of the plutonium, as the first step in the final preparation of metal. This paper discusses the production of plutonium metal from the aqueous solutions.

  16. The absorption spectra of Pu(VI), -(V) and -(IV) produced electrochemically in carbonate-bicarbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wester, D.W.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Absorption spectra in carbonate and bicarbonate media have been measured for various oxidation states of plutonium. The oxidation state of plutonium was adjusted electrochemically (Pu(VI)-V), Esub(f)=+0.11 V vs. SCE) to avoid contamination by redox reagents. In carbonate medium the spectra of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) showed marked differences from the spectra of the same oxidation state in acidic solutions. In bicarbonate the spectra of Pu(VI) and Pu(IV) also differed from the corresponding spectra in acidic media. Reduction to Pu(III) resulted in a precipitate in both carbonate and bicarbonate media. (author)

  17. Probing phonons in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Joe; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Occelli, F.; Schwartz, A.; Chiang, T.C.; Wall, M.; Boro, C.; Xu, Ruqing

    2010-01-01

    Plutonium (Pu) is well known to have complex and unique physico-chemical properties. Notably, the pure metal exhibits six solid-state phase transformations with large volume expansions and contractions along the way to the liquid state: α → β → γ → (delta) → (delta)(prime) → (var e psilon) → liquid. Unalloyed Pu melts at a relatively low temperature ∼640 C to yield a higher density liquid than that of the solid from which it melts, (Figure 1). Detailed understanding of the properties of plutonium and plutonium-based alloys is critical for the safe handling, utilization, and long-term storage of these important, but highly toxic materials. However, both technical and and safety issues have made experimental observations extremely difficult. Phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) are key experimenta l data to the understanding of the basic properties of Pu materials such as: force constants, sound velocities, elastic constants, thermodynamics, phase stability, electron-phonon coupling, structural relaxation, etc. However, phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) in plutonium (Pu) and its alloys have defied measurement for the past few decades since the discovery of this element in 1941. This is due to a combination of the high thermal-neutron absorption cross section of plutonium and the inability to grow the large single crystals (with dimensions of a few millimeters) necessary for inelastic neutron scattering. Theoretical simulations of the Pu PDC continue to be hampered by the lack of suitable inter -atomic potentials. Thus, until recently the PDCs for Pu and its alloys have remained unknown experimentally and theoretically. The experimental limitations have recently been overcome by using a tightly focused undulator x-ray micro-beam scattered from single -grain domains in polycrystalline specimens. This experimental approach has been applied successfully to map the complete PDCs of an fcc d-Pu-Ga alloy using the high resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HRIXS

  18. Probing phonons in plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Joe; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Occelli, F.; Schwartz, A.; Chiang, T.C.; Wall, M.; Boro, C.; Xu, Ruqing (UIUC); (LLNL); (ESRF); (LANL)

    2010-11-16

    Plutonium (Pu) is well known to have complex and unique physico-chemical properties. Notably, the pure metal exhibits six solid-state phase transformations with large volume expansions and contractions along the way to the liquid state: {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {delta} {yields} {delta}{prime} {yields} {var_epsilon} {yields} liquid. Unalloyed Pu melts at a relatively low temperature {approx}640 C to yield a higher density liquid than that of the solid from which it melts, (Figure 1). Detailed understanding of the properties of plutonium and plutonium-based alloys is critical for the safe handling, utilization, and long-term storage of these important, but highly toxic materials. However, both technical and and safety issues have made experimental observations extremely difficult. Phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) are key experimenta l data to the understanding of the basic properties of Pu materials such as: force constants, sound velocities, elastic constants, thermodynamics, phase stability, electron-phonon coupling, structural relaxation, etc. However, phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) in plutonium (Pu) and its alloys have defied measurement for the past few decades since the discovery of this element in 1941. This is due to a combination of the high thermal-neutron absorption cross section of plutonium and the inability to grow the large single crystals (with dimensions of a few millimeters) necessary for inelastic neutron scattering. Theoretical simulations of the Pu PDC continue to be hampered by the lack of suitable inter -atomic potentials. Thus, until recently the PDCs for Pu and its alloys have remained unknown experimentally and theoretically. The experimental limitations have recently been overcome by using a tightly focused undulator x-ray micro-beam scattered from single -grain domains in polycrystalline specimens. This experimental approach has been applied successfully to map the complete PDCs of an fcc d-Pu-Ga alloy using the

  19. Plutonium safety training course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, H. J.

    1976-03-01

    This course seeks to achieve two objectives: to provide initial safety training for people just beginning work with plutonium, and to serve as a review and reference source for those already engaged in such work. Numerous references have been included to provide information sources for those wishing to pursue certain topics more fully. The first part of the course content deals with the general safety approach used in dealing with hazardous materials. Following is a discussion of the four properties of plutonium that lead to potential hazards: radioactivity, toxicity, nuclear properties, and spontaneous ignition. Next, the various hazards arising from these properties are treated. The relative hazards of both internal and external radiation sources are discussed, as well as the specific hazards when plutonium is the source. Similarly, the general hazards involved in a criticality, fire, or explosion are treated. Comments are made concerning the specific hazards when plutonium is involved. A brief summary comparison between the hazards of the transplutonium nuclides relative to /sup 239/Pu follows. The final portion deals with control procedures with respect to contamination, internal and external exposure, nuclear safety, and fire protection. The philosophy and approach to emergency planning are also discussed.

  20. Plutonium safety training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe, H.J.

    1976-03-01

    This course seeks to achieve two objectives: to provide initial safety training for people just beginning work with plutonium, and to serve as a review and reference source for those already engaged in such work. Numerous references have been included to provide information sources for those wishing to pursue certain topics more fully. The first part of the course content deals with the general safety approach used in dealing with hazardous materials. Following is a discussion of the four properties of plutonium that lead to potential hazards: radioactivity, toxicity, nuclear properties, and spontaneous ignition. Next, the various hazards arising from these properties are treated. The relative hazards of both internal and external radiation sources are discussed, as well as the specific hazards when plutonium is the source. Similarly, the general hazards involved in a criticality, fire, or explosion are treated. Comments are made concerning the specific hazards when plutonium is involved. A brief summary comparison between the hazards of the transplutonium nuclides relative to 239 Pu follows. The final portion deals with control procedures with respect to contamination, internal and external exposure, nuclear safety, and fire protection. The philosophy and approach to emergency planning are also discussed

  1. Adsorption of plutonium oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Moritz; Wilson, Richard E; Lee, Sang Soo; Soderholm, L; Fenter, P

    2012-02-07

    Adsorption of monodisperse cubic plutonium oxide nanoparticles ("Pu-NP", [Pu(38)O(56)Cl(x)(H(2)O)(y)]((40-x)+), with a fluorite-related lattice, approximately 1 nm in edge size) to the muscovite (001) basal plane from aqueous solutions was observed in situ (in 100 mM NaCl background electrolyte at pH 2.6). Uptake capacity of the surface quantified by α-spectrometry was 0.92 μg Pu/cm(2), corresponding to 10.8 Pu per unit cell area (A(UC)). This amount is significantly larger than that of Pu(4+) needed for satisfying the negative surface charge (0.25 Pu(4+) for 1 e(-)/A(UC)). The adsorbed Pu-NPs cover 17% of the surface area, determined by X-ray reflectivity (XR). This correlates to one Pu-NP for every 14 unit cells of muscovite, suggesting that each particle compensates the charge of the unit cells onto which it adsorbs as well as those in its direct proximity. Structural investigation by resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity distinguished two different sorption states of Pu-NPs on the surface at two different regimes of distance from the surface. A fraction of Pu is distributed within 11 Å from the surface. The distribution width matches the Pu-NP size, indicating that this species represents Pu-NPs adsorbed directly on the surface. Beyond the first layer, an additional fraction of sorbed Pu was observed to extend more broadly up to more than 100 Å from the surface. This distribution is interpreted as resulting from "stacking" or aggregation of the nanoparticles driven by sorption and accumulation of Pu-NPs at the interface although these Pu-NPs do not aggregate in the solution. These results are the first in situ observation of the interaction of nanoparticles with a charged mineral-water interface yielding information important to understanding the environmental transport of Pu and other nanophase inorganic species.

  2. Lymph transport of soluble and insoluble plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallberger, J.A.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Lebel, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The uptake and transport mechanisms of soluble [Pu(NO 3 ) 4 ] and insoluble (polydispersed PuO 2 ) plutonium were studied in afferent and efferent lymph from the popliteal lymph nodes of dogs after simulated-wound exposures. Lymph was partitioned into acellular and cellular fractions. Plutonium nitrate concentration was higher in the acellular fraction of both afferent lymph and efferent lymph than in the cellular fraction, whereas the polydispersed PuO 2 concentration was higher in the cellular fraction at the end of the collection period. Discontinuous-gel, isoelectric-focusing-gel, and cellulose acetate strip electrophoresis indicated that transferrin and albumin were the two principal proteins transporting plutonium in the acellular fraction of both afferent and efferent lymph

  3. PARC (Plutonium Accident Resistant Container) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Response by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to a public law limiting the air transport of plutonium resulted in a new Qualification Criteria and led to the PARC project. The PARC project resulted in the design, development, and certification testing of a crashworthy air transportable radioactive materials package for certification by the NRC. This package, identified by the NRC as the Model PAT-1 Package (PAT = Plutonium Air Transportable), has a mass capacity of 2 kg of PuO 2 and a thermal capacity of 25 watts; the internal volume of the inner containment vessel is 1460 cm 3 ; the package dimensions are 62 cm (24 - 1/2 in.) O.D. x 108 cm (42 - 1/2 in.) length and a mass of 227 kg (500 lbs). The design rationale for very high energy absorption (impact, crush, puncture, and slash protection) with residual high-level fire protection, resulted in a reasonably small air-transportable package, advancing the packaging state-of-the-art. Optimization design interactions were utilized in the areas of impact energy absorption and stress and thermal analysis. Package test results are presented in relation to the containment acceptance criteria of the Qualification Criteria and ANSI N 14.5 leaktight standards and the IAEA Safety Series No. 6 A2 radioactive material release quantities. Acceptability of the pre-accident and post-accident package configuration with respect to shielding and criticality standards are ascertained

  4. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterbentz, J.W.; Olsen, C.S.; Sinha, U.P.

    1993-06-01

    This study is in response to a request by the Reactor Panel Subcommittee of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) to evaluate the feasibility of using plutonium fuels (without uranium) for disposal in existing conventional or advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs and in low temperature/pressure LWR designs that might be developed for plutonium disposal. Three plutonium-based fuel forms (oxides, aluminum metallics, and carbides) are evaluated for neutronic performance, fabrication technology, and material and compatibility issues. For the carbides, only the fabrication technologies are addressed. Viable plutonium oxide fuels for conventional or advanced LWRs include plutonium-zirconium-calcium oxide (PuO 2 -ZrO 2 -CaO) with the addition of thorium oxide (ThO 2 ) or a burnable poison such as erbium oxide (Er 2 O 3 ) or europium oxide (Eu 2 O 3 ) to achieve acceptable neutronic performance. Thorium will breed fissile uranium that may be unacceptable from a proliferation standpoint. Fabrication of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuels is well established; however, fabrication of plutonium-based oxide fuels will require further development. Viable aluminum-plutonium metallic fuels for a low temperature/pressure LWR include plutonium aluminide in an aluminum matrix (PuAl 4 -Al) with the addition of a burnable poison such as erbium (Er) or europium (Eu). Fabrication of low-enriched plutonium in aluminum-plutonium metallic fuel rods was initially established 30 years ago and will require development to recapture and adapt the technology to meet current environmental and safety regulations. Fabrication of high-enriched uranium plate fuel by the picture-frame process is a well established process, but the use of plutonium would require the process to be upgraded in the United States to conform with current regulations and minimize the waste streams

  5. Criticality of mixtures of plutonium and high enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolleau, E.; Lein, M.; Leka, G.; Maidou, B.; Klenov, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a criticality evaluation of moderated homogeneous plutonium-uranium mixtures. The fissile media studied are homogeneous mixtures of plutonium and high enriched uranium in two chemical forms: aqueous mixtures of metal and mixtures of nitrate solutions. The enrichment of uranium considered are 93.2wt.% 235 U and 100wt.% 235 U. The 240 Pu content in plutonium varies from 0wt.% 240 Pu to 12wt.% 240 Pu. The critical parameters (radii and masses of a 20 cm water reflected sphere) are calculated with the French criticality safety package CRISTAL V0. The comparison of the calculated critical parameters as a function of the moderator-to-fuel atomic ratio shows significant ranges in which high enriched uranium systems, as well as plutonium-uranium mixtures, are more reactive than plutonium systems. (author)

  6. The toxicological study of plutonium: tumor-inducing effect of plutonium in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rusong; Zhao Yongchan; Wang Shoufang; Li Maohe

    1992-09-01

    The carcinogenic effects of Pu compounds through different routs of administration are introduced. The following results have been obtained: (1) Pu is really a powerful carcinogenic radionuclide. (2) Osteosarcoma can be induced in rats by plutonium nitrate at low level radiation. The incidence is from 38.9% to 42.9% in the 185 kBq/kg group. (3) Lung cancer can be induced by plutonium dioxide and the biological effect of TLN (thoracic lymph node) is significant. (4) Under the combined treatment of 239 Pu, 90 Sr and 144 Ce, the carcinogenic effects is much greater than their separative effect on rats. (5) By using the method of comparative toxicology, the risk of osteosarcoma induced by Pu in human is about 600/(10 6 man·cGy) which is extrapolated from animal to human. The above conclusions are important for evaluating the potential hazard of Pu to human beings

  7. Preliminary safety evaluation for the plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    This Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) describes and analyzes the installation and operation of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The SPS is a combination of components required to expedite the safe and timely storage of Plutonium (Pu) oxide. The SPS program will receive site Pu packages, process the Pu for storage, package the Pu into metallic containers, and safely store the containers in a specially modified storage vault. The location of the SPS will be in the 2736- ZB building and the storage vaults will be in the 2736-Z building of the PFP, as shown in Figure 1-1. The SPS will produce storage canisters that are larger than those currently used for Pu storage at the PFP. Therefore, the existing storage areas within the PFP secure vaults will require modification. Other modifications will be performed on the 2736-ZB building complex to facilitate the installation and operation of the SPS

  8. Distillation of cadmium from uranium plutonium cadmium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tetsuya; Iizuka, Masatoshi; Inoue, Tadashi; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo

    2005-04-01

    Uranium-plutonium alloy was prepared by distillation of cadmium from U-Pu-Cd ternary alloy. The initial ternary alloy contained 2.9 wt% U and 8.7 wt% Pu other than Cd, which were recovered by molten salt electrolysis with liquid Cd cathode. The distillation experiments were conducted in 10 g scale of the initial alloy using a small-scale distillation furnace equipped with an evaporator and a condenser in a vacuum vessel. After distillation at 1073 K, the weight of the residue was in good agreement with that of the loaded actinides, where the content of Cd decreased to less than 0.05 wt%. The uranium-plutonium alloy product was recovered without adhering to the yttria crucible. The cross section of the product was observed using electron probe micro-analyzer and it was found to consist of a dense material. Almost all of the evaporated Cd was recovered in the condenser and so enclosed well in the apparatus.

  9. Plutonium potentiometric analysis after reduction by copper (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Plutonium determination in solutions containing fission products and an important amount of uranium (ratio U/Pu = 7), suitable for a mass of plutonium between 5 to 30 mg, by reduction of plutonium to the valency state III with an excess of copper (I) in hydrochloric acid saturated with aluminium chloride and sulfamic acid; molybdemum (VI) and uranium (VI) are not reduced. Copper (I) in excess is titrated potentiometrically with potassium dichromate. Addition of sulfuric-phosphoric acid and oxidation of plutonium to the valency state IV by potassium dichromate by potentiometry. The mass of plutonium is obtained from the volume of dichromate used [fr

  10. Qualitative chemical analysis of plutonium by Alpha spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, J Qumica.J.

    1994-01-01

    In this work the separation and purification of plutonium from irradiated uranium was done. The plutonium, produced by the irradiation of uranium in a nuclear reactor and the β decay of 239 Np, was stabilized to Pu +4 with sodium nitrite. Plutonium was separated from the fission products and uranium by ion exchange using the resin Ag 1 X 8. It was electrodeposited on stainless steel discs and the alpha radioactivity of plutonium was measured in a surface barrier detector. The results showed that plutonium was separated with a radiochemical purity higher than 99 %. (Author)

  11. Repository and deep borehole disposition of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, W.G.

    1996-02-01

    Control and disposition of excess weapons plutonium is a growing issue as both the US and Russia retire a large number of nuclear weapons> A variety of options are under consideration to ultimately dispose of this material. Permanent disposition includes tow broad categories: direct Pu disposal where the material is considered waste and disposed of, and Pu utilization, where the potential energy content of the material is exploited via fissioning. The primary alternative to a high-level radioactive waste repository for the ultimate disposal of plutonium is development of a custom geologic facility. A variety of geologic facility types have been considered, but the concept currently being assessed is the deep borehole

  12. Concentration of plutonium in desert plants from contaminated area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hui; Jin Yuren; Tian Mei; Li Weiping; Zeng Ke; Wang Yaoqin; Wang Yu

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of plutonium in desert plants from contaminated sites contributes to the evaluation of its pollution situation and to the survey of plutonium hyper accumulator. The concentration of 239 Pu in desert plants collected from a contaminated site was determined, and the influence factors were studied. The concentration of 239 Pu in plants was (1.8±4.9) Bq/kg in dry weight, and it means that the plants were contaminated, moreover, the resuspension results in dramatic plutonium pollution of plant surface. The concentration of plutonium in plants depends on species, live stages and the content of plutonium in the rhizosphere soil. The concentration of plutonium in herbage is higher than that in woody plant, and for the seven species of desert plants investigated, it decreases in the order of Hexinia polydichotoma, Phragmites australis, Halostashys caspica, Halogeton arachnoideus, Lycium ruthenicum, Tamarix hispida and Calligonum aphyllum. (authors)

  13. Applications of plutonium dioxide oxydising dissolution process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, M.; Bourges, J.; Madic, C.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory investigations having demonstrated the outstanding effectiveness of Ag 2+ ions for the dissolution of plutonium dioxide in nitric medium, two applications of this method were developed at the CEA: dissolution of off-standard PuO 2 , recovery of the plutonium contained in ashes produced by incineration of solid wastes. With respect to PuO 2 dissolution, the parametric investigation of the electrogeneration of Ag (II) and of its reaction with PuO 2 , led to the development of a process and of the equipment required for its implementation. The prototype facility used to dissolve in 4 hours 1 kg of plutonium, in oxide form, was built and tested in the laboratory. This equipment was used to dissolve 30 kg of plutonium oxide in batches of about 700 grams. An in-line spectrophotometric method was developed for process control. The application of this process to the recovery of plutonium from incineration ash is currently being developed. Tested on the scale of about 1 kg of ash, the process helps to recover the plutonium with yields higher than 98 % [fr

  14. Effect of compositional variation in plutonium on process shielding design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.H.

    1997-11-01

    Radiation dose rate from plutonium with high {sup 239}Pu content varies with initial nuclidic content, radioactive decay time, and impurity elemental content. The two idealized states of old plutonium and clean plutonium, whose initial compositions are given, provide approximate upper and lower bounds on dose rate variation. Whole-body dose rates were calculated for the two composition states, using unshielded and shielded plutonium spheres of varying density. The dose rates from these variable density spheres are similar to those from expanded plutonium configurations encountered during processing. The dose location of 40 cm from the sphere center is representative of operator standoff for direct handling of plutonium inside a glove box. The results have shielding implications for glove boxes with only structurally inherent shielding, especially for processing of old plutonium in an expanded configuration. Further reduction in total dose rate by using lead to reduce photon dose rate is shown for two density cases representing compact and expanded plutonium configurations.

  15. Model of plutonium dynamics in a deciduous forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Gardner, R.H.; Dahlman, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A linear compartment model with donor-controlled flows between compartments was designed to describe and simulate the behavior of plutonium ( 239 240 Pu) in a contaminated forest ecosystem at Oak Ridge, TN. At steady states predicted by the model, less than 0.25% of the plutonium in the ecosystem resides in biota. Soil is the major repository of plutonium in the forest, and exchanges of plutonium between soil and litter or soil and tree roots were dominant transfers affecting the ecosystem distribution of plutonium. Variation in predicted steady-state amounts of plutonium in the forest, given variability in the model parameters, indicates that our ability to develop models of plutonium transport in ecosystems should improve with greater precision in data from natural environments and a better understanding of sources of variation in plutonium data

  16. Simulation study for purification, recovery of plutonium and uranium from plant streams of Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukumar, S.; Siva Kumar, P.; Radhika, R.; Subbuthai, S.; Mohan, S.V.; Subha Rao, R.V.

    2005-01-01

    A method for removal of plutonium from the lean organic streams obtained after co-stripping of uranium -plutonium was developed. Plutonium from lean organic phase was stripped using U 4+ /hydrazine as the stripping agent. The effect of concentrations of stripping agent U 4+ and feed Pu concentration in the lean organic phase was studied. Lean organic phases having higher plutonium concentration require three stages of stripping to bring plutonium concentration 4+ stabilized by hydrazine reduces Pu (IV) to Pu (III) thereby stripping plutonium from the organic phase. The non-extractability of Pu (III) by TBP was utilized for development of flow sheet for obtaining a uranium product lean of plutonium for ease of handling. (author)

  17. Method of immobilizing weapons plutonium to provide a durable, disposable waste product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Lutze, Werner; Weber, William J.

    1996-01-01

    A method of atomic scale fixation and immobilization of plutonium to provide a durable waste product. Plutonium is provided in the form of either PuO.sub.2 or Pu(NO.sub.3).sub.4 and is mixed with and SiO.sub.2. The resulting mixture is cold pressed and then heated under pressure to form (Zr,Pu)SiO.sub.4 as the waste product.

  18. A case of internal contamination with plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, F.; Clemente, G.F.; Strambi, E.; Testa, C.

    1980-01-01

    A case is described of internal contamination caused by the accidental explosion of a glove box, whereby a technician was wounded in his right cheek and inhaled insoluble PuO 2 . Immediate washing of the wound with a DTPA solution and the performance of a small surgical toilet reduced the wound contamination a hundred times. Intravenous injection of DPTA was started and continued for nine days. The ''in vivo'' determination of plutonium and Am-241 lung content was performed immediately after the accident and several other times thereafter. Plutonium was determined periodically in urine and fecal samples for five months. The large Esub(f)/Esub(u) ratio and the steep slope of the Esub(f) curve in the first days indicated that the inhaled material was very insoluble and that the suspended powder particles were large. This conclusion was confirmed by the lung clearance ''in vivo'' during the first few days. The initial lung burden, calculated by the fecal excretion of plutonium in the first five days, was in very good agreement with the direct measurement of the lung content; the residual lung burden and the systemic burden were derived respectively U by the fecal and urinary excretion 100 days after the intake. The committed doses to lungs, bone, liver and kidneys were calculated and were found to be considerably lower than the maximum permissible levels. (H.K.)

  19. Calculation of Plutonium content in RSG-GAS spent fuel using IAFUEL computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochamad-Imron

    2003-01-01

    It has been calculated the contain of isotopes Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and isotope Pu-242 in MTR reactor fuel types which have U-235 contain about 250 gram. The calculation was performed in three steps. The first step is to determine the library of calculation output of BOC (Beginning of Cycle). The second step is to determine the core isotope density, the weight of plutonium for one core, and one fuel isotope density. The third step is to calculate weight of plutonium in gram. All calculation is performed by IAFUEL computer code. The calculation was produced content of each Pu isotopes were Pu-239 is 6.7666 gr, Pu-240 is 1.4628 gr, Pu-241 is 0.52951 gr, and Pu-242 is 0.068952 gr

  20. PLUTONIUM LOADING CAPACITY OF REILLEX HPQ ANION EXCHANGE COLUMN - AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FLOWSHEET FOR MOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyser, E.; King, W.; O' Rourke, P.

    2012-07-26

    Radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the dependence of column loading performance on the feed composition in the H-Canyon dissolution process for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). These loading experiments show that a representative feed solution containing {approx}5 g Pu/L can be loaded onto Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin from solutions containing 8 M total nitrate and 0.1 M KF provided that the F is complexed with Al to an [Al]/[F] molar ratio range of 1.5-2.0. Lower concentrations of total nitrate and [Al]/[F] molar ratios may still have acceptable performance but were not tested in this study. Loading and washing Pu losses should be relatively low (<1%) for resin loading of up to 60 g Pu/L. Loading above 60 g Pu/L resin is possible, but Pu wash losses will increase such that 10-20% of the additional Pu fed may not be retained by the resin as the resin loading approaches 80 g Pu/L resin.

  1. Magnetism, superconductivity and Fermi surfaces of plutonium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haga, Y.; Aoki, D.; Yamagami, H.; Matsuda, T.D.; Nakajima, K.; Arai, Y.; Homma, Y.; Shiokawa, Y.; Yamamoto, E.; Nakamura, A.; Onuki, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Single crystals of plutonium compounds PuRhGa 5 and PuIn 3 are successfully grown. For PuRhGa 5 , anisotropy of the superconducting upper critical field was found and analyzed by the anisotropic mass model, consistent with quasi-two-dimensional electronic states predicted by band calculations. On the other hand, the de Haas-van Alphen oscillation was observed in PuIn 3 . By comparing with the band calculations, it is concluded that 5f electrons are itinerant in PuIn 3

  2. Plutonium in the environment. Can we predict its subsurface behavior?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie [Glenn T. Seaborg Institute, Lawrence Livermore National Laborartory, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    There is an acute need to expedite progress toward a permanent storage facility that can safely isolated long-lived radionuclides from the biosphere. Significant uncertainty remains on how to safely store long-lived radionuclides that will make up the majority of the dose after a few hundred years.Plutonium (Pu) is of particular interest because of its high toxicity and long half life (t1/2 239Pu 2.4 x104 yrs). The chemical interactions of Pu are dependent on its oxidation state, which in turn control its stability and solubility. Understanding the interplay (the bio-geo-chemistry) between Pu and the repository environment is necessary to predict the conditions for which Pu will either migrate or remain immobile. A mechanistic understanding of the surface structure and reactivity of coupled Pu*mineral, Pu*organic ligand, and Pu*microbe interfacial processes is needed to advance our understanding Pu. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling Pu transport, we have investigated Pu desorption rates from montmorillonite and other mineral colloids. These data suggest that Pu desorption rates are slow enough that colloid-facilitated transport of adsorbed Pu is possible at the field scale (km distances and decade timescales). Additional experiments show that the presence of organic matter plays an important role in stabilizing Pu both in solution and on mineral surfaces. Our experiments are helping to develop a conceptual model of Pu subsurface behavior.

  3. Nondestructive analysis of plutonium contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.E.; Taylor, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    Plutonium contaminated soil is currently being removed from a covered liquid waste disposal trench near the Pu Processing facility on the Hanford Project. This soil with the plutonium is being mined using remote techniques and equipment. The mined soil is being packaged for placement into retrievable storage, pending possible recovery. To meet the requirements of criticality safety and materials accountability, a nondestructive analysis program has been developed to determine the quantity of plutonium in each packing-storage container. This paper describes the total measurement program: equipment systems, calibration techniques, matrix assumption, instrument control program and a review of laboratory operating experience

  4. Plutonium in a grassland ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.

    1976-08-01

    A study was made of plutonium contamination of grassland at the Rocky Flats plant northwest of Denver, Colorado. Of interest were: the definition of major plutonium-containing ecosystem compartments; the relative amounts in those compartments; how those values related to studies done in other geographical areas; whether or not the predominant isotopes, 238 Pu and 239 Pu, behaved differently; and what mechanisms might have allowed for the observed patterns of contamination. Samples of soil, litter, vegetation, arthropods, and small mammals were collected for Pu analysis and mass determination from each of two macroplots. Small aliquots (5 g or less) were analyzed by a rapid liquid scintillation technique and by alpha spectrometry. Of the compartments sampled, greater than 99 percent of the total plutonium was contained in the soil and the concentrations were significantly inversely correlated with distance from the contamination source, depth of the sample, and particle size of the sieved soil samples. The soil data suggested that the distribution of contamination largely resulted from physical transport processes

  5. Redox reactions of Pu(IV) and Pu(III) in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid in HNO(3) solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkac, Peter; Precek, Martin; Paulenova, Alena

    2009-12-21

    The reduction of Pu(IV) in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid (HAHA) was monitored by vis-NIR spectroscopy. All experiments were performed under low HAHA/Pu(IV) ratios, where only the Pu(IV)-monoacetohydroxamate complex and Pu uncomplexed with HAHA were present in relevant concentrations. Time dependent concentrations of all absorbing species were resolved using molar extinction coefficients for Pu(IV), Pu(III), and the Pu(AHA)(3+) complex by deconvolution of spectra. From fitting of the experimental data by rate equations integrated by a numeric method three reactions were proposed to describe a mechanism responsible for the reduction and oxidation of plutonium in the presence of HAHA and HNO(3). Decomposition of Pu(AHA)(3+) follows a second order reaction mechanism with respect to its own concentration and leads to the formation of Pu(III). At low HAHA concentrations, a two-electron reduction of uncomplexed Pu(IV) with HAHA also occurs. Formed Pu(III) is unstable and slowly reoxidizes back to Pu(IV), which, at the point when all HAHA is decomposed, can be catalyzed by the presence of nitrous acid.

  6. Effects of plutonium on the immune system: immunoglobulin-M in beagle dogs exposed to plutonium and in unexposed controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Serum Immunoglobulin-M (IgM) levels in plutonium-oxide-exposed and unexposed beagle dogs were measured with a Mancini assay. With this assay, there was no apparent difference in IgM levels between the control group and groups of dogs with differing amounts of 238 PuO 2 or 239 PuO 2 deposited in the lung

  7. An experimental study of the recovery of plutonium from non-combustible wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, H.E.; Datton, J.T.; Gaudie, S.C.; Wilkins, J.D.; Dawson, R.K.; Turner, A.D.

    1985-12-01

    Removal of loose Pu0 2 from non-combustible plutonium contaminated waste by Arklone (1,1,2 trichloro, 1,2,2-trifluoro ethane) has been demonstrated on a laboratory scale. While aqueous containing media are generally more effective decontaminants, Arklone has the advantages of being non-moderating and easily recycled by distillation. Although low pressure spraying and vibrocleaning are effective contacting methods, ultrasonics gave the highest DF's - reducing residual Pu levels to 1-10 μg/cm 2 . Lower levels are unattainable in a simple batch process due to redeposition of particulates in small surface flaws. More aggressive processes are needed to achieve further decontamination - such as paint stripping from mild steel followed by treatment with Marshall's solution ( -4 μCi/cm 2 ), or electrochemical decontamination for stainless steel ( -5 μCi/cm 2 ). Microscopic smoothness has been identified as the most significant parameter in determining Pu0 2 retention and subsequent ease of decontamination. To maintain this, radiation resistance is important, as also is surface hardness under abrasive conditions. For facility walls and ceilings, therefore, electropolished stainless steel, 316L or PEEK foil faced GRP, and epoxy paint (treated with fine Ti0 2 to block any surface defects) are recommended to reduce residual Pu0 2 to 2 after ultrasonic washing, while work-hardened polish rolled stainless steel and bright nickel or chrome electro-plates are suggested to achieve similar levels on the floor. (author)

  8. An experimental study of the recovery of plutonium from non-combustible wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, H.E.; Dalton, J.T.; Dawson, R.K.; Gaudie, S.C.; Turner, A.D.; Wilkins, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Removal of loose PuO 2 from non-combustible plutonium contaminated waste by Arklone (1,1,2-trichloro,1,2,2-trifluoro ethane) has been demonstrated on a laboratory scale. While aqueous-containing media are generally more effective decontaminants, Arklone has the advantages of being non-moderating and easily recycled by distillation. Although low-pressure spraying and vibrocleaning are effective contacting methods, ultrasonics gave the highest DF's- reducing residual Pu levels to 1-10 μg/cm 2 . Lower levels are unattainable in a simple batch process due to redeposition of particulates in small surface flaws. More agressive processes are needed to achieve further decontamination. Microscopic smoothness has been identified as the most significant parameter in determining PuO 2 retention and subsequent ease of decontamination. To maintain this, radiation resitance is important, as also is surface hardness under abrasive conditions. For facility walls and ceilings, therefore, electropolished stainless steel, 316L or PEEK foil-faced GRP, and epoxy paint (with fine TiO 2 ) are recommended to reduce residual PuO 2 to 2 after ultrasonic washing, while work-hardened polish rolled stainless steel and bright nickel or chrome electroplates are suggested to achieve similar levels on the floor. 10 tables, 50 figs, 6 refs

  9. Deposition of Pu-239 in human bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okabayashi, Hiroyuki

    1976-01-01

    It is known that plutonium produced by nuclear explosion tests has been widely dispersed on all over the earth and Pu-238 generated by the ''Accident of SNAP-9A'' in 1964 has been disposed into the atmosphere. These Pu are gradually falling down on the earth and taken into the human body through inhalation and ingestion. The measurements on the concentrations of Pu in bones and other various organs of Japanese population have been carried out. The results reveal that the concentrations of Pu in bones has a trend to be gradually increasing since 1962 and seems to be saturated at about 1970. The concentrations of Pu in bones sampled in 1971 are, in average, in the level of 4fCi per gram of wet samples and those in other organs (lung, liver, spleen, kidney, reproductive organs, etc.) sampled from 1963 to 1973 are in the level of 0.5-3.4 fCi per gram of wet tissues. Pu has been identified in the bones of fetus and infants and the averaged concentrations of placenta was 42.5 fCi. These may indicate that Pu would be transferred to the fetus through the placenta of mother. Some calculation has been attempted on the ratio of contributions through inhalation and ingestion to the body content of Pu, by using the formula for the scheme of metabolism of Pu compound in the body recommended by I.C.R.P. and this revealed that the contribution through inhalation route seemed to be greater than the other for the accumulation of Pu in the body. (auth.)

  10. Biological behavior of mixed sodium and plutonium oxide aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, H.

    1976-01-01

    New risks from sodium cooled fast breeders are due to solubilization of plutonium dioxide by sodium oxides. The resulting chemical forms of higher valency stage are more transportable than PuO 2 . Bone burden is about 100 times as high as observed with PuO 2 . Diffusion is fast, therapy must be started within 6 h. DTPA is still effective, however chelation efficiency is lower than in the case of Pu IV-DTPA chelation [fr

  11. The ingestion of plutonium and americium by range cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blincoe, C.; Bohman, V.R.; Smith, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The intake of plutonium and americium in the diet of cattle grazing on plutonium contaminated desert range was determined. Daily feed intake of the grazing animals was also determined so that the amount of nuclides ingested daily could be ascertained. Soil ingested by range cattle constituted the principal and possibly only source of ingested plutonium and americium and resulted in a daily intake of 3600-6600 pCi 238 Pu, 85,000-400,000 pCi 239 Pu, and 11,000-31,000 pCi 241 Am daily. Determining transuranic intake by direct measurement and from the composition and contamination of the diet gave identical results. (author)

  12. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-10-06

    This research is focused on improving the efficiency of the anion exchange process for purifying plutonium. While initially focused on plutonium, the technology could also be applied to other ion-exchange processes. Work in FY17 focused on the improvement and optimization of porous foam columns that were initially developed in FY16. These foam columns were surface functionalized with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) to provide the Pu specific anion-exchange sites. Two different polymerization methods were explored for maximizing the surface functionalization with the PVP. The open-celled polymeric foams have large open pores and large surface areas available for sorption. The fluid passes through the large open pores of this material, allowing convection to be the dominant mechanism by which mass transport takes place. These materials generally have very low densities, open-celled structures with high cell interconnectivity, small cell sizes, uniform cell size distributions, and high structural integrity. These porous foam columns provide advantages over the typical porous resin beads by eliminating the slow diffusion through resin beads, making the anion-exchange sites easily accessible on the foam surfaces. The best performing samples exceeded the Pu capacity of the commercially available resin, and also offered the advantage of sharper elution profiles, resulting in a more concentrated product, with less loss of material to the dilute heads and tails cuts. An alternate approach to improving the efficiency of this process was also explored through the development of a microchannel array system for performing the anion exchange.

  13. Twenty-four Years of Follow-Up for a Hanford Plutonium Wound Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Antonio, Cheryl L.; Medina-Del Valle, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    A 1985 plutonium puncture wound resulted in the initial deposition of 48 kBq of transuranic alpha activity, primarily 239Pu and 241Am, in a worker's right index finger. Surgical excisions in the week following reduced the long-term residual wound activity to 5.4 kBq, and 164 DTPA chelation therapy administrations over a 17-month period resulted in urinary excretion of about 7 kBq. The case was published in 1988, but now 20 additional years of follow-up data are available. Annual bioassay measurements have included wound counts, skeleton counts, liver counts, lung counts, axillary lymph node counts, and urinalyses for plutonium and 241Am. These measurements have shown relatively stable levels of 241Am at the wound site, with gradually increasing amounts of 241Am detected in the skeleton. Liver counts has shown erratic detection of 241Am, and lung counts indicate 241Am as shine from the axillary lymph nodes and skeleton. Urine excretion of 239Pu since termination of chelation therapy has typically ranged from 10 to 20 mBq d-1, with 241Am excretion being about 10% of that for 239Pu. In addition, the worker has undergone annual routine medical exams, which have not identified any adverse health effects associated with the intake.

  14. Influence of chemical form, feeding regimen, and animal species on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Cohen, N.; Ralston, L.G.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Ayres, L.

    1985-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of chemical form and feeding regimen on the gastrointestinal (GI) absorption of plutonium in adult mice at plutonium concentrations relevant to the establishment of drinking water standards. Mean fractional GI absorption values in fasted adult mice were: Pu(VI) bicarbonate, 15 x 10 -4 ; Pu(IV) bicarbonate, 20 x 10 -4 ; Pu(IV) nitrate (pH2), 17 x 10 -4 ; Pu(IV) citrate, 24 x 10 -4 ; and Pu(IV) polymer, 3 x 10 -4 . Values in fed adult mice were: Pu(VI) bicarbonate, 1.4 x 10 -4 ; Pu(IV) polymer, 0.3 x 10 -4 . Pu(VI) is the oxidation state in chlorinated drinking waters and Pu(IV) is the oxidation state in many untreated natural waters. To assess the validity of extrapolating data from mice to humans, we also determined the GI absorption of Pu(VI) bicarbonate in adult baboons with a dual-isotope method that does not require animal sacrifice. Fractional GI absorption values obtained by this method were 23 +- 10 x 10 -4 for fasted baboons (n=5) and 1.4 +- 0.9 x 10 -4 for fed baboons (n=3). We have so far validated this method in one baboon and are currently completing validation in two additional animals. At low plutonium concentrations, plutonium oxidation state [Pu(VI) vs Pu(IV)] and administration medium (bicarbonate vs nitrate vs citrate) had little effect on the GI absorption of plutonium in mice. Formation of Pu(IV) polymers and animal feeding decreased the GI absorption of plutonium 5- to 10-fold. The GI absorption of Pu(VI) bicarbonate in both fed and fasted adult baboons appeared to be the same as in fed and fasted adult mice, respectively. 17 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Development of automatic system for determination of U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI) and nitric acid in nuclear fuel reprocessing streams by spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, Yusuke; Kawabe, Katsuya; Akiyama, Takao

    1991-01-01

    An automatic system for the determination of the stable oxidation states of uranium and plutonium, and nitric acid in nuclear fuel reprocessing streams has been developed. The system based on a spectrophotometry is capable of rapidly determining U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV) and Pu(VI). The spectrum obtained from a mixed solution is separated into individual spectra of several components with graphical operations. Acidic concentration can also be obtained from the ratio of specific peaks in a spectrum of U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III) or Pu(IV). (author)

  16. Effect of microorganisms on the plutonium oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukšienė, Benedikta; Druteikienė, Rūta; Pečiulytė, Dalia; Baltrūnas, Dalis; Remeikis, Vidmantas; Paškevičius, Algimantas

    2012-01-01

    Particular microbes from substrates at the low-level radioactive waste repository in the Ignalina NPP territory were exposed to 239 Pu (IV) at low pH under aerobic conditions. Pu(III) and Pu(IV) were separated and quantitatively evaluated using the modified anion exchange method and alpha spectrometry. Tested bacteria Bacillus mycoides and Serratia marcescens were more effective in Pu reduction than Rhodococcus fascians. Fungi Paecillomyces lilacinus and Absidia spinosa var. spinosa as well as bacterium Rhodococcus fascians did not alter the plutonium oxidation state. - Highlights: ► Particular microbes from low-level radioactive waste repository were exposed to Pu (IV). ► Some tested bacteria induced slight Pu (IV) reduction at low pH under aerobic conditions. ► Tested fungi did not show peculiarities to alter Pu oxidation state. ► The modified radiochemical method was applied to differentiate Pu oxidation states.

  17. Effect of microorganisms on the plutonium oxidation states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksiene, Benedikta, E-mail: bena@ar.fi.lt [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Druteikiene, Ruta [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Peciulyte, Dalia [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos street 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Baltrunas, Dalis; Remeikis, Vidmantas [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Paskevicius, Algimantas [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos street 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2012-03-15

    Particular microbes from substrates at the low-level radioactive waste repository in the Ignalina NPP territory were exposed to {sup 239}Pu (IV) at low pH under aerobic conditions. Pu(III) and Pu(IV) were separated and quantitatively evaluated using the modified anion exchange method and alpha spectrometry. Tested bacteria Bacillus mycoides and Serratia marcescens were more effective in Pu reduction than Rhodococcus fascians. Fungi Paecillomyces lilacinus and Absidia spinosa var. spinosa as well as bacterium Rhodococcus fascians did not alter the plutonium oxidation state. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particular microbes from low-level radioactive waste repository were exposed to Pu (IV). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some tested bacteria induced slight Pu (IV) reduction at low pH under aerobic conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tested fungi did not show peculiarities to alter Pu oxidation state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The modified radiochemical method was applied to differentiate Pu oxidation states.

  18. Calculation of thermodynamic equilibrium for reactions of plutonium with air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Lexi; Sun Ying; Luo Deli; Xue Weidong; Zhu Zhenghe; Wang Rong

    2000-01-01

    There are six independent component with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH 2.7 (s), PuN(s), Pu 2 O 3 (s), N 2 (g) and H 2 (g), therefore, the system described involves of 2 independent reactions, both ΔG degree << O. The mass balances calculated for gas and solid phases are in good agreement with those of experimental, indicating the chemical equilibrium is nearly approached. So, it is believed that the reaction ratio of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The results are meaningful to the storage of plutonium

  19. Economical Production of Pu-238

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven D. Howe; Douglas Crawford; Jorge Navarro; Terry Ring

    2013-02-01

    All space exploration missions traveling beyond Jupiter must use radioisotopic power sources for electrical power. The best isotope to power these sources is plutonium-238. The US supply of Pu-238 is almost exhausted and will be gone within the next decade. The Department of Energy has initiated a production program with a $10M allocation from NASA but the cost is estimated at over $100 M to get to production levels. The Center for Space Nuclear Research has conceived of a potentially better process to produce Pu-238 earlier and for significantly less cost. The new process will also produce dramatically less waste. Potentially, the front end costs could be provided by private industry such that the government only had to pay for the product produced. Under a NASA Phase I NIAC grant, the CSNR has evaluated the feasibility of using a low power, commercially available nuclear reactor to produce at least 1.5 kg of Pu-238 per year. The impact on the neutronics of the reactor have been assessed, the amount of Neptunium target material estimated, and the production rates calculated. In addition, the size of the post-irradiation processing facility has been established. In addition, a new method for fabricating the Pu-238 product into the form used for power sources has been identified to reduce the cost of the final product. In short, the concept appears to be viable, can produce the amount of Pu-238 needed to support the NASA missions, can be available within a few years, and will cost significantly less than the current DOE program.

  20. Ultra-sensitive detection of plutonium by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R.; Ditada, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Day, J.P.; Clacher, A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Priest, N.D. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    On the bases of the measurements performed to date, a sensitivity of 10{sup 6} atoms is achievable with accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) for each of the plutonium isotopes. Not only does this open the way to the sort of study outlined, but it also makes possible other novel applications, of which two examples are given: (i)the ration of {sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu as a sensitive indicator of the source of the plutonium; (ii) the biochemistry of plutonium in humans. The ultra-sensitive atom counting capability of AMS will make it possible to use the very long-lived {sup 244}Pu (8x10{sup 7}a) in human volunteer studies without any significant increase in radiation body burden. This paper will describe the AMS technique as applied to plutonium using the ANU`s 14UD accelerator, will present the results obtained to date, and will discuss the prospects for the future.

  1. ''Distribution and behaviour of plutonium in the waters of the channel and of the seine estuary''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, K.

    1997-01-01

    Excess dissolved plutonium has been measured in the coastal waters of the Channel, from Granville to Boulogne, probably due to sorption-desorption processus. In the Seine estuary, in situ measurements and experimental studies showed that the plutonium desorbs himself from particles in low salinity waters. The desorbed plutonium originates in marine and/or fluvial dissolved Pu. Marine dissolved Pu(V), originating from La Hague plant discharges and from atlantic waters, is reduced and sorbed when the salinity decreases onto estuarial particles: Isotopic Activity Ration 238 Pu/ 239 , Pu(IR) of marine dissolved Pu(V) is about 0.7. Fluvial dissolved plutonium originates from atmospheric fallout and from an internal river source: fallout plutonium (IR=0.05) is unreactive with salinity while 45% of river plutonium (IR>1.7) flocculates at 0.5 g l -1 . Desorbed plutonium may have various origins, depending on the Seine liquid discharges and on the tidal coefficient. When the marine waters do not migrate upstream, the low salinity waters encounters particles marked essentially with marine plutonium and the IR of desorbed Pu is about 0.7. The activities of desorbed plutonium are too low to have any influence on the distribution of plutonium in the coastal waters on the Seine Bay. When the marine waters migrate upstream, the low salinity waters meet particles marked essentially with river plutonium (IR>1.7) and desorbed plutonium has a very high IR. These estuarine conditions are encountered five to seven month a year and implicate an increase of the IR of 0.1 of the plutonium present in the coastal waters of the Seine bay (1.2.-1.3.). (author)

  2. Perturbation in the 240Pu/239Pu global fallout ratio in local sediment following the nuclear accidents at Thule (Greenland) and Palomares (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, P.I.; Vintro, L.L.; Gasco, C.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is well established that the main source of the plutonium found in marine sediments throughout the Northern Hemisphere is global stratospheric fallout, characterized by a typical 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atom ratio of ∼0.18. Measurements of perturbations in this ratio at various sites which had been subjected to close-in fallout, mainly from surface-based testing, has confirmed the feasibility of using this ratio to distinguish plutonium from different fallout sources. In the present study, the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio has been examined in samples of sediment collected at Thule (Greenland) and Palomares (Spain), where accidents involving the release and dispersion of plutonium from fractured nuclear weapons occurred in 1968 and 1966, respectively. The 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio was measured by high-resolution alpha spectrometry and spectral deconvolution. The analytical results showed that at Thule the mean 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atom ratio was 0.033±0.004, while at Palomares the equivalent ratio appeared to be significantly higher at 0.056±0.003. Both ratios are consistent with those reported for soils samples at the Nevada site and Nagasaki, and are clearly indicative of weapons-grade plutonium. 27 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  3. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Equipment Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.

    1998-05-01

    This report lists the operations required to complete the Can Loading steps on the Pu Immobilization Plant Flow Sheets and evaluates the equipment options to complete each operation. This report recommends the most appropriate equipment to support Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading operations

  4. Equilibrium-constant expressions for aqueous plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Equilibrium-constant expressions for Pu disproportionation reactions traditionally contain three or four terms representing the concentrations or fractions of the oxidation states. The expressions can be rewritten so that one of the oxidation states is replaced by a term containing the oxidation number of the plutonium. Experimental estimations of the numerical values of the constants can then be checked in several ways. (author)

  5. Process for plutonium rextraction in aqueous solution from an organic solvent, especially for uranium plutonium partition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain, M.; Gillet, B.; Pasquiou, J.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The organic solvent containing plutonium is contacted with an aqueous solution of a uranous salt, for instance uranous nitrate, and a hydroxylamine salt, for instance the nitrate. In these conditions uranous nitrate is a reducing agent of Pu III and hydroxylamine nitrate stabilizes Pu III and U IV in the aqueous phase. Performances are similar to these of the U IV-hydrazine nitrate without interference of hydrazine nitrate degradation products [fr

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of PuSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptist, R.; Chayrouse, J.; Courteix, D.; Heintz, L.; Damien, D.; Wojakowski, A.

    1983-01-01

    After presenting photoemission results for two uranium monopnictides, uranium nitride and antimonide, we present and analyse the X-ray photoemission spectroscopy results for PuSb. The increase of the 5f electron localization along the uranium monopnictides series is also observed when going from USb to PuSb. In this last case, the localization is due to an increase of the 5f intra-atomic Coulomb interaction in plutonium atoms compared to that in the uranium atoms [fr

  7. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report: 238Pu fuel form processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Progress in the Savannah River 238 Pu Fuel Form Program is discussed. Goals of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) program are to provide technical support for the transfer of the 238 Pu fuel form fabrication operations from Mound Laboratory to new facilities being built at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), to provide the technical basis for 238 Pu scrap recovery at SRP, and to assist in sustaining plant operations. During the period it was found that the density of hot-pressed 238 PuO 2 pellets decreased as the particle size of ball-milled powder decreased;the surface area of calcined 238 PuO 2 powder increased with increasing precipitation temperature and may be related to the variation in ball-milling response observed among different H Area B-Line batches; calcined PuO 2 produced by Pu(III) reverse-strike precipitation was directly fabricated into a pellet without ball milling, slugging, or sharding. The pellet had good appearance with acceptable density and dimensional stability, and heat transfer measurements and calculations showed that the use of hollow aluminum sleeves in the plutonium fuel fabrication (PuFF) storage vault reduced the temperature of shipping cans to 170 0 C and will reduce the temperature at the center of pure plutonium oxide (PPO) spheres to 580 0 C

  8. Stabilization of plutonium nano-colloids by epitaxial distortion on mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Brian A; Dai, Zurong; Zavarin, Mavrik; Zhao, Pihong; Kersting, Annie B

    2011-04-01

    The subsurface migration of Pu may be enhanced by the presence of colloidal forms of Pu. Therefore, complete evaluation of the risk posed by subsurface Pu contamination needs to include a detailed physical/chemical understanding of Pu colloid formation and interactions of Pu colloids with environmentally relevant solid phases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize Pu nanocolloids and interactions of Pu nanocolloids with goethite and quartz. We report that intrinsic Pu nanocolloids generated in the absence of goethite or quartz were 2-5 nm in diameter, and both electron diffraction analysis and HRTEM confirm the expected Fm3m space group with the fcc, PuO2 structure. Plutonium nanocolloids formed on goethite have undergone a lattice distortion relative to the ideal fluorite-type structure, fcc, PuO2, resulting in the formation of a bcc, Pu4O7 structure. This structural distortion results from an epitaxial growth of the plutonium colloid on goethite, leading to stronger binding of plutonium to goethite compared with other minerals such as quartz, where the distortion was not observed. This finding provides new insight for understanding how molecular-scale behavior at the mineral-water interface may facilitate transport of plutonium at the field scale.

  9. Phytate may influence the absorption of plutonium from food materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.R.; Harrison, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    When considering the exposure of populations to plutonium in food and water estimates of gut uptake of plutonium based on absorption measurements in other mammalian species may not be applicable. Absorption may be affected by binding plutonium to organic food molecules. Phytate and citrate have been identified as binding plutonium in potato juice. 238 Plutonium, as citrate or phytate, was administered to rabbits and rats and total absorption estimated using tissue distribution. Effects of citrate and phytate on the gut uptake of plutonium in rats and rabbits were compared. High values of absorption for 238 Pu phytate were obtained in rats and indicate that a more restrictive factor should be used when considering exposure of populations to low concentrations of plutonium in food and water. (U.K.)

  10. Quantitative dissolution of (U, Pu)O2 MOX (0.4% to 44% PuO2) using microwave heating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malav, R.K.; Fulzele, Ajit K.; Prakash, Amrit; Afzal, Md.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    AFFF has fabricated the (U, Pu)O 2 mixed oxide fuels for PHWRs, BWRs, PFBRs and FBTRs. The quantitative dissolution of the fuel samples are required within time for accurate determination of uranium-plutonium in chemical quality control laboratory. This paper describes the use of microwave heating technique in quantitative dissolution of (U, Pu)O 2 MOX (from 0.4% to 44% PuO 2 ). (author)

  11. A rapid and specific titrimetric method for the precise determination of plutonium using redox indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitnis, R.T.; Dubey, S.C.

    1976-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of plutonium in plutonium nitrate solution and its application to the purex process solutions is discussed. The method involves the oxidation of plutonium to Pu(VI) with the help of argentic oxide followed by the destruction of the excess argentic oxide by means of sulphamic acid. The determination of plutonium is completed by adding ferrous ammonium sulphate solution which reduces Pu(VI) to Pu(IV) and titrating the excess ferrous with standard potassium dichromate solution using sodium diphenylamine sulphonate as the internal indicator. The effect of the various reagents add during the oxidation and reduction of plutonium, on the final titration has been investigated. The method works satisfactorily for the analysis of plutonium in the range of 0.5 to 5 mg. The precision of the method is found to be within 0.1%. (author)

  12. Fuel cycles using adulterated plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; Bigelow, J.E.; Campbell, D.O.; Kitts, F.G.; Lindauer, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Adjustments in the U-Pu fuel cycle necessitated by decisions made to improve the nonproliferation objectives of the US are examined. The uranium-based fuel cycle, using bred plutonium to provide the fissile enrichment, is the fuel system with the highest degree of commercial development at the present time. However, because purified plutonium can be used in weapons, this fuel cycle is potentially vulnerable to diversion of that plutonium. It does appear that there are technologically sound ways in which the plutonium might be adulterated by admixture with 238 U and/or radioisotopes, and maintained in that state throughout the fuel cycle, so that the likelihood of a successful diversion is small. Adulteration of the plutonium in this manner would have relatively little effect on the operations of existing or planned reactors. Studies now in progress should show within a year or two whether the less expensive coprocessing scheme would provide adequate protection (coupled perhaps with elaborate conventional safeguards procedures) or if the more expensive spiked fuel cycle is needed as in the proposed civex pocess. If the latter is the case, it will be further necessary to determine the optimum spiking level, which could vary as much as a factor of a billion. A very basic question hangs on these determinations: What is to be the nature of the recycle fuel fabrication facilities. If the hot, fully remote fuel fabrication is required, then a great deal of further development work will be required to make the full cycle fully commercial

  13. Considerations in the assessment of plutonium deposition in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelz, G.; Umbarger, J.; McInroy, J.; Healy, J.

    1975-01-01

    Data from human cases of plutonium inhalation are used to illustrate several important problems in the current methods of estimating plutonium body burdens. Individuals exposed to 238 PuO 2 particles in a highly insoluble matrix showed an unusually slow rising urinary excretion curve over 300 to 400 days. In vivo chest counts during the first 6 months estimated lung burdens to be 10 to 30 nCi, but urinary excretion methods calculate residual systematic body burdens of 50 to 100 nCi at 1200 days after exposure. Current assumptions used in the in vivo calibration do not consider possible lung distribution of particulates soon after exposure that could alter the interpretation significantly. Tissue analysis of a lung from another case after recent inhalation exposure shows a significantly lesser concentration of plutonium in the subpleural region--the principal region of plutonium measurement by in vivo chest counting--as compared to distributions found years after exposure. Tissue analyses indicate that urinary excretion estimates of body burden over the long term tend to err on the high side up to a factor of 5 or more. This procedure serves well for the purpose of protection of workers, but high estimates can lead to unnecessary job reassignments for the individual worker and can cause misleading conclusions when such data is used uncritically for reference in health effects studies. Additional research is needed to improve urinary excretion data analysis to reflect newer information derived from tissue data and to seek further understanding of the sources of variation in in vivo counting technology so it can be used with greater confidence

  14. Determination of Pu in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres C, C. O.; Hernandez M, H.; Romero G, E. T.; Vega C, H. R.

    2016-10-01

    The irreversible consequences of accidents occurring in nuclear plants and in nuclear fuel reprocessing sites are mainly the distribution of different radionuclides in different matrices such as the soil. The distribution in the superficial soil is related to the internal and external exposure to the radiation of the affected population. The internal contamination with radionuclides such as Pu is of great relevance to the nuclear forensic science, where is important to know the chemical and isotopic compositions of nuclear materials. The objective of this work is to optimize the radiochemical separation of plutonium (Pu) from soil samples and to determine their concentration. The soil samples were prepared using acid digestion assisted by microwave; purification of Pu was carried out with AG1X8 resin using ion exchange chromatography. Pu isotopes were measured using ICP-SFMS. In order to reduce the interference due to the presence of 238 UH + in the samples, a solvent removal system (Apex) was used. In addition, the limit of detection and quantification of Pu was determined. It was found that the recovery efficiency of Pu in soil samples ranges from 70 to 93%. (Author)

  15. Equilibrium, kinetic and reactive transport models for Pu: employing numerical methods to uncover the nature of the intrinsic colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Batchelor, Bill

    2000-01-01

    Future missions for the Department of Defense include processing plutonium for vitrification and conversion to mixed oxide fuels for commercial use. Such processing could result in the production of Pu-containing waste and unplanned releases of Pu to the environment. Some releases related to plutonium processing have occurred in the past. However, scientists are currently not able to explain the observed behavior of plutonium in natural systems. For example, classical filtration theory predicts that plutonium transport within groundwater should be limited to a few tens of meters. Experimental observations, however, show that plutonium is present in groundwater at distances orders of magnitude farther away from its source than predicted. Before adequate disposal practices can be designed for plutonium, its behavior in these systems must be better understood. The overall goal of this project is to develop equilibrium, kinetic and reactive transport models that describe the behavior of Pu in aqueous systems and to apply these models to natural and engineered systems

  16. Determination of free acid in plutonium (IV) solutions - thermometrically, potentiometrically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.L.; Tucker, G.M.; Huff, G.A.; Jordan, L.G.

    1981-09-01

    The thermometric titration technique was found to offer certain advantages over potentiometry in the determination of free acid in Pu(IV) solutions. The thermometric technique was applied to the determination of free acid in plutonium nitrate solutions using potassium fluoride to suppress the hydrolytic interference of plutonium(IV). The results indicate that 0.2 to 2.0 milliequivalents of free acid can be determined with acceptable bias and precision in solutions containing up to 30 milligrams of plutonium. In contrast, neither the thermometric nor the potentiometric technique was suitable for samples containing more than eight milligrams of plutonium complexed with potassium oxalate

  17. Determination of plutonium oxidation states at trace levels pertinent to nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitsche, H.; Lee, S.C.; Gatti, R.C.

    1987-04-01

    A scheme was developed for the determination of oxidation states of plutonium in environmental samples. The method involves a combination of solvent extractions and coprecipitation. It was tested on solutions with both high-level and trace-level concentrations. The scheme was used to determine Pu oxidation states in solutions from solubility experiments in groundwater from a potential nuclear waste disposal site. At steady-state conditions, Pu was found to be soluble predominantly as Pu(V) and Pu(VI)

  18. Plutonium determination in solution with excess hydrofluoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krtil, J.; Kuvik, V.; Spevackova, V.

    1975-01-01

    The determination is described of plutonium in solutions in the presence of fluoride ions resulting from the hydrolysis of PuF 6 . The method is based on reduction of Pu(VI) by excess of Fe(II) and on re-titration of Fe(II) with ceric salt. The effect of fluoride ions on plutonium determination was studied. It was found that a 3 mole excess of HF with respect to Pu decreased the results of Pu determination. The interference of fluoride ions was eliminated by a two-fold evaporation of the solution to be titrated with HNO 3 to dryness or by complex formation with boric arid. The amount of 20.50 mg Pu in the presence of a 10 mole excess of fluoride ions (17 mg HF) was determined with an error of +- 0.09 mg ). (author)

  19. Formation of crystalline PuO2+x·nH2O nanoparticles upon sorption of Pu(V,VI) onto hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchuk, Anna Yu.; Kalmykov, Stepan N.; Egorov, Alexander V.; Zubavichus, Yan V.; Shiryaev, Andrey A.; Batuk, Olga N.; Conradson, Steven D.; Pankratov, Denis A.; Presnyakov, Igor A.

    2013-11-01

    It has been recognized that natural aquatic colloids can readily sorb actinide elements, including plutonium, whose behavior is complicated by its multiple valence states and the possibility of redox reactions under environmental conditions. In this paper, the sorption and surface-mediated redox transformations of hexavalent plutonium on synthetic well-characterized hematite colloids are studied in a series of batch sorption experiments. The variation in the kinetics of the Pu-hematite interactions, Pu-L3-XAFS, and HRTEM over a broad range of total concentrations of Pu have been studied in an attempt to define the molecular-level speciation of Pu. The surface-mediated slow reduction of Pu(V/VI) results in the formation of crystalline nanoparticles of PuO2+x·nH2O approximately 1.5 nm in size at [Pu]tot ⩾ 10-9 M. This result is confirmed independently by HRTEM images of Pu-containing particles and through the identification in the EXAFS of a Pu neighbor shell at 3.8 Å. The formation of such nanoparticles potentially influences the colloid-mediated transport of Pu in the subsurface environment because of the very slow leaching of Pu from the hematite colloids.

  20. Conceptual designs for a long term 238PuO2 storage vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, D.M.; Replogle, W.C.

    1996-08-01

    This is a report on conceptual designs for a long term, 250 years, storage container for plutonium oxide ([sup 238]PuO[sub 2]). These conceptual designs are based on the use of a quartz filter to release the helium generated during the plutonium decay. In this report a review of filter material selection, design concepts, thermal modeling, and filter performance are discussed

  1. Base case short-term Pu-oxide store. 2. Pt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    This paper describes the interim storage of plutonium oxide after its conversion from plutonium nitrate and before fabrication into fuel elements. The capacity of the store is 3 tons Pu. A description of the major handling, criticality, maintenance and physical protection philosophy is given, together with comments on the safety of the store and its impact on the environment

  2. Late effects of inhaled 238PuO2 in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.; Case, A.C.; Catt, D.L.; Hackett, P.L.; Lund, J.E.; Powers, G.J.; Ragan, H.A.; Watson, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    Osteosarcomas were the primary cause of death in beagle dogs 4 to 8 years after inhalation of 238 PuO 2 . The plutonium body burden at death ranged from 0.4 to 2.6 μCi with 32 to 55 percent of the plutonium in the skeleton. Pulmonary neoplasia was observed in three of the bone-tumor-bearing dogs

  3. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions

  4. Plutonium Solubility In High-Level Waste Alkali Borosilicate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-01

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to ∼18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m 3 of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m 3 3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt

  5. Pertubation in the 240Pu/239Pu global fallout ratio in local sediments following the nuclear accidents at Thule (Greenland) and Palomares (Spain)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, P.I.; León Vintró, L.; Dahlgaard, H.

    1997-01-01

    It is well established that the main source of the plutonium found in marinesediments throughout the Northern Hemisphere is global stratospheric fallout, characterized by a typical Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratio of similar to 0.18. Measurement of perturbations in this ratio at various sites which had...... been subjected to close-in fallout, mainly from surface-based testing (e.g. Bikini Atoll, Nevada test site, Mururoa Atoll), has confirmed the feasibility of using this ratio to distinguish plutonium from different fallout sources. In the present study, the Pu-240/Pu-239 ratio has been examined...... and spectral deconvolution, and confirmed in the case of the most active samples by high-resolution X-ray spectrometry. Only samples which displayed plutonium heterogeneities, i.e. hot particles or concentrations well in excess (at least two orders of magnitude) of those expected from global fallout, were...

  6. Conceptual Design for the Pilot-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jones, Susan A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-08-05

    This report describes a conceptual design for a pilot-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide for use as exercise and reference materials, and for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. This capability is referred to as the Pilot-scale Plutonium oxide Processing Unit (P3U), and it will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including plutonium dioxide (PuO2) dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and conversion to oxide by calcination.

  7. Airborne plutonium transported during southwesterly winds near the Hanford Prosser Barricade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    Airborne plutonium could result from resuspension of nuclear-weapons-testing stratospheric fallout deposition. To determine this possible resuspension at the Hanford site, two field experiments between April 12 to june 29, 1976 and August 12, 1976 to January 11, 1977 were conducted near the Prosser Barricade in the Hanford area about 19 to 22 km southeast (140 0 to 160 0 ) of the fuel-processing areas. The primary objective of these experimentss was to determine if stratospheric fallout resuspension was reflected by airborne plutonium concentrations increasing with increasing wind speed. A secondary objective was to confirm the source of the airborne plutonium by determining the plutonium-240 isotopic content or the plutonium-240/plutonium-239-mass ratio. Stratospheric fallout can be identified by the ratio of 240 Pu to other plutonium isotopes in surface soils. Plutonium was transported during southwesterly winds during the two study periods at the Prosser Barricade. Airborne 239 240 Pu concentrations varied as powers of wind speed (U):U -0 2 to U 7 8 . The airborne solids content ranged from 6 x 10 -8 to 1.7 x 10 -6 μCi/g. The 240 Pu isotopic content ranged from 5.6 to 8.1 atom percent and the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu mass ratio ranged from 0.065 to 0.089. The estimated fraction of stratospheric fallout plutonium in these samples was less than 0.24. The remaining airborne plutonium was probably of Hanford origin. Airborne plutonium probably represents resuspension of plutonium from undetermined sites by mechanisms and events not clear at present. An increasing airborne plutonium concentration with increasing wind speed might be expected for an upwind resuspension source(s). However, the geographical source(s) location was not investigated in this study

  8. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, L. C.; Noguere, G.; de Saint Jean, C.; Kahler, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deficiency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplicity (νbar) and the prompt neutron fission spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation effort.

  9. Global plutonium management: A security option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvester, K.W.B.

    1998-01-01

    The US surplus plutonium disposition program was created to reduce the proliferation risk posed by the fissile material from thousands of retired nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy has decided to process its Put into a form as secure as Pu in civilian spent fuel. While implementation issues have been considered, a major one (Russian reciprocity) remains unresolved. Russia has made disposition action conditional on extracting the fuel value of its Pu but lacks the infrastructure to do so. Assistance in the construction of the required facilities would conflict with official US policy opposing the development of a Pu fuel cycle. The resulting stagnation provides impetus for a reevaluation of US nonproliferation objectives and Pu disposition options. A strategy for satisfying Russian fuel value concerns and reducing the proliferation risk posed by surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) is proposed. The effectiveness of material alteration (e.g., isotopic, chemical, etc.hor-ellipsis) at reducing the desire, ability and opportunity for proliferation is assessed. Virtually all the security benefits attainable by material processing can be obtained by immobilizing Pu in large unit size/mass monoliths without a radiation barrier. Russia would be allowed to extract the Pu at a future date for use as fuel in a verifiable manner. Remote tracking capability, if proven feasible, would further improve safeguarding capability. As an alternate approach, the US could compensate Russia for its Pu, allowing it to be disposed of or processed elsewhere. A market based method for pricing Pu is proposed. Surplus Pu could represent access to nuclear fuel at a fixed price at a future date. This position can be replicated in the uranium market and priced using derivative theory. The proposed strategy attempts to meet nonproliferation objectives by recognizing technical limitations and satisfying political constraints

  10. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blau, M.S.

    1994-08-01

    The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, δ-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal

  11. Environmental behaviour of plutonium accidentally released at Thule, Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarkrog, A.

    1977-01-01

    The environmental contamination resulting from the B-52 accident in 1968 at Thule was studied by scientific expeditions in 1968, 1970 and 1974. The contamination was mainly confined to the marine environment, where plutonium was preferentially located in the sediments and the benthic fauna. Plutonium concentrations down through the sediment layers decayed exponentially with a half-depth of 1 to 2 cm. The horizontal distribution of the plutonium may be described by an exponential expression: mCi sup(239,240)Pu km -2 = 460sub(e)sup(-0.28R) or by a power function: mCisup(239,240)Pu km -2 = 370 Rsup(-1.2), where R is the distance in km from the point of impact. The inventory of sup(239,240)Pu in the marine environment from the accident was estimated at 25 to 30 Ci. The amount of 238 Pu was approximately 0.5 Ci. The bottom animals, such as worms and molluscs, showed a horizontal distribution of radioactivity similar to that of the sediments. From 1968 to 1970 the sup(239,240)Pu concentrations in the biota decreased by an order of magnitude, since 1970 the decrease has been less evident. In 1970 and 1974 there were no indications of increased plutonium concentrations in surface seawater or in sea plants or zooplankton. Higher animals such as fish, seabirds and marine mammals have shown no tendency to increasing plutonium levels since the accident. (author)

  12. The growth and evolution of thin oxide films on delta-plutonium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Flores, Harry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pugmire, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The common oxides of plutonium are the dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) and the sesquioxide (Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The structure of an oxide on plutonium metal under air at room temperature is typically described as a thick PuO{sub 2} film at the gas-oxide interface with a thinner PuO{sub 2} film near the oxide-metal substrate interface. In a reducing environment, such as ultra high vacuum, the dioxide (Pu{sup 4+}; O/Pu = 2.0) readily converts to the sesquioxide (Pu{sup 3+}; O/Pu = 1.5) with time. In this work, the growth and evolution of thin plutonium oxide films is studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) under varying conditions. The results indicate that, like the dioxide, the sesquioxide is not stable on a very clean metal substrate under reducing conditions, resulting in substoichiometric films (Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3-y}). The Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3-y} films prepared exhibit a variety of stoichiometries (y = 0.2-1) as a function of preparation conditions, highlighting the fact that caution must be exercised when studying plutonium oxide surfaces under these conditions and interpreting resulting data.

  13. Investigation of the oxidation states of Pu isotopes in a hydrochloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.H. [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P. O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mhlee@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, J.Y.; Kim, W.H.; Jung, E.C.; Jee, K.Y. [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P. O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The characteristics of the oxidation states of Pu in a hydrochloric acid solution were investigated and the results were applied to a separating of Pu isotopes from IAEA reference soils. The oxidation states of Pu(III) and Pu(IV) were prepared by adding hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium nitrite to a Pu stock solution, respectively. Also, the oxidation state of Pu(VI) was adjusted with concentrated HNO{sub 3} and HClO{sub 4}. The stability of the various oxidation states of plutonium in a HCl solution with elapsed time after preparation were found to be in the following order: Pu(III){approx}Pu(VI)>Pu(IV)>Pu(V). The chemical recoveries of Pu(IV) in a 9 M HCl solution with an anion exchange resin were similar to those of Pu(VI). This method for the determination of Pu isotopes with an anion exchange resin in a 9 M HCl medium was applied to IAEA reference soils where the activity concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 238}Pu in IAEA-375 and IAEA-326 were consistent with the reference values reported by the IAEA.

  14. Progress report on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Moretti, E.S.; Austin, D.J.; Cacic, C.G.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation is being made of the effect of the oxidation state of plutonium on absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. For mice that were starved prior to gastrointestinal administration, there is no significant difference between the absorption factors for Pu(IV) and Pu(VI). The value obtained for Pu(VI) is an order of magnitude lower than that reported previously. The value obtained for Pu(IV) is two orders of magnitude higher than those reported for nitrate solutions and the same as those reported for citrate solutions

  15. Migration modelling of different plutonium chemical forms through porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltelli, A.

    1979-01-01

    Two solutions of the migration equations are described. The first relates to the transport equations for the decay chain Am 243→Pu 239→U 235. Numerical integration was performed in this case by a simulation code written in CSMP III language and plutonium is considered to be all in the same chemical form. The second case relates to the problem of Pu speciation and migration. The decay chain Pu 240→U 236 is considered and numerical integration is performed by a modified version of Bo code COLUMN. Pseudo first order reactions are supposed to act between Pu states to maintain equilibrium during the migration

  16. Design of the Laboratory-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orton, Robert D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smart, John E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes a design for a laboratory-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide (PuO2) for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production, as well as for use as exercise and reference materials. This capability will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including PuO2 dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and re-conversion to PuO2 by calcination.

  17. Determination of plutonium isotopic ratios by using low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.K.

    1983-01-01

    A nondestructive gamma-ray technique has been developed to determine plutonium isotopic ratios. The technique is based on the high-intensity, low-energy gamma rays at 43.48, 45.23, 51.63, 59.54, and 64.83 keV for 238 Pu, 240 Pu, 239 Pu, 241 Am, and 241 Pu, respectively. The results demonstrate that this technique can accurately measure plutonium samples in a timely manner and in a wide range of masses, isotopic contents, chemical forms, and ages from chemical processing

  18. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy of plutonium solid species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropf, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    We present XANES at the L III edge for four plutonium solid phases: Pu(III)F 3 , Pu(IV)O 2 , NaPu(V)O 2 CO 3 , and Ba 3 Pu(VI)O 6 . These correspond to the four important oxidation states in the process chemistry and environmental chemistry of plutonium. By a fitting method that uses an arc tangent function and gaussian curves, it was possible to reproducibly determine the edge energy and distinguish among the four oxidation states. These data demonstrate a 1.85 ± 0.20 eV shift per oxidation state

  19. Activity Ratios of ^<241>Pu/^<239+240>Pu and ^<238>Pu/^<239+240>Pu in Fall-out Samples Collected in the Period of 1961-1968

    OpenAIRE

    松並, 忠男; 真室, 哲雄; T., MATSUNAMI; T., MAMURO; 大阪府立放射線中央研究所; 大阪府立放射線中央研究所; Department of Health Physics and Instrumentation, Radiation Center of Osaka Prefecture; Department of Health Physics and Instrumentation, Radiation Center of Osaka Prefecture

    1981-01-01

    Beta-ray emitting nuclide 241Pu, which transforms into alpha-ray emitting nuclide 241Am( α-ray energy:5.49 MeV (85%), 5.44 MeV (13%); half-life:458 y), is released in nuclear explosions together with three alpha-ray emitting plutonium isotopes, namely, 23

  20. 238Pu fuel form processes. Monthly report, October 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    High-density 239 PuO 2 pellets were hot pressed for the Multi-Hundred Watt process demonstration. Development of the oxalate shard process for the Milliwatt heat source is described. Checkout and repair of equipment in Plutonium Experimental Facility continues

  1. Photoreduction of Pu(V,VI) by TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanchuk, Anna Yu.; Egorov, Alexander V.; Smirnov, Eugene A.; Garshev, Alexey V. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Kalmykov, Stepan N. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation). Vernadsky Inst. of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry; National Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation). Kurchatov Institute; Zubavichus, Yan V. [National Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation). Kurchatov Institute; Shiryaev, Andrei A. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Inst. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the effect of light on the kinetics and speciation of plutonium at its interaction with particles of TiO{sub 2} under different light conditions is shown for the first time. It was found that sorption was followed by reduction of the plutonium to Pu(IV). In this, the reduction reaction and sorption in conditions of the presence of light proceed significantly more rapidly due to the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide, providing a source of electrons for the reaction. Spectral methods (XAFS and TEM) showed that plutonium forms nanoclusters with the structure of PuO{sub 2}, which decorate the surface of the solid phase.

  2. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  3. Plutonium concentrations in arthropods at a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bly, J.A.; Whicker, F.W.

    1979-01-01

    Arthropods were collected for 239 240 Pu ( 239 Pu) and 238 Pu analysis from three study plots in close proximity to the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant and from a site 110 km N-NE of the plant. Mean 239 Pu concentrations in arthropods were 265, 16, 0.7 and 0.5 dis/min g -1 at the three Rocky Flats study plots and at the control site, respectively. Arthropod 239 Pu concentration data were statistically analyzed by season of collection, taxonomic group, and sampling site. Only the collection site differences were significant (α = 0.01) and these were correlated with 239 Pu concentrations in soil. The mean activity ratio of 239 Pu to 238 Pu in arthropods was 52, similar to the value of 51 obtained for soil. The mean ratio of 239 Pu in arthropods to 239 Pu in 0-3 cm soil at Rocky Flats was 9 x 10 -3 . Arthropod biomass and Pu concentration data indicated that only about 10 -8 of the total plutonium inventory is in the arthropod component of the ecosystem. Leafhoppers, grasshoppers and spiders accounted for roughly 80% of the arthropod inventory of 239 Pu. (author)

  4. Safe disposal of surplus plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W. L.; Naz, S.; Lutze, W.; Busch, R.; Prinja, A.; Stoll, W.

    2001-06-01

    About 150 tons of weapons grade and weapons usable plutonium (metal, oxide, and in residues) have been declared surplus in the USA and Russia. Both countries plan to convert the metal and oxide into mixed oxide fuel for nuclear power reactors. Russia has not yet decided what to do with the residues. The US will convert residues into a ceramic, which will then be over-poured with highly radioactive borosilicate glass. The radioactive glass is meant to provide a deterrent to recovery of plutonium, as required by a US standard. Here we show a waste form for plutonium residues, zirconia/boron carbide (ZrO 2/B 4C), with an unprecedented combination of properties: a single, radiation-resistant, and chemically durable phase contains the residues; billion-year-old natural analogs are available; and criticality safety is given under all conceivable disposal conditions. ZrO 2/B 4C can be disposed of directly, without further processing, making it attractive to all countries facing the task of plutonium disposal. The US standard for protection against recovery can be met by disposal of the waste form together with used reactor fuel.

  5. Drop Calculations of HLW Canister and Pu Can-in-Canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreten Mastilovic

    2001-07-31

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (Pu) (''can-in-canister'' [CIC] throughout this document) subjected to drop DBEs (design basis events) during the handling operation. The evaluated DBE in the former case is 7-m (23-ft) vertical (flat-bottom) drop. In the latter case, two 2-ft (0.61-m) corner (oblique) drops are evaluated in addition to the 7-m vertical drop. These Pu CIC calculations are performed at three different temperatures: room temperature (RT) (20 C ), T = 200 F = 93.3 C , and T = 400 F = 204 C ; in addition to these the calculation characterized by the highest maximum stress intensity is performed at T = 750 F = 399 C as well. The scope of the HLW canister calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of: stress intensity and effective plastic strain in the canister, directional residual strains at the canister outer surface, and change of canister dimensions. The scope of Pu CIC calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity, and effective plastic strain in the canister. The information provided by the sketches from Reference 26 (Attachments 5.3,5.5,5.8, and 5.9) is that of the potential CIC design considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the Plutonium Immobilization Project and is performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with Reference 24. It should be noted that the 9-m vertical drop DBE, included in Reference 24, is not included in the objective of this calculation since it did not become a waste acceptance requirement. AP-3.124, ''Calculations'', is used to perform the calculation and develop the document.

  6. Drop Calculations of HLW Canister and Pu Can-in-Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreten Mastilovic

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (Pu) (''can-in-canister'' [CIC] throughout this document) subjected to drop DBEs (design basis events) during the handling operation. The evaluated DBE in the former case is 7-m (23-ft) vertical (flat-bottom) drop. In the latter case, two 2-ft (0.61-m) corner (oblique) drops are evaluated in addition to the 7-m vertical drop. These Pu CIC calculations are performed at three different temperatures: room temperature (RT) (20 C), T = 200 F = 93.3 C , and T = 400 F = 204 C ; in addition to these the calculation characterized by the highest maximum stress intensity is performed at T = 750 F = 399 C as well. The scope of the HLW canister calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of: stress intensity and effective plastic strain in the canister, directional residual strains at the canister outer surface, and change of canister dimensions. The scope of Pu CIC calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity, and effective plastic strain in the canister. The information provided by the sketches from Reference 26 (Attachments 5.3,5.5,5.8, and 5.9) is that of the potential CIC design considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the Plutonium Immobilization Project and is performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with Reference 24. It should be noted that the 9-m vertical drop DBE, included in Reference 24, is not included in the objective of this calculation since it did not become a waste acceptance requirement. AP-3.124, ''Calculations'', is used to perform the calculation and develop the document

  7. Initial synthesis of area 13 239Pu data and other statistical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, R.O.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1976-02-01

    An initial effort is made here to synthesize the 239-240 Pu data currently available from Area 13 (Project 57). Plutonium concentrations for soil, vegetation, small vertebrates, and various tissues in beef cattle (grazed on the Pu contaminated vegetation) are plotted on a single graph for visual comparison. Hypothetical 239-240 Pu concentrations for lungs, skeletal bone, and kidney of a Standard Man assumed to live in and obtain most of his food from the area are also plotted. These hypothetical values were obtained using results from the plutonium transport and dose estimation model of Martin and Bloom (1975)

  8. Initial synthesis of area 13 /sup 239/Pu data and other statistical analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, R.O.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1976-02-01

    An initial effort is made here to synthesize the /sup 239 -240/Pu data currently available from Area 13 (Project 57). Plutonium concentrations for soil, vegetation, small vertebrates, and various tissues in beef cattle (grazed on the Pu contaminated vegetation) are plotted on a single graph for visual comparison. Hypothetical /sup 239 -240/Pu concentrations for lungs, skeletal bone, and kidney of a Standard Man assumed to live in and obtain most of his food from the area are also plotted. These hypothetical values were obtained using results from the plutonium transport and dose estimation model of Martin and Bloom (1975).

  9. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Powell, Brian A.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time which has implications for near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption-desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  10. ``Distribution and behaviour of plutonium in the waters of the channel and of the seine estuary``; ``Distribution et comportement du plutonium dans les eaux de la manche et de l`estuaire de la seine``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, K.

    1997-12-31

    Excess dissolved plutonium has been measured in the coastal waters of the Channel, from Granville to Boulogne, probably due to sorption-desorption processus. In the Seine estuary, in situ measurements and experimental studies showed that the plutonium desorbs himself from particles in low salinity waters. The desorbed plutonium originates in marine and/or fluvial dissolved Pu. Marine dissolved Pu(V), originating from La Hague plant discharges and from atlantic waters, is reduced and sorbed when the salinity decreases onto estuarial particles: Isotopic Activity Ration {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239}, Pu(IR) of marine dissolved Pu(V) is about 0.7. Fluvial dissolved plutonium originates from atmospheric fallout and from an internal river source: fallout plutonium (IR=0.05) is unreactive with salinity while 45% of river plutonium (IR>1.7) flocculates at 0.5 g l{sup -1}. Desorbed plutonium may have various origins, depending on the Seine liquid discharges and on the tidal coefficient. When the marine waters do not migrate upstream, the low salinity waters encounters particles marked essentially with marine plutonium and the IR of desorbed Pu is about 0.7. The activities of desorbed plutonium are too low to have any influence on the distribution of plutonium in the coastal waters on the Seine Bay. When the marine waters migrate upstream, the low salinity waters meet particles marked essentially with river plutonium (IR>1.7) and desorbed plutonium has a very high IR. These estuarine conditions are encountered five to seven month a year and implicate an increase of the IR of 0.1 of the plutonium present in the coastal waters of the Seine bay (1.2.-1.3.). (author).

  11. Electrochemical investigations of Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox reaction using graphene modified glassy carbon electrodes and a comparison to the performance of SWCNTs modified glassy carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Ruma; Gamare, Jayashree; Sharma, Manoj K.; Kamat, J.V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • First report of aqueous electrochemistry of Plutonium on graphene modified electrode. • Graphene is best electrocatalytic material for Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox couple among the reported modifiers viz. reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and SWCNT’s. • The electrochemical reversibility of Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox couple improves significantly on graphene modified electrode compared to previously reported rGO & SWCNTs modified electrodes • Donnan interaction between plutonium species and graphene surface offers a possibility for designing a highly sensitive sensor for plutonium • Graphene modified electrode shows higher sensitivity for the determination of plutonium compared to glassy carbon and single walled carbon nanotube modified electrode - Abstract: The work reported in this paper demonstrates for the first time that graphene modified glassy carbon electrode (Gr/GC) show remarkable electrocatalysis towards Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox reaction and the results were compared with that of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified GC (SWCNTs/GC) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Graphene catalyzes the exchange of current of the Pu(IV)/Pu(III) couple by reducing both the anodic and cathodic overpotentials. The Gr/GC electrode shows higher peak currents (i p ) and smaller peak potential separation (ΔE p ) values than the SWCNTs/GC and GC electrodes. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants (k s ), charge transfer coefficients (α) and the diffusion coefficients (D) involved in the electrocatalytic redox reaction were determined. Our observations show that graphene is best electrocatalytic material among both the SWCNTs and GC to study Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox reaction.

  12. Plutonium Speciation in Support of Oxidative-Leaching Demonstration Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.

    2007-01-01

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the plutonium speciation in caustic solutions that reasonably represent the process streams from the oxidative-leaching demonstration test. Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to develop a spectrophotometric method to measure plutonium speciation at submicromolar (< 10-6 M) concentrations in alkaline solutions in the presence of chromate and carbonate. Data obtained from the testing will be used to identify the oxidation state of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) species, which potentially could exist in caustic leachates. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan TSS A-219 to evaluate the speciation of chromium, plutonium, and manganese before and after oxidative leaching. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PNNL Operating Contract MOA: 24590-QL-HC9-WA49-00001

  13. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF PLUTONIUM AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS MOBILITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS, A.J.

    2000-09-30

    The current state of knowledge of the effect of plutonium on microorganisms and microbial activity is reviewed, and also the microbial processes affecting its mobilization and immobilization. The dissolution of plutonium is predominantly due to their production of extracellular metabolic products, organic acids, such as citric acid, and sequestering agents, such as siderophores. Plutonium may be immobilized by the indirect actions of microorganisms resulting in changes in Eh and its reduction from a higher to lower oxidation state, with the precipitation of Pu, its bioaccumulation by biomass, and bioprecipitation reactions. In addition, the abundance of microorganisms in Pu-contaminated soils, wastes, natural analog sites, and backfill materials that will be used for isolating the waste and role of microbes as biocolloids in the transport of Pu is discussed.

  14. 242Pu as tracer for simultaneous determination of 237Np and 239,240Pu in environmental samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Q.J.; Dahlgaard, H.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2002-01-01

    A procedure has been developed using Pu-242 as tracer for simultaneous determination of Np-237 and Pu-239,Pu-240 in environmental samples. The validity of the method has been demonstrated by ICPMS and alpha-spectroscopy for up to 10 gram soil and sediment, seawater up to 200 litres. The paper...... from Np and Pu) R-before/R-after = 1.004 +/- 3.3% (S.D n = 20) and 1 litre seawater R-before/R-after = 1.019+/-1.9% (S.D., n = 12). Results from the intercomparison samples LAEA-135, LAEA-381 and from environmental samples are presented....... describes a suitable chemical procedure for Np and Pu including a quantitative pre-concentration of neptunium and plutonium, preparation of Np4+ and Pu4+, NP(NO3)(6)(2-) and Pu(NO3)(6)(2-), The ratio of Np-237/Pu-242 (or Np-237/Pu-239) before and after the procedure has been determined using 10 g soil (free...

  15. Deep borehole disposal of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibb, F. G. F.; Taylor, K. J.; Burakov, B. E.

    2008-01-01

    Excess plutonium not destined for burning as MOX or in Generation IV reactors is both a long-term waste management problem and a security threat. Immobilisation in mineral and ceramic-based waste forms for interim safe storage and eventual disposal is a widely proposed first step. The safest and most secure form of geological disposal for Pu yet suggested is in very deep boreholes and we propose here that the key to successful combination of these immobilisation and disposal concepts is the encapsulation of the waste form in small cylinders of recrystallized granite. The underlying science is discussed and the results of high pressure and temperature experiments on zircon, depleted UO 2 and Ce-doped cubic zirconia enclosed in granitic melts are presented. The outcomes of these experiments demonstrate the viability of the proposed solution and that Pu could be successfully isolated from its environment for many millions of years. (authors)

  16. Determination of Pu in soil samples; Determinacion de Pu en muestras de suelo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres C, C. O.; Hernandez M, H.; Romero G, E. T. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: carioli_32907@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    The irreversible consequences of accidents occurring in nuclear plants and in nuclear fuel reprocessing sites are mainly the distribution of different radionuclides in different matrices such as the soil. The distribution in the superficial soil is related to the internal and external exposure to the radiation of the affected population. The internal contamination with radionuclides such as Pu is of great relevance to the nuclear forensic science, where is important to know the chemical and isotopic compositions of nuclear materials. The objective of this work is to optimize the radiochemical separation of plutonium (Pu) from soil samples and to determine their concentration. The soil samples were prepared using acid digestion assisted by microwave; purification of Pu was carried out with AG1X8 resin using ion exchange chromatography. Pu isotopes were measured using ICP-SFMS. In order to reduce the interference due to the presence of {sup 238}UH {sup +} in the samples, a solvent removal system (Apex) was used. In addition, the limit of detection and quantification of Pu was determined. It was found that the recovery efficiency of Pu in soil samples ranges from 70 to 93%. (Author)

  17. Studies on the adsorption of plutonium(IV) on alumina from aqueous nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subba Rao, M.; Gaikwad, A.M.; Rao, V.K.; Natarajan, P.R. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiochemistry Div.)

    1983-05-11

    Results of experiments on the adsorption of plutonium(IV) on alumina from solutions containing oxalic acid-nitric acid are reported. Distribution coefficients for Pu adsortion at various oxalic acid and nitric acid concentrations have been determined and optimum conditions for loading and elution of plutonium from columns packed with alumina have been established. Plutonium recoveries better than 99.5% were obtained. The effect of ions like U(VI) and Fe(III) on plutonium loading has also been studied.

  18. Plutonium production in a remote cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddux, E.P.; Purcell, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Production of 239 Pu metal has traditionally been carried out in glovebox enclosures for protection of operating personnel and the environment. With the advent of more stringent federal regulations for protecting personnel, the environment, and security of special nuclear materials, it is proposed that plutonium be processed in a totally remote environment using automated work stations and robotic materials transfer and equipment maintenance. At the Savannah River Plant, the existing plutonium production facility is a batch-type glovebox operation built in the 1950s. A viable alternative to restoration of the existing glovebox operation is to provide a facility that uses remote cell operation

  19. Determination of americium and plutonium in autopsy tissue: methods and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, H.A.; Eutsler, B.C.; McInroy, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The current methods used by the tissue analysis program at LASL for the determination of americium and plutonium in autopsy tissue are described. Problems affecting radiochemical yield are discussed. Included are problems associated with sample preparation, separation of plutonium from large amounts of bone ash, and reagent contamination. The average 242 Pu tracer yield for 1800 Pu determinations is 78 +- 12%. The average 242 Am tracer yield is 85 +- 7% for 40 determinations

  20. Accumulation of plutonium from fallout in southern Finns and Lapps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H.

    1981-01-01

    The body burden of 239 , 240 Pu and 238 Pu from fallout in southern Finns and Lapps was determined by ion exchange and alpha-spectrometry through analyses of autopsy tissue samples. Comparing the body burden against the inhalation and ingestion intake of plutonium of these population groups the fractional absorption factor for plutonium from the human gastrointestinal tract and lungs was estinated. In addition, the determined tissue values were compared with those computed with the aid of the ICRP lung model and plutonium content of surface air in the Helsinki area. The 239 , 240 Pu concentrations per wet weight of tissue descended in the order liver>lymph nodes>bone>lung>testes>muscle. A dependence of plutonium content of tissues on the amount of air inhaled by the person during the fallout period and, thus, on the age of the person, was shown. The skeletal distribution of plutonium in man was roughly similar to that reported for animals. The ratio of 239 , 240 Pu content in vertebrae to that in ribs was 1.4, on the average, and the rib/femur ratio 1.0. The average body burden of 239 , 240 Pu in adult southern Finn and Lapp males was estimated to be 1.2 pCi (44.4 mBq), of which about 51 per cent was located in liver and 40 per cent in skeleton. The estimates for the ingestion and inhalation intake of 239 , 240 Pu during the period 1945-78 were 36 and 18 pCi (1.3, 0.67 Bq) and 540 and 13 pCi (19.9, 0.48 Bq) for southern Finn and Lapp males, respectively. The estimated fractional absorption factor of plutonium in humn GI-tract was of the order (6-9)x10 -4 and in lungs (7.5-8.5)x10 -2 . (author)

  1. The effect of oxidation state on the absorption of ingested or inhaled plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Gorham, L.S.; Ryan, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Rats received plutonium nitrate (as 239 Pu(IV) or 239 Pu(VI) by gavage or nose-only exposure. Some of the animals were deprived of food before and/or after exposure. Results obtained indicate that there was increased retention of plutonium after exposure to 239 Pu(VI) in comparison with 239 Pu(IV). The absence of food either before and/or after inhalation exposure had no effect on the amount of 239 Pu retained by the liver and carcass. It was concluded that plutonium in its hexavalent state may under certain conditions be more readily absorbed from the GI tract, but that these conditions are unlikely to occur in human exposure. (H.K.)

  2. Learning more about plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document offers chemical, metallurgical and economical information on the plutonium, a hard white radioelement. It deals also on the plutonium formation in the earth, the plutonium use in the nuclear industry, the plutonium in the environment and the plutonium toxicity. (A.L.B.)

  3. Sensitive endpoint detection for coulometric titration of microgram amounts of plutonium. Part II: Use of amperometric indication for the end point detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitnis, R.T.; Talnikar, S.G.; Thakur, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Subsequent to the work on polarized indicator electrodes in the coulometric titration of PuO 2 2+ with electrolytically generated Fe 2+ , the possibility of applying amperometry for the endpoint detection in the same titration was explored. Earlier Moiseen et al used the amperometric indication in the coulometric titration of plutonium and have reported coefficient of variation of 0.4% for the titration of 1 mg of plutonium. The lowest amount of plutonium determined was in the range of 100 micrograms. In the present method, using similar analytical technique, the titrations of 25 micrograms and lower amounts of plutonium are reported. While titrating microgram amounts using amperometric indication, the residual currents due to the supporting electrolyte affect the titrations to a considerable extent. However, it is shown that by proper choice of the potential to be applied to the indicating electrode, the interference, due to the supporting electrolyte can be minimised. Using this technique, it is possible to titrate even a fraction of a microgram of plutonium. The precision at 0.5 microgram level is found to be about 6% and that for 5 micrograms, about 1%. (author)

  4. Properties of plutonium-contaminated particles resulting from British Vixen B trials at Maralinga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.A.; Cooper, M.B.; Williams, G.A.; Johnston, P.N.

    1990-12-01

    Since 1984 a number of studies have been performed to investigate residual contamination at the former atomic weapons test site at Maralinga in South Australia, and to aid in the rehabilitation of the area. The largest site of plutonium contamination at Maralinga results from twelve Vixen B trials conduced at Taranaki in 1960, 1961 and 1963. Plutonium was dispersed along four major plumes from these trials. Measurements of the ratios of activities of 239 Pu and 240 Pu to 241 Am are presented for the plumes. These are identified with individual trials where possible. Some measurements have also been made of 235 U activities. An examination of meteorological and health physics survey data suggests that the most extensive part of the north-west plume results from a single trial, viz. Vixen B2 round 5 of 1961. It appears that the level of contamination in this plume was augmented by rainout of material, and the extent of the plume was enhanced by the considerable wind speed at the time. Results of proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE), which provides elemental content and maps of the distribution of elements on the surface of some of the active particles, are presented, together with some other physical characteristics of the particles, in the expectation that these will aid in hazard assessment and with the development of techniques to rehabilitate the Taranaki site at Maralinga. 17 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  5. Radiation effects in glass waste forms for high-level waste and plutonium disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    A key challenge in the permanent disposal of high-level waste (HLW), plutonium residues/scraps, and excess weapons plutonium in glass waste forms is the development of predictive models of long-term performance that are based on a sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Radiation effects from β-decay and α-decay can impact the performance of glasses for HLW and Pu disposition through the interactions of the α-particles, β-particles, recoil nuclei, and γ-rays with the atoms in the glass. Recently, a scientific panel convened under the auspices of the DOE Council on Materials Science to assess the current state of understanding, identify important scientific issues, and recommend directions for research in the area of radiation effects in glasses for HLW and Pu disposition. The overall finding of the panel was that there is a critical lack of systematic understanding on radiation effects in glasses at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels. The current state of understanding on radiation effects in glass waste forms and critical scientific issues are presented

  6. Determination of Pu and U isotopes in safeguard swipe sample with extraction chromatographic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M H; Park, J H; Oh, S Y; Ahn, H J; Lee, C H; Song, K; Lee, M S

    2011-10-30

    A simple and reliable separation method of plutonium and uranium was developed using extraction chromatographic techniques. Using the separation method of plutonium and uranium developed in this study, recoveries of plutonium and uranium were compared with those by commercial separation methods of Pu and U. The redox reactions of hydrogen peroxide with plutonium in a nitric acid medium were investigated by UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopic techniques. The separation method of Pu and U isotopes with the UTEVA resin updated in this study could be effective to measure quantitatively nano- and picogram amounts of uranium and plutonium in swipe samples using isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metal-carbide multilayers for molten Pu containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, T.S.E.; Curtis, P.G.; Juntz, R.S.; Krueger, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    Multilayers composed of nine or ten alternating layers of Ta or W and TaC were studied for the feasibility of their use in containing molten plutonium (Pu) at 1200 degrees C. Single layers of W and TaC were also investigated. A two-source electron beam evaporation process was developed to deposit these coatings onto the inside surface of hemispherical Ta cups about 38 mm in diameter. Pu testing was done by melting Pu in the coated hemispherical cups and holding them under vacuum at 1200 degrees C for two hours. Metallographic examination and microprobe analysis of cross sections showed that Pu had penetrated to the Ta substrate in all cases to some extent. Full penetration to the outer surface of the Ta substrate, however, occurred in only a few of the samples. The fact that full penetration occurred in any of the samples suggests that it would have occurred in uncoated Ta under these testing conditions which in turn suggests that the multilayer coatings do afford some protection against Pu attack. The TaC used for these specimens was wet by Pu under these testing conditions, and following testing, Pu was found uniformly distributed throughout the carbide layers which appeared to be rather porous. Pu was seen in the W and Ta layers only when exposed directly to molten Pu during testing or near defects suggesting that Pu penetrated the multilayers at defects in the coating and traveled parallel to the layers along the carbide layers. These results indicate that the use of alternating metal and ceramic layers for Pu containment should be possible through the use of nonporous ceramic that is not wet by molten Pu and defect-free films

  8. Dose-effect studies with inhaled plutonium oxide in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.F.; Buschbom, R.L.; Case, A.C.

    1977-01-01

    Beagle dogs given a single exposure to 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 aerosols are being observed for life-span dose-effect relationships. The 239 Pu body burden of the nine dogs that died of pulmonary fibrosis-induced respiratory insufficiency during the first 3 yr after exposure was 1 to 12 μCi. One of these dogs had a pulmonary tumor. Five additional dogs with body burdens of 0.7 to 1.8 μCi died due to pulmonary neoplasia 3 to 5 yr after exposure. None of the dogs exposed to 238 Pu have died during the first 3 postexposure yr. Lymphocytopenia was the earliest observed effect after inhalation of 239 PuO 2 or 238 PuO 2 , occurring 0.5 to 2 yr after deposition of greater than or equal to 80 nCi plutonium in the lungs

  9. Bacteria and plutonium in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, A.E.; Bowen, V.T.

    1978-01-01

    Microbes are important in geochemical cycling of many elements. Recent reports emphasize biogenous particulates and bacterial exometabolites as controlling oceanic distribution of plutonium. Bacteria perform oxidation/reduction reactions on metals such as mercury, nickel, lead, copper, and cadmium. Redox transformations or uptake of Pu by marine bacteria may well proceed by similar mechanisms. Profiles of water samples and sediment cores were obtained along the continental shelf off Nova Scotia and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Profiles of water samples, and sediment cores were obtained. Epifluorescent microscopy was used to view bacteria (from water or sediment) after concentration on membrane filters and staining with acridine orange. Radiochemical analyses measured Pu in sediments and water samples. Studies of 237 Pu uptake used a strain of Leucothrix mucor isolated from a macroalga. Enumeration shows bacteria to range 10 4 to 10 5 cells/ml in seawater or 10 7 to 10 8 cells/gram of sediment. These numbers are related to the levels and distrbution of Pu in the samples. In cultures of L. mucor amended with Pu atom concentrations approximating those present in open ocean environments, bacterial cells concentrated 237 Pu slower and to lower levels than did clay minerals, glass beads, or phytoplankton. These data further clarify the role of marine bacteria in Pu biogeochemistry

  10. Plutonium-burn high temperature gas-cooled reactor for 3E+3S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Development in Japan is facing a very difficult conditions after Fukushima-Daiichi NPP Accident. Nuclear Energy has strong advantages on 3E, i.e., Energy security, Economical efficiency and Environment. However, people does not believe the Safety 'S' of Nuclear Energy, now. The disadvantage of 'S' overrides the advantages of '3E'. In Nuclear Energy, 'S' is expanded into 3S, i.e., Safety, Security and Safeguards. Especially, the management of Plutonium inventory in Spent Fuel generated by the NPP operation is very important in the viewpoints of non-proliferation. The high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is the solution of these disadvantages of '3S' in Nuclear Energy. The fuel of HTGR is composed by 1 mm spherical fuel particle, i.e., TRISO made by fuel, graphite and silicon-carbide. The silicon-carbide can confine the fission products in any conditions of fuel life cycle, i.e., during operation, accidents and disposal for 1 million years. The confinement of the radioactive materials can be confirmed by the TRISO. The HTGR core has strong negative feedback for temperature. So, the fission automatically stopped at the accidental conditions, such as loss of flow and LOCA. Also, the residual heat can be cooled by the radiation heat transfer to reactor vessel wall. The HTGR system usually has passive vessel wall cooling system. When the passive cooling system had been failed, the heat can be transferred to the land by heat conductions, and fuel does not reach the SiC broken temperature. The fission chain reaction has been stopped automatically by negative feedback, i.e., physics. The residual heat had been cooled automatically by radiation. The radioactive materials had been confined automatically by silicon-carbide. The HTGR is superior for 'S' safety. Plutonium can be burned by the HTGR. In the viewpoints of non-proliferation, the fuel should be made by YSZ-PuO 2 , stabilized buffer

  11. Reversibility of sorption of plutonium-239 onto hematite and goethite colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, N.; Cotter, C.R.; Kitten, H.D.; Bentley, J.; Triay, I.R.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory batch sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate: (1) sorption of plutonium-239 ( 239 Pu) on different iron oxide colloids (hematite and geothite), (2) sorption kinetics of colloidal Pu(IV) and soluble Pu(V) onto these two colloids, and (3) desorption of colloidal Pu(IV) and soluble Pu(V) from 239 Pu-loaded colloids as a function of time. Natural groundwater and carbonate-rich synthetic groundwater were used in this study. To examine the possible influence of bicarbonate on 239 Pu sorption, an additional set of experiments was conducted in sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) solutions under carbon dioxide free environments. Our results show that colloidal Pu(IV) as well as soluble Pu(V) was rapidly adsorbed by hematite and goethite colloids in both natural and synthetic groundwater. The amount of 239 Pu adsorbed by both iron oxide colloids in synthetic groundwater was higher than in natural groundwater. The presence of carbonate did not influence the sorption of 239 Pu. While sorption of soluble Pu(V) is a slow process, sorption of colloidal Pu(IV) occurs rapidly. Desorption of Pu from iron oxide colloids is much slower than the sorption processes. Our findings suggest that different sorption and desorption behaviors of 239 Pu by iron oxide colloids in groundwater may facilitate the transport of 239 Pu along potential flowpaths from the areas contaminated by radionuclide and release to the accessible environment. (orig.)

  12. Radiation-induced non-equilibrium redox chemistry of plutonium: implications for environmental migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, J M; Siekhaus, W J

    2009-02-11

    Static concentrations of plutonium oxidation states in solution and at surfaces in oxide-water systems are identified as non-equilibrium steady states. These kinetically controlled systems are described by redox cycles based on irreversible disproportionation of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) in OH-bridged intermediate complexes and at OH-covered oxide surfaces. Steady state is fixed by continuous redox cycles driven by radioactivity-promoted electron-transfer and energetically favorable reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(VII) disproportionation products with H2O. A model based on the redox cycles accounts for the high steady-state [Pu] coexisting with Pu(IV) hydrous oxide at pH 0-15 and for predominance of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) in solution. The steady-state [Pu] depends on pH and the surface area of oxide in solution, but not on the initial Pu oxidation state. PuO{sub 2+x} formation is attributed to high Pu(V) concentrations existing at water-exposed oxide surfaces. Results infer that migration of Pu in an aqueous environment is controlled by kinetic factors unique to that site and that the predominant oxidation states in solution are Pu(V) and Pu(VI).

  13. Radiation-induced non-equilibrium redox chemistry of plutonium: implications for environmental migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschke, J.M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Static concentrations of plutonium oxidation states in solution and at surfaces in oxide-water systems are identified as non-equilibrium steady states. These kinetically controlled systems are described by redox cycles based on irreversible disproportionation of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) in OH-bridged intermediate complexes and at OH-covered oxide surfaces. Steady state is fixed by continuous redox cycles driven by radioactivity-promoted electron-transfer and energetically favorable reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(VII) disproportionation products with H2O. A model based on the redox cycles accounts for the high steady-state (Pu) coexisting with Pu(IV) hydrous oxide at pH 0-15 and for predominance of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) in solution. The steady-state (Pu) depends on pH and the surface area of oxide in solution, but not on the initial Pu oxidation state. PuO 2+x formation is attributed to high Pu(V) concentrations existing at water-exposed oxide surfaces. Results infer that migration of Pu in an aqueous environment is controlled by kinetic factors unique to that site and that the predominant oxidation states in solution are Pu(V) and Pu(VI)

  14. Importance of 241 Am Determination in the Characterization of PuO2 Standards for Calorimetric Assay.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    Plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) standards are often used both as heat standards and isotopic standards for calorimetric assay. Calorimetric assay is the combination of the power in watts measured in a calorimeter with the effective specific power (P{sub eff}) in watts/g Pu, determined either by nondestructive gamma-ray assay or by destructive mass spectrometry, to yield the total elemental plutonium mass in the sample. To use a PuO{sub 2} sample as a heat standard for calorimetry, one must determine both the plutonium mass and P{sub eff} with very small uncertainties and then calculate the sample watts from the known plutonium mass, specific powers, and isotopic composition. Well-characterized PuO{sub 2} standards have plutonium mass values determined by analytical chemistry with a precision and accuracy on the order of 0.1%-0.2% relative to the total mass of the sample. Mass spectrometry, typically used to determine the isotopic fractions of plutonium standards, is very accurate and precise for the major isotopes but is somewhat less precise for low-abundance isotopes. The characterization of the {sup 241}Am/Pu ratio in the standard is also of great importance because {sup 241}Am can contribute significantly to P{sub eff} and to the heat output of the standard. The determination of the {sup 241}Am/Pu ratio in a plutonium-bearing sample is a process that is less standardized than mass spectrometry. There are no certified reference materials (CRMs) traceable to the national measurement system for {sup 241}Am in plutonium, and routine analytical {sup 241}Am/Pu ratio measurements often exhibit uncertainties of several percent relative to the total plutonium or greater.

  15. Radiative capture on $^{242}$Pu for MOX fuel reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    The use of MOX fuel (mixed-oxide fuel made of UO$_{2}$ and PuO$_{2}$) in nuclear reactors allows substituting a large fraction of the enriched Uranium by Plutonium reprocessed from spent fuel. Indeed around 66% of the plutonium from spent fuel is made of $^{239}$Pu and $^{241}$Pu, which are fissile in thermal reactors. A typical reactor of this type uses a fuel with 7% reprocessed Pu and 93% depleted U, thus profiting from both the spent fuel and the remaining $^{238}$U following the $^{235}$U enrichment. With the use of such new fuel compositions rich in Pu the better knowledge of the capture and fission cross sections of the Pu isotopes becomes very important. This is clearly stated in the recent OECD NEA’s “High Priority Request List” and in the WPEC-26 “Uncertainty and target accuracy assessment for innovative systems using recent covariance data evaluations” report. In particular, a new series of cross section evaluations have been recently carried out jointly by the European (JEFF) and United ...

  16. Estimation of 239Pu in fecal sample using simulant matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalaiselvan, S.; Jeevanram, R.K.; Sundararajan, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Estimation of 239 Pu in faeces following accidental exposure to insoluble aerosols like plutonium oxide is the best means of obtaining an indirect assessment of the intake. As part of providing radiological surveillance to plutonium handling workers, a technique has been developed and standardised for analysis of 239 Pu in fecal sample. For developing the technique cow dung and simulant fecal matrices spiked with 239 Pu have been used. The sample was ashed and the silica was eliminated by treating with HF-HNO 3 mixture. 239 Pu was separated on anion exchange and electrodeposited. The interfering elements such as Fe, Si were removed by washing the column. The percent recovery of 239 Pu by this method was 86.14±3% with a minimum detectable activity of 12.6 mBq. Experiments were repeated with a matrix which simulates fecal matter. The percent recoveries and the minimum detectable activities in both cow dung and simulant faeces were comparable. This method can detect activity less than one derived investigation level even on tenth day following exposure of 239 Pu due to inhalation. (author). 10 refs., 2 tabs

  17. Migration of plutonium from freshwater ecosystem at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; McShane, M.C.

    1977-09-01

    A reprocessing waste pond at Hanford has been inventoried to determine quantities of plutonium (Pu) that have been accumulated since its formation in 1944. Expressions of export were developed from these inventory data and from informed assumptions about the vectors which act to mobilize material containing Pu. This 14-acre pond provides a realistic illustration of the mobility of Pu in a lentic ecosystem. The ecological behavior of Pu in this pond is similar to that in other contaminated aquatic systems having widely differing limnological characteristics. Since its creation, this pond has received about one Ci of 239 , 240 Pu and 238 Pu, most of which has been retained by its sediments. Submerged plants, mainly diatoms and Potamogeton, accumulate >95% of the Pu contained in biota. Emergent insects are the only direct biological route of export, mobilizing about 5 x 10 3 nCi of Pu annually, which is also the estimated maximum quantity of the Pu exported by waterfowl, birds and mammals collectively. There is no apparent significant export by wind, and it is not likely that Pu has migrated to the ground water below U-Pond via percolation. Although this pond has a rapid flushing rate, a eutrophic nutrient supply with a diverse biotic profile, and interacts with an active terrestrial environment, it appears to effectively bind Pu and prevent it from entering pathways to man and other life

  18. Studies of plutonium and the lymphatic system: six years of progress at Colorado State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebel, J.L.; Bistline, R.W.; Schallberger, J.A.; Dagle, G.E.; Gomez, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    Air-oxidized PuO 2 , high-fired (850 0 C) PuO 2 , Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , PuF 4 , and PuCl 3 , all of which had known amounts of 241 Am, were implanted over the left metacarpus of beagles. The concentration of plutonium and 241 Am in various tissues was measured as a function of time. The effect of diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) therapy on organ deposition was studied. Significant differences in the translocation dynamics of air-oxidized PuO 2 , high-fired PuO 2 , and Pu(NO 3 ) 4 in the left superficial cervical lymph node (LSCLN) were observed by in vivo measurement and radiochemical analysis. A 3 percent buildup of plutonium was observed 2 weeks after implantation of air-oxidized PuO 2 , with an exponential buildup to 17 percent at 1 year. With Pu(NO 3 ) 4 and high-fired PuO 2 , the activity accumulation built up to a peak of 31 and 20 percent, respectively, at 30 and 60 days after implantation, followed by a gradual regression. At the implant site 1 year postimplant, a 70 percent reduction in activity was observed with Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , a 90 percent reduction with PuO 2 (high-fired), and only a 20 percent reduction with air-oxidized PuO 2 . The effect of larger particle size on the movement of plutonium from a wound site was speculated. Chemical form and physical form appear to change the rate of translocation and relative depositions of plutonium and americium in various organs.Particle size was not found to be an important factor in the total movement of plutonium in afferent and efferent lymph. More plutonium moves in the cellular fraction of afferent and efferent lymph regardless of particle size. The clearance of plutonium particles from the lymph nodes was associated with necrosis of macrophages. The effect of DTPA therapy on plutonium concentration was greater for the nitrate than for the other chemical forms

  19. Separation of trace uranium from plutonium for subsequent analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.

    1980-08-01

    Trace uranium quantities are separated from plutonium metal and plutonium oxide for subsequent analysis. Samples are dissolved in hydrobromic acid or a hydrobromic acid-hydrofluoric acid mixture. The U(VI)-halide complex is separated from nonsorbed Pu(III) on an anion exchange column using sequential washes of 9M HBr, a 0.1M HI-12M HCl mixture and 0.1M HCl

  20. Environmental Behaviour of Plutonium Accidentally Released at Thule, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Asker

    1977-01-01

    . Plutonium concentrations down through the sediment layers decayed exponentially with a half-depth of 1-2 cm. The horizontal distribution of the plutonium may be described by an exponential expression: mCi 239,240Pn km-2 = 460e-0.28R or by a power function: mCl 239,240Pu km-2 = 370 R-1.2, where R...

  1. Implications of plutonium and americium recycling on MOX fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, A.; Pilate, S.; Maldague, Th.; La Fuente, A.; Evrard, G.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the multiple recycling of plutonium in power reactors on the radiation dose rates is analyzed for the most critical stage in a MOX fuel fabrication plant. The limitation of the number of Pu recycling in light water reactors would rather stem from reactor core physics features. The case of recovering americium with plutonium is also considered and the necessary additions of shielding are evaluated. A comparison between the recycling of Pu in fast reactors and in light water reactors is presented. (author)

  2. Ostwald Ripening and Its Effect on PuO2 Particle Size in Hanford Tank Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.

    2011-09-29

    Between 1944 and 1989, the Hanford Site produced 60 percent (54.5 metric tons) of the United States weapons plutonium and produced an additional 12.9 metric tons of fuels-grade plutonium. High activity wastes, including plutonium lost from the separations processes used to isolate the plutonium, were discharged to underground storage tanks during these operations. Plutonium in the Hanford tank farms is estimated to be {approx}700 kg but may be up to {approx}1000 kg. Despite these apparent large quantities, the average plutonium concentration in the {approx}200 million liter tank waste volume is only about 0.003 grams per liter ({approx}0.0002 wt%). The plutonium is largely associated with low solubility metal hydroxide/oxide sludges where its low concentration and intimate mixture with neutron-absorbing elements (e.g., iron) are credited in nuclear criticality safety. However, concerns have been expressed that plutonium, in the form of plutonium hydrous oxide, PuO{sub 2} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O, could undergo sufficient crystal growth through Ostwald ripening in the alkaline tank waste to potentially be separable from neutron absorbing constituents by settling or sedimentation. It was found that plutonium that entered the alkaline tank waste by precipitation through neutralization from acid solution is initially present as 2- to 3-nm (0.002- to 0.003-{mu}m) scale PuO{sub 2} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O crystallite particles and grows from that point at exceedingly slow rates, posing no risk to physical segregation. These conclusions are reached by both general considerations of Ostwald ripening and specific observations of the behaviors of PuO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O upon aging in alkaline solution.

  3. Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium in mice, rats, and dogs: application to establishing values of f1 for soluble plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Moretti, E.S.; Spaletto, M.I.

    1985-04-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) absorption of plutonium was measured in mice, rats, and dogs under conditions relevant to setting drinking water standards. The fractional GI absorption of Pu(VI) in adult mice was 2 x 10 -4 (0.02%) in fed mice and 2 x 10 -3 (0.2%) in fasted mice. The GI absorption of plutonium was independent of plutonium oxidation state, administration medium, and plutonium concentration; absorption was dependent upon animal species, state of animal fasting, state of Pu(IV) hydrolysis, and age of the animal. Fractional GI absorption values ranged from 3 x 10 -5 (0.003%) for hydrolyzed Pu(IV) administered to fed adult mice to 7 x 10 -3 (0.7%) for Pu(VI) administered to fed neonatal rats. From analysis of our data, we suggested values of f 1 (the fraction transferred from gut to blood in humans) for use in establishment of oral limits of exposure to plutonium. For an acute exposure in the occupational setting, we proposed one value of f 1 for fed (2 x 10 -4 ) and one for fasted (2 x 10 -3 ) individuals. For the environmental setting, we developed two approaches to obtaining values of f 1 ; suggested values were 6 x 10 -4 and 4 x 10 -3 , respectively. Both approaches took into account effects of animal age and fasting. We discussed uncertainties in proposed values of f 1 and made recommendations for further research. 41 refs., 8 figs., 24 tabs

  4. Vertical distribution of (241)Pu in the southern Baltic Sea sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2014-12-15

    The vertical distribution of plutonium (241)Pu in marine sediments can assist in determining the deposition history and sedimentation process of analyzed regions. In addition, (241)Pu/(239+240)Pu activity ratio could be used as a sensitive fingerprint for radioactive source identification. The present preliminary studies on vertical distribution of (241)Pu in sediments from four regions of the southern Baltic Sea are presented. The distribution of (241)Pu was not uniform and depended on sediment geomorphology and depth as well as location. The highest concentrations of plutonium were found in the surface layers of all analyzed sediments and originated from the Chernobyl accident. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Plutonium uniqueness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    A standard is suggested against which the putative uniqueness of plutonium may be tested. It is common folklore that plutonium is unique among the chemical elements because its four common oxidation states can coexist in the same solution. Whether this putative uniqueness appears only during transit to equilibrium, or only at equilibrium, or all of the time, is not generally made clear. But while the folklore may contain some truth, it cannot be put to test until some measure of 'uniqueness' is agreed upon so that quantitative comparisons are possible. One way of measuring uniqueness is as the magnitude of the product of the mole fractions of the element at equilibrium. A 'coexistence index' is defined and discussed. (author)

  6. Testing plutonium fuel assembly production for fast-neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nougues, B.; Benhamou, A.; Bertothy, G.; Lepetit, H.

    1975-01-01

    The main characteristics of plutonium fuel elements for fast breeder reactors justify specific test procedures and special techniques. The specific tests relating to the Pu content consist of Pu enrichment and distribution tests, determination of the O/M ratio and external contamination tests. The specific tests performed on fuel configuration are: testing of sintered pellet diameter, testing of pin welding and checking of internal assmbly [fr

  7. Biological behaviour of plutonium inhaled by baboons as plutonium n-tributylphosphate complex. Comparison with ICRP models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, H.; Duserre, C.; Rateau, G.; Legendre, N.; Masse, R.; Piechowski, J.; Menoux, B.

    1989-01-01

    In order to devise a model capable of calculating committed doses for workers contaminated by inhalation of plutonium tributylphosphate complex during reprocessing, we investigated the biokinetics of plutonium in baboons after inhalation of this chemical form. The animals were killed 0.6, 3, 15, 30, 90 and 365 days post inhalation. Urine and faeces were collected daily. After killing, the main organs were collected for chemical analysis. In order to improve our knowledge of the behaviour of systemic plutonium, three baboons were given an intravenous injection of Pu-TBP and were respectively killed 2, 30 and 365 days post injection. We observed that Pu-TBP could be classified as a W compound, with a half-time for lung clearance of 150 days. Urinary Pu excretion was 3 times higher than was expected from Durbin's model, suggesting that Pu introduced as Pu-TBP, is extremely mobile, and that the complex formed with blood proteins differs from the one formed after inhalation of plutonium nitrate. (author)

  8. Np Analysis in IAT-Samples Containing <10 Microgram Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, R.; Raab, W.; Dashdondog, J.; Balsley, S.

    2008-01-01

    A method for the determination of neptunium to plutonium in safeguards samples containing less than 10 microgram Pu is presented. The chemical treatment and the optimized measurement conditions for gamma spectrometry are reported. This method is based on thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) after chemical treatment and separation and was validated with mixtures of U, Pu and Np certified reference materials and using the 237 Np standard addition method, followed by separation of the waste fraction and gamma spectrometric analysis. The highest sensitivity, precision and accuracy in the determination of the Np:Pu ratio at microgram levels of Pu is achieved by evaluating 241 Pu and 233 Pa after measuring the adsorbent with a well-type gamma detector 3 weeks after chemical treatment. The repeatability of determining the Np:Pu ratio is estimated to be 5%, the maximum uncertainty as determined from comparing the 4 measurement modes is within ± 10% for samples containing 3 μg Pu, while being within ± 20% for 0.4 μg Pu. (authors)

  9. Studies and manufacture of plutonium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, P.; Mustelier, J.P.; Pascard, R.

    1964-01-01

    The studies carried out at the C.E.A. on the properties of fast neutron reactor fuels, the manufacture of fuel elements and their behaviour under irradiation are broadly outlined. The metal fuels studied are the ternary alloys U Pu Mo, U Pu Nb, U Pa Ti, U Pa Zr, the ceramic fuels being mixed uranium and plutonium oxides, carbides and nitrides obtained by sintering. Results are given on the manufacture of uranium fuel elements containing a small proportion of plutonium, used in a critical experiment, and on the first experiments in the manufacture of fuel elements for the reactor Rapsodie. Finally the results of irradiation tests carried out on the prototype fuel pins for Rapsodie are described. (authors) [fr

  10. Aerosol generation by oxidation and combustion of plutonium and its compounds: literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1987-09-01

    Generation of aerosols by oxidation or combustion is one of the greatest risks due to plutonium. A review is made of the most interesting documents available on this topic. Following a brief study of plutonium oxydation conditions, characteristics of aerosols generated by accidents of fires involving metallic Pu and some of its compounds are assessed. Nuclear weapons are not included in this review [fr

  11. Adsorption-desorption characteristics of plutonium and americium with sediment particles in the estuarine environment: studies using plutonium-237 and americium-241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, C.N.; Fukai, R.

    1975-01-01

    The particle formation of plutonium and americium, their adsorption onto fresh water sediments and the desorption from the sediments in sea water were studied in the Laboratory under simulated river-estuary conditions, using γ-emitting plutonium-237 and americium-241. The results of the experiments show that the particle formation of plutonium depends on its valence states, on pH and on the salinity of the medium. For river water at pH4, some 25%, 20% and 30% of the added 237 Pu was in particulate form, larger than 0.45 μm, for Pu (III), Pu (IV) and Pu (VI), respectively, while 65%, 90% and 50% of the respective valence states was associated with particles at pH 8. In sea water the general pattern remains similar, although Pu (VI) is more soluble in sea water owing to higher ligand concentrations for carbonate and bicarbonate complexes. The pH-dependency of particle formation of Am (III) is more steep than that of plutonium and seems to be influenced by colloidal substances occurring in the experimental media. The adsorption-desorption characteristics of plutonium and americium with the sediment in river water as well as sea water reflect the characteristics of their particle formation, being dependent upon such properties as valence states, the pH and salinity of the medium. A sewage effluent added to the media has small but measurable effects on the adsorption-desorption processes of plutonium. (author)

  12. Stabilization of polynuclear plutonium(IV) species by humic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Rémi; Banik, Nidhu Lal; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Kratz, Jens Volker

    2014-04-01

    Although the formation of tetravalent plutonium (Pu(IV)) polymers with natural organic matter was previously observed by spectroscopy, there is no quantitative evidence of such reaction in batch experiments. In the present study, Pu(IV) interaction with humic acid (HA) was investigated at pH 1.8, 2.5 and 3, as a function of HA concentration and for Pu total concentration equal to 6 × 10-8 M. The finally measured Pu(IV) concentrations ([Pu(IV)]eq) are below Pu(IV) solubility limit. Pu(IV)-HA interaction can be explained by the complexation of Pu(IV) monomers by HA up to [Pu(IV)]eq ∼ 10-8 M. However, the slope of the log-log Pu(IV)-HA binding isotherm changes from ∼0.7 to ∼3.5 for higher [Pu(IV)]eq than ∼10-8 M and at any pH. This result suggests the stabilization of hydrolyzed polymeric Pu(IV) species by HA, with a 4:1 Pu:HA stoichiometry. This confirms, for the first time, previous observations made by spectroscopy in concentrated systems. The humic-ion binding model, Model VII, was introduced into the geochemical speciation program PHREEQC and was used to simulate Pu(IV) monomers binding to HA. The simulations are consistent with other tetravalent actinides-HA binding data from literature. The stabilization of a Pu tetramer (Pu4(OH)88+) by HA was proposed to illustrate the present experimental results for [Pu(IV)]eq > 10-8 M. Predictive simulations of Pu(IV) apparent solubility due to HA show that the chosen Pu(IV)-polymer has no impact for pH > 4. However, the comparison between these predictions and recent spectroscopic results suggest that more hydrolyzed polymeric Pu(IV) species can be stabilized by HA at pH > 4. Polymeric Pu(IV)-HA species might significantly enhance Pu(IV) apparent solubility due to humics, which support a colloid-facilitated transport of this low solubility element.

  13. Characterization of Pu concentration and its isotopic composition in a reference fallout material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongsan; Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi; Wu, Fengchang; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Hirose, Katsumi

    2010-02-01

    Because there is no reference material for fallout plutonium isotope monitoring, preparation of such a material is necessary for quality control of fallout radionuclides analysis for atmospheric environmental studies. In this work, we report the characterization of Pu activity and its isotopic composition in a reference fallout material prepared by the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI), Japan. This material was prepared from samples collected at 14 stations throughout Japan in 1963-1979, with reference values of (137)Cs, (90)Sr and (239)(+)(240)Pu activities. We analyzed the activities of (239)(+)(240)Pu and (241)Pu, and the atom ratios of (240)Pu/(239)Pu and (241)Pu/(239)Pu using an isotope dilution sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). The (239)(+)(240)Pu activities in this fallout material using acid leaching and total digestion were 6.56+/-0.20 mBq/g and 6.79+/-0.16 mBq/g, respectively. Atom ratios of (240)Pu/(239)Pu were 0.1915+/-0.0030 and 0.1922+/-0.0044, respectively. Both (240)Pu/(239)Pu and (241)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were slightly higher than those of global fallout, which could be attributed to the deposition of fallout radionuclides resulting from the Chinese nuclear weapons tests conducted in the 1970s. The dominant host phases of (239)(+)(240)Pu were found to be organic matter-sulfides (70%) with a relative high (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio, and Fe-Mn oxides (19%) using a sequential extraction method. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ceramic processing of uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuels (U1-yPuy)O2 with high plutonium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauchy, Romain; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Audubert, Fabienne; Hodaj, Fiqiri

    2014-01-01

    The ternary thermodynamic U-Pu-O system has been studied for decades for MOX fuel applications but the phase diagram is still not precisely described mostly in the UO 2 -PuO 2 -Pu 2 O 3 sub-system. Furthermore, uranium-plutonium mixed oxides containing high amounts of plutonium are now being considered within the scope of future nuclear reactors. Within this framework, obtaining homogeneous mixed oxides by powder metallurgy is paramount. The studied process is based on UO 2 and PuO 2 co-milling and applied to compounds with high Pu content. The objective of this study is obtaining microstructures free of local heterogeneities in the U-Pu distribution which are not suitable for research studies. Furthermore, in case of prospective irradiation application, local high Pu concentrations lead to 'hot spots' in the material influencing the fission gas release behaviour such as the thermal conductivity which may raise a number of safety issues. This study describes the effect of some fabrication parameters on the powder morphology and/or, on the final microstructure (e.g. U-Pu distribution). The co-milling, sieving and sintering steps were investigated within this scope and the resulting powders and pellets were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy observations, respectively. (authors)

  15. Artificial radioactivity and marine environment. Study of 238Pu, 239Pu+240Pu, 241Pu and 241Am in the Mediterranean sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestra, Serge.

    1980-10-01

    This paper is in two parts. Part one is about the methods for analyzing transuranium elements particularly the development of an analytical process for plutonium and for perfecting an Americium analyzing method, capable of treating samples of 200 litres of sea water, 100 grams of sediment and 100 grams of biological matter. Part two concerns the in situ determinations carried out within the scope of the study on the distribution and behaviour of transuranium elements in the Mediterranean sea. The high sea studies concerned the effects of atmospheric fall out and the vertical distribution of Pu and Am. Studies along the coasts enabled a quantitative study to be made of the contribution of rivers to the Mediterranean and to study the distribution of Pu along the French Mediterranean coast line [fr

  16. Progress on determination of Pu in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xunlai; Zeng Ying; Tuo Xianguo

    2012-01-01

    With the development of nuclear energy and nuclear technology, the content of radionuclides discharge into the environment is increasing, in order to protecting public safety and the environment, the radionuclides in environment must be determinated accurately. This article describes the progress on determination of Pu in environment in the past two decades, detailed analysis and compare a spectrometry, liquid scintillation counting, mass spectrometry, induced the characteristics and application of each method. α spectrometer is the most widely used technology, because it is simple, equipment is relatively cheap, but its sensitivity is too low to determinate low content of Pu and its counting need a long time. Liquid scintillation counting method is rapid, accuracy, but the efficiency is generally, the cost is relatively high. The detection limits of mass spectrometry is low, its analysis time fast and efficiency high, but the cost is high, the application is common in recent years, because mass spectrometry can analysis trace plutonium of environment. (authors)

  17. Vapor pressure of plutonium carbide adsorbed on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallent, O.K.; Wichner, R.P.; Towns, R.L.; Godsey, T.T.

    1984-09-01

    An investigation was conducted to obtain data needed to make realistic estimates of plutonium contamination in the primary coolant system in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The vapor pressure of plutonium over plutonium sesquicarbide (Pu 2 C 3 ) adsorbed on the surface of H-451 graphite was found to be defined by adsorption isotherms at test temperatures of 1000, 1200, and 1400 0 C. The vapor pressures at low concentrations of Pu 2 C 3 on the surface of the graphite were up to three orders of magnitude below that of pure Pu 2 C 3 at a given temperature. The heat of adsorption increases with decreasing Pu 2 C 3 surface coverage with the measured value at 0.05 μmol Pu 2 C 3 /m 2 being 107.9 kcal/mol. The Pu 2 C 3 concentration required for monolayer surface coverage on the graphite was found to be 3.27 μmol/m 2

  18. Weapon plutonium in accelerator driven power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvedov, O.V.; Murin, B.P.; Kochurov, B.P.; Shubin, Yu.M.; Volk, V.I.; Bogdanov, P.V.

    1997-01-01

    Accelerator Driven Systems are planned to be developed for the use (or destruction) of dozens of tons of weapon-grade Plutonium (W-Pu) resulted from the reducing of nuclear weapons. In the paper are compared the parameters of various types of accelerators, the physical properties of various types of targets and blankets, and the results of fuel cycle simulation. Some economical aspects are also discussed

  19. Study of plutonium-addition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchar, L.; Wozniakova, B.

    1976-11-01

    Steady state phase diagrams and calculated values of concentrations on the solid and liquid curves, the steady state distribution coefficient and thermodynamic control are presented for temperatures ranging from the eutectic reaction temperatures to the Pu melting point temperature for binary systems plutonium-addition (Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Zr, Ru, Os, Th, U, Np). (J.P.)

  20. Anticipated Radiological Dose to Worker for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP - Project W-460

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides estimates of the expected whole body and extremity radiological dose, expressed as dose equivalent (DE), to workers conducting planned plutonium (Pu) stabilization processes at the Hanford Site Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The report is based on a time and motion dose study commissioned for Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, to provide personnel exposure estimates for construction work in the PFP storage vault area plus operation of stabilization and packaging equipment at PFP

  1. In-line measurement of plutonium and americium in mixed solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    A solution assay instrument (SAI) has been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and installed in the plutonium purification and americium recovery process area in the Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility. The instrument is designed for accurate, timely, and simultaneous nondestructive analysis of plutonium and americium in process solutions that have a wide range of concentrations and Am/Pu ratios. For a 25-mL sample, the assay precision is 5 g/L within a 2000-s count time

  2. Anticipated Radiological Dose to Worker for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP - Project W-460

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, E V

    2000-01-01

    This report provides estimates of the expected whole body and extremity radiological dose, expressed as dose equivalent (DE), to workers conducting planned plutonium (Pu) stabilization processes at the Hanford Site Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The report is based on a time and motion dose study commissioned for Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, to provide personnel exposure estimates for construction work in the PFP storage vault area plus operation of stabilization and packaging equipment at PFP.

  3. Fractionation of plutonium in environmental and bio-shielding concrete samples using dynamic sequential extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    Fractionation of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239,240Pu) in environmental samples (i.e. soil and sediment) and bio-shielding concrete from decommissioning of nuclear reactor were carried out by dynamic sequential extraction using an on-line sequential injection (SI) system combined with a specially...... to the treatment and disposal of nuclear waste from decommissioning....

  4. Thermodynamic study of preventing the corrosion of plutonium surface with CO and H2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Quan; Gao Tao; Wang Hongyan; Jiang Gang; Zhu Zhenghe

    1999-08-01

    The calculated results of the temperature dependence of standard Gibbs free energy change ΔG 0 of the reactions of CO and H 2 with Pu, PuO, Pu 2 O 3 , PuO 2 , respectively, show that the CO-H 2 system enables a passive surface film to be formed on the compact and stable crystal surface of Pu 2 O 3 to prevent the metallic plutonium from further corrosion by the inward diffusive CO and H 2 gas. It is presumably like the protecting aluminum surface with its oxidized layer

  5. Deposition of the trace heavy metals polonium and plutonium onto marine surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, V.F.; Folsom, T.R.; Cowen, J.P.; Parks, G.J. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Plutonium and polonium assays of the giant kelp revealed that most of the Pu and Po was in the surface scrapings. Both nuclides were concentrated to 1000 times their sea water concentrations; there was usually 200 times more Po activity than Pu. Field experiments using Macrocystis pyrifera showed that Pu and Po accumulated in proportion with time and surface area and that approximately four times more Pu and Po were found on oldest tissues. When glass microscope slides were exposed alongside living plants, deposition rates for Po were identical and Po deposited about 200 times faster than Pu. (HLW)

  6. Feasibility study of plutonium isotopic analysis of resin beads by nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    We have initiated a feasibility study on the use of nondestructive low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy for plutonium isotopic analysis on resin beads. Seven resin bead samples were measured, with each sample containing an average of 9 μg of plutonium; the isotopic compositions of the samples varied over a wide range. The gamma-ray spectroscopy results, obtained from 4-h counting-time measurements, were compared with mass spectrometry results. The average ratios of gamma-ray spectroscopy to mass spectrometry were 1.014 +- 0.025 for 238 Pu/ 239 Pu, 0.996 +- 0.018 for 240 Pu/ 239 Pu, and 0.980 +- 0.038 for 241 Pu/ 239 Pu. The rapid, automated, and accurate nondestructive isotopic analysis of resin beads may be very useful to process technicians and International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  7. The unrivalled expertise for Pu recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, W.; Pouilloux, M.

    1997-01-01

    Relying on the outstanding performances of the reprocessing facilities and the growing fabrication facilities, the in-reactor Pu recycling program in France and in other European countries is steadily implemented and has reached full-scale industrial operation. The RCR strategy -Reprocessing, Conditioning and Recycling- developed by COGEMA is now a well proven industrial reality. In 1997, plutonium recycling through MOX fuel is a mature industry, with successful operational experience and large-scale fabrication plants. In this field, COGEMA is the main actor, on operating simultaneously three complete multidesign fuel production plants: MELOX plant (in Marcoule), CADARACHE plant and DESSEL plant (in Belgium). Present MOX production capacity available to COGEMA fits 175 tHM per year and will be extended to reach about 325 tHM in the year 2000, that will represent 75% of the total MOX fabrication capacity in Europe. The industrial mastery and the high production level in MOX production assured by high technology processes confers COGEMA an unrivalled expertise for Pu recycling. This allows COGEMA to be a major actor in Pu-based fuels in the coming second nuclear era with advanced fuel cycles. The paper depicts the steps of the progressive advance of COGEMA to reach the Pu recycling expertise. (author)

  8. Assembly-level analysis of heterogeneous Th–Pu PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainuddin, Nurjuanis Zara; Parks, Geoffrey T.; Shwageraus, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We directly compare homogeneous and heterogeneous Th–Pu fuel. • Examine whether there is an increase in Pu incineration in the latter. • Homogeneous fuel was able to achieve much higher Pu incineration. • In the heterogeneous case, U-233 breeding is faster (larger power fraction), thus decreasing incineration of Pu. - Abstract: This study compares homogeneous and heterogeneous thorium–plutonium (Th–Pu) fuel assemblies (with high Pu content – 20 wt%), and examines whether there is an increase in Pu incineration in the latter. A seed-blanket configuration based on the Radkowsky thorium reactor concept is used for the heterogeneous assembly. This separates the thorium blanket from the uranium seed, or in this case a plutonium seed. The seed supplies neutrons to the subcritical thorium blanket which encourages the in situ breeding and burning of 233 U, allowing the fuel to stay critical for longer, extending burnup of the fuel. While past work on Th–Pu seed-blanket units shows superior Pu incineration compared to conventional U–Pu mixed oxide fuel, there is no literature to date that directly compares the performance of homogeneous and heterogeneous Th–Pu assembly configurations. Use of exactly the same fuel loading for both configurations allows the effects of spatial separation to be fully understood. It was found that the homogeneous fuel with and without burnable poisons was able to achieve much higher Pu incinerations than the heterogeneous fuel configurations, while still attaining a reasonably high discharge burnup. This is because in the heterogeneous cases, 233 U breeding is faster, thereby contributing to a much larger fraction of total power produced by the assembly. In contrast, 233 U build-up is slower in the homogeneous case and therefore Pu burning is greater. This 233 U begins to contribute a significant fraction of power produced only towards the end of life, thus extending criticality, allowing more Pu to burn.

  9. Calculated critical parameters in simple geometries for oxide and nitrate water mixtures of U-233, U-235 and Pu-239 with thorium. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Converse, W.E.; Bierman, S.R.

    1979-11-01

    Calculations have been performed on water mixtures of oxides and nitrates of 233 U, 235 U, and 239 Pu with chemically similar thorium compounds to determine critical dimensions for simple geometries (sphere, cylinder, and slab). Uranium enrichments calculated were 100%, 20%, 10%, and 5%; plutonium calculations assumed 100% 239 Pu. Thorium to uranium or plutonium weight ratios (Th: U or Pu) calculated were 0, 1, 4, and 8. Both bare and full water reflection conditions were calculated. The results of the calculations are plotted showing a critical dimension versus the uranium or plutonium concentration. Plots of K-infinity and material buckling for each material type are also shown

  10. Standard test method for plutonium assay by plutonium (III) diode array spectrophotometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the determination of total plutonium as plutonium(III) in nitrate and chloride solutions. The technique is applicable to solutions of plutonium dioxide powders and pellets (Test Methods C 697), nuclear grade mixed oxides (Test Methods C 698), plutonium metal (Test Methods C 758), and plutonium nitrate solutions (Test Methods C 759). Solid samples are dissolved using the appropriate dissolution techniques described in Practice C 1168. The use of this technique for other plutonium-bearing materials has been reported (1-5), but final determination of applicability must be made by the user. The applicable concentration range for plutonium sample solutions is 10–200 g Pu/L. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropria...

  11. Preventing pollution from plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-01-01

    The plutonium processing facility at Los Alamos has adopted the strategic goal of becoming a facility that processes plutonium in a way that produces only environmentally benign waste streams. Pollution prevention through source reduction and environmentally sound recycling are being pursued. General approaches to waste reductions are administrative controls, modification of process technologies, and additional waste polishing. Recycling of waste materials, such as spent acids and salts, are technical possibilities and are being pursued to accomplish additional waste reduction. Liquid waste stream polishing to remove final traces of plutonium and hazardous chemical constituents is accomplished through (a) process modifications, (b) use of alternative chemicals and sorbents for residue removal, (c) acid recycling, and (d) judicious use of a variety of waste polishing technologies. Technologies that show promise in waste minimization and pollution prevention are identified. Working toward this goal of pollution prevention is a worthwhile endeavor, not only for Los Alamos, but for the Nuclear Complex of the future

  12. Preventing pollution from plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1995-01-01

    The plutonium processing facility at Los Alamos has adopted the strategic goal of becoming a facility that processes plutonium in a way that produces only environmentally benign waste streams. Pollution prevention through source reduction and environmentally sound recycling are being pursued. General approaches to waste reductions are administrative controls, modification of process technologies, and additional waste polishing. Recycling of waste materials, such as spent acids and salts, are technical possibilities and are being pursued to accomplish additional waste reduction. Liquid waste stream polishing to remove final traces of plutonium and hazardous chemical constituents is accomplished through process modifications, use of alternative chemicals and sorbents for residue removal, acid recycling, and judicious use of a variety of waste polishing technologies. Technologies that show promise in waste minimization and pollution prevention are identified. Working toward this goal of pollution prevention is a worthwhile endeavor , not only for Los Alamos, but for the Nuclear Complex of the future. (author) 12 refs.; 2 figs

  13. Structural Investigation of (U0.7Pu0.3)O2-x Mixed Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Martin, Philippe M; Martel, Laura; Prieur, Damien; Scheinost, Andreas C; Somers, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Uranium-plutonium mixed oxide containing 30% of plutonium is a candidate fuel for several fast neutron and accelerator driven reactor systems. In this work, a detailed structural investigation on sol-gel synthesized stoichiometric U0.7Pu0.3O2.00 and substoichiometric U0.7Pu0.3O2-x, using X-ray diffraction (XRD), oxygen 17 magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((17)O MAS NMR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy is described. As observed by XRD, the stoichiometric U0.7Pu0.3O2.00 is monophasic with a lattice parameter in good agreement with Vegard's law, while the substoichiometric U0.7Pu0.3O2-x material is biphasic. Solid solution ideality in terms of a random distribution of metal atoms is proven for U0.7Pu0.3O2.00 with (17)O MAS NMR. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy shows the presence of plutonium(III) in U0.7Pu0.3O2-x. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy indicates a similar local structure around both cations, and comparison with XRD indicates a close similarity between uranium and plutonium local structures and the long-range ordering.

  14. Chemical speciation of plutonium in the radioactive waste burial ground at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1978-08-01

    The plutonium chemical species in two types of samples from the Savannah River Plant burial ground for radioactive waste were identified. Samples analyzed were water and sediment from burial ground monitoring well C-17 and soil from an alpha waste burial trench. Soluble plutonium in the monitoring well was less than 12A in diameter, was cationic, and contained about 43% Pu(VI) and 25% Pu(IV). The equilibrium distribution coefficient (K /sub d/) for soluble plutonium from the well water (pH 7) to burial ground soil was about 60. Soil plutonium from the waste trench was not cation-exchanged; 78% of the soil plutonium was associated with metallic oxides in the soil. Approximately 9% of the Pu was contained in the crystalline soil matrix. Thus, about 87% of the plutonium in the soil was in a relatively immobile form. Ion-exchangeable and organic acid forms of plutonium amounted to only about 2.5% each. The bulk of the plutonium now on burial ground soils will be immobile except for movement of soil particles containing plutonium. 6 tables

  15. FY12 Final Report for PL10-Mod Separations-PD12: Electrochemically Modulated Separation of Plutonium from Dilute and Concentrated Dissolver Solutions for Analysis by Gamma Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Sandra H.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Duckworth, Douglas C.; Cloutier, Janet M.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate and timely analysis of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel is critical in nuclear safeguards for detection of both protracted and rapid plutonium diversions. Gamma spectroscopy is a viable method for accurate and timely measurements of plutonium provided that the plutonium is well separated from the interfering fission and activation products present in spent nuclear fuel. Electrochemically modulated separation (EMS) is a method that has been used successfully to isolate picogram amounts of Pu from nitric acid matrices. With EMS, Pu adsorption may be turned “on” and “off” depending on the applied voltage, allowing for collection and stripping of Pu without the addition of chemical reagents. In this work, we have scaled up the EMS process to isolate microgram quantities of Pu from matrices encountered in spent nuclear fuel during reprocessing. Several challenges have been addressed including surface area limitations, radiolysis effects, electrochemical cell performance stability, and chemical interferences. After these challenges were resolved, 6 µg Pu was deposited in the electrochemical cell with approximately an 800-fold reduction of fission and activation product levels from a spent nuclear fuel sample. Modeling showed that these levels of Pu collection and interference reduction may not be sufficient for Pu detection by gamma spectroscopy. The main remaining challenges are to achieve a more complete Pu isolation and to deposit larger quantities of Pu for successful gamma analysis of Pu. If gamma analyses of Pu are successful, EMS will allow for accurate and timely on-site analysis for enhanced Pu safeguards.

  16. The partition chromatograph separation-spectrometry for the determination of 29 trace elements in PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Lanxiang; Ji Junying; Gao Binghua; Pan Chenlian; Lu Huibao

    1986-04-01

    The partition chromatograph separation-spectrometry for the determination of 29 trace elements in PuO 2 is described. A dissolving sample with electromagnetical mixer was designed. The oil bath of high boiling point was employed for dissolving sample. 30 mg PuO 2 could be dissolved completely about 20 minuts. The column partition chromatograph was used in which mixing extraction agent of TBP and TIOA (1:1) was employed as stationary phase, PTFCE powder as support, 3.5 N nitric acid as mobile phase. The determined trace elements were separated from 30 mg PuO 2 and collected in 1 ml receiving liquid. In which the low content of Pu did not interfere the determination. The indium was used as extra base, the indium and yttrium were used as inside marking elements. 29 trace elements (Cd, Ba, Be, Fe, Co, Si, B, Ga, Sc, P, Mn, Cr, W, Mg, Mo, Pb, Ni, Al, Ti, La, Ca, V, Ce, Cu, Ag, Zn, Li, Na, K) were determined cooperatively by ISP-28 type and ISP-51 type spectrograph using solution dry residue of high pressure spark. The range of the determination of the trace elements varies from 3 x 10 -6 to 3 x 10 -2 %. The recovery of this method varies from 83-120%. The precision is within +- 28%. The plutonium absorbed in the column can be desorbed by 4 N methanoic acid, for example, 30 mg PuO 2 can be desorbed quantitatively by 2 ml such desorbing agent

  17. Investigation of single crystal zircon, (Zr,Pu)SiO4 doped with Pu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchar, J. M.; Burakov, B. E.; Anderson, E. B.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.

    2003-04-01

    Zircon-based ceramics are under consideration as durable waste forms for immobilization of weapons grade plutonium and other actinide elements. Samples of polycrystalline zircon doped with 238Pu and 239Pu have been obtained in previous studies. These materials, however, are difficult to use for precise measurement of the leach-rate of Pu, and to accurately determine the level of Pu doping that can be attained in zircon, (Zr,Pu)SiO_4. Single crystals of 238Pu doped zircon (ranging from 0.3 to 3.5 mm in size) were successfully grown for the first time ever using a Li-Mo flux synthesis method. The incorporation of Pu ranged from 1.9 to 4.7 wt. % el. (with approximately 81 wt.% of 238Pu isotope) based on electron microprobe analysis. The zircon crystals were pinkish-brown when they were crystallized, and then over a period of five months changed to a brown color. After fourteen months the crystals turned to a brown-gray color. The zircon crystals glow in the dark probably from alpha particle induced luminescence. The intensity of the cathodoluminescence (CL) emission in the Pu doped crystals is correlated with the Pu content, and the CL emission showed no change 141 days after the initial CL measurements were made. Single crystal X-ray diffraction results obtained 141 days after synthesis indicate unit cell parameters (in angstroms): a = 6.6267(15), c = 5.9992(10) and a cell volume of 263.41(10). When the zircon crystals were grown, they were free of cracks. Over the course of five months cracks appeared throughout the crystals, and after fourteen months the cracks became much more abundant. The zircon crystals were transparent upon crystallization, and even with numerous cracks throughout the crystals remain transparent. Radiation damage calculations indicate that after only a short period of time, six months, these zircon crystals had already accumulated significant alpha-induced radiation damage (˜2.5 x1014 alpha-decay events per milligram). After five years they

  18. Estimated inventory of plutonium and uranium radionuclides for vegetation in aged fallout areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romney, E.M.; Wallace, A.; Kinnear, J.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1977-01-01

    Data are presented pertinent to the contamination of vegetation by plutonium and other radionuclides in aged fallout areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The standing biomass of vegetation estimated by nondestructive dimensional methods varied from about 200 to 600 g/m 2 for the different fallout areas. Estimated inventories of 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, and 235 U in plants and their biological effects are discussed

  19. Spectrochemical determination of tantalum in plutonium metal using direct current plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeff, S.K.; Morris, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Tantalum is determined by direct current plasma spectrometry after separation of plutonium from solution as PuF 3 . After centrifugation of the PuF 3 precipitate, a low level of plutonium remains in solution in sufficient quantity to cause spectral interferences. It is necessary to determine the plutonium by dc plasma spectrometry and apply a correction to determine low tantalum concentrations with good accuracy and precision. Tantalum can be determined down to 0.4 ppM in solution with a relative standard deviation of 10 percent. Better precision can be achieved at higher concentrations. The procedure is simple and convenient for glovebox work. 5 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  20. Effect of compression on reactivity of plutonium based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.; Marotta, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis was made to determine if criticality could occur due to compression of bare spheres of Pu and PuO 2 (solid or powdered) during a high-speed impact accident of an air transportable plutonium package. It was calculated that an initial k/sub eff/ less than 0.70 would not result in a critical condition (less than 0.97); thus, a conservative max permissible design value of k/sub eff/ for a Pu air transportable package is 0.70

  1. Equilibrium composition for the reaction of plutonium hydride with air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Lexi; Sun Ying; Xue Weidong; Zhu Zhenghe; Wang Rong; Luo Deli

    2002-01-01

    There are six independent constituents with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH 2.7 (s), PuN(s), Pu 2 O 3 (s), N 2 , O 2 and H 2 , therefore, the system described involves of 2 independent reactions, both ΔG 0 <<0. The calculated equilibrium compositions are in agreement with those of the experimental, which indicates that the chemical equilibrium is nearly completely approached. Therefore, it is believed that the reaction rate of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The author has briefly discussed the simultaneous reactions and its thermodynamic coupling effect

  2. Size determinations of plutonium colloids using autocorrelation photon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Newton, T.W.; Thompson, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Autocorrelation Photon Spectroscopy (APS) is a light-scattering technique utilized to determine the size distribution of colloidal suspensions. The capabilities of the APS methodology have been assessed by analyzing colloids of known sizes. Plutonium(IV) colloid samples were prepared by a variety of methods including: dilution; peptization; and alpha-induced auto-oxidation of Pu(III). The size of theses Pu colloids was analyzed using APS. The sizes determined for the Pu colloids studied varied from 1 to 370 nanometers. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  3. On thorium and plutonium cocrystallization with calcium oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basalaeva, L.N.; Bekyasheva, T.A.; Popov, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    Study of possibility of 239 Pu and 234 Th concentration from bone ashe (calcium phosphate) hydrochloric acid solutions by coprecipitation with nonisotopic medium (CaC 2 O 4 ) for their further radiometry or alpha-spectrometry is carried out. Thorium and plutonium distribution coefficients in calcium oxalate precipitate - solution system, as well as coefficients of Th and Pu cocrystallization with CaC 2 O 4 and cocrystallization type are determined. Possibility of Pu and Th concentration from bone tissue solutions is demonstrated on small oxalate amount containing 25% of Ca total amount in bone tissue

  4. Investigations on the oxidation of nitric acid plutonium solutions with ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction of ozone with nitric acid Pu solutions was studied as a function of reaction time, acid concentration and Pu concentration. Strong nitric acid Pu solutions are important in nuclear fuel element production and reprocessing. The Pu must be converted into hexavalent Pu before precipitation from the homogeneous solution together with uranium-IV, ammonia and CO 2 in the form of ammonium uranyl/plutonyl carbonate (AUPuC). Formation of a solid phase during ozonation was observed for the first time. The proneness to solidification increases with incrasing plutonium concentrations and with decreasing acid concentrations. If the formation of a solid phase during ozonation of nitric acid Pu solutions cannot be prevented, the PU-IV oxidation process described is unsuitable for industrial purposes as Pu solutions in industrial processes have much higher concentrations than the solutions used in the present investigation. (orig./EF) [de

  5. A compartment model of plutonium dynamics in a deciduous forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Gardner, R.H.; Dahlman, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    A linear compartment donor-controlled model was designed to describe and simulate the behaviour of plutonium ( 239 , 240 Pu) in a contaminated deciduous forest ecosystem at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. At steady states predicted by the model, less than 0.25% of the Pu in the ecosystem resides in forest biota. Soil is the major repository of Pu in the forest, and reciprocal exchanges of Pu between soil and litter or soil and tree roots were dominant transfers affecting the ecosystem distribution of Pu. Variation in predicted steady state amounts of Pu in the forest, given variability in the model parameters, indicated that ones ability to develop reliable models of Pu transport in ecosystems will improve with greater precision in data from natural environments and a better understanding of sources of variation in Pu data. (author)

  6. Electronic structure of Pu-Ce(-Ga) and Pu-Am(-Ga) alloys, stabilized in the {delta} phase; Structure electronique d'alliages Pu-Ce(-Ga) et Pu-Am(-Ga) stabilises en phase {delta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormeval, M

    2001-09-01

    The behaviour of {delta}-plutonium, stable between 319 and 451 deg C, exhibits numerous singularities which are still a mystery for both physicists and metallurgists. This is due to its complex electronic structure, and in particular to the 5f electrons, which are at the edge between localization and delocalization. The stability domain of the {delta} phase can be extended down to room temperature by alloying with so called 'deltagen atoms' such as gallium (Ga), aluminum (A1), cerium (Ce) or americium (Am). The present work deals, one the one hand, with the influence of cerium and americium solutes regarding the localization of the 5f electrons of {delta}-plutonium, in binary Pu-Ce and Pu-Am alloys. On the other hand, the effect of two different deltagen solutes, simultaneously present, on the stability of the {delta} phase has been studied in ternary Pu-Am-Ga and Pu-Ce-Ga alloys. The electronic structure being strongly related to the crystalline organization, characterization methods such as X-Ray diffraction and EXAFS measurements were used together with electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility experiments. These showed that the roles of cerium and americium, supposed to be similar at the beginning of this investigation, are actually very different. Moreover, the additive effect of cerium and gallium, and, americium and gallium, has been demonstrated. Studying plutonium alloys, which are radioactive, also means following their evolution in time. The characteristics of the alloys have then been followed which allowed to detect, in Pu-Ce(-Ga) alloys, a destabilization of the {delta} phase and, to observe, in Pu-Am(-Ga) alloys, the influence of self-irradiation defects on the magnetic response. (author)

  7. MA Doping Analysis on Breeding Capability and Protected Plutonium Production of Large FBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Kuno, Yusuke

    2010-06-01

    Spent fuel from LWR can be seen as long-live waste if it is not recycled or as a "new fuel" resource if it is recycled into the reactors. Uranium and plutonium have been used for "new fuel" resources from LWR spent fuel as MOX fuel type which is loaded into thermal reactor or fast reactor types. Other actinides from the spent fuel such as neptunium, americium and curium as minor actinide (MA) are considered to be loaded into the reactors for specific purposes, recently. Those purposes such as for increasing protected plutonium production and breeding capability for protected plutonium as well as in the same time those amount of MA can be reduced to a small quantity as a burner or transmutation purpose. Some investigations and scientific approaches are performed in order to increase a material "barrier" in plutonium isotope composition by increasing the even mass number of plutonium isotope such as Pu-238, Pu-240 and Pu-242 as plutonium protected composition. Higher material barrier which related to intrinsic properties of plutonium isotopes with even mass number (Pu-238, Pu-240 and Pu-242), are recognized because of their intense decay heat (DH) and high spontaneous fission neutron (SFN) rates. Those even number mass of plutonium isotope contribute to some criteria of plutonium characterization which will be adopted for present study such as IAEA, Pellaud and Kessler criteria (IAEA, 1972; Pellaud, 2002; and Kessler, 2007). The present paper intends to evaluate the breeding capability as a fuel sustainability index of the reactors and to analyze the composition of protected plutonium production of large power reactor based on the FaCT FBR as reference (Ohki, et al., 2008). Three dimensional FBR core configuration has been adopted which is based on the core optimization calculation of SRAC-CITATION code as reactor core analysis and JENDL-3.3 is adopted for nuclear data library. Some MA doping materials are loaded into the blanket regions which can be considered as

  8. Uptake of plutonium and americium by plants from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.; Tompkins, G.A.; Babcock, K.L.

    1975-01-01

    Plant uptake of 239 , 240 Pu and 241 Am was studied on two soil samples collected on the Nevada Test Site. These soils had each been previously contaminated with the radionuclides by high explosive detonation of devices containing plutonium. The 239 PuO 2 equivalent diameters of plutonium bearing particles present in the soil samples were determined and found to be log-normal in the range of 0.2 to 0.7 μm. Particles were examined by electronmicroscopy and found to be 2 to 3 times larger than the 239 PuO 2 equivalent diameter. Electron microprobe analysis showed that these particles consisted primarily of Pu, U, and O, with Al, Si, Fe and Mg present in much smaller amounts. The plutonium distribution ratio (D. R. = nuclide concentration in plant/nuclide concentration in soil) was in the order of 10 -5 for barley plant vegetation and was 20 to 100 times lower for barley grain. The D. R. for 241 Am was in the order of 10 -4 for vegetative growth and 25-75 times lower for the grain. In other uptake experiments three different soils were utilized: slightly acid forest soil, neutral valley soil, and calcareous alkaline soil. The 239 240 Pu and 241 Am were added to the soil as nitrate or chloride solution to facilitate the addition of Pu to soil in different oxidation states. Where Pu in the higher oxidation states (nitrate) was added to the alkaline calcareous soil, the highest plant uptake was observed. In uptake experiments with wheat the plutonium distribution ratio of the grain ranged from about 4 x 10 -8 to 4 x 10 -6 . The 241 Am D. R.'s ranged from 3 x 10 -7 to 3 x 10 -5 . (U.S.)

  9. Measurements Conducted on an Unknown Object Labeled Pu-239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoteling, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Measurements were carried out on 12 November 2013 to determine whether Pu-239 was present on an object discovered in a plastic bag with label ''Pu-239 6 uCi''. Following initial survey measurements to verify that the object was not leaking or contaminated, spectra were collected with a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector with object positioned in two different configurations. Analysis of the spectra did not yield any direct evidence of Pu-239. From the measured spectra, minimum detectable activity (MDA) was determined to be approximately 2 uCi for the gamma ray measurements. Although there was no direct evidence of Pu-239, a peak at 60 keV characteristic of Am-241 decay was observed. Since it is very likely that Am-241 would be present in aged plutonium samples, this was interpreted as indirect evidence for the presence of plutonium on the object. Analysis of this peak led to an estimated Pu-239 activity of 0.02-0.04 uCi, or <1x10 -6 grams.

  10. Adsorption-Desorption Characteristics of Plutonium and Americium with Sediment Particles in the Estuarine Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, C.N.; Fukai, R.

    1976-01-01

    The particle formation of plutonium and americium, their adsorption onto fresh water sediments and the desorption from the sediments in sea water were studied in the Laboratory under simulated river-estuary conditions, using γ-emitting plutonium-237 and americium-241. The results of the experiments show that the particle formation of plutonium depends on its valence states, on pH and on the salinity of the medium. For river water at pH4, some 25%, 20% and 30% of the added 237 Pu was in particulate form, larger than 0.45pm, for Pu (III), Pu (IV) and Pu (VI), respectively, while 65%, 90% and 50% of the respective valence states was associated with particles at pH 8. In sea water the general pattern remains similar, although Pu (VI) is more soluble in sea water owing to higher ligand concentrations for carbonate and bicarbonate complexes. The pH-dependency of particle formation of Am (III) is more steep than that of plutonium and seems to be influenced by colloidal substances occurring in the experimental media. The adsorption-desorption characteristics of plutonium and americium with the sediment in river water as well as sea water reflect the characteristics of their particle formation, being dependent upon such properties as valence states, the pH and salinity of the medium. A sewage effluent added to the media has small but measurable effects on the adsorption-desorption processes of plutonium. (author)

  11. The Optimum Plutonium Inert Matrix Fuel Form for Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulenko, J.S.; Wang, J.; Acosta, C.

    2004-01-01

    The University of Florida has underway an ongoing research program to validate the economic, operational and performance benefits of developing an inert matrix fuel (IMF) for the disposition of the U.S. weapons plutonium (Pu) and for the recycle of reprocessed Pu. The current fuel form of choice for Pu disposition for the Department of Energy is as a mixed oxide (MOX) (PuO2/UO2). We will show analyses that demonstrate that a Silicon Carbide (SiC) IMF offers improved performance capabilities as a fuel form for Pu recycle and disposition. The reason that UF is reviewing various materials to serve as an inert matrix fuel is that an IMF fuel form can offer greatly reduced Pu and transuranic isotope (TRU) production and also improved thermal performance characteristics. Our studies showed that the Pu content is reduced by an order of magnitude while centerline fuel temperatures are reduced approximately 380 degrees centigrade compared to MOX. These reduced temperatures result in reduced stored heat and thermal stresses in the pellet. The reduced stored heat reduces the consequences of the loss of coolant accident, while the reduced temperatures and thermal stresses yield greatly improved fuel performance. Silicon Carbide is not new to the nuclear industry, being a basic fuel material in gas cooled reactors

  12. Plutonium and americium behavior in coral atoll environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.L.; Eagle, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Inventories of 239+240 Pu and 241 Am greatly in excess of global fallout levels persist in the benthic environments of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. Quantities of 239+240 Pu and lesser amounts of 241 Am are continuously mobilizing from these sedimentary reservoirs. The amount of 239+240 Pu mobilized to solution at any time represents 0.08 to 0.09% of the sediment inventories to a depth of 16 cm. The mobilized 239+240 Pu has solute-like characteristics and different valence states coexist in solution - the largest fraction of the soluble plutonium is in an oxidized form (+V,VI). The adsorption of plutonium to sediments is not completely reversible because of changes that occur in the relative amounts of the mixed oxidation states in solution with time. Further, any characteristics of 239+240 Pu described at one location may not necessarily be relevant in describing its behavior elsewhere following mobilization and migration. The relative amounts of 241 Am to 239+240 Pu in the sedimentary deposits at Enewetak and Bikini may be altered in future years because of mobilization and radiological decay. Mobilization of 239+240 Pu is not a process unique to these atolls, and quantities in solution derived from sedimentary deposits can be found at other global sites. These studies in the equatorial Pacific have significance in assessing the long-term behavior of the transuranics in any marine environment. 22 references, 1 figure, 13 tables

  13. Study of plutonium sorption in aluminia column in the system HNO3-HF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, J.A. de.

    1977-01-01

    The column chromatographic method using alumina has been applied successfully to study the sorption-desorption behavior of plutonium traces in HNO 3 -HF and HNO 3 -HF-UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 systems, aiming to elaborate a process for recovering plutonium traces from reprocessing wastes, mainly in existing solutions where uranium is presented in macro quantities. Basically, the method consists in the sorption of plutonium by percolating a solution containing HNO 3 (0,1 to 0,8M) or uranyl nitrate (1-50 gU/l) and HF(0,1 to 0,3M) through an Al 2 O 3 collumn. The plutonium is fixed on Al 2 O 3 whereas the uranyl ions is collected in the efluent. The adsorption of Pu-III, Pu-IV and Pu-VI in the presence of HF was determined and Pu-IV can be almost completely sorbed. The Pu-IV is eluted by reduction to Pu-III in the column using 3 M HNO 3 -0,005M FeSO 4 at 50 0 C as elutrient. This method is very simple and can be applied for separation and purification of plutonium (traces) from uranyl nitrate or others coming solutions from wet chemistry of irradiated fuels [pt

  14. The influence of fasting and valence on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium in hamsters and rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stather, J.W.; Harrison, J.D.; Smith, H.; Rodwell, P.; David, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Plutonium ingested in contaminated food may be complexed to biological ligands in the food materials. Also, it is known that Pu in drinking water can exist as Pu(VI). A suggestion has been made, based on the results obtained by Weeks et al (Radiation Res., Vol. 4, 339,1956) that ingestion of Pu(VI) could mean that absorption of Pu would be substantially underestimated by using the value recommended by the ICRP. To further investigate the effect on absorption of both the oxidation state of ingested Pu and the nutritional state of the animal, Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) were administered to normally fed and fasted hamsters. The absorption of Pu(IV) was also measured in rabbits. Absorption of Pu in hamsters was not enhanced by prior oxidation to Pu(VI). However, increased absorption of both Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) was obtained in fasted animals. The results do not substantiate the high value for absorption of Pu(VI) obtained by Weeks et al, and support the value of 10sup(-2%) recommended by the ICRP for soluble forms of Pu. (author)

  15. Characterization of airborne plutonium-bearing particles from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, S.M. Jr.

    1977-11-01

    The elemental compositions, sizes, structures, and 239 Pu contents were determined for 299 plutonium-bearing particles isolated from airborne particles collected at various locations in the exhaust from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. These data were compared with data from natural aerosol particles. Most of the collected particles were composed of aggregates of crustal materials. Seven percent of the particles were organic and 3% were metallic, viz., iron, chromium, and nickel. High enrichment factors for titanium, manganese, chromium, nickel, zinc, and copper were evidence of the anthropic nature of some of the particles. The amount of plutonium in most particles was very small (less than one femtocurie of 239 Pu). Plutonium concentrations were determined by the fission track counting method. Only one particle contained sufficient plutonium for detection by electron microprobe analysis. This was a 1-μm-diameter particle containing 73% PuO 2 by weight (estimated to be 170 fCi of 239 Pu) in combination with Fe 2 O 3 and mica. The plutonium-bearing particles were generally larger than natural aerosols. The geometric mean diameter of those collected from the mechanical line exhaust point where plutonium is converted to the metal was larger than that of particles collected from the wet cabinet exhaust (13.7 μm vs. 4.6 μm). Particles from the mechanical line also contained more plutonium per particle than those from the wet cabinets

  16. System specification for the plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This document describes functional design requirements for the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (Pu SPS), as required by DOE contract DE-AC03-96SF20948 through contract modification 9 for equipment in Building 707 at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS).

  17. Liquid waste processing from plutonium (III) oxalate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Cassaniti, P.; Orosco, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    Plutonium (III) oxalate filtrates contain about 0.2M oxalic acid, 0.09M ascorbic acid, 0.05M hydrazine, 1M nitric acid and 20-100 mg/l of plutonium. The developed treatment of liquid wastes consist in two main steps: a) Distillation to reduce up to 10% of the initial volume and refluxing to destroy organic material. Then, the treated solution is suitable to adjust the plutonium at the tetravalent state by addition of hydrogen peroxide and the nitric molarity up to 8.6M. b) Recovery and purification of plutonium by anion exchange using two columns in series containing Dowex 1-X4 resin. With the proposed process, it is possible to transform 38 litres of filtrates with 40mg/l of Pu into 0.1 l of purified solution with 15-20g/l of Pu. This solution is suitable to be recycled in the Pu (III) oxalate precipitation process. This process has several potential advantages over similar liquid waste treatments. These include: 1) It does not increase the liquid volume. 2) It consumes only few reagents. 3) The operations involved are simple, requiring limited handling and they are feasible to automatization. 4) The Pu recovery factor is about 99%. (Author) [es

  18. Further Studies of Plutonium and Americium at Thule, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Asker; Dahlgaard, Henning; Nilsson, Karen Kristina

    1984-01-01

    Eleven years after the accidental loss of nuclear weapons in 1968, the fourth scientific expedition to Thule occurred. The estimated inventory of 1 TBq 239,240Pu in the marine sediments was unchanged when compared with the estimate based on the 1974 data. Plutonium from the accident had moved...

  19. Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-31

    DOE is investigating methods for long term dispositioning of weapons grade plutonium. One such method would be to utilize the plutonium in Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel assemblies in existing CANDU reactors. CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) reactors are designed, licensed, built, and supported by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), and currently use natural uranium oxide as fuel. The MOX spent fuel assemblies removed from the reactor would be similar to the spent fuel currently produced using natural uranium fuel, thus rendering the plutonium as unattractive as that in the stockpiles of commercial spent fuel. This report presents the results of a study sponsored by the DOE for dispositioning the plutonium using CANDU technology. Ontario Hydro`s Bruce A was used as reference. The fuel design study defined the optimum parameters to disposition 50 tons of Pu in 25 years (or 100 tons). Two alternate fuel designs were studied. Safeguards, security, environment, safety, health, economics, etc. were considered. Options for complete destruction of the Pu were also studied briefly; CANDU has a superior ability for this. Alternative deployment options were explored and the potential impact on Pu dispositioning in the former Soviet Union was studied. An integrated system can be ready to begin Pu consumption in 4 years, with no changes required to the reactors other than for safe, secure storage of new fuel.

  20. Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    DOE is investigating methods for long term dispositioning of weapons grade plutonium. One such method would be to utilize the plutonium in Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel assemblies in existing CANDU reactors. CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) reactors are designed, licensed, built, and supported by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), and currently use natural uranium oxide as fuel. The MOX spent fuel assemblies removed from the reactor would be similar to the spent fuel currently produced using natural uranium fuel, thus rendering the plutonium as unattractive as that in the stockpiles of commercial spent fuel. This report presents the results of a study sponsored by the DOE for dispositioning the plutonium using CANDU technology. Ontario Hydro's Bruce A was used as reference. The fuel design study defined the optimum parameters to disposition 50 tons of Pu in 25 years (or 100 tons). Two alternate fuel designs were studied. Safeguards, security, environment, safety, health, economics, etc. were considered. Options for complete destruction of the Pu were also studied briefly; CANDU has a superior ability for this. Alternative deployment options were explored and the potential impact on Pu dispositioning in the former Soviet Union was studied. An integrated system can be ready to begin Pu consumption in 4 years, with no changes required to the reactors other than for safe, secure storage of new fuel

  1. System specification for the plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document describes functional design requirements for the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (Pu SPS), as required by DOE contract DE-AC03-96SF20948 through contract modification 9 for equipment in Building 707 at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS)

  2. Advances on reverse strike co-precipitation method of uranium-plutonium mixed solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menghini, Jorge E.; Marchi, Daniel E.; Orosco, Edgardo H.; Greco, Luis

    2000-01-01

    The reverse strike coprecipitation of uranium-plutonium mixed solutions, is an alternative way to obtain MOX fuel pellets. Previous tests, carried out in the Alpha Laboratory, included a stabilization step for transforming 100 % of plutonium into Pu +4 . Therefore, the plutonium precipitated as Pu(OH) 4 . In this second step, the stabilization process was suppressed. In this way, besides Pu(OH) 4 , a part of the precipitated is composed of a mixed salt: AD(U,Pu). Then, a homogeneous solid solution is formed in the early steps of the process. The powders showed higher tap density, better performance during the pressing and lower sinterability than the powders obtained in previous tests. The advantageous and disadvantageous effects of the stabilization step are analyzed in this paper. (author)

  3. Life-span studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1990-04-01

    In 1970 a life-span study with over 300 beagle dogs was begun to gain an understanding of long-term health effects resulting from respiratory tract intakes of plutonium and to derive risk estimates that might be applied to plutonium and other transuranic elements. Groups of beagle dogs were given single exposures to 239 PuO 2 , 238 PuO 2 , or 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 to obtain graded levels of initial lung burdens ranging from 1 to 1800 Bq lung. The objective of this paper is to give you a progress report on the current life-span studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. I will describe the biokinetics of inhaled plutonium in dogs and the resulting health effects. I will also mention some studies directed towards understanding the mechanism leading to these effects. Finally, I will discuss the current risk estimates derived from these studies and how they might relate to plutonium exposures in humans. 5 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Reduction of uranium and plutonium oxides by aluminum. Application to the recycling of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallay, J.

    1968-01-01

    A process for treating plutonium oxide calcined at high temperatures (1000 to 2000 deg. C) with a view to recovering the metal consists in the reduction of this oxide dissolved in a mixture of aluminium, sodium and calcium fluorides by aluminium at about 1180 deg. C. The first part of the report presents the results of reduction tests carried out on the uranium oxides UO 2 and U 3 O 8 ; these are in agreement with the thermodynamic calculations of the exchange reaction at equilibrium. The second part describes the application of this method to plutonium oxides. The Pu-Al alloy obtained (60 per cent Pu) is then recycled in an aqueous medium. (author) [fr

  5. Some Thermodynamic Features of Uranium-Plutonium Nitride Fuel in the Course of Burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinkevich, A. A.; Ivanov, A. S.; Belov, G. V.; Skupov, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    Calculation studies on the effect of carbon and oxygen impurities on the chemical and phase compositions of nitride uranium-plutonium fuel in the course of burnup are performed using the IVTANTHERMO code. It is shown that the number of moles of UN decreases with increasing burnup level, whereas UN1.466, UN1.54, and UN1.73 exhibit a considerable increase. The presence of oxygen and carbon impurities causes an increase in the content of the UN1.466, UN1.54 and UN1.73 phases in the initial fuel by several orders of magnitude, in particular, at a relatively low temperature. At the same time, the presence of impurities abruptly reduces the content of free uranium in unburned fuel. Plutonium in the considered system is contained in form of Pu, PuC, PuC2, Pu2C3, and PuN. Plutonium carbides, as well as uranium carbides, are formed in small amounts. Most of the plutonium remains in the form of nitride PuN, whereas unbound Pu is present only in the areas with a low burnup level and high temperatures.

  6. The gastrointestinal absorption of organically bound forms of plutonium in fed and fasted hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.D.; Cooper, J.R.; Bomford, J.A.; David, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Values of about 0.005-0.01% were obtained for the absorption in fed hamsters of plutonium ingested as Pu 4+ citrate, isocitrate, phytate and malate complexes and Pu 3+ ascorbate compared with about 0.003-0.004% for Pu 4+ nitrate. Replacing drinking water with tea did not affect the result for Pu 4+ nitrate. Fasting hamsters for 8 h before the administration of plutonium citrate increased absorption to 0.1-0.2%. An extra period of fasting for 4 h after administration did not lead to a further increase in absorption. Similar values were also obtained when plutonium citrate was administered after a 24 h fast, followed either by immediate access to food or a further 4 h fast. In hamsters fasted for 24 h before administration of either Pu 3+ ascorbate or Pu 4+ nitrate, about 6-7 per cent of the ingested plutonium was retained in the gastrointestinal tract after one week. At three weeks after ingestion of Pu 3+ ascorbate, gastrointestinal retention had fallen 100-fold without an increase in absorption. (author)

  7. EXAFS and XANES analysis of plutonium and cerium edges from titanate ceramics for fissile materials disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortner, J. A.; Kropf, A. J.; Bakel, A. J.; Hash, M. C.; Aase, S. B.; Buck, E. C.; Chamerlain, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    We report x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra from the plutonium L III edge and XANES from the cerium L II edge in prototype titanate ceramic hosts. The titanate ceramics studied are based upon the hafnium-pyrochlore and zirconolite mineral structures and will serve as an immobilization host for surplus fissile materials, containing as much as 10 weight % fissile plutonium and 20 weight % (natural or depleted) uranium. Three ceramic formulations were studied: one employed cerium as a ''surrogate'' element, replacing both plutonium and uranium in the ceramic matrix, another formulation contained plutonium in a ''baseline'' ceramic formulation, and a third contained plutonium in a formulation representing a high-impurity plutonium stream. The cerium XANES from the surrogate ceramic clearly indicates a mixed III-IV oxidation state for the cerium. In contrast, XANES analysis of the two plutonium-bearing ceramics shows that the plutonium is present almost entirely as Pu(IV) and occupies the calcium site in the zirconolite and pyrochlore phases. The plutonium EXAFS real-space structure shows a strong second-shell peak, clearly distinct from that of PuO 2 , with remarkably little difference in the plutonium crystal chemistry indicated between the baseline and high-impurity formulations

  8. Standard test method for plutonium by Iron (II)/Chromium (VI) amperometric titration

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plutonium in unirradiated nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide, uranium-plutonium mixed oxides with uranium (U)/plutonium (Pu) ratios up to 21, plutonium metal, and plutonium nitrate solutions. Optimum quantities of plutonium to measure are 7 to 15 mg. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  9. The chemistry of plutonium in sol-gel processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, M.H.; Haire, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of plutonium chemical behavior conducted in conjunction with plutonia sol-gel process development at ORNL are described. The colloidal solutions produced consist of 'Pu(IV) polymer,' and this is therefore the study of polymeric plutonium behavior. Spectrophotometric, electron diffraction, and electron microscopy studies, in addition to specific studies that were concerned with the colloidal behavior of Pu(IV) polymer, indicate several characteristics of polymer that are not generally recognized. The particle nature of Pu(IV) polymer indicated by electron microscopy, the amorphous-crystalline characteristics of primary polymer particles demonstrated by electron diffraction, and the reversible and irreversible aggregation of the primary particles shown by spectrophotometric techniques present a useful view of the nature of Pu(IV) polymer that has been helpful in solving or understanding various types of processing problems involving plutonium hydrolytic behavior. The colloidal characteristics of Pu(IV) polymer and crystallite growth of primary polymer particles by thermal denitration are also described. (orig.) [de

  10. Thermodynamic database development: Al-Am-Ga-Pu-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perron, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Physical and Life Sciences; Turchi, P. E. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Physical and Life Sciences; Landa, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Physical and Life Sciences; Soderlind, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Physical and Life Sciences

    2014-03-17

    The goal of this study is about the thermodynamic re-assessment of the Plutonium- Uranium (Pu-U) system as a first step leading to the development of a plutonium-based thermodynamic database (i.e., Pu with Al, Am, Ga, Mo, U…) with resulting phase diagrams and associated thermodynamic data. Indeed, phase stability trends and phase diagrams of multi-component nuclear materials are crucial for predicting properties and performance under normal, hypothetical or even accidental conditions. This work is based on a coupling between ab initio energetics, phenomenological thermodynamics models - based on the CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) approach - and the use of the Thermo-Calc software, together with experimental data (whenever available). The present report summarizes results obtained (quarter period: 10/07/2013-01/07/2014) under the auspices of an agreement between CEA/DAM and NNSA/DP on cooperation in fundamental science supporting stockpile stewardship (P182).

  11. Transport of Intrinsic Plutonium Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Tarimala, S.; Keller, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Actinide contaminants were introduced to the subsurface environment as a result of nuclear weapons development and testing, as well as for nuclear power generation and related research activities for defense and civilian applications. Even though most actinide species were believed to be fairly immobile once in the subsurface, recent studies have shown the transport of actinides kilometers away from their disposal sites. For example, the treated liquid wastes released into Mortandad Canyon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory were predicted to travel less than a few meters; however, plutonium and americium have been detected 3.4 km away from the waste outfall. A colloid-facilitated mechanism has been suggested to account for this unexpected transport of these radioactive wastes. Clays, oxides, organic matters, and actinide hydroxides have all been proposed as the possible mobile phase. Pu ions associated with natural colloids are often referred to as pseudo-Pu colloids, in contrast with the intrinsic Pu colloids that consist of Pu oxides. Significant efforts have been made to investigate the role of pseudo-Pu colloids, while few studies have evaluated the environmental behavior of the intrinsic Pu colloids. Given the fact that Pu (IV) has extremely low solubility product constant, it can be inferred that the transport of Pu in the intrinsic form is highly likely at suitable environmental conditions. This study investigates the transport of intrinsic Pu colloids in a saturated alluvium material packed in a cylindrical column (2.5-cm Dia. x 30-cm high) and compares the results to previous data on the transport of pseudo Pu colloids in the same material. A procedure to prepare a stable intrinsic Pu colloid suspension that produced consistent and reproducible electrokinetic and stability data was developed. Electrokinetic properties and aggregation stability were characterized. The Pu colloids, together with trillium as a conservative tracer, were injected into the

  12. Fluorination of incinerator ash by hydrofluorination or ammonium bifluoride fusion for plutonium recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, S.D.; Gray, J.H.; Kent, S.J.; Apgar, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Incinerator ash containing small quantities of plutonium has been accumulating across the defense complex for many years. Although the total Pu inventory is small, the ash is a nondiscardable residue which presents storage and accountability difficulties. The work discussed here is the result of a joint exploratory effort between members of Savannah River Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory to compare two proposed pyrochemical pretreatments of incinerator ash prior to aqueous processing. These experiments attempted to determine the relative effectiveness of hydrofluorination and ammonium bifluoride fusion as head-end operations for a two step aqueous recovery method. The two pretreatments are being considered as possible second generation enhancements for the New Special Recovery Facility nearing operation at Savannah River Plant. Experimental results and potential engineering concerns are discussed. 3 figs.

  13. Uptake of plutonium and americium by barley from two contaminated Nevada Test Site soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.; Tompkins, G.A.; Leventhal, L.; Babcock, K.L.

    1976-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare, Var. Atlas 68) plant uptake of Pu 239 , Pu 240 , and Am 241 was studied using two soil samples collected from widely separated areas of the Nevada Test Site. Each area had been previously contaminated with plutonium and americium as a result of a separate high explosive (nonnuclear) detonation of a device containing plutonium. The plants were grown on 3-kg soil samples in a controlled environment chamber. The plutonium concentration ratio (plutonium concentration in dry plant tissue/plutonium concentration in dry soil) was in the order of 10 -5 for plant vegetative material. The plutonium concentration ratio for the grain was 20 to 100 times lower than that in the vegetative material. Concentration ratios for americium were in the order of 10 -4 for vegetative growth and 25 to 75 times lower for the grain. These results imply that americium is more available to plants than plutonium. Plutonium-bearing particles were identified in a soil sample using an autoradiographic technique and then separated from the soil samples. The Pu 239 oxide equivalent diameters of plutonium-bearing particles could be described by a log-normal distribution function in the range of 0.2 to 0.7 μm. The actual diameters of the particles were 2 to 3 times the PuO 2 equivalent diameter. Microprobe analyses of the surface region of particles greater than 2 μm showed the following order of abundance: U, Pu is greater than O is greater than Al is greater than Si is greater than Fe is greater than Mg. Photographs obtained with a scanning electron microscope revealed that some of the particles are quite irregular and have large specific surface areas which might enhance solubility and plant uptake

  14. Plutonium-239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-06-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with Plutonium-239

  15. Hematological responses after inhaling 238PuO2: An extrapolation from beagle dogs to humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.R.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Welsh, C.A.; Angerstein, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The alpha emitter plutonium-238 ( 238 Pu), which is produced in uranium-fueled, light-water reactors, is used as a thermoelectric power source for space applications. Inhalation of a mixed oxide form of Pu is the most likely mode of exposure of workers and the general public. Occupational exposures to 238 PuO 2 have occurred in association with the fabrication of radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Organs and tissue at risk for deterministic and stochastic effects of 238 Pu-alpha irradiation include the lung, liver, skeleton, and lymphatic tissue. Little has been reported about the effects of inhaled 238 PuO 2 on peripheral blood cell counts in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate hematological responses after a single inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to alpha-emitting 238 PuO 2 particles and to extrapolate results to humans

  16. Fabrication of gamma sources using the neutron-gamma reactions of 238Pu13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solinhac, I.; Maillard, C.; Donnet, L.

    2004-01-01

    A production campaign for 238 Pu 13 C sources with gamma fluence ranging from 2500 to 4500 gamma/s/4π at 6.13 MeV was carried out in 2002 in Atalante. An experimental study was undertaken to prepare the 238 PuC mixture, which is the most delicate step. This procedure is described together with the other steps in the source fabrication process: purification of a plutonium oxide batch, preparation of a nitric solution of 238 Pu, measurement of the gamma fluence of the PuC mixture before and after insertion into each of the two stainless steel capsules that constitute a PuN 2 O package, welding of the second envelope followed by leak testing, final measurement of the gamma fluence of the sealed source. This PuC sources fabrication procedure is effective: all the sources include the required gamma activity with an uncertainty on the gamma fluence of less than 10%. (authors)

  17. Combined exposure of F344 rats to beryllium metal and 239PuO2 aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, G.L.; Carlton, W.W.; Rebar, A.H.; Hahn, F.F.; Hoover, M.D.; Griffith, W.C.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Cuddihy, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear weapons industry workers have the potential for inhalation exposures to plutonium (Pu) and other agents, such as beryllium (Be) metal. Inhaled Pu deposited in the lung delivers high linear energy transfer alpha particle radiation and is known to induce pulmonary cancer in laboratory animals. Although the epidemiological evidence implicating Be in the induction of human lung cancer is weak and controversial, various studies in laboratory animals have demonstrated the pulmonary carcinogenicity of Be; Be is currently classified as a suspect human carcinogen in the United States and as a demonstrated human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential interactions between Pu and Be in the production of lung tumors in rats exposed by inhalation to particles of plutonium dioxide ( 239 PuO 2 ), Be metal, or these agents in combination

  18. 239Pu contamination in snakes inhabiting the Rocky Flats Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, R.A.; Winsor, T.F.

    1975-01-01

    For approximately four years studies have been under way at the Rocky Flats plant to determine contamination patterns and concentrations of Pu in the biota. Contamination of the Rocky Flats environs has resulted from at least three incidents, a September 1957 fire, a May 1969 fire, and leaking barrels containing plutonium-laden cutting oil. The latter incident was considered by far the major source of the plutonium contamination. Results are reported from a study conducted to determine whether snake tissues of the area contained detectable amounts of 239 Pu and, if so, at what concentrations. Eastern yellow-bellied racers (Coluber constrictor flaviventris, bullsnakes (Pituophis melanoleucus sayi, and prairie rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis viridis, were collected for 239 Pu bioassay of lung, liver, and bone tissues. Snakes were captured using drift fences terminating in funnel traps and by opportunistic sampling. Results led to the conclusion that snakes are not an important organism in the redistribution of 239 Pu

  19. /sup 239/Pu contamination in snakes inhabiting the Rocky Flats Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, R.A.; Winsor, T.F.

    1975-01-01

    For approximately four years studies have been under way at the Rocky Flats plant to determine contamination patterns and concentrations of Pu in the biota. Contamination of the Rocky Flats environs has resulted from at least three incidents, a September 1957 fire, a May 1969 fire, and leaking barrels containing plutonium-laden cutting oil. The latter incident was considered by far the major source of the plutonium contamination. Results are reported from a study conducted to determine whether snake tissues of the area contained detectable amounts of /sup 239/Pu and, if so, at what concentrations. Eastern yellow-bellied racers (Coluber constrictor flaviventris, bullsnakes (Pituophis melanoleucus sayi, and prairie rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis viridis, were collected for /sup 239/Pu bioassay of lung, liver, and bone tissues. Snakes were captured using drift fences terminating in funnel traps and by opportunistic sampling. Results led to the conclusion that snakes are not an important organism in the redistribution of /sup 239/Pu. (CH)

  20. Calculation code; REPROSY-P for process studies on Pu purification with TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujino, Takeshi; Kohsaka, Atsuo; Aochi, Tetsuo

    1975-10-01

    To evaluate the plutonium purification process with tributhyl phosphate (TBP), the calculation code; REPROSY-P for TBP-HNO 3 -Pu system, has been prepared on the basis of a batchwise counter-current extraction cascade model. With the code, the concentration profiles under transient or steady state condition and the number of theoretical stages required, can be calculated for a given process condition. Empirical distribution equations, distribution data of plutonium and the detailed calculation program, are described. (auth.)

  1. Aerial deposition of plutonium in mixed forest stands from nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriano, D.C.; Pinder, J.E. III

    1977-01-01

    Concentrations of 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu were determined in bark, organic matter, and soil samples collected in the summer of 1975 from pine (Pinus taeda) and hardwood (Quercus falcata; Carya tormentosa) stands near a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at the U.S. Energy Res. and Dev. Admin.'s Savannah River Plant near Aiken, S.C. The results indicated that tree crowns intercepted fallout Pu (Pu-bearing particles) and produced higher Pu concentrations in the organic matter and soil under tree crowns. Higher 239 , 240 Pu concentrations were found under pines than under hardwoods. Plutonium concentrations in the O1 (litter, A 00 ) and O2 (organic matter, A 0 ) layers were higher than those in mineral soil, but most of the Pu was contained in the mineral soil. Higher contents of 239 , 240 Pu were observed near the tree stems than in locations outside of the tree crowns. In pines these values were 163 and 80 nCi 239 , 240 Pu/m 2 , and in hardwoods, 122 and 80 nCi 239 , 240 Pu/m 2 , for the respective locations, from the litter to the 15-cm depth. The proportion of 238 Pu contained in foliage, litter, and organic matter was greater than for 239 , 240 Pu. However, the latter radionuclides had a greater proportion contained in the mineral soil. This observation is consistent with the more recent releases containing a higher percentage of 238 Pu from reprocessing operation. Plutonium concentrations in the 5 to 15 cm depth indicated limited Pu mobility in soil, but 238 , 240 Pu concentrations at this depth were higher near tree stems, suggesting greater mobility perhaps as a result of stem flow

  2. The plutonium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.; Ang, K.P.

    1975-01-01

    The quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides have been calculated for equilibrium fuel cycles for 1000-MW water reactors fueled with slightly enriched uranium, water reactors fueled with plutonium and natural uranium, fast-breder reactors, gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium and highly enriched uranium, and gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium, plutonium and recycled uranium. The radioactivity quantities of plutonium, americium and curium processed yearly in these fuel cycles are greatest for the water reactors fueled with natural uranium and recycled plutonium. The total amount of actinides processed is calculated for the predicted future growth of the U.S. nuclear power industry. For the same total installed nuclear power capacity, the introduction of the plutonium breeder has little effect upon the total amount of plutonium in this century. The estimated amount of plutonium in the low-level process wastes in the plutonium fuel cycles is comparable to the amount of plutonium in the high-level fission product wastes. The amount of plutonium processed in the nuclear fuel cycles can be considerably reduced by using gas-cooled reactors to consume plutonium produced in uranium-fueled water reactors. These, and other reactors dedicated for plutonium utilization, could be co-located with facilities for fuel reprocessing ad fuel fabrication to eliminate the off-site transport of separated plutonium. (author)

  3. A 233U/236U/242Pu/244Pu spike for isotopic and isotope dilution analysis by mass spectrometry with internal calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.; Belyaev, B.; Buljanitsa, L.

    1989-11-01

    The Khlopin Radium Institute prepared on behalf of the IAEA a synthetic mixture of 233 U, 236 U, 242 Pu and 244 Pu isotopes. The isotopic composition and elemental concentration of uranium and plutonium were certified on the basis of analyses done by four laboratories of the IAEA Network, using mass spectrometry with internal standardization. The certified values for 233 U/ 236 U ratio and the 236 U chemical concentration have a coefficient of variation of 0.05%. The latter is fixed by the uncertainty in the 235 U/ 238 U ratio of NBS500 used as internal standard. The coefficients of variation of the 244 Pu/ 242 Pu ratio and the 242 Pu chemical concentration are respectively 0.10% and 0.16% and limited by the uncertainty in the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio of NBS947. This four isotope mixture was used as an internal standard as well as a spike, to analyze 30 batches of LWR spent fuel solutions. The repeatability of the mass spectrometric measurements have a coefficient of variation of 0.025% for the uranium concentration, and of 0.039% for the plutonium concentration. The spiking and treatment errors had a coefficient of variation of 0.048%. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040±0.010 and 0.055±0.015 g g dry -1 , respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0x10 -4 mol l -1 Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment

  5. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko E-mail: ohnuki@sparclt.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O

    2004-07-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040{+-}0.010 and 0.055{+-}0.015 g g{sub dry}{sup -1}, respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0x10{sup -4} mol l{sup -1} Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment.

  6. Plutonium and minor actinides recycling in PWRs with new APA concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golfier, H.; Rohart, M.; Aniel, S.; Bergeron, J.; Deffain, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of the studies required by the French law of 1991, CEA have launched a wide range of assessments on waste management for different reactors (PWR, FBR). Considerable R and D work has already been performed in order to improve the use of Plutonium (Pu) in PWRs. In this context, the Advanced Plutonium Assembly (APA) aims to improve the use of Plutonium (Pu) in PWRs while minimizing Minor Actinides (MA) production, with only slight modifications of the core design. From a neutronic point of view, the overall studied cases lead to the stabilization of the Pu inventory with approximately 30% of the park refueled with APA assemblies in full APA cores. Multi-recycling could satisfy the stabilization of Pu+ (Am+Cm) inventory by the implementation of approximately 40% APA reactors in a conventional PWRs park. After 7 or 8 recycles, the equilibrium is reached. The Pu inventory in the fuel cycle ranges from 210 tons to 270 tons for Pu multi-recycling, and from 240 tons to 290 tons for Pu+(Am+Cm) multi-recycling. The saving in Natural Uranium and Separative Work Units (SWU) due to the use of APA reactors would be between 30% and 15% in comparison with the UO 2 open cycle. This paper presents a selection of the main preliminary Pu recycling results of the joint study program COGEMA-CEA. (author)

  7. Study on distribution of 239+240Pu in sediment of Mumbai Harbour Bay over a quinquennial period (2010-2014)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugandhi, S.; Joshi, V.M.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    The anthropogenic radionuclide, Plutonium was introduced into the environment mainly from the fallout of atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, particularly in late 1950's and early 1960's, from which the total fallout of 330TBq( 238 Pu), 7.4PBq ( 239 Pu), 5.2PBq ( 240 Pu), 170PBq( 241 Pu), 16TBq ( 242 Pu) were estimated. Pu and its status in environment is less investigated than other fallout radionuclides in environment. Fallout 239 Pu(t ½ : 24410 years), 240 Pu (t ½ :6563 years) is regarded highly hazardous pollutants in the environment due to its long half life, which lead to its persistence in the environment. The current investigation aimed at the study on distribution of 239+240 Pu in sediment of Mumbai Harbour Bay(MHB) over a quinquennial period (2010-2014) to assess the impact in coastal marine environment which will serve as a benchmark

  8. Estimation of initial lung deposition of inhaled 238PuO2 in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.L.; Park, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Studies to determine the life-span dose-effect relationship of inhaled 238 PuO 2 in dogs require an estimate of initial lung deposition (ILD) to calculate the radiation dose to several organs. Ideally, this estimate of ILD is obtained by a summation of plutonium body burden at death plus all the plutonium excreted during the life of the dog. However, the high costs of excreta collection and of plutonium analyses for all excreta from each dog made it necessary to approximate the ILD by other less expensive methods. These methods could introduce error into the estimate of ILD and, consequently, into the radiation dose calculation. The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential error for several methods of estimating ILD. Thirteen beagle dogs were given a single 5- to 30-min exposure to 238 PuO 2 aerosols, resulting in estimated ILD of 0.85 to 11.7 μCi of plutonium-238. Plutonium analyses of the tissues at death and of all excreta from these dogs were used for this evaluation. The estimate of ILD, obtained by summation of the plutonium body burden at death plus all the plutonium excreted, was compared to the estimated ILD obtained by the plutonium whole-body retention function for each dog, using all excreta data; the mean plutonium whole-body retention function for each dog, using all excreta data; the plutonium whole-body retention function for each dog, using partial excreta data; and a mean plutonium whole-body retention function for all dogs, using partial excreta data. 4 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Proliferation resistance attributes of advanced plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.

    2009-01-01

    To obtain public acceptance for future use of Pu, new concepts must overcome the present concerns about environmental compliance as well as concerns about misusing plutonium of the civil nuclear fuel cycle for nuclear explosives e.g. by terrorists. In future the preferable remedy is the multi-recycling of all transuranium elements in fast neutron reactors. In such a partitioning and transmutation scheme, P T, Pu becomes proliferation resistant, when mixed with self-generated actinides. This strategy will also reduce the long-term radio-toxicity, the radiogenic heat production and the Pu content of the nuclear waste per G We produced in the geological repositories, which otherwise could be regarded as future Pu-mines. The development of advanced spent fuel reprocessing should aim at technologies with intrinsic barriers that under normal operation exclude the production of weapon usable fissile material at all stages of the process. Complementary institutional, extrinsic measures would then have to verify the declared operation and the absence of weapon usable material, instead of presently verifying the declared mass of weapon usable Pu.

  10. Target fuels for plutonium and minor actinide transmutation in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, J., E-mail: jwashing@gmail.com [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); King, J., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Shayer, Z., E-mail: zshayer@mines.edu [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • We evaluate transmutation fuels for plutonium and minor actinide destruction in LWRs. • We model a modified AP1000 fuel assembly in SCALE6.1. • We evaluate spectral shift absorber coatings to improve transmutation performance. - Abstract: The average nuclear power plant produces twenty metric tons of used nuclear fuel per year, containing approximately 95 wt% uranium, 1 wt% plutonium, and 4 wt% fission products and transuranic elements. Fast reactors are a preferred option for the transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides; however, an optimistic deployment time of at least 20 years indicates a need for a nearer-term solution. This study considers a method for plutonium and minor actinide transmutation in existing light water reactors and evaluates a variety of transmutation fuels to provide a common basis for comparison and to determine if any single target fuel provides superior transmutation properties. A model developed using the NEWT module in the SCALE 6.1 code package provided performance data for the burnup of the target fuel rods in the present study. The target fuels (MOX, PuO{sub 2}, Pu{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, PuN, PuUZrH, PuZrH, PuZrHTh, and PuZrO{sub 2}) are evaluated over a 1400 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD) interval to ensure each assembly remained critical over the entire burnup period. The MOX (5 wt% PuO{sub 2}), Pu{sub 0.31}ZrH{sub 1.6}Th{sub 1.08}, and PuZrO{sub 2}MgO (8 wt% Pu) fuels result in the highest rate of plutonium transmutation with the lowest rate of curium-244 production. This study selected eleven different burnable absorbers (B{sub 4}C, CdO, Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and TaC) for evaluation as spectral shift absorber coatings on the outside of the fuel pellets to determine if an absorber coating can improve the transmutation properties of the target fuels. The PuZrO{sub 2}MgO (8 wt% Pu) target

  11. Partitioning and speciation of Pu in the sedimentary rocks aquifer from the deep liquid nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalmykov, Stepan N. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry; Vlasova, Irina E.; Romanchuk, Anna Yu.; Presnyakov, Igor A. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Chemistry; Zakharova, Elena V.; Volkova, Anna G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry

    2015-06-01

    Plutonium partitioning and speciation was studied under the conditions of a liquid nuclear waste repository site. The dominating effect of corrosion products (Fe and Cr) oxides on plutonium partitioning was established in batch sorption tests at 150 C and by using sequential extraction. Various techniques including Moessbauer spectrometry, XRD and TEM were used to characterize Fe/Cr oxide phases that form both precipitates and surface coatings which sorb plutonium. The sorption and speciation of plutonium was modeled thermodynamically using Pourbaix diagram that takes into account both surface complexation reaction and precipitation of insoluble PuO{sub 2}.

  12. Rapid determination of 239,240Pu, 238Pu, 241Am and 90Sr in high contaminated samples waste using combined SPE sorbents AnaLigR Pu-02, AnaLigR Sr-01 and DGAR Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvia Dulanska; Igor Antalik; Miroslav Labaska; Boris Remenec; Andrej Matel

    2013-01-01

    A rapid separation method has been developed which allows measurement of plutonium, americium and strontium isotopes in the high active sample from CBRN Training and Testing Centre in Zemianske Kostolany (Slovakia) with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of matrix interferences. This method uses different commercial products stacked AnaLig R Pu-02, AnaLig R Sr-01 and DGA R Resin cartridges from IBC Advanced Technologies and Eichrom Technologies. The method allows rapid separation of plutonium, strontium and americium using a single multi-stage column in the vacuum box (cartridge technology) with rapid flow rates to minimize sample separation time. The 239,240 Pu, 23 8Pu and 241 Am were determined by alpha spectroscopy, 90 Sr was counted on TRICARB 2900 TR by Cherenkov counting of its progeny 90 Y. (author)

  13. LLNL SFA FY11 Program Management and Performance Report: Environmental Transport of Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Powell, Brian A. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Moser, Duane [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Carroll, Susan A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Maxwell, Robert [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Zurong [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, Ross [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tumey, Scott [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhao, Pihong [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tinnacher, Ruth [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Huang, Patrick [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kips, Ruth [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mason, Harris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Begg, James [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fisher, Jen [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Simpkins, Laura [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Zimmerman, Trevor [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Jablonski, Joseph [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Snow, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The major challenge in predicting the mobility and transport of plutonium (Pu) is determining the dominant geochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface. The reaction chemistry of Pu (i.e., aqueous speciation, solubility, sorptivity, redox chemistry, and affinity for colloidal particles, both abiotic and microbially mediated) is particularly complicated. It is generally thought that due to its low solubility and high sorptivity, Pu migration in the environment occurs only when facilitated by transport on particulate matter (i.e., colloidal particles). Despite the recognized importance of colloid-facilitated transport of Pu, very little is known about the geochemical and biochemical mechanisms controlling Pu-colloid formation and association, particularly at femtomolar Pu concentrations observed at DOE sites. This 5-year program is designed to test the important biogeochemical processes governing colloid-facilitated Pu transport in the field.

  14. Electrochemical studies of plutonium(IV) complexes in aqueous nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong-Yun; Asakura, Toshihide; Morita, Yasuji

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemistry has been used to investigate the behavior of plutonium (IV) in 1-7 M HNO 3 solutions. These Pu(IV) complexes were found to be reduced quasi-reversibly to Pu(III) species. The formal redox potentials (E 0 ) for Pu(IV)/Pu(III) couples were determined to be +0.721, +0.712, +0.706, +0.705, +0.704, 0.694, and +0.696 V (vs. Ag/AgCl(SSE)) for Pu(IV) complexes in 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 M HNO 3 solutions, respectively. These results indicate that the reduction product of Pu(IV) is Pu(III), which is considerably stable in HNO 3 solution. (author)

  15. Non-destructive assay of 242Pu by resonance neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, W.R.; Lu, Ming-Shih; Aronson, A.; Forman, L.; Vanier, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    For the accurate assay of plutonium by neutron correlation measurements, especially for material derived from high-burnup reactor fuel, the content of 242 Pu in a sample must be determined. Since 242 Pu has a long half-life (387,000 yr) and decays to 238 U by alpha particle emission with the accompanying emission of only weak, low-energy gamma rays, gamma-ray spectrometry methods which are ordinarily employed to determine the isotopic composition of a plutonium sample are not feasible for 242 Pu. The existence of a resonance in the neutron capture cross section of 242 Pu at an energy of 2.67 electron volts (eV) with a large (72, 000 barn) cross section affords the possibility for the quantitative assay of this isotope by epithermal neutron capture. Essential for this purpose is an appropriately designed geometry of neutron moderators and absorbers which will provide maximum flux in the eV region while suppressing thermal neutron capture by the fissile plutonium isotopes. Signatures for neutron capture in 242 Pu include the decay of 243 Pu (4.9 hr), prompt capture gamma rays (total energy 5.034 MeV), and the decay of an isomeric state (330 nanosecond). Experiments to determine the feasibility of this approach are currently in progress

  16. Plutonium storage: Requirements and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, P.T.; Haschke, J.M.; Martz, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The retirement of large numbers of nuclear weapons will necessitate management of unprecedented quantities of excess plutonium. In addition, surplus material and residues from previous weapon production activities comprise a substantial quantity of concentrated plutonium that exists in a variety of chemical forms. Storage of plutonium for an indefinite period will be necessary until a decision regarding ultimate disposition is made. Selection of the most suitable storage option(s) for this interim period is complicated by technical issues, nuclear proliferation concerns, contingency planning, political factors, and uncertainty regarding the length of the interim period. Options for excess plutonium include storage as intact weapon components and storage as extracted nuclear material. Specific advantages for storage of excess material in a variety of chemical forms have been presented. In this paper, technical issues associated with various storage options are examined with emphasis on relevant physical and chemical properties of candidate materials. Technology and facility requirements for preparing and certifying storage forms are considered and recommendations, based on our assessment of options, are presented

  17. PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-07

    Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

  18. Reanalysis of gastrointestinal absorption factors for plutonium and other actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Larsen, R.P.; Toohey, R.E.; Moretti, E.S.; Oldham, R.D.; Spaletto, M.I.; Engel, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    This project studies the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and other actinide elements relevant to nuclear power production, at concentrations at or below their respective maximum permissible concentrations (MPC's) in drinking water, using high specific activity isotopes. The gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium is measured in mice, rats, and dogs exposed to plutonium either via drinking water or by gavage. Plutonium concentrations are determined in liver and eviscerated carcass at 6 days (mice and rats) or 4 weeks (dogs). Administered solutions are 1 x 10 -10 M in Pu (the molar concentration at MPC for 239 Pu) and contain one of several high specific activity isotopes ( 237 Pu, 47-day half-life; 236 Pu, 2.8-year half-life; 238 Pu, 86-year half-life). Fasted mice and rats, administered plutonium solutions that are: (1) low in concentration (10- 10 M); and (2) carefully prepared to assure a given oxidation state and to avoid hydrolysis and polymes, and major policy issues. The first HEED for near-term battery energy storage systems (lead/acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron) astention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  19. 236U/238U and 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratios in small (2 L) sea and river water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigl, R; Srncik, M; Steier, P; Wallner, G

    2013-02-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and alpha spectrometry were used to determine uranium ((236)U, (238)U, (234)U) and plutonium isotopes ((239)Pu, (240)Pu) in sea and river water samples. Plutonium was separated by Dowex(®) 1 × 8 resin and UTEVA(®) resin was used for uranium purification. The measured (236)U/(238)U isotopic ratios for surface water from the Atlantic Ocean, the Pacific Ocean and the Black Sea were in the order of 10(-9), while values for river water were in the order of 10(-8). These contaminations may be attributed to global fallout. A sample of the reference material IAEA-443, collected from the Irish Sea, showed, in accordance to the reference value, a ratio that was 10(3) times higher due to effluents from the reprocessing plant at Sellafield. These results underline the good suitability of (236)U/(238)U as a tracer for hydrology and oceanography, and show that relatively small water samples are sufficient for the determination of (236)U by AMS, which is not the case for plutonium with present techniques. The plutonium concentrations in our water samples could only be measured with large uncertainties and were in the order of 10(-3) mBq/L (with the exception of the Irish Sea sample). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Plutonium emission from the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossew, P.

    2013-01-01

    A strong earthquake and subsequent tsunami on 11 th March 2011 initiated a severe accident in units 1 to 4 of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, resulting in substantial releases of radionuclides. While much has since been published 00 environmental contamination and exposure to radio--iodine and radio-caesium, little is known about releases of plutonium and other non-volatile elements. Although the total activities of released 131 I, 134 Cs and 137 Cs are of the same order of magnitude as of the Chernobyl accident in 1986, the contribution of little volatile elements, including Pu, is much smaller in Fukushima fallout. The reason is the different physical nature of the accident sequence which led to a release of some 10 - 5% of the core inventories only (to be compared with 3.5% from Chernobyl). In this contribution the available data on Pu in Fukushima fallout will be reviewed. Data sources are mainly reports and press releases by Japanese authorities and a few scientific articles. The mean ratio 239+240 Pu: 137 Cs in the near field around the NPP (mainly part of Fukushima prefecture and districts of adjacent prefectures) can be assumed about 3 x 10 - 7 , to be compared to nearly 0.01 in the vicinity of Chernobyl, down to about 3 x 10 -6 in Central Europe. Isotopic ratios 238 Pu: 239+240 Pu are about 2.2 (0.46 and 0.035 in Chemobyl and global fallout, respectively). Activity concentrations of Fukushima- 239+240 Pu in surface soil were found up to above 0.1 Bq/kg d.m. in the immediate vicinity of the Fukushima NPP and about one order of magnitude less in Fukushima city, about 60 km away. The 239+240 Pu activity released into the atmosphere is roughly estimated some 10 9 Bq (Chemobyl : almost 10 14 Bq). (author)

  1. Selection and evaluation of a new Pu density measurement fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziewinska, K M; Peters, A M; Martinez, P; Dziewinski, J J; Pugmire, D L; Flores, H G; Trujillo, S M; LaVerne, J A; Rajesh, P

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts leading to selection of a new fluid for the determination of the density of large Pu parts. Based on an extended literature search, perfluorotributylamine (CF 3 (CF 2 ) 3 ) 3 N, trade name FC-43) was chosen for an experimental study. Plutonium coupon corrosion studies were performed by exposing Pu to deaerated and aerated solutions and measuring corrosion rates gravimetrically. Samples of deaerated and aerated (FC-43) were also irradiated with 6 deg. Co gamma rays. The samples were extracted with NaOH and analyzed by Ion Chromatography (IC). In surface study experiments, Pu coupons were exposed to deaerated and aerated solutions of FC-43 and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS data indicate that there is no detectable surface effect caused by the new fluid.

  2. Interaction of a 238Pu fueled-sphere assembly with a simulated terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkruger, F.J.; Patterson, J.H.; Herrera, B.; Nelson, G.B.; Matlack, G.M.; Waterbury, G.R.; Pavone, D.

    1981-02-01

    A 238 Pu fueled sphere assembly (FSA) was exposed to a simulated humid environment on sandy soil for 3 y. After a 70-week exposure, plutonium was first detected in measurable quantities in rain and condensate samples. A core sample taken in the ninety-third week contained 302 ng of plutonium. Examination of the FSA after exposure revealed a hole in the bottom of the graphite impact shell (GIS) and a leaking weld on the vent assembly of the postimpact containment shell (PICS). These two openings may be the pathways for plutonium entry into the environment from the FSA

  3. Breeding and plutonium characterization analysis on actinides closed water-cooled thorium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Higher difficulties (barrier) or more complex design of nuclear weapon, material fabrication and handling and isotopic enrichment can be achieved by a higher isotopic barrier. The isotopic material barrier includes critical mass, heat-generation rate, spontaneous neutron generation and radiation. Those isotopic barriers in case of plutonium isotope is strongly depend on the even mass number of plutonium isotope such as 238 Pu, 240 Pu and 242 Pu and for 233 U of thorium cycle depends on 232 U. In this present study, fuel sustainability as fuel breeding capability and plutonium characterization as main focus of proliferation resistance analysis have been analyzed. Minor actinide (MA) is used as doping material to be loaded into the reactors with thorium fuel. Basic design parameters are based on actinide closed-cycle reactor cooled by heavy water. The evaluation use equilibrium burnup analysis coupled with cell calculation of SRAC and nuclear data library is JENDL.32. Parametrical survey has been done to analyze the effect of MA doping rate, different moderation ratio for several equilibrium burnup cases. Plutonium characterization which based on plutonium isotope composition is strongly depending on MA doping concentration and different moderation conditions. Breeding condition can be achieved and high proliferation resistance level can be obtained by the present reactor systems. Higher isotopic plutonium composition of Pu-238 (more than 40%) can be obtained compared with other plutonium isotopes. In addition, higher moderation ratio gives the isotope composition of 238 Pu increases, however, it obtains lower composition when MA doping is increased and it slightly lower composition for higher burnup. Meanwhile, higher 240 Pu composition can be achieved by higher MA doping rate as well as for obtaining higher breeding capability. (author)

  4. Review of criticality safety benchmark data of plutonium solution in ICSBEP handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Okubo, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The criticality data of plutonium solutions published in the ICSBEP Handbook were reviewed. Criticality data for lower plutonium concentration and higher 240 Pu content, which correspond to a reprocessing process condition, are very scarce and hence the criticality data in this area are desired. While the calculated k eff 's with ENDF/B-V show the dependence of the plutonium concentration, the dependence has been corrected in JENDL-3.3 because of energy distribution of the capture cross section of 239 Pu. Based on the generalized perturbation theory, the sensitivity coefficient of k eff with respect to fission and capture cross section in plutonium solutions were obtained. In a plutonium solution with a lower concentration, cross sections in the thermal energy less than 0.1 eV have significant effects on the criticality. On the other hand, the criticality of higher concentration plutonium solutions is mostly dominated by cross sections in the energy range larger than 0.1 eV. Regarding the effect of 240 Pu on criticality, the capture cross section 240 Pu around the resonance peak near 1 eV is dominant regardless of the concentration. (author)

  5. Waste minimization at a plutonium processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1995-01-01

    As part of Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) mission to reduce the nuclear danger throughout the world, the plutonium processing facility at LANL maintains expertise and skills in nuclear weapons technologies as well as leadership in all peaceful applications of plutonium technologies, including fuel fabrication for terrestrial and space reactors and heat sources and thermoelectric generators for space missions. Another near-term challenge resulted from two safety assessments performed by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and the U.S. Department of Energy during the past two years. These assessments have necessitated the processing and stabilization of plutonium contained in tons of residues so that they can be stored safely for an indefinite period. This report describes waste streams and approaches to waste reduction of plutonium management

  6. Structural, magnetic, electronic and optical properties of PuC and PuC{sub 0.75}: A hybrid density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rong [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Tang, Bin [School of Business Administration, Chongqing City Management College, Chongqing 401331 (China); Gao, Tao, E-mail: gaotao@scu.edu.cn [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Ao, BingYun, E-mail: aobingyun@caep.cn [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2016-05-15

    We perform first principles calculations to investigate the structural, magnetic, electronic and optical properties of PuC and PuC{sub 0.75}. Furthermore, we examine the influence of carbon non-stoichiometry on plutonium monocarbide. For the treatment of strongly correlated electrons, the hybrid density functionals like PBE0, Fock-0.25 are used and we compare the results with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), local density approximation (LDA), LDA + U and experimental ones. The optimized lattice constant a{sub 0} = 4.961 Å for PuC in the Fock-0.25 scheme is the most close to the experimental data. The ground states of PuC and PuC{sub 0.75} are found to be anti-ferromagnetic. Our results indicate that additional removal of a C atom make lattice contract and new DOS peak appear in the near-Fermi region. We also compute and compare the optical properties of PuC and PuC{sub 0.75}. The difference in optical properties between PuC and PuC{sub 0.75} should also be the influence of carbon vacancies.

  7. Extraction of plutonium and uranium from oxalate bearing solutions using phosphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, A.G.; Mapara, P.M.; Swarup, Rajendra

    1995-01-01

    A feasibility study on the solvent extraction of plutonium and uranium from solutions containing oxalic and nitric acids using a phosphonic acid extractant (PC88A) was made to explore the possibility of recovering Pu from these solutions. Batch experiments on the extraction of Pu(IV) and U(VI) under different parameters were carried out using PC88A in dodecane. The results indicated that Pu could be extracted quantitatively by PC88A from these solutions. A good separation of Pu from U could be achieved at higher temperatures. (author). 6 refs., 3 tabs

  8. Management of disused plutonium sealed sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitworth, Julia Rose [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pearson, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Cristy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources since 1999, including more than 2,400 Plutonium (Pu)-238 sealed sources and 653 Pu-239-bearing sources that represent more than 10% of the total sources recovered by GTRI/OSRP to date. These sources have been recovered from hundreds of sites within the United States (US) and around the world. OSRP grew out of early efforts at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program, a loan-lease program that serviced 31 countries, as well as domestic users. In the conduct of these recovery operations, GTRI/OSRP has been required to solve problems related to knowledge-of-inventory, packaging and transportation of fissile and heat-source materials, transfer of ownership, storage of special nuclear material (SNM) both at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and commercially, and disposal. Unique issues associated with repatriation from foreign countries, including end user agreements required by some European countries and denials of shipment, will also be discussed.

  9. Plutonium Training Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Galya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wolkov, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-26

    This report was created to examine the current state of plutonium training in the United States and to discover ways in which to ensure that the next generation of plutonium workers are fully qualified.

  10. Plutonium metal burning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausburg, D.E.; Leebl, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    A glove-box facility was designed to convert plutonium skull metal or unburned oxide to an oxide acceptable for plutonium recovery and purification. A discussion of the operation, safety aspects, and electrical schematics are included

  11. The dangers of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1978-01-01

    After outlining the physical and chemical properties of plutonium, the author compares toxic substances inhaled and ingested; it is found that plutonium is far less dangerous than botulin or anthrax spores. (GL) [de

  12. Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Plutonium Finishing Plant, also known as PFP, represented the end of the line (the final procedure) associated with plutonium production at Hanford.PFP was also...

  13. Plutonium in Atlantic coastal estuaries in the southeastern United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, D.W.; LeRoy, J.H.; Cross, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    A survey was made to begin to provide baseline information on the plutonium distribution of representative estuarine and coastal areas of the southeastern United States of America. Sediments and marsh grass (Spartina) were collected and analysed from three locations within a tidal marsh. In the three estuaries (Savannah, Neuse and Newport) the suspended particulate matter (1μm and greater) was filtered from waters with different salinities and the plutonium content of the particulates determined. The Savannah river estuary, in addition to fall-out plutonium, has received up to 0.3Ci of plutonium from the Savannah River Plant (SRP) of the US Energy Research and Development Administration. The SRP plutonium has a variable isotopic composition that can influence plutonium isotopic ratios in the estuarine system. The other estuaries do not have nuclear installations upstream. Plutonium contents in surface marsh sediment from the Savannah River estuary are lower than those found in nearby bay sediments. In fact, total plutonium concentrations of sediments showed increases from the upper to lower portions of the estuary; however, higher contributions of 238 Pu in the upper portions indicate that releases from the Savannah River Plant do contribute plutonium to the Savannah river estuary. Plutonium concentrations in Spartina were less than 10fCi/g dry weight but are higher than plutonium contents of terrestrial plants ( 238 Pu to the total plutonium activities in the sediment and the Spartina. Plutonium concentrations were about three times higher in the Newport river estuary than in the Neuse and Savannah river estuaries. (author)

  14. Plutonium multi-recycling in increased moderating ratio reactors (IMR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbrault, P.; Larderet, P.

    1998-01-01

    The large core of the future jointly defined European PWR (EPR), would be compatible with an increased Moderating Ratio (MR) enabling better plutonium burnout. The purpose of current work on the subject is to assess plutonium multi-recycling possibilities in IMR reactors. What additional operating constraints would be involved under normal and accidental conditions and are they acceptable? The conclusion is that Plutonium multi-recycling in a PWR of the type envisaged for the EPR raises no major problems under the following conditions: use of an IMR MOX core, enhancing both plutonium burnout and absorber efficiency; use of enriched boron in both the primary coolant soluble boron and the B4C boron carbide in the control rods. Deeper investigation should be performed concerning the partial or total core drain-out, in view of the high total Pu concentrations involved (13%) and the types of core considered (100% MOX). (author)

  15. Phenomenology of uranium-plutonium homogenization in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The uranium and plutonium cations distribution in mixed oxide fuels (U 1-y Pu y )O 2 with y ≤ 0.1 has been studied in laboratory with industrial fabrication methods. Our experiences has showed a slow cations migration. In the substoichiometry (UPu)O 2-x the diffusion is in connection with the plutonium valence which is an indicator of the oxidoreduction state of the crystal lattice. The plutonium valence is in connection with the oxygen ion deficit in order to compensate the electrical charge. The oxygen ratio of the solid depends of the oxygen partial pressure prevailing at the time of product elaboration but it can be modified by impurities. These impurities permit to increase or decrease the fuel characteristics and performances. An homogeneity analysis methodology is proposed, its objective is to classify the mixed oxide fuels according to the uranium and plutonium ions distribution [fr

  16. Modified titrimetric determination of plutonium using photometric end-point detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baughman, W.J.; Dahlby, J.W.

    1980-04-01

    A method used at LASL for the accurate and precise assay of plutonium metal was modified for the measurement of plutonium in plutonium oxides, nitrate solutions, and in other samples containing large quantities of plutonium in oxidized states higher than +3. In this modified method, the plutonium oxide or other sample is dissolved using the sealed-reflux dissolution method or other appropriate methods. Weighed aliquots, containing approximately 100 mg of plutonium, of the dissolved sample or plutonium nitrate solution are fumed to dryness with an HC1O 4 -H 2 SO 4 mixture. The dried residue is dissolved in dilute H 2 SO 4 , and the plutonium is reduced to plutonium (III) with zinc metal. The excess zinc metal is dissolved with HCl, and the solution is passed through a lead reductor column to ensure complete reduction of the plutonium to plutonium (III). The solution, with added ferroin indicator, is then titrated immediately with standardized ceric solution to a photometric end point. For the analysis of plutonium metal solutions, plutonium oxides, and nitrate solutions, the relative standard deviation are 0.06, 0.08, and 0.14%, respectively. Of the elements most likely to be found with the plutonium, only iron, neptunium, and uranium interfere. Small amounts of uranium and iron, which titrate quantitatively in the method, are determined by separate analytical methods, and suitable corrections are applied to the plutonium value. 4 tables, 4 figures

  17. Optimization and plutonium equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    The sequential simplex method has been used to estimate the extent of disproportionation of tetravalent plutonium in dilute acid. A method for simulating potentiometric titrations is proposed, and this method suggests that the stoichiometric end point and the inflection point may not always correspond in the potentiometric titration of plutonium. A possible characteristic equation for the nitrite-plutonium reaction is illustrated, and the method of proportional equations is extended to the iron-plutonium reaction

  18. Risk estimates for lung tumours from inhaled 239PuO2, 238PuO2, and 239Pu(NO3)4 in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagle, G.E.; Park, J.F.; Gilbert, E.S.; Weller, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Lung cancer risks are being studied in beagle dogs given single exposures to aerosols of 239 PuO 2 , 238 PuO 2 , or 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 . A major objective of these studies is to examine the risk of lung cancer relative to the specific activity of the radionuclide, rate of dose accumulation due to differences in solubilities of the radionuclides, and the presence of competing risk from extrapulmonary lesions. Dose-response relationships were studied for the three groups of dogs, with analyses specifically designed to evaluate differences in response. Based on estimated cumulative dose to the lung, risks were found to differ significantly among the radionuclides; they were highest for 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 and lowest for 238 PuO 2 . A model in which the risk was assumed to be a pure quadratic function of dose fitted the data much better than a pure linear model. Currently, all three groups of dogs can be compared only to 10 years after exposure. However, it is apparent that the average cumulative dose to the lung may not be an adequate predictor of lung cancer risk for different isotopic and physicochemical forms of plutonium. (author)

  19. Long-term exposure of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ to a terrestrial environment. Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.C.; Patterson, J.H.; Steinkruger, F.J.; Coffelt, K.P.

    1985-02-01

    A plutonium oxide source consisting of a single piece of 83% /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ and weighing 38 g was exposed for 2.9 years to a humid, temperate terrestrial environment in an environmental simulation chamber. The soil tray of the chamber was divided into four compartments so that different soil types could be studied under identical conditions. Soils examined in this experiment included loam, silt loam, sand, and humus. Plutonium released into the soils, the soil drainages, and the condensates from the dehumidifier was monitored throughout the experiment. The total plutonium release rate from the PuO/sub 2/ source was approximately 2 ng/m/sup 2//s. The generation of short-ranged airborne plutonium, able to travel from a few centimeters to half a meter, was one of the most significant release pathways. The amount of plutonium released in this way was 10 times that washed directly off the source by rainwater and 20 times that from the fully airborne (longer ranged) release. Of the 200 ..mu..g of plutonium deposited in the soils, less than 0.1 ..mu..g was released into the soil percolates. In fact, the soil percolates constituted the least significant release pathway. Within the uncertainties in deriving the plutonium inventories of the soil compartments, we found no discernible differences among the behaviors of the four soil types towards plutonium. There was little or no seasonal effect on the release of plutonium from the soil.

  20. Calculations of thermodynamic properties of PuO2 by the first-principles and lattice vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masato; Konashi, Kenji; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Plutonium dioxide (PuO 2 ) is a key compound of mixed oxide fuel (MOX fuel). To predict the thermal properties of PuO 2 at high temperature, it is important to understand the properties of MOX fuel. In this study, thermodynamic properties of PuO 2 were evaluated by coupling of first-principles and lattice dynamics calculation. Cohesive energy was estimated from first-principles calculations, and the contribution of lattice vibration to total energy was evaluated by phonon calculations. Thermodynamic properties such as volume thermal expansion, bulk modulus and specific heat of PuO 2 were investigated up to 1500 K

  1. Plutonium immobilization -- Can loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP adds the excess plutonium to ceramic pucks, loads the pucks into cans, and places the cans into DWPF canisters. This paper discusses the PIP process steps, the can loading conceptual design, can loading equipment design, and can loading work completed

  2. Treatment of plutonium contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    Three kinds of plutonium contaminations were considered: skin contamination; contaminated wounds; contamination by inhalation. The treatment of these contaminations was studied for insoluble (oxide and metal forms) and soluble plutonium (complexes). The use of DTPA and therapeutic problems encountered with stable plutonium complexes were analyzed. The new possibilities of internal decontamination using Puchel and LICAM were evaluated [fr

  3. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques with liquid photographic emulsion and cellulose nitrate track-etch film are being used to investigate the spatial distribution of inhaled plutonium in the lungs of beagle dogs exposed to cigarette smoke or to the plutonium aerosol only. More plutonium than expected was detected on the inner surfaces of bronchi, and particles were observed beneath the bronchial mucosa. 2 figures, 2 tables

  4. Development program to recycle and purify plutonium-238 oxide fuel from scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, L.D.; Silver, G.L.; Avens, L.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Espinoza, J.; Foltyn, E.M.; Rinehart, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT) Division has initiated a development program to recover and purify plutonium-238 oxide from impure sources. A glove box line has been designed and a process flowsheet developed to perform this task on a large scale. The initial effort has focused on purification of 238 PuO 2 fuel that fails to meet General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) specifications because of impurities. The notable non-actinide impurities were silicon and phosphorus, but aluminum, chromium, iron and nickel were also near or in excess of limits specified by GPHS fuel powder specifications. Among actinide impurities, uranium is of paramount concern because 234 U is the daughter of 2238 Pu by alpha decay, and is the largest actinide impurity. An aqueous method based on nitric acid was selected for purification of the 238 PuO 2 fuel. All aqueous processing used high purity reagents, and was performed in PTFE apparatus to minimize introduction of new contaminants. Impure 238 PuO 2 was first dissolved in refluxing HNO 3 /HF and then the solution was filtered. The dissolved 238 Pu was adjusted to the trivalent state by an excess of reducing reagents to compensate for radiolytic effects, precipitated as plutonium(III) oxalate, and recovered by filtration. The plutonium(III) oxalate was subsequently calcined to convert the plutonium to the oxide. Decontamination factors for silicon, phosphorus and uranium were excellent. Decontamination factors for aluminum, chromium, iron and nickel were very good. The purity of the 238 PuO 2 recovered from this operation was significantly better than specifications. Efforts continue to develop the capability for efficient, safe, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable methods to recover and purify 238 PuO 2 fuel in a glovebox environment. Plutonium-238 materials targeted for recovery includes impure oxide and scrap items that are lean in 238 Pu values

  5. GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSHILICATE FRIT X COMPOSITION FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J

    2006-11-21

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is the preferred option for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. A reference glass composition (Lanthanide Borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B) was developed during the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) to immobilize plutonium in the late 1990's. A limited amount of performance testing was performed on this baseline composition before efforts to further pursue Pu disposition via a glass waste form ceased. Recent FY05 studies have further investigated the LaBS Frit B formulation as well as development of a newer LaBS formulation denoted as LaBS Frit X. The objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium loaded LaBS Frit X glass and perform corrosion testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit X composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The glass was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. A series of PCTs were conducted at SRNL using quenched Pu Frit X glass with varying exposed surface areas. Effects of isothermal and can-in-canister heat treatments on the Pu Frit X glass were also investigated. Another series of PCTs were performed on these different heat-treated Pu Frit X glasses. Leachates from all these PCTs

  6. Plutonium conversion by the gel-supported precipitation (GSP) process at the ENEA-EUREX reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchini, A.G.; Hall, A.

    1984-01-01

    Conversion of plutonium nitrate solutions to plutonium oxide powders, necessary for the manufacture of mixed U-Pu oxide fuel, presents many technological problems. The ENEA-EUREX-Plant, Saluggia, Italy, is in the process of completing a reprocessing campaign of CANDU fuel elements. Plants are under way to use the GSP process to convert purified plutonium in nitric acid solutions to (U, Pu)O 2 powder. Such a conversion unit is presently being tested with natural uranium and the results of these tests, as well as relevant details of the GSP process flowsheet, are presented in this paper. (orig.)

  7. Solvent extraction of Pu(IV) with TODGA in C6mimTf2N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaohong Huang; Qiuyue Zhang; Jinping Liu; Hui He; Wenbin Zhu; Xiaorong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the solvent extraction of Plutonium(Pu(IV)) from aqueous nitric acid by N,N,N'N'tetraoctyl-diglycolamide (TODGA) in 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium-bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide (C 6 mimTf 2 N) room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) were carried out. It was found that Pu(IV) is extracted into RTIL phase as [Pu(NO 3 )(TODGA)] 3+ through cation exchange mechanism. Extraction reaction equation is obtained by the influence of acidity and extractant concentration, and the parameters of thermodynamic equilibrium constant was calculated. (author)

  8. Radiolytic gas generation in plutonium contaminated waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanjian, A.R.

    1976-01-01

    Many plutonium contaminated waste materials decompose into gaseous products because of exposure to alpha radiation. The gases generated (usually hydrogen) over long-storage periods may create hazardous conditions. To determine the extent of such hazards, knowing the gas generation yields is necessary. These yields were measured by contacting some common Rocky Flats Plant waste materials with plutonium and monitoring the enclosed atmospheres for extensive periods of time. The materials were Plexiglas, polyvinyl chloride, glove-box gloves, machining oil, carbon tetrachloride, chlorothene VG solvent, Kimwipes (dry and wet), polyethylene, Dowex-1 resin, and surgeon's gloves. Both 239 Pu oxide and 238 Pu oxide were used as radiation sources. The gas analyses were made by mass spectrometry and the results obtained were the total gas generation, the hydrogen generation, the oxygen consumption rate, and the gas composition over the entire storage period. Hydrogen was the major gas produced in most of the materials. The total gas yields varied from 0.71 to 16 cm 3 (standard temperature pressure) per day per curie of plutonium. The oxygen consumption rates varied from 0.0088 to 0.070 millimoles per day per gram of plutonium oxide-239 and from 0.0014 to 0.0051 millimoles per day per milligram 238 Pu

  9. On the presence of plutonium in Madagascar following the SNAP-9A satellite failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rääf, C; Holm, E; Rabesiranana, N; Garcia-Tenorio, R; Chamizo, E

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu activity concentration and the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atomic ratio in peat bogs sampled in 2012 from marshlands in central Madagascar. The purpose was to investigate the presence of plutonium isotopes, 238, 239, 240 Pu, from the 1964 satellite failure carrying a SNAP-9A radiothermal generator. With an average 238 Pu/ 239+240 Pu activity ratio of 0.165 ± 0.02 (decay corrected to 1964), the peat bogs in Madagascar exhibit similar values as the ones found in the southeastern African continent, except they are one order of magnitude higher than expected (0.025) from global fallout in the Southern Hemisphere. The 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atomic ratio showed a distinct decrease for layers dating back to the mid-1960s (down to 0.069 compared with an anticipated ratio of 0.17 for global fallout), indicating that the SNAP-9A failure also resulted in an elevated deposition of 239 Pu. The obtained results demonstrate that further Pu analysis in Madagascar and in southeastern continental Africa is necessary to fully account for the regional Pu deposition from the SNAP-9A event. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Performance of cladding on MOX fuel with low 240Pu/239Pu ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, K.; Blanpain, P.; Morris, R.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of its surplus plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. As part of fuel qualification, four lead assemblies were manufactured and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod average burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg heavy metal. This was the world's first commercial irradiation of MOX fuel with a 240 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio less than 0.10. Five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This paper discusses the results of those examinations with emphasis on cladding performance. Exams relevant to the cladding included visual and eddy current exams, profilometry, microscopy, hydrogen analysis, gallium analysis, and mechanical testing. There was no discernible effect of the type of MOX fuel on the performance of the cladding. (authors)

  11. Study of plutonium and its alloys with III B elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, Gregory

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to understand phenomena which intervene in the delta phase stabilisation of plutonium alloys, and to build phase diagrams for PuAl, PuGa, and PuIn. After a presentation of some properties of plutonium and of its compounds, the author presents the adopted approach: the 'ab initio' approach to the fundamental state based on the density functional theory (DFT). Then, a numerical method used within the framework of the DFT is developed, and results obtained by using the developed code are presented for the different studied materials (Al, Ga, In, Pu). A gradient correction is applied to the alloys by using the Generalised Gradient Approximation (GGA) with spin polarisation. It allows the determination of the formation energy of compounds. Hybridisation effects between plutonium and delta-generating elements (Al, Ga, In) are assessed. A statistic approach (cluster variation method, CVM) is used to assess the influence of the chemical order at short distance on the stability of the fcc solid solution, and to obtain theoretical binary alloy diagrams

  12. Separation of uranium and common impurities from solid analytical waste containing plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, Nimai; Kumar, Mithlesh; Thulasidas, S.K.; Hon, N.S.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Mhatre, Amol; Natarajan, V.

    2014-07-01

    The report describes separation of uranium (U) and common impurities from solid analytical waste containing plutonium (Pu). This will be useful in recovery of Pu from nuclear waste. This is an important activity of any nuclear program in view of the strategic importance of Pu. In Radiochemistry Division, the trace metal analysis of Pu bearing fuel materials such as PuO 2 , (U,Pu)O 2 and (U,Pu)C are being carried out using the DC arc-Carrier Distillation technique. During these analyses, solid analytical waste containing Pu and 241 Am is generated. This comprises of left-over of samples and prepared charges. The main constituents of this waste are uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and silver chloride used as carrier. This report describes the entire work carried out to separate gram quantities of Pu from large amounts of U and mg quantities of 241 Am and the effect of leaching of the waste with nitric acid as a function of batch size. The effect of leaching the solid analytical waste of (U,Pu)O 2 and AgCl with concentrated nitric acid for different time intervals was also studied. Later keeping the time constant, the effect of nitric acid molarity on the leaching of U and Pu was investigated. Four different lots of the waste having different amounts were subjected to multiple leaching with 8 M nitric acid, each for 15 minutes duration. In all the experiments the amount of Uranium, Plutonium and other impurities leached were determined using ICP as an excitation source. The results are discussed in this report. (author)

  13. Plutonium determination in urine by techniques of mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez M, H.; Yllera de Ll, A.

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an analytic method for quantification and plutonium reappraisal in plane tables of alpha spectrometry be means of the mass spectrometry technique of high resolution with plasma source inductively coupled and desolvator Aridus (Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms) and mass spectrometry with accelerator (AMS). The obtained results were, the recovery percentage of Pu in the plane table was of ∼ 90% and activity minimum detectable obtained with Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS was of ∼ 3 and ∼ 0.4 f g of 239 Pu, respectively. Conclusion, the results demonstrate the aptitude of the Aridus-Hr-Icp-Ms and AMS techniques in the Pu reappraisal in plane tables with bigger speed and precision, improving the values notably of the activity minimum detectable that can be obtained with the alpha spectrometry (∼ 50 f g of 239 Pu). (author)

  14. Determination of plutonium-241 half-life by mass spectrometric measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiyama, Takashi; Wada, Yukio; Onishi, Koichi

    1982-01-01

    Much data for Pu-241 half-life have been reported, but these values range from 13.8 years to 15.1 years depending on investigators. In order to define the half-life of Pu-241, the half-life was calculated by analyzing the mass spectrometry data obtained in the author's laboratory over the past six years on Plutonium Isotopic Standard Reference Materials prepared at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). The sample used for this work consisted of SRM-947 and SRM-948 prepared at NBS. Before mass spectrometric analysis, the plutonium aliquot was separated from its Am-241 daughter by anion exchange chromatography, since Am-241 is not distinguished from Pu-241 in the mass spectrometer. 241 Pu/ 239 Pu and 241 Pu/ 240 Pu ratios were calculated from the values of mass spectrometric measurement. From the relation of log N to time, the half-life of Pu-241 was determined, based on the slope using a least squares fit. The half-life of Pu-241 was estimated to be 14.29+-0.15 years. (Yoshitake, I.)

  15. Transfer of plutonium across the human gut and its urinary excretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popplewell, D.S.; Ham, G.J.; McCarthy, W.; Lands, C.

    1994-01-01

    The gastrointestinal absorption of 244 Pu(IV) has been measured in three male adult volunteers. The plutonium was in citrate solution and was taken with food. The work was carried out in two stages. The first stage measured urinary plutonium excretion up to 8 or 9 d after the oral intake. The second stage commenced about six months later with an intravenous injection of plutonium citrate and measurements of the urinary plutonium excretion. Results from the two routes of intake were used to calculate the fractional absorption (f 1 ) of ingested plutonium. The f 1 values were in the range (2-9) x 10 -4 . In theory it should be possible to measure the plutonium in the volunteers' urine throughout their lives. Measurements are continuing and the results show the excretion pattern up to nearly 2 y for one subject, and 6 months for the other two volunteers. (author)

  16. Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in existing facilities at the Savannah River site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiSabatino, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources, and through a ceramic immobilization process converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans

  17. PFPF canister counter for foreign plutonium (PCAS-3) hardware operations and procedures manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.; Baca, J.; Kroncke, K.E.; Miller, M.C.; Takahashi, S.; Seki, S.; Inose, S.; Yamamoto, T.

    1993-01-01

    A neutron coincidence counter has been designed for the measurement of plutonium powder contained in tall storage canisters. The counter was designed for installation in the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility fabrication plant. Each canister contains from one to five cans of PuO 2 . The neutron counter measures the spontaneous-fission rate from the plutonium and, when this is combined with the plutonium isotopic ratios, the plutonium mass is determined. The system can accommodate plutonium loadings up to 12 kg, with 10 kg being a typical loading. Software has been developed to permit the continuous operation of the system in an unattended mode. Authentication techniques have been developed for the system. This manual describes the system and its operation and gives performance and calibration parameters for typical applications

  18. Evaluation of micro-homogeneity in plutonium based nuclear reactor fuel pellets by alpha-autoradiography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghra, Chetan, E-mail: chetanbaghra.barc@gmail.com [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Tarapur Complex, Maharashtra, 401502 (India); Sathe, D.B.; Sharma, Jitender; Walinjkar, Nilima; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Tarapur Complex, Maharashtra, 401502 (India); Kumar, Arun [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Maharashtra, 400094 (India)

    2015-12-15

    Alpha-autoradiography is a fast and non-destructive technique which is used at Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (India) to evaluate micro-homogeneity of plutonium in uranium and plutonium mixed oxide (U–Pu)O{sub 2} fuel pellets fabricated for both thermal and fast breeder reactors. In this study, various theoretical calculations to understand effect of alpha autoradiography process parameters and limiting conditions for measuring micro-homogeneity of plutonium in the pellets having different concentrations of plutonium were reported. Experiments were carried out to establish the procedure to evaluate micro-homogeneity of plutonium in (U-x%Pu)O{sub 2} pellets where x varies from 0.4 to 44% and to measure the size of agglomerates, if any, present in the pellet. An attempt had been made to measure plutonium content in the agglomerate using alpha-autoradiography. This study can also be useful for carrying out alpha-autoradiography of spent fuel pellets during post-irradiation examination. - Highlights: • Alpha-Autoradiography of (U–Pu)O{sub 2} oxide pellet having 0.4–44% PuO{sub 2} was done. • Exposure and etching time required for alpha-autoradiography was optimized. • Size of Pu agglomerate was measured using micro-homogeneity profiling.

  19. Modeling of Pu(IV) extraction and HNO3 speciation in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De-Sio, S.

    2012-01-01

    The PUREX process is a solvent extraction method dedicated to the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel in order to recover pure uranium and plutonium from aqueous solutions of concentrated nitric acid. The tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) is used as the extractant in the organic phase. The aim of this thesis work was to improve the modeling of liquid-liquid extraction media in nuclear fuel reprocessing. First, Raman and 14 N NMR measurements, coupled with theoretical calculations based on simple solutions theory and BIMSA modeling, were performed in order to get a better understanding of nitric acid dissociation in binary and ternary solutions. Then, Pu(IV) speciation in TBP after extraction from low nitric acid concentrations was investigated by EXAFS and vis-NIR spectroscopies. We were able to show evidence of the extraction of Pu(IV) hydrolyzed species into the organic phase. A new structural study was conducted on An(VI)/TBP and An(IV)/TBP complexes by coupling EXAFS measurements with DFT calculations. Finally, extraction isotherms modeling was performed on the Pu(IV)/HNO 3 /H 2 O/TBP 30%/dodecane system (with Pu at tracer scale) by taking into account deviation from ideal behaviour in both organic and aqueous phases. The best modeling was obtained when considering three plutonium (IV) complexes in the organic phase: Pu(OH) 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (TBP) 2 , Pu(NO 3 ) 4 (TBP) 2 and Pu(NO 3 ) 4 (TBP) 3 . (author) [fr

  20. Chemistry of tetravalent plutonium and zirconium. Hydrolysis, solubility, colloid formation and redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hye-Ryun

    2006-01-01

    The chemical properties of plutonium and zirconium are important in order to assess nuclear waste disposals with respect to isolation and immobilization of radionuclides. In this study, the hydrolysis, solubility and colloid formation of tetravalent plutonium and zirconium are investigated in 0.5 M HCl/NaCl solution using several complementary methods and the redox behavior of plutonium is investigated in acidic conditions as well. The solubilities of Pu(IV) and Zr(IV) are determined from the onset of colloid formation as a function of pH and metal concentration using LIBD (laser-induced breakdown detection). The investigation of the solubility of Zr(IV) is carried out at different concentrations (log [Zr] = -3 ∝ -7.6) and in a wide pH range (pH = 3 - 9) yielding log K sp (Zr(IV)) = -53.1 ± 0.5 based on the assumption that only mononuclear hydrolysis species exist in solution. Comparing the present results with literature data, the solubilities of Zr can be split in two groups, a crystalline phase with lower solubility and an amorphous phase (Zr(OH) 4 (am)) with higher solubility. The data obtained in the present work set an upper limit for the solubility of freshly formed Zr(OH) 4 (am). To understand this difference of solubilities, the geometrical structure of the dominant solution species is investigated as a function of pH using XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure). The samples at pH >2, still below the solubility limit determined by LIBD, contain the polynuclear Zr(IV) species probably due to the high concentration ([Zr] = 1 mM) and their structure do not resemble any reported simple ZrO 2 structure. The Zr(IV) colloid species in oversaturated solution under this experimental condition resembles amorphous Zr(IV) hydroxide rather than crystalline ZrO 2 . The solubility of Pu(IV) is investigated in acidic solution below pH 2. Considering only mononuclear hydrolysis species, log K sp (Pu(IV)) = -58.3 ± 0.4 is obtained. Since Pu(IV) is not redox stable even

  1. Plutonium and americium in the foodchain lichen-reindeer-man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaakkola, T.; Hakanen, M.; Keinonen, M.; Mussalo, H.; Miettinen, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    The atmospheric nuclear tests have produced a worldwide fallout of transuranium elements. In addition to plutonium measurable concentrations of americium are to be found in terrestrial and aquatic environments. The metabolism of plutonium in reindeer was investigated by analyzing plutonium in liver, bone, and lung collected during 1963-1976. To determine the distribution of plutonium in reindeer all tissues of four animals of different ages were analyzed. To estimate the uptake of plutonium from the gastrointestinal tract in reindeer, the tissue samples of elk were also analyzed. Elk which is of the same genus as reindeer does not feed on lichen but mainly on deciduous plants, buds, young twigs, and leaves of trees and bushes. The composition of its feed corresponds fairly well to that of reindeer during the summer. Studies on behaviour of americium along the foodchain lichen-reindeer-man were started by determining the Am-241 concentrations in lichen and reindeer liver. The Am-241 results were compared with those of Pu-239,240. The plutonium contents of the southern Finns, whose diet does not contain reindeer tissues, were determined by analyzing autopsy tissue samples (liver, lung, and bone). The southern Finns form a control group to the Lapps consuming reindeer tissues. Plutonium analyses of the placenta, blood, and tooth samples of the Lapps were performed

  2. Economic aspects of plutonium recycling in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumier, J.

    1987-01-01

    Starting from the next decade, there will be large quantities of plutonium available in France from reprocessing plants after deduction has been made for the needs of the Creys-Malville power plant and those of a likely 1500 MW(e) fast reactor. The amounts available from EDF fuels would be of the order 9 cumulative tonnes of fissile plutonium in 1992 and 40 t from 1992 to 2000, or 5 t/a. These quantities justify the establishment at the beginning of the next decade of a fabrication plant for UO 2 -PuO 2 (MOX) fuel with a capacity of about 100 t/a. In examining the economic aspects of this policy, the author compares the fuel cycle costs for a core loaded with standard fuel and a core loaded with 70% standard and 30% MOX fuel, and also those of a core with 100% MOX fuel, although the last option is purely theoretical at the present time. The actual price of plutonium is derived from this and is compared, in terms of uranium price, with its 'production cost', which is meaningful for countries where the option of reprocessing or not reprocessing has not arisen. It has been shown that the discount rate has little impact on the results. Pending large scale introduction of breeder reactors, use of plutonium recycling in PWRs seems to be an economic solution which will secure the future. (author). 2 figs, 9 tabs

  3. The use of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.

    1980-01-01

    The use of plutonium as a vital energy source producing maximum economic benefit with minimum proliferation risks is discussed. Having considered the production of plutonium, several possible plutonium fuel cycle options are identified and the economic value to be attached to plutonium for each examined. It is shown how the use of plutonium in fast reactors gives an opportunity for a non-proliferation policy not available when plutonium is used only in thermal reactors. From the technical considerations reviewed concerning plutonium and fast reactors it is shown that an economic regime involving international trade in spent thermal reactor fuel is possible which benefits equally those countries with fast reactors and those without and also assists in avoiding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. (U.K.)

  4. Sorption of Pu(IV) from nitric acid by bifunctional anion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, R.A.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Elshani, S.; Zhao, W.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Barr, M.E.; Marsh, S.F.; Chamberlin, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Anion exchange is attractive for separating plutonium because the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is very strongly sorbed and few other metal ions form competing anionic nitrate complexes. The major disadvantage of this process has been the unusually slow rate at which the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is sorbed by the resin. The paper summarizes the concept of bifunctional anion-exchange resins, proposed mechanism for Pu(IV) sorption, synthesis of the alkylating agent, calculation of K d values from Pu(IV) sorption results, and conclusions from the study of Pu(IV) sorption from 7M nitric acid by macroporous anion-exchange resins including level of crosslinking, level of alkylation, length of spacer, and bifunctional vs. monofunctional anion-exchange resins

  5. First-principles elastic constants and phonons of delta-Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderlind, P.; Landa, A.; Sadigh, B.

    2004-01-01

    Elastic constants and zone-boundary phonons of delta-plutonium have been calculated within the density-functional theory. The paramagnetic state of delta-Pu is modeled by disordered magnetism utilizing either the disordered local moment or the special quasirandom structure techniques...

  6. U, Pu, and Am nuclear signatures of the Thule hydrogen bomb debris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Mats; Lindahl, Patric; Roos, Per

    2008-01-01

    for the determination of the nuclear fingerprint of the accident. We report that the fissile material in the hydrogen weapons involved in the Thule accident was a mixture of highly enriched uranium and weapon-grade plutonium and that the main fissile material was U-235 (about 4 times more than the mass of Pu-239...

  7. Financing evaluation of the Pu spiking project in the Argentine nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergallo, J.E.; Barcelo, G.N.

    1990-01-01

    The present work pretends to evaluate the benefits that may be obtained from changing the natural uranium cycle that is presently used instead of that of Pu spiking which consists in changing a few elements with mixed oxides fuel with the plutonium reprocessed from all the fuel elements on the periphery of the reactor, maintaining the actual reactor's operating conditions. (Author) [es

  8. Chloride-catalyzed corrosion of plutonium in glovebox atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.; Haschke, J.M.; Allen, T.H.; Morales, L.A.; Jarboe, D.M.; Puglisi, C.V.

    1998-04-01

    Characterization of glovebox atmospheres and the black reaction product formed on plutonium surfaces shows that the abnormally rapid corrosion of components in the fabrication line is consistent with a complex salt-catalyzed reaction involving gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) and water. Analytical data verify that chlorocarbon and HCl vapors are presented in stagnant glovebox atmospheres. Hydrogen chloride concentrations approach 7 ppm at some locations in the glovebox line. The black corrosion product is identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH), a product formed by hydrolysis of plutonium in liquid water and salt solutions at room temperature. Plutonium trichloride (PuCl 3 ) produced by reaction of HCl at the metal surface is deliquescent and apparently forms a highly concentrated salt solution by absorbing moisture from the glovebox atmosphere. Rapid corrosion is attributed to the ensuing salt-catalyzed reaction between plutonium and water. Experimental results are discussed, possible involvement of hydrogen fluoride (HF) is examined, and methods of corrective action are presented in this report

  9. Plutonium scrap processing at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.E.; McKerley, B.J.; Christensen, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory currently has the newest plutonium handling facility in the nation. Los Alamos has been active in the processing of plutonium almost since the discovery of this man-made element in 1941. One of the functions of the new facility is the processing of plutonium scrap generated at LASL and other sites. The feed for the scrap processing program is extremely varied, and a wide variety of contaminants are often encountered. Depending upon the scrap matrix and contaminants present, the majority of material receives a nitric acid/hydrofluoric acid or nitric acid/calcium fluoride leach. The plutonium nitrate solutions are then loaded onto an anion exchange column charged with DOWEX 1 x 4, 50 to 100 mesh, nitrate form resin. The column is eluted with 0.48 M hydroxyl amine nitrate. The Pu(NO 3 ) 3 is then precipitated as plutonium III oxalate which is calcined at 450 to 500 0 C to yield a purified PuO 2 product

  10. Chloride-catalyzed corrosion of plutonium in glovebox atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, M. [ed.; Haschke, J.M.; Allen, T.H.; Morales, L.A.; Jarboe, D.M.; Puglisi, C.V.

    1998-04-01

    Characterization of glovebox atmospheres and the black reaction product formed on plutonium surfaces shows that the abnormally rapid corrosion of components in the fabrication line is consistent with a complex salt-catalyzed reaction involving gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) and water. Analytical data verify that chlorocarbon and HCl vapors are presented in stagnant glovebox atmospheres. Hydrogen chloride concentrations approach 7 ppm at some locations in the glovebox line. The black corrosion product is identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH), a product formed by hydrolysis of plutonium in liquid water and salt solutions at room temperature. Plutonium trichloride (PuCl{sub 3}) produced by reaction of HCl at the metal surface is deliquescent and apparently forms a highly concentrated salt solution by absorbing moisture from the glovebox atmosphere. Rapid corrosion is attributed to the ensuing salt-catalyzed reaction between plutonium and water. Experimental results are discussed, possible involvement of hydrogen fluoride (HF) is examined, and methods of corrective action are presented in this report.

  11. On the substantion of permissible concentrations of plutonium isotopes in the water of fresh water and sea water NPP cooling reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grachev, M.I.; Gusev, D.I.; Stepanova, V.D.

    1985-01-01

    Substantiation of maximum permissible concentration (PC) of plutonium isotopes ( 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu) in fresh and sea water cooling reservoirs of NPP with fast neutron reactors is given. The main criterion when calculating permissible plutonium content in water of surface reservoirs is the requirement not to exceed the established limits for radiation doses to persons resulted from water use. Data on coefficients of plutonium concentration in sea and fresh water hydrobionts are presented as well as on plutonium PC in water of fresh and sea water cooling reservoirs and bottom sediments of sea water cooling reservoirs. It is shown that doses to critical groups of population doesn't exceed potentially hazardous levels due to plutonium intake through food chains. But the calculation being carried out further should be corrected

  12. Properties of concentrated plutonium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.; Swanson, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Selected properties were measured for solutions containing about 500 and 700 g/l plutonium (IV) in 4--5M nitric acid: density, viscosity, vapor pressure, boiling point, radiolytic gas (H 2 ) evolution rates, and corrosion rate on Ti and 304L stainless steel. Pu solubility was determined to be 550 to 800 g/l in 2.5 to 7M HNO 3 at ambient temperature and 820 to 860 g/l in 3M HNO 3 at 50 0 C

  13. Electronic properties of Pu19Os simulating β-Pu: the strongly correlated Pu phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havela, Ladislav; Maskova, Silvie; Kolorenc, Jindrich; Colineau, E; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Eloirdi, Rachel

    2018-01-04

    We established basic electronic properties of ζ-Pu19Os, which is a close analogue to β-Pu, and its low-temperature variety, η-Pu19Os. Their magnetic susceptibility is by 15% higher than for δ-Pu. Specific heat study of ζ-Pu19Os shows a soft lattice similar to δ-Pu, leading to a low Debye temperature ΘD = 101 K. The linear electronic coefficient γ related to the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi level points to a higher value, 55±2 mJ/mol Pu K2, compared to 40 mJ/mol K2 for δ-Pu. The results confirm that β-Pu is probably the most strongly correlated Pu phase, as had been indicated by resistivity measurements. The volume and related Pu-Pu spacing is clearly not the primary tuning parameter for Pu metal, as the β-Pu density stands close to the ground-state α-phase and is much higher than that for δ-Pu. The η-Pu19Os phase has a record γ-value of 74±2 mJ/mol Pu K2. The enhancement is not reproduced by LDA+DMFT calculations in the fcc structure, which suggests that the multiple diverse sites can be the key to the understanding of β-Pu. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. HB-LINE ANION EXCHANGE PURIFICATION OF AFS-2 PLUTONIUM FOR MOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyser, E.; King, W.

    2012-04-25

    Non-radioactive cerium (Ce) and radioactive plutonium (Pu) anion exchange column experiments using scaled HB-Line designs were performed to investigate the feasibility of using either gadolinium nitrate (Gd) or boric acid (B as H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) as a neutron poison in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Expected typical concentrations of probable impurities were tested and the removal of these impurities by a decontamination wash was measured. Impurity concentrations are compared to two specifications - designated as Column A or Column B (most restrictive) - proposed for plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) product shipped to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Use of Gd as a neutron poison requires a larger volume of wash for the proposed Column A specification. Since boron (B) has a higher proposed specification and is more easily removed by washing, it appears to be the better candidate for use in the H-Canyon dissolution process. Some difficulty was observed in achieving the Column A specification due to the limited effectiveness that the wash step has in removing the residual B after {approx}4 BV's wash. However a combination of the experimental 10 BV's wash results and a calculated DF from the oxalate precipitation process yields an overall DF sufficient to meet the Column A specification. For those impurities (other than B) not removed by 10 BV's of wash, the impurity is either not expected to be present in the feedstock or process, or recommendations have been provided for improvement in the analytical detection/method or validation of calculated results. In summary, boron is recommended as the appropriate neutron poison for H-Canyon dissolution and impurities are expected to meet the Column A specification limits for oxide production in HB-Line.

  15. Preparation of plutonium hexafluoride. Recovery of plutonium from waste dross (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendre, R.

    1962-01-01

    The object of this work is to study the influence of various physical factors on the rate of fluorination of solid plutonium tetrafluoride by fluorine. In a horizontal oven with a circulation for pure fluorine at atmospheric pressure and 520 deg. C, at a fluorine rate of 9 litres/hour, it is possible to transform 3 g of tetrafluoride to hexafluoride with about 100 per cent transformation and a recovery yield of over 90 per cent, in 4 to 5 hours. The fluorination rate is a function of the temperature, of the fluorine flow-rate, of the crucible surface, of the depth of the tetrafluoride layer and of the reaction time. It does not depend on the diffusion of the fluorine into the solid but is determined by the reaction at the gas-solid interface and obeys the kinetic law (1 - T T ) 1/3 = kt + 1. The existence of intermediate fluorides, in particular Pu 4 F 17 , is confirmed by a break in the Arrhenius plot at about 370 deg. C, by differences in the fluorination rates inside the tetrafluoride layer, and by reversible colour changes. The transformation to hexafluoride occurs with a purification with respect of the foreign elements present in the initial plutonium. Recovery of plutonium from waste dross: The study is based on the transformation of occluded plutonium particles to gaseous hexafluoride which is then decomposed thermally to the tetrafluoride which can be reintroduced directly in the production circuit. Under the conditions considered this process is not applicable industrially. After milling, it is possible to separate the dross into enriched (75 per cent Pu in 2.6 per cent by weight of dross) and depleted portions. By prolonged fluorination (16 hours) of the various fractions it is possible to recover about 80 per cent of the plutonium. A treatment plant using fluidization, as described at the end of this study, should make it possible to substantially improve the yield. (author) [fr

  16. Compositions of airborne plutonium-bearing particles from a plutonium finishing operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, S.M. Jr.

    1976-11-01

    The elemental composition of 111 plutonium-bearing particles was determined (using an electron microprobe) as part of a program to investigate the origin and behavior of the long-lived transuranic radionuclides released from fuel reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Plant. These particles, collected from wet-cabinet and room-air exhausts from the plutonium finishing operation (JB-Line), were between 0.4 and 36 μm in diameter. Ninety-nine of the particles were found to be aggregates of various minerals and metals, six were quartz, and six were small (less than 2-μm-diameter) pieces of iron oxide. Collectively, these particles contained less minerals and more metals than natural dusts contain. The metallic constituents included elements normally not found in dusts, e.g., chromium, nickel, copper, and zinc. Concentrations of aluminum and iron exceeded those normally found in minerals. Elemental concentrations in individual particles covered a wide range: one 2-μm-diameter particle contained 97 percent NiO, a 9-μm-diameter particle contained 72 percent Cr 2 O 3 . Although the particles were selected because they produced plutonium fission tracks, the plutonium concentration was too low to be estimated by microprobe analysis in all but a 1-μm-diameter particle. This plutonium-bearing particle contained 73 percent PuO 2 by weight in combination with Fe 2 O 3 and mica; its activity was estimated at 0.17 pCi of 239 Pu

  17. Some of the properties of plutonium and the aluminium-plutonium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, R.; Boucher, R.; Fabre, R.; Monti, H.

    1959-01-01

    1- Study of the physical properties of plutonium. 1) Study of the allotropy of plutonium. a) Thermal analysis: the apparatus used and the measurement technique are briefly described. The transition point temperatures and the corresponding heats of transformation have been determined. Finally, the results of the particular study of certain transition points are given. b) Dilatometry. The dilatometric analysis of the phase changes of plutonium has been carried out by means of the Chevenard dilatometer with photographic recording. The testing conditions (heating and cooling speeds, isotherm plateaux) have been varied in order to determine accurately the characteristics of each transition, particularly the δ → γ transition on cooling. 2) Micrography of plutonium. For the accurate preparation of metallographic samples the electrolytic polishing must be rapid, which implies a mechanical polishing of excellent quality. Information is given on new attacking reagents which show the structure of the metal very clearly. 2- Study of aluminium-plutonium alloys. Comparative study of Al-Pu and Al-U alloys rich in aluminium. a) Thermal analysis. The liquids and fusion temperatures of the eutectic Al-XAl 4 , have been accurately determined. From the measurement of the heats of fusion the exact composition of the eutectic alloy has been determined. b) Thermal treatments. The eutectic coalescence kinetics have been studied by a micrographic method and by following the evolution of hardness. The results obtained show that the phenomenon is more rapid in Al-Pu alloys than in Al-U alloys. c) Micrographic study of the transition XAl 3 → XAl 4 . The peritectic reaction XAl 3 + liq. → XAl 4 has been suppressed by quenching. The transformation of the XAl 3 phase to the solid phase has been studied as well as the effect of small additions of silicon on the kinetics of this reaction. (author) [fr

  18. Recovery of plutonium from incinerator ash at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.C.

    1976-01-01

    Incineration of combustible materials highly contaminated with plutonium produces a residue of incinerator ash. Recovery of plutonium from incinerator ash residues at Rocky Flats is accomplished by a continuous leaching operation with nitric acid containing fluoride ion. Special equipment used in the leaching operation consists of a screw feeder, air-lift dissolvers, filters, solids dryer, and vapor collection system. Each equipment item is described in detail. The average dissolution efficiency of plutonium experienced with the process was 68% on the first pass, 74% on the second pass, and 64% on each subsequent pass. Total-solids dissolution efficiencies averaged 47% on the first pass and about 25% on each subsequent pass

  19. Pu-238 Supply Program Project Execution Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wham, Robert M.; Martin, Sherman

    2012-01-01

    This Pu-238 Supply Program Project Execution Plan (PEP) summarizes critical information and processes necessary to manage the program. The PEP is the primary agreement regarding planning and objectives between The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE-75), Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Office (OSO) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The acquisition executive (AE) will approve the PEP. The PEP is a living document that will be reviewed and revised periodically until the project is complete. The purpose of the project is to reestablish the capability to produce plutonium-238 (Pu-238) domestically. This capability consists primarily of procedures, processes, and design information, not capital assets. As such, the project is not subject to the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, but it will be managed using the project management principles and best practices defined there. It is likely that some capital asset will need to be acquired to complete tasks within the project. As these are identified, project controls and related processes will be updated as necessary. Because the project at its initiation was envisioned to require significant capital assets, Critical Decision 0 (CD-0) was conducted in accordance with DOE O 413.3B, and the mission need was approved on December 9, 2003, by William Magwood IV, director of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science and Technology, DOE. No date was provided for project start-up at that time. This PEP is consistent with the strategy described in the June 2010 report to Congress, Start-up Plan for Plutonium-238 Production for Radioisotope Power Systems.

  20. Potentiometric determination of uranium in the presence of plutonium in Hsub(2)SOsub(4) medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, N.; Rama Rao, G.A.; Manchanda, V.K.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The potentiometric determination of uranium is widely carried out in phosphoric acid medium to suppress the interferences of plutonium by complexation. Owing to the complexity of the recycling plutonium from the phosphate based waste involving manifold stages of separation, a method is proposed which does not use phosphoric acid. Uranium and plutonium are reduced to U(IV) and Pu(III) in IM Hsub(2)SOsub(4) by Ti(III), and NaNOsub(2) is chosen to selectively oxidize Pu(III) and the excess of Ti(III). The unreacted NaNOsub(2) is destroyed by sulphamic acid and excess Fe(III) is added following dilution. The euqivalent amount of Fe(II) thus liberated is titrated against standard Ksub(2)Crsub(2)Osub(7). RSD obtained for the determination of uranium (1-2 mg) is 0.3% with plutonium present up to 4.0 mg. (author)

  1. Plutonium in the marine environment at Thule, NW-Greenland after a nuclear weapons accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, H.; Eriksson, M.; Ilus, E.

    2001-01-01

    originates from at least two sources of different quality. The radioecological implication of the observed variations is that the use of plutonium isotope ratios in quantitatively determining the influence of different plutonium sources is a very complex affair requiring substantial data sets.......In January 1968, a B52 plane carrying 4 nuclear weapon!: crashed on the sea ice similar to 12 km from the Thule Air Base, in northwest Greenland. The benthic marine environment in the 180-230 m deep Bylot Sound was then contaminated with similar to1.4 TBq Pu-239,Pu-240 (similar to0.5 kg). The site...... was revisited in August 1997, 29 years after the accident. Water and brown algae data indicate that plutonium is not transported from the contaminated sediments into the surface waters in significant quantities. Sediment core data only indicate minor translocation of plutonium from the accident to the area...

  2. Application of extraction paper chromatography in the analysis of Pu in aqueous samples containing 241Am

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagasia, Poonam; Dhami, P.S.; Tripathi, S.C.; Gandhi, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Closing the fuel cycle is an inevitable option for sustained growth and is hallmark of Indian Atomic Energy Programme. Analysis of fissile component especially plutonium is very important for almost all the process streams at the back end of the fuel cycle. Among the various Isotopes of plutonium, 241 Pu is β emitter and decays to 241 Am (T 1/2 of ∼432 y) which is an α emitter and having γ energy of ∼60 keV. Its specific activity is about 56 times higher than that Pu. Therefore, Pu stream is always associated with 241 Am and its activity increases with time needing its separation prior to radiometric assay. Among the various separation techniques, solvent extraction method employing thenoytrifluoroacetone (TTA) is commonly employed for its selective separation under particular experimental conditions. In an alternate approach, 2-ethyl hexyl 2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid (KSM-17) based extraction paper chromatography (EPC) was attempted for separation of 241 Am from plutonium prior to radiometry. Pu 4+ forms strong complex with KSM-17 and is held at the point of application whereas 241 Am migrates towards the solvent front under the experimental conditions. During migration clear separation is observed in ∼15 minutes using 0.5 M HNO 3 as developing reagent. After separation is achieved, 1 cm 2 spot area containing Pu is desorbed in 1 mL xylene phase and used for radiometric counting

  3. Safety issues in fabricating mixed oxide fuel using surplus weapons plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buksa, J.; Badwan, F.; Barr, M.; Motley, F.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the safety issues and implications of fabricating mixed oxide (MOX) fuel using surplus weapons plutonium. The basis for this assessment is the research done at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in identifying and resolving the technical issues surrounding the production of PuO 2 feed, removal of gallium from the PuO 2 feed, the fabrication of test fuel, and the work done at the LANL plutonium processing facility. The use of plutonium in MOX fuel has been successfully demonstrated in Europe, where the experience has been almost exclusively with plutonium separated from commercial spent nuclear fuel. This experience in safely operating MOX fuel fabrication facilities directly applies to the fabrication and irradiation of MOX fuel made from surplus weapons plutonium. Consequently, this paper focuses on the technical difference between plutonium from surplus weapons, and light-water reactor recycled plutonium. Preliminary assessments and research lead to the conclusion that no new process or product safety concerns will arise from using surplus weapons plutonium in MOX fuel

  4. Study on Characteristic of Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity for Plutonium Core of Pebbled Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhair; Suwoto; Setiadipura, T.; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    As a part of the solution searching for possibility to control the plutonium, a current effort is focused on mechanisms to maximize consumption of plutonium. Plutonium core solution is a unique case in the high temperature reactor which is intended to reduce the accumulation of plutonium. However, the safety performance of the plutonium core which tends to produce a positive temperature coefficient of reactivity should be examined. The pebble bed inherent safety features which are characterized by a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity must be maintained under any circumstances. The purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristic of temperature coefficient of reactivity for plutonium core of pebble bed reactor. A series of calculations with plutonium loading varied from 0.5 g to 1.5 g per fuel pebble were performed by the MCNPX code and ENDF/B-VII library. The calculation results show that the k eff curve of 0.5 g Pu/pebble declines sharply with the increase in fuel burnup while the greater Pu loading per pebble yields k eff curve declines slighter. The fuel with high Pu content per pebble may reach long burnup cycle. From the temperature coefficient point of view, it is concluded that the reactor containing 0.5 g-1.25 g Pu/pebble at high burnup has less favorable safety features if it is operated at high temperature. The use of fuel with Pu content of 1.5 g/pebble at high burnup should be considered carefully from core safety aspect because it could affect transient behavior into a fatal accident situation.

  5. Chemical Disposition of Plutonium in Hanford Site Tank Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This report examines the chemical disposition of plutonium (Pu) in Hanford Site tank wastes, by itself and in its observed and potential interactions with the neutron absorbers aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and sodium (Na). Consideration also is given to the interactions of plutonium with uranium (U). No consideration of the disposition of uranium itself as an element with fissile isotopes is considered except tangentially with respect to its interaction as an absorber for plutonium. The report begins with a brief review of Hanford Site plutonium processes, examining the various means used to recover plutonium from irradiated fuel and from scrap, and also examines the intermediate processing of plutonium to prepare useful chemical forms. The paper provides an overview of Hanford tank defined-waste–type compositions and some calculations of the ratios of plutonium to absorber elements in these waste types and in individual waste analyses. These assessments are based on Hanford tank waste inventory data derived from separately published, expert assessments of tank disposal records, process flowsheets, and chemical/radiochemical analyses. This work also investigates the distribution and expected speciation of plutonium in tank waste solution and solid phases. For the solid phases, both pure plutonium compounds and plutonium interactions with absorber elements are considered. These assessments of plutonium chemistry are based largely on analyses of idealized or simulated tank waste or strongly alkaline systems. The very limited information available on plutonium behavior, disposition, and speciation in genuine tank waste also is discussed. The assessments show that plutonium coprecipitates strongly with chromium, iron, manganese and uranium absorbers. Plutonium’s chemical interactions with aluminum, nickel, and sodium are minimal to non-existent. Credit for neutronic interaction of plutonium with these absorbers

  6. Relationships among plutonium contents of soil, vegetation and animals collected on and adjacent to an integrated nuclear complex in the humid southeastern United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLendon, H.R.

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-three representative sampling locations on and adjacent to the Savannah River Plant (SRP) site were selected to obtain information on plutonium movement in the food chain under southeastern US environmental conditions. Soil, a resuspendible fraction of the soil, honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), and camphor weed (Heterotheca subaxillaris) were collected at each location. Grasshoppers and cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) were collected at some locations. The plutonium concentrations in soil at the selected locations ranged from 1.5 to 171fCi/g and alpha percentages of 238 Pu ranged from 2 to 66. The concentration of plutonium in the vegetation and on the leaves ranged from 0.17 to 76.1fCi/g and the alpha percentages of 238 Pu from 3 to 61. The concentration of plutonium in cotton rats and grasshoppers ranged from 0.07 to 3.58fCi/g and the alpha percentages of 238 Pu ranged from 22 to 80. The average ratio of plutonium concentration of vegetation to that of the surrounding soil was 10 -1 ; the corresponding ratio for cotton rats and soil was 10 -2 . These ratios appear to be independent of the plutonium concentration in the soil. Deposition on the surfaces of leaves and stems was the principal mechanism of plutonium contamination of vegetation. Comparisons among the plutonium values of the vegetation, soil and resuspendible fraction suggest the use of a proposed resuspendible measurement technique as a monitoring method to indicate subtle changes in the plutonium concentration of the soil surface that are not detectable by routine soil sampling. Although the 238 Pu data in the various ecosystem components were not conclusive, they do support evidence presented in other studies that there is an apparent increase in the biological availability of 238 Pu relative to that of sup(239,240)Pu in the environment. The plutonium concentrations of all ecosystem components decreased as the distance from the reprocessing plants increased. (author)

  7. Determination of Pu and U by ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Y.; Yoshida, S.

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the distribution and behaviour of long-lived radionuclides in the terrestrial environment, we have developed analytical methods for 238 U, 232 Th and 239 , 240 Pu and determined them in several environmental samples. ICP-MS was applied to the analyses. Concentrations of 238 U and 232 Th were determined in variety of soils, plants and environmental waters. The mean concentration of U and Th in 77 soils, collected several parts of Japan, were 2.3 and 7.0 ppm (dry wt). Red and yellow soils, which are mainly found in western Japan, have high concentrations of Th, suggesting the contribution from granitic rocks. Higher concentration of U in agricultural soils than forest soils suggested the possible accumulation of this element from phosphate fertilizer. The soil-to-plant transfer factors (concentration ratios between plants and soils) of U and Th were estimated from the analytical results of these nuclides in soils and in several crops. The factors for U were about 0.0005 in leaf vegetables, 0.0002 in root vegetables, 0.0001 in potatoes and 0.00001 in rice (polished). For Th, the factors were about 0.0005 in leaf vegetables, 0.0008 in root vegetables, 0.0005 in potatoes and 0.00003 in rice (polished). For the analysis of plutonium, chromatographic resin, Dowex 1x8, was examined for their applicability in the separation of Pu from the matrix elements. Sufficient decontamination factors (10 4 -10 5 ) for many matrix elements including U, which interferes in the detection of mass 239, were obtained in both resins. Analytical results of 239+240 Pu in standard reference materials (IAEA-135, -SOIL-6, -368 and -134) indicated that the accuracy of this method was satisfactory. Data on the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atom ratios in these reference materials, which are rare in the literature, were also obtained. Soil samples from the Marshall Islands showed a large variation of the 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atom ratios (0.06 - 0.30), which should be related to the type of devises

  8. Reactions of plutonium dioxide with water and oxygen-hydrogen mixtures: Mechanisms for corrosion of uranium and plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, John M.; Allen, Thomas H.; Morales, Luis A.

    1999-06-18

    Investigation of the interactions of plutonium dioxide with water vapor and with an oxygen-hydrogen mixture show that the oxide is both chemically reactive and catalytically active. Correspondence of the chemical behavior with that for oxidation of uranium in moist air suggests that similar catalytic processes participate in the mechanism of moisture-enhanced corrosion of uranium and plutonium. Evaluation of chemical and kinetic data for corrosion of the metals leads to a comprehensive mechanism for corrosion in dry air, water vapor, and moist air. Results are applied in confirming that the corrosion rate of Pu in water vapor decreases sharply between 100 and 200 degrees C.

  9. Electronic properties of Pu19Os simulating β-Pu: the strongly correlated Pu phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havela, L.; Mašková, S.; Kolorenč, J.; Colineau, E.; Griveau, J.-C.; Eloirdi, R.

    2018-02-01

    We established the basic electronic properties of ζ-Pu19Os, which is a close analogue to β-Pu, and its low-temperature variety, η-Pu19Os. Their magnetic susceptibility is 15% higher than for δ-Pu. A specific heat study of ζ-Pu19Os shows a soft lattice similar to δ-Pu, leading to a low Debye temperature Θ D  =  101 K. The linear electronic coefficient γ related to the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi level points to a higher value, 55  ±  2 mJ (mol Pu K2)–1, compared to 40 mJ (mol K2)–1 for δ-Pu. The results confirm that β-Pu is probably the most strongly correlated Pu phase, as had been indicated by resistivity measurements. The volume and related Pu–Pu spacing is clearly not the primary tuning parameter for Pu metal, as the β-Pu density stands close to the ground-state α-phase and is much higher than that for δ-Pu. The η-Pu19Os phase has a record γ-value of 74  ±  2 mJ (mol Pu K2)–1. The enhancement is not reproduced by LDA+DMFT calculations in the fcc structure, which suggests that multiple diverse sites can be the key to the understanding of β-Pu.

  10. Environmental Transport of Plutonium: Biogeochemical Processes at Femtomolar Concentrations and Nanometer Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-10-05

    The major challenge in predicting the mobility and transport of plutonium (Pu) is determining the dominant geochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface. The reaction chemistry of Pu (i.e., aqueous speciation, solubility, sorptivity, redox chemistry, and affinity for colloidal particles, both abiotic and microbially mediated) is particularly complicated. It is generally thought that due to its low solubility and high sorptivity, Pu migration in the environment occurs only when facilitated by transport on particulate matter (i.e., colloidal particles). Despite the recognized importance of colloid-facilitated transport of Pu, very little is known about the geochemical and biochemical mechanisms controlling Pu-colloid formation and association, particularly at femtomolar Pu concentrations observed at DOE sites.

  11. Plutonium and americium in arctic waters, the North Sea and Scottish and Irish coastal zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallstadius, L.; Aarkrog, Asker; Dahlgaard, Henning

    1986-01-01

    of the Irish Sea) to Spitsbergen. 241Am found in Arctic waters probably originates from the decay of fallout 241Pu and, like Pu, tentatively has a residence time of the order of several years. Americium from Sellafield has an estimated mean residence time of 4–6 months in Scottish waters.......Plutonium and americium have been measured in surface waters of the Greenland and Barents Seas and in the northern North Sea from 1980 through 1984. Measurements in water and biota, Fucus, Mytilus and Patella, were carried out in North-English and Scottish waters in 1982 and Fucus samples were...... collected from the Irish coast in 1983. Fallout is found to dominate as a source of 239+240Pu north of latitude 65°N, while for 238Pu a substantial fraction originates from European nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. The 238Pu/239+240Pu isotope ratio provides clear evidence of the transport of effluent...

  12. Behavior of plutonium-238 solutions in the soil and hydrology system at Mound Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    Because plutonium is a potentially hazardous material, extensive precautions have been exercised since Pu operations began at Mound Laboratory to carefully maintain strict control of the Pu and to prevent significant amounts from entering the environment. These precautions include elaborate facility and equipment design criteria, scientific expertise, experience, personnel training, management and operational control systems, and environmental monitoring. In spite of these precautions, in early 1974, core samples from area waterways collected and analyzed showed that 238 Pu concentrations in the sediment of certain waterways adjacent to the site were above the baseline levels expected ( 238 Pu deposits presented no immediate hazard to the general population in the area as indicated by the air and water concentrations which were well within accepted Radioactivity Concentration Guides (RCG) for 238 Pu. Data are presented from an investigation of the extent of the contamination, the source of Pu, how it was transported and deposited in waterways, and potential hazards of these deposits to the general public

  13. Colloid-Facilitated Plutonium Transport: Model Formulation and Simulations of Column Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Lu, G.; Wolfsberg, A.; McGraw, M.; Reimus, P.; Ware, D.

    2001-12-01

    Field observations indicate that plutonium, believed to be immobile due to its strong sorption to immobile media, has migrated away from the BENHAM underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The concentrations of plutonium (Pu) measured in the groundwater samples are just above the detection level and indicate that the plutonium is sorbed onto colloids, at least following sample preparation activities. In our research we have developed a model incorporating processes including sorption, speciation, interaction between Pu and colloids, Pu-colloid filtration, and colloid filtration. In natural aqueous environment, most colloids carry a negative charge, and are inclined to interact with Pu species with positive charges (dominantly PuO2+). On the other hand, Pu is apt to be sorbed onto minerals. Thus, two competitive processes between Pu colloid interactions and Pu sorption affect the Pu mobility. In our modeling effort these processes are simplified for computational efficiency. Pu speciation is represented with an equilibrium ratio between reactive and non-reactive species (e.g. PuO2(CO3)- ). Pu sorption is formulated with a lumped distribution coefficient, Kd, for PuO2+) that considers pH, oxidation potential (Eh), concentrations of relevant components, and fracture mineral compositions. Fracture minerals are quantified with active surface sites by taking into consideration the area covered by the secondary minerals, the thickness of the coating, the amount of the minerals in contact with fracture water, and their sorption site density. These processes were modeled and compared with the data from a fractured column transport experiment involving tritium, Pu, and montmorillonite colloids. One of the key findings with these models is that kinetic expressions are necessary to describe the Pu-colloid interaction and Pu-colloid filtration. This work was performed under contract with the United States Department of Energy. Los Alamos National Laboratory is

  14. Feasibility Study for the Development of Plutonium Reference Materials for Age Dating in Nuclear Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, M.; Richter, S.; Aregbe, Y.; Wellum, R.; Altzitzoglou, T.; Verbruggen, A.; Mayer, K.; Prohaska, T.

    2010-01-01

    Isotopic reference materials certified for the age of nuclear material (uranium, plutonium) are needed in the fields of nuclear forensics and environmental measurements. Therefore a feasibility study for the development of plutonium reference materials for age dating has been started recently at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (EC-JRC-IRMM). The ''age'' of the material is defined as the time that has passed since the last chemical separation of the mother and daughter isotopes (e.g. 241 Pu and 241 Am). Assuming that the separation has been complete and all the daughter isotopes have been removed from the original material during this last separation, the age of the material can be determined by measuring the ratio of daughter and mother radio-nuclides, e.g. 241 Am/ 241 Pu. At a given time after the last separation and depending on the half lives of the radio-nuclides involved, a certain amount of the daughter radionuclide(s) will be present. For the determination of the unknown age of a material different ''clocks'' can be used; ''clocks'' are pairs of mother and daughter radio-nuclides, such as 241 Am/ 241 Pu, 238 Pu/ 234 U, 239 Pu/ 235 U, 240 Pu/ 236 U, and possibly 242 Pu/ 238 U. For the age estimation of a real sample, such as material seized in nuclear forensics investigations or dust samples in environmental measurements, it is advisable to use more than one clock in order to ensure the reliability of the results and to exclude the possibility that the sample under question is a mixture of two or more materials. Consequently, a future reference material certified for separation date should ideally be certified for more than one ''clock'' or several reference materials for different ''clocks'' should be developed. The first step of this study is to verify the known separation dates of different plutonium materials of different ages and isotopic compositions by measuring the mother ( 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Pu, 242 Pu) and daughter

  15. Plutonium distribution and remobilization in sediments of the Rhone River mouth (North-Western Mediterranean)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansard, B.

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the distribution and remobilization of plutonium (Pu) in the sediments off the Rhone river mouth. Most of the 238 Pu and 239,240 Pu isotopes introduced into the Rhone River were discharged by the liquid effluents released from the Marcoule reprocessing plant, located 120 km upstream the river mouth. Due to its high affinity for particles and its long half life, 238 Pu is a promising tracer to follow the dispersion of particulate matter from the Rhone River to the Mediterranean Sea. During the 3 REMORA cruises, sediment samples were specifically collected in the Rhone pro-delta area and more offshore on the whole continental shelf of the Gulf of Lions. The measurements of alpha emitters gave a first detailed spatial distribution of Pu isotope concentrations in surface sediments off the Rhone mouth. Using 137 Cs concentrations and their correlations with Pu isotopes, we were able to give a first estimate of Pu inventories for the sediments of the study area. In 2001, plutonium inventories were estimated to 92 ± 7 GBq of 238 Pu and 522 ± 44 GBq of 239,240 Pu for an area of 500 km 2 in front of the Rhone River mouth. Roughly, 50 % of these inventories are trapped in an area of 100 km 2 corresponding to the extent of the Rhone pro-delta zone. In spring 2002, an ADCP, with current velocity and wave measurements, was moored off the Rhone River mouth. This unique in situ dataset highlights the major role of South-East swells in the erosion of pro-deltaic sediments and their dispersion to the South-Westward direction. Plutonium remobilization was examined using a new experimental design based on sediment resuspension processes studied within a linear recirculating flume. For Gulf of Lions sediments and for a given hydrodynamic stress, remobilization fluxes raised a maximum of 0.08 Bq.m -2 .h -1 for 238 Pu and 0.64 Bq.m -2 .h -1 for 239,240 Pu. A first plutonium budget determined for the study area indicates that at least 85

  16. Plutonium distribution in the environs of the Nevada Test Site: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, W.A.; Jakubowski, F.M.

    1977-01-01

    Over 6,000 soil samples from Areas 1, 4, and 5 of the Nevada Test Site were Ge(Li) scanned for Am-241 and other gamma-emitting radionuclides. The results indicate only about 5% contained Am-241 in quantities above the detection limit (1 pCi/g of Am-241). In addition, approximately 10% of the samples were subjected to wet chemistry analysis for Pu-239. The results indicate all contained Pu-239 in quantities above the detection limit (0.01 pCi/g of Pu-239). The largest concentrations of Am-241 and Pu-239 appear in the Hamilton and Small Boy sites of Area 5. The Hamilton soil data may be sufficient to estimate both an inventory and a distribution of plutonium over most of the site, but the data from the majority of the other sites are sufficient only to set upper limits of plutonium inventories

  17. Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, J.R.; Dunn, J.G.; Avens, L.R.

    1987-02-13

    Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides. AmF/sub 4/ is not further oxidized to AmF/sub 6/ by the application of O/sub 2/F at room temperature thereto, while plutonium compounds present in the americium sample are fluorinated to volatile PuF/sub 6/, which can readily be separated therefrom, leaving the purified americium oxides and/or fluorides as the solid tetrafluoride thereof.

  18. Forensic investigation of plutonium metal: a case study of CRM 126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byerly, B.L.; Floyd Stanley; Khal Spencer; Colletti, Lisa; Garduno, Katherine; Kuhn, Kevin; Lujan, Elmer; Martinez, Alex; Porterfield, Donivan; Jung Rim

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a certified plutonium metal reference material (CRM 126) with a known production history is examined using analytical methods that are commonly employed in nuclear forensics for provenancing and attribution. The measured plutonium isotopic composition and actinide assay are consistent with values reported on the reference material certificate. Model ages from U/Pu and Am/Pu chronometers agree with the documented production timeline. The results confirm the utility of these analytical methods and highlight the importance of a holistic approach for forensic study of unknown materials. (author)

  19. Determination of plutonium in environmental samples by controlled valence in anion exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Q.J.; Aarkrog, A.; Nielsen, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    The title method was successfully used for collecting Pu-239, Pu-249 from 200 litres of seawater by coprecipitation with 16 g FeSO4 . 7H2O under reducing conditions without filtering. The plutonium is leached by concentrated HNO3 + HCI from the coprecipitate and the solid particles. The precipita...... stripped by H20, NaOH, 2N HNO3 and 0.5N HNO3 containing 0.01M NaNO3. The chemical yield of plutonium for a 200 l seawater sample is 60-80%. The resolution of the electroplated thin source is very good....

  20. Problems and progress in the preparation of sources for the alpha spectrometry of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguel, M.; Deron, S.; Swietly, H.; Heinonen, O.J.

    1981-01-01

    The interpretation of non-destructive measurements of plutonium materials require more accurate determinations of the isotopic abundance of Pu-238 than conventional chemical assays. The requirements of calorimetry, passive neutron and conventional chemical assays are presented and compared. When Pu-238 is measured by alpha spectrometry, these requirements define how well the plutonium must be separated from americium, and what should be the accuracy of the spectrometry. The latter can strongly depend upon the resolution of the alpha spectrum. The authors describe a procedure to produce sources by drop deposition which ensure a resolution of 17 keV with commercial instrumentation