WorldWideScience

Sample records for residual nuclei production

  1. Low-energy particle production and residual nuclei production from high-energy hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmiller, F.S.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Hermann, O.W.

    1987-01-01

    The high-energy hadron-nucleus collision model, EVENTQ, has been modified to include a calculation of the excitation and kinetic energy of the residual compound nucleus. The specific purpose of the modification is to make it possible to use the model in the high-energy radiation transport code, HETC, which, in conjunction with MORSE, is used to transport the low energy particles. It is assumed that the nucleons in the nucleus move in a one-dimensional potential well and have the momentum distribution of a degenerate Fermi gas. The low energy particles produced by the deexcitation of the residual compound nucleus, and the final residual nucleus, are determined from an evaporation model. Comparisons of multiplicities and residual nuclei distributions with experimental data are given. The ''grey'' particles, i.e., charged particles with 0.25 < β < 0.7, are in good agreement with experimental data but the residual nuclei distributions are not. 12 refs., 3 figs

  2. Experimental and theoretical study of the yields of residual product nuclei produced in thin targets irradiated by 100-2600 MeV protons

    CERN Document Server

    Titarenko, Y E; Karpikhin, E I

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the project is measurements and computer simulations of independent and cumulative yields of residual product nuclei in thin targets relevant as target materials and structure materials for hybrid accelerator-driven systems coupled to high-energy proton accelerators. The yields of residual product nuclei are of great importance when estimating such basic radiation-technology characteristics of hybrid facility targets as the total target activity, target 'poisoning', buildup of long-lived nuclides that, in turn, are to be transmuted, product nuclide (Po) alpha-activity, content of low-pressure evaporated nuclides (Hg), content of chemically-active nuclides that spoil drastically the corrosion resistance of the facility structure materials, etc. In view of the above, radioactive product nuclide yields from targets and structure materials were determined by an experiment using the ITEP U-10 proton accelerator in 51 irradiation runs for different thin targets: sup 1 sup 8 sup 2 sup , sup 1 sup 8 ...

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies of the yields of residual product nuclei produced in thin Pb and Bi targets irradiated by 40 - 2600 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V.F.; Karpikhin, E.I.; Zhivun, V.M.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Lunev, V.P.; Titarenko, N.N.; Shubin, Yu.N.; Barashenkov, V.S.

    2009-10-01

    The Project is aimed at experimental determining and computer-aided theoretical simulating the independent and cumulative yields of residual radioactive product nuclei in high-energy protonirradiated thin targets made of high-isotopic and natural lead ( 206 Pb, 207 Pb, 208 PB, natPb) and bismuth ( 209 Bi) that are the most probable choice to be the target materials in the acceleratordriven (hybrid) systems (ADS) coupled to a high-current proton accelerator. The yields of residual product nuclei are of great importance when estimating such basic radiation-technology characteristics of the hybrid facility targets as the total target activity, the target 'poisoning', the buildup of long-lived nuclides, the α-activity, the content of low-pressure evaporated nuclides (Hg), the content of the chemically-active nuclides that drastically spoil the corrosion resistance of the facility structure materials, etc. In view of the above, the radioactive product nuclide yields from targets materials were experimentally determined using the ITEP U-10 proton accelerator in 55 measurement runs using the monoisotopic and natural lead ( 206 Pb, 207 Pb, 208 PB, natPb) and bismuth ( 209 Bi) targets within the proton energy range fractionated minutely, namely at 0.04, 0.07, 0.10, 0.8, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, and 2.6 GeV to cover the entire range of the internuclear hadron cascading. As a result, 5972 cumulative and independent yields of residual radioactive product nuclei, whose lifetimes range from 8 minutes to 32 years, have been measured. Besides, the cross sections for the 27 Al(p,x) 24 Na and 27 Al(p,x)7Be monitor reactions have been measured at the same proton energies together with the 27 Al(n,p) 27 Mg reaction rate that characterizes the neutron background contributions in each experiment. The experimental nuclide yields are determined by the direct γ-spectrometry method. The γ-spectrometer resolution is 1.8 keV in the 1332 keV 60 Co γ-line. The experimental γ-spectra are processed by

  4. Pion production in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afnan, I.R.; Thomas, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    A method has been suggested for relating μ-capture in nuclei to pion absorption through partially conserved axial vector current hypothesis. The success of the method relies heavily on the knowledge of the pion absorption amplitude at a momentum transfer equal to the μ-meson mass. That is we need to know the pion absorption amplitude off the mass-shell. The simplest nucleus for which this suggestion can be examined is μ-capture in deuterium. The Koltum-Reitan model is used to determine the pion absorption amplitude off the mass shell. In particular the senstivity of this off-mass-shell extrapolution to details of the N-N interaction is studied. (author)

  5. Production of residual nuclei in the spallation of 238U by 1 GeV protons and 2 GeV deuterons, measured in inverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernas, M.; Casarejos, E.; Pereira, J.

    2002-09-01

    In this paper, we report on the first systematic study of nuclide production in isotopic chains from nitrogen (Z=7) to uranium (Z=92). In the second section, we present some characteristics of the experimental set up and the analysis techniques. In the third and in the forth part, we report on the obtained cross sections and kinematical properties of the studied nuclei, respectively. In the last section, we discuss the results and compare them to data obtained previously with conventional techniques. (orig.)

  6. Perspectives of production of superheavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V., E-mail: antonenk@theor.jinr.ru; Bezbakh, A. N.; Sargsyan, V. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU–141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Scheid, W. [Institut für Theoretische Physik der Justus-Liebig-Universität, D–35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2016-07-07

    Possible ways of production of superheavies are discussed. Impact of nuclear structure on the production of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions is discussed. The proton shell closure at Z = 120 is discussed.

  7. Hyperdeformed nuclei and the residual pseudo-SU(3) symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, J.; Werner, T.

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses superdeformed and hypothetical hyperdeformed nuclei. Quadrupole deformations characteristic of these types of nuclei are defined. Symmetry features are also discussed. The characteristic cycle dependence of shell structures as functions of the deformation gives rise to chains of the deformed shell closures. Such a chain structure applies to moderately-, super- and hyper-deformed nuclei as well. The resulting total energy calculations give a systematic variation of super- and hyperdeformations with, e.g., increasing N at fixed Z, thus predicting the way nuclei deviate from the simple a:b = 2:1 and a:b = 3:1 symmetries

  8. Fusion probability and survivability in estimates of heaviest nuclei production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagaidak, Roman

    2012-01-01

    A number of theoretical models have been recently developed to predict production cross sections for the heaviest nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions. All the models reproduce cross sections obtained in experiments quite well. At the same time they give fusion probability values P fus ≡ P CN differed within several orders of the value. This difference implies a corresponding distinction in the calculated values of survivability. The production of the heaviest nuclei (from Cm to the region of superheavy elements (SHE) close to Z = 114 and N = 184) in fusion-evaporation reactions induced by heavy ions has been considered in a systematic way within the framework of the barrier-passing (fusion) model coupled with the standard statistical model (SSM) of the compound nucleus (CN) decay. Both models are incorporated into the HIVAP code. Available data on the excitation functions for fission and evaporation residues (ER) produced in very asymmetric combinations can be described rather well within the framework of HIVAP. Cross-section data obtained in these reactions allow one to choose model parameters quite definitely. Thus one can scale and fix macroscopic (liquid-drop) fission barriers for nuclei involved in the evaporation-fission cascade. In less asymmetric combinations (with 22 Ne and heavier projectiles) effects of fusion suppression caused by quasi-fission are starting to appear in the entrance channel of reactions. The P fus values derived from the capture-fission and fusion-fission cross-sections obtained at energies above the Bass barrier were plotted as a function of the Coulomb parameter. For more symmetric combinations one can deduce the P fus values semi-empirically, using the ER and fission excitation functions measured in experiments, and applying SSM model with parameters obtained in the analysis of a very asymmetric combination leading to the production of (nearly) the same CN, as was done for reactions leading to the pre-actinide nuclei formation

  9. Exotic nuclei: production, properties and specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Duppen, Piet

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we will put the production of energetic radioactive ion beams of exotic nuclei in perspective and describe the two complementary production processes that are used nowadays: Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) followed by post-acceleration, and In-Flight Separation (IFS). After a general description of the process we will focus on recent technical developments in the field. In the subsequent section we give some 'typical' examples of physics cases that are addressed with exotic beams. The examples are chosen not only because their physics importance but also to demonstrate the complementary aspects in the production process and the detection systems. This overview will not be complete and the reader is referred to literature for further information, nor is the lecture intended to give an overview of all the efforts that are taking place in the field by mentioning every project separately. (author)

  10. Heavy quarkonium production and propagation in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.Y.

    1997-01-01

    In the search for the quark-gluon plasma, it has been suggested that the production of charmonium will be suppressed in a quark-gluon plasma because of the screening of the interaction between c and anti c. To extract information on the suppression due to the quark-gluon plasma, it is necessary to study the suppression of J/ψ production by sources different from the quark-gluon plasma. It is therefore useful to examine the mechanism of heavy quarkonium production and its propagation in nuclei. The authors describe a precursor in heavy quarkonium production in terms of a coherent admixture of states of different color, spin, and angular momentum quantum numbers, and obtain the production amplitudes for different quarkonium bound states by projecting out this precursor state onto these bound states. The precursor is absorbed in its passage through a nucleus in a pA reaction, and the total cross section between this precursor with a nucleon can be calculated with the two-gluon model of the Pomeron. Such a description of coherent precursors and their subsequent interactions with nucleons can explain many salient features of J/ψ and ψ' production in pA collisions

  11. Carbaryl residues in maize products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.M.A.D.; Mansour, S.A.; Mostafa, I.Y.; Hassan, A.

    1976-01-01

    The 14 C-labelled insecticide carbaryl was synthesized from [1- 14 C]-1-naphthol at a specific activity of 3.18mCig -1 . Maize plants were treated with the labelled insecticide under simulated conditions of agricultural practice. Mature plants were harvested and studied for distribution of total residues in untreated grains as popularly roasted and consumed, and in the corn oil and corn germ products. Total residues found under these conditions in the respective products were 0.2, 0.1, 0.45 and 0.16ppm. (author)

  12. Fusion probability and survivability in estimates of heaviest nuclei production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagaidak Roman N.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Production of the heavy and heaviest nuclei (from Po to the region of superheavy elements close to Z=114 and N=184 in fusion-evaporation reactions induced by heavy ions has been considered in a systematic way within the framework of the barrier-passing model coupled with the statistical model (SM of de-excitation of a compound nucleus (CN. Excitation functions for fission and evaporation residues (ER measured in very asymmetric combinations can be described rather well. One can scale and fix macroscopic (liquid-drop fission barriers for nuclei involved in the calculation of survivability with SM. In less asymmetric combinations, effects of fusion suppression caused by quasi-fission (QF are starting to appear in the entrance channel of reactions. QF effects could be semi-empirically taken into account using fusion probabilities deduced as the ratio of measured ER cross sections to the ones obtained in the assumption of absence of the fusion suppression in corresponding reactions. SM parameters (fission barriers obtained at the analysis of a very asymmetric combination leading to the production of (nearly the same CN should be used for this evaluation.

  13. Diffractive production off nuclei-shadow of hadronic bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, A.; Czyz, W.

    1974-01-01

    Diffractive production on nuclei is calculated using as an input a specific model for diffractive production on nucleons. In this model diffractive production is described as a shadow of non-diffractive multiple production of particles. The mechanism for non-diffractive production is taken to be hadronic bremsstrahlung of independently produced clusters. It is shown that such a model naturally explains the strikingly simple pattern of absorption observed in coherent production on nuclei. Possible generalizations of these results are indicated. (author)

  14. Removal of residual cavitation nuclei to enhance histotripsy fractionation of soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duryea, Alexander P; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-12-01

    Remanent bubble nuclei generated by primary cavitation collapse can limit the efficiency of histotripsy softtissue fractionation. When these residual bubbles persist from one histotripsy pulse to the next, they can seed the repetitive nucleation of cavitation bubbles at a discrete set of sites within the focal volume. This effect-referred to as cavitation memory- manifests in inefficient lesion formation, because certain sites within the focal volume are overtreated whereas others remain undertreated. Although the cavitation memory effect can be passively mitigated by using a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) that affords remanent nuclei sufficient time for dissolution between successive pulses, this low PRF also results in slow lesion production. As such, it would be highly desirable to maintain the high per-pulse efficiency associated with low pulse rates when much higher PRFs are utilized. In this vein, we have developed a strategy for the active removal of the remanent bubble nuclei following primary cavitation collapse, using low-amplitude ultrasound sequences (termed bubble-removal sequences) to stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of these bubbles. In this study, bubbleremoval sequences were incorporated in high-PRF histotripsy treatment (100 Hz) of a red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantom that allows for the visualization of lesion development in real time. A series of reference treatments were also conducted at the low PRF of 1 Hz to provide a point of comparison for which cavitation memory effects are minimal. It was found that bubble-removal sequences as short as 1 ms are capable of maintaining the efficacious lesion development characteristics associated with the low PRF of 1 Hz when the much higher pulse rate of 100 Hz is used. These results were then extended to the treatment of a large volume within the tissue phantom, and optimal bubble-removal sequences identified for the singlefocal- spot case were utilized to homogenize a 10

  15. Interplay between symmetries and residual interactions in rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwiok, S.; Kvasil, J.; Nazmitdinov, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Using the space rotation and translation invariance of the nuclear Hamiltonian, the residual interactions for a rotating nucleus are constructed. The connection is found between the Goldstone modes of motion (spurious states) and the symmetries of equations of motion in Random Phase Approximation for states near the yrast line. (author). 18 figs

  16. Removal of residual nuclei following a cavitation event using low-amplitude ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duryea, Alexander P; Cain, Charles A; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2014-10-01

    Microscopic residual bubble nuclei can persist on the order of 1 s following a cavitation event. These bubbles can limit the efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, because they attenuate pulses that arrive subsequent to their formation and seed repetitive cavitation activity at a discrete set of sites (cavitation memory). Here, we explore a strategy for the removal of these residual bubbles following a cavitation event, using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate bubble coalescence. All experiments were conducted in degassed water and monitored using high-speed photography. In each case, a 2-MHz histotripsy transducer was used to initiate cavitation activity (a cavitational bubble cloud), the collapse of which generated a population of residual bubble nuclei. This residual nuclei population was then sonicated using a 1 ms pulse from a separate 500-kHz transducer, which we term the bubble removal pulse. Bubble removal pulse amplitudes ranging from 0 to 1.7 MPa were tested, and the backlit area of shadow from bubbles remaining in the field following bubble removal was calculated to quantify efficacy. It was found that an ideal amplitude range exists (roughly 180 to 570 kPa) in which bubble removal pulses stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubble nuclei, effectively removing them from the field. Further optimization of bubble removal pulse sequences stands to provide an adjunct to cavitation-based ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, mitigating the effects of residual bubble nuclei that currently limit their efficacy.

  17. Stability and production of superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Nix, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Beyond uranium heavy elements rapidly become increasingly unstable with respect to spontaneous fission as the proton number Z increases, because of the disruptive effect of the long-range Coulomb force. However, in the region just beyond Z = 100 magic proton and neutron numbers and the associated shell structure enhances nuclear stability sufficient to allow observation of additional nuclei. Some thirty years ago it was speculated that an island of spherical, relatively stable superheavy nuclei would exist near the next doubly magic proton-neutron combination beyond 208 Pb, that is, at proton number Z 114 and neutron number N = 184. Theory and experiment now show that there also exists a rock of stability in the vicinity of Z = 110 and N = 162 between the actinide region, which previously was the end of the peninsula of known elements, and the predicted island of spherical superheavy nuclei slightly southwest of the magic numbers Z = 114 and N = 184. The authors review here the stability properties of the heavy region of nuclei. Just as the decay properties of nuclei in the heavy region depend strongly on shell structure, this structure also dramatically affects the fusion entrance channel. The six most recently discovered new elements were all formed in cold-fusion reactions. They discuss here the effect of the doubly magic structure of the target in cold-fusion reactions on the fusion barrier and on dissipation

  18. Production and de excitation of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, F.; Faure, B.; Wirleczki, J.P.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.; Plagnol, E.

    1988-01-01

    We studied Kr induced reactions on C, Al and Ti at 26.4, 34.4 and 45.4 MeV/nucleon. The aims of these experiments were to learn about the influence of the incident energy and asymmetry of the system on the incomplete fusion mechanism, that is on the characteristics (E,l) of the nuclei formed in the reactions and on the competition between massive transfer and preequilibrium emission. We also wanted to study the influence of excitation energy and angular momentum of the nuclei on their deexcitation modes, specially on the competition between light particles (n, p, α) and complex fragments (M>4). Considering the available energies (2.8 < ε < 10.5 MeV/nucleon), the grazing and the total masses (96 ≤ M ≤ 132), nuclei with masses around 100 are likely to be formed with very different excitation energies and angular momenta

  19. Study of the production of residual evaporation nuclei issued from the spallation reaction of uranium-238 by 1 GeV protons; Etude de la production de noyaux residuels d'evaporation issus de la reaction de spallation de l'uranium-238 par des protons a 1 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, J

    2000-10-01

    The spallation reaction by high energy protons is one of the envisaged nuclear reactions for production of exotic nuclei. We have measured the production of more than 300 different evaporation residues issued by the spallation reaction of Uranium-238 by 1 GeV protons. We used the reverse kinematics technique in order to produce the relativistic nuclei and therefore to be able to detect those nuclides within a very short time, shorter in most cases than the radioactive disintegration period. The achieved nuclear charge and mass resolution are excellent. They allow a good accuracy on the values of the measured cross-sections (10 to 15%). We have observed for the first time the nuclide Actinium-235 obtained consequently to the loss of 3 protons by the projectile. The measured isotopic distribution are strongly influenced by the mechanism of fission which leads to a strong reduction of the production of the heavy neutron deficient isotopes. We have compared our results to some other measurements achieved with radio-chemical methods at a similar energy. We observed a systematic disagreement of about 40%. Some comparison with the available systematics show that those are presently not able to reproduce the data with a reasonable precision. We could also measure the recoil momentum distribution for each studied isotopes. We show that Goldhaber's model agrees very well with the experiment in case. of 'cold' channels where the evaporation of particles never occurs. On the other hand, when the produced pre-fragment is excited the data show that Goldhaber's model does not reproduce.the data showing the limitation of such an approach. We finally tried to reproduce the measurement of evaporation residue cross-section thanks to the coupling of intra-nuclear cascade and statistical evaporation codes. The influence of the fission process is rather important is the system p+U; we therefore had to account for the dynamical aspect of the fission. We also showed

  20. Production and identification of very exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pougheon, F.

    1986-01-01

    New very exotic nuclei have been produced by fragmentation of the projectile at intermediate energy at GANIL. They have been identified through time of flight and ΔE-E measurements after a magnetic separation with the 0 0 LISE spectrometer. New neutron rich isotopes have been identified up to Z = 26 and evidence for the stability of the new series Tz = -5/2 has been shown. These results improve the knowledge of the neutron and proton drip lines

  1. Production of polarized vector mesons off nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Nemchik, J.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Using the light-cone QCD dipole formalism we investigate manifestations of color transparency (CT) and coherence length (CL) effects in electroproduction of longitudinally (L) and transversally (T) polarized vector mesons. Motivated by forthcoming data from the HERMES experiment we predict both the A and Q 2 dependence of the L/T ratios for ρ 0 mesons produced coherently and incoherently off nuclei. For an incoherent reaction the CT and CL effects add up and result in a monotonic A dependence of the L/T ratio at different values of Q 2 . In contrast, for a coherent process the contraction of the CL with Q 2 causes an effect opposite to that of CT and we expect quite a nontrivial A dependence

  2. Confinement forces in fast backward nucleon production off nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Niedermayer, F.

    1982-01-01

    Multiple colour exchange mechanism is proposed to describe fast backward nucleon production off nuclei at high energies. Cross section of hd → psub(B)X reaction is calculated in the colour flux tube model. This contribution is found to dominate in the hard part of momentum spectra

  3. Theory of coherent production on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeldt, G.

    1976-08-01

    The theory of nuclear reactions of the type a+A→a*+A, where a is a hadron and a* one of its multi-particle excitations is reviewed. In coherent reactions the nucleus A remains in its ground state. Production experiments with nuclear targets are usually designed to give information which cannot be obtained from experiments with hydrogen targets alone. The main emphasis is on the determination of i) strong and electromagnetic production amplitudes on nucleons and of ii) cross sections for unstable particles on nucleons. The experimental data are usually interpreted with the Glauber model but it must be remembered that there is no universal formula valid for all types of production reactions. The author in particular discusses phenomena which might be important for the proper interpretation of recent experiments. i) The helicity structure of the underlying nucleon amplitudes which is crucial for determining the nuclear form factor. ii) The production mechanism which is not necessarily of the one-step type. For many channels multi-step production is expected. iii) The possible corrections to the description of the propagation of high energy particles in nuclear matter. (Auth.)

  4. nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkov N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects of quadrupole-octupole deformations on the energy and magnetic properties of high-K isomeric states in even-even heavy and superheavy nuclei. The neutron two-quasiparticle (2qp isomeric energies and magnetic dipole moments are calculated within a deformed shell model with the Bardeen-Cooper- Schrieffer (BCS pairing interaction over a wide range of quadrupole and octupole deformations. We found that in most cases the magnetic moments exhibit a pronounced sensitivity to the octupole deformation, while the 2qp energies indicate regions of nuclei in which the presence of high-K isomeric states may be associated with the presence of octupole softness or even with octupole deformation. In the present work we also examine the influence of the BCS pairing strength on the energy of the blocked isomer configuration. We show that the formation of 2qp energy minima in the space of quadrupole-octupole and eventually higher multipolarity deformations is a subtle effect depending on nuclear pairing correlations.

  5. Effects of the residual proton-neutron interaction in the development of collectivity in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The widespread effects of the residual T=0 proton-neutron (p-n) interaction in the evolution of nuclear structure are discussed. Although these effects in inducing single nucleon configuration mixing, and hence in the development of non-spherical nuclear shapes, collectivity, and the associated shape and phase transitions have been known for four decades, it is only in recent years that their deep ramifications have become more fully appreciated. This had led to a unified phenomenological understanding of the role of the p-n interaction in nuclear collectivity and to, for example, the proposal of the N p N n scheme and the associated concept of the P factor, which is a normalized value of N p N n reflecting the average number of p-n interactions per valence nucleon. Simultaneously, experimentally-determined p-n matrix elements for many nuclei have been extracted: they disclose striking anomalies for N=Z nuclei, and intriguing microstructure. These developments and empirical results will be discussed along with microscopic calculations that can be used to interpret them. 18 refs., 13 figs

  6. The Peculiarities of the Production and Decay of Superheavy Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itkis, M. G.; Bogachev, A. A.; Itkis, I. M.; Jandel, M.; Kliman, J.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Prokhorova, E. V.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.

    2006-01-01

    The interest in the study of the fission process of superheavy nuclei mainly deals with the opportunity to obtain information about the cross-section of the compound nucleus (CN) formation at excitation energies E*≅15-30 MeV. It allows one to estimate the survival probability of the superheavy composite system after evaporation of 1-3 neutrons, i.e. in 'cold' or 'warm' fusion reactions. However, in order to solve this problem deeper understanding of the coalescence processes between colliding nuclei, the competition between fusion-fission and quasi-fission processes is needed. The characteristics of both processes, their manifestation in the experimental observables and the relative contribution to the capture cross-section in dependence on the excitation energies, reaction entrance channel etc were investigated for a wide range of target-projectile combinations. Results of the experiments devoted to the study of the fusion-fission and quasi-fission processes in the reactions of the formation of the superheavy nuclei with Z = 102-122 are presented. The heavy ions 26Mg, 48Ca, 50Ti, 58Fe and 64Ni were used as projectiles. The choice of the reactions with 48Ca and actinide-targets was inspired by the experiments on the production of the isotopes 283112, 289114 and 283116 in Dubna using the same reactions. The 50Ti, 58Fe and 64Ni projectiles were chosen since the corresponding projectile-target combinations lead to the synthesis of even heavier elements. The experiments were carried out at the U-400 accelerator of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR, Russia) and the XTU Tandem accelerator of the National Laboratory of Legnaro (LNL, Italy) using the time-of-flight spectrometer of fission fragments CORSET. The role of the shell effects, the influence of the entrance channel asymmetry and the deformations of colliding nuclei on the mechanism of the fusion-fission and the competitive process of quasi-fission are discussed. The recent results on synthesis of

  7. Production of actinide nuclei by multi-nucleon transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Multi-nucleon transfers have increasingly allowed us to reach parts of the nuclear chart where regular compound nuclear reactions are prohibited. The interesting region of Ra and Rn, where a rich tapestry of nuclear structure manifests itself, is now accessible using this technique of deep inelastic scattering. In particular, these nuclei are predicted to lie at the onset of octupole deformation and the region is rich in examples of shape coexistence. There are several theoretical predictions of nuclear structure of these nuclei that have not been experimentally tested. Moreover, there is serious disagreement among these theories. We used a beam of {sup 136}Xe at 720 MeV from ATLAS on a target of {sup 232}Th to produce a range of Rn isotopes, with a mass from 220 to 224, and Ra isotopes with masses greater than 222. The beam energy, target and beam were selected carefully to enhance the cross-section for production of these nuclei and reduce the Doppler broadening of the gamma rays that were observed in the Argonne Notre Dame gamma-ray facility. The 12 germanium detectors of this array allowed the observation of gamma-gamma coincidences. The inner ball of 50 BGO detectors allowed us to record the multiplicity and sum-energy information for each event. The latter should permit us to determine the entry region in the products of the transfer reaction. We had four successful days of beam-time, when we collected in excess of 8 x 10{sup 7} events. Data analysis is in progress at the University of Liverpool. A complete set of spectroscopic information on the yrast structure of the many nuclei produced in this reaction is being extracted.

  8. Fate of leptophos residues in milk products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.M.A.D.; Mohammed, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    The fate of leptophos residues in various milk products was studied using 14 C-phenyl labelled leptophos. Milk products were prepared from milk fortified with the radioactive insecticide by methods simulating those used in industry. The highest leptophos level was found in butter and the lowest in skim milk and whey. Analysis of the radioactive residues in all products showed the presence of leptophos alone. A trace of the oxon could be detected in whey. The results obtained in this investigation indicated that processing of milk did not affect the nature of leptophos to any appreciable extent. (author)

  9. Characterization of residual oils for biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmilson Antonio Canesin

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The obtained results suggesting that it is possible to take advantage of these residues for biodiesel production as the obtained products were approved according to the rules established by the National Association of Petroleum (ANP; the bovine samples were the exception regarding moisture and acidity.

  10. Nonlinear effect of pion production in collisions of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grin', Yu.T.

    1982-01-01

    The phenomenon of pion production in relativistic nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions is investigated. The present experimental data are analyzed. It is shown that average multiplicity of pions in the (p, C), (C, C) collision reactions with the momentum p=4.2 GeV/cA and (p, Ar), (Ar, KCl) with the momentum p=2.3 GeV/cA non-linearly depends on the nucleon number. The calculated values of average multiplicity of negative pions per one nucleon of nucleus-pro ectile, probability of pion production and number of nucleon interactions for the investigated reactions are presented as a table. A comparative analysis of average multiplicities of pions per nucleon-participant in the nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions at the p=2.3 GeV/cA momentum for argon and at the p=4.2 GeV/cA for carbon reveals that decrease of multiplicity by 30-35% is observed in nucleus-nucleus collision. Non-linearity is associated with decrease of effective interaction of each incident nucleon in the collision of nuclei as compared with the number of nucleon interactions in the ''elementary'' nucleon-nucleus reaction. Knock-out of nucleons from the colliding nuclei is the most probable reason for the decrease of the number of interactions

  11. Properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.A.; Henry, E.A.; Griffin, H.C.; Lien, O.G. III; Lane, S.M.; Stevenson, P.C.; Yaffe, R.P.; Skarnemark, G.

    1979-09-01

    A review is given of the properties of neutron-rich nuclei studied by fission product nuclear chemistry and includes the techniques used in elemental isolation and current research on the structure of nuclei near 132 Sn, particle emission, and coexisting structure in both neutron-poor and neutron-rich nuclei. 35 references

  12. Production of hyperfragments by antiprotons at rest annihilating on nuclei in nuclear photoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batusov, Yu.A.; Bunyatov, S.A.; Pontecorvo, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    Events have been observed, for the first time, of the production, departure and mesonic decay of the light hyperfragments Λ 3 H and Λ 4 H in the annihilation on the light (C, N, O, S)-nuclei of antiprotons stopping in nuclear photoemulsion. The lower limit of the production probability of Λ 3 H and Λ 4 H hyperfragments per single antiproton stopping in nuclear photoemulsion has been determined to be (6.1±3.5)x10 -4 . The charge exchange, on nucleons of the residual nucleus, of K - -mesons resulting from the annihilation process has been demonstrated to be the most probable mechanism of hyperfragment production. 17 refs.; 9 figs

  13. Formulation of morning product using food residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Rosário de Fátima Padilha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, there is resistance of the population to the use of stalks, leaves, peels and seeds of vegetables and fruits, leading to trash important parts of the food in good physiological conditions and with the presence of potential nutrients. In this research, a morning product was elaborated using green and dry coconut residue, jerimum and melon seed, crystallized sicilian lemon peel, cashew nut, common rapadura sweet and ginger. The bacteriological tests proved the hygienic-sanitary quality of the product, therefore suitable for consumption, that is, according to RDC 12/2001. It was also observed that the dehydration of all the residues reached the legal levels and accepted by ANVISA that limits in 25% the water content in the dehydrated foods. As for the centesimal composition, it was observed that the elaborated product with residues and other ingredients had a good content of macro nutrients. A use of the type of waste as a new food proposal constitutes an alternative to avoid and reduce: the serious environmental problem caused by the large residual volume generated, and the inadequate places in which they are stored or deposited, aggravating the scenario of food-borne pollutants.

  14. Cross-sections of residual nuclei from deuteron irradiation of thin thorium target at energy 7 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vespalec Radek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The residual nuclei yields are of great importance for the estimation of basic radiation-technology characteristics (like a total target activity, production of long-lived nuclides etc. of accelerator driven systems planned for transmutation of spent nuclear fuel and for a design of radioisotopes production facilities. Experimental data are also essential for validation of nuclear codes describing various stages of a spallation reaction. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to add new experimental data in energy region of relativistic deuterons, as similar data are missing in nuclear databases. The sample made of thin natural thorium foil was irradiated at JINR Nuclotron accelerator with a deuteron beam of the total kinetic energy 7 GeV. Integral number of deuterons was determined with the use of aluminum activation detectors. Products of deuteron induced spallation reaction were qualified and quantified by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy method. Several important spectroscopic corrections were applied to obtain results of high accuracy. Experimental cumulative and independent cross-sections were determined for more than 80 isotopes including meta-stable isomers. The total uncertainty of results rarely exceeded 9%. Experimental results were compared with MCNP6.1 Monte-Carlo code predictions. Generally, experimental and calculated cross-sections are in a reasonably good agreement, with the exception of a few light isotopes in a fragmentation region, where the calculations are highly under-estimated. Measured data will be useful for future development of high-energy nuclear codes. After completion, final data will be added into the EXFOR database.

  15. Exclusive description of multiple production on nuclei in the additive quark model. Multiplicity distributions in interactions with heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levchenko, B.B.; Nikolaev, N.N.

    1985-01-01

    In the framework of the additive quark model of multiple production on nuclei we calculate the multiplicity distributions of secondary particles and the correlations between secondary particles in πA and pA interactions with heavy nuclei. We show that intranuclear cascades are responsible for up to 50% of the nuclear increase of the multiplicity of fast particles. We analyze the sensitivity of the multiplicities and their correlations to the choice of the quark-hadronization function. We show that with good accuracy the yield of relativistic secondary particles from heavy and intermediate nuclei depends only on the number N/sub p/ of protons knocked out of the nucleus, and not on the mass number of the nucleus (N/sub p/ scaling)

  16. Evaporation residue cross sections for the {sup 64}Ni + {sup 144,154}Sm reaction -- Energy dissipation in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The fission hindrance of hot nuclei was deduced recently from an enhanced emission of GDR {gamma} rays, neutrons and charged particles prior to scission of heavy nuclei. In the most recent experiments addressing this topic, namely new measurements of the pre-scission {gamma} rays and evaporation residues from the {sup 32}S + {sup 184}W reaction, a rather sharp transition from negligible to full one-body dissipation occurs over the excitation energy region E{sub exc} = 60-100 MeV. However, the cross section does not appear to level out or start to decline again at the upper end of the energy range as expected in this interpretation. It is therefore clearly desirable to extend the excitation energy range to look for such an effect in order to either corroborate or refute this interpretation.

  17. Puzzles of J/Ψ production off nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B.Z.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear effects for J/Ψ production in pA collisions are controlled by the coherence and color transparency effects. Color transparency onsets when the time of formation of the charmonium wave function becomes longer than the inter-nucleon spacing. In this energy regime the effective break-up cross section for a c-barc dipole depends on energy and nuclear path length, and agrees well with data from fixed target experiments, both in magnitude and energy dependence. At higher energies of RHIC and LHC coherence in c-barc pair production leads to charm quark shadowing which is a complement to the high twist break up cross section. These two effects explain well with no adjusted parameters the magnitude and rapidity dependence of nuclear suppression of J/Ψ observed at RHIC in dAu collisions, while the contribution of leading twist gluon shadowing is found to be vanishingly small. A novel mechanism of double color filtering for c-barc dipoles makes nuclei significantly more transparent in AA compared to pA collisions. This is one of the mechanisms which make impossible a model independent 'data driven' extrapolation from pA to AA. This effect also explains the enhancement of nuclear suppression observed at forward rapidities in AA collisions at RHIC, what hardly can be related to the produced dense medium. J/Ψ is found to be a clean and sensitive tool measuring the transport coefficient characterizing the dense matter created in AA collisions. RHIC data for p T dependence of J/Ψ production in nuclear collisions are well explained with the low value of the transport coefficient q-hat 0 2 /fm.

  18. The energy overcompensating disintegrations of residual target nuclei damaged in hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1995-01-01

    Massive target nuclei damaged in hadron-nucleus collisions at high energies are used to disintegrate into nuclear fragments. In many cases such breakup is egzoergic - some portion of nuclear energy is released; this portion should be overcompensating the energy used for the nuclear damage, in some cases. 30 refs

  19. Utilization of corn residues for production of the polysaccharide schizophyllan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abundant corn residues include fiber from wet milling operations and distillers' dried grains from dry grind ethanol plants. Biorefineries of the future will utilize such residues for the production of valuable bioproducts, particularly those traditionally produced from fossil fuels. Schizophyllan...

  20. Associated multiplicity of γ-particles in processes of lepton pair production on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorkyan, S.R.; Gulkanyan, H.R.; Vartanyan, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    An expression has been obtained for mean multiplicity of g-particles accompanying the process of deep-inelastic lepton pair production on nuclei. The expression allows one to get information on structure peculiarities of leading hadron in this process

  1. Bioethanol production from rice straw residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed B. Belal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A rice straw -cellulose utilizing mold was isolated from rotted rice straw residues. The efficient rice straw degrading microorganism was identified as Trichoderma reesei. The results showed that different carbon sources in liquid culture such as rice straw, carboxymethyl cellulose, filter paper, sugar cane bagasse, cotton stalk and banana stalk induced T. reesei cellulase production whereas glucose or Potato Dextrose repressed the synthesis of cellulase. T. reesei cellulase was produced by the solid state culture on rice straw medium. The optimal pH and temperature for T. reesei cellulase production were 6 and 25 ºC, respectively. Rice straw exhibited different susceptibilities towards cellulase to their conversion to reducing sugars. The present study showed also that, the general trend of rice straw bioconversion with cellulase was more than the general trend by T. reesei. This enzyme effectively led to enzymatic conversion of acid, alkali and ultrasonic pretreated cellulose from rice straw into glucose, followed by fermentation into ethanol. The combined method of acid pretreatment with ultrasound and subsequent enzyme treatment resulted the highest conversion of lignocellulose in rice straw to sugar and consequently, highest ethanol concentration after 7 days fermentation with S. cerevisae yeast. The ethanol yield in this study was about 10 and 11 g.L-1.

  2. Carbaryl residues in maize and processed products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M.J.; Sattar, A. Jr.; Naqvi, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    Carbaryl residues in two local maize varieties were determined using a colorimetric method. No significant differences were observed for residues of the two varieties which ranged between 12.0 to 13.75 mg/kg in the crude oil, and averaged 1.04 and 0.67 mg/kg in the flour and cake respectively. In whole maize plants, carbaryl residues declined to approximately 2 mg/kg 35 days after treatment. Cooking in aqueous, oil or aqueous-oil media led to 63-83% loss of carbaryl residues, after 30 minutes. (author)

  3. Carbaryl residues in cottonseed products in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pablo, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    Residues of carbaryl in cottonseed products were determined by spectrophotometry. Carbaryl residues in oil and cake were 0.83 and 0.04 mg/kg respectively. Parallel experiments with 14 C-carbaryl gave comparable results. 14 C-carbaryl residues in oil and cake were 0.42 and 0.15 mg/kg respectively. (author)

  4. Cement production from coal conversion residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.D.; Clavenna, L.R.; Eakman, J.M.; Nahas, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    Cement is produced by feeding residue solids containing carbonaceous material and ash constituents obtained from converting a carbonaceous feed material into liquids and/or gases into a cement-making zone and burning the carbon in the residue solids to supply at least a portion of the energy required to convert the solids into cement

  5. The empirical residual proton-neutron interaction and the onset of collectivity in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    The critical role of the residual valence p-n interaction in the development and evolution of collectivity, and the onset of shape/phase transitions, is discussed from the standpoint of phenomenological approaches, and empirical extraction of individual p-n interaction strengths, and simple model calculation of them. 22 refs., 18 figs

  6. In-target rare nuclei production rates with EURISOL single-stage configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Chabod, S P; Ene, D; Doré, D; Blideanu, V; David, J.-Ch; Ridikas, D

    2010-01-01

    We conducted calculations of exotic nuclei production rates for 320 configurations of EURISOL (European Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam Facility) direct spallation targets. The nuclei yields were evaluated using neutron generation-transport codes, completed with evolution calculations to account for nuclei decays and low energy neutron interactions. The yields were optimized for 11 selected elements (Li, Be, Ne, Mg, Ar, Ni, Ga, Kr, Sn, Hg, Fr) and 23 of their isotopes, as function of the target compositions and geometries as well as the incident proton beam energies. For the considered elements, we evaluated the yield distributions as functions of the charge and mass numbers using two different spallation models.

  7. Estimates of production and structure of nuclei with Z = 119

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Lenske, H.

    2018-02-01

    The comparative analysis of the hot fusion reactions 50Ti +247-249Bk and 51V +246-248Cm for synthesis of element 119 is made with the dinuclear system model and the prediction of nuclear properties of the microscopic-macroscopic approach, where the closed proton shell at Z ≥ 120 is expected. The quasiparticle structures of nuclei in the α-decay chain of 295119 and a possible spread of alpha energies are studied. The calculated values of Qα are compared with available experimental data. The termination of the α-decay chain of 295119 is revealed.

  8. Collisions of deformed nuclei and superheavy-element production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Akira; Moeller, P.; Univ. of Aizu, Fukushima; P. Moller Scientific Computing and Graphics, Inc., Los Alamos, NM; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Nix, J.R.; Sagawa, Hiroyuki, Sagawa

    1995-01-01

    A detailed understanding of complete fusion cross sections in heavy-ion collisions requires a consideration of the effects of the deformation of the projectile and target. The aim here is to show that deformation and orientation of the colliding nuclei have a very significant effect on the fusion-barrier height and on the compactness of the touching configuration. To facilitate discussions of fusion configurations of deformed nuclei, the authors develop a classification scheme and introduce a notation convention for these configurations. They discuss particular deformations and orientations that lead to compact touching configurations and to fusion-barrier heights that correspond to fairly low excitation energies of the compound systems. Such configurations should be the most favorable for producing superheavy elements. They analyze a few projectile-target combinations whose deformations allow favorable entrance-channel configurations and whose proton and neutron numbers lead to compound systems in a part of the superheavy region where a half-lives are calculated to be observable, that is, longer than 1 micros

  9. Measurement of the yields of residual nuclei in interactions 17.9 GeV/c α-particles with sup(159)Tb, sup(181)Ta and sup(207,2)Pb nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butsev, V.S.; Butseva, G.L.; Kostin, V.Ya.; Migalenya, V.Ya.

    1984-01-01

    The results of investigations of 17.9 GeV/c α-particle interactions with Tb, Ta and Ph nuclei are presented. Measurements have been carried out of the relative yields of residual nuclei for the (α+Tb), (α+Ta) and (α+Pb) reactions in the 24 93 Tc, 133 Ce and 198 Tl the isomeric ratios are determined, that are compared with the isomeric ratios measured in reactions induced by 500 MeV protons and by 25.2 GeV 12 C ions

  10. Western Canadian wood residue production and consumption trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCloy, B.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation considered various trends in western Canadian wood residue production and consumption. Potential markets for wood residue products were also discussed. Trends were reviewed by province for the years 2000-2004. British Columbia (BC) is currently the largest producer of residue in the country, and also retains the largest surpluses of bark, sawdust and shavings. Wood residues in BC are used in pulp and plywood mill production, as well as in the creation of particleboard and MDF. Surplus mill wood residue production in the province has greatly increased due to the Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB) infestation, which has in turn spurred expansion of the BC interior sawmill industry. The infestation has also resulted in a glut of pulp chips. Current wood residue products in Alberta are mostly used in pulp mill combined heat and power (CHP) systems, as well as for wood pellet production and the creation of particleboard and MDF. It was noted that surplus residues are rapidly declining in the province. Saskatchewan's wood residue storage piles are estimated to contain 2,900,000 BDt, while Manitoba surpluses are relatively minor. It was suggested that high natural gas prices have increased the payback on wood energy systems to approximately 2 years. The value of wood residue is now greater than $100/BDt as a substitute for natural gas once the wood energy system has been fully depreciated. Sawmills may now wish to consider equipping themselves to sell wood residue products, as most sawmills only require 20 per cent of their residues for heating purposes. It was concluded that markets for hog fuel wood pellets should be developed in Canada and internationally. Future markets may also develop if natural gas currently used in pulp mill power boilers and lime kilns is replaced with wood residue energy systems. refs., tabs., figs

  11. Bioconversion of sago residue into value added products | Awg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... value added products. DS Awg-Adeni, S Abd-Aziz, K Bujang, MA Hassan ... sago processing mills. This review focuses on the developments in processes and products for the value addition of sago residues through biotechnological means.

  12. Light hyper- and anti-nuclei production at the LHC measured with ALICE

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The high collision energies reached at the LHC lead to significant production yields of light (anti-) and hyper-nuclei in proton-proton, proton-lead and, in particular, lead-lead collisions. The excellent particle identification capabilities of the ALICE apparatus, based on the specific energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber and the velocity information obtained with the Time-Of-Flight detector, allow for the detection of these rarely produced particles. Furthermore, the Inner Tracking System gives the possibility to separate primary nuclei from those originating from the decay of hyper-nuclei. One example is the hypertriton which is reconstructed in the decay channel 3LambdaH -> 3H + pi. We present results on the production of stable nuclei and anti-nuclei in Pb--Pb and lighter collision systems. Hypernuclei production rates in Pb--Pb will also be shown. All results are compared with predictions for the production in thermal (statistical) models and alternatives which are based on coalescence mech...

  13. Inclusive production from 10 GeV/c K+ on nuclei and comparison with the same production on hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conception, O.; Escoubes, B.; Matteuzi, C.; Paty, M.

    1977-01-01

    Transverse and longitudinal distributions for the K 0 inclusive production induced by 10GeV/c K + incident on complex nuclei are obtained. They are compared with the same distributions on hydrogen from K + at comparable energies. Some differences are observed in the rapidity distributions of K 0 when produced on nuclei and on free protons. These differences are correlated with the fast charged track multiplicity associated with the observed K 0

  14. Calculated nuclide production yields in relativistic collisions of fissile nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benlliure, J.; Schmidt, K.H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Grewe, A.; Jong, M. de [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Zhdanov, S. [AN Kazakhskoj SSR, Alma-Ata (USSR). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1997-11-01

    A model calculation is presented which predicts the complex nuclide distribution resulting from peripheral relativistic heavy-ion collisions involving fissile nuclei. The model is based on a modern version of the abrasion-ablation model which describes the formation of excited prefragments due to the nuclear collisions and their consecutive decay. The competition between the evaporation of different light particles and fission is computed with an evaporation code which takes dissipative effects and the emission of intermediate-mass fragments into account. The nuclide distribution resulting from fission processes is treated by a semiempirical description which includes the excitation-energy dependent influence of nuclear shell effects and pairing correlations. The calculations of collisions between {sup 238}U and different reaction partners reveal that a huge number of isotopes of all elements up to uranium is produced. The complex nuclide distribution shows the characteristics of fragmentation, mass-asymmetric low-energy fission and mass-symmetric high-energy fission. The yields of the different components for different reaction partners are studied. Consequences for technical applications are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Production and interaction of the η meson with nucleons and nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzemień Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the status of the search for η-mesic nuclei and the studies of the interaction of the η meson with nucleons. Recently we have completed the analysis of the newWASA-at-COSY data on the production of the η meson with polarized proton beam. New results on the analyzing power for the p̄p → ppη reaction with more than an order of magnitude improved precision shed a new light on the production mechanism of the η meson in nucleon-nucleon collisions. Also, the latest results of the search for η-mesic nuclei are discussed.

  16. Helicity-flip in particle production on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeldt, G.

    1977-01-01

    Coherent nuclear production processes are generally analyzed assuming helicity conserving production amplitudes. In view of the uncertainties of the actual helicity structure this could be a dangerous assumption. It is shown that helicity-flip contributions might be part of the explanation of the small effective (pππ)-nucleon cross sections observed in coherent production. (Auth.)

  17. Study of the production of nuclei and anti-nuclei at the LHC with the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00508690; Bufalino, Stefania

    In the ultra-relativistic lead-lead collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a state of matter called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) is created. A typical signature of a heavy ion collision (HIC) correlated to the production of the QGP is the large number of particles produced ($\\mathrm{d} N_{\\mathrm{ch}}/\\mathrm{d}\\eta$ up to 2000 in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV). This high multiplicity environment poses a tremendous experimental challenge on the experiments that have to cope with the high density of signals in their sensitive volume. A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) has been designed to deal with the harsh environment of a HIC and to study in details the characteristics of the QGP. Among the particles produced in a HIC, light nuclei and their anti-matter companions are of special interest since the production mechanism of such loosely bound states is not clear in high energy collisions. The production rate at the LHC for the lightest of these objects, the deuteron, is a...

  18. Impact of Corn Residue Removal on Crop and Soil Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. M.; Wilhelm, W. W.; Hatfield, J. L.; Voorhees, W. B.; Linden, D.

    2003-12-01

    Over-reliance on imported fuels, increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouses and sustaining food production for a growing population are three of the most important problems facing society in the mid-term. The US Department of Energy and private enterprise are developing technology necessary to use high cellulose feedstock, such as crop residues, for ethanol production. Based on production levels, corn (Zea mays L.) residue has potential as a biofuel feedstock. Crop residues are a renewable and domestic fuel source, which can reduce the rate of fossil fuel use (both imported and domestic) and provide an additional farm commodity. Crop residues protect the soil from wind and water erosion, provide inputs to form soil organic matter (a critical component determining soil quality) and play a role in nutrient cycling. Crop residues impact radiation balance and energy fluxes and reduce evaporation. Therefore, the benefits of using crop residues as fuel, which removes crop residues from the field, must be balanced against negative environmental impacts (e.g. soil erosion), maintaining soil organic matter levels, and preserving or enhancing productivity. All ramifications of new management practices and crop uses must be explored and evaluated fully before an industry is established. There are limited numbers of long-term studies with soil and crop responses to residue removal that range from negative to negligible. The range of crop and soil responses to crop residue removal was attributed to interactions with climate, management and soil type. Within limits, corn residue can be harvested for ethanol production to provide a renewable, domestic source of energy feedstock that reduces greenhouse gases. Removal rates must vary based on regional yield, climatic conditions and cultural practices. Agronomists are challenged to develop a protocol (tool) for recommending maximum permissible removal rates that ensure sustained soil productivity.

  19. Scattering, diffraction and multiparticle production on hadron and nuclei at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ter-Martirosyan, K.A.; Zoller, V.R.

    1988-01-01

    The cross sections for different types of interactions of hadronic with hadrons and nuclei at high energy are obtained in the simple form in the supercritical pomeron theory. Diffraction desintegration (DD) of hadrons both in the intermediate states, between rescatterings on pomerons, and in the final states is taken into account. With the same accuracy the cross sections δ n for production of n pomeron jets on hadrons and nuclei are also obtained. They determine the whole dynamics of the multiple particle productions, i.e. the spectra and multiplicities of produced particles, the cross sections for DD of colliding hadrons and nucleons inside the target nuclei. The numerical results for δ tot , δ el and for dδ el /dp tr 2 with the set of the pomeron and f, ω-reggeons pole parameters obtained early are presented. 19 refs.; 6 figs

  20. Cumulative effect in multiple production processes on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubyatnikova, E.S.; Shmonin, V.L.; Kalinkin, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the cumulative effect is a natural result of the process of hadron multiple production in nuclear reactions. Interpretation is made of the universality of slopes of inclusive spectra and other characteristics of cumulative hadrons. The character of information from such reactions is discussed, which could be helpful in studying the mechanism of multiparticle production. 27 refs.; 4 figs

  1. Colour dynamics in large psub(T) hadron production on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Niedermayer, F.

    1984-01-01

    The color dynamics of hadron production with large transverse momentum (psub(T)) on nuclei is investigated. Retardation by colour forces of colour objects propagating through nuclear matter leads to considerable shadowing of hard processes inside the nucleus. This explains the weak A dependence of the production cross section for large psub(T) meson pairs. The small absorption of compressed hadronic configurations inside the nucleus explains the linear A dependence of pp-pair production

  2. On-line nuclear half life and spectroscopic measurements on mass-separated fission product nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.; Fogelberg, B.; Baecklin, A.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of the methods and equipment employed for nuclear spectroscopy studies of short lived fission product nuclei at the OSIRIS ISOL facility in Studsvik, Sweden. Furthermore a table of new nuclear half-lives measured with this equipment is presented. (author)

  3. A study on the production of agricultural residues in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Blasi, C.; Tanzi, V.; Lanzetta, M. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Dip di Ingegneria Chimica, Napoli (Italy)

    1997-12-01

    The Italian production of agricultural residues has been evaluated with a view to energy recovery through gasification. Two main categories of residues have been identified: the first, (A) is associated with the growing and collection of products with a nutritional value, whereas the second (B) includes the residues associated with the subsequent processing in order to obtain final products for commercialization. Category A, which comprises three further sub-categories: straw (A1); woody residues (A2); and stems and leaves (residues from vegetables, tobacco, sugar beet, (A3)), results in about 16.5 mt yr. The average amount of straw (A1) is 11 mt/yr, of which about 60% is waste to be eliminated. Woody residues (A2) (mainly pruning off-cuts from vineyards and olive groves) are about 3.5 mt/yr (85% unused). Category A3 amounts to about 2 mt/yr (90% unused). Straw is available mainly in the northern part of the country, whereas the other two sub-categories are widely distributed in central and southern regions. The yields of category B are estimated at 4 mt/yr, of which more than 3 mt/yr are waste products from grape and olive processing. Other residues, such as rice, sunflower and soya-bean husks (about 0.65 mt/yr), almond and nut shells and fruit stones (about 0.2 mt/yr), although not widely available on a national scale, can be significant on a local basis. The total amount of unused agricultural residues is about 14.5 mt/yr, which, if completely exploited through gasification, can contribute as much as 7-10% to the current national electricity needs. The regions of Veneto, Puglia, Friuli, Lombardia and Emilia Romagna appear to be good candidates for electricity production, given the significant surface concentration of unused residues (105-55 t km{sup 2}). (author)

  4. PAIR PRODUCTION IN LOW-LUMINOSITY GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscibrodzka, M.; Gammie, C. F.; Dolence, J. C.; Shiokawa, H.

    2011-01-01

    Electron-positron pairs may be produced near accreting black holes by a variety of physical processes, and the resulting pair plasma may be accelerated and collimated into a relativistic jet. Here, we use a self-consistent dynamical and radiative model to investigate pair production by γγ collisions in weakly radiative accretion flows around a black hole of mass M and accretion rate M-dot . Our flow model is drawn from general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and our radiation field is computed by a Monte Carlo transport scheme assuming the electron distribution function is thermal. We argue that the pair production rate scales as r -6 M -1 M-dot 6 . We confirm this numerically and calibrate the scaling relation. This relation is self-consistent in a wedge in M, M-dot parameter space. If M-dot is too low the implied pair density over the poles of the black hole is below the Goldreich-Julian density and γγ pair production is relatively unimportant; if M-dot is too high the models are radiatively efficient. We also argue that for a power-law spectrum the pair production rate should scale with the observables L X ≡ X-ray luminosity and M as L 2 X M -4 . We confirm this numerically and argue that this relation likely holds even for radiatively efficient flows. The pair production rates are sensitive to black hole spin and to the ion-electron temperature ratio which are fixed in this exploratory calculation. We finish with a brief discussion of the implications for Sgr A* and M87.

  5. Enhancing biogas production from recalcitrant lignocellulosic residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapekos, Panagiotis

    Lignocellulosic substrates are abundant in agricultural areas around the world and lately, are utilized for biogas production in full-scale anaerobic digesters. However, the anaerobic digestion (AD) of these substrates is associated with specific difficulties due to their recalcitrant nature which...... protects them from enzymatic attack. Hence, the main purpose of this work was to define diverse ways to improve the performance of AD systems using these unconventional biomasses. Thus, mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatments, microaeration and bioaugmentation with hydrolytic microbes were examined...... conductivity, soluble chemical oxygen demand and enzymatic hydrolysis) as a rapid way to predict the methane production. However, the precision of methane yield prediction was not high (R2

  6. Photoproduction of {omega} mesons on nuclei near the production threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanova, M.; Friedrich, S.; Metag, V.; Thiel, M.; Gregor, R.; Kotulla, M.; Lugert, S.; Novotny, R.; Pant, L.M.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Schadmand, S.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R. [Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Weil, J.; Mosel, U. [Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, Giessen (Germany); Anton, G.; Bogendoerfer, R.; Hoessl, J.; Suft, G. [Universitaet Erlangen, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Bacelar, J.C.S.; Castelijns, R.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Shende, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Institut, Groningen (Netherlands); Bartholomy, O.; Crede, V.; Ehmanns, A.; Essig, K.; Fabry, I.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, C.; Gutz, E.; Hoeffgen, S.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Klempt, E.; Lotz, J.; Pee, H. van; Schmidt, C.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, C.; Wendel, C. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Bayadilov, D. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Beloglazov, Y.A.; Gridnev, A.B.; Lopatin, I.V.; Radkov, A.; Sumachev, V.V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Gothe, R.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Konrad, M.; Menze, D.; Morales, C.; Ostrick, M.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Suele, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Jaegle, I.; Krusche, B.; Mertens, T. [Universitaet Basel, Physikalisches Institut, Basel (Switzerland); Kopf, B. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Universitaet Bochum, Physikalisches Institut, Bochum (Germany); Langheinrich, J. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Universitaet Bochum, Physikalisches Institut, Bochum (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    The photoproduction of {omega} mesons on LH{sub 2}, C and Nb has been measured for incident photon energies from 900 to 1300MeV using the CB/TAPS detector at ELSA. The {omega} lineshape does not show any significant difference between the LH{sub 2} and the Nb targets. The experiment was motivated by transport calculations that predicted a sensitivity of the {omega} lineshape to in-medium modifications near the production threshold on a free nucleon of E{sub {gamma}}{sup lab}=1109 MeV. A comparison with recent calculations is given. (orig.)

  7. GALS – setup for production and study of heavy neutron rich nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemlyanoy Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map are very close to stability while the unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides along the neutron closed shell N = 126 below 208Pb is extremely important for nuclear astrophysics investigations and, in particular, for the understanding of the r-process of astrophysical nucleosynthesis. This area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion–fission reactions nor in fragmentation processes widely used nowadays for the production of exotic nuclei. A new way was recently proposed for the production of these nuclei via low-energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions. The estimated yields of neutron-rich nuclei are found to be significantly high in such reactions and several tens of new nuclides can be produced, for example, in the near-barrier collision of 136Xe with 208Pb. A new setup is proposed to produce and study heavy neutron-rich nuclei located along the neutron closed shell N=126.

  8. GALS – setup for production and study of heavy neutron rich nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zemlyanoy, Sergey; Kozulin, Eduard; Kudryavtsev, Yury; Fedosseev, Valentin; Bark, Robert; Janas, Zenon; Othman, Hosam

    2015-01-01

    The present limits of the upper part of the nuclear map are very close to stability while the unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides along the neutron closed shell N = 126 below ^208Pb is extremely important for nuclear astrophysics investigations and, in particular, for the understanding of the r-process of astrophysical nucleosynthesis. This area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion-fission reactions nor in fragmentation processes widely used nowadays for the production of exotic nuclei. A new way was recently proposed for the production of these nuclei via low-energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions. The estimated yields of neutron-rich nuclei are found to be significantly high in such reactions and several tens of new nuclides can be produced, for example, in the near-barrier collision of ^136Xe with ^208Pb. A new setup is proposed to produce and study heavy neutron-rich nuclei located along the neutron closed shell N=126.

  9. η production on nucleon and nuclei: report on pinot experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiavassa, E.; Dellacasa, G.; Marco, N. de; Oliveira Martin, C. de; Gallio, M.; Guaita, P.; Musso, A.; Piccotti, A.; Scomparin, E.; Vercellin, E.; Wilkin, C.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program with the aim of studying η production in p- N and p- nucleus collisions near threshold (T p = 1.26 GeV) has been recently carried out at SATURNE. The η- mesons were detected via the η → γγ decay by the two-arm PINOT spectrometer. The results concerning the pp → ppη reaction in the incident energy region 1.265 GeV ≤ GeV ≤ T p ≤ 2 GeV are presented here, as well as A-dependence. T η -dependence, T p -dependence of pA → ηX doubly differential cross sections. (author)

  10. Soft gamma-ray production in active galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, M; Zbyszewska, M

    1985-02-01

    Recent studies by Lightman (1982), Svensson (1984), an others on the pair-equilibrium states of mildly relativistic thermal plasma, including magnetic fields and optical sources are considered. Resulting constraints on luminosities and proton densities together with observational data permit the selection of an accretion scenario in which a high-energy spectrum, similar to that of NGC 4151, is produced. It is shown that soft gamma-ray production via thermal bremsstrahlung can occur in the central region of the two-temperature, geometrically thick part of the disc. On the other hand, the power-law X-ray spectrum is expected to be generated in the intermediate region due to Comptonization of optical photons coming from an outer, geometrically thin part of the disc. Implications for the relation between quasars and Seyfert galaxies are discussed. 27 references.

  11. Spectroscopy of few-particle nuclei around magic 132Sn from fission product γ-ray studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    We are studying the yrast structure of very neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic 132 Sn by analyzing fission product γ-ray data from a 248 Cm source at Eurogam II. Yrast cascades in several few-valence-particle nuclei have been identified through γγ cross coincidences with their complementary fission partners. Results for two-valence-particle nuclei 132 Sb, 134 Te, 134 Sb and 134 Sn provide empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions which, combined with single-particle energies already known in the one-particle nuclei, are essential for shell-model analysis in this region. Findings for the N = 82 nuclei 134 Te and 135 I have now been extended to the four-proton nucleus 136 Xe. Results for the two-neutron nucleus 134 Sn and the N = 83 isotones 134 Sb, 135 Te and 135 I open up the spectroscopy of nuclei in the northeast quadrant above 132 Sn

  12. Recycling crop residues for use in recirculating hydroponic crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Garland, J. L.; Sager, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    As part of bioregenerative life support feasibility testing by NASA, crop residues are being used to resupply elemental nutrients to recirculating hydroponic crop production systems. Methods for recovering nutrients from crop residues have evolved from water soaking (leaching) to rapid aerobic bioreactor processing. Leaching residues recovered the majority of elements but it also recovered significant amounts of soluble organics. The high organic content of leachates was detrimental to plant growth. Aerobic bioreactor processing reduced the organic content ten-fold, which reduced or eliminated phytotoxic effects. Wheat and potato production studies were successful using effluents from reactors having with 8- to 1-day retention times. Aerobic bioreactor effluents supplied at least half of the crops elemental mass needs in these studies. Descriptions of leachate and effluent mineral content, biomass productivity, microbial activity, and nutrient budgets for potato and wheat are presented.

  13. The potential for energy production from crop residues in Zimbabwe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingura, R.M.; Matengaifa, R. [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Chinhoyi University of Technology, P. Bag 7724, Chinhoyi (Zimbabwe)

    2008-12-15

    There is increasing interest in Zimbabwe in the use of renewable energy sources as a means of meeting the country's energy requirements. Biomass provides 47% of the gross energy consumption in Zimbabwe. Energy can be derived from various forms of biomass using various available conversion technologies. Crop residues constitute a large part of the biomass available from the country's agriculture-based economy. The potential for energy production of crop residues is examined using data such as estimates of the quantities of the residues and their energy content. The major crops considered are maize, sugarcane, cotton, soyabeans, groundnuts, wheat, sorghum, fruits and forestry plantations. Quantities of residues are estimated from crop yields by using conversion coefficients for the various crops. Long-term crop yields data from 1970 to 1999 were used. Total annual residue yields for crops, fruits and forestry plantations are 7.805 Mt, 378 kt and 3.05 Mt, respectively. The crops, fruits and forestry residues have energy potential of 81.5, 4.9 and 44.3 PJ per year, respectively. This represents about 44% of the gross energy consumption in Zimbabwe. The need to balance use of crop residues for both energy purposes and other purposes such as animal feeding and soil fertility improvement is also highlighted. (author)

  14. Direct Detection Phenomenology in Models Where the Products of Dark Matter Annihilation Interact with Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherry, John F.; Frandsen, Mads T.; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the direct detection phenomenology of a class of dark matter (DM) models in which DM does not directly interact with nuclei, {but rather} the products of its annihilation do. When these annihilation products are very light compared to the DM mass, the scattering in direct detection...... to nuclei, the limit from annihilation to relativistic particles in the Sun can be stronger than that of conventional non-relativistic direct detection by more than three orders of magnitude for masses in a 2-7 GeV window.......We investigate the direct detection phenomenology of a class of dark matter (DM) models in which DM does not directly interact with nuclei, {but rather} the products of its annihilation do. When these annihilation products are very light compared to the DM mass, the scattering in direct detection...... experiments is controlled by relativistic kinematics. This results in a distinctive recoil spectrum, a non-standard and or even absent annual modulation, and the ability to probe DM masses as low as a $\\sim$10 MeV. We use current LUX data to show that experimental sensitivity to thermal relic annihilation...

  15. Meson (photo- and) electro-production and the structure of nuclei at short distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1985-09-01

    The present status and the future prospects of the studies of very inelastic electronuclear reaction are reviewed, when both high energy and high momentum are transferred to the nucleus. Real and virtual mesons are tested on the same footing. Real meson production allows us to study the propagation of baryonic and mesonic resonances in nuclei and to put constraints on their interaction with the nucleon. Virtual meson creation is an alternative way to deal with exchange currents. The first lecture deals with the elementary operators, which describe meson photo- and electroproduction on free nucleons. The second one deals with real meson- photo- and electroproduction on few-body systems. Only the main features are discussed here and the last developments are presented. The third lecture deals with the coupling of the electromagnetic probe to the virtual meson in nuclei. The emphasis is put on the few-body systems, since their nuclear wave functions are known and since they are simple enough to allow for elaborate calculations. The case of heavy nuclei is also discussed. In the last lecture, I will try to look for evidence of the limits and the breakdown of the description of nuclei in terms of nucleons and mesons, and to forecast the new developments

  16. Curves and tables of neutron cross sections of fission product nuclei in JENDL-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo [ed.

    1992-06-15

    Neutron cross sections of 172 nuclei in the fission product region stored in JENDL-3 are shown in graphs and tables. The evaluation work of these nuclei was made by the Fission Product Nuclear Data Working Group of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, in the neutron energy region from 10{sup {minus}5} eV to 20 MeV. Almost of the cross section data reproduced in graphs in this report. The cross section averaged over 38 energy intervals are listed in a table. Shown in order tables are thermal cross sections, resonance integrals, Maxwellian neutron flux average cross sections, fission spectrum average cross sections, 14-MeV cross sections, one group average cross sections in neutron flux of typical types of fission reactors and average cross sections in the 30-keV Maxwellian spectrum.

  17. Curves and tables of neutron cross sections of fission product nuclei in JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo

    1992-06-01

    Neutron cross sections of 172 nuclei in the fission product region stored in JENDL-3 are shown in graphs and tables. The evaluation work of these nuclei was made by the Fission Product Nuclear Data Working Group of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, in the neutron energy region from 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV. Almost all the cross section data are reproduced in graphs in this report. The cross section averaged over 38 energy intervals are listed in a table. Shown in other tables are thermal cross sections, resonance integrals, Maxwellian neutron flux average cross sections, fission spectrum average cross sections, 14-MeV cross sections, one group average cross sections in neutron flux of typical types of fission reactors and average cross sections in the 30-keV Maxwellian spectrum. (author)

  18. Production of (anti-)(hyper-)nuclei at LHC energies with ALICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccio, Maximiliano

    2018-02-01

    The ALICE experiment at the LHC has measured a variety of (anti-)(hyper-)nuclei produced in Pb-Pb collisions at = 5.02 TeV and at 2.76 TeV. In addition, a large sample of high quality data was collected in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV and 13 TeV and in p-Pb collisions at = 5.02 TeV. These data are used to study the production of different (anti-)(hyper-)nuclei in the collisions, namely (anti-)deuteron, (anti-)3He, (anti-)alpha and (anti-)3ΛH. The identification of these (anti-)(hyper-)nuclei is based on the energy loss measurement in the Time Projection Chamber and the velocity measurement in the Time-Of-Flight detector. In addition, the Inner Tracking System is used to distinguish secondary vertices originating from weak decays from the primary vertex. New results on deuteron production as a function of multiplicity in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions will be presented, as well as the measurement of 3He in p-Pb and Pb- Pb collisions. Special emphasis will be given to the new results of the (anti-)3ΛH in its charged-two-body decay mode. The large variety of measurements at different energies and system sizes constrains the production models of light flavour baryon clusters, in particular those based on coalescence and the statistical hadronisation approaches.

  19. Fuel gas production from animal and agricultural residues and biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, D. L; Wentworth, R. L

    1978-05-30

    Progress was reported by all contractors. Topics presented include: solid waste to methane gas; pipeline fuel gas from an environmental cattle feed lot; heat treatment of organics for increasing anaerobic biodegradability; promoting faster anaerobic digestion; permselective membrane control of algae and wood digesters for increased production and chemicals recovery; anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residues; pilot plant demonstration of an anaerobic, fixed-film bioreactor for wastewater treatment; enhancement of methane production in the anaerobic diegestion of sewage; evaluation of agitation concepts for biogasification of sewage sludge; operation of a 50,000 gallon anaerobic digester; biological conversion of biomass to methane; dirt feedlot residue experiments; anaerobic fermentation of livestock and crop residues; current research on methanogenesis in Europe; and summary of EPA programs in digestion technology. (DC)

  20. Cellulosic ethanol production from agricultural residues in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iye, Edward; Bilsborrow, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Nigeria′s Biofuels Policy introduced in 2007 mandates a 10% blend (E10) of bioethanol with gasoline. This study investigates the potential for the development of a cellulosic ethanol industry based on the availability of agricultural residues and models the number of commercial processing facilities that could be sited in the six Geo-political zones. The potential for cellulosic ethanol production from agricultural residues in Nigeria is 7556 km 3 per annum exceeding the mandate of 10% renewable fuel required and providing the potential for 12 large- and 11 medium-scale processing facilities based on the use of a single feedstock. Cassava and yam peelings provided in excess of 80% of the process residues available with enough feedstock to supply 10 large-scale facilities with a fairly even distribution across the zones. Sorghum straw, millet straw and maize stalks represented 75% of the potential resource available from field residues with the potential to supply 2 large- and 7 medium-scale processing facilities, all of which would be located in the north of the country. When a multi-feedstock approach is used, this provides the potential for either 29 large- or 58 medium-scale facilities based on outputs of 250 and 125 km 3 per annum respectively. - Highlights: • Nigeria′s Biofuels Policy mandates a 10% blend of bioethanol with gasoline. • Total bioethanol production from agricultural residues was 7556 km 3 per annum. • Process residues offer the greatest potential accounting for 62% of production. • Nigeria has the potential for 12 large- and 11 medium scale commercial. • The use of mixed feedstocks significantly increases the potential for production

  1. Fate of ivermectin residues in ewes' milk and derived products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerkvenik, V.; Perko, B.; Rogelj, I.; Doganoc, D.Z.; Skubic, V.; Beek, W.M.J.; Keukens, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    The fate of ivermectin (IVM) residues was studied throughout the processing of daily bulk milk from 30 ewes (taken up to 33 d following subcutaneous administration of 0·2 mg IVM/kg b.w.) in the following milk products: yoghurt made from raw and pasteurized milk; cheese after pressing; 30- and 60-day

  2. Production of proton-rich nuclei around Z = 84-90 in fusion-evaporation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Peng-Hui [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Jin, Gen-Ming [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Niu, Fei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Henan Normal University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Xinxiang (China); Guo, Ya-Fei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Zhang, Hong-Fei [Lanzhou University, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-05-15

    Within the framework of the dinuclear system model, production cross sections of proton-rich nuclei with charged numbers of Z = 84-90 are investigated systematically. Possible combinations with the {sup 28}Si, {sup 32}S, {sup 40}Ar bombarding the target nuclides {sup 165}Ho, {sup 169}Tm, {sup 170-174}Yb, {sup 175,176}Lu, {sup 174,} {sup 176-180}Hf and {sup 181}Ta are analyzed thoroughly. The optimal excitation energies and evaporation channels are proposed to produce the proton-rich nuclei. The systems are feasible to be constructed in experiments. It is found that the neutron shell closure of N = 126 is of importance during the evaporation of neutrons. The experimental excitation functions in the {sup 40}Ar induced reactions can be nicely reproduced. The charged particle evaporation is comparable with neutrons in cooling the excited proton-rich nuclei, in particular for the channels with α and proton evaporation. The production cross section increases with the mass asymmetry of colliding systems because of the decrease of the inner fusion barrier. The channels with pure neutron evaporation depend on the isotopic targets. But it is different for the channels with charged particles and more sensitive to the odd-even effect. (orig.)

  3. Reaction rate and energy-loss rate for photopair production by relativistic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Michal J.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Sikora, Marek

    1992-01-01

    The process of e(+/-) pair production by relativistic nuclei on ambient photons is considered. The process is important for cosmic-ray nuclei in interstellar and intergalactic space as well as in galactic and extragalactic compact objects. The rate of this process is given by an integral of the cross section over the photon angular and energy distribution. In the case of isotropic photons, the angular integration is performed to provide an expression for the rate at given photon energy in the nucleus rest frame. The total rate then becomes a single integral of that rate over the photon energy distribution. Formulas are also given for the fractional energy loss of a relativistic nucleus colliding with a photon of a given energy in the rest frame. The nucleus energy-loss rate is integrated over the photon angular distribution in the case of isotropic photons, and simple fits are provided.

  4. Production of no carrier added residue free /sup 22/Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto, J L.Q. de; Bastos, M A.V.; Silva, R.F. da; Silva, A.G. da

    1988-05-02

    A method for the production of no carrier added and residue free /sup 22/Na, was developed via the /sup 24/Mg(d,..cap alpha..)/sup 22/Na nuclear reaction applying 14 MeV deuterons and a high current MG-Cu target. The yield for the reaction was measured and the chemical separation was performed using a Dowex 50WX8 resin in H/sup +/ form. The overall yield was higher than 98%. Residue could not be detected. All experiments were carried out at IEN's CV-28 cyclotron. (author) 13 refs.; 2 figs.

  5. Production of nuclei far from the beta stability line using intermediate-energy heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1986-05-01

    The production of far unstable nuclei using heavy ion accelerators in the intermediate energy domain is reviewed. The various mechanisms responsible for the production of exotic species, mainly the projectile fragmentation and transfer reactions, are discussed, and the first experimental results presented. Results can be summarized as follows: existence of 4 new isotopes 22 C, 23 N, 29 Ne, 30 Ne; indication of bound character of 71 Ni, 72 Ni; clear evidence for bound character of 23 Si, 27 S, 31 Ar, 35 Ca; indications of bound character of 43 V, 46 Mn, 47 Mn, 48 Fe, 50 Co, 52 Co, 52 Ni, 55 Cu, 56 Cu

  6. Application of x-ray residual stress measurement to products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, T.; Iwamura, T.

    1975-01-01

    The X-ray residual stress measuring method is the only nondestructive method for measuring residual stress in polycrystalline materials. It is capable of obtaining information not only on macroscopic stress but also microscopic stress. The authors are employing this method for the development of pre-service and in-service inspection methods and for the improvement of various manufacturing techniques. In this paper, the results of measurement of some products as examples of its application are described. The examples introduced concern the following: (1) Selection of optimum conditions in heat treatment and stress-relief treatment. (2) Residual stress produced by mechanical processes such as autofrettage and flow form. (3) Check of manufacturing processes of rotary shaft and welded parts. (4) Estimation of fatigue strength of shot-peened part. (5) Detection of fatigue damage of shot-peened part. (auth.)

  7. Biogas Production from Energy Crops and Agriculture Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Guangtao

    and wet explosion pretreated energy crops and agriculture residues with swine manure at various volatile solids (VS) ratio between crop and manure was carried out by batch tests and continuous experiments. The efficiency of the co-digestion experiment was evaluated based on (a) the methane potential......In this thesis, the feasibility of utilizing energy crops (willow and miscanthus) and agriculture residues (wheat straw and corn stalker) in an anaerobic digestion process for biogas production was evaluated. Potential energy crops and agriculture residues were screened according...... of perennial crops was tested as a storage method and pretreatment method for enhancement of the biodegradability of the crops. The efficiency of the silage process was evaluated based on (a) the amount of biomass loss during storage and (b) the effect of the silage on methane potential. Co-digestion of raw...

  8. 14C-Profenofos Residues in Milk and Milk Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhr, I.M.I.; Afifi, L.M.; Fouzy, A.S.M.; Hegazi, B.

    1999-01-01

    Treatment of lactating goats with only one dose of 14 C-ethoxy profenofos (17.9 mg/Kg) in gelatin capsules and then feeding normally, resulted in the presence of 0.5% of the radioactive insecticide residues in the milk collected through the fourteen successive days. The highest activity level was depicted at the first day and almost disappeared after two weeks. After processing, the analysis of milk products revealed difference in radioactive residue level according to the nature of the product and increased in the order: whey< skim < yoghurt < pasteurized milk < cheese< cream. TLC analysis of milk and milk products revealed the absence of the parent compound and the presence of 4 major metabolites, which were identified by co-chromatography with authentic compounds

  9. Monitoring residue in animals and primary products of animal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Saša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of control and systematic monitoring of residue is to secure, by the examination of a corresponding number of samples, the efficient monitoring of the residue level in tissues and organs of animals, as well as in primary products of animal origin. This creates possibilities for the timely taking of measures toward the securing of food hygiene of animal origin and the protection of public health. Residue can be a consequence of the inadequate use of medicines in veterinary medicine and pesticides in agriculture and veterinary medicine, as well as the polluting of the environment with toxic elements, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, and others. Residue is being monitored in Serbia since 1972, and in 2004, national monitoring was brought to the level of EU countries through significant investments by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Water Management. This is also evident in the EU directives which permit exports of all kinds of meat and primary products of animal origin, covered by the Residue Monitoring Program. The program of systematic examinations of residue has been coordinated with the requirements of the European Union, both according to the type of examined substance, as well as according to the number of samples and the applied analytical techniques. In addition to the development of methods and the including of new harmful substances into the monitoring programme, it is also necessary to coordinate the national regulations that define the maximum permitted quantities of certain medicines and contaminants with the EU regulations, in order to protect the health of consumers as efficiently as possible, and for the country to take equal part in international trade.

  10. Hot nuclei production and deexcitation in heavy ions induced reactions on medium mass targets in the 10-84 MeV/nucleon energy domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lleres, A.

    1988-01-01

    Velocity, angular distributions and total cross sections for heavy residues produced in the reactions 12 C, 14 N, 20 Ne, 40 Ar + 124 Sn have been measured in the 10-84 MeV/nucleon incident energy range using catchers technique in association with off-line gamma-activity spectroscopy. The observed reaction products are interpreted as evaporation residues from equilibrated systems formed by complete or incomplete fusion of the projectile and target nuclei. From the velocities and residual masses measured at forward angles, the linear momentum transfers and excitation energies associated with the intermediate systems are estimated using simple fusion-evaporation models and are next compared to the predictions of the preequilibrium and Fermi jets models. Energy, angular, charge and charge correlation distributions for intermediate mass fragments emitted in the reaction 32 S + nat Ag at 30 MeV/nucleon were also measured using gaseous and silicon detectors. The energy and angular distributions indicate that both equilibrated and non-equilibrated emitting sources are present. The equilibrium emission is attributed to the deexcitation of systems produced by incomplete fusion of the projectile and target nuclei. The charge correlation distributions are consistent with an asymmetric fission decay process. The linear momentum transfer and excitation energy associated with the equilibrated source are estimated using a simple fusion-fission model [fr

  11. Residual biomass resources for energy production. Extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevot, G.

    2010-06-01

    This report covers the whole problematic of energy production from biomass residues in France except the production of biofuels. It is made of two parts. The first one gives an overview of the availability of residual biomass resources, The concept of residue (or waste) is placed in its economic and regulatory context (the major part of the resource cannot be considered as waste without any further potential use). The conditions of availability of the resource for each market segment are identified. The second part describes the conditions for the use of 5 different conversion options of these residues into energy. The logistics constraints for the procurement of the fuel and the intermediate operations to prepare it are briefly summarised. The objective was the identification of key issues in all relevant aspects, without giving too much emphasis to one of them at the expense of another one in order to avoid duplicating the frequent cases of facilities that do not meet environmental and economic targets because the designers of the system have not paid enough attention to a parameter of the system. (author)

  12. Microbiological Production of Surfactant from Agricultural Residuals for IOR Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, Greg Alan; Bruhn, Debby Fox; Fox, Sandra Lynn; Noah, Karl Scott; Thompson, David Neal

    2002-04-01

    Utilization of surfactants for improved oil recovery (IOR) is an accepted technique with high potential. However, technology application is frequently limited by cost. Biosurfactants (surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms) are not widely utilized in the petroleum industry due to high production costs associated with use of expensive substrates and inefficient product recovery methods. The economics of biosurfactant production could be significantly impacted through use of media optimization and application of inexpensive carbon substrates such as agricultural process residuals. Utilization of biosurfactants produced from agricultural residuals may 1) result in an economic advantage for surfactant production and technology application, and 2) convert a substantial agricultural waste stream to a value-added product for IOR. A biosurfactant with high potential for use is surfactin, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, produced by Bacillus subtilis. Reported here is the production and potential IOR utilization of surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis (American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 21332) from starch-based media. Production of surfactants from microbiological growth media based on simple sugars, chemically pure starch medium, simulated liquid and solid potato-process effluent media, a commercially prepared potato starch in mineral salts, and process effluent from a potato processor is discussed. Additionally, the effect of chemical and physical pretreatments on starchy feedstocks is discussed.

  13. Production of ferrous sulfate from residue from the iron mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, K.A; Riella, H.G.; Abreu, E.F.; Carvalho, E.F. Urano de; Durazzo, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper was developed from a residue obtained by processing iron ore exploited by the mining company Samarco S/A. The residue was characterized and the analyses showed that it contains about 70% of the mineral hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ) and also that some economically important products could be produced. One is the ferrous sulfate that can be used in pharmaceuticals and also that can be used in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The iron, in addition to is importance for the industrial production of steel and parts in general, also has great biological importance in all living beings. In order to produce ferrous sulfate from the byproduct in question, it was developed a obtaining route using metallic iron as hematite reductor and sulfuric acid to form the salt. (author)

  14. Waste vinegar residue as substrate for phytase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Hong; Dong, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Tong, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Qi; Xu, Shang-Zhong

    2011-12-01

    Waste vinegar residue, the by-product of vinegar processing, was used as substrate for phytase production from Aspergillus ficuum NTG-23 in solid-state fermentation to investigate the potential for the efficient re-utilization or recycling of waste vinegar residue. Statistical designs were applied in the processing of phytase production. First, a Plackett-Burman (PB) design was used to evaluate eleven parameters: glucose, starch, wheat bran, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), NH(4)NO(3), tryptone, soybean meal, MgSO(4)·7H(2)O, CaCl(2)·7H(2)O, FeSO(4)·7H(2)O, incubation time. The PB experiments showed that there were three significant factors: glucose, soybean meal and incubation time. The closest values to the optimum point were then derived by steepest ascent path. Finally, a mathematical model was created and validated to explain the behavioural process after these three significant factors were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). The best phytase activity was attained using the following conditions: glucose (7.2%), soybean meal (5.1%), and incubation time (271 h). The phytase activity was 7.34-fold higher due to optimization by PB design, steepest ascent path design and RSM. The phytase activity was enhanced 0.26-fold in comparison with the results by the second step of steepest ascent path design. The results indicate that with waste vinegar residue as a substrate higher production of phytase from Aspergillus ficuum NTG-23 could be obtained through an optimization process and that this method might be applied to an integrated system for recycling of the waste vinegar residue.

  15. Vertex detector working as an active target in multihadron production on nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albini, E [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Brescia Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Matematica); Artuso, M; Bacchiocchi, G; D' Angelo, P; Moroni, L; Ragusa, F; Rancoita, P G; Sala, S [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Bellini, G

    1980-12-01

    In this paper a vertex detector working as active target is described. It consists of a telescope of nuclear targets surrounded by two coaxial cylindrical MWPCs, working in the proportional regime. The energy loss in the two 6 mm gaps of the chambers is measured with an accuracy better than 18%. The coordinates of the track along the sense wires are measured using the charge division method with an accuracy of 0.5-1.0%. The efficiency is about 99.5%. This device is used in an experiment concerned with multihadron production on nuclei, coupled with a forward spectrometer in order to detect and recognize grey, black and shower secondary particles.

  16. Simulation of neutron rich nuclei production through 239U fission at intermediates energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirea, M.; Clapier, F.; Pauwels, N.; Proust, J.

    1997-01-01

    The theoretical part and some results obtained from a model realised for fission processes in wide range of mass-asymmetries are presented. The fission barriers are computed in a tridimensional configuration space using the Yukawa - plus - exponential macroscopic energies corrected within the Strutinsky procedure. It is assumed that channel probabilities are proportional with Gamow penetrabilities. The model is applied for the disintegration of the 239 U in order to determine the relative yields for the production of neutron rich nuclei at diverse intermediate energies. (author)

  17. Correlations in multiple production on nuclei and Glauber model of multiple scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, V.R.; Nikolaev, N.N.

    1982-01-01

    Critical analysis of possibility for describing correlation phenomena during multiple production on nuclei within the framework of the Glauber multiple seattering model generalized for particle production processes with Capella, Krziwinski and Shabelsky has been performed. It was mainly concluded that the suggested generalization of the Glauber model gives dependences on Ng(Np) (where Ng-the number of ''grey'' tracess, and Np-the number of protons flying out of nucleus) and, eventually, on #betta# (where #betta#-the number of intranuclear interactions) contradicting experience. Independent of choice of relation between #betta# and Ng(Np) in the model the rapidity corrletor Rsub(eta) is overstated in the central region and understated in the region of nucleus fragmentation. In mean multiplicities these two contradictions of experience are disguised with random compensation and agreement with experience in Nsub(S) (function of Ng) cannot be an argument in favour of the model. It is concluded that eiconal model doesn't permit to quantitatively describe correlation phenomena during the multiple production on nuclei

  18. Pion production and fragmentation of nuclei in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oskarsson, A.

    1983-01-01

    In collisions between nuclei at high energies one can study the behaviour of nuclear matter under extreme conditions, regarding nuclear density and temperature. The Bevalac and the CERN SC beams have been used and nuclear emulsion and scintillation telescopes have measured the reaction products. Collisions at 50A-200A MeV and at 2A GeV have been investigated. Proton spectra from 12 C induced reactions at 85A MeV have been recorded for different targets. Energetic protons at large angles can be assumed to be emitted from a source moving with half the beam velocity and a temperature between 13 and 17 MeV, depending on the target. In collisions between nuclei, pions can be produced below 290A MeV due to the internal Fermi motion of the nucleons. Subthreshold pion production has been studied for 12 C induced reactions at 85A and 75A Mev. The cross-sections are consistent with a quasi-free nucleon-nucleon scattering picture, involving Fermi motion, Pauli blocking and pion reabsorption. 16 C induced reactions in emulsion have been studied at 75A, 175A and 2000A MeV. It is shown that the excitation of the parts of the nuclei which are not overlapping (the spectators) increases with the beam energy. The 16 O projectile frequently breaks up into multiple He fragments. These events are associated with large impact parameters. Central collisions with Ag, Br target at 50A-110A MeV have been analysed separately. It is shown that the momentum transfer to the target nucleus is limited to a value considerably lower than the full momentum transfer in a fusion reactions. Events are observed where there are numerous fragments with 3< Z<8. These multifragmentation events cannot be understood in a thermal approach. (author)

  19. Total disintegration of three-nucleon nuclei in charged-pion photo-production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhibuti, R.I.; Kezerashvili, R.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The total disintegration of three-nucleon nuclei in charged-pion photo-production is studied within the framework of the microscopic approach based on the method of hyperspherical functions. The initial and final nuclear states are described using the same NN potentials. The differential and total cross sections are calculated using various NN potentials. It is shown that the cross sections are sensitive to the form of the NN interaction and to the final-state interaction of the three nucleons. It is found that the cross section for π - meson production is systematically larger than the cross section for π + meson production. The importance of an experimental investigation of these reactions is shown

  20. Use of MRF residue as alternative fuel in cement production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyffe, John R; Breckel, Alex C; Townsend, Aaron K; Webber, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Single-stream recycling has helped divert millions of metric tons of waste from landfills in the U.S., where recycling rates for municipal solid waste are currently over 30%. However, material recovery facilities (MRFs) that sort the municipal recycled streams do not recover 100% of the incoming material. Consequently, they landfill between 5% and 15% of total processed material as residue. This residue is primarily composed of high-energy-content non-recycled plastics and fiber. One possible end-of-life solution for these energy-dense materials is to process the residue into Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) that can be used as an alternative energy resource capable of replacing or supplementing fuel resources such as coal, natural gas, petroleum coke, or biomass in many industrial and power production processes. This report addresses the energetic and environmental benefits and trade-offs of converting non-recycled post-consumer plastics and fiber derived from MRF residue streams into SRF for use in a cement kiln. An experimental test burn of 118 Mg of SRF in the precalciner portion of the cement kiln was conducted. The SRF was a blend of 60% MRF residue and 40% post-industrial waste products producing an estimated 60% plastic and 40% fibrous material mixture. The SRF was fed into the kiln at 0.9 Mg/h for 24h and then 1.8 Mg/h for the following 48 h. The emissions data recorded in the experimental test burn were used to perform the life-cycle analysis portion of this study. The analysis included the following steps: transportation, landfill, processing and fuel combustion at the cement kiln. The energy use and emissions at each step is tracked for the two cases: (1) The Reference Case, where MRF residue is disposed of in a landfill and the cement kiln uses coal as its fuel source, and (2) The SRF Case, in which MRF residue is processed into SRF and used to offset some portion of coal use at the cement kiln. The experimental test burn and accompanying analysis indicate

  1. Biogas production from energy crops and agriculture residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.

    2010-12-15

    In this thesis, the feasibility of utilizing energy crops (willow and miscanthus) and agriculture residues (wheat straw and corn stalker) in an anaerobic digestion process for biogas production was evaluated. Potential energy crops and agriculture residues were screened according to their suitability for biogas production. Moreover, pretreatment of these biomasses by using wet explosion method was studied and the effect of the wet explosion process was evaluated based on the increase of (a) sugar release and (b) methane potential when comparing the pretreated biomass and raw biomass. Ensiling of perennial crops was tested as a storage method and pretreatment method for enhancement of the biodegradability of the crops. The efficiency of the silage process was evaluated based on (a) the amount of biomass loss during storage and (b) the effect of the silage on methane potential. Co-digestion of raw and wet explosion pretreated energy crops and agriculture residues with swine manure at various volatile solids (VS) ratio between crop and manure was carried out by batch tests and continuous experiments. The efficiency of the co-digestion experiment was evaluated based on (a) the methane potential in term of ml CH4 produced per g of VS-added and (b) the amount of methane produced per m3 of reactor volume. (Author)

  2. Biogas and mineral fertiliser production from plant residues of phytoremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Thi Thu Ha

    2011-07-01

    The former uranium mining site in Ronneburg, Thuringia, Germany was known as a big source of uranium with more than 113,000 tons of uranium mined from 1946 to 1990. This area has been remediated since the nineties of the last century. However, nowadays the site in Ronneburg is still specially considered because of the heterogeneous contamination by many heavy metals and the vegetation can be affected. Three plant species including Indian mustard - Brassica juncea L., triticale - x. Triticosecale Wittmaek and sunflower - Helianthus annuus L. were seeded as accumulators of heavy metals and radionuclides in the phytoremediation process in 2009 and 2010 in Ronneburg. The subsequent utilization of the plant residues after phytoremediation is of special consideration. Batch fermentation of harvested plant materials under the mesophilic condition showed that all of the investigated plant materials had much higher biogas production than liquid cow manure except triticale root, of which biogas yield per volatile solid was not significantly higher than the one of sludge. The highest biogas yields (311 L{sub N}/kg FM and 807 L{sub N}/kg VS) were achieved from the spica of triticale after 42 days of retention of anaerobic digestion. Triticale shoot residues generated higher biogas and methane yields than the previously reported triticale materials that were harvested from the uncontaminated soil Triticale was considered as the highest potential species in biogas production, beside the best growth ability on the acidic soil at the test field site with highest biomass production. Biogas yield of Indian mustard shoot was also high but dramatically varied from 2009 to 2010. Digestates after anaerobic digestion of plant residues contained various macronutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus and sulphur, and various micronutrients such as iron, manganes, zinc, etc. The accumulation levels of heavy metals in the investigated plant materials were not the hindrance factors

  3. Fate of ivermectin residues in ewes' milk and derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerkvenik, Vesna; Perko, Bogdan; Rogelj, Irena; Doganoc, Darinka Z; Skubic, Valentin; Beek, Wim M J; Keukens, Henk J

    2004-02-01

    The fate of ivermectin (IVM) residues was studied throughout the processing of daily bulk milk from 30 ewes (taken up to 33 d following subcutaneous administration of 0.2 mg IVM/kg b.w.) in the following milk products: yoghurt made from raw and pasteurized milk; cheese after pressing; 30- and 60-day ripened cheese; and whey, secondary whey and whey proteins obtained after cheese-making (albumin cheese). The concentration of the H2B1a component of IVM was analysed in these dairy products using an HPLC method with fluorescence detection. The mean recovery of the method was, depending on the matrix, between 87 and 100%. Limits of detection in the order of only 0.1 microg H2B1a/kg of product were achieved. Maximum concentrations of IVM were detected mostly at 2 d after drug administration to the ewes. The highest concentration of IVM was found on day 2 in 60-day ripened cheese (96 microg H2B1a/kg cheese). Secondary whey was the matrix with the lowest concentration of IVM (milk fat and solid content were evident. During yoghurt production, fermentation and thermal stability of IVM was observed. During cheese production, approximately 35% of the IVM, present in the raw (bulk) milk samples, was lost. From the results it was concluded that the processing of ewes' milk did not eliminate the drug residues under investigation. The consequences of IVM in the human diet were discussed. Milk from treated animals should be excluded from production of fat products like cheese for longer after treatment with IVM than for lower fat products.

  4. Accumulative effect of food residues on intestinal gas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mego, M; Accarino, A; Malagelada, J-R; Guarner, F; Azpiroz, F

    2015-11-01

    As mean transit time in the colon is longer than the interval between meals, several consecutive meal loads accumulate, and contribute to colonic biomass. Our aim was to determine the summation effect of fermentable food residues on intestinal gas production. In eight healthy subjects, the volume of endogenous intestinal gas produced in the intestine over a 4-h period was measured by means of a wash-out technique, using an exogenous gas infusion into the jejunum (24 mL/min) and collection of the effluent via a rectal Foley catheter. The exogenous gas infused was labeled (5% SF6 ) to calculate the proportion of endogenous intestinal gas evacuated. In each subject, four experiments were performed ≥1 week apart combining a 1-day high- or low-flatulogenic diet with a test meal or fast. Basal conditions: on the low-flatulogenic diet, intestinal gas production during fasting over the 4-h study period was 609 ± 63 mL. Effect of diet: during fasting, intestinal gas production on the high-flatulogenic diet was 370 ± 146 mL greater than on the low-flatulogenic diet (p = 0.040). Effect of test meal: on the low-flatulogenic diet, intestinal gas production after the test meal was 681 ± 114 mL greater than during fasting (p = 0.001); a similar effect was observed on the high-flatulogenic diet (599 ± 174 mL more intestinal gas production after the test meal than during fasting; p = 0.021). Our data demonstrate temporal summation effects of food residues on intestinal gas production. Hence, intestinal gas production depends on pre-existing and on recent colonic loads of fermentable foodstuffs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of the total gamma-ray production cross-sections for nonelastic interaction of fast neutrons with iron nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savin, M.V.; Nefedov, Yu.Ya; Livke, A.V.; Zvenigorodskij, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data on the total gamma-ray production cross-sections for inelastic interaction of fast neutrons with iron nuclei were analysed. The total gamma-ray production cross-sections, grouped according to E γ , were evaluated in the neutron energy range 0.5-19 MeV. The statistical spline approximation method was used to evaluate the experimental data. Evaluated data stored in the ENDF, JENDL, BROND, and other libraries on gamma-ray production spectra and cross-sections for inelastic interaction of fast neutrons with iron nuclei, were analysed. (author)

  6. Residues of 14C-cyolane in cottonseed products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.M.A.D.; Osman, A.Z.; Fakhr, I.M.I.; Bahig, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    The systemic insecticide cyolane [2-(0,0-diethylphosphoryl)-imino-1,3-dithiolane] was prepared from 14 C-ethanol, phosphorus oxychloride and 2-amino-1,3-dithiolane. Cotton plants were treated with two applications of the insecticide under conditions of local agricultural practice. 14 C-residues in the crude oil and cake of the harvested cotton seeds amounted to 1.63 and 0.014 mg/kg respectively. About 50% of the 14 C-activity present in the crude oil was found to be eliminated by simulated commercial processes used for refining of the oil. Alkali treatment and bleaching removed 16% and 25% of the radioactive residues respectively. Winterization of the bleached oil at 5-7 0 C for 3 days effected a further elimination of 13%. 14 C-residues in the cotton seed products and in the samples of the refined oil were characterized and the main constituents identified using chromatographic techniques. (author)

  7. Torrefaction of residues and by-products from sunflower chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Riva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The high heterogeneity of some residual biomasses makes rather difficult their energy use and standardisation is a key aspect for these fuel products. Torrefaction is an interesting process used to improve the quality of ligno-cellulosic biomasses and to achieve standardisation. In the present study torrefaction has been employed on residues and by-products deriving from sunflower production chain, in particular sunflower stalks and oil press cake. The thermal behaviour of materials has been studied at first by thermo-gravimetric analysis in order to identify torrefaction temperatures range. Different residence time and torrefaction temperatures have been employed in a bench top torrefaction reactor afterwards. Analyses of raw and torrefied materials have been carried out to assess the influence of the process. As a consequence of torrefaction, the carbon and ash contents increase while the volatilisation range is reduced making the material more stable and standardised. Mass yield, energy yield and energy densification reach values of about 60 %, 80 % and 1.33 for sunflower stalks and 64 %, 85 % and 1.33 for sunflower oil press cake respectively. As highlighted by results, torrefaction is more interesting for sunflower stalks than oil cake and husks because of the different starting characteristics. Untreated oil cake and husks already show a good high heating value and the eventual torrefaction should be mild. On the contrary for sunflower stalks the process is more useful and could be more severe.

  8. Results from (anti-)(hyper-)nuclei production and searches for exotic bound states with ALICE at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    The excellent particle identification capabilities of the ALICE detector, using the time projection chamber and the time-of-flight detector, allow the detection of light nuclei and anti-nuclei. Furthermore, the high tracking resolution provided by the inner tracking system enables the separation of primary nuclei from those coming from the decay of heavier systems. This allows for the reconstruction of decays such as the hypertriton mesonic weak decay ($^3_{\\Lambda}$H$\\rightarrow ^3$He + $\\pi^-$), the decay of a hypothetical bound state of a $\\Lambda$n into a deuteron and pion or the H-dibaryon decaying into a $\\Lambda$, a proton and a $\\pi^{-}$. An overview of the production of stable nuclei and anti-nuclei in proton-proton, proton-lead and, in particular, lead-lead collisions is presented. Hypernuclei production rates in Pb--Pb are also shown, together with the upper limits estimated on the production of hypothetical exotica candidates. The results are compared with predictions for the production in thermal...

  9. Biodiesel production from residual oils recovered from spent bleaching earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yi-Pin; Chang, James I.

    2010-01-01

    This work was to study technical and economic feasibilities of converting residual oils recovered from spent bleaching earth generated at soybean oil refineries into useable biodiesel. Experimental results showed that fatty acids in the SBE residual oil were hexadecenoic acid (58.19%), stearic acid (21.49%) and oleic acid (20.32%), which were similar to those of vegetable oils. The methyl ester conversion via a transesterification process gave a yield between 85 and 90%. The biodiesel qualities were in reasonable agreement with both EN 14214 and ASTM D6751 standards. A preliminary financial analysis showed that the production cost of biodiesel from SBE oils was significantly lower than the pre-tax price of fossil diesel or those made of vegetable oils or waste cooking oils. The effects of the crude oil price and the investment on the production cost and the investment return period were also conducted. The result showed that the investment would return faster at higher crude oil price. (author)

  10. Studies of evaporation residue products from krypton and argon reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasil, F.; Ferguson, R.L.; Britt, H.C.; Erkkila, B.H.; Blann, M.; Gutbrod, H.H.; California Univ., Berkeley

    1978-01-01

    Mass distributions of evaporation residue (ER) products from 86 Kr-bombardments of 70 Ge and 74 Ge have been obtained by a time-of-flight method at energies ranging from the interaction barrier to 706 MeV. ER excitation functions have also been obtained for a variety of target and projectile combinations. Results are compared with statistical model calculations and with results obtained from γ-measurements. It is deduced that at the lowest impact parameters, the reaction products belong to the ER group, in contrast with the angular momentum hypothesis of Lefort. Cross sections were found to be consistent with an angular momentum limit arising from the onset of fission. (orig.) [de

  11. PLANT PROTECTION PRODUCT RESIDUES IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS OF SLOVENE ORIGIN FOUND IN 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena BAŠA ČESNIK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2008, 166 apple, bean, carrot, cucumber, lettuce, pear, potato and spinach samples from Slovene producers were analysed for plant protection product residues. The samples were analysed for the presence of 158 different active compounds using three analytical methods. In two samples (1.2% exceeded maximum residue levels (MRLs were determined which is better than the results of the monitoring of pesticide residues in the products of plant origin in the 27 European Union, Member States (EU MS and 2 European Free Trade Association (EFTA States: Norway and Iceland in 2008 (2.2%. The most frequently found active substance in agricultural products was dithiocarbamates. Products which contained 4 or more active substances per sample were apples and pears.

  12. Evaporation residue cross sections for the {sup 100}Mo + {sup 116}Cd reaction -- energy dissipation in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    In this experiment we tried to measure the evaporation residue cross section over a wide range of beam energies for the {sup 100}Mo + {sup 116}Cd reaction using the FMA. However, because of longer-than-estimated runs needed at each beam energy, and the difficulty of bending evaporation residues at the higher energies in the FMA, data were taken only at beam energies of E{sub beam} = 460, 490, and 521 MeV, which correspond to excitation energies of E{sub exc} = 62, 78, and 95 MeV, respectively. By comparing to results for the {sup 32}S + {sup 184}W reactions measured recently, we expect to demonstrate a strong entrance channel effect related to the hindrance of complete fusion in near-symmetric heavy systems (a fusion hindrance factor of the order 7-10 is expected on the basis of the Extra-Push Model). The data are being analyzed.

  13. Angular distributions of evaporation residues from near-barrier fusion of 32,36S on a ≅100 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The angular distributions of evaporation residues from near-barrier fusion of 32,36 S ions with 92,94,96,98,100 Mo, 100,101,102,104 Ru, 103 Rh, and 104,105,106,108,110 Pd were measured in the range of 3 to 11 degrees in the laboratory system. The relative yield of the four most abundant exit evaporation channels has been extracted for all target-projectile combination at two bombarding energies, by fitting the angular distributions expected for each channel as obtained from the Monte-Carlo program TRANMI to the measured angular distribution of the evaporation residues. The total detection efficiency for the Munich-RF-Recoil Spectrometer was obtained from the relative yields, taking into account the effect due to multiple scattering, and compared with that obtained previously from the recoil velocity distributions. (orig./HSI) [de

  14. Benchmark calculations on residue production within the EURISOL DS project. Part 1: thin targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, J.C.; Blideanu, V.; Boudard, A.; Dore, D.; Leray, S.; Rapp, B.; Ridikas, D.; Thiolliere, N

    2006-12-15

    We have begun this benchmark study using mass distribution data of reaction products obtained at GSI in inverse kinematics. This step has allowed us to make a first selection among 10 spallation models; in this way the first assessment of the quality of the models was obtained. Then, in a second part, experimental mass distributions for some elements, which either are interesting as radioactive ion beams or important due to the safety and radioprotection issues (alpha or gamma emitters), will be also compared to model calculations. These data have been obtained for an equivalent 0.8 or 1.0 GeV proton beam, which is approximately the proposed projectile energy. We note that in realistic thick targets the proton beam will be slowed down and some secondary particles will be produced. Therefore, the residual nuclei production at lower energies is also important. For this reason, we also performed in the third part of this work some excitation function calculations and the associated data obtained with gamma-spectroscopy to test the models in a wide projectile energy range. We conclude that INCL4/Abla and Isabel/Abla are the best model combinations which we recommend. We also note that the agreement between model and data are better with 1 GeV protons than with 100-200 MeV protons.

  15. Biogas production from energy crops and crop residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtomaeki, A.

    2006-07-01

    The feasibility of utilising energy crops and crop residues in methane production through anaerobic digestion in boreal conditions was evaluated in this thesis. Potential boreal energy crops and crop residues were screened for their suitability for methane production, and the effects of harvest time and storage on the methane potential of crops was evaluated. Codigestion of energy crops and crop residues with cow manure, as well as digestion of energy crops alone in batch leach bed reactors with and without a second stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) or methanogenic filter (MF) were evaluated. The methane potentials of crops, as determined in laboratory methane potential assays, varied from 0.17 to 0.49 m3 CH{sub 4} kg-1 VS{sub added} (volatile solids added) and from 25 to 260 m3 CH4 t-1 ww (tons of wet weight). Jerusalem artichoke, timothy-clover and reed canary grass gave the highest methane potentials of 2 900-5 400 m3 CH{sub 4} ha-1, corresponding to a gross energy potential of 28-53 MWh ha-1 and 40 000-60 000 km ha-1 in passenger car transport. The methane potentials per ww increased with most crops as the crops matured. Ensiling without additives resulted in minor losses (0-13%) in the methane potential of sugar beet tops but more substantial losses (17-39%) in the methane potential of grass, while ensiling with additives was shown to have potential in improving the methane potentials of these substrates by up to 19-22%. In semi-continuously fed laboratory continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) co-digestion of manure and crops was shown feasible with feedstock VS containing up to 40% of crops. The highest specific methane yields of 0.268, 0.229 and 0.213 m3 CH{sub 4} kg-1 VS{sub added} in co-digestion of cow manure with grass, sugar beet tops and straw, respectively, were obtained with 30% of crop in the feedstock, corresponding to 85-105% of the methane potential in the substrates as determined by batch assays. Including 30% of crop in

  16. Lactic Acid and Biosurfactants Production from Residual Cellulose Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilla Rivera, Oscar Manuel; Arzate Martínez, Guillermo; Jarquín Enríquez, Lorenzo; Vázquez Landaverde, Pedro Alberto; Domínguez González, José Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The increasing amounts of residual cellulose films generated as wastes all over the world represent a big scale problem for the meat industry regarding to environmental and economic issues. The use of residual cellulose films as a feedstock of glucose-containing solutions by acid hydrolysis and further fermentation into lactic acid and biosurfactants was evaluated as a method to diminish and revalorize these wastes. Under a treatment consisting in sulfuric acid 6% (v/v); reaction time 2 h; solid liquid ratio 9 g of film/100 mL of acid solution, and temperature 130 °C, 35 g/L of glucose and 49% of solubilized film was obtained. From five lactic acid strains, Lactobacillus plantarum was the most suitable for metabolizing the glucose generated. The process was scaled up under optimized conditions in a 2-L bioreactor, producing 3.4 g/L of biomass, 18 g/L of lactic acid, and 15 units of surface tension reduction of a buffer phosphate solution. Around 50% of the cellulose was degraded by the treatment applied, and the liqueurs generated were useful for an efficient production of lactic acid and biosurfactants using L. plantarum. Lactobacillus bacteria can efficiently utilize glucose from cellulose films hydrolysis without the need of clarification of the liqueurs.

  17. Probing QCD critical fluctuations from light nuclei production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jia Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the coalescence model for light nuclei production, we show that the yield ratio Op-d-t=NH3Np/Nd2 of p, d, and 3H in heavy-ion collisions is sensitive to the neutron relative density fluctuation Δn=〈(δn2〉/〈n〉2 at kinetic freeze-out. From recent experimental data in central Pb+Pb collisions at sNN=6.3 GeV, 7.6 GeV, 8.8 GeV, 12.3 GeV and 17.3 GeV measured by the NA49 Collaboration at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS, we find a possible non-monotonic behavior of Δn as a function of the collision energy with a peak at sNN=8.8 GeV, indicating that the density fluctuations become the largest in collisions at this energy. With the known chemical freeze-out conditions determined from the statistical model fit to experimental data, we obtain a chemical freeze-out temperature of ∼144 MeV and baryon chemical potential of ∼385 MeV at this collision energy, which are close to the critical endpoint in the QCD phase diagram predicted by various theoretical studies. Our results thus suggest the potential usefulness of the yield ratio of light nuclei in relativistic heavy-ion collisions as a direct probe of the large density fluctuations associated with the QCD critical phenomena.

  18. Fast helium production in interactions of 3.7 A GeV 24Mg with emulsion nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilany, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the properties of the relativistic helium fragments emitted from the projectile in the interactions of 24 Mg ions accelerated at an energy of 3.7 A GeV with emulsion nuclei. The total, partial nuclear cross-sections and production rates of helium fragmentation channels in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions and their dependence on the mass and energy of the incident projectile nucleus are investigated. The yields of multiple helium projectile fragments disrupted from the interactions of 24 Mg projectile nuclei with hydrogen H, light CNO and heavy AgBr groups of target emulsion nuclei are discussed and they indicate that the breakup mechanism of the projectile seems to be independent of the target mass. Limiting fragmentation behavior of fast-moving helium fragments is observed in both the projectile and target nuclei. The multiplicity distributions of helium projectile fragments emitted in the interactions of 24 Mg projectile nuclei with the different target nuclei of the emulsion are well described by the KNO scaling presentation. The mean multiplicities of the different charged secondary particles, normally defined shower, grey and black (left angle n s right angle, left angle n g right angle and left angle n b right angle) emitted in the interactions of 3.7 A GeV 24 Mg with the different groups of emulsion nuclei at different ranges of projectile fragments are decreasing when the number of He fragments stripped from projectile increases. These values of left angle n i right angle (i=s, g, band h particles) in the events where the emission of fast helium fragments were accompanied by heavy fragments having Z≥3 seem to be constant as the He multiplicity increases, and exhibit a behavior independent of the He multiplicity. (orig.)

  19. Excitation functions of residual nuclei production from 40–2600 MeV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We found that the predictive power of the tested codes is different but is satisfactory ... A number of current and planned nuclear projects, such as transmutation of nuclear .... gion are predicted satisfactorily, with a mean deviation factor below 2.

  20. Production of spin-polarized unstable nuclei by using polarized electron capture process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, S.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of emitted radiation from spin polarized nuclei are used to get information on electromagnetic moment of ground state unstable nuclei together with spin or parity state of excited states of their decayed (daughter) nuclei. These data are known to be useful for experimental investigation into the structure of unstable nuclei far from the stability line. The present study aims to establish a general method applicable to 11 Be and 16 N nuclei. To produce spin polarization, a new method in which the electron spin polarization of Rb is firstly produced by laser pumping, then the electron is transferred to the unstable nuclear beam (RNB) when they passes through the Rb vapor is proposed. Finally the polarized RNB will be implanted into superfluid helium to remain with a long spin-relaxation time. Future experimental set up for the above measurement adopted in the available radioactive nuclear beam facilities is briefly described. (Ohno, S.)

  1. Anthelmintic residues in goat and sheep dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedziniak Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A multiresidue method (LC-MS/MS for determination of wide range of anthelmintics was developed. The method covered benzimidazoles: albendazole (and metabolites, cambendazole, fenbendazol (and metabolites, flubendazole (and metabolites, mebendazole (and metabolites, oxibendazole, thiabendazole (and metabolites, triclabendazole (and metabolites; macrocyclic lactones: abamectin, doramectin, emamectin, eprinomectin, ivermectin, moxidectin; salicylanilides: closantel, ioxynil, nitroxynil, oxyclosamide, niclosamide, rafoxanid and others: clorsulon, derquantel, imidocarb, monepantel (and metabolites, morantel, praziquantel, and pyrantel. The method was used to examine the potential presence of anthelmintics in goat and sheep milk and dairy products from the Polish market. A total of 120 samples of milk, yoghurt, cottage cheese, cream cheese, and curd were analysed. None of the samples were found positive above CCα (1-10 μg/kg except for one cottage cheese in which traces of albendazole sulfone were detected (5.2 ug/kg and confirmed. The results of the study showed negligible anthelmintic residues in the goat and sheep milk and dairy products and confirm their good quality.

  2. Charmonium production in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei at CERN and comparison with Brookhaven data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topilskaya, N. S.

    2013-01-01

    A review of experimental data on charmoniumproduction that were obtained in fixed-target experiments at the SPS synchrotron and in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei in beams of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Switzerland) is presented. A comparison with data obtained at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) from experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is performed. Measurement of the suppression of J/ψ-meson production as a possible signal of the production of quark-gluon plasmawas proposed back in 1986 by T. Matsui and H. Satz. An anomalous suppression of J/ψ-meson production was discovered by the NA50 Collaboration at SPS (CERN) in central collisions of lead nuclei at the c.m. collision energy of 158 GeV per nucleon. Data obtained at the c.m. energy of 200 GeV per nucleon in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC indicate that, depending on multiplicity, the suppression of J/ψ-meson production at this energy approximately corresponds to the suppression of J/ψ-meson production in collisions of lead nuclei at the SPS accelerator. Theoretical models that take into account the regeneration of J/ψ mesons describe better RHIC experimental data. The measurement of charmonium production in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei in LHC beams revealed the importance of taking into account the regeneration process. At the LHC energies, it is also necessary to take into account the contribution of B-meson decays. Future measurements of charmonium production at the LHC to a higher statistical precision and over an extended energy region would be of importance for obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of charmonium production and for studying the properties of matter at high energy density and temperature

  3. Light nuclei production as a probe of the QCD phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai-Jia; Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Pu, Jie; Xu, Zhangbu

    2018-06-01

    It is generally believed that the quark-hadron transition at small values of baryon chemical potentials μB is a crossover but changes to a first-order phase transition with an associated critical endpoint (CEP) as μB increases. Such a μB-dependent quark-hadron transition is expected to result in a double-peak structure in the collision energy dependence of the baryon density fluctuation in heavy-ion collisions with one at lower energy due to the spinodal instability during the first-order phase transition and another at higher energy due to the critical fluctuations in the vicinity of the CEP. By analyzing the data on the p, d and 3H yields in central heavy-ion collisions within the coalescence model for light nuclei production, we find that the relative neutron density fluctuation Δρn = 〈(δρn) 2 〉 /〈ρn 〉 2 at kinetic freeze-out indeed displays a clear peak at √{sNN } = 8.8GeV and a possible strong re-enhancement at √{sNN } = 4.86GeV. Our findings thus provide a strong support for the existence of a first-order phase transition at large μB and its critical endpoint at a smaller μB in the temperature versus baryon chemical potential plane of the QCD phase diagram.

  4. Inclusive particle production at forward angles from collisions of light relativistic nuclei: Negative pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, E.; Anderson, L.; Brueckner, W.; Nagamiya, S.; Nissen-Meyer, S.; Schroeder, L.; Shapiro, G.; Steiner, H.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured single particle inclusive spectra of negative pions produced at angles from 0 0 to 12 0 (lab) in collisions of 1.05 and 2.1 GeV/nucleon protons, deuterons, alpha particles, and carbon nuclei with targets of C, Cu, Pb, and H (from a CH 2 -C subtraction). Most of the pions are produced in the kinematical domains allowed in free nucleon-nucleon collisions, but for alpha and carbon projectiles we have also observed pions whose energies range up to nearly twice the kinetic energy of a nucleon in the projectile. Our results suggest that processes involving more than two colliding nucleons and/or high internal momentum components are involved in the production of these high energy pions. Comparison is made with several hypotheses of scaling including specific dynamical models, and some disagreement is observed. We present fits to the kinetic energy dependence of the data, and the target and projectile mass dependence. We also show transverse momentum distributions

  5. Low-energy structure studies of odd-odd deformed nuclei and the coriolis and residual interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewberry, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    The nuclear level structure of /sup 176/Lu, /sup 170/Tm, /sup 166/Ho, and /sup 160/Tb have been studied by means of the /sup 177/Hf(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 176/Lu, /sup 171/Yb(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 170/Tm, /sup 167/Er(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 166/Ho, and /sup 161/Dy(t,..cap alpha..)/sup 160/Tb reactions and with the use of previously published (d,p) spectroscopy and gamma transitions from the (n,..gamma..) reactions. The (t,..cap alpha..) reactions have been performed and analyzed with 17 MeV tritons and the Los Alamos Q3D spectrometer. Eighty-one new rotational states in excited proton configurations or vibrational excited states are proposed. An independent parameterization of the Coriolis interaction is presented, which leads to satisfactory results in reproducing experimental single-particle transfer reaction cross-sections by theoretical calculations. The anomalous population of the excited neutron configurations (404 reduces to -624 up arrow) in /sup 176/Lu and (411 reduces to +- 512 up arrow) in /sup 170/Tm, and the anomalously low (t,..cap alpha..) cross-sections of the (411 up arrow +- 633 up arrow) configuration in /sup 166/Ho are observed. Qualitative explanation of the anomalies is presented in terms of the mixing of states which satisfy the requirement delta/sub I'/,/sub I/delta/sub K'/,/sub K/. Off-diagonal H/sub INT/ matrix elements are calculated, which show that the residual interaction cannot be used to account for the magnitude of the cross-sections observed.

  6. Application of industrial wood residues for combined heat and power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majchrzycka, A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses combined production of heat and power (CHP) from industrial wood residues. The system will be powered by wood residues generated during manufacturing process of wooden floor panels. Based on power and heat demands of the plant and wood residues potential, the CHP system was selected. Preliminary analysis of biomass conversion in CHP system and environmental impact was performed.

  7. Production of light nuclei and anti-nuclei in $pp$ and Pb-Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Kamal; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Masui, Hiroshi; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Seeder, Karin Soraya; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-02-29

    The production of (anti-)deuteron and (anti-)$^{3}$He nuclei in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV has been studied using the ALICE detector at the LHC. The spectra exhibit a significant hardening with increasing centrality. Combined blast-wave fits of several particles support the interpretation that this behavior is caused by an increase of radial flow. The integrated particle yields are discussed in the context of coalescence and thermal-statistical model expectations. The particle ratios, $^3$He/d and $^3$He/p, in Pb-Pb collisions are found to be in agreement with a common chemical freeze-out temperature of $T_{\\rm chem} \\approx 156$ MeV. These ratios do not vary with centrality which is in agreement with the thermal-statistical model. In a coalescence approach, it excludes models in which nucleus production is proportional to the particle multiplicity and favors those in which it is proportional to the particle density instead. In addition, the observation of 31 anti-tritons in Pb-Pb coll...

  8. Bioconversion of sago residue into value added products

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... In Sarawak, East Malaysia, agro-residues from sago starch processing industries are ... conversion to animal food or fuel ethanol (Species. Profiles for Pacific Island ..... serious contamination of the rivers. Based on study by.

  9. Residual Resistance Data from Cavity Production Projects at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Geng, Rongli; Mammosser, John; Saunders, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental limitation towards achieving high quality factors in superconducting radio-frequency cavities is the so-called residual resistance. Understanding and controlling the residual resistance has important implications towards improving the efficiency and reduce the operating cost of continuous wave superconducting linear accelerators. In this contribution we will report on the residual resistance values obtained from measurements of the quality factor of a large set of cavities, with resonant frequency between 805 MHz and 1.5 GHz, all of them processed and tested at Jefferson Lab. Surface treatments included both buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing. The results indicate an approximate value of the residual resistance of about 7-10 n Omega.

  10. Challenges around automotive shredder residue production and disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodier, Ala; Williams, Karl; Dallison, Neil

    2018-03-01

    The challenge for the automotive industry is how to ensure they adopt the circular economy when it comes to the disposal of end-of-life vehicles (ELV). According to the European Commission the UK achieved a total reuse and recovery rate of 88%. This is short of the revised ELV directive target of 95% materials recovery, which requires a minimum of 85% of materials to be recycled or reused. A significant component of the recycling process is the production of automotive shredder residue (ASR). This is currently landfilled across Europe. The additional 10% could be met by processing ASR through either waste-to-energy facilities or Post shredder technology (PST) to recover materials. The UK auto and recycling sectors claimed there would need to be a massive investment by their members in both new capacity and new technology for PST to recover additional recycle materials. It has been shown that 50% of the ASR contains valuable recoverable materials which could be used to meet the Directive target. It is expected in the next 5years that technological innovation in car design will change the composition from easily recoverable metal to difficult polymers. This change in composition will impact on the current drive to integrate the European Circular Economy Package. A positive factor is that main driver for using ASR is coming from the metals recycling industry itself. They are looking to develop the infrastructure for energy generation from ASR and subsequent material recovery. This is driven by the economics of the process rather than meeting the Directive targets. The study undertaken has identified potential pathways and barriers for commercial thermal treatment of ASR. The results of ASR characterisation were used to assess commercial plants from around the world. Whilst there were many claiming that processing of ASR was possible none have so far shown both the technological capability and economic justification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biodrying of animal slaughterhouse residues and heat production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Y. [Centre de recherche industrielle, Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Animal carcasses from slaughterhouses are usually composted on farms, but the composting process is not optimized and a large volumes of carbonaceous residues are needed. This type of composting takes place over a period of 6 to 9 months in a nonaerated static pile. Quebec's industrial research centre (CRIQ) developed an organic biodrying process (BIOSECO) adapted to large-scale operations in order to optimize the treatment of slaughterhouse residues. Biodrying is a form of composting, in which the thermophilic phase is optimized, making it possible to evaporate large amounts of water. Biodrying is done inside a building and reduces the amount of carbonaceous residues considerably. The process is optimized by the sequence in which the slaughterhouse residues are added, the choice of input and the aeration flow. Slaughterhouse residues can be treated non-stop throughout the entire year. Since the odours are nearly completed limited to the building, the biodrying can be done near the slaughterhouse. A large amount of heat was produced by the process during the pilot project. It was concluded that the BIOSECO biodrying process is suitable for treating slaughterhouse residues in an effective and economic manner, and has the added advantage of producing heat that could be used for various purposes.

  12. Pseudomagic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharff-Goldhaber, G.

    1979-01-01

    It was shown previously that, below a critical angular momentum, yrast bands of nonmagic nuclei are well described by the two-parameter variable moment of inertia model. Some striking exceptions to this rule are found in nuclei which have the same mass number as doubly magic nuclei but possess either one (or two) proton pairs beyond a magic number and one (or two) neutron hole pairs, or vice versa. Yrast bands in these pseudomagic nuclei resemble those in magic nuclei. 17 references

  13. Techno-economic evaluation of residue exhaustion in batch rectification ethanol production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaćimović Branislav M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techno-economic optimization of batch plant for production of rectified alcohol based on the concentration of ethanol in residue. The aim of the analysis was to determine the extent to which it is economically profitable to exhaust the residual liquid in boiler. The "profit production" criterion is used for calculations.

  14. On the role of the residual stress state in product manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, G.; Groen, M.; Post, J.; Ocelik, V.; de Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the effect of the residual stress state during product manufacturing of AISI 420 steel on the final shape of the product. The work includes Finite Element (FE) calculations of the distribution of the residual stresses after metal forming and a heat treatment. The evolution

  15. Partial sums of lagged cross-products of AR residuals and a test for white noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gooijer, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Partial sums of lagged cross-products of AR residuals are defined. By studying the sample paths of these statistics, changes in residual dependence can be detected that might be missed by statistics using only the total sum of cross-products. Also, a test statistic for white noise is proposed. It is

  16. Production of light (anti-)nuclei and (anti-)hypernuclei with ALICE at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The measurements in smaller collision systems may also provide an input to cosmological searches for segregated primordial anti-matter and dark matter, since anti-nuclei produced in pp and p--A collisions in interstellar space represent a background source in these measurements. Thanks to its excellent particle identification and tracking capabilities, the ALICE detector allows for the measurement of deuterons, tritons, 3He, 4He and their corresponding anti-nuclei. Moreover, the secondary vertices from the mesonic decays of (anti-)hypernuclei can ...

  17. A simple geometrical approach to particle production in collisions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias de Deus, J.

    1975-11-01

    It is argued that hadron collisions with nuclei are similar to hadron-hadron collisions, having similar properties for the impact parameter distributions and the leading particle spectra. The relevant existing high energy data, including the universality of multiplicity distributions and the possibility of geometrical scaling in reactions with nuclei, are easily understood in the framework of geometrical models by extending to p-nucleus collisions what was learnt about impact parameter and leading particles in p-p collisions. The question of forward-backward correlations and photo and electroproduction are briefly discussed. (author)

  18. Proton-gamma coincidence experiment on medium mass nuclei at 400MeV and study of reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldit, Alain.

    1981-01-01

    Previous γ ray production experiments produced by proton on nuclei show important cross sections for residual nuclei corresponding to a four nucleon (2p + 2n) removal. With our (p - γ) coincidence experiment the forward emitted proton reflects the primary interaction and the γ spectra characterizes the final state of the reaction. Protons are detected with a magnetic spectrometer and γ rays are selected with a Ge(Li) diode. Angular and momentum analysis of scattered protons demonstrate a primary quasi free process on nucleons. No indication of knock out reactions on clusters has been seen. The residual nuclei are mainly produced by evaporation processes. A theoretical calculation involving intranuclear cascades and evaporation processes has been performed. The nucleus model is based upon a Fermi gas and nuclear density agrees with diffusion electron experiments. Residual nuclei far from target are well described with a such model. Residual nuclei near the target are sensitive to the nuclear structure [fr

  19. Residual Nitrite in Some Egyptian Meat Products and the Reduction Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Dalia A. Zahran; Gehan M.A. Kassem

    2011-01-01

    Nitrite, a curing agent of meat products, is a precursor of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines during processing of meat products or under human stomach conditions, as well as having its own toxicity. To investigate the residual nitrite level in meat products marketed in Egyptian markets, 160 samples of cured cooked (luncheon and frankfurter) and cured raw (oriental sausages and pastirma) meat products (40 sample each) were analyzed for residual nitrite by a spectrophotometric method. Samples were s...

  20. Some implications of the Hartree product treatment of the quantum nuclei in the ab initio nuclear–electronic orbital methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharabaghi, Masumeh [Faculty of Chemical and Petroleum Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran, 19839, P.O. Box 19395-4716 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahbazian, Shant, E-mail: chemist_shant@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran, 19839, P.O. Box 19395-4716 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-09

    In this letter the conceptual and computational implications of the Hartree product type nuclear wavefunction introduced recently within the context of the ab initio non-Born–Oppenheimer Nuclear–electronic orbital (NEO) methodology are considered. It is demonstrated that this wavefunction may imply a pseudo-adiabatic separation of the nuclei and electrons and each nucleus is conceived as a quantum oscillator while a non-Coulombic effective Hamiltonian is deduced for electrons. Using the variational principle this Hamiltonian is employed to derive a modified set of single-component Hartree–Fock equations which are equivalent to the multi-component version derived previously within the context of the NEO and, easy to be implemented computationally. - Highlights: • The Hartree product wavefunction is used for the quantum nuclei of a molecule. • With this wavefunction quantum nuclei may be conceived as quantum oscillators. • Using variational integral, non-Coulomb effective electronic Hamiltonian was derived. • A set of modified Hartree–Fock equations were derived from this Hamiltonian. • The derived equations are equivalent to the multi-component Hartree–Fock equations.

  1. Production and identification of new, neutron-rich nuclei in the {sup 208}Pb region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rykaczewski, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Physics Div.]|[ISOLDE-CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)]|[Univ. of Warsaw (Poland); Kurpeta, J.; Plochocki, A. [Univ. of Warsaw (Poland)] [and others

    1998-11-01

    The recently developed methods allowing the experimental studies on new neutron-rich nuclei beyond doubly-magic {sup 208}Pb are briefly described. An identification of new neutron-rich isotopes {sup 215}Pb and {sup 217}Bi, and new decay properties of {sup 216}Bi studied by means of a pulsed release element selective technique at PS Booster-ISOLDE are reported.

  2. Production and identification of new, neutron-rich nuclei in the 208Pb region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykaczewski, K.; Kurpeta, J.; Plochocki, A.; Karny, M.; Szerypo, J.; Evensen, A.-H.; Kugler, E.; Lettry, J.; Ravn, H.; Duppen, P. van; Andreyev, A.; Huyse, M.; Woehr, A.; Jokinen, A.; Aeystoe, J.; Nieminen, A.; Huhta, M.; Ramdhane, M.; Walter, G.; Hoff, P.

    1998-01-01

    The recently developed methods allowing the experimental studies on new neutron-rich nuclei beyond doubly-magic 208 Pb are briefly described. An identification of new neutron-rich isotopes 215 Pb and 217 Bi, and new decay properties of 216 Bi studied by means of a pulsed release element selective technique at PS Booster-ISOLDE are reported

  3. Wood residue production and utilization research at Virgina Tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, L.A.; Stuart, W.B.; Sharp, J.C. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (US)); Yu Jian-guo (Northeastern Forestry Univ., Harbin (CN))

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the activities in crushing, drying and segregating wood residues currently underway at Virginia Tech. Experiments with high speed roll crushing as a means of reducing logging residues and small diameter stems to a form suitable for transportation and further processing appear promising. Deflecting whole tree chip streams across a double set of screens coupled with stripping transport air has been shown to reduce bark content and remove fines, bark and grit. Testing and refinement of two prototype sawdust driers is currently under way. Both driers offer increased opportunity for suspension burning and transport. (4 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.) (au).

  4. Feed or bioenergy production from agri-industrial residues?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Hamelin, Lorie; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    induced GHG emissions). All in all, the use of biomasses that are today used as animal feed (e.g. beet molasses) induced significant GHG emissions through iLUC. These were quantified at between 1-3.5 t CO2/t dry residue depending upon the nutritional value. The recommendation is to avoid the use...

  5. Hot nuclei production in Ar+Ag reactions at 50 and 70 MeV/u: limits of decay standard mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vient, E.

    1992-04-01

    The experiment discussed in this thesis is devoted to the study of hot nuclei produced in the Ar + Ag collisions at 50 and 70 MeV per nucleon. Special emphasis has been given to the standard decay of these nuclei, i.e. to the sequential evaporation process leading to a heavy residue. The experimental set up has been triggered by a residue detector and all the evaporated light charged particles have been detected in a large area set up covering nearly the whole space. It has been possible to sort all the detected particles and to isolate those evaporated from the initial hot nuclei, the initial characteristics of which have been reconstructed. Two important features have been stressed: - A shot nuclei can sustain an excitation energy of 6 MeV/a and a temperature of 8 MeV without disintegrating completely. - The distributions of excitation energy stored at 50 and 70 MeV/nucleon are similar. This result can refled either an entrance channel property or a hot nuclei behaviour. Further results obtained in this work give arguments supporting the first interpretation

  6. Pesticide residues in grapes, wine, and their processing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabras, P; Angioni, A

    2000-04-01

    In this review the results obtained in the 1990s from research on the behavior of pesticide residues on grapes, from treatment to harvest, and their fate in drying, wine-making, and alcoholic beverage processing are reported. The fungicide residues on grapes (cyproconazole, hexaconazole, kresoxim-methyl, myclobutanil, penconazole, tetraconazole, and triadimenol), the application rates of which were of a few tens of grams per hectare, were very low after treatment and were not detectable at harvest. Pyrimethanil residues were constant up to harvest, whereas fluazinam, cyprodinil, mepanipyrim, azoxystrobin, and fludioxonil showed different disappearance rates (t(1/2) = 4.3, 12, 12.8, 15.2, and 24 days, respectively). The decay rate of the organophosphorus insecticides was very fast with t(1/2) ranging between 0.97 and 3.84 days. The drying process determined a fruit concentration of 4 times. Despite this, the residue levels of benalaxyl, phosalone, metalaxyl, and procymidone on sun-dried grapes equalled those on the fresh grape, whereas they were higher for iprodione (1.6 times) and lower for vinclozolin and dimethoate (one-third and one-fifth, respectively). In the oven-drying process, benalaxyl, metalaxyl, and vinclozolin showed the same residue value in the fresh and dried fruit, whereas iprodione and procymidone resides were lower in raisins than in the fresh fruit. The wine-making process begins with the pressing of grapes. From this moment onward, because the pesticide on the grape surface comes into contact with the must, it is in a biphasic system, made up of a liquid phase (the must) and a solid phase (cake and lees), and will be apportioned between the two phases. The new fungicides have shown no effect on alcoholic or malolactic fermentation. In some cases the presence of pesticides has also stimulated the yeasts, especially Kloeckera apiculata, to produce more alcohol. After fermentation, pesticide residues in wine were always smaller than those on the

  7. The potential of residues of furfural and biogas as calcareous soil amendments for corn seed production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunchen; Yan, Zhibin; Qin, Jiahai; Ma, Zhijun; Zhang, Youfu; Zhang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Intensive corn seed production in Northwest of China produced large amounts of furfural residues, which represents higher treatment cost and environmental issue. The broad calcareous soils in the Northwest of China exhibit low organic matter content and high pH, which led to lower fertility and lower productivity. Recycling furfural residues as soil organic and nutrient amendment might be a promising agricultural practice to calcareous soils. A 3-year field study was conducted to evaluate the effects of furfural as a soil amendment on corn seed production on calcareous soil with compared to biogas residues. Soil physical-chemical properties, soil enzyme activities, and soil heavy metal concentrations were assessed in the last year after the last application. Corn yield was determined in each year. Furfural residue amendments significantly decreased soil pH and soil bulk density. Furfural residues combined with commercial fertilizers resulted in the greater cumulative on soil organic matter, total phosphorus, available phosphorus, available potassium, and cation exchange capacity than that of biogas residue. Simultaneously, urease, invertase, catalase, and alkaline phosphatase increased even at the higher furfural application rates. Maize seed yield increased even with lower furfural residue application rates. Furfural residues resulted in lower Zn concentration and higher Cd concentration than that of biogas residues. Amendment of furfural residues led to higher soil electrical conductivity (EC) than that of biogas residues. The addition of furfural residues to maize seed production may be considered to be a good strategy for recycling the waste, converting it into a potential resource as organic amendment in arid and semi-arid calcareous soils, and may help to reduce the use of mineral chemical fertilizers in these soils. However, the impact of its application on soil health needs to be established in long-term basis.

  8. FATE OF ENDOSULFAN AND DELTAMETHRIN RESIDUES DURING TOMATO PASTE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CIGDEM UYSAL-PALA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of tomato paste processing steps on pesticides with active ingredient endosulfan and deltamethrin were investigated in Biga/Canakkale. Residue data were obtained by analyzing samples taken during harvesting, taken after washing and chopping, taken after pulping (pulp and pomace and taken from the tomato paste with GC-ECD. In the process of making tomato paste, washing decreased endosulfan and deltamethrin, 30.62% and 47.58%, respectively. Pre-heating, pulping, evaporation and half-pasteurization increased deltamethrin 2.33% while decreasing endosulfan 66.5% after washing. The whole process decreased endosulfan and deltamethrin, 76.8% and 46.3%, respectively. The residues were mostly collected in pomace.

  9. Napropamide residues in runoff and infiltration water from pepper production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonious, George F; Patterson, Matthew A

    2005-01-01

    A field study was conducted on a Lowell silty loam soil of 2.7% organic matter at the Kentucky State University Research Farm, Franklin County, Kentucky. Eighteen universal soil loss equation (USLE) standard plots (22 x 3.7 m each) were established on a 10% slope. Three soil management practices were used: (i) class-A biosolids (sewage sludge), (ii) yard waste compost, each mixed with native soil at a rate of 50 ton acre(-1) on a dry-weight basis, and (iii) a no-mulch (NM) treatment (rototilled bare soil), used for comparison purposes. Devrinol 50-DF "napropamide" [N,N-diethyl-2-(1-naphthyloxy) propionamide] was applied as a preemergent herbicide, incorporated into the soil surface, and the plots were planted with 60-day-old sweet bell pepper seedlings. Napropamide residues one hour following spraying averaged 0.8, 0.4, and 0.3 microg g(-1) dry soil in sewage sludge, yard waste compost, and no-mulch treatments, respectively. Surface runoff water, runoff sediment, and napropamide residues in runoff were significantly reduced by the compost and biosolid treatments. Yard waste compost treatments increased water infiltration and napropamide residues in the vadose zone compared to sewage sludge and NM treatments. Total pepper yields from yard waste compost amended soils (9187 lbs acre(-1)) was significantly higher (P soil amended with class-A biosolids (6984 lbs acre(-1)) or the no-mulch soil (7162 lbs acre(-1)).

  10. Soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaim, S.

    1979-07-01

    A summary of the methodologies used to estimate the soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production is presented. Estimates of excess residue are developed for wheat in north-central Oklahoma and for corn and soybeans in central Iowa. These sample farming situations are analyzed in other research in the Analysis Division of the Solar Energy Research Institute.

  11. Production rates and costs of cable yarding wood residue from clearcut units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris B. LeDoux

    1984-01-01

    Wood residue is a little used source of fiber, chips, and fuel because harvest costs are largely unknown. This study calculates incremental production rates and costs for yarding and loading logging residue in clearcut old-growth Douglas-fir/western hemlock forests. Harvest operations were observed for two timber sales in western Oregon. Three different cable yarding...

  12. Productivity and cost analysis of a mobile pyrolysis system deployed to convert mill residues into biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodam Chung; Dongyeob Kim; Nathaniel Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Forest and mill residues are a promising source of biomass feedstock for the production of bioenergy, biofuels and bioproducts. However, high costs of transportation and handling of feedstock often make utilization of forest residues, such as logging slash, financially unviable. As a result, these materials are often considered waste and left on site to decompose or...

  13. 75 FR 50771 - Draft Revised Guidance for Industry on Residual Solvents in New Veterinary Medicinal Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ...] (formerly Docket No. 1999D-4071) Draft Revised Guidance for Industry on Residual Solvents in New Veterinary...) entitled ``Residual Solvents in New Veterinary Medicinal Products, Active Substances and Excipients... 2001 final guidance), has been developed for veterinary use by the International Cooperation on...

  14. Residual monomer reduction in polymer latex products by extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, M.; Meuldijk, J.; Kemmere, M.F.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of residual monomer from a latex product with supercritical carbon dioxide ((sc)CO2) in a column was studied. Operating conditions were chosen at 35¿°C and 100 bar. For reducing the residual styrene level in a polystyrene latex from 104 ppm to 100¿ppm and from 104 ppm to 10¿ppm, a

  15. The role of compound nuclei and deep-inelastic scattering in complex fragment production at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wozniak, G.J.; Colonna, N.; Charity, R.J.; Moretto, L.G.

    1989-02-01

    The dependence of complex fragment production on the asymmetry of the entrance channel has been investigated with the 18 A MeV 139 La + 12 C, 27 Al, 64 Ni reactions. Invariant cross section plots show a very simple pattern for the two lighter targets and a more complex one for the heavier 64 Ni target. The observed complex fragments are shown to result from quasi-elastic/deep-inelastic reactions and from compound nuclei formed in complete/incomplete fusion processes. 9 refs., 10 figs

  16. New substrate containing agroindustrial carnauba residue for production of papaya under foliar fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca G. Albano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of organic waste in the composition of substrates for seedlings constitutes an alternative to the recycling of these materials. Thus, an experiment was conducted with the objective to evaluate the production of ‘Formosa’ papaya seedlings in substrate containing carnauba wax residue, under foliar fertilization. The experimental design was completely randomized with five replicates, with treatments distributed in a 5 x 2 factorial scheme, corresponding to five materials used as substrates, in the presence and absence of foliar fertilization. The materials used were: earthworm humus, carnauba residue + fresh rice husk; carnauba residue in powder; carnauba residue semi-decomposed and mixture of carnauba residues: carnauba residue + fresh rice husk + carnauba residue semi-decomposed + carnauba residue in powder, at the proportion 1:1:1. The agroindustrial residue of carnauba wax semi-decomposed can be used as substrates in the production of ‘Formosa’ papaya seedlings. The foliar fertilization increases the quality of papaya seedlings, leading to increment in leaf area, root volume and sulfur content in the leaves, thus becoming a necessary practice.

  17. Hydroponic Crop Production using Recycled Nutrients from Inedible Crop Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Jay L.; Mackowiak, Cheryl L.; Sager, John C.

    1993-01-01

    The coupling of plant growth and waste recycling systems is an important step toward the development of bioregenerative life support systems. This research examined the effectiveness of two alternative methods for recycling nutrients from the inedible fraction (residue) of candidate crops in a bioregenerative system as follows: (1) extraction in water, or leaching, and (2) combustion at 550 C, with subsequent reconstitution of the ash in acid. The effectiveness of the different methods was evaluated by (1) comparing the percent recovery of nutrients, and (2) measuring short- and long-term plant growth in hydroponic solutions, based on recycled nutrients.

  18. Residual pyrethroids in fresh horticultural products in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana-Madrid, Maria L; Valenzuela-Quintanar, Ana I; Silveira-Gramont, Maria I; Rodríguez-Olibarría, Guillermo; Grajeda-Cota, Patricia; Zuno-Floriano, Fabiola G; Miller, Marion G

    2011-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the presence of cyhialothrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate, and deltamethrin in vegetables produced and consumed in Sonora, Mexico. A total of 345 samples were collected from cluster sampling of markets and fields. Approximately 9% of the samples tested positive for pyrethroids (residue range 0.004-0.573 mg kg(-1)). Based on the results, the potential toxicological risk of human exposure to the pyrethroid insecticides measured in vegetables appears to be minimal, with the estimated exposure being 1,000 times lower than admissible levels. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  19. Study of the multiparticle production in the coherent production for π- 340 GeV/c and K±70 GeV/c interaction with emulsion nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nadi, M.; Yasin El-Bakry, M.N.; Abd El-Halim, S.

    1992-10-01

    The coherent multiparticle production in π - (340 GeV/c) and in K ± (70 GeV/c) interactions with nuclei is studied using the nuclear emulsion technique. The mean free path and cross-sections of the three prong events are estimated and compared with other data. A Σ sin θ i analysis, pseudorapidity and azimuthal angular distributions are discussed. (author). 42 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Production of surfactin from rice mill polishing residue by submerged fermentation using Bacillus subtilis MTCC 2423.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Jigar; Sengupta, Bina

    2015-08-01

    Rice mill polishing residue (RMPR), an abundant and cheap agro residue, was used as substrate for microbial growth of Bacillus subtilis MTCC 2423 by submerged fermentation process to produce surfactin. Nutrients present in the residue were sufficient to sustain the growth of the microorganism. Multi stage foam fractionation followed by acid precipitation was used to concentrate and recover the product. Recoverable yield of surfactin was 4.17 g/kg residue. Product recovered in the foamate accounted for 69% of the total yield. The residual broth containing ∼ 30% surfactin exhibited biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand values of 23 and 69 mg/L respectively. The microbial growth data was correlated using three parameter sigmoid models. Surfactin synthesized had a predominance of molecular weight 1076 Da. Foam separation of copper using surfactin resulted in a maximum removal of 72.5%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In-situ single particle composition analysis of free tropospheric ice nuclei and ice residues in mixed-phase clouds during INUIT-JFJ 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Thomas, Klimach; Stephan, Mertes; Ludwig, Schenk; Udo, Kästner; Frank, Stratmann; Joachim, Curtius; Piotr, Kupiszewski; Ernest, Weingartner; Emanuel, Hammer; Paul, Vochezer; Martin, Schnaiter; Stephan, Borrmann

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the DFG (deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft)-funded research unit INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT) a field campaign at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (JFJ, Swiss Alps, Sphinx Laboratory, 3580 m asl; 7°59'2''E, 46°32'53''N) took place in January/February 2013 (INUIT-JFJ 2013). The goal of the measurements was to investigate the chemical composition of ice particle residues (IPR) in ambient air as well as the background aerosol particles. Previous investigations conducted at the JFJ showed that particles consisting of mineral components dominate the ice particle residue number (Kamphus et al., 2008) but also particles consisting of black carbon were found to be enriched in IPR (Mertes et al., 2007; Cozic et al., 2008). Cziczo et al. find out that lead as well is a good ice nucleus and was measured in IPR at previous measurements at the JFJ. During INUIT-JFJ 2013, the IPR were sampled out of mixed-phase clouds by an Ice-CVI (Ice Counterflow Virtual Impactor, Mertes et al., 2007) and an ISI (Ice Selective Inlet, Kupiszewski et al., 2013) and analyzed by the single particle mass spectrometer ALABAMA (Aircraft-based Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometer; Brands et al., 2011). Additionally, the ALABAMA was connected to a total aerosol-inlet to investigate the chemical composition of background aerosol particles. During 217 hours of background aerosol measurements we analyzed more than 27000 aerosol particles, which consisted mainly of pure organic components or organics mixed with ammonium, metals or mineral components. During six cloud events with approximately 63 h measurement time we detected 162 IPR sampled by the Ice-CVI. The main part of these IPR were also composed of organic material mixed with other chemical compounds. Additionally, we found particles which consisted of mineral components (approximately 23 %). Sampling mixed-phase cloud through the ISI we measured during four cloud events 34 ice residues in approximately 30 h

  2. 9 CFR 318.16 - Pesticide chemicals and other residues in products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION... ingredients. Residues of pesticide chemicals, food additives and color additives or other substances in or on ingredients (other than meat, meat byproducts, and meat food products) used in the formulation of products...

  3. Hot nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1993-01-01

    A review is made of the present status concerning the production of nuclei above 5 MeV temperature. Considerable progress has been made recently on the understanding of the formation and the fate of such hot nuclei. It appears that the nucleus seems more stable against temperature than predicted by static calculations. However, the occurrence of multifragment production at high excitation energies is now well established. The various experimental features of the fragmentation process are discussed. (author) 59 refs., 12 figs

  4. Exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The actual tendencies to study exotic nuclei; applications of exotic nuclei beams in material study and medicine; recent results obtained by GANIL and Berkeley Laboratories of measurements of binding energy and radii of light nuclei; the future experiences to be carry out in several international laboratories and; proposal of studies in Brazil using Pelletron-USP accelerator and the LINAC superconductor accelerator, in construction in the same laboratory, are presented. (M.C.K.)

  5. Anaerobic digestion of microalgae residues resulting from the biodiesel production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehimen, E.A.; Sun, Z.F.; Carrington, C.G.; Birch, E.J.; Eaton-Rye, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The recovery of methane from post transesterified microalgae residues has the potential to improve the renewability of the 'microalgae biomass to biodiesel' conversion process as well as reduce its cost and environmental impact. This paper deals with the anaerobic digestion of microalgae biomass residues (post transesterification) using semi-continuously fed reactors. The influence of substrate loading concentrations and hydraulic retention times on the specific methane yield of the anaerobically digested microalgae residues was investigated. The co-digestion of the microalgae residues with glycerol as well as the influence of temperature was also examined. It was found that the hydraulic retention period was the most significant variable affecting methane production from the residues, with periods (>5 days) corresponding to higher energy recovery. The methane yield was also improved by a reduction in the substrate loading rates, with an optimum substrate carbon to nitrogen ratio of 12.44 seen to be required for the digestion process.

  6. The role of research and development work on the production costs of logging residue chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nousiainen, I.

    1998-01-01

    Purchase of logging residue chips in the early 80s was mainly based on production chains in which the residues were collected with load-carrying tractors at the road-side storage, from which it was chipped or crushed directly into the trailer of a waiting lorry. Six new production chains were developed in the national Bioenergy Research Programme. Three of these are now commercial. Kotimaiset Energiat Pekka Lahti Ky has developed, on the basis of a traditional logging residue production chain, a high-efficiency EVOLUTION intermediate storage chipper, suitable for chipping of logging residues. Oy Logset Ab has developed a new type of lot-chipping chip-harvester, the LOGSET 536C. Nested containers have also been developed for the lot-chipping method. MOHA multi-purpose chipper, in which the chipping and lorry-transportation of chips have been integrated, has also been developed as a part of the research programme. In addition to these, a chipper-container lorry combination, transportation of complete logging residues, and whole- tree skidding have been developed in the project for production of logging residue chips. In the beginning of the 80s the production costs of logging residues at the place of utilization were about 52 FIM/MWh, and the average transportation distance 50 km. In 1992 the production costs, 64 FIM/MWh at the distance of 100 km, was significantly higher than the price of alternative fuels. The lowest production cost level, obtainable by the developed methods is 46 FIM/MWh

  7. The effect of delignification process with alkaline peroxide on lactic acid production from furfural residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Furfural residues produced from the furfural industry were investigated as a substrate for lactic acid production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF. Alkaline peroxide was used for delignification of furfural residues to improve the final lactic acid concentration. The residue was treated with 1.3% to 1.7% hydrogen peroxide at 80 °C for 1 h with a substrate concentration of 3.33%. SSF of furfural residues with different delignification degrees were carried out to evaluate the effect of delignification degree on lactic acid production. Using corn hydrolysates/ furfural residues as substrates, SSF with different media were carried out to investigate the effect of lignin on the interaction between enzymes and lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria had a negative effect on cellulase, thus resulting in the reduction of enzyme activity. Lignin and nutrients slowed down the decreasing trend of enzyme activity. A higher delignification resulted in a slower fermentation rate and lower yield due to degradation products of lignin and the effect of lignin on the interaction between enzymes and lactic acid bacteria. For the purpose of lactic acid production, a moderate delignification (furfural residues with the lignin content of 14.8% was optimum.

  8. Biogas production and digestate utilisation from agricultural residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corre, W.J.; Conijn, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    The HYSOL project aims at hybridisation of concentrated solar power with a gas turbine in order to guarantee a stable and reliable electricity supply, based on renewable energy. The production of fully renewable electricity in a Hybrid Concentrated Solar Power (HCSP) plant includes the use of

  9. Characterization of residual biomass from the Arequipa region for the production of biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Stronguiló Leturia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to select residual biomass from the Arequipa Region for the production of biofuels (biodiesel, bioethanol and biogas. In each case, the initial point is a matrix based on products with residual biomass available in the region, from the agricultural and livestock sectors, information that was obtained from the regional Management of Agriculture web site. Specific factors of the resudue that will be used as raw material for each biofuel production would be considered for the selection process. For the production of biodiesel it is necessary to start from the oil extracted from oilseeds. Regarding obtaining bioethanol, it requires that the residual biomass has high percent of cellulose. With regard to the generation of biogas, we will use animal droppings. Finally, the raw materials selected are: squash and avocado seeds for biodiesel, rice chaff and deseeded corncob for bioethanol and cow and sheep droppings for biogas

  10. Radiotracer studies of pesticide residues in edible oil seeds and related products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Ten papers were presented in which chemical pollution due to insecticides was examined in edible oil seeds and their products. They include hexachlorocyclohexane residues in groundnut; carbaryl in groundnut; maize and cotton seed products, and in lactating goats; propoxur in cocoa beans; and leptophos residues in cotton seed and its products and in lactating goats. Eight of these papers constitute separate INIS entries. Egypt, Ghana, India, Korea, Lebanon, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, and the Sudan participated under the coordinated research programme. The progress of the programme is reviewed, and problems and priorities for future development of the programme are identified. A number of recommendations are addressed to the Joint FAO/IAEA Secretariat

  11. Review on Sources and Handling Method of Pesticide Residues in Animal Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indraningsih

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Field studies and literature search showed that some pesticide residues either organochlorines (OC or organophosphates (OP were detected in animal products (meat and milk . Pesticide residues in meat collected from West Java were detected at the level of 0 .8 ppb lindane and 62 ppb diazinon . While in meat from Lampung was detected at the level of 7 ppb lindane . 2 .7 heptachlor, 0 .8 endosulfan and 0 .5 ppb aldrin . Furthermore, pesticide residues were also detected in the milk collected from West, Central and East Java . The levels of lindane were 2,3 ; 15,9 ; 0,2 ppb ; heptachlor 8 ; 0 .4 and 0,05 ppb; diazinon 8 ; 0 and 1,8 ppb; CPM 0,4 ; 0,8 and 0 ppb ; endosulfan 0,1 ; 0,04 and 0,05 ppb for West, Central and East Java, respectively . The source of pesticide contamination in animal products is generally originated from feed materials, fodders . contaminated soils and water around the farm areas . Minimalization approach of pesticide residues in animal products could be conducted integratedly, such as through chemical process, biodegradation using microorganisms . Organic farming system is recognised as an alternative that may be applied to minimise contamination on agricultural land, eventually reducing pesticide residues in the agricultural products . Feeding with organic agricultural by-products with low pesticide residues appears to reduce pesticide residues in animal products . In order to eliminate pesticide contamination in soil, it has to be conducted progressively by implementing sustainable organic farming .

  12. Effects of processing treatment on pesticide residues in fruits and their products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xuefei; Jiao Bining; Fu Chenmei; Qian Yongzhong; Wang Jing

    2008-01-01

    The influence of processing treatments on pesticide residues in fruits and their products was reviewed. The effects on pesticide residues and relative control treatments for each processing step, including peeling, washing, sterilization, juicing, clarification, filtration, drying and fermentation, were discussed, respectively. Meanwhile we analyzed the future development prospectin of this field, in order to provide some suggestions for commercial fruit industry and consumers' health. (authors)

  13. Benchmark calculations on residue production within the EURISOL DS project; Part I: thin targets

    CERN Document Server

    David, J.C; Boudard, A; Doré, D; Leray, S; Rapp, B; Ridikas, D; Thiollière, N

    Report on benchmark calculations on residue production in thin targets. Calculations were performed using MCNPX 2.5.0 coupled to a selection of reaction models. The results were compared to nuclide production cross-sections measured in GSI in inverse kinematics

  14. Economic values of production and functional traits, including residual feed intake, in Finnish milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, P; Wolfová, M; Wolf, J; Kantanen, J; Juga, J

    2014-02-01

    Improving the feed efficiency of dairy cattle has a substantial effect on the economic efficiency and on the reduction of harmful environmental effects of dairy production through lower feeding costs and emissions from dairy farming. To assess the economic importance of feed efficiency in the breeding goal for dairy cattle, the economic values for the current breeding goal traits and the additional feed efficiency traits for Finnish Ayrshire cattle under production circumstances in 2011 were determined. The derivation of economic values was based on a bioeconomic model in which the profit of the production system was calculated, using the generated steady state herd structure. Considering beef production from dairy farms, 2 marketing strategies for surplus calves were investigated: (A) surplus calves were sold at a young age and (B) surplus calves were fattened on dairy farms. Both marketing strategies were unprofitable when subsidies were not included in the revenues. When subsidies were taken into account, a positive profitability was observed in both marketing strategies. The marginal economic values for residual feed intake (RFI) of breeding heifers and cows were -25.5 and -55.8 €/kg of dry matter per day per cow and year, respectively. The marginal economic value for RFI of animals in fattening was -29.5 €/kg of dry matter per day per cow and year. To compare the economic importance among traits, the standardized economic weight of each trait was calculated as the product of the marginal economic value and the genetic standard deviation; the standardized economic weight expressed as a percentage of the sum of all standardized economic weights was called relative economic weight. When not accounting for subsidies, the highest relative economic weight was found for 305-d milk yield (34% in strategy A and 29% in strategy B), which was followed by protein percentage (13% in strategy A and 11% in strategy B). The third most important traits were calving

  15. Co-benefits of utilizing logging residues for bioenergy production: The case for East Texas, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Jianbang; Smith, C.T.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the co-benefits associated with the utilization of logging residues for electricity production in East Texas, USA. The benefits evaluated included the value of CO 2 emissions displaced due to substituting logging residues for coal in power generation, reductions in site preparation costs during forest regeneration, and creation of jobs and income in local communities. Based on the 2004 Forest Inventory Analysis data and a 70% biomass recovery rate, annual recoverable logging residues in East Texas were estimated at 1.3 Mt (dry). These residues, if used for electricity production, would displace about 2.44 Mt of CO 2 , valued at some 9M$ at the current CO 2 price traded at the Chicago Climate Exchange (accounting for about 2% of the stumpage value). Removing logging residues would also save $200-250 ha -1 in site preparation costs. In addition, input-output modeling revealed that logging residue procurement and electricity generation together would have a stronger ripple effect on employment than on output or value-added, with about 1340 new jobs created and 215M$ in value-added generated annually. These results offer new insights into the cost-competitiveness of forest biomass and bioenergy production. (author)

  16. TIMS-1: a processing code for production of group constants of heavy resonant nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hideki; Ishiguro, Yukio; Matsui, Yasushi.

    1980-09-01

    The TIMS-1 code calculates the infinitely dilute group cross sections and the temperature dependent self-shielding factors for arbitrary values of σ 0 and R, where σ 0 is the effective background cross section of potential scattering and R the ratio of the atomic number densities for two resonant nuclei if any. This code is specifically programmed to use the evaluated nuclear data file of ENDF/B or JENDL as input data. In the unresolved resonance region, the resonance parameters and the level spacings are generated by using Monte Carlo method from the Porter-Thomas and Wigner distributions respectively. The Doppler broadened cross sections are calculated on the ultra-fine lethargy meshes of about 10 -3 -- 10 -5 using the generated and resolved resonance parameters. The effective group constants are calculated by solving the neutron slowing down equation with the use of the recurrence formula for the neutron slowing down source. The output of the calculated results is given in a format being consistent with the JAERI-Fast set (JFS) or the Standard Reactor Analysis Code (SRAC) library. Both FACOM 230/75 and M200 versions of TIMS-1 are available. (author)

  17. Impact parameter analysis of coherent and incoherent pion production on nuclei by 11.7GeV/c π+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.; Barshay, S.; Riester, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    Using the complete momentum measurements for 2, 3, 4 and 5 pion final states. The impact parameter structure, with the following principal results has been studied. Evidence is presented for an empirical method that can help in the separation of coherent events on nuclei. Incoherent nuclear production exhibits lower-bound impact parameters which decrease systematically with an increasing number of produced pions. The experimental b-distributions can be very well fitted by a single simple scaled functional form, dsigmasub(N)(b)/d 2 bvector proportional to F(N/f(b)), this N-distribution yields a ratio (dispersion/average dispersion) of about 0.35 at any impact parameter [fr

  18. A-dependence of the γ- and p-induced production of the Λ(1520) from nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaskulov, M.; Oset, E.; Roca, L.

    2006-01-01

    Using results of a recent calculation of the Λ(1520) in the nuclear medium, which show that the medium width is about five times the free width, we study the A-dependence of the Λ(1520) production cross-section in the reactions γA→K + Λ(1520)A' and pA→pK + Λ(1520)A'. We find a sizable A-dependence in the ratio of the nuclear cross-sections for heavy nuclei with respect to a light one due to the large value of the Λ(1520) width in the medium, showing that devoted experiments, easily within reach in present facilities, can provide good information on that magnitude by measuring the cross-sections studied here. (orig.)

  19. Influence of turkey meat on residual nitrite in cured meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, B; Cassens, R G; Borchert, L L

    2001-02-01

    A response surface experimental design was employed to estimate residual nitrite level at various initial nitrite concentrations, percent turkey meat in the formula, and heat quantity (F) values using a typical wiener as the test system. Pork and mechanically separated turkey were used as the meat ingredients. Residual nitrite and pH were measured at day 1, 7 days, 14 days, and 49 days after processing. Protein, fat, salt, moisture, and CIE (L*a*b*) color values were also determined. Results showed that the effect of turkey meat on residual nitrite level was significant (P meat in the formula resulted in lower residual nitrite levels at a fixed pH. The residual nitrite level was initially proportional to initial nitrite concentration, but it became a nonsignificant factor during longer storage time. Differences in heat quantity had a significant effect (P nitrite level initially. Greater heat quantity decreased residual nitrite level in finished cured meat products at a fixed pH. However, this effect became nonsignificant during longer storage. Reduction of residual nitrite in wieners because of turkey meat addition at a fixed pH was due to characteristics of the turkey tissue, but the mechanism of action remains unknown. It was also established that commercial wieners had a higher pH if poultry meat was included in the formulation.

  20. Development of immunoassays for detecting clothianidin residue in agricultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Sheng, Enze; Cong, Lujing; Wang, Minghua

    2013-04-17

    Two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on polyclonal antibodies (PcAbs) for clothianidin are described: colorimetric detection format (ELISA) and pattern of chemiluminescent assay (CLEIA). Clothianidin hapten was synthesized and conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) to produce immunogen and coating antigen. Anticlothianidin PcAbs were obtained from immunized New Zealand white rabbits. Under optimal conditions, the half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) and the limit of detection (LOD, IC₂₀) of clothianidin were 0.046 and 0.0028 mg/L for the ELISA and 0.015 and 0.0014 mg/L for the CLEIA, respectively. There were no obvious cross-reactivities of the antibodies with its analogues except for dinotefuran. Recoveries of 76.4-116.4% for the immunoassays were achieved from spiked samples. The results of immunoassays for the spiked and authentic samples were largely consistent with gas chromatography. Therefore, the proposed immunoassays would be convenient and satisfactory analytical methods for the monitoring of clothianidin in agricultural products.

  1. Nuclear geometry effect and transport coefficient in semi-inclusive lepton-production of hadrons off nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hadron production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of leptons from nuclei is an ideal tool to determine and constrain the transport coefficient in cold nuclear matter. The leading-order computations for hadron multiplicity ratios are performed by means of the SW quenching weights and the analytic parameterizations of quenching weights based on BDMPS formalism. The theoretical results are compared to the HERMES positively charged pions production data with the quarks hadronization occurring outside the nucleus. With considering the nuclear geometry effect on hadron production, our predictions are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The extracted transport parameter from the global fit is shown to be qˆ=0.74±0.03 GeV2/fm for the SW quenching weight without the finite energy corrections. As for the analytic parameterization of BDMPS quenching weight without the quark energy E dependence, the computed transport coefficient is qˆ=0.20±0.02 GeV2/fm. It is found that the nuclear geometry effect has a significant impact on the transport coefficient in cold nuclear matter. It is necessary to consider the detailed nuclear geometry in studying the semi-inclusive hadron production in deep inelastic scattering on nuclear targets.

  2. Studies of the magnitude and nature of pesticide residues in stored products, using radiotracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Growing world population and food demand have dictated the introduction of intensive agricultural practices, including the use of an increasing range of agrochemicals. The utilization of these chemicals has a positive and often dramatic impact on agricultural production, but every effort has to be made to ensure safety in use. This is a dynamic challenge for many countries and necessitates the implementation of adequate monitoring programmes. Even when pesticide use conforms to currently adopted standards of good management practice, undesirable side effects may occur and could, at times, endanger public health. Nuclear techniques provide a valuable tool for studying pesticide residues in stored food commodities. Radioisotopes can be used to determine total quantities of residue present, the nature of the residue (i.e. both undecomposed parent material and reaction products), rates of breakdown and loss and distribution in the food material. All of this information is essential for health and regulatory authorities to establish and maintain comprehensive tolerance standards that will protect the health of the consumer. The use of 14 C labelled compounds constitutes a superior and unrivalled tool, in particular for the detection and quantification of grain bound residues. All pesticide residues remaining on or in food materials are of potential concern to human health. Surface residues that remain on commodities such as grain may present an occupational risk to workers exposed to dust emanating from the commodity; residues that remain in food may be a hazard to the consumer. The nature of the residue, the quantity present and its toxicological significance should be known so that tolerance levels can be established and complied with. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Fermentative utilization of glycerol residue for the production of acetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvan; Trisakti, B.; Hasibuan, R.; Joli, M.

    2018-02-01

    Glycerol residue, frequently known as pitch, is a waste produced from the downstream product of crude glycerine distillation. With the increasing need of pure glycerine in the world, the glycerol residue produced is also increasing. Glycerol residue is a solid waste at room temperature, highly alkaline (pH > 13), corrosive, and categorized as hazardous and poisonous waste. In this research, acetic acid was produced from glycerol residue through the anaerobic fermentation process by using purple non-sulphur photosynthetic bacteria. The purpose of this study was to find out the influence of concentration change of glycerol residue on time and to find out the possibility of glycerol residue to be utilized as acetic acid. In this research, at first 400 g of glycerol residue was diluted with 200 ml of distilled water to change the glycerine phase, from solid to liquid at room temperature, acidified by using hydrochloric acid until pH 2. The top layer formed was fatty acid and triglycerides that should be removed. Meanwhile, the bottom layer was diluted glycerol residue which was then neutralized with caustic soda. To produce acetic acid, glycerol residue with various concentrations, salt, and purple non-sulphur photosynthetic bacteria were put together into a 100 ml bottle which had been previously sterilized, then incubated for four weeks under the light of 40-watt bulb. The result showed that on the 28th day of fermentation, the produced acetic acid were 0.28, 1.85, and 0.2% (w/w) by using glycerine with the concentration of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% (w/w), respectively.

  4. Pesticide residue assessment in three selected agricultural production systems in the Choluteca River Basin of Honduras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammerbauer, J.; Moncada, J.

    1999-01-01

    There is a basic lack of information about the presence of pesticide residues in the environment in Central America. Over the period of February 1995 to June 1997, river, well, lagoon and spring water samples, as well as soil, fish tissue, lagoon bed sediments and some foodstuffs were taken from the greater Cholutecan River Basin of Honduras and analyzed for pesticide residues. These were collected at three separate sites (La Lima, Zamorano and Choluteca), each characterized by differing agricultural production systems. The main pesticide residues found in soil samples were dieldrin and p,p'-DDT, while river water samples were found to have detectable levels of heptachlor, endosulfan and chlorpyrifos, with lagoon and well water also being shown to contain heptachlor. These pesticides detected were in more than 20% of the samples assessed. In river water samples more pesticide residues at higher concentrations were found to be associated with areas of more intensive agricultural production. The fewest pesticides with lowest concentrations were found in the small subwatershed associated with traditional agricultural production. Although the pesticides found in the soils at the three sites were generally similar they tended to be higher in the southern part of the Cholutecan watershed, followed by the central zone, with the lowest concentrations being found in the more traditional production zone. In lagoon and well water samples more pesticides, but mostly in lower concentrations were detected at the traditional production site than at the others. Ten pesticide compounds were detected in fish tissue, mainly organochlorines, some of which were also found in lagoon sediments. In terms of food products, almost no pesticides were detected in vegetables, but the kidney adipose tissue taken from slaughtered cows was shown to have a tendency to contain some organochlorines. Spring water in the traditional agricultural production zone contained three organochlorine compounds

  5. Residual Isocyanates in Medical Devices and Products: A Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a pilot qualitative and quantitative assessment of residual isocyanates and their potential initial exposures in neonates, as little is known about their contact effect. After a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU stockroom inventory, polyurethane (PU and PU foam (PUF devices and products were qualitatively evaluated for residual isocyanates using Surface SWYPE ™ . Those containing isocyanates were quantitatively tested for methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI species, using UPLC-UV-MS/MS method. Ten of 37 products and devices tested, indicated both free and bound residual surface isocyanates; PU/PUF pieces contained aromatic isocyanates; one product contained aliphatic isocyanates. Overall, quantified mean MDI concentrations were low (4,4‘-MDI = 0.52 to 140.1 pg/mg and (2,4‘-MDI = 0.01 to 4.48 pg/mg. The 4,4‘-MDI species had the highest measured concentration (280 pg/mg. Commonly used medical devices/products contain low, but measurable concentrations of residual isocyanates. Quantifying other isocyanate species and neonatal skin exposure to isocyanates from these devices and products requires further investigation.

  6. Production and decay of the heaviest odd-Z nuclei in the 249Bk + 48Ca reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganessian, Yu Ts; Abdullin, F Sh; Dmitriev, S N; Itkis, M G; Polyakov, A N; Alexander, C; Binder, J; Boll, R A; Ezold, J; Felker, K; Grzywacz, R K; Miernik, K; Roberto, J B; Gostic, J M; Henderson, R A; Moody, K J; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V; Miller, D; Ryabinin, M A

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of 249 Bk with 48 Ca has been investigated with an aim of synthesizing and studying the decay properties of isotopes of the new element 117. The experiments were performed at five projectile energies (in two runs, in 2009-2010 and 2012) and with a total beam dose of 48 Ca ions of about 9x10 19 The experiments yielded data on a-decay characteristics and excitation functions of the produced nuclei that establish these to be 293 117 and 294 117 – the products of the 4n- and 3n-evaporation channels, respectively. In total, we have observed 20 decay chains of Z=117 nuclides. The cross sections were measured to be 1.1 pb for the 3n and 2.4 pb for the 4n-reaction channel. The new 289 115 events, populated by α decay of 117, demonstrate the same decay properties as those observed for 115 produced in the 243 Am( 48 Ca,2n) reaction thus providing cross-bombardment evidence. In addition, a single decay of 294 118 was observed from the reaction with 249 Cf – a result of the in-growth of 249 Cf in the 249 Bk target. The observed decay chain of 294 118 is in good agreement with decay properties obtained in 2002-2005 in the experiments with the reaction 249 Cf( 48 Ca,3n) 294 118. The energies and half-lives of the odd-Z isotopes observed in the 117 decay chains together with the results obtained for lower-Z superheavy nuclei demonstrate enhancement of nuclear stability with increasing neutron number towards the predicted new magic number N=184

  7. MC generator HARDPING 2.0: hadron production in lepton-nuclei interactions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdnikov, Ya.A.; Ivanov, A.E.; Kim, V.T.; Murzin, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    Hadron production in lepton-nucleus interactions at high-energies is considered in framework of developing Monte Carlo (MC) generator HARDPING (HARD Probe INteraction Generator). Such effects as formation length, energy loss and multiple rescattering for produced hadrons are implemented into the HARPING. Available data from HERMES on hadron production in lepton-nucleus collisions are described by the current version of the HARDPING generator in a reasonable agreement.

  8. Production of mirror nuclei 7Li and 7Be in 16Op interactions at a momentum of 3.25 GeV/c per nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olimov, K.; Glagolev, V. V.; Lutpullaev, S. L.; Kurbanov, A.; Olimov, A. K.; Petrov, V. I.; Yuldashev, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Results of a comparative analysis of processes leading to the production of mirror nuclei 7 Li and 7 Be in 16 Op collisions at a momentum of 3.25 GeV/c per nucleon are presented. A comparison of associated multiplicities of accompanying particles is performed. The first results on the mean multiplicity of neutrons appearing as fragments are described.

  9. A productivity and cost comparison of two systems for producing biomass fuel from roadside forest treatment residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathaniel Anderson; Woodam Chung; Dan Loeffler; John Greg Jones

    2012-01-01

    Forest operations generate large quantities of forest biomass residues that can be used for production of bioenergy and bioproducts. However, a significant portion of recoverable residues are inaccessible to large chip vans, making use financially infeasible. New production systems must be developed to increase productivity and reduce costs to facilitate use of these...

  10. Benchmark calculations on residue production within the EURISOL DS project; Part II: thick targets

    CERN Document Server

    David, J.-C; Boudard, A; Doré, D; Leray, S; Rapp, B; Ridikas, D; Thiollière, N

    Benchmark calculations on residue production using MCNPX 2.5.0. Calculations were compared to mass-distribution data for 5 different elements measured at ISOLDE, and to specific activities of 28 radionuclides in different places along the thick target measured in Dubna.

  11. Coherence Phenomena in Charmonium Production off Nuclei at the Energies of RHIC and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeliovich, V B; Hüfner, J

    2001-01-01

    In the energy range of RHIC and LHC the mechanisms of nuclear suppression of charmonia are expected to be strikingly different from what is known for the energy of the SPS. One cannot think any more of charmonium produced on a bound nucleon which then attenuates as it passes through the rest of the nucleus. The coherence length of charmonium production substantially exceeds the nuclear radius in the new energy range. Therefore the production amplitudes on different nucleons, rather than the cross sections, add up and interfere, i.e. shadowing is at work. So far no theoretical tool has been available to calculate nuclear effects for charmonium production in this energy regime. We develop a light-cone Green function formalism which incorporates the effects of the coherence of the production amplitudes and of charmonium wave function formation, and is the central result of this paper. We found a substantial deviation from QCD factorization, namely, gluon shadowing is much stronger for charmonium production than ...

  12. Residue management practices and planter attachments for corn production in a conservation agriculture system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nejadi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Seed placement and failure to establish a uniform plant stand are critical problems associated with production of corn (Zea mays following wheat (Triticum aestivum in a conservation agriculture system in Iran. Our objectives were to evaluate the performance of a corn row- crop planter equipped with two planter attachments (smooth/toothed coulters at six wheat residue management systems (three tillage systems and two levels of surface residue at two forward speeds of 5 and 7 km h-1. Residue retained after planting, seeding depth, emergence rate index (ERI and seed spacing indices were determined. The baled residue plots tilled by chisel plow followed by disc harrow (BRCD resulted in minimum residue after planting as compared to other residue treatments. Furthermore, the maximum values of the ERI and uniformity of plant spacing pertained to this treatment. Other results showed that the ERI increased up to 18% for the toothed coulter as compared to the smooth coulter. The toothed coulter also established a deeper seed placement as compared to the smooth coulter. Planting at forward speed of 5 km h-1 resulted in deeper seeding depth as compared to a forward speed of 7 km h-1. However, lower values of miss and precision indices were obtained at forward speed of 7 km h-1, indicating a more uniformity of plant spacing. Results of this study showed that equipping the conventional planter with toothed coulter and planting in soil prepared under the BRCD residue management system can result in a satisfactory conservation crop production system.

  13. Study of the energetic proton production in relativistic heavy ions Ne + nuclei collisions, using Diogene detector. Hadronic matter temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, A.

    1988-12-01

    The study of the proton's production differential cross sections, in the collision of relativistic heavy ions, allows to obtain the nuclear-matter temperature and gives information about the nucleons large burst pulses in the nucleus. The chosen thermodynamic model is a generalized approach of the R. Hagedorn model, applied to heavy ions collisions: the nuclear matter is divided in volume elements δV assumed to be in thermal and chemical equilibrium and emitting particles and fragments isotropically, inside their own system. The applied nuclear-matter velocity distribution depended only on the impact parameter and on the relationship between the chemical potential and the temperature. The predictions of this thermodynamic model were compared to the Saturne experimental results, using Diogene detector. The obtained temperature values are similar to those given by D. Hahn and H. Stoker. The proton production cross sections were measured for backward emitting angles. A relationship between the cross sections and the burst pulse distribution in the nuclei was settled [fr

  14. Production of secondary particles and nuclei in cosmic rays collisions with the interstellar gas using the FLUKA code

    CERN Document Server

    Mazziotta, M N; Ferrari, A; Gaggero, D; Loparco, F; Sala, P R

    2016-01-01

    The measured fluxes of secondary particles produced by the interactions of Cosmic Rays (CRs) with the astronomical environment play a crucial role in understanding the physics of CR transport. In this work we present a comprehensive calculation of the secondary hadron, lepton, gamma-ray and neutrino yields produced by the inelastic interactions between several species of stable or long-lived cosmic rays projectiles (p, D, T, 3He, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, 9Be, 10Be, 10B, 11B, 12C, 13C, 14C, 14N, 15N, 16O, 17O, 18O, 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si) and different target gas nuclei (p, 4He, 12C, 14N, 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, 28Si and 40Ar). The yields are calculated using FLUKA, a simulation package designed to compute the energy distributions of secondary products with large accuracy in a wide energy range. The present results provide, for the first time, a complete and self-consistent set of all the relevant inclusive cross sections regarding the whole spectrum of secondary products in nuclear collisions. We cover, for the projectiles, a ki...

  15. Cloud condensation nuclei production associated with atmospheric nucleation: a synthesis based on existing literature and new results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper synthesizes the available scientific information connecting atmospheric nucleation with subsequent cloud condensation nuclei (CCN formation. We review both observations and model studies related to this topic, and discuss the potential climatic implications. We conclude that CCN production associated with atmospheric nucleation is both frequent and widespread phenomenon in many types of continental boundary layers, and probably also over a large fraction of the free troposphere. The contribution of nucleation to the global CCN budget spans a relatively large uncertainty range, which, together with our poor understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions, results in major uncertainties in the radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosols. In order to better quantify the role of atmospheric nucleation in CCN formation and Earth System behavior, more information is needed on (i the factors controlling atmospheric CCN production and (ii the properties of both primary and secondary CCN and their interconnections. In future investigations, more emphasis should be put on combining field measurements with regional and large-scale model studies.

  16. A Unified approach for nucleon knock-out, coherent and incoherent pion production in neutrino interactions with nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, M.; Chanfray, G.; Marteau, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a theory of neutrino interactions with nuclei aimed at the description of the partial cross-sections, namely quasi-elastic and multi-nucleon emission, coherent and incoherent single pion production. For this purpose, we use the theory of nuclear responses treated in the random phase approximation, which allows a unified description of these channels. It is particularly suited for the coherent pion production where collective effects are important whereas they are moderate in the other channels. We also study the evolution of the neutrino cross-sections with the mass number from carbon to calcium. We compare our approach to the available neutrino experimental data on carbon. We put a particular emphasis on the multi-nucleon channel, which at present is not easily distinguishable from the quasi-elastic events. This component turns out to be quite relevant for the interpretation of experiments (K2K, MiniBooNE, SciBooNE). It can account in particular for the unexpected behavior of the quasi-elastic cro...

  17. Study of the d+d→4He+X0; production of light nuclei at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Brun, Christian.

    1977-01-01

    The inclusive study of the d+d→ 4 He+X 0 reaction has been done by several deuteron momenta between 1.8 and 3.8 GeV/c. The alpha momentum spectra were measured with a double focusing magnetic spectrometer. The alphas were identified by both a time-of-flight and a pulse height-discrimination. The application to the reaction of the conservation laws implies X 0 to be a mesonic object with isospin 0. The π 0 production limit for Psub(d)=1.885GeV/c is calculated. This value, five times smaller than the previous one, shows that the isospin conservation law is not violated. The ω 0 , the only I=0 resonance observed, is produced at 0 0 with a differential cross section of 1 nb/sr. The ABC effect clearly dominates the greatest part of the measured spectra. The 0 0 alpha production varies greatly as a function of energy; the angular distribution at 2.5 GeV/c is strongly peaked in the forward direction. The ABC effect is directly related to the constraints set by the nuclei formation. Various models and especially a one-pion-exchange model have been calculated but no one gives, until to-day, quantitatively suitable results [fr

  18. Coherent production on nuclei and measurements of total cross sections for unstable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czyz, W.; Zielinski, M.

    1980-01-01

    The Koelbig-Margolis Formula is fitted to some explicity nonperturbative models of diffractive production. It is shown that, in spite of the fact that the standard procedure of fitting the integrated cross sections may give acceptable fits, thus obtained ''cross sections of unstable particles'', grossly disagree with the ''true'' cross sections known exactly from the models. (author)

  19. Transfer products from the reactions of heavy ions with heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K.E. III.

    1979-11-01

    Production of nuclides heavier than the target from 86 Kr- and 136 Xe-induced reactions with 181 Ta and 238 U was investigated. Attempts were made to produce new neutron-excess Np and Pu isotopes by the deep inelastic mechanism. No evidence was found for 242 Np or 247 Pu. Estimates were made for the production of 242 Np, 247 Pu, and 248 Am from heavy-ion reactions with uranium targets. Comparisons of reactions of 86 Kr and 136 Xe ions with thick 181 Ta targets and 86 Kr, 136 Xe and 238 U ions with thick 238 U targets indicate that the most probable products are not dependent on the projectile. The most probable products can be predicted by the equation Z - Z/sub target/ = 0.43 (A - A/sub target/) + 1.0. The major effect of the projectile is the magnitude of the production cross section of the heavy products. Based on these results, estimates are made of the most probable mass of element 114 produced from heavy-ion reactions with 248 Cm and 254 Es targets. These estimates give the mass number of element 114 as approx. 287 if produced in heavy-ion reactions with these very heavy targets. Excitation functions of gold and bismuth isotopes arising from 86 Kr- and 136 Xe-induced reactions with thin 181 Ta targets were measured. These results indicate that the shape and location (in Z and A above the target) of the isotopic distributions are not strongly dependent on the projectile incident energy. Also, the nuclidic cross sections are found to increase with an increase in projectile energy to a maximum at approximately 1.4 to 1.5 times the Coulomb barrier. Above this maximum, the nuclidic cross sections are found to decrease with an increase in projectile energy. This decrease in cross section is believed to be due to fission of the heavy products caused by high excitation energy and angular momentum. 111 references, 39 figures, 34 tables

  20. Construction of a risk assessment system for chemical residues in agricultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Shinai; Hong, Jiyeon; Lee, Dayeon; Paik, Minkyoung

    2014-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of chemical residues in agricultural and food products has been performed by various government bodies in South Korea. These bodies have made attempts to systematically manage this information by creating a monitoring database system as well as a system based on these data with which to assess the health risk of chemical residues in agricultural products. Meanwhile, a database system is being constructed consisting of information about monitoring and, following this, a demand for convenience has led to the need for an evaluation tool to be constructed with the data processing system. Also, in order to create a systematic and effective tool for the risk assessment of chemical residues in foods and agricultural products, various evaluation models are being developed, both domestically and abroad. Overseas, systems such as Dietary Exposure Evaluation Model: Food Commodity Intake Database and Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System are being used; these use the US Environmental Protection Agency as a focus, while the EU has developed Pesticide Residue Intake Model for assessments of pesticide exposure through food intake. Following this, the National Academy of Agricultural Science (NAAS) created the Agricultural Products Risk Assessment System (APRAS) which supports the use and storage of monitoring information and risk assessments. APRAS efficiently manages the monitoring data produced by NAAS and creates an extraction feature included in the database system. Also, the database system in APRAS consists of a monitoring database system held by the NAAS and food consumption database system. Food consumption data is based on Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. This system is aimed at exposure and risk assessments for chemical residues in agricultural products with regards to different exposure scenarios.

  1. Bioethanol production from forestry residues: A comparative techno-economic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankó, Balázs; Galbe, Mats; Wallberg, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A proposed cellulosic ethanol biorefinery in Sweden was simulated with Aspen Plus. • Forestry residues with different bark contents were evaluated as raw materials. • The bark content negatively influenced the minimum ethanol selling price. • Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the influence of raw material cost. - Abstract: A techno-economic analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of using forestry residues with different bark contents for bioethanol production. A proposed cellulosic ethanol biorefinery in Sweden was simulated with Aspen Plus. The plant was assumed to convert different forestry assortments (sawdust and shavings, fuel logs, early thinnings, tops and branches, hog fuel and pulpwood) to ethanol, pellets, biogas and electricity. The intention was not to obtain absolute ethanol production costs for future facilities, but to assess and compare the future potential of utilizing different forestry residues for bioethanol production. The same plant design and operating conditions were assumed in all cases, and the effect of including bark on the whole conversion process, especially how it influenced the ethanol production cost, was studied. While the energy efficiency (not including district heating) obtained for the whole process was between 67 and 69% regardless of the raw material used, the ethanol production cost differed considerably; the minimum ethanol selling price ranging from 0.77 to 1.52 USD/L. Under the basic assumptions, all the forestry residues apart from sawdust and shavings exhibited a negative net present value at current market prices. The profitability decreased with increasing bark content of the raw material. Sensitivity analyses showed that, at current market prices, the utilization of bark-containing forestry residues will not provide significant cost improvement compared with pulpwood unless the conversion of cellulose and hemicellulose to monomeric sugars is improved.

  2. Effect of residual ascorbate on determination of nitrite in commercial cured meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J B; Doerr, R C; Gates, R

    1984-01-01

    Residual ascorbate in cured meat slurries results in different amounts of pigment being produced from different Griess reagent combinations. The phenomenon was used to study residual ascorbate in commercial cured meat products which had a variety of textures, acidities, moisture and meat content, fat, homogeneity, initial nitrite, and processing conditions. Diluting and heating the samples according to the AOAC procedure did not completely eliminate the ascorbate interference, but making the sample alkaline did. Determining nitrite separately in supernate and precipitate from the first dilution showed the effect of heating to be the elimination of interferences and solubilization or extraction of nitrite from the precipitate.

  3. Impact of toxic heavy metals and pesticide residues in herbal products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nema S. Shaban

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants have a long history of use in therapy throughout the world and still make an important part of traditional medicine. The World Health Organization (WHO estimates that 65%–80% of the world's populations depend on the herbal products as their primary form of health care. This review is conducted to provide a general idea about chemical contaminants such as heavy metals and pesticide residues as major common contaminants of the herbal medicine, which impose serious health risks to human health. Additionally, we aim to provide different analytical methods for analysis of heavy metals and pesticide residues in the herbal medicine.

  4. Photopion production from nuclei in the energy region of the Δ resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamas, G.

    1979-01-01

    The γD→p+p+π - and the γ 4 He→p+π+3 nucleons reactions in the energy region of the Δ resonance are studied. As a temporary conclusion, it is possible to explain the largest part of the photon-nucleus interaction for D and 4 He in the Δ resonance region by the quasi-free production and the pion and proton rescattering

  5. Fast-neutron capture cross sections for the most important fission-product nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.

    1982-01-01

    The main activity of the fission-product (FP) Working Group was the discussion of the current status of neutron capture knowledge of the most important FP nuclides, including the formulation of recommendations toward improved understanding. The results of the discussion are summarized. General conclusions and recommendations are given. The status of integral data is summarized by R. Anderl; and nuclear models and calculations are reviewed by D. Gardner and G. Reffo

  6. Organizational procedure for the study of pion production and absorption processes on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, M.K.; Walker, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    For nuclear processes involving pions, such as pion production/absorption or exchange currents, it is shown that a natural organization involves adoption of the πNN vertex function g/sub π/(q 2 )#betta# 5 tau/sub α/, where q is the pion four-momentum and g/sub π/(m/sub π/ 2 )approx. =13.4 is the renormalized pion-nucleon coupling constant. The result is independent of the form and details of any fundamental interaction Lagrangian. The difference between g/sub π/(q 2 )#betta# 5 tau/sub α/ and the fully-dressed πNN vertex function contributes to amplitudes involving more bosons, e.g., scattering amplitudes (πN→πN), production amplitudes (πN→ππN), etc. Such contributions are mediated through either seagull-like terms or P11 intermediate states. It is pointed out that it is neither necessary nor practical to calculate these partial contributions to scattering and production amplitudes. One can always exploit other approaches, theoretical and phenomenological, to make reasonably good models for the full amplitudes. The usual procedure of including the effects of negative energy parts of the nucleon propagator in interaction potentials, exchange currents, etc., is easily included in the present organization. The result is that from scattering amplitudes, etc; the positive energy nucleon poles are deleted but Z graphs are included

  7. A two-stage bioprocess for hydrogen and methane production from rice straw bioethanol residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai-Hsuan; Whang, Liang-Ming; Wu, Chao-Wei; Chung, Man-Chien

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluates a two-stage bioprocess for recovering hydrogen and methane while treating organic residues of fermentative bioethanol from rice straw. The obtained results indicate that controlling a proper volumetric loading rate, substrate-to-biomass ratio, or F/M ratio is important to maximizing biohydrogen production from rice straw bioethanol residues. Clostridium tyrobutyricum, the identified major hydrogen-producing bacteria enriched in the hydrogen bioreactor, is likely utilizing lactate and acetate for biohydrogen production. The occurrence of acetogenesis during biohydrogen fermentation may reduce the B/A ratio and lead to a lower hydrogen production. Organic residues remained in the effluent of hydrogen bioreactor can be effectively converted to methane with a rate of 2.8 mmol CH(4)/gVSS/h at VLR of 4.6 kg COD/m(3)/d. Finally, approximately 75% of COD in rice straw bioethanol residues can be removed and among that 1.3% and 66.1% of COD can be recovered in the forms of hydrogen and methane, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation conditions for improved bioethanol production from potato peel residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Taher, Imen; Fickers, Patrick; Chniti, Sofien; Hassouna, Mnasser

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was the optimization of the enzyme hydrolysis of potato peel residues (PPR) for bioethanol production. The process included a pretreatment step followed by an enzyme hydrolysis using crude enzyme system composed of cellulase, amylase and hemicellulase, produced by a mixed culture of Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma reesei. Hydrothermal, alkali and acid pretreatments were considered with regards to the enhancement of enzyme hydrolysis of potato peel residues. The obtained results showed that hydrothermal pretreatment lead to a higher enzyme hydrolysis yield compared to both acid and alkali pretreatments. Enzyme hydrolysis was also optimized for parameters such as temperature, pH, substrate loading and surfactant loading using a response surface methodology. Under optimized conditions, 77 g L -1 of reducing sugars were obtained. Yeast fermentation of the released reducing sugars led to an ethanol titer of 30 g L -1 after supplementation of the culture medium with ammonium sulfate. Moreover, a comparative study between acid and enzyme hydrolysis of potato peel residues was investigated. Results showed that enzyme hydrolysis offers higher yield of bioethanol production than acid hydrolysis. These results highlight the potential of second generation bioethanol production from potato peel residues treated with onsite produced hydrolytic enzymes. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:397-406, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. Technical feasibility and carbon footprint of biochar co-production with tomato plant residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorach-Massana, Pere; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Peña, Javier; Rieradevall, Joan; Montero, Juan Ignacio; Puy, Neus

    2017-09-01

    World tomato production is in the increase, generating large amounts of organic agricultural waste, which are currently incinerated or composted, releasing CO 2 into the atmosphere. Organic waste is not only produced from conventional but also urban agricultural practices due recently gained popularity. An alternative to current waste management practices and carbon sequestration opportunity is the production of biochar (thermally converted biomass) from tomato plant residues and use as a soil amendment. To address the real contribution of biochar for greenhouse gas mitigation, it is necessary to assess the whole life cycle from the production of the tomato biomass feedstock to the actual distribution and utilisation of the biochar produced in a regional context. This study is the first step to determine the technical and environmental potential of producing biochar from tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum arawak variety) waste biomass and utilisation as a soil amendment. The study includes the characterisation of tomato plant residue as biochar feedstock (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and metal content); feedstock thermal stability; and the carbon footprint of biochar production under urban agriculture at pilot and small-scale plant, and conventional agriculture at large-scale plant. Tomato plant residue is a potentially suitable biochar feedstock under current European Certification based on its lignin content (19.7%) and low metal concentration. Biomass conversion yields of over 40%, 50% carbon stabilization and low pyrolysis temperature conditions (350-400°C) would be required for biochar production to sequester carbon under urban pilot scale conditions; while large-scale biochar production from conventional agricultural practices have not the potential to sequestrate carbon because its logistics, which could be improved. Therefore, the diversion of tomato biomass waste residue from incineration or composting to biochar production for use as a soil amendment

  10. Utilization of tropical crop residues and agroindustrial by-products in animal nutrition. Constraints and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, T.R.; Parra, R.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of by-products and crop residues as animal feeds is increasing steadily. This is a consequence of the increasing demand for cereal grains as both human and animal (chiefly poultry) food, and the increasing demand for energy coupled with decreasing availability of fossil fuels. The effects of these two trends are that primary use of land for livestock production (usually grazing systems) will steadily diminish; at the same time, sources of biomass will increase in importance as renewable energy sources, and greater emphasis will be placed on draught animal power. Most by-products and crop residues are fibrous and therefore of only low to moderate nutritive value, or have special physical and chemical characteristics making them difficult to incorporate in conventional ''balanced'' rations. Such feed raw materials may need special processing and/or special forms of supplementation if they are to be used efficiently. It is hypothesized that industrial by-products and crop residues will be more efficiently utilized if they are incorporated in diversified and integrated production systems, i.e. (a) livestock production is integrated with production of cash crops both for food and fuel; (b) different livestock species are utilized in the same enterprise in a complementary way; (c) livestock feeding is based on crop residues (energy) supplemented with protein-rich forages and aquatic plants; and (d) animal wastes are recycled and used for food, fertilizer and fuel. This strategy is particularly suitable for the conditions in (i) tropical countries, whose climate favours high crop/biomass yields per unit area and ease of fermentation of organic wastes, and (ii) family farms, for which diversification means greater opportunity for self-sufficiency and increased possibilities for use of family resources. (author)

  11. Enhanced biogas production from penicillin bacterial residue by thermal-alkaline pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Weizhang; Li, Guixia; Gao, Yan; Li, Zaixing; Geng, Xiaoling; Li, Yubing; Yang, Jingliang; Zhou, Chonghui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the orthogonal experimental design was used to determine the optimum conditions for the effect of thermal alkaline; pretreatment on the anaerobic digestion of penicillin bacterial residue. The biodegradability of the penicillin; bacterial residue was evaluated by biochemical methane potential tests in laboratory. The optimum values of temperature,; alkali concentration, pretreatment time and moisture content for the thermal-alkaline pretreatment were determined as; 70 °C, 6% (w/v), 30 min, and 85%, respectively. Thermal-alkaline pretreatment could significantly enhance the soluble; chemical oxygen demand solubilization, the suspended solid solubilization and the biodegradability. Biogas production; was enhanced by the thermal-alkaline pretreatment, probably as a result of the breakdown of cell walls and membranes of; micro-organisms, which may facilitate the contact between organic molecules and anaerobic microorganisms.; Keywords: penicillin bacterial residue; anaerobic digestion; biochemical methane potential tests; pretreatment

  12. Research Progress on Pesticide Residue Analysis Techniques in Agro-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Ze-ying

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There are constant occurrences of acute pesticide poisoning among consumers and pesticide residue violations in agro-products import/export trading. Pesticide residue analysis is the important way to protect the food safety and the interest of import/export enterprises. There has been a rapid development in pesticide residue analysis techniques in recent years. In this review, the research progress in the past five years were discussed in the respects of samples preparation and instrument determination. The application, modification and development of the QuEChERS method in samples preparation and the application of tandem mass spectrometry and high resolution mass spectrometry were reviewed. And the implications for the future of the field were discussed.

  13. [Interlaboratory Study on Evaporation Residue Test for Food Contact Products (Report 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Mutsuga, Motoh; Abe, Tomoyuki; Abe, Yutaka; Amano, Homare; Ishihara, Kinuyo; Ohsaka, Ikue; Ohno, Haruka; Ohno, Yuichiro; Ozaki, Asako; Kakihara, Yoshiteru; Kobayashi, Hisashi; Sakuragi, Hiroshi; Shibata, Hiroshi; Shirono, Katsuhiro; Sekido, Haruko; Takasaka, Noriko; Takenaka, Yu; Tajima, Yoshiyasu; Tanaka, Aoi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Tonooka, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Toru; Nomura, Chie; Haneishi, Nahoko; Hayakawa, Masato; Miura, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Miku; Watanabe, Kazunari; Sato, Kyoko

    2018-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was performed to evaluate the equivalence between an official method and a modified method of evaporation residue test using three food-simulating solvents (water, 4% acetic acid and 20% ethanol), based on the Japanese Food Sanitation Law for food contact products. Twenty-three laboratories participated, and tested the evaporation residues of nine test solutions as blind duplicates. For evaporation, a water bath was used in the official method, and a hot plate in the modified method. In most laboratories, the test solutions were heated until just prior to evaporation to dryness, and then allowed to dry under residual heat. Statistical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between the two methods, regardless of the heating equipment used. Accordingly, the modified method provides performance equal to the official method, and is available as an alternative method.

  14. Stimulation of Egg Production in Japanese Quails by Enriching Feed with Residual Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letitia Oprean

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Quail eggs are more and more approved for consumers because they bring many benefits to the human body. Therefore, quails breeding for eggs production have become a very profitable business. Residual yeast may be a nutritional supplement, especially rich in vitamins and proteins. This article studies the influence of residual beer yeast on egg laying in Japanese quails. In order to be integrated into the diet of quails the yeast has undergone a process of autolysis; its influence has been examined on separate groups. The results were reported as a percentage compared with the control group, where the feed does not contain this supplement. Due to its content rich in vitamins and proteins, the residual beer yeast used in feeding the quails bred for eggs stimulates egg laying.

  15. Pion production in 3He collisions on complex nuclei: a comparison of theory with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulcher, L.P.; Banerjee, M.K.

    1976-01-01

    The BLSZ theory of inclusive pion production is applied to the (p,π + ) and the ( 3 He,π 0 ) reactions on 12 C. The calculations are based on plane waves for the projectile and pion wave functions and are compared with experiments. The effects of distortion are considered. The magnitudes of the (p,π + ) reaction cross sections are comparable to the experimental values, but for the ( 3 He,π 0 ) case the theoretical results are four or five orders of magnitude larger than the experiments

  16. Agro-residues as Alternative for Xylanase Production by Filamentous Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Knob

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Agro-industrial wastes are the most abundant renewable resource on earth and are available in large quantities. However, the disposal of these wastes presents an increasing environmental problem. Recently, there has been a great interest in the exploitation of these wastes as low-cost raw materials for the production of value-added compounds as microbial enzymes by submerged or solid-state fermentation systems. This review focuses on alternatives for xylanase production using agro-residues as substrates. In recent years, the interest in xylanase, which plays an important role in the breakdown of xylan, has markedly increased due to its wide variety of biotechnological applications. Among several agro-industrial residues that have been intensively investigated, many, such as wheat bran, wheat straw, and sugarcane bagasse, are suitable and result in high yields of xylanase, leading to low production costs. In addition, many relatively unexplored residues, such as oil palm wastes, sorghum straw, and coffee by-products, are some of the most promising substrates for xylanase production, requiring further assessment.

  17. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and residue management practices on ammonia emissions from subtropical sugarcane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    mudi, Sanku Datta; Wang, Jim J.; Dodla, Syam Kumar; Arceneaux, Allen; Viator, H. P.

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emission from soil is a loss of nitrogen (N) nutrient for plant production as well as an issue of air quality, due to the fact that it is an active precursor of airborne particulate matters. Ammonia also acts as a secondary source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emission when present in the soil. In this study, the impacts of different sources of N fertilizers and harvest residue management schemes on NH3 emissions from sugarcane production were evaluated based on an active chamber method. The field experiment plots consisting of two sources of N fertilizer (urea and urea ammonium nitrate (UAN)) and two common residue management practices, namely residue retained (RR) and residue burned (RB), were established on a Commerce silt loam. The NH3 volatilized following N fertilizer application was collected in an impinger containing diluted citric acid and was subsequently analyzed using ion chromatography. The NH3 loss was primarily found within 3-4 weeks after N application. Average seasonal soil NH3 flux was significantly greater in urea plots with NH3-N emission factor (EF) twice or more than in UAN plots (2.4-5.6% vs. 1.2-1.7%). The RR residue management scheme had much higher NH3 volatilization than the RB treatment regardless of N fertilizer sources, corresponding to generally higher soil moisture levels in the former. Ammonia-N emissions in N fertilizer-treated sugarcane fields increased with increasing soil water-filled pore space (WFPS) up to 45-55% observed in the field. Both N fertilizer sources and residue management approaches significantly affected NH3 emissions.

  18. Ethanol production from Lycoris radiata Herbert (Amarylllidaceae) residues as a new resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shuangping; Ding, Zhongyang; Zhang, Liang; Gu, Zhenghua; Wang, Xiaolan; Sun, Xiaojun; Shi, Guiyang

    2012-01-01

    The large quantities of Lycoris radiata Herbert (Amarylllidaceae) residues, left after the extraction of alkaloids from the bulbs, could threaten the environment if not properly disposed. Therefore, the aim of this research is to investigate the feasibility of bioconversion of L. radiata Herbert residues to ethanol through batch fermentation. In L. radiata Herbert residues, the average contents (g kg −1 ) of non-structural carbohydrates, crude fiber, crude protein, ash, and lignin are 485.1, 177.3, 124.7, 108.9, and 91.0, respectively. Five commercial enzymes (β-glucanase, pectinase, xylanase, phytase and cellulase) were employed in pretreatment process and ethanol bioconversion was evaluated with three yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, osmotolerant S. cerevisiae and genetically engineered S. cerevisiae constructed to use cellobiose). The results showed that pretreament by β-glucanase successfully facilitated the penetration of α-amylase into ground material. After residues pretreatment by 10 g kg −1 of β-glucanase for 14 h at 50 °C, the viscosity decreased from 1135 to 59 Pa·s which was equivalent to that obtained by the combined whole five enzymes. Further experiments proved that osmotolerant S. cerevisiae was desirable for ethanol production from Lycoris radiate Herbert residues. The results are helpful to develop non-grain bioethanol production. -- Highlights: ► The residuals from Lycoris radiata Herbert bulbs were able to generate 55% ethanol concentrations by yeast fermentation. ► Treatment with xylanase significantly reduced the viscosity more than 10-fold and improved fermentable sugars by ∼35%. ► An osmotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that showed improved fermentation rates was identified.

  19. Safe apples for baby-food production: survey of pesticide treatment regimes leaving minimum residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticha, Jana; Hajslova, Jana; Kovalczuk, Tomas; Jech, Martin; Honzicek, Jiri; Kocourek, Vladimir; Lansky, Miroslav; Kloutvorova, Jana; Falta, Vladan

    2007-06-01

    A total of 19 pesticide preparations were used according to agricultural practice in six trials in apple orchards. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), premature Golden Delicious apples collected 64, 50, 36 days before harvest and mature fruit were examined for residues of active ingredients. No residues of triflumuron, triazamate, chlorpyrifos, etofenprox, fenoxycarb, kresoxim-methyl, cyprodinyl, difenoconazole or thiram were detected in the first sampling. Also, the levels of chlorpyrifos-methyl, penconazole, tebuconazole and tolylfluanid dropped during the pre-harvest interval. Detectable residues of pyridaben, thiacloprid, trifloxystrobin and tetraconazole in harvested fruits were below 0.01 mg kg(-1), which is the maximum concentration of residues acceptable by baby-food producers in any raw material. The only residues exceeding this concentration were captan and teflubenzuron. Based on the data, farmers can choose pesticides for optimal treatment of plants, while enabling growth of a safe crop suitable for baby-food production.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of a Solid Acid Catalyst from Macro Fungi Residue for Methyl Palmitate Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the process of fungal polysaccharide extraction for health care products and food factories, a large quantity of macro-fungi residues are produced, but most of the residues are abandoned and become environmental pollutants. A solid acid catalyst, prepared by sulfonating carbonized Phellinus igniarius residue, was shown to be an efficient and environmentally benign catalyst for the esterification of palmitate acid (PA and methanol. As a comparison, two types of common biomass catalysts, wheat straws and wood chips, were prepared. In this study, characterizations, including scanning electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller assays and elemental analysis, and reaction conditions for the synthesis of methyl palmitate (MP using solid acid catalysts were investigated. Experiments showed that the solid acid catalyst prepared from P. igniarius residue had a higher catalytic activity than the other two catalysts, and the highest yield of MP catalyzed by P. igniarius residue solid acid catalyst was 91.5% under the following optimum conditions: molar ratio of methanol/PA of 10:1, reaction temperature of 60 °C, mass ratio of catalyst/substrate of 2%, and a reaction time of 1.5 h. Thus, the use of this catalyst offers a method for producing MP.

  1. X-ray flares from runaway pair production in active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J. G.; Mastichiadis, A.

    1992-01-01

    The hard X-ray spectrum of AGNs is nonthermal, probably arising from an electron-positron pair cascade, with some emission reflected off relatively cold matter. There has been interest in models on which protons are accelerated and create relativistic electrons on interaction with a local radiation field. It is shown here that a sufficient column density of protons can lead to runaway pair production: photons generated by the relativistic pairs are the targets for the protons to produce more pairs. This can produce X-ray fluxes with the characteristics observed in AGN. The model predicts the maximum ratio of luminosity to source size as well as their spectrum in the early phases. The same mechanism may also be able to create the knots of synchrotron-radiating pair plasma seen in sources such as 3C273.

  2. Study of $\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ production via Primakoff effect on nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposed experiment makes use of the FRAMM spectrometer (experiments NA1 and NA7). The aim of the experiment is to study the reaction $\\pi^{-}$Pb $\\rightarrow \\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$Pb via Primakoff effect in order to measure the radiative decay width $\\Gamma(\\rho^{-} \\rightarrow \\pi^{-}\\gamma)$ of the $\\rho^{-}$meson and to measure the cross-section of the reaction at threshold. \\\\\\\\The controversial data on $\\Gamma(\\rho^{-} \\rightarrow \\pi^{-}\\gamma)$ and the theoretical importance of this process justify a high statistics study of the reaction in the $\\rho^{-}$ region.\\\\\\\\ The physical interest of the measurement of the $\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ production cross-section at threshold is to check the validity of the low energy theorem for the $\\gamma \\rightarrow 3\\pi$ vertex (Adler, Bell and Jackiw anomalies) and to obtain a direct determination

  3. Magnetic substate populations of product nuclei in the /sup 11/B(d,p)/sup 12/B reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, M; Ochi, S; Minamisono, T; Mizobuchi, A; Sugimoto, K [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Lab. of Nuclear Studies

    1976-05-31

    Magnetic substate populations of product nuclei in the /sup 11/B(d,p)/sup 12/B reaction have been measured in an energy range Esub(d) = 1.3-3.0 MeV at recoil angles of thetasub(R) = 55/sup 0/, 45/sup 0/ and 27/sup 0/-37/sup 0/. A static magnetic field (3 kG) was applied normal to the reaction plane to keep the nuclear orientation. Quadrupole effects on the implanted /sup 12/B in Ta were utilized to perturb the Zeeman splitting. NMR transitions were induced, and detected by the asymmetry change in the ..beta..-decay of /sup 12/B. From this information, the magnetic substate populations were determined, for the unique assignment of which the sign of the quadrupole interaction had to be known. For this purpose, a p-..gamma.. angular correlation was measured, which determined the alignment of the first excited state of /sup 12/B. A comparison of the present result with theoretical predictions is given, together with the resultant information about j-mixings in the /sup 12/B states.

  4. 75 FR 75482 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Residual Solvents in Animal Drug Products; Questions and Answers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry on Residual Solvents in Animal Drug Products; Questions and Answers... Solvents in Animal Drug Products; Questions and Answers.'' The draft questions and answers (Q&A) guidance addresses the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) General Chapter Residual Solvents that applies to both human...

  5. Polyhydroxybutyrate production using agro-industrial residue as substrate by Bacillus sphaericus NCIM 5149

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha V. Ramadas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the production of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB using agro- industrial residues as the carbon source. Seven substrates, viz., wheat bran, potato starch, sesame oil cake, groundnut oil cake, cassava powder, jackfruit seed powder and corn flour were hydrolyzed using commercial enzymes and the hydrolyzates assessed for selecting the best substrate for PHB production. Jackfruit seed powder gave the maximum production of PHB under submerged fermentation using Bacillus sphaericus (19% at the initial pH of 7.5.

  6. Production of petroleum bitumen by oxidation of heavy oil residue with sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tileuberdi, Ye.; Akkazyn, Ye. A.; Ongarbayev, Ye. K.; Imanbayev, Ye. I.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper production of bitumen adding elemental sulfur at oxidation of oil residue are investigated. The objects of research were distilled residue of Karazhanbas crude oil and elemental sulfur. These oil residue characterized by a low output of easy fractions and the high content of tar-asphaltene substances, therefore is the most comprehensible feedstock for producing bitumen. The sulfur is one of the oil product collected in oil extraction regions. Oxidation process of hydrocarbons carried out at temperatures from 180 up to 210 °С without addition of sulfur and with the addition of sulfur (5-10 wt. %) for 4 hours. At 200 °С oxidation of hydrocarbons with 5, 7 and 10 wt.% sulfur within 3-4 h allows receiving paving bitumen on the mark BND 200/300, BND 130/200, BN 90/130 and BN 70/30. Physical and mechanical characteristics of oxidation products with the addition of 5-7 wt. % sulfur corresponds to grade of paving bitumen BND 40/60. At the given temperature oxidized for 2.5-3 h, addition of 10 wt. % sulfur gave the products of oxidation describing on parameters of construction grades of bitumen (BN 90/10).

  7. Production of light flavor hadrons and anti-nuclei at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kalweit, Alexander

    With the recording of the first collisions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in November 2009, a new era in the domain of high energy and relativistic heavy-ion physics has started. As one of the early observables which can be addressed, the measurement of light quark flavor production is presented in this thesis. Hadrons that consist only of u, d, and s quarks constitute the majority of the produced particles in pp and Pb–Pb collisions. Their measurement forms the basis for a detailed understanding of the collision and for the answer of the question if hadronic matter undergoes a phase transition to the deconfined quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures. The basics of ultra-relativistic heavy- ion physics are briefly introduced in the first chapter followed by a short description of the ALICE experiment. A particular focus is put on the unique particle identification (PID) capabilities as they provide the basis of the measurements which are presented in the following chapters. The particle identification ...

  8. The peculiarities of the production and decay of super heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itkis, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    Results of the experiments aimed at the study of fission and quasi-fission processes in the reactions 12 C+ 204 Pb, 48 Ca+ 144,154 Sm, 168 Er, 208 Pb, 238 U, 244 Pu, 248 Cm; 58 Fe+ 208 Pb, 244 Pu, 248 Cm, and 64 Ni+ 186 W, 242 Pu are presented. The choice of the above-mentioned reactions was inspired by the experiments on the production of the isotopes 283 112, 289 114 and 283 116 at Dubna using the same reactions. The 58 Fe and 64 Ni projectiles were chosen since the corresponding projectile-target combinations lead to the synthesis of even heavier elements. The experiments were carried out at the U-400 accelerator of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR, Russia), the XTU Tandem accelerator of the National Laboratory of Legnaro (LNL, Italy) and the Accelerator of the Laboratory of University of Jyvaskyla (JYFL, Finland) using the time-of-flight spectrometer of fission fragments CORSET and the neutron multi-detector DEMON. The role of shell effects and the influence of the entrance channel asymmetry and the deformations of colliding nucleus on the mechanism of the fusion-fission and the competitive process of quasi-fission are discussed.

  9. On the production of shower particles from light (Cno) and heavy (Ag Br) emulsion nuclei at Dubna energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Nagdy, M.S.; Abdel-Waged, Kh; Abdel-Halim, S.M.; Khalil, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    The reaction cross sections for p, d, He, C, Mg and S beams with different chemical components of emulsion nuclei at 4.5 A GeV/c have been studied with high statistics, and were compared with the calculations according to Glauber model. The multiplicity distributions of shower produced particles from these interactions with light and heavy emulsion nuclei are analyzed in terms of the negative binomial and Poisson distribution laws

  10. Superdeformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    Superdeformation was first proposed some twenty years ago to explain the fission isomers observed in some actinide nuclei. It was later realized that superdeformed shapes can occur at high angular momentum in lighter nuclei. The interest in the mechanisms responsible for these exotic shapes has increased enormously with the discovery of a superdeformed band of nineteen discrete lines in 152 Dy (8). At about the same time, evidence for highly deformed nuclei (axis ratio 3:2) was also reported near 132 Ce(9). Striking properties emerged from the first experiments, such as the essentially constant energy spacing between transitions (picket-fence spectra), the unexpectedly strong population of superdeformed bands at high spins, and the apparent lack of a link between the superdeformed states and the yrast levels. These findings were reviewed by Nolan and Twin. The present article follows upon their work and discusses the wealth of information that has since become available. This includes the discovery of a new island of superdeformation near A = 190, the detailed spectroscopy of ground and excited bands in the superdeformed well near A = 150 and A = 190, the surprising occurrence of superdeformed bands with identical transition energies in nuclei differing by one or two mass units, and the improved understanding of mechanisms responsible for the feeding into and the decay out of the superdeformed states

  11. Synthesis and decay process of superheavy nuclei with Z=119-122 via hot-fusion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghahramany, N.; Ansari, A. [Shiraz University, Department of Physics and Biruni Observatory, College of Science, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In this research article attempts have been made to calculate the superheavy-nuclei synthesis characteristics including, the potential energy parameters, fusion probability, fusion and evaporation residue (ER) cross sections as well as, decay properties of compound nucleus and the residue nuclei formation probability for elements with Z=119-122 by using the hot-fusion reactions. It is concluded that, although a selection of double magic projectiles such as {sup 48}Ca with high binding energy, simplifies the calculations significantly due to spherical symmetric shape of the projectile, resulting in high evaporation residue cross section, unfortunately, nuclei with Z > 98 do not exist in quantities sufficient for constructing targets for the hot-fusion reactions. Therefore, practically our selection is fusion reactions with titanium projectile because the mass production of target nuclei for experimental purposes is more feasible. Based upon our findings, it is necessary, for new superheavy-nuclei production with Z > 119, to use neutron-rich projectiles and target nuclei. Finally, the maximal evaporation residue cross sections for the synthesis of superheavy elements with Z=119-122 have been calculated and compared with the previously founded ones in the literature. (orig.)

  12. Release of Phosphorus Forms from Cover Crop Residues in Agroecological No-Till Onion Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Assis de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cover crops grown alone or in association can take up different amounts of phosphorus (P from the soil and accumulate it in different P-forms in plant tissue. Cover crop residues with a higher content of readily decomposed forms may release P more quickly for the next onion crop. The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of P forms from residues of single and mixed cover crops in agroecological no-till onion (Allium cepa L. production. The experiment was conducted in Ituporanga, Santa Catarina (SC, Brazil, in an Inceptisol, with the following treatments: weeds, black oat (Avena sativa L., rye (Secale cereale L., oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus L., oilseed radish + black oat, and oilseed radish + rye. Cover crops were sown in April 2013. In July 2013, plant shoots were cut close to the soil surface and part of the material was placed in litterbags. The bags were placed on the soil surface and residues were collected at 0, 15, and 45 days after deposition (DAD. Residues were dried and ground and P in the plant tissue was determined through chemical fractionation. The release of P contained in the tissue of cover crops depends not only on total P content in the tissue, but also on the accumulation of P forms and the quality of the residue in decomposition. The highest accumulation of P in cover crops occurred in the soluble inorganic P fraction, which is the fraction of fastest release in plants. Black oat had the highest initial release rate of soluble inorganic P, which became equal to the release rate of other cover crop residues at 45 DAD. Weeds released only half the amount of soluble inorganic P in the same period, despite accumulating a considerable amount of P in their biomass. The mixtures of oilseed radish + rye and oilseed radish + black oat showed higher release of P associated with RNA at 45 DAD in comparison to the single treatments.

  13. Development and quality characteristics of shelf-stable soy-agushie: a residual by-product of soymilk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nti, Christina A; Plahar, Wisdom A; Annan, Nana T

    2016-03-01

    A process was developed for the production of a high-protein food ingredient, soy-agushie, from the residual by-product of soymilk production. The product, with a moisture content of about 6%, was evaluated for its quality characteristics and performance in traditional dishes. The protein content was about 26% with similar amino acids content as that of the whole soybean. Lysine remained high in the dehydrated product (6.57 g/16 g N). While over 60% of the original B vitamins content in the beans was extracted with the milk, high proportions of the minerals were found to be retained in the residual by-product. The process adequately reduced the trypsin inhibitor levels in the beans from 25 to 1.5 mg/g. High sensory scores were obtained for recipes developed with soy-agushie in traditional dishes. The scope of utilization of the soy-agushie could be widened to include several traditional foods and bakery products for maximum nutritional benefits.

  14. Complete destruction of heavy nuclei by hadrons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstov, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    The total disintegration is considered of Ag and Pb nuclei and 4 He, 12 C nuclei With a momentum of 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon. It is shown that nucleons are mainly emitted, and there is no residual nUcleus the mass of which is comparable to that of the primary nucleus. The probability of total nucleus disintegration is considered as a function of projectile energy and the mass. The multiplicity, energy and emission angle of particles are considerred as well. It is shown that the density of nuclear matter in the overlap zone of colliding nuclei exceeds the usual one by a factor of approximately 4. A comparison is made with interaction models. A conclusion is drawn of the collective interaction mechanism (perhaps, of the shock wave type) of particle ejection from the target nucleus at the first stage of interaction and of explosive decay of the residual nucleus at the next one

  15. New substrate containing agroindustrial carnauba residue for production of papaya under foliar fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Albano, Francisca G.; Cavalcante, Ítalo H. L.; Machado, Jailson S.; Lacerda, Claudivan F. de; Silva, Esdras R. da; Sousa, Humberto G. de

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of organic waste in the composition of substrates for seedlings constitutes an alternative to the recycling of these materials. Thus, an experiment was conducted with the objective to evaluate the production of ‘Formosa’ papaya seedlings in substrate containing carnauba wax residue, under foliar fertilization. The experimental design was completely randomized with five replicates, with treatments distributed in a 5 x 2 factorial scheme, corresponding to five materials used as...

  16. New substrate containing agroindustrial carnauba residue for production of papaya under foliar fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Albano,Francisca G.; Cavalcante,Ítalo H. L.; Machado,Jailson S.; Lacerda,Claudivan F. de; Silva,Esdras R. da; Sousa,Humberto G. de

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of organic waste in the composition of substrates for seedlings constitutes an alternative to the recycling of these materials. Thus, an experiment was conducted with the objective to evaluate the production of ‘Formosa’ papaya seedlings in substrate containing carnauba wax residue, under foliar fertilization. The experimental design was completely randomized with five replicates, with treatments distributed in a 5 x 2 factorial scheme, corresponding to five mater...

  17. Study of the mechanism of the reaction 58Ni+40Ca and high spin states of the evaporation residual nuclei by application of γ-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komninos, P.

    1983-01-01

    γ-spectroscopic methods were applied to determine absolute cross sections for different evaporation channels of the reaction 40 Ca-> 58 Ni. In the incident-energy range Esub(lab)=135 to 158 MeV excitation functions were measured for the channels 2p+np, 3p+n2p, 4p, 5p, n4p, α, 2pα, and 3pα. Besides the cross section for the n2p and the n3p channel at Esub(lab)=135 MeV was determined. In the course of this thesis by means of 40 Ca-induced compound-nucleus reactions on Ni and Fe targets high spin states of neutron-deficient nuclei in the N 93 Ru a (17/2 - ) state and a (21/2) + isomeric state was identified the half-life of which was determined to (2.6+-0.2)μs. The earlier unknown level scheme of 91 Tc was established. Thereby states with spins up to 37/2 + (6398.0 keV) and 42/2 - (7715.1 keV) were observed. Both level schemes were compared with shell model calculations, and a good agreement resulted. Finally a partial β + /EC decay scheme for the identified new isotope 91 Ru(9+-1 s) was established. (orig./HSI) [de

  18. Development of Value-Added Products from Residual Algae to Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Craig [Sapphire Energy, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    DOE Award # EE0000393 was awarded to fund research into the development of beneficial uses of surplus algal biomass and the byproducts of biofuel production. At the time of award, Sapphire’s intended fuel production pathway was a fairly conventional extraction of lipids from biomass, resulting in a defatted residue which could be processed using anaerobic digestion. Over the lifetime of the award, we conducted extensive development work and arrived at the conclusion that anaerobic digestion presented significant technical challenges for this high-nitrogen, high-ash, and low carbon material. Over the same timeframe, Sapphire’s fuel production efforts came to focus on hydrothermal liquefaction. As a result of this technology focus, the residue from fuel production became unsuitable for either anaerobic digestion (or animal feed uses). Finally, we came to appreciate the economic opportunity that the defatted biomass could represent in the animal feed space, as well as understanding the impact of seasonal production on a biofuels extraction plant, and sought to develop uses for surplus biomass produced in excess of the fuel production unit’s capacity.

  19. Theory of magic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosov, V.G.; Kamchatnov, A.M.

    A consistent theory of the shell and magic oscillations of the masses of spherical nuclei is developed on the basis of the Fermi liquid concept of the energy spectrum of nuclear matter. A ''magic'' relationship between the system's dimensions and the limiting momentum of the quasi-particle distribution is derived; an integer number of the de Broglie half-waves falls on the nuclear diameter. An expression for the discontinuity in the nucleon binding energy in the vicinity of a magic nucleus is obtained. The role of the residual interaction is analyzed. It is shown that the width of the Fermi-surface diffuseness due to the residual interaction is proportional to the squared vector of the quasi-particle orbital angular momentum. The values of the corresponding proportionality factors (the coupling constant for quasi particles) are determined from the experimental data for 52 magic nuclei. The rapid drop of the residual interaction with increasing nuclear size is demonstrated. (7 figures, 3 tables) (U.S.)

  20. Production of light nuclei and anti-nuclei in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, J.; Adamová, Dagmar; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Brož, M.; Čepila, J.; Contreras, J. G.; Eyyubova, G.; Ferencei, Jozef; Křelina, M.; Křížek, Filip; Kučera, Vít; Kushpil, Svetlana; Mareš, Jiří A.; Petráček, V.; Pospíšil, Jan; Schulc, M.; Špaček, M.; Šumbera, Michal; Vajzer, Michal; Vaňát, Tomáš; Závada, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 2 (2016), s. 024917 ISSN 0556-2813 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : heavy ion collisions * ALICE collaboration * deuteron production Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2016

  1. Multifragmentation of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, B.

    1990-10-01

    It is difficult to deposit a large amount (∼ 1 Gev) of excitation energy into a nucleus. And if one wants to deposit large excitation energy values, the best way consists of shooting a given target nucleus with several nucleons, which can be achieved by using intermediate energy (10-100 MeV/nucleon) heavy ions. Such very excited objects were named hot nuclei. The study of hot nuclei has been undertaken only for 7 years because intermediate energy heavy ion facilities were not available before. The game is then to determine the decay properties of such nuclei, their limits of existence. Their study is connected with general properties of nuclear matter: namely its equation of state. Of special interest, is the onset of a new decay mechanism: multifragmentation, which is the non-sequential disassembly of a hot nucleus into several light nuclei (often called intermediate-mass fragments or IMF) or particles. This paper, shows how this mechanism can reflect fundamental properties of nuclear matter, but also how its experimental signature is difficult to establish. Multifragmentation has also been studied by using very energetic projectiles (protons and heavy ions) in the relativistic or ultra-relativistic region. The multifragmentation question of hot nuclei is far from being solved. One knows that IMF production increases when the excitation energy brought into a system is strongly increased, but very little is known about the mechanisms involved and a clear onset for multifragmentation is not established

  2. Utilization of agroindustrial residues for lipase production by solid-state fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Damaso, M?nica Caramez Triches; Passianoto, Mois?s Augusto; de Freitas, Sidin?a Cordeiro; Freire, Denise Maria Guimar?es; Lago, Regina Celi Araujo; Couri, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to produce lipases by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using, as substrate, agroindustrial residue supplemented with by-products from corn oil refining process or olive oil. For a group of ten fungi strains selected in the first steps, the lipase activity obtained by SSF varied from 7.7 to 58.6 U/g of dry substrate (gds). Among the evaluated strains, the Aspergillus niger mutant 11T53A14 was selected by presenting the best enzymatic production. For the fermentation test...

  3. Safeguards By Design - As applied to the Sellafield Product and Residue Store (SPRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chare, Peter; Lahogue, Yves; Schwalbach, Peter; Smejkal, Andreas; Patel, Bharat [European Commission, Directorate-General for Energy, Directorate E - Nuclear Safeguards, Euroforum, Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

    2011-12-15

    Sellafield Product and Residue Store (SPRS) is a new facility that has been constructed on the site of Sellafield. The design work started in early 2001 and active commissioning commenced with the introduction of the first nuclear material which arrived in the building early 2011. The store has been designed for the long term storage of Plutonium product (PuO2) from Thorp and Magnox, MOX residue powder from Sellafield MOX Plant (SMP) as well as pellet, powder or granular PuO2 residues from the older stores on the Sellafield site. This paper describes the application of Safeguards By Design commencing at the early design stage based upon the Safeguards Approach to be applied by DG ENER at the Sellafield Product and Residue Store (SPRS). The approach had been developed based upon the requirements for implementing Commission Regulation 302(2005) and the technical measures to be implemented in order to meet Article 77(a) of the Euratom Treaty. In order to meet these requirements a close dialogue was established between the different interested parties and the design team for the installation of instrumentation with associated cabling in order to implement the agreed safeguards measures. Early contacts at the design stage facilitated the inclusion of installed safeguards supplied instrumentation into the overall design and facility construction. The equipment and cabling supplied by Euratom was incorporated into the planning and construction phases. This ensured that upon plant completion the safeguards tools were commissioned and ready for the verification of the first nuclear material to be introduced into SPRS. Detailed discussions at the early stages of the design phase raised the profile of nuclear material safeguards and made certain that the necessary instrumentation infrastructure was incorporated into the plant infrastructure.

  4. A proposal for pellet production from residual woody biomass in the island of Majorca (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sánchez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of residual biomass for energy purposes is of great interest in isolated areas like Majorca for waste reduction, energy sufficiency and renewable energies development. In addition, densification processes lead to easy-to-automate solid biofuels which additionally have higher energy density. The present study aims at (i the estimation of the potential of residual biomass from woody crops as well as from agri-food and wood industries in Majorca, and (ii the analysis of the optimal location of potential pellet plants by means of a GIS approach (location-allocation analysis and a cost evaluation of the pellets production chain. The residual biomass potential from woody crops in Majorca Island was estimated at 35,874 metric tons dry matter (t DM per year, while the wood and agri-food industries produced annually 21,494 t DM and 2717 t DM, respectively. Thus, there would be enough resource available for the installation of 10 pellet plants of 6400 t·year−1 capacity. These plants were optimally located throughout the island of Mallorca with a maximum threshold distance of 28 km for biomass transport from the production points. Values found for the biomass cost at the pellet plant ranged between 57.1 €·t−1 and 63.4 €·t−1 for biomass transport distance of 10 and 28 km. The cost of pelleting amounted to 56.7 €·t−1; adding the concepts of business fee, pellet transport and profit margin (15%, the total cost of pelleting was estimated at 116.6 €·t−1. The present study provides a proposal for pellet production from residual woody biomass that would supply up to 2.8% of the primary energy consumed by the domestic and services sector in the Balearic Islands.

  5. Colliding nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, Roger; Remaud, Bernard; Suraud, E.; Durand, Dominique; Tamain, Bernard; Gobbi, A.; Cugnon, J.; Drapier, Olivier; Govaerts, Jan; Prieels, Rene

    1995-09-01

    This 14. international school Joliot-Curie of nuclear physic deals with nuclei in collision at high energy. Nine lectures are included in the proceedings of this summer school: 1 - From statistical mechanics outside equilibrium to transport equations (Balian, R.); 2 - Modeling of heavy ions reactions (Remaud, B.); 3 - Kinetic equations in heavy ions physics (Suraud, E.); 4 - Colliding nuclei near the Fermi energy (Durand, D.; Tamain, B.); 5 - From the Fermi to the relativistic energy domain: which observable? For which physics? (Gobbi, A.); 6 - Collisions at relativistic and ultra relativistic energies, Theoretical aspects (Cugnon, J.); 7 - Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures (Drapier, O.); 8 - Electroweak interaction: a window on physics beyond the standard model (Govaerts, J.); 9 - Symmetry tests in β nuclear process: polarization techniques (Prieels, R.)

  6. Collisions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulamov, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that interactions of high energy particles with nuclei, owing to possible intranuclear rescatterings, may provide information about the space-time behaviour of the production process. Therefore the main goals of these investigations are related with the attempts to study the space-time process of hadronization of coloured quarks and gluons produced at the initial stage of an interaction to white final state particles and to clarify the influence of composite quark-gluon structure of both the projectile and target on features of the production mechanisms. Since in both the initial and final states of these reactions the authors have strongly interacting multiparticle systems, it is of importance to study the collective properties of these systems. The questions to the point are: what is the degree of collectivization of particles newly produced in collisions with nuclei and what is the influence of the collective nature of a nucleus itself on the production mechanisms, in particular, what are the manifestations of possible multinucleon (multiquark) configurations in nuclei? It is obvious that the reductability of, say, hadron-nucleus (hA) interaction to hadron-nucleon (hN) collisions is directly related to the above problems. Due to time limitations the author discusses here only a few aspects of low p/sub t/ hA interactions which in his opinion are of importance for better understanding of general regularities of collisions with nuclei and for further investigations of the above problems

  7. Crop residue harvest for bioenergy production and its implications on soil functioning and plant growth: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Roberto Cherubin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The use of crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock is considered a potential strategy to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. However, indiscriminate harvesting of crop residues can induce deleterious effects on soil functioning, plant growth and other ecosystem services. Here, we have summarized the information available in the literature to identify and discuss the main trade-offs and synergisms involved in crop residue management for bioenergy production. The data consistently showed that crop residue harvest and the consequent lower input of organic matter into the soil led to C storage depletions over time, reducing cycling, supply and availability of soil nutrients, directly affecting the soil biota. Although the biota regulates key functions in the soil, crop residue can also cause proliferation of some important agricultural pests. In addition, crop residues act as physical barriers that protect the soil against raindrop impact and temperature variations. Therefore, intensive crop residue harvest can cause soil structure degradation, leading to soil compaction and increased risks of erosion. With regard to GHG emissions, there is no consensus about the potential impact of management of crop residue harvest. In general, residue harvest decreases CO2 and N2O emissions from the decomposition process, but it has no significant effect on CH4 emissions. Plant growth responses to soil and microclimate changes due to crop residue harvest are site and crop specific. Adoption of the best management practices can mitigate the adverse impacts of crop residue harvest. Longterm experiments within strategic production regions are essential to understand and monitor the impact of integrated agricultural systems and propose customized solutions for sustainable crop residue management in each region or landscape. Furthermore, private and public investments/cooperations are necessary for a better understanding of the potential environmental

  8. Comparison of biogas production from rapeseed and wheat residues in compound with cattle manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Safari

    2016-09-01

    process pH was observed in the first few days of the digestion and this is due to high volatile fatty acid (VFA formation. These results were compatible with sanaee moghadam et al. (2013. The results obtained showed that, the highest rate of VS reduction belonged to rapeseed residues at 52.22%.The lowest rate of VS reduction attributed to wheat residues at 36.79%. The rapeseed residues with 311.45 Lit.kg-1 VS had the highest accumulated methane followed by wheat straw with 167.69.28 L.Kg-1 VS in probability level of 5%. The average percentages of methane production for rapeseed straw and wheat straw during the 140 days experiment under mesophilic condition were 66% and 55%, respectively. Production of methane had delay and started after 46th day. Much reason may be possible. Inoculums used in this study were only fresh cattle dung. The mixture of fresh cattle dung and effluent of anaerobic digester or fresh rumen fluid may be decrease retention time and increase biogas production. According results of Budiyono the rumen fluid inoculated to biodigester significantly affected the biogas production. Rumen fluid inoculums caused biogas production rate and efficiency increase more than two times in compare to manure substrate without rumen fluid inoculums (Budyono et al., 2010. The other reason was pretreatment. This study applied just mechanical pretreatment. According to Cecilia studies, different pretreatment combined with mechanical pretreatment decrease retention time and increase biogas production efficiency (Cecilia et al, 2013. However, Zhang et al. claimed that it is hard to say which method is the best because each has its own strong point and weak point. Yet, until now, none of the pretreatment technologies has found a real breakthrough. Conclusions According to this study, rapeseed residues had the highest level of methane production in comparison with wheat residues. The rapeseed residues combine with cattle dung had suitable potential to methane production. The

  9. Lignin-enriched Fermentation Residues from Bioethanol Production of Fast-growing Poplar and Forage Sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José I Santos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The current challenges in developing a cost-effective bioethanol industry include the production of not only high-volume, low cost biofuels but also high-value products with minimal downstream waste. The up-grading of side-stream lignins from bioethanol production plants to novel high-value products will improve the profitability of the bioethanol industry; to do that, a precise understanding of lignin is required. In the present study, lignin-enriched fermentation residues from bioethanol production (steam explosion pretreatment, saccharification, and fermentation of fast-growing poplar and forage sorghum were characterized. In addition to the purity and composition, lignin structure (syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G ratio, inter-unit linkages was also analyzed with spectroscopy techniques such as Fourier transform infrared and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance. Bioethanol processing and feedstock origins seemed to be the main factors determining the purity, composition, and structure of lignins. Residual lignins from poplar and forage sorghum contained significant amounts of sugar and protein impurities. Poplar lignin showed a very high S/G ratio associated with p-hydroxybenzoate. A lower S/G ratio together with H lignin units and p-hydroxycinnamates (p-coumarate and ferulate was observed for forage sorghum lignin. The main inter-unit linkages present in both lignins were β-O-4´ aryl ether followed by resinols and phenylcoumarans.

  10. Utilization of lignite power generation residues for the production of lightweight aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Iason M; Stivanakis, Victor E

    2009-04-15

    A novel process is proposed for the utilization of lignite combustion solid residues in the production of inflammable lightweight aggregates (LWA). The process consists of two stages, pelletization and sintering, and carbon contained in BA was used as the process fuel. The main residues bottom ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) from Megalopolis power plant were characterized, mixed in different proportions and treated through pelletization and sintering process. Sintering benefits from combustion of BA carbon content and the product is a hardened porous cake. The energy required for achievement of high temperatures, in the range of 1250 degrees C, was offered by carbon combustion and CO(2) evolution is responsible for porous structure formation. Selected physical properties of sintered material relevant to use as lightweight aggregates were determined, including bulk density, porosity and water absorption. Bulk density varies from 0.83 to 0.91 g/cm(3), porosity varies from 60% to 64% and water absorption varies from 66% to 80%. LWA formed is used for the production of lightweight aggregate concrete (LWAC). Thermal conductivity coefficient varies from 0.25 to 0.37 W/mK (lower than maximum limit 0.43 W/mK) and compressive strength varies from 19 to 23 MPa (higher than minimum limit 17 MPa). The results indicate that sintering of lignite combustion residues is an efficient method of utilization of carbon containing BA and production of LWA for structural and insulating purposes. Carbon content of BA is a key factor in LWA production. Finally, this research work comprises the first proposed application for utilization of BA in Greece.

  11. Development of Analytical Method and Monitoring of Veterinary Drug Residues in Korean Animal Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Sang; Park, Su-Jeong; Choi, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jin-Sook; Kang, Myung-Hee; Choi, Bo-Kyung; Hur, Sun Jin

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the residual amount of veterinary drugs such as meloxicam, flunixin, and tulathromycin in animal products (beef, pork, horsemeat, and milk). Veterinary drugs have been widely used in the rearing of livestock to prevent and treat diseases. A total of 152 samples were purchased from markets located in major Korean cities (Seoul, Busan, Incheon, Daegu, Daejeon, Gwangju, Ulsan and Jeju), including Jeju. Veterinary drugs were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry according to the Korean Food Standards Code. The resulting data, which are located within 70-120% of recovery range and less than 20% of relative standard deviations, are in compliance with the criteria of CODEX. A total of five veterinary drugs were detected in 152 samples, giving a detection rate of approximately 3.3%; and no food source violated the guideline values. Our result indicated that most of the veterinary drug residues in animal products were below the maximum residue limits specified in Korea.

  12. Valorization of agroindustrial solid residues and residues from biofuel production chains by thermochemical conversion: a review, citing Brazil as a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Virmond

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides high industrial development, Brazil is also an agribusiness country. Each year about 330 million metrics tons (Mg of biomass residues are generated, requiring tremendous effort to develop biomass systems in which production, conversion and utilization of bio-based products are carried out efficiently and under environmentally sustainable conditions. For the production of biofuels, organic chemicals and materials, it is envisaged to follow a biorefinery model which includes modern and proven green chemical technologies such as bioprocessing, pyrolysis, gasification, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and other catalytic processes in order to make more complex molecules and materials on which a future sustainable society will be based. This paper presents promising options for valorization of Brazilian agroindustrial biomass sources and residues originating from the biofuel production chains as renewable energy sources and addresses the main aspects of the thermochemical technologies which have been applied.

  13. Nitrous oxide production from soils amended with biogas residues and cattle slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubaker, J; Odlare, M; Pell, M

    2013-07-01

    The amount of residues generated from biogas production has increased dramatically due to the worldwide interest in renewable energy. A common way to handle the residues is to use them as fertilizers in crop production. Application of biogas residues to agricultural soils may be accompanied with environmental risks, such as increased NO emission. In 24-d laboratory experiments, NO dynamics and total production were studied in arable soils (sandy, clay, and organic) amended with one of two types of anaerobically digested biogas residues (BR-A and BR-B) generated from urban and agricultural waste and nondigested cattle slurry (CS) applied at rates corresponding to 70 kg NH-N ha. Total NO-N losses from the sandy soil were higher after amendment with BR-B (0.32 g NO-N m) than BR-A or CS (0.02 and 0.18 g NO-N m, respectively). In the clay soil, NO-N losses were very low for CS (0.02 g NO-N m) but higher for BR-A and BR-B (0.25 and 0.15 g NO-N m, respectively). In the organic soil, CS gave higher total NO-N losses (0.31 g NO-N m) than BR-A or BR-B (0.09 and 0.08 g NO-N m, respectively). Emission peaks differed considerably between soils, occurring on Day 1 in the organic soil and on Days 11 to 15 in the sand, whereas in the clay the peak varied markedly (Days 1, 6, and 13) depending on residue type. In all treatments, NH concentration decreased with time, and NO concentration increased. Potential ammonium oxidation and potential denitrification activity increased significantly in the amended sandy soil but not in the organic soil and only in the clay amended with CS. The results showed that fertilization with BR can increase NO emissions and that the size is dependent on the total N and organic C content of the slurry and on soil type. In conclusion, the two types of BR and the CS are not interchangeable regarding their effects on NO production in different soils, and, hence, matching fertilizer type to soil type could reduce NO emissions. For instance, it could be

  14. Sustainability of bioethanol production from wheat with recycled residues as evaluated by Emergy assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppola, F.; Bastianoni, S.; Østergård, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    , were considered. Material and energy flows were assessed to evaluate the bioethanol yield, the production efficiency in terms of Emergy used compared to energy produced (transformity), and the environmental load (ELR) in terms of use of non-renewable resources. These three indicators varied among......An Emergy assessment study of 24 bioethanol production scenarios was carried out for the comparison of bioethanol production using winter wheat grains and/or straw as feedstock and conversion technologies based on starch (1st generation) and/or lignocellulose (2nd generation). An integrated biomass...... utilization system (IBUS) was used for combining the two kinds of feedstock. The crop was cultivated under four combinations of Danish soil conditions (sand or sandy loam) and crop managements (organic or conventional). For each of the production processes, two scenarios, with or without recycling of residues...

  15. Electrical conductivity of the screening residuals of coke production in context of ferrochromium production in a submerged arc furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousu, Arto; Mattila, Olli [Lab. of Process Metallurgy, Univ. of Oulu (Finland)

    2009-11-15

    Coke is used as a reducing agent in the production of ferrochromium in a submerged arc furnace (SAF). Its good electrical conductivity compared to other input materials makes it a dominant current conductivity substance in the burden. The resistance of the coke has to be high enough to ensure the proper functionality of the furnace. Used cokes for submerged arc furnace production are relatively small in size compared to e.g. blast furnace (BF) cokes. A common practice is to use screening residual coke, which is too small for the BF, in SAF. The goal of this study was to show differences in the electrical properties of screening residual cokes compared to coke formed in different parts of the coke battery, in dependence of particle size. The resistances of different cokes were measured and XRD measurements were performed to define the crystallographic structure of the selected cokes. The results indicate that small coke particles have higher overall resistance, which is due to their internal properties. This small weakly carbonized coke is formed in the middle of the coking battery and is subject to changes in varying coking practices. Continuous quality control of screening residual coke is needed to use it in the SAF. (orig.)

  16. Use of residual hydrocarbons treated by Thermal Plasma (recovery of energy by-products)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreno B, J.A.; Pacheco S, J.O.; Ramos F, F.; Cruz A, A.; Duran G, M.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of new technologies is getting greater importance for the control of pollution. One of them is the destruction of hazardous wastes treated by thermal plasma, which is of special interest for the efficient treatment of the hazardous wastes since the heat generated by thermal plasma is able to destroy the molecular bonds generating solids and gaseous products which do not represent danger for the human being and the environment. The thermal plasma is the suitable technology for treating a wide range of hazardous wastes, including the residual hydrocarbons from the refinement process of petroleum, plasma exceeds the barrier of 3000 Centigrade. The efficiency of the degradation of residues is greater than 99.99%. Toxic emissions are not generated to environment as SO 2 , NO x and CO 2 neither dioxins and furans by being a pyrolysis process. The use of hydrogen as fuel does not generate pollution to environment. (Author)

  17. The production of residual nuclides in Pb irradiated by 400 MeV/u carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, H.L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Ma, F., E-mail: mf@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, X.Y.; Ju, Y.Q.; Zhang, H.B.; Chen, L.; Luo, P. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhou, B. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Y.B.; Li, J.Y.; Xu, J.K. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liang, T.J. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, S.L. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Y.W.; Yang, L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-10-15

    The experiment was performed by irradiating a Pb foil with 400 MeV/u carbon beam at the HIRFL-CSR in Lanzhou, China. The experimental data was acquired by the off-line γ-spectroscopy method. 32 radioactive residual nuclides had been observed and their cross sections were determined. The measured results were compared with the results simulated by Monte Carlo code MCNPX2.7.0. The comparison shows that the simulated cross sections were underestimated for the fragments from A = 20 to 41 and A = 110 to 175. By fitting the measured and simulated cross sections to Rudstams semi-empirical formula, it was found that the charge distribution of products was asymmetric for the residual nuclides with a high mass number.

  18. Study of the acceleration of ammonia generation process from poultry residues aiming at hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egute, Nayara dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen, utilized in fuel cells, can be produced from a variety of intermediate chemicals, between them, the ammonia. The ammonia gas as a raw material for the hydrogen production has been used due to its high energetic content, facility of decomposition, high availability, low prices, low storage pressure and its by-products are environmentally correct. One of the sources of ammonia is poultry and egg production systems. In these systems the ammonia is produced from the decomposition of uric acid present in the excreta of birds. The residue from the poultry-rearing farms is the broiler litter and from the egg production system is the excreta without any substrate. The characterization of these residues was performed using the Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF), Elementary Analysis (CHN), Thermogravimetry and GC/MS - Gas chromatography/ Mass spectrometry. The studied factors which influence the ammonia volatilization were: nitrogen content, raising period, urease enzyme, temperature, pH and moisture content. The experiment results with poultry litter and excreta allow to conclude that the manipulation of the following parameters increased the ammonia emission: pH, nitrogen content, raising period, age of birds and excreta accumulation, urease enzyme and the temperature. The addition of different amounts of sand in the excreta and different volumes of water in the poultry litter inhibited the emission of ammonia. The variation of the quantity of material (broiler litter or excreta) and the volume of the flask used as incubator chamber showed no significant alterations to be chosen as a variable. The excreta was considered more appropriate than poultry litter for the objectives of this work due to the higher ammonia concentrations determined in this material. Due to the large amount of poultry litter and excreta from the production processes, the reuse of poultry residues to obtain ammonia is necessary to improve the quality of the local

  19. Quantitative determination and sampling of azathioprine residues for cleaning validation in production area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Tatiana Tatit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Kedor-Hackmann, Erika Rosa Maria; Santoro, Maria Inês Rocha Miritello

    2007-03-12

    Cleaning validation is an integral part of current good manufacturing practices in any pharmaceutical industry. Nowadays, azathioprine and several other pharmacologically potent pharmaceuticals are manufactured in same production area. Carefully designed cleaning validation and its evaluation can ensure that residues of azathioprine will not carry over and cross contaminate the subsequent product. The aim of this study was to validate simple analytical method for verification of residual azathioprine in equipments used in the production area and to confirm efficiency of cleaning procedure. The HPLC method was validated on a LC system using Nova-Pak C18 (3.9 mm x 150 mm, 4 microm) and methanol-water-acetic acid (20:80:1, v/v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1). UV detection was made at 280 nm. The calibration curve was linear over a concentration range from 2.0 to 22.0 microg mL(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The detection limit (DL) and quantitation limit (QL) were 0.09 and 0.29 microg mL(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precision expressed as relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) were below 2.0%. The mean recovery of method was 99.19%. The mean extraction-recovery from manufacturing equipments was 83.5%. The developed UV spectrophotometric method could only be used as limit method to qualify or reject cleaning procedure in production area. Nevertheless, the simplicity of spectrophotometric method makes it useful for routine analysis of azathioprine residues on cleaned surface and as an alternative to proposed HPLC method.

  20. Ceramic residue for producing cements, method for the production thereof, and cements containing same

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez de Rojas, María Isabel; Frías, Moisés; Asensio, Eloy; Medina Martínez, César

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a ceramic residue produced from construction and demolition residues, as a puzzolanic component of cements. The invention also relates to a method for producing said ceramic residues and to another method of producing cements using said residues. This type of residue is collected in recycling plants, where it is managed. This invention facilitates a potential commercial launch.

  1. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  2. Production of n-rich Nuclei along the Closed Shell N=126 in the collision 136Xe + 208Pb @E lab =870 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, D.; Vardaci, E.; Kozulin, E. M.; Zagrebaev, V. A.; Corradi, L.; Pulcini, A.; La Rana, G.; Itkis, I. M.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Novikov, K.; Harca, I.; Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Montanari, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Szilner, S.; Mijatović, T.; Trzaska, W. H.

    2018-05-01

    Multi-nucleon transfer reactions are nowadays the only known mean to produce neutron-rich nuclei in the Terra Incognita. The closed-shell region N=126 is crucial for both studying shell-quenching in exotic nuclei and the r-process, being its last “waiting-point”. The choice of suitable reactions is challenging and a favorable case is 136Xe+208Pb, near the Coulomb barrier, because their neutron shell-closures play a stabilizing role, favoring the proton-transfer from lead to xenon. TOF-TOF data were analyzed to reconstruct the mass-energy distribution of the primary fragments. Preliminary results of an experiment held at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro with PRISMA, aimed at A and Z identification of the products, will be shown.

  3. Incorporation of feasibility study of residue thin kaolin in of porcelain formulations production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, V.S. de; Ferreira, E.C.; Oliveira, T.M. de; Freitas, K.D. de Araujo; Soares Filho, J.E.; Sousa, F.J.P. de

    2016-01-01

    The porcelain is the more advanced product among traditional ceramics due to the high technology used in its manufacture and its excellent technological and aesthetic properties. Due to the continuing worldwide development, kaolin processing industries have increased their productivity and consequently generating large amounts of waste, contributing to environmental degradation. Studies are being conducted to analyze the incorporation of such wastes in the ceramic mass compositions. The objective of this study was to evaluate 4 formulations of porcelain as the possibility of using waste coming from the last stage of kaolin processing. Processing occurred by wet grinding process, with uniaxial compacting pressure of 45 MPa after heat treatment at 1250 ° C. Technological tests were carried out physical and mechanical product. The results showed that the addition of fine kaolin residue was presented as an efficient alternative for the porcelain industry. (author)

  4. Screening of antibiotics and chemical analysis of penicillin residue in fresh milk and traditional dairy products in Oyo state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Olufemi Olatoye

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: There are global public health and economic concerns on chemical residues in food of animal origin. The use of antibiotics in dairy cattle for the treatment of diseases such as mastitis has contributed to the presence of residues in dairy products. Penicillin residues as low as 1 ppb can lead to allergic reactions and shift of resistance patterns in microbial population as well as interfere with the processing of several dairy products. Antibiotic monitoring is an essential quality control measure in safe milk production. This study was aimed at determining antibiotic residue contamination and the level of penicillin in dairy products from Fulani cattle herds in Oyo State. Materials and Methods: The presence of antibiotic residues in 328 samples of fresh milk, 180 local cheese (wara, and 90 fermented milk (nono from Southwest, Nigeria were determined using Premi® test kit (R-Biopharm AG, Germany followed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of penicillin-G residue. Results: Antibiotic residues were obtained in 40.8%, 24.4% and 62.3% fresh milk, wara and nono, respectively. Penicillin-G residue was also detected in 41.1% fresh milk, 40.2% nono and 24.4% wara at mean concentrations of 15.22±0.61, 8.24±0.50 and 7.6±0.60 μg/L with 39.3%, 36.7% and 21.1%, respectively, containing penicillin residue above recommended Codex maximum residue limit (MRL of 5 μg/L in dairy. There was no significant difference between the mean penicillin residues in all the dairy products in this study. Conclusion: The results are of food safety concern since the bulk of the samples and substantial quantities of dairy products in Oyo state contained violative levels of antibiotic residues including penicillin residues in concentrations above the MRL. This could be due to indiscriminate and unregulated administration of antibiotics to dairy cattle. Regulatory control of antibiotic use, rapid screening of milk and dairy farmers

  5. UTILIZATION OF CANDEIA (Eremanthus erythropappus WOOD RESIDUES IN THE PRODUCTION OF PARTICLEBOAD WITH ADDITION OF PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimeire Cavalcante dos Santos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate, through the physical and mechanical properties, the panels production viability with inclusion of candeia (Eremanthus erythropappus wood residues and the influence of different percentages of PET (polyethylene terephthalate, as well as the presence and absence of paraffin on the properties of particleboard. There were used candeia wood residues, after oil extraction, in association with eucalypt wood in the proportion of 25:75 and urea-formaldehyde adhesive (12% for panels production; besides the PET incorporation in particle form, which were originated from soft drink bottles and included in three percentages (0%, 25% e 50% in treatments in the presence (1% and absence of paraffin emulsion. The panels pressing cycle occurred under electric heating at 160°C, 0.4 MPa of pressure, during 8 minutes. The experimental design was entirely randomized with three repetitions. The properties evaluated, according to DIN (1971, ASTM D 1037-93 (1995 and CS 236-66 (1968 standards, were: internal bonding; static bending (modulus of elasticity – MOE and rupture – MOR; compression parallel to the panel surface; water absorption and thickness swelling, after 2 and 24 hours water immersion. The panel mechanical properties decreased with increasing in PET level; in general, paraffin addition did not improve the wood/plastic panels resistance and higroscopicity; the utilization of candeia wood residues is viable, in association with eucalypt wood, for the wood/plastic panel production, since the properties attended the minimum demands of the standards, except static bending.

  6. [Interlaboratory Study on Evaporation Residue Test for Food Contact Products (Report 2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Mutsuga, Motoh; Abe, Tomoyuki; Abe, Yutaka; Amano, Homare; Ishihara, Kinuyo; Ohsaka, Ikue; Ohno, Haruka; Ohno, Yuichiro; Ozaki, Asako; Kakihara, Yoshiteru; Kobayashi, Hisashi; Sakuragi, Hiroshi; Shibata, Hiroshi; Shirono, Katsuhiro; Sekido, Haruko; Takasaka, Noriko; Takenaka, Yu; Tajima, Yoshiyasu; Tanaka, Aoi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Nakanishi, Toru; Nomura, Chie; Haneishi, Nahoko; Hayakawa, Masato; Miura, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Miku; Yamada, Kyohei; Watanabe, Kazunari; Sato, Kyoko

    2018-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was performed to evaluate the equivalence between an official method and a modified method of evaporation residue test using heptane as a food-simulating solvent for oily or fatty foods, based on the Japanese Food Sanitation Law for food contact products. Twenty-three laboratories participated, and tested the evaporation residues of nine test solutions as blind duplicates. In the official method, heating for evaporation was done with a water bath. In the modified method, a hot plate was used for evaporation, and/or a vacuum concentration procedure was skipped. In most laboratories, the test solutions were heated until just prior to dryness, and then allowed to dry under residual heat. Statistical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between the two methods. Accordingly, the modified method provides performance equal to the official method, and is available as an alternative method. Furthermore, an interlaboratory study was performed to evaluate and compare two leaching solutions (95% ethanol and isooctane) used as food-simulating solvents for oily or fatty foods in the EU. The results demonstrated that there was no significant difference between heptane and these two leaching solutions.

  7. Highly sensitive and selective colorimetric detection of cartap residue in agricultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Daohong; Tang, Yafan; Wang, Yashan; Yan, Fei; Li, Zhonghong; Wang, Jianlong; Zhou, H Susan

    2012-11-15

    The residue of pesticide has posed a serious threat to human health. Fast, broad-spectrum detection methods are necessary for on-site screening of various types of pesticides. With citrate-coated Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) as colorimetric probes, a visual and spectrophotometric method for rapid assay of cartap, which is one of the most important pesticides in agriculture, is reported for the first time. Based on the color change of Au colloid solution from wine-red to blue resulting from the aggregation of Au NPs, cartap could be detected in the concentration range of 0.05-0.6 mg/kg with a low detection limit of 0.04 mg/kg, which is much lower than the strictest cartap safety requirement of 0.1 mg/kg. Due to the limited research on the rapid detection of cartap based on Au NPs, the performance of the present method was evaluated through aggregation kinetics, interference influence, and sample pretreatment. To further demonstrate the selectivity and applicability of the method, cartap detection is realized in cabbage and tea with excellent analyte concentration recovery. These results demonstrate that the present method provides an easy and effective way to analyze pesticide residue in common products, which is of benefit for the rapid risk evaluation and on-site screening of pesticide residue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Biochar from different residues on soil properties and common bean production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isley Cristiellem Bicalho da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The production of biochar from organic residues promises to be an interesting strategy for the management of organic waste. To assess the effect of biochar on soil properties and the production and nutrition of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., three simultaneous experiments were conducted in a greenhouse with different biochar from organic residues (rice husk, sawdust, and sorghum silage used as filtration material for swine biofertilizer. In each experiment the treatments consisted of five different biochar concentrations (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 L m−3, arranged in a completely randomized design, with four repetitions. In the experiments, the use of biochar increased soil pH, cation exchange capacity, nutrient availability in the soil, and nutrient accumulation in grains. The biochar concentrations corresponding to the maximum production of grain dry matter of bean plants were 100, 68, and 71 L m−3 for biochar from rice husk filter (BRHF, biochar from sawdust filter (BSF, and biochar from sorghum silage filter (BSSF, respectively.

  9. Environmental assessment of mild bisulfite pretreatment of forest residues into fermentable sugars for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaneshiudu, Ikechukwu C; Ganguly, Indroneil; Pierobon, Francesca; Bowers, Tait; Eastin, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Sugar production via pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic feedstock, in this case softwood harvest residues, is a critical step in the biochemical conversion pathway towards drop-in biofuels. Mild bisulfite (MBS) pretreatment is an emerging option for the breakdown and subsequent processing of biomass towards fermentable sugars. An environmental assessment of this process is critical to discern its future sustainability in the ever-changing biofuels landscape. The subsequent cradle-to-gate assessment of a proposed sugar production facility analyzes sugar made from woody biomass using MBS pretreatment across all seven impact categories (functional unit 1 kg dry mass sugar), with a specific focus on potential global warming and eutrophication impacts. The study found that the eutrophication impact (0.000201 kg N equivalent) is less than the impacts from conventional beet and cane sugars, while the global warming impact (0.353 kg CO2 equivalent) falls within the range of conventional processes. This work discusses some of the environmental impacts of designing and operating a sugar production facility that uses MBS as a method of treating cellulosic forest residuals. The impacts of each unit process in the proposed facility are highlighted. A comparison to other sugar-making process is detailed and will inform the growing biofuels literature.

  10. Radiotracer studies of agrochemical residues in meat, milk and related products of livestock and poultry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The joint FAO/IAEA programme was initiated in 1981 and terminates with this report. The specific objectives of the programme have been to evaluate the magnitude, fate and significance of agricultural chemical residues in edible tissues and by-products of livestock and poultry, aided by radiotracer techniques. It was anticipated that the data arising from studies conducted under this programme would be useful in assessing the toxicological significance of studied chemicals to exposed animals and to humans who may consume potentially polluted meat, milk or eggs. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 13 papers in this report

  11. Safety aspects of targets for ADTT: Activity, volatile products, residual heat release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, E.V.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Lunev, V.P.; Shubin, Yu.N.

    1999-01-01

    Safety aspects of heavy metal liquid targets for the accelerator driven systems connected with the activity accumulation and residual energy release due to the irradiation with high energy proton beam are discussed. The results obtained for the lead-bismuth target that are under construction in IPPE now in the frame of ISTC Project No. 559 are briefly presented. The calculations and the analysis of the accumulation of the spallation reaction products, activity and energy release at various moments after the accelerator shutdown are presented. The concentrations of the reaction products, the total and partial activities, the activities of volatile products are determined. The contributions of the short-lived nuclides important for the prediction of the facility behaviour in regimes with the accelerator beam trips. The calculations and analysis of the residual energy release due to different decay type have been performed. The conclusions are as follows. The obtained results showed that long lived radioactivity accumulates mainly due to primary nuclear reactions. Secondary reactions are responsible for the production of small number of long-lived isotopes Bi-207, Po-210 and some others, being generated by radiative capture of low energy neutrons. It is possible to make a conclusion that neutrons in the energy range 20 - 800 MeV and protons with energy above 100 MeV give main contribution to the total activity generation although these parts of spectra inside the target give comparatively small contribution to the total flux. The correct consideration of short-lived nuclides contribution is the main problem in the analysis of the target behaviour in the case of short accelerator shutdowns. They make the determining contribution to the both activity and the heat release at the first moments after the accelerator shutdown, creating the intermediate links and additional channels for the long-lived nuclides accumulation chains. The strong dependence of calculated

  12. Reusing a residue of the oil industry (FCC) in the production of building elements

    OpenAIRE

    Caicedo Casso, Eduard Andrés; Universidad del Valle; Mejía de Gutiérrez, Ruby; Universidad del Valle; Gordillo Suárez, Marisol; Universidad Autónoma de Occidente; Torres Agredo, Janneth; Universidad Nacional de Colombia, sede Palmira

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the feasibility of using a residue of spent catalyst (FCC) of the cracking process, from a Colombian oil company, in the production of building elements such as locks and pavers. To define the optimal mix of portland cement/FCC, Portland cement mortars with FCC ratios between 0 and 70% as replacement of cement were prepared and its compressive strength is evaluated at ages up to 28 days of curing. Using a statistical processing, applying the methodology of response, the pr...

  13. Optimization of ethanol production from garcinia cambogia residues and the effects of its medicinal component on production yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, H.; Zhang, F.

    2017-01-01

    Garcinia cambogia, a Chinese herbal medicine, was popular due to its effect for weight loss. The main medical component inside was determined to be hydroxycitric acid (HCA). To realize the resource technology of garcinia cambogia residue, Optimum ethanol production from residues was investigated, and the effects of remaining HCA on the ethanol yield were investigated. A Plackett-Burman experimental design was used to screen the significance of several influencing factors, and cellulase, yeast extract, and KH2PO4 were observed to exert important effects. The optimum ethanol fermentation conditions were determined through an orthogonal design to include a cellulase concentration of 100 U/g, a yeast extract concentration of 15 g/L, and a KH2PO4 concentration of 1.0 g/L. The ethanol concentration obtained under optimal conditions was 4.0 g/L. The remained HCA in the residues showed minimal influences on ethanol fermentation and could even increase ethanol yield at low concentrations. (author)

  14. Agrochemical characterisation of the solid by-products and residues from the winery and distillery industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, M A; Moral, R; Paredes, C; Pérez-Espinosa, A; Moreno-Caselles, J; Pérez-Murcia, M D

    2008-01-01

    The winery and distillery industry produces a great quantity of residues, whose management and disposal are environmental problems due to their seasonal character and some polluting characteristics. The main solid by-products and residues generated are grape stalk, grape pomace or marc, wine lee, exhausted grape marc and winery sludge. In this study, 87 samples of winery and distillery residues were collected from different Spanish wineries and distilleries. Electrical conductivity, pH, total organic matter, organic carbon, polyphenols and contents of plant nutrients and heavy metals were determined. The purpose of this research was to study the composition of these wastes and to find relationships in order to use easily analysable parameters to estimate their composition. In general, the winery and distillery residues showed low pH (mean values ranged from 3.8 to 6.8) and electrical conductivity values (1.62-6.15 dS m(-1)) and high organic matter (669-920 g kg(-1)) and macronutrient contents, especially in K (11.9-72.8 g kg(-1)). However, a notable polyphenol concentration (1.2-19.0 g kg(-1)) and low micronutrient and heavy metal contents were also observed, some of these properties being incompatible with agricultural requirements. Therefore, conditioning treatments are necessary prior to possible use of these wastes. In all wastes, significant correlations were found between easily determined parameters, such as pH, electrical conductivity and total organic matter, and most of the parameters studied. The regression models obtained are also discussed.

  15. Primordial nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The recent detection of intergalactic helium by NASA's Astro-2 mission backs up two earlier measurements by ESA and the University of California, San Diego, using instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Taken together, these results give strong evidence that this helium is primordial, confirming a key prediction of the Big Bang theory. The amount of helium the results imply could also account for some of the Universe's invisible dark matter - material which affects galactic motion but is otherwise undetectable. According to theory, helium nuclei formed at around 100 seconds after the Big Bang, but the amount of helium depended on even earlier events. Initially, protons turned into neutrons with the same probability that neutrons turned into protons. But after about one second, the Universe had cooled down enough for the weak interaction to freeze out. Neutrons continued to decay into the slightly lighter protons, whilst the opposite reaction became much more scarce. At around 100 seconds, thermonuclear fusion reactions could begin, and all the neutrons that were left became absorbed into helium nuclei, leaving the remaining protons locked up in hydrogen. The ratio of helium to hydrogen was therefore determined by events occurring when the Universe was just one second old. Standard models of primordial nucleosynthesis fix this ratio at slightly less than 2 5% by mass. All heavier elements were cooked up much later in the stars, and amount to less than 1 % of the Universe's mass. These predictions have been borne out remarkably well by observation, although proof of the primordial origins of hydrogen and helium has remained elusive until now. Big Bang nucleosynthesis goes on to estimate that primordial baryonic matter in the form of light nuclei could account for around 10% of the Universe's dark matter. All three recent measurements used the same technique of looking at distant quasars, some of the most luminous objects in the Universe, to

  16. Utilization of residue from cassava starch processing for production of fermentable sugar by enzymatic hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Reis Fontinelle SOUTO

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to characterize and perform enzymatic hydrolysis of cassava peeling residue (peel and inner peel, mainly composed of peels and small pieces. Residue was sanitized, dried at 55 °C for 24 hours and ground. The obtained flour showed pH of 4.85; 72.53 g 100 g–1 moisture; 5.18 mL 1M NaOH 100 g–1 acidity; 60.68 g 100 g–1 starch; 1.08 g 100 g–1 reducing sugar; 1.63 g 100g–1 ash; 0.86 g 100 g–1 lipid and 3.97 g 100 g–1 protein. Enzymatic hydrolysis was carried out by means of rotational central composite design, analyzing the effects of concentrations of α-amylase enzyme (10 to 50 U g starch–1, and the amyloglucosidase enzyme (80 to 400 U g starch–1 on variable responses: percent conversion of starch into reducing sugars (RSC and soluble solid content (SS. Highest values of RSC (110% and SS (12 °Brix were observed when using the maximum concentration of amyloglucosidase and throughout the concentration range of α-amylase. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cassava peel is feasible and allows the use of hydrolysate in fermentation processes for the production of various products, such as alcoholic drinks, vinegar, among others.

  17. Utilization of residue from cassava starch processing for production of fermentable sugar by enzymatic hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Reis Fontinelle SOUTO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to characterize and perform enzymatic hydrolysis of cassava peeling residue (peel and inner peel, mainly composed of peels and small pieces. Residue was sanitized, dried at 55 °C for 24 hours and ground. The obtained flour showed pH of 4.85; 72.53 g 100 g–1 moisture; 5.18 mL 1M NaOH 100 g–1 acidity; 60.68 g 100 g–1 starch; 1.08 g 100 g–1 reducing sugar; 1.63 g 100g–1 ash; 0.86 g 100 g–1 lipid and 3.97 g 100 g–1 protein. Enzymatic hydrolysis was carried out by means of rotational central composite design, analyzing the effects of concentrations of α-amylase enzyme (10 to 50 U g starch–1, and the amyloglucosidase enzyme (80 to 400 U g starch–1 on variable responses: percent conversion of starch into reducing sugars (RSC and soluble solid content (SS. Highest values of RSC (110% and SS (12 °Brix were observed when using the maximum concentration of amyloglucosidase and throughout the concentration range of α-amylase. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cassava peel is feasible and allows the use of hydrolysate in fermentation processes for the production of various products, such as alcoholic drinks, vinegar, among others.

  18. Isolation and characterization of lignin from the oak wood bioethanol production residue for adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Jung; Kim, Hyun Joo; Cho, Eun Jin; Song, Younho; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Lignin was isolated from the residue of bioethanol production with oak wood via alkaline and catalyzed organosolv treatments at ambient temperature to improve the purity of lignin for the materials application. The isolated lignins were analyzed for their chemical composition by nitrobenzene oxidation method and their functionality was characterized via wet chemistry method, element analysis, (1)H NMR, GPC and FTIR-ATR. The isolated lignin by acid catalyzed organosolv treatment (Acid-OSL) contained a higher lignin content, aromatic proton, phenolic hydroxyl group and a lower nitrogen content that is more reactive towards chemical modification. The lignin-based adhesives were prepared and the bond strength was measured to evaluate the enhanced reactivity of lignin by the isolation. Two steps of phenolation and methylolation were applied for the modification of the isolated lignins and their tensile strengths were evaluated for the use as an adhesive. The acid catalyzed organosolv lignin-based adhesives had comparable bond strength to phenol-formaldehyde adhesives. The analysis of lignin-based adhesives by FTIR-ATR and TGA showed structural similarity to phenol adhesive. The results demonstrate that the reactivity of lignin was enhanced by isolation from hardwood bioethanol production residues at ambient temperature and it could be used in a value-added application to produce lignin-based adhesives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ethanol production process from banana fruit and its lignocellulosic residues: Energy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez-Arredondo, H.I. [Grupo de Investigacion Bioprocesos y Flujos Reactivos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellin, Calle 59 A N 63-20 (Colombia); Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida Professor Mello Moraes 2231 (Brazil); Ruiz-Colorado, A.A. [Grupo de Investigacion Bioprocesos y Flujos Reactivos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellin, Calle 59 A N 63-20 (Colombia); De Oliveira, S. Jr. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Escola Politecnica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida Professor Mello Moraes 2231 (Brazil)

    2010-07-15

    Tropical countries, such as Brazil and Colombia, have the possibility of using agricultural lands for growing biomass to produce bio-fuels such as biodiesel and ethanol. This study applies an energy analysis to the production process of anhydrous ethanol obtained from the hydrolysis of starch and cellulosic and hemicellulosic material present in the banana fruit and its residual biomass. Four different production routes were analyzed: acid hydrolysis of amylaceous material (banana pulp and banana fruit) and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic material (flower stalk and banana skin). The analysis considered banana plant cultivation, feedstock transport, hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation, dehydration, residue treatment and utility plant. The best indexes were obtained for amylaceous material for which mass performance varied from 346.5 L/t to 388.7 L/t, Net Energy Value (NEV) ranged from 9.86 MJ/L to 9.94 MJ/L and the energy ratio was 1.9 MJ/MJ. For lignocellulosic materials, the figures were less favorable; mass performance varied from 86.1 to 123.5 L/t, NEV from 5.24 to 8.79 MJ/L and energy ratio from 1.3 to 1.6 MJ/MJ. The analysis showed, however, that both processes can be considered energetically feasible. (author)

  20. Enhanced Ethanol Production with Mixed Lignocellulosic Substrates from Commercial Furfural and Cassava Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF is an attractive process configuration for bio-ethanol production. Further reductions in process cost of SSF are expected with the use of waste agricultural or industrial materials as feedstock. In the current study, two industrial lignocellulosic wastes, cassava residues (CR and furfural residues (FR, were combined during SSF for ethanol production due to their value-added applications and positive environmental impacts. After CR were liquefied and saccharified, saccharification liquid was added to SSF of FR. The effect of substrate fractions was investigated in terms of ethanol yield, byproduct concentration and the number of yeast cells. Besides, a natural surfactant, Gleditsia saponin, was added to investigate the effect of FR lignin on SSF with 20% substrate concentration. The results showed that increasing the ratio of CR/FR improved the ethanol yield and that the ethanol yield was also increased gradually by increasing the substrate concentration from 6% to 12%. A high ethanol concentration of 36.0 g/L was obtained under the condition of CR:FR = 2:1 with 12% substrate concentration, reaching 71.1% of the theoretical yield. However, Gleditsia saponin did not affect the ethanol yield, indicating the insignificant effect of lignin in SSF with low lignin content in the reaction system.

  1. Modelling of different enzyme productions by solid-state fermentation on several agro-industrial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Ana Belen; Blandino, Ana; Webb, Colin; Caro, Ildefonso

    2016-11-01

    A simple kinetic model, with only three fitting parameters, for several enzyme productions in Petri dishes by solid-state fermentation is proposed in this paper, which may be a valuable tool for simulation of this type of processes. Basically, the model is able to predict temporal fungal enzyme production by solid-state fermentation on complex substrates, maximum enzyme activity expected and time at which these maxima are reached. In this work, several fermentations in solid state were performed in Petri dishes, using four filamentous fungi grown on different agro-industrial residues, measuring xylanase, exo-polygalacturonase, cellulose and laccase activities over time. Regression coefficients after fitting experimental data to the proposed model turned out to be quite high in all cases. In fact, these results are very interesting considering, on the one hand, the simplicity of the model and, on the other hand, that enzyme activities correspond to different enzymes, produced by different fungi on different substrates.

  2. Neoclassical versus Frontier Production Models ? Testing for the Skewness of Regression Residuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuosmanen, T; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    The empirical literature on production and cost functions is divided into two strands. The neoclassical approach concentrates on model parameters, while the frontier approach decomposes the disturbance term to a symmetric noise term and a positively skewed inefficiency term. We propose a theoreti......The empirical literature on production and cost functions is divided into two strands. The neoclassical approach concentrates on model parameters, while the frontier approach decomposes the disturbance term to a symmetric noise term and a positively skewed inefficiency term. We propose...... a theoretical justification for the skewness of the inefficiency term, arguing that this skewness is the key testable hypothesis of the frontier approach. We propose to test the regression residuals for skewness in order to distinguish the two competing approaches. Our test builds directly upon the asymmetry...

  3. Net emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere when using forest residues for production of heat and electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zetterberg, L.; Hansen, O.

    1998-05-01

    This study estimates net emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere from the use of forest residues for production of heat and electricity. In the report, the use of forest residues for energy production is called residue-usage. Our results show that for a turnover period of 80 years, the net emission of CO 2 to the atmosphere is 15.8 kg CO 2 -C/MWh (3.1-31.6 kg CO 2 -C/MWh), which represents 16% of the total carbon content in the wood fuel (3%-32%). Fossil fuel consumption is responsible for 3.1 kg CO 2 -C/MWh of this. Residue-usage may produce indirect emissions or uptake of carbon dioxide, e.g. through changes in production conditions, changes in the turnover of carbon in the humus layer or through a reduction of the amount of forest fires. Due to uncertainties in data it is hard to quantify these indirect effects. In some cases it is hard even to determine their signs. As a consequence of this, we have chosen not to include the indirect effects in our estimates of net emissions from residue-usage. Instead we discuss these effects in a qualitative manner. It may seem surprising that the biogenic part of the residue-usage produces a net emission of carbon dioxide considering that carbon has originated from the atmosphere. The explanation is that the residue-usage systematically leads to earlier emissions than would be the case if the residues were left on the ground. If forest residues are left to decay, in the long run a pool of carbon might be created in the ground. This does not happen with residue-usage 33 refs, 4 figs, 12 tabs

  4. Comparative analysis for power generation and ethanol production from sugarcane residual biomass in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seabra, Joaquim E.A.; Macedo, Isaias C.

    2011-01-01

    This work compares the technical, economic and environmental (GHG emissions mitigation) performance of power generation and ethanol production from sugarcane residual biomass, considering conversion plants adjacent to a sugarcane mill in Brazil. Systems performances were simulated for a projected enzymatic saccharification co-fermentation plant (Ethanol option) and for a commercial steam-Rankine power plant (Electricity option). Surplus bagasse from the mill would be used as fuel/raw material for conversion, while cane trash collected from the field would be used as supplementary fuel at the mill. For the Electricity option, the sugarcane biorefinery (mill+adjacent plant) would produce 91 L of ethanol per tonne of cane and export 130 kWh/t of cane, while for the Ethanol option the total ethanol production would be 124 L/t of cane with an electricity surplus of 50 kWh/t cane. The return on investment (ROI) related to the biochemical conversion route was 15.9%, compared with 23.2% for the power plant, for the conditions in Brazil. Considering the GHG emissions mitigation, the environmentally preferred option is the biochemical conversion route: the net avoided emissions associated to the adjacent plants are estimated to be 493 and 781 kgCO 2 eq/t of dry bagasse for the Electricity and Ethanol options, respectively. - Research Highlights: → Power generation would present better profitability than ethanol production from sugarcane residues in Brazil, in the reference scenario adopted here. → The Ethanol option would be able to mitigate more GHG emissions in Brazil. → The economics for the ethanol production technology are more likely to improve in the future.

  5. Production of green biodegradable plastics of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) from renewable resources of agricultural residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahman, Yaser; Ugwu, Charles U

    2014-08-01

    This work describes potential opportunities for utilization of agro-industrial residues to produce green biodegradable plastics of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). Wheat straws were examined with good efficacy of carbon substrates using Cupriavidus necator. Production was examined in separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) in the presence and absence of WS hydrolysis enzymes, and in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with enzymes. Results showed that production of PHB in SSF was more efficient in terms of viable cell count, cell dry weight, and PHB production and yield compared to those of SHF and glucose-control cultures. While glucose control experiment produced 4.6 g/L PHB; SSF produced 10.0 g/L compared to 7.1 g/L in SHF when utilizing enzymes during WS hydrolysis. Results showed that most of sugars produced during the hydrolysis were consumed in SHF (~98 %) compared to 89.2 % in SSF. Results also demonstrated that a combination of glucose and xylose can compensate for the excess carbon required for enhancing PHB production by C. necator. However, higher concentration of sugars at the beginning of fermentation in SHF can lead to cell inhibition and consequently catabolite repressions. Accordingly, results demonstrated that the gradual release of sugars in SSF enhanced PHB production. Moreover, the presence of sugars other than glucose and xylose can eliminate PHB degradation in medium of low carbon substrate concentrations in SSF.

  6. Coherent production of π+ and π- mesons by charged-current interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos on neon nuclei at the Fermilab Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P. P.; Baba, P. V.; Badyal, S. K.; Barth, M.; Baton, J. P.; Bingham, H. H.; Brucker, E. B.; Burnstein, R. A.; Campbell, R. C.; Cence, R.; Chatterjee, T. K.; Clayton, E. F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; de Prospo, D.; Devanand; de Wolf, E.; Faulkner, P. J.; Fretter, W. B.; Gupta, V. K.; Guy, J.; Hanlon, J.; Harigel, G.; Harris, F.; Jabiol, M. A.; Jacques, P.; Jain, V.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, M. D.; Jones, R. W.; Kafka, T.; Kalelkar, M.; Kasper, P.; Kasper, P.; Kaul, G. L.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Koller, E. L.; Krawiec, R. J.; Lauko, M.; Lys, J.; Mann, W. A.; Marage, P.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, D. B.; Mittra, I. S.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Moreels, J.; Morrison, D. R.; Myatt, G.; Nailor, P.; Naon, R.; Napier, A.; Neveu, M.; Passmore, D.; Peters, M. W.; Peterson, V. Z.; Plano, R.; Rao, N. K.; Rubin, H. A.; Sacton, J.; Saitta, B.; Schmid, P.; Schmitz, N.; Schneps, J.; Sekulin, R.; Sewell, S.; Singh, J. B.; Sood, P. M.; Smart, W.; Stamer, P.; Varvell, K. E.; Venus, W.; Verluyten, L.; Voyvodic, L.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wainstein, S.; Willocq, S.; Wittek, W.; Yost (E632 Collaboration), G. P.

    1989-11-01

    Coherent single-pion production on neon nuclei is studied using the Fermilab 15-ft bubble chamber filled with a heavy Ne-H2 mixture and exposed to the Tevatron neutrino beam. In the neutrino energy range 40-300 GeV, the net signal is 20+/-6 events, giving a corrected rate per charged-current event of (0.26+/-0.10)%. The cross section and kinematic distributions agree with the predictions of a model based on partial conservation of axial-vector current and meson dominance.

  7. Using a decision support system to optimize production of agricultural crop residue Biofeedstock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Rope, Ronald C.; Fink, Raymond K.

    2007-01-01

    For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw. In this paper we report the results of 2 yr of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Ag's ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock. For both years, the DSS4Ag reduced the cost and amount of fertilizers used and increased grower profit, while reducing the biomass produced. The DSS4Ag results show that when a biorefinery infrastructure is in place and growers have a strong market for their straw it is not economically advantageous to increase fertilization in order to try to produce more straw. This suggests that other solutions, such as single-pass selective harvest, must be implemented to meet national goals for the amount of biomass that will be available for collection and use for bioenergy. (author)

  8. Antioxidant, Anti-Tyrosinase and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Oil Production Residues from Camellia tenuifloria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yuan Chiou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Camellia tenuifloria is an indigenous Camellia species used for the production of camellia oil in Taiwan. This study investigated for the first time the potential antioxidant, anti-tyrosinase and anti-inflammatory activities of oil production byproducts, specifically those of the fruit shell, seed shell, and seed pomace from C. tenuifloria. It was found that the crude ethanol extract of the seed shell had the strongest DPPH scavenging and mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activities, followed by the fruit shell, while seed pomace was the weakest. The IC50 values of crude extracts and fractions on monophenolase were smaller than diphenolase. The phenolic-rich methanol fraction of seed shell (SM reduced nitric oxide (NO production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. It also repressed the expression of IL-1β, and secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and IL-6 in response to LPS. SM strongly stimulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 expression and addition of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, reversed the inhibition of NO production, indicating the involvement of HO-1 in its anti-inflammatory activity. The effects observed in this study provide evidence for the reuse of residues from C. tenuifloria in the food additive, medicine and cosmetic industries.

  9. Effect of gamma radiation on residual nitrate and nitrite in some meat and chicken products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afifi, S.A.; Abdel-Daiem, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out to establish the residual nitrate and nitrite and concentrations of six heavy metals in meat products samples that purchased from retail outlets in Sharkia governorate, Egypt. The possibility of using gamma irradiation at doses of 3, 5 and 7 KGy for reducing residual nitrate and nitrite was studied. The results showed that most of samples under investigation above the maximum permissible limit of nitrate in Egypt. Gamma irradiation at doses of 3, 5 and 7 KGy reduced the levels of nitrate and nitrite proportionally to applied doses. The irradiation dose of 7 KGy was more effective for reducing the level of residual nitrate and nitrite. Heavy metals concentrations were determined using the inductively coupled plasma spectrometry (ICPS) in non-irradiated samples. The results showed that the concentration of Pb in meat products was ranged between 0.643-0.828, 0.548, 0.598-0.844, 0.574-0.877, 0.324-0.568 and 0.156-0.432 mg/kg (wet weight basis) in pastirma, chicken luncheon, fresh sausages, burger, minced chicken and minced beef meat, respectively, but the values of Hg ranged between 0.0965-0.839, 0.121, 0.147-0.218, 0.114-0.258, 0.087-0.143 and 0.057-0.124 mg/kg in pastirma, chicken luncheon, fresh sausages, burger, minced chicken and beef meat, respectively. The content of iron ranged between 0.336, 0.362-4.284, 0.364-0.611, 0.264-0.336 and 0.276-0.314 mg/kg in chicken luncheon, fresh sausages, burger, minced chicken and beef meat, respectively. However, the results indicated that, the most of meat products under investigation had high concentrations from toxic metals of Pb and Hg than the permissible limits that recommended by FAO/WHO of person daily. Therefore, the consumption of high amount of these commodities dose not pose a health risk for the consumer

  10. Anaerobic Digestion of Laminaria japonica Waste from Industrial Production Residues in Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Yann Nicolas; Thomsen, Claudia; Thomsen, Laurenz; Benz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of macroalgae to supply the biofuel, pharmaceutical or food industries generates a considerable amount of organic residue, which represents a potential substrate for biomethanation. Its use optimizes the total resource exploitation by the simultaneous disposal of waste biomaterials. In this study, we explored the biochemical methane potential (BMP) and biomethane recovery of industrial Laminaria japonica waste (LJW) in batch, continuous laboratory and pilot-scale trials. Thermo-acidic pretreatment with industry-grade HCl or industrial flue gas condensate (FGC), as well as a co-digestion approach with maize silage (MS) did not improve the biomethane recovery. BMPs between 172 mL and 214 mL g−1 volatile solids (VS) were recorded. We proved the feasibility of long-term continuous anaerobic digestion with LJW as sole feedstock showing a steady biomethane production rate of 173 mL g−1 VS. The quality of fermentation residue was sufficient to serve as biofertilizer, with enriched amounts of potassium, sulfur and iron. We further demonstrated the upscaling feasibility of the process in a pilot-scale system where a CH4 recovery of 189 L kg−1 VS was achieved and a biogas composition of 55% CH4 and 38% CO2 was recorded. PMID:26393620

  11. Logistics cost analysis of rice residues for second generation bioenergy production in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay Ramamurthi, Pooja; Cristina Fernandes, Maria; Sieverts Nielsen, Per; Pedro Nunes, Clemente

    2014-12-01

    This study explores the techno-economic potential of rice residues as a bioenergy resource to meet Ghana's energy demands. Major rice growing regions of Ghana have 70-90% of residues available for bioenergy production. To ensure cost-effective biomass logistics, a thorough cost analysis was made for two bioenergy routes. Logistics costs for a 5 MWe straw combustion plant were 39.01, 47.52 and 47.89 USD/t for Northern, Ashanti and Volta regions respectively. Logistics cost for a 0.25 MWe husk gasification plant (with roundtrip distance 10 km) was 2.64 USD/t in all regions. Capital cost (66-72%) contributes significantly to total logistics costs of straw, however for husk logistics, staff (40%) and operation and maintenance costs (46%) dominate. Baling is the major processing logistic cost for straw, contributing to 46-48% of total costs. Scale of straw unit does not have a large impact on logistic costs. Transport distance of husks has considerable impact on logistic costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Logistics cost analysis of rice residues for second generation bioenergy production in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijay Ramamurthi, Pooja; Cristina Fernandes, Maria; Nielsen, Per Sieverts

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the techno-economic potential of rice residues as a bioenergy resource to meet Ghana’s energy demands. Major rice growing regions of Ghana have 70–90% of residues available for bioenergy production. To ensure cost-effective biomass logistics, a thorough cost analysis was made...... for two bioenergy routes. Logistics costs for a 5MWe straw combustion plant were 39.01, 47.52 and 47.89USD/t for Northern, Ashanti and Volta regions respectively. Logistics cost for a 0.25MWe husk gasification plant (with roundtrip distance 10km) was 2.64USD/t in all regions. Capital cost (66......–72%) contributes significantly to total logistics costs of straw, however for husk logistics, staff (40%) and operation and maintenance costs (46%) dominate. Baling is the major processing logistic cost for straw, contributing to 46–48% of total costs. Scale of straw unit does not have a large impact on logistic...

  13. TECHNOLOGICAL TESTS USING QUARTZITE RESIDUES AS COMPONENT OF CERAMIC MASS AT THE PORCELAIN STONEWARE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcondes Mendes Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to evaluate through technological tests the use of quartzite residues as component at the the production of porcelain stoneware. Were collected five samples of quartzites called of green quartzite, black quartzite, pink quartzite, goldy quartzite, white quartzite. After, the raw materials were milled, passed by a sieve with a Mesh of 200# (Mesh and characterized by chemical analysis in fluorescence of x-rays and also analysis of the crystalline phases by diffraction of x-rays. The porcelain tiles mass is composed of five formulations containing 57% of feldspar, 37% of clay and 6% of residues of quartzite with different coloration. For the preparation of the specimens, it was used uniaxial pressing, which afterwards were synthesized at 1150°C, 1200°C and 1250°C. After the sintering, the specimens were submit for tests of technological characterization like: water absorption, linear shrinkage, apparently porosity, density and flexural strain at three points. The results presented in the fluorescence of x-rays showed a high-content of iron oxide on black quartzite that is why it was discarded the utilization of it in porcelain stoneware. All quartzite formulations had low water absorption achieved when synthesized at 1200°C, getting 0.1 to 0.36% without having gone through the atomization process. At the tests of flexural strain, all the quartzite had in acceptance limits, according to the European norm EN 100, overcoming 27 MPA at 1200°C

  14. Anaerobic Digestion of Laminaria japonica Waste from Industrial Production Residues in Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Nicolas Barbot

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of macroalgae to supply the biofuel, pharmaceutical or food industries generates a considerable amount of organic residue, which represents a potential substrate for biomethanation. Its use optimizes the total resource exploitation by the simultaneous disposal of waste biomaterials. In this study, we explored the biochemical methane potential (BMP and biomethane recovery of industrial Laminaria japonica waste (LJW in batch, continuous laboratory and pilot-scale trials. Thermo-acidic pretreatment with industry-grade HCl or industrial flue gas condensate (FGC, as well as a co-digestion approach with maize silage (MS did not improve the biomethane recovery. BMPs between 172 mL and 214 mL g−1 volatile solids (VS were recorded. We proved the feasibility of long-term continuous anaerobic digestion with LJW as sole feedstock showing a steady biomethane production rate of 173 mL g−1 VS. The quality of fermentation residue was sufficient to serve as biofertilizer, with enriched amounts of potassium, sulfur and iron. We further demonstrated the upscaling feasibility of the process in a pilot-scale system where a CH4 recovery of 189 L kg−1 VS was achieved and a biogas composition of 55% CH4 and 38% CO2 was recorded.

  15. Anaerobic Digestion of Laminaria japonica Waste from Industrial Production Residues in Laboratory- and Pilot-Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Yann Nicolas; Thomsen, Claudia; Thomsen, Laurenz; Benz, Roland

    2015-09-18

    The cultivation of macroalgae to supply the biofuel, pharmaceutical or food industries generates a considerable amount of organic residue, which represents a potential substrate for biomethanation. Its use optimizes the total resource exploitation by the simultaneous disposal of waste biomaterials. In this study, we explored the biochemical methane potential (BMP) and biomethane recovery of industrial Laminaria japonica waste (LJW) in batch, continuous laboratory and pilot-scale trials. Thermo-acidic pretreatment with industry-grade HCl or industrial flue gas condensate (FGC), as well as a co-digestion approach with maize silage (MS) did not improve the biomethane recovery. BMPs between 172 mL and 214 mL g(-1) volatile solids (VS) were recorded. We proved the feasibility of long-term continuous anaerobic digestion with LJW as sole feedstock showing a steady biomethane production rate of 173 mL g(-1) VS. The quality of fermentation residue was sufficient to serve as biofertilizer, with enriched amounts of potassium, sulfur and iron. We further demonstrated the upscaling feasibility of the process in a pilot-scale system where a CH₄ recovery of 189 L kg(-1) VS was achieved and a biogas composition of 55% CH₄ and 38% CO₂ was recorded.

  16. Pyrolysis of automotive shredder residue for the production of fuel-grade gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, L.L.; Ness, R.O. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Every year eight to ten million cars and trucks are disposed of by shredding at one of the 200 auto shredders located in the United States. Automotive shredder residue (ASR) is a by-product created in the dismantling of automobiles. Figure 1 illustrates the process by which ASR is generated. An automobile is stripped of useful and/or hazardous items, such as the gas tank, battery, tires, and radiator. Although it is beneficial to have these items removed for safety and environmental concerns, this is not always accomplished. After removal of some or all of these items, the automobile is shredded to provide a material less than 4 inches in size and composed of approximately 50% organic and 50% inorganic fractions. Ferrous scrap is then separated out magnetically. This ferrous scrap supplies the steel industry with 12 to 14 million tons per year for electric arc furnace feedstock. Air cyclone separators isolate a low density open-quotes fluffclose quotes from the nonferrous fraction (aluminum, copper, etc.). This fluff (shredder residue) is composed of a variety of plastics, fabrics, foams, glass, rubber, and an assortment of contaminants. Fluff bulk density is approximately 20 lb/ft

  17. Production and desexcitation of hot nuclei in 40Ar + 238U collisions at 27 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, D.

    1987-01-01

    The selection of hot nuclei can be achieved through the folding angle of the coincident fission fragments. At this bombarding energy a distinct fusion component shows up in the folding angle correlation function corresponding to the most central collisions. The mass of the fission fragments decreases with increasing linear momentum transfer; the energy dissipated into the target nucleus is proportional to the momentum transfer. The mass distribution full width at half maximum increases with dissipated energy and this can be understood as the result of thermal fluctuations. The light charged particles detected in coincidence with the fission fragments exhibit, at least backwards, the characteristic behaviour of evaporative particles from a thermally equilibrated source. The fused nucleus is revealed as the dominant emitter. The observed energy spectra can be reproduced in a Monte Carlo type simulation assuming that about 80% of the particles arise from the fused nuclei and only 20 % from the fully accelerated fission fragments. A detailed analysis of the shape of the spectra allows to precise the average characteristics of the emitter: it is quite deformed has a very broad spin distribution and a temperature from 4 to 5 MeV. All these characteristics are consistently deduced in semi-classical dynamical calculations based on the Landau-Vlasov equation. The pre-fission particle emission probabilities are shown to be much larger than would predict a purely statistical model for such heavy and hot nuclei. Such a behaviour can only be understood if the dynamics of the collision is taken into account [fr

  18. Balance of natural radionuclides in the brown coal based power generation and harmlessness of the residues and side product utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Hartmut; Kunze, Christian; Hummrich, Holger

    2017-01-01

    During brown coal combustion a partial enrichment of natural radionuclides occurs in different residues. Residues and side product from brown coal based power generation are used in different ways, for example filter ashes and gypsum from flue gas desulfurization facilities are used in the construction materials fabrication and slags for road construction. Detailed measurement and accounting of radionuclides in the mass throughputs in coal combustion power plants have shown that the utilized gypsum and filter ashes are harmless in radiologic aspects.

  19. Conceptual model and procedures to assimilate production technologies of bioenergetics of residual biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto Lubota, David; González Suárez, Erenio; Hernández Pérez, Gilberto; Miño Valdés, Juan Esteban

    2016-01-01

    The present work expose the conceptual pattern for a process of assimilation of technologies with the purpose of creating obtaining capacities of bio energy with the objective of achieving an energy insurance of the recycle of Urban Solid Residuals (RSU) in the municipality of Cabinda, Angola. The conceptual pattern is novel because it considers the south-south collaboration, and it is supported by a general procedure of assimilation of the technologies that includes in one of its steps a specify procedure for the step concerning the insurance of the chain supply that contains as additional aspect, in a novel way, the determination of the initial’s investors capacities assisting to the demand of final products as well as to the readiness of the raw materials, based in the problems of uncertainty to the future changes. Finally conclusions are elaborated with projections for the future work. (author)

  20. Environmental performance of crop residues as an energy source for electricity production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, T Lan T; Hermansen, John Erik; Mogensen, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to address the question, “What is the environmental performance of crop residues as an alternative energy source to fossil fuels, and whether and how can it be improved?”. In order to address the issue, we compare electricity production from wheat straw to that from coal and natural...... gas. The results on the environmental performance of straw for energy utilization and the two fossil fuel references are displayed first for different midpoint categories and then aggregated into a single score. The midpoint impact assessment shows that substitution of straw either for coal...... or for natural gas reduces global warming, non-renewable energy use, human toxicity and ecotoxicity, but increases eutrophication, respiratory inorganics, acidification and photochemical ozone. The results at the aggregate level show that the use of straw biomass for conversion to energy scores better than...

  1. [An experimental proficiency test for ability to screen 104 residual pesticides in agricultural products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumura, Yukari; Ishimitsu, Susumu; Otaki, Kayo; Uchimi, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Daba, Masaki; Tsuchiya, Tetsu; Ukyo, Masaho; Tonogai, Yasuhide

    2003-10-01

    An experimental proficiency test program for ability to screen 104 residual pesticides in agricultural products has been conducted. Eight Japanese laboratories joined the program. Items tested in the present study were limit of detection, internal proficiency test (self spike) and external proficiency test (blind spike). All 104 pesticides were well detected and recovered from agricultural foods in the internal proficiency test. However, the results of the external proficiency test did not completely agree with those of the internal proficiency tests. After 5 rounds of the blind spike test, the ratio of the number of correctly detected pesticides to that of actually contained ones (49 total) ranged from 65% to 100% among laboratories. The numbers of mistakenly detected pesticides by a laboratory were 0 to 15. Thus, there was a great difference among the laboratories in the ability to screen multiresidual pesticides.

  2. Rapid detection of chlorpyrifos pesticide residue concentration in agro-product using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Peng, Yankun; Li, Yongyu; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Zhang, Leilei; Xu, Tianfeng

    2014-05-01

    Different chemicals are sprayed in fruits and vegetables before and after harvest for better yield and longer shelf-life of crops. Cases of pesticide poisoning to human health are regularly reported due to excessive application of such chemicals for greater economic benefit. Different analytical technologies exist to detect trace amount of pesticides in fruits and vegetables, but are expensive, sample destructive, and require longer processing time. This study explores the application of Raman spectroscopy for rapid and non-destructive detection of pesticide residue in agricultural products. Raman spectroscopy with laser module of 785 nm was used to collect Raman spectral information from the surface of Gala apples contaminated with different concentrations of commercially available organophosphorous (48% chlorpyrifos) pesticide. Apples within 15 days of harvest from same orchard were used in this study. The Raman spectral signal was processed by Savitzky-Golay (SG) filter for noise removal, Multiplicative Scatter Correction (MSC) for drift removal and finally polynomial fitting was used to eliminate the fluorescence background. The Raman spectral peak at 677 cm-1 was recognized as Raman fingerprint of chlorpyrifos. Presence of Raman peak at 677 cm-1 after fluorescence background removal was used to develop classification model (presence and absence of pesticide). The peak intensity was correlated with actual pesticide concentration obtained using Gas Chromatography and MLR prediction model was developed with correlation coefficient of calibration and validation of 0.86 and 0.81 respectively. Result shows that Raman spectroscopy is a promising tool for rapid, real-time and non-destructive detection of pesticide residue in agro-products.

  3. Conjugated fatty acid synthesis: residues 111 and 115 influence product partitioning of Momordica charantia conjugase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Richa; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Sweet, Marie; Shanklin, John

    2012-05-11

    Conjugated linolenic acids (CLNs), 18:3 Δ(9,11,13), lack the methylene groups found between the double bonds of linolenic acid (18:3 Δ(9,12,15)). CLNs are produced by conjugase enzymes that are homologs of the oleate desaturases FAD2. The goal of this study was to map the domain(s) within the Momordica charantia conjugase (FADX) responsible for CLN formation. To achieve this, a series of Momordica FADX-Arabidopsis FAD2 chimeras were expressed in the Arabidopsis fad3fae1 mutant, and the transformed seeds were analyzed for the accumulation of CLN. These experiments identified helix 2 and the first histidine box as a determinant of conjugase product partitioning into punicic acid (18:3 Δ(9cis,11trans,13cis)) or α-eleostearic acid (18:3 Δ(9cis,11trans,13trans)). This was confirmed by analysis of a FADX mutant containing six substitutions in which the sequence of helix 2 and first histidine box was converted to that of FAD2. Each of the six FAD2 substitutions was individually converted back to the FADX equivalent identifying residues 111 and 115, adjacent to the first histidine box, as key determinants of conjugase product partitioning. Additionally, expression of FADX G111V and FADX G111V/D115E resulted in an approximate doubling of eleostearic acid accumulation to 20.4% and 21.2%, respectively, compared with 9.9% upon expression of the native Momordica FADX. Like the Momordica conjugase, FADX G111V and FADX D115E produced predominantly α-eleostearic acid and little punicic acid, but the FADX G111V/D115E double mutant produced approximately equal amounts of α-eleostearic acid and its isomer, punicic acid, implicating an interactive effect of residues 111 and 115 in punicic acid formation.

  4. Production of green biocellulose nanofibers by Gluconacetobacter xylinus through utilizing the renewable resources of agriculture residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdallah, Wahib; Dahman, Yaser

    2013-11-01

    The present study demonstrates the ability to produce green biocellulose nanofibers using the renewable resources of agriculture residues. Locally grown wheat straws (WS) were hydrolyzed under different conditions. Their hydrolysates were utilized to produce the nanofibers in separate hydrolysis fermentation process by Gluconacetobacter xylinus strain bacterium. Highest biocellulose production of ~10.6 g/L was achieved with samples that were enzymatically hydrolyzed. Moreover, acidic hydrolyzed WS produced up to 9.7 g/L, with total sugar concentrations in culture media of 43 g/L. Generally, enzymatic hydrolysis of WS resulted in more total sugar concentration than the acidic hydrolysis (i.e., 52.12 g/L), while water hydrolysis produced the least. This can be related to utilizing Xylanase in addition to Cellulase and Beta-glucosidase that helps to hydrolyse WS dry basis of cellulose and hemicelluloses. Sugar mixtures produced under all hydrolysis conditions were mainly composed of glucose and xylose with average percentages of 56 and 28 %, respectively. Acidic hydrolysis at higher acid concentration, as well as soaking WS in the acidic solution for longer time, improved the total sugar concentration in the culture media by 18 %. Conducting thermal treatment at more intense conditions of higher temperature or heating time improved the total sugar produced with acidic hydrolysis. These conditions, however, resulted in further production of furfural, which considerably affected bacterial cells proliferation. This resulted in lowest sugar consumption in the range of 62-64 % that affected final BC production.

  5. Chemical and ecotoxicological evaluation of biochar produced from residues of biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniuk, Magdalena; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Bartmiński, Piotr

    2016-11-15

    Analyses were carried out for biochars produced at three temperatures of pyrolysis (400, 600 and 800°C) from solid residue from biogas production (RBP). Separated and non-separated RBP from biogas plants employing different biogas production conditions were pyrolyzed. The contents of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (16 PAH US EPA) were analyzed in biochars. The analyses showed that with an increased pyrolysis temperature, there was an increase in the contents of PAHs and of certain heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Cd, Pb and Mn). In the ecotoxicological tests, it was noted that the effect depended on the temperature of pyrolysis and on the feedstock from which the biochar was produced. The least harmful effect on the test organisms was from biochar produced by separated RBP in a biogas plant operating in mesophilic conditions. The most negative effect on the test organisms was characteristic of biochar produced from non-separated mesophilic RBP. This study shows that the main factors determining the level of toxicity of biochars produced from RBP towards various living organisms are both the method of feedstock production and the temperature at which the process of pyrolysis is conducted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Co-production of bio-ethanol, electricity and heat from biomass residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reith, J.H.; Den Uil, H.; Van Veen, H. [ECN Biomass, Petten (Netherlands); De Laat, W.T.A.M.; Niessen, J.J. [Royal Nedalco, Bergen op Zoom (Netherlands); De Jong, E.; Elbersen, H.W.; Weusthuis, R. [Agrotechnological Research Institute ATO, BU Renewable Resources, Wageningen (Netherlands); Van Dijken, J.P.; Raamsdonk, L. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    The use of lignocellulose biomass residues as a feedstock offers good perspectives for large scale production of fuel ethanol at competitive costs. An evaluation was performed to assess the international status of lignocellulose-to-bioethanol technology and the economical and ecological system performance, to identify RandD approaches for further development. Deriving fermentable sugars from the hemicellulose and cellulose fractions of lignocellulose materials via suitable pretreatment and enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis is a critical RandD issue. Further development of pretreatment via mild, low temperature alkaline extraction or weak acid hydrolysis using CO2, dissolved in pressurized hot water ('carbonic acid process') shows good perspectives. Enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis with the currently available industrial cellulases accounts for 36-45% of ethanol production costs. At least a 10-fold increase of cellulase cost-effectiveness is required. Despite substantial RandD efforts, no suitable fermentation system is currently available for the fermentation of pentoses (mainly xylose) from the hemicellulose fraction. Several strains of anaerobic, thermophilic bacteria are able to convert all (hemi)cellulose components into ethanol. Follow-up RandD will focus on isolation of suitable strain(s) from this group. The system evaluation shows a 40-55% energetic efficiency (LHV basis) for conversion of lignocellulose feedstocks to ethanol. Thermal conversion of non-fermentable residues (mainly lignin) in a Biomass-Integrated-Gasifier/Combined Cycle (BIG/CC) system can provide the total steam and electricity requirement for the production process and an electricity surplus for export to the grid, giving a total system efficiency of 56-68%. Water consumption in the process (28-54 liter water/liter ethanol) is much higher than in current ethanol production (lo-15 l/l ethanol). The large amount of process water (used in the pretreatment and cellulose hydrolysis

  7. Experimental and theoretical study of the residual nuclide production in 40-2600 MeV proton-irradiated thin targets of ads structure materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titarenko, Yu.E.; Batyaev, V.F.; Belonozhenko, A.A.; Borovlev, S.P.; Butko, M.A.; Florya, S.N.; Pavlov, K.V.; Rogov, V.I.; Tikhonov, R.S.; Titarenko, A.Yu.; Zhivun, V.M.

    2011-10-01

    The Project is aimed at experimental and theoretical studying the independent and cumulative yields of residual radioactive nuclei produced in high-energy proton-irradiated structure materials intended for constructing the high-power Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS) with a high-current proton accelerator. The Project is an extension of the researches carried out earlier under the ISTC Projects #017, #839, and #2002 which provided more 10000 residual nuclide production cross sections mainly in materials intended to use as target materials of the ADS. This Project includes 57 measurement runs carried out using the 97 targets made only of the ADS structural materials of both monoisotopic ( 56 Fe, 93 Nb, 181 Ta) and natural ( nat Cr, nat Ni, nat W) compositions within minutely fractionated proton energy range, namely, at 0.04, 0.07, 0.1, 0.15, 0.25, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6 and 2.6GeV. All the targets were irradiated using the ITEP U-10 proton synchrotron. The experimental nuclide yields are determined by the direct γ-spectrometry and α-spectrometry methods. As a result, 3839 cumulative and independent yields of residual β-radioactive product nuclei with lifetimes range from 6 minutes to 10 years as well as 12 cumulative yields of α- radioactive 148 Gd whose lifetime is 74.6 years have been measured. Besides, the cross sections for the 27 Al(p,x) 22 Na , 27 Al(p,x) 24 Na and 27 Al(p,x) 7 Be monitor reactions have been measured at the same proton energies with the use of the current transformer technique. The γ-spectrometer resolution is 1.8 keV in the 1332 keV 60 Co γ-line. The experimental γ-spectra were processed by the GENIE2000 code. The γ-lines were identified, and the cross sections calculated, by the ITEP-developed SIGMA code using the PCNUDAT database. The proton fluence was monitored by the 27 Al(p,x) 22 Na reaction. Measurement data have been compared with the calculation results of the BERTINI and ISABEL models of MCNPX code, CEM03.02, INCL 4.2, INCL4

  8. Growth and Productivity of Response of Hybrid Rice to Application of Animal Manures, Plant Residues and Phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Amanullah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the impact of organic sources (animal manures vs. plant residues at the rate of 10 t ha-1 each on the productivity profitability of small land rice (Oryza sativa L. grower under different levels of phosphorus (0, 30, 60 and 90 kg P ha-1 fertilization. Two separate field experiments were conducted. In experiment (1, impact of three animal manures sources (cattle, sheep & poultry manures and P levels was studied along with one control plot (no animal manure and P applied as check was investigated. In experiment (2, three plant residues sources (peach leaves, garlic residues & wheat straw and P levels was studied along with one control plot (no plant residues and P applied as check. Both the experiments were carried out on small land farmer field at District Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province (Northwest Pakistan during summer 2015. The results revealed that in both experiments the control plot had significantly (p≤0.05 less productivity than the average of all treated plots with organic sources and P level. The increase in P levels in both experiments (animal manure vs. plant residues had resulted in higher rice productivity (90 = 60 > 30 > 0 kg P ha-1. In the experiment under animal manures, application of poultry manure increased rice productivity as compared with sheep and cattle manures (poultry > sheep > cattle manures. In the experiment under plant residues, application of peach leaves or garlic resides had higher rice productivity over wheat straw (peach leaves = garlic residues > wheat straw. On the average, the rice grown under animal manures produced about 20% higher grain yield than the rice grown under crop residues. We concluded from this study that application of 90 kg P ha-1 along with combined application of animal manures especially poultry manure could increase rice productivity. We conclude from this study that application of 90 kg P ha-1 along with combined application of animal

  9. Fusability and survivability in reactions leading to heavy nuclei in the vicinity of the N = 126 shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagajdak, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    The production of heavy nuclei from Rn to Th around the N = 126 neutron shell in complete fusion reactions of nuclei has been considered in a systematic way in the framework of the conventional barrier-passing fusion model coupled with the Standard Statistical Model (SSM). Available data on the excitation functions for fusion and production of evaporation residues obtained in very asymmetric combinations are described with these models rather well. In the interaction of massive projectiles with heavy target nuclei quasi-fission effects appear in the entrance reaction channel. The quantity of the fusion probability introduced empirically has been used to reproduce excitation functions with the same SSM parameters (fission barriers) as those obtained in the analysis of very asymmetric combinations. A lack of stabilization against fission around N = 126 for Th nuclei was earlier explained with a reduced collective contribution to the level density in spherical nuclei. However, the present analysis shows severe inhibition for fusion, i.e., the drop in production cross sections of Th nuclei in the vicinity of N = 126 is mainly caused by entrance channel effects. The macroscopic component of fission barriers for nuclei involved in a deexcitation cascade has been derived and compared with the theoretical model predictions and available data

  10. Analyzing key constraints to biogas production from crop residues and manure in the EU—A spatially explicit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, U. Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a spatially explicit method for making regional estimates of the potential for biogas production from crop residues and manure, accounting for key technical, biochemical, environmental and economic constraints. Methods for making such estimates are important as biofuels from agricultural residues are receiving increasing policy support from the EU and major biogas producers, such as Germany and Italy, in response to concerns over unintended negative environmental and social impacts of conventional biofuels. This analysis comprises a spatially explicit estimate of crop residue and manure production for the EU at 250 m resolution, and a biogas production model accounting for local constraints such as the sustainable removal of residues, transportation of substrates, and the substrates’ biochemical suitability for anaerobic digestion. In our base scenario, the EU biogas production potential from crop residues and manure is about 0.7 EJ/year, nearly double the current EU production of biogas from agricultural substrates, most of which does not come from residues or manure. An extensive sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the potential could easily be 50% higher or lower, depending on the stringency of economic, technical and biochemical constraints. We find that the potential is particularly sensitive to constraints on the substrate mixtures’ carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and dry matter concentration. Hence, the potential to produce biogas from crop residues and manure in the EU depends to large extent on the possibility to overcome the challenges associated with these substrates, either by complementing them with suitable co-substrates (e.g. household waste and energy crops), or through further development of biogas technology (e.g. pretreatment of substrates and recirculation of effluent). PMID:28141827

  11. Analyzing key constraints to biogas production from crop residues and manure in the EU-A spatially explicit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsson, Rasmus; Persson, U Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a spatially explicit method for making regional estimates of the potential for biogas production from crop residues and manure, accounting for key technical, biochemical, environmental and economic constraints. Methods for making such estimates are important as biofuels from agricultural residues are receiving increasing policy support from the EU and major biogas producers, such as Germany and Italy, in response to concerns over unintended negative environmental and social impacts of conventional biofuels. This analysis comprises a spatially explicit estimate of crop residue and manure production for the EU at 250 m resolution, and a biogas production model accounting for local constraints such as the sustainable removal of residues, transportation of substrates, and the substrates' biochemical suitability for anaerobic digestion. In our base scenario, the EU biogas production potential from crop residues and manure is about 0.7 EJ/year, nearly double the current EU production of biogas from agricultural substrates, most of which does not come from residues or manure. An extensive sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the potential could easily be 50% higher or lower, depending on the stringency of economic, technical and biochemical constraints. We find that the potential is particularly sensitive to constraints on the substrate mixtures' carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and dry matter concentration. Hence, the potential to produce biogas from crop residues and manure in the EU depends to large extent on the possibility to overcome the challenges associated with these substrates, either by complementing them with suitable co-substrates (e.g. household waste and energy crops), or through further development of biogas technology (e.g. pretreatment of substrates and recirculation of effluent).

  12. Analyzing key constraints to biogas production from crop residues and manure in the EU-A spatially explicit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Einarsson

    Full Text Available This paper presents a spatially explicit method for making regional estimates of the potential for biogas production from crop residues and manure, accounting for key technical, biochemical, environmental and economic constraints. Methods for making such estimates are important as biofuels from agricultural residues are receiving increasing policy support from the EU and major biogas producers, such as Germany and Italy, in response to concerns over unintended negative environmental and social impacts of conventional biofuels. This analysis comprises a spatially explicit estimate of crop residue and manure production for the EU at 250 m resolution, and a biogas production model accounting for local constraints such as the sustainable removal of residues, transportation of substrates, and the substrates' biochemical suitability for anaerobic digestion. In our base scenario, the EU biogas production potential from crop residues and manure is about 0.7 EJ/year, nearly double the current EU production of biogas from agricultural substrates, most of which does not come from residues or manure. An extensive sensitivity analysis of the model shows that the potential could easily be 50% higher or lower, depending on the stringency of economic, technical and biochemical constraints. We find that the potential is particularly sensitive to constraints on the substrate mixtures' carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and dry matter concentration. Hence, the potential to produce biogas from crop residues and manure in the EU depends to large extent on the possibility to overcome the challenges associated with these substrates, either by complementing them with suitable co-substrates (e.g. household waste and energy crops, or through further development of biogas technology (e.g. pretreatment of substrates and recirculation of effluent.

  13. Target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering of 14.5 GeV electrons from nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyarenko, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Shuvalov, S.

    1993-01-01

    Results will be presented for inclusive pion, kaon, proton and deuteron electroproduction from light nuclei (mainly 12 C and 16 O) of the residual gas in the beam pipe of the TPC/2γ detector at SLAC. Counter-circulating beams of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons were used. Comparison will be made with the fragmentation of 2 H, 40 Ar, and Xe target nuclei in several regions of Q 2 and ν. The dependence of the hadron production on the hadron's kinetic energy, emission angle, and x f will be presented. The results will be compared with models of nuclear fragmentation

  14. The Food Safety of Livestock Products (Meatball, Corned Beef, Beef Burger and Sausage Studied from Heavy Metal Residues Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Harlia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of animal husbandry improvements are to increase both the quality and the quantity of livestock production and to ensure the safety of the product. It is necessarry for consumers to pay attention to the food safety of livestock product because it is related to human's health. The research was conducted to determine the food safety of livestock product condition by detecting heavy metal residues on several food products from livestock like meatball, corned beef, burger’s beef, and sausages. This research was explored by using survey's method and purposive technique sampling, then the resulted data were descriptively analyzed. The observed variables were heavy metal contents such as Plumbum (Pb and Cadmium (Cd in which being measured by using AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometri . The result showed that in general, heavy metal residue of Pb from several livestock products (meatball, corned beef, beef burger, and sausages were smaller than Maximum Residue Limit (MRL, while the Cd’s residue was partly over the MRL concentration, therefore further action has to be taken as it affects the human's health. (Animal Production 12(1: 50-54 (2010 Key words : food safety, MRL, heavy metal Pb, Cd.

  15. Impact of residual by-products from tungsten film deposition on process integration due to nonuniformity of the tungsten film

    CERN Document Server

    Sidhwa, A; Gandy, T; Melosky, S; Brown, W; Ang, S; Naseem, H; Ulrich, R

    2002-01-01

    The effects of residual by products from a tungsten film deposition process and their impact on process integration due to the nonuniformity of the tungsten film were investigated in this work. The tungsten film deposition process involves three steps: nucleation, stabilization, and tungsten bulk fill. Six experiments were conducted in search for a solution to the problem. The resulting data suggest that excess nitrogen left in the chamber following the tungsten nucleation step, along with residual by products, causes a shift in the tungsten film uniformity during the tungsten bulk fill process. Data reveal that, due to the residual by products, an abnormal grain growth occurs causing a variation in the tungsten thickness across the wafer during the bulk fill step. Although several possible solutions were revealed by the experiments, potential integration problems limited the acceptable solutions to one. The solution chosen was the introduction of a 10 s pumpdown immediately following the nucleation step. Thi...

  16. An environmental assessment of electricity production from slaughterhouse residues. Linking urban, industrial and waste management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santagata, R.; Ripa, M.; Ulgiati, S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Animal by-products use for electricity generation is investigated as a case-study. • Different methodological approaches to deal with by-products are explored in LCA. • Adopting a holistic perspective is crucial to achieve a circular economy framework. - Abstract: The food processing industry continues to grow, generating large amount of organically rich waste flows per year: these processors face significant economic and environmental pressures for appropriate conversion and disposal of these waste flows. Solid waste disposal problems, mostly in highly urbanized environments, energy shortages (primarily oil) and/or high petroleum prices, as well as environmental issues such as the shrinking landfill capacity, can all be addressed by converting waste material into useful and saleable products. This paper brings to the attention a possible strategy in order to meet the general EU directives concerning the residues utilization and percentage contribution for the total energy consumption by 2020, by evaluating the use of animal by-products (category 3, as defined in the directive 2002/1774/EC) for energy purposes. Slaughterhouse waste represents an important potential source of renewable energy: on average, 40–50% of a live animal is waste, with a potential energy content close to diesel fuel. Treatment of animal waste from slaughterhouse and the subsequent conversion to electricity is investigated as a case study in the Campania Region (Italy): the animal waste undergoes a rendering process, to separate a protein-rich fraction useful for animal meal production and a fat-rich fraction, to be combusted in a diesel engine for power and heat generation (CHP). An environmental assessment of the entire process is performed by means of LCA, providing a quantitative understanding of the plant processing. The study aims to understand to what extent electricity production from animal fat is environmentally sound and if there are steps and/or components

  17. Fission-evaporation competition in excited uranium and fermium nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagajdak, R.N.; Chepigin, V.I.; Kabachenko, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    The production cross sections and excitation functions for the 223-226 U neutron deficient isotopes have been measured in the 20 Ne+ 208 Pb and 22 Ne+ 208 Pb reactions for (4,5)n and (4-7)n evaporation channels of the de-excitation of the compound nuclei 228 U* and 230 U*, respectively. The present study considers in addition the de-excitation via the (5,6)n evaporation channels of the 224 U* compound nucleus formed in the 27 Al+ 197 Au reaction. The production cross sections of 247g,246 Fm formed after evaporation of (5,6)n and (7,8)n from the 252 Fm* and 254 Fm* compound nuclei produced in the 20 Ne+ 232 Th and 22 Ne+ 232 Th reactions were also measured respectively. The evaporation residues emerging from the target were separated in-flight from the projectiles and background reaction products by the electrostatic recoil separator VASSILISSA [1]. The investigation regards the U and Fm compound nuclei in the 40-80 MeV excitation energy range. For the analysis of the (Hl, xn) evaporation cross sections the advanced statistical model [2] calculations were used. The angular momentum dependence of the shell correction to the fission barrier, and the effects of the nuclear viscosity and dynamical deformation for these fissile excited nuclei are considered. The n /Γ t > values at the initial steps of the de-excitation cascade for the U and Fm compound nuclei were derived from the measured excitation functions and discussed from the point of view of the consequences for the fission process dynamics

  18. Analysis of veterinary drug residue monitoring results for commercial livestock products in Taiwan between 2011 and 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chun Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics have been widely used in the treatment of livestock diseases. However, the emergence of issues related to drug resistance prompted governments to enact a series of laws regulating the use of antibiotics in livestock. Following control of the problem of drug resistant bacteria, public attention has shifted to the recurring incidence of human health and safety issues caused by residual veterinary drugs in livestock products. To guarantee the safety and hygiene of meat, milk, and eggs from food-producing animals, governments and relevant agencies established laws and regulations for the use of veterinary drugs. It is, therefore, necessary to monitor the content of residual drugs in livestock products at regular intervals to assess whether the regulations have resulted in the effective management of food product safety, and to prevent and manage sudden problems related to this issue. A 2011–2015 livestock product post-marketing monitoring program launched by the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA inspected 1487 livestock products. Over the past 5 years, there were 34 samples identified that did not conform to the regulations; these samples included residue drugs such as β-agonists, chloramphenicols, β-lactam antibiotics, sulfa drugs, enrofloxacin, and lincomycin. Inspections of commercial livestock products with the consistent cooperation of agricultural authorities did not detect the drugs that were banned by the government, whereas the detection of other drugs decreased annually with an increase in the post-market monitoring sample size. In the future, the TFDA will continue to monitor the status of residual veterinary drugs in commercial livestock products, adjust the sampling of food products annually according to monitoring results, and closely cooperate with agricultural authorities on source management. Keywords: Agricultural authorities, Livestock products, Post-market monitoring, Veterinary drug residues

  19. Towards efficient bioethanol production from agricultural and forestry residues: Exploration of unique natural microorganisms in combination with advanced strain engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinqing; Xiong, Liang; Zhang, Mingming; Bai, Fengwu

    2016-09-01

    Production of fuel ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks such as agricultural and forestry residues is receiving increasing attention due to the unsustainable supply of fossil fuels. Three key challenges include high cellulase production cost, toxicity of the cellulosic hydrolysate to microbial strains, and poor ability of fermenting microorganisms to utilize certain fermentable sugars in the hydrolysate. In this article, studies on searching of natural microbial strains for production of unique cellulase for biorefinery of agricultural and forestry wastes, as well as development of strains for improved cellulase production were reviewed. In addition, progress in the construction of yeast strains with improved stress tolerance and the capability to fully utilize xylose and glucose in the cellulosic hydrolysate was also summarized. With the superior microbial strains for high titer cellulase production and efficient utilization of all fermentable sugars in the hydrolysate, economic biofuels production from agricultural residues and forestry wastes can be realized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Catalyst systems in the production of biodiesel from residual oil; Sistemas cataliticos na producao de biodiesel por meio de oleo residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Carlos Alexandre de [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The vegetable oils and fat animals appear like an alternative for substitution the diesel oil in ignition engines for compression. Submitting the oil on transesterification reaction, we obtain a fuel with same characteristics as diesel, called biodiesel. Generally, 85 per cent of biodiesel cost is from the oil production. Through transesterification vegetable oil can be transformed in a mixture of esters of fatty acids. The residual oil from frying has been used as a possibility of raw materials of biodiesel, due to its easy acquisition and the viability of not being discarded as waste. (author)

  1. Production of neutron-rich nuclei in fission induced by neutrons generated by the p+ sup 1 sup 3 C reaction at 55 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, L; Andrighetto, A; Tecchio, L B; Dendooven, P; Huikari, J; Pentillä, H; Peraejaervi, K; Wang, Y

    2003-01-01

    Cross-sections for the production of neutron-rich nuclei obtained by neutron-induced fission of natural uranium have been measured. The neutrons were generated by bombarding a sup 1 sup 3 C target with 55 MeV protons. The results, position of the maximum in the (Z, A)-plane, width and magnitude, are very comparable with those where the neutrons are generated by bombardment of natural sup 1 sup 2 C graphite with 50 MeV deuterons. Depending on the geometry of the converter/target assembly the isotope yields, however, are a factor of 2-3 lower due to less efficient production of neutrons per primary projectile, especially at small forward angles. (orig.)

  2. Effect of the rearing tank residue of fish farms on the production of passion fruit tree seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. O. R. Silva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the initial growth of seedlings and biomass production of blue and yellow passion fruit trees (round cultivar produced from residue of the rearing tanks of fish farms. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse using residue obtained from fish farming tanks. Ravine soil (RS, fish tank residue (FR and Tropstrato (TR were used as substrate. The treatments were: T1 = control consisting of Tropstrato substrate; T2 = 25% FR + 75% RS; T3 = 50% FR + 50% RS; T4 = 25% RS + 75% FR; T5 = 100% FR. A completely randomized block design consisting of 5 treatments, 4 replicates and 11 plants per plot was used. Treatment T5 (100% fish farming residue resulted in the largest average number of leaves, highest dry matter production of the aerial part, and highest dry matter accumulation in the root (P<0.05. The worst results were obtained for the treatment using 25% FR (T2, which resulted in less uniformity of the variables studied. Stem height of the passion fruit tree was greater for the treatments that included FR, with the greatest mean height being observed for T5. In conclusion, the treatment using the residue of fish farming tanks was found to be beneficial to produce yellow passion fruit seedlings (round cultivar, representing a good alternative for the reutilization of this residue.

  3. Reconstitution of dewatered food processing residuals with manure to increase energy production from anaerobic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, David M.; Wu-Haan, Wei; Safferman, Steven I.

    2012-01-01

    Solid residuals generated from dewatering food processing wastewater contain organic carbon that can potentially be reclaimed for energy through anaerobic digestion. This results in the diversion of waste from a landfill and uses it for a beneficial purpose. Dewatering the waste concentrates the carbon, reducing transportation costs to a farm digester where it can be blended with manure to increase biogas yield. Polymers are often used in the dewatering of the food waste but little is known regarding their impact on biogas production. Four 2 dm 3 working volume, semi-continuous reactors, were used at a mesophilic temperature and a solids retention time (SRT) of 15 days. Reactors were fed daily with a blended feedstock containing a food processing sludge waste (FPSW)/manure ratio of 2.2:1 (by weight) as this produced the optimized carbon to nitrogen ratio. Results demonstrated that reconstitution of dewatered FPSW with dairy manure produced approximately 2 times more methane than animal manure alone for the same volume. However, only approximately 30% of volatile solids (VS) were consumed indicating energy potential still remained. Further, the efficiency of the conversion of VS to methane for the blended FPSW/manure was substantially less than for manure only. However, the overall result is an increase in energy production for a given tank volume, which can decrease life cycle costs. Because all FPSW is unique and the determination of dewatering additives is customized based on laboratory testing and field adjustment, generalizations are difficult and specific testing is required. -- Highlights: ► Energy production in anaerobic digestion can increase by co-blending food waste. ► Energy for transporting food waste to blend with manure is less when dewatered. ► Dewatered food waste in manure produced twice as much methane than manure. ► Efficiency of carbon to methane was low because of ammonium bicarbonate production. ► Carbon destruction was 30%, more

  4. Thermal and physiochemical properties of pellets with power aims made of sawmill residual product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova Treto, Pedro; Solis, Kattia; Carrillo, Tonny

    2017-01-01

    Sawmill residual product of Pylon (Hyeronima alchorneoides) and Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp) species was used to produce pellets under different conditions of densification. Experimental equipment was used to determine the thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat. Physicochemical properties of the pellets obtained under different conditions of densification, such as ash content and calorific value were determined. The content of nitrogen, chlorine and sulfur present in the material used to produce the pellets was estimated. Thermal conductivity values were determined between 0,253 W/m·K and 0,279 W/m·K; 1,748 m2 /s and 2,314 m2 /s for the thermal diffusivity, and in the case of specific heat were determined values between 3,019 kJ/kg·K and 2,183 kJ/kg·K. The high heat values was between 18 907 kJ/kg and 18 960 kJ/kg. An ash content of 1,31% was determined on a dry basis. Finally, the content of nitrogen, chlorine and sulfur determined in the residual biomass used, corresponds to 0,1129%, 0,0592 % and 0,0317%, respectively. A direct relationship between increasing the bulk density of the pellets and the thermal properties was determined. The calorific value and the ash content had a negligible effect due to the treatments applied. The estimated content of N, Cl and S corresponds to that expected in the selected biomass. Comparison of the properties of the pellets produced under the conditions studied -densification, against regulations-, showed acceptable results, entering these in terms of different categories of quality. (author) [es

  5. Residual stresses and their mechanisms of production at circumferential weld by heat-sink welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yukio; Nakacho, Keiji; Ohkubo, Katsumi; Shimizu, Tsubasa.

    1983-01-01

    In the previous report, the authors showed effectiveness of the heat-sink welding (water cooling) to accomplish this end by conducting theoretical analysis and an experiment on residual stresses in the 4B pipe of SUS 304 by the conventional welding and the heat-sink welding at a certain standard heat-input condition. In this research, different pipe sizes and varied heat-input are applied. The welding residual stresses by the conventional welding and the heat-sink welding are obtained by the theoretical analysis and their production mechanisms are clarified. Hence the influence of the above changes of conditions on effectiveness of the heat-sink welding is investigated. The main results are summarized as follow. (1) In case of this pipes such as 2B and 4B pipes, it is important to minimize heat-input per one pass (especially for latter half passes) in order to improve the effectiveness of the heat-sink welding. The effectiveness can be predicted either by theoretical analysis of the temperature distribution history with consideration of the characteristic of heat transfer under spray-watering or by experimental measurement. (2) In case of 24B pipes, thick pipes, it is desirable to minimize heat-input for the first half passes, by which the heat-sink welding becomes more effective. In addition, no matter whether the conventional welding or the heat-sink welding, it is important to prevent angular distorsion which produces tensile axial stresses on the inner surface of the pipe in the weld zone. Possible measures to meet these requirements are to apply restraining jigs, to minimize the section area of the groove (ex. application of the narrow gap arc welding), and to change continuous welding to skip one. (J.P.N.)

  6. Production of bio-sugar and bioethanol from coffee residue (CR) by acid-chlorite pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Myeong; Choi, Yong-Soo; Lee, Dae-Seok; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, coffee residue (CR) after roasting is recognized as one of the most useful resources in the world for producing the biofuel and bio-materials. In this study, we evaluated the potential of bio-sugar and bioethanol production from acid-chlorite treated CR. Notably, CR treated three times with acid-chlorite after organic solvent extraction (OSE-3), showed the high monosaccharide content, and the efficient sugar conversion yield compared to the other pretreatment conditions. The OSE-3 (6% substrate loading, w/v) can produce bio-sugar (0.568g/g OSE-3). Also, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) produced ethanol (0.266g/g OSE-3), and showed an ethanol conversion yield of 73.8% after a 72-h reaction period. These results suggest that acid-chlorite pretreatment can improve the bio-sugar and bioethanol production of CR by removing the phenolic and brown compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Production of hydrolysate from processed Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus residues and assessment of its antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Miotto BERNARDI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this work was to produce protein hydrolysates from by-products of the Nile tilapia fileting process, and to assess the effects of different hydrolysis times on the antioxidant activity of the hydrolysed animal-based protein, in free form and incorporated into a food matrix. Gutted tilapia heads and carcasses were hydrolysed by Alcalase® for different hydrolysis times producing six hydrolysates. The protein content, degree of hydrolysis, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and antioxidant activity by the ORAC, FRAP and TEAC methods were analysed. Three mini-hamburger formulations were produced and the lipidic oxidation of mini-hamburger was determined by TBARS. The protein contained in the residue was completely recovered in the process. The hydrolysates varied in their degree of hydrolysis, but presented similar levels of antioxidant activity. In the mini-hamburgers the hydrolysate was capable of delaying oxidation after 7 days of storage. Hydrolysis of tilapia processing by-products produced peptides may be used in the formulation of functional foods.

  8. Screening boreal energy crops and crop residues for methane biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtomaeki, A.; Rintala, J.A. [Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Viinikainen, T.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to screen potential boreal energy crops and crop residues for their suitability in methane production and to investigate the effect of harvest time on the methane production potential of different crops. The specific methane yields of crops, determined in 100-200 d methane potential assays, varied from 0.17 to 0.49 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} kg{sup -1} VS{sub added} (volatile solids added) and from 25 to 260 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} t{sub ww}{sup -1} (tonnes of wet weight). Jerusalem artichoke, timothy-clover grass and reed canary grass gave the highest potential methane yields of 2900-5400 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} ha{sup -1}, corresponding to a gross energy yield of 28-53 MWh ha{sup -1} and ca. 40,000-60,000 km ha{sup -1} in passenger car transport. The effect of harvest time on specific methane yields per VS of crops varied a lot, whereas the specific methane yields per t{sub ww} increased with most crops as the crops matured. (author)

  9. MULTIVARIATE TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO EVALUATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC RESIDUES FOR BIOENERGY PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de Paula Protásio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509812361The evaluation of lignocellulosic wastes for bioenergy production demands to consider several characteristicsand properties that may be correlated. This fact demands the use of various multivariate analysis techniquesthat allow the evaluation of relevant energetic factors. This work aimed to apply cluster analysis and principalcomponents analyses for the selection and evaluation of lignocellulosic wastes for bioenergy production.8 types of residual biomass were used, whose the elemental components (C, H, O, N, S content, lignin, totalextractives and ashes contents, basic density and higher and lower heating values were determined. Bothmultivariate techniques applied for evaluation and selection of lignocellulosic wastes were efficient andsimilarities were observed between the biomass groups formed by them. Through the interpretation of thefirst principal component obtained, it was possible to create a global development index for the evaluationof the viability of energetic uses of biomass. The interpretation of the second principal component alloweda contrast between nitrogen and sulfur contents with oxygen content.

  10. From the HINDAS Project: Excitation Functions for Residual Nuclide Production by Proton-Induced Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.; Gloris, M.; Protoschill, J.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Weug, M.; Herpers, U.; Kuhnhenn, J.; Kubik, P.-W.; Schumann, D.; Synal, H.-A.; Weinreich, R.; Leya, I.; David, J.C.; Leray, S.; Duijvestijn, M.; Koning, A.; Kelic, A.; Schmidt, K.H.; Cugnon, J.

    2005-01-01

    A survey is given about efforts undertaken during the HINDAS project to investigate the energy dependence of residual nuclide production by proton-induced reactions from thresholds up to 2.6 GeV. For proton-induced reactions, our experiments aimed to further develop and complete the cross-section database that was established by our collaboration in recent years. It was extended to the heavy-target elements Ta, W, Pb, and Bi for energies up to 2.6 GeV. In addition, new measurements for the target element iron were performed up to 2.6 GeV and for natural uranium for energies from 21 MeV to 69 MeV. For the target element lead, a comprehensive set of excitation functions published recently was completed by AMS-measurements of cross sections for the production of the long-lived radionuclides Be-10, Al-26, Cl-36, and I-129 and by mass spectrometric measurements for stable and radioactive rare gas isotopes of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Comprehensive tests of the nuclear-reaction codes TALYS and INCL4+ABLA, which were developed within the HINDAS project, were performed with the new experimental results over the entire energy range

  11. Use of inedible wheat residues from the KSC-CELSS breadboard facility for production of fungal cellulase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, R. F.; Brannon, M. A.; Garland, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Cellulose and xylan (a hemicellulose) comprise 50 percent of inedible wheat residue (which is 60 percent of total wheat biomass) produced in the Kennedy Space Center Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Breadboard Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). These polysaccharides can be converted by enzymatic hydrolysis into useful monosaccharides, thus maximizing the use of BPC volume and energy, and minimizing waste material to be treated. The evaluation of CELSS-derived wheat residues for production for cellulase enzyme complex by Trichoderma reesei and supplemental beta-glucosidase by Aspergillus phoenicis is in progress. Results to date are given.

  12. Production of Nutritious Flour from Residue Custard Apple (Annona squamosa L. for the Development of New Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Thiago Caldeira Souza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the fruit processing industry generates a high volume of waste in fruits that have not reached a quality standard for consumption or by-products generated throughout the production process. To reduce this waste, mitigating measures, such as reuse in food formulations, have been proposed. In this work the custard apple bagasse flour (Annona squamosa L. (CAB was produced and incorporated into cookie formulations in different proportions (5 to 50% evaluating its acceptability. The CAB flour was characterized by physicochemical analysis, proximate composition, mineral analysis, determination of the phenolic content, and antioxidant capacity. The results of the physicochemical and proximate characterizations show that the processed flour presents values and specifications suitable for food formulations. The mineral composition of the CAB flour responds to more than 20% of the daily intake of nutrients, highlighting the Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, Ca, and Mg. The composition of phenolic compounds for CAB flour and cookies formulations presented values ranging from 200 to 658 mg GAE/100 g, similar to flour and formulations prepared of residues tropical fruit, while DPPH• inhibition showed a variation of 9.68–10.75%. Cookies made from the CAB flour showed high acceptability making the flour promising in the nutritional incorporation in food formulations.

  13. On the distribution of quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.; Panebrattsev, V.S.; Stavinskij, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the data on cumulative proton, deuteron and nuclear fragment production in hadr on-nucleon reactions and deep inelastic muon-nucleon scattering quark distributions in light, intemediate and heavy nuclei have been investigated. Conditions of limiting fragmentation of hadrons and nuclei in the studied processes have been investigated to obtain quark-parton structure functions (Gs 2 ) of the studied hadrons or nuclei. Invariant differential cross sections of π + , π - , K + meson production on aluminium, deuterium and lead nuclei and their dependence on scale variable at the transverse momentum value Psub(T) approximately 0 have been obtained. Properties of structure functions G 2 and behaviour of different nuclei differential cross sections of limiting fragmentation have been investigated. It is concluded that considered regularities testify to the presence of multiquark states in nuclei, different by its structure from nUcleons

  14. Simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate residues in meat products marketed in Shiraz by high performance liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Golkari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite and nitrate are the key ingredients and play a multifunctional role in meat curing technology. Despite all of their desirable effects, the addition of nitrite to meat is the major cause of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines formation. In this study, the amount of residual nitrite and nitrate in meat products containing 61% to 80% meat were assessed. The samples were obtained at the fourth day of their production from Shiraz retails and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. According to the results, the mean concentrations of residual nitrite and nitrate were estimated at 36.96 ± 7.38 and 85.81 ± 5.5 mg/kg in small-diameter (1.5-2 cm sausages. Meanwhile, in large-diameter (5.5-8 cm sausages the residues were estimated at 20.97 ± 3.28 and 124.85±5.3 mg/kg, respectively. In all analyzed samples, the residual nitrite level was found below the permitted level of 120 mg/kg which indicated the application of allowed concentrations of nitrite in such products. The mean values of residual nitrite and nitrate concentrations were statistically different (p

  15. Recovery of biogas as a source of renewable energy from ice-cream production residues and wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Burak; Orok, Murat; Hot, Elif; Erkişi, Selin; Albükrek, Metin; Onay, Turgut T

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of waste streams and residues from agro-industry is very important to prevent environmental pollution. In particular, the anaerobic co-digestion process can be used as an important tool for safe disposal and energy recovery from agro-industry waste streams and residues. The primary objective of this laboratory-scale study was to determine whether it was possible to recover energy (biogas) from ice-cream production residues and wastewater, through a mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion process. A high methane yield of 0.338 L CH4/gCOD(removed) could be achieved from anaerobic digestion of ice-cream wastewater alone, with almost 70% of methane in biogas, while anaerobic digestion of ice-cream production residue alone did not seem feasible. When wastewater and ice-cream production residue were anaerobically co-digested at a ratio of 9:1 by weight, the highest methane yield of 0.131 L CH4/gCOD(removed) was observed. Buffering capacity seemed to be imperative in energy recovery from these substrates in the anaerobic digestion process.

  16. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Residual Oil Recovered from Spent Bleaching Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramli Mat

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, semi-refined and refined vegetable oils are used as a feedstock in biodiesel production. However, due to competition with conventional fossil fuel, economic reasons, shortage supply of food and its social impact on the global scale has somewhat slowed the development of biodiesel industry. Studies have been conducted to recover oil from mill palm oil operation especially from the spent bleaching earth. Hence, the study was to investigate the potential recovery of oil from spent bleaching earth to be used as a feedstock for biodiesel production. The effect of different types of catalysts (sodium hydroxide alkali and sulfuric acid catalysts on biodiesel yield was studied. In addition, the effect of volume addition of methanol to the weight of spent bleaching earth on the product yield was also studied. Furthermore, the effect of ratio of hexane to methanol was also carried out to determine its product yield. The studies were carried out in an in-situ biodiesel reactor system and the biodiesel product was analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Result shows that the use of alkali catalyst produced the highest yield of biodiesel and the most optimum biodiesel yield was obtained when the methanol to spent bleaching earth ratio was 3.2:1 (gram of methanol: gram of SBE and hexane to methanol ratio of 0.6:1 (volume of hexane: volume of methanol. © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 19th December 2010, Revised: 10th May 2011; Accepted: 18th May 2011[How to Cite: R. Mat, O.S. Ling, A. Johari, M. Mohamed. (2011. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Residual Oil Recovered from Spent Bleaching Earth. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6(1: 53-57. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.678.53-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.678.53-57 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/678 ] | View in 

  17. Sustainable waste management by production of activated carbon from agroforestry residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ntuli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Agroforestry waste presents a problem for disposal and negatively impacts on the environment if left to rot or burn. The aim of this study was to reduce environmental problems associated with agroforestry waste by promoting the innovative use of such waste in the production of activated carbons (ACs using a low-cost production technique, and ultimately delivering more affordable water and effluent treatment adsorbents. Four varieties of ACs from four different agroforestry materials – pine (Pinus contorta cones (PC, Abies (Abies cilicica seeds (AS, maple (Acer ginnala seeds (MS and peach (Prunus persica stones (PS – were prepared by single-step steam pyrolysis and characterised. The raw materials were evaluated for AC yield while the respective ACs were evaluated on the basis of iodine number, phenol specific area, ash content, pH, moisture content and removal of metal ions, nitrates and sulphates from aqueous solution. The AC yields for PS, PC, AS and MS were found to be 23.0%, 18.0%, 17.8% and 14.6%, respectively. The yield for PS (23% is within the specified commercial limits of 20% to 40%. The phenol specific areas of the ACs ranged between 381 m2/g and 415 m2/g higher than the commercial lower limit (300 m2/g generally specified. The ACs also showed the capacity to remove heavy metal ions from their aqueous solutions. Removal of both nitrates and sulphates in raw water was greater than 50%. Although no quantitative analysis has been performed to date, it is envisaged that the production of AC from agroforestry wastes can contribute to the sustainable management of environmental pollution by these residues and the concomitant delivery of cheaper adsorbents.

  18. Production of xylose, furfural, fermentable sugars and ethanol from agricultural residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; Das, K.; Sharma, D.K.

    1984-02-01

    With the developing shortage of petroleum, reliance on biomass as a source of chemicals and fuels will increase. In the present work, bagasse and rice husk were subjected to dilute acid (H2SO4) hydrolysis using pressurised water to obtain furfural and fermentable sugars. Various process conditions such as particle size, solid-liquid ratio, acid concentration, reaction time and temperature have been studied to optimise yields of furfural, xylose and other fermentable sugars. The use of particle sizes smaller than 495 mu m did not further increase the yield of reducing sugars. A solid-liquid ratio of 1:15 was found to be the most suitable for production of reducing sugars. Hydrolysis using 0.4% H2SO4 at 453 K resulted in selective yields (g per 100 g of dried agricultural residues) of xylose from bagasse (22.5%) and rice husk (21.5%). A maximum yield of furfural was obtained using 0.4% H2SO4 at 473 K from bagasse (11.5%) and rice husk (10.9%). It was also found that hydrolysis using 1% H2SO4 at 493 K resulted in maximum yields of total reducing sugar from bagasse (53.5%) and rice husk (50%). The reducing sugars obtained were fermented to ethanol after removal of furfural. The effect of furfural on the fermentation of sugars to ethanol was also studied. Based on these studies, an integrated two-step process for the production of furfural and fermentable sugars could be envisaged. In the first step, using 0.4% H2SO4 at 473 K, furfural could be obtained, while in the second step, the use of 1% H2SO4 at 493 K should result in the production of fermentable sugars. (Refs. 22).

  19. Vibrational-rotational model of odd-odd nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, A.V.; Guseva, T.V.; Tamberg, Yu.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    The rotational vibrational (RV) model of odd nuclei is generalized to odd-odd nuclei. The hamiltonian, wave functions and matrix elements of the RV-model of odd-odd nuclei are obtained. The expressions obtained for matrix elements of the RV-model of odd-odd nuclei can be used to study the role of vibrational additions in low-lying two-particle states of odd-odd deformed nuclei. Such calculations permit to study more correctly the residual neutron-proton interaction of valent nucleons with respect to collectivization effects

  20. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains eight separate records on the interaction of high energy Λ 6 He hypernuclear beams with atomic nuclei, the position-sensitive detector of a high spatial resolution on the basis of a multiwire gas electron multiplier, pseudorapidity hadron density at the LHC energy, high precision laser control of the ATLAS tile-calorimeter module mass production at JINR, a new approach to ECG's features recognition involving neural network, subcriticity of a uranium target enriched in 235 U, beam space charge effects in high-current cyclotron injector CI-5, a homogeneous static gravitational field and the principle of equivalence

  1. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains six separate records on the DELPHI experiment at LEP, the Fermi-surface dynamics of rotating nuclei, production of large samples of the silica dioxide aerogel in the 37-litre autoclave and test of its optical properties, preliminary radiation resource results on scintillating fibers, a new algorithm for the direct transformation method of time to digital with the high time resolution and development and design of analogue read-out electronics for HADES drift chamber system

  2. Biomass production on the Olympic and Kitsap Peninsulas, Washington: updated logging residue ratios, slash pile volume-to-weight ratios, and supply curves for selected locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason C. Cross; Eric C. Turnblom; Gregory J. Ettl

    2013-01-01

    Biomass residue produced by timber harvest operations is estimated for the Olympic and Kitsap Peninsulas, Washington. Scattered residues were sampled in 53 harvest units and piled residues were completely enumerated in 55 harvest units. Production is based on 2008 and 2009 data and is stratified by forest location, ownership type, harvest intensity, and harvest method...

  3. Estimates of fission barrier heights for neutron-deficient Po to Ra nuclei produced in fusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagaidak Roman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cross section data for fission and evaporation residue production in fusion reactions leading to nuclei from Po to Ra have been considered in a systematic way in the framework of the conventional barrier-passing (fusion model coupled with the statistical model. The cross section data obtained in very asymmetric projectile-target combinations can be described within these models rather well with the adjusted model parameters. In particular, one can scale and fix the macroscopic (liquid-drop fission barrier heights (FBHs for nuclei involved in the de-excitation of compound nuclei produced in the reactions. The macroscopic FBHs for nuclei from Po to Ra have been derived in the framework of such analysis and compared with the predictions of various theoretical models.

  4. The use of solid phase extraction method for analysis of residues of pesticides used in banana production in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, L.E.; Ruepert, C.; Alfaro, A.R.; Solis, E.

    1999-01-01

    Different solid phase extraction devices were tested for the analysis of residues of eleven pesticides used in banana production in Costa Rica. The analysis was performed by using gas chromatograph equipped with NPD and ECD detectors. In general low recoveries and high variation coefficients were found for chlorothalonil, imazalil, terbufos and thiabendazole. For the other pesticides recoveries ranged between 60 and over 100%. (author)

  5. Residual efficacy of pyriproxyfen and Hydroprene applied to wood, metal, and concrete for control of stored-product insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyriproxyfen and hydroprene are insect growth regulators (IGRs) that have been evaluated to control insect pests of field crops, but there are limited reports of efficacy against stored-product insects. A laboratory study was conducted to determine residual efficacy of pyriproxyfen and hydroprene on...

  6. Cumulative nucleon production in 3Hep- and 3Hp interactions at momenta of colliding nuclei 5 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullin, S.K.; Blinov, A.V.; Vanyushin, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    Inclusive cross sections of cumulative protons produced in 3 Hep- and 3 Hp-interactions under momenta of colliding 5 GeV/c nuclei are investigated. Experimental material is obtained using liquid-hydrogen ITEP chamber-80cm. Under the cumulative proton kinetic energy, exceeding 50 MeV inclusive cross section ratio σ( 3 Hep→pX)/σ( 3 Hp→pX)=1.6±0.1. Within the same energy interval evaluation of yield ratio of cumulative protons and neutrons, produced in 3 Hep -interactions, leads to ∼ 1.6 value. Asymmetry of mean multiple protons escaping forward and backward both in 3 Hep -and in 3 Hp interactions is observed. Averaged invariant distribution functions for cumulative protons and neutrons in 8 Hep-interactions and protons in 3 Hp-interactions are constructed (the averaging is performed within 90-180 deg and 120-180 deg intervals). To temperatures of such distributions are found. 43 refs.; 1 fig

  7. Bose-Einstein correlations in hadron-pairs from lepto-production on nuclei ranging from hydrogen to xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Justus-Liebig Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); University of Michigan, Randall Laboratory of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Akopov, N.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Elbakian, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Karyan, G.; Marukyan, H.; Petrosyan, A.; Taroian, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Akopov, Z.; Avetisyan, E.; Borissov, A.; Deconinck, W.; Hartig, M.; Holler, Y.; Lu, X.G.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Rostomyan, A.; Ye, Z.; Zihlmann, B. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Aschenauer, E.C.; Fabbri, R.; Hristova, I.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.D. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Augustyniak, W.; Marianski, B.; Trzcinski, A.; Zupranski, P. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Belostotski, S.; Kisselev, A.; Naryshkin, Y.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); Bianchi, N.; Capitani, G.P.; De Sanctis, E.; Di Nezza, P.; Fantoni, A.; Hasch, D.; Reolon, A.R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Blok, H.P. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef), Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bryzgalov, V.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Ivanilov, A.; Korotkov, V.; Salomatin, Y. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Burns, J.; Kaiser, R.; Lehmann, I.; Mahon, D.; Murray, M.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B. [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Capiluppi, M.; Ciullo, G.; Dalpiaz, P.F.; Lenisa, P.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy); Cisbani, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, Gruppo Collegato Sanita, Rome (Italy); Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Contalbrigo, M.; Movsisyan, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); De Leo, R.; Lagamba, L.; Nappi, E.; Vilardi, I. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Diefenthaler, M. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Dueren, M.; Etzelmueller, E.; Keri, T.; Perez-Benito, R.; Stahl, M. [Justus-Liebig Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Ellinghaus, F.; Kinney, E. [University of Colorado, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States); Felawka, L.; Yen, S. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Garay Garcia, J. [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics, Bilbao (Spain); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gavrilov, G. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Giordano, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy); University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Gliske, S.; Lorenzon, W. [University of Michigan, Randall Laboratory of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Imazu, Y.; Miyachi, Y.; Shibata, T.A. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Jackson, H.E.; Reimer, P.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, Argonne, IL (United States); Joosten, S.; Lopez Ruiz, A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Tytgat, M.; Van Haarlem, Y. [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent (Belgium); Kozlov, V.; Terkulov, A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kravchenko, P. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); Krivokhijine, V.G.; Shutov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Lapikas, L.; Steijger, J.J.M. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ma, B.Q.; Mao, Y.; Wang, S. [Peking University, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Makins, N.C.R.; Truty, R. [University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Mussgiller, A.; Yaschenko, S. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Nass, A.; Rith, K. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Riedl, C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Rubin, J. [University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); University of Michigan, Randall Laboratory of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Schaefer, A. [Universitaet Regensburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Regensburg (Germany); Schnell, G. [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics, Bilbao (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao (Spain); Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hulse, C. [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics, Bilbao (Spain); Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent (Belgium); Collaboration: HERMES Collaboration

    2015-08-15

    Bose-Einstein correlations of like-sign charged hadrons produced in deep-inelastic electron and positron scattering are studied in the HERMES experiment using nuclear targets of {sup 1}H, {sup 2}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, N, Ne, Kr, and Xe. A Gaussian approach is used to parametrize a two-particle correlation function determined from events with at least two charged hadrons of the same sign charge. This correlation function is compared to two different empirical distributions that do not include the Bose-Einstein correlations. One distribution is derived from unlike-sign hadron pairs, and the second is derived from mixing like-sign pairs from different events. The extraction procedure used simulations incorporating the experimental setup in order to correct the results for spectrometer acceptance effects, and was tested using the distribution of unlike-sign hadron pairs. Clear signals of Bose-Einstein correlations for all target nuclei without a significant variation with the nuclear target mass are found. Also, no evidence for a dependence on the invariant mass W of the photon-nucleon system is found when the results are compared to those of previous experiments. (orig.)

  8. Effect of pre-treatments on methane production potential of energy crops and crop residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtomaki, A.; Ronkainen; Rintala, J.A. [Jyvaskla Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biological and Environmental Sciences; Viinikainen, T.A. [Jyvaskla Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    Energy crops, that is, crops grown specifically for energy purposes are an alternative to food production in areas with sufficient agricultural land. Crop residues are also a potential source of energy. The anaerobic digestion of solid materials is limited by hydrolysis of complex polymeric substances such as lignocellulose. The methane producing potential of ligno cellulosic material is to pretreat the substrate in order to break up the polymer chains to more easily accessible soluble compounds. In this study, three different substrates were used: sugar beet tops, grass hay, and straw of oats. Biological pretreatments were the following: enzyme treatment, composting, white-rot fungi treatment. Also, pretreatment in water was tried. Chemical pretreatments included peracetic acid treatment, and treatment with two different alkalis. Alkaline pretreatments of hay and sugar beet tops have the potential to improve the methane yield. For instance, the yield of grass hay was increased 15 per cent by one particular alkaline treatment. Straw did not respond to any of the treatments tried. 18 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  9. Polylactide-based renewable composites from natural products residues by encapsulated film bag: characterization and biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-San

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, the biodegradability, morphology, and mechanical properties of composite materials consisting of acrylic acid-grafted polylactide (PLA-g-AA) and natural products residues (corn starch, CS) were evaluated. Composites containing acrylic acid-grafted PLA (PLA-g-AA/CS) exhibited noticeably superior mechanical properties due to their greater compatibility with CS compared with PLA/CS. The feasibility of using PLA-g-AA/CS as a film bag material to facilitate the controlled release of an encapsulated phosphate-solubilizing bacterium (PSB) Burkholderia cepacia as a fertilizer use promoter was then evaluated. For purposes of comparison and accurate characterization, a PLA film bag was also assessed. The results showed that the bacterium completely degraded both the PLA and the PLA-g-AA/CS composite film bags, resulting in cell release. The PLA-g-AA/CS (20 wt%) film bags were more biodegradable than those made of PLA, and displayed a higher loss of molecular weight and intrinsic viscosity, indicating a strong connection between these characteristics and biodegradability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Sequential Combination of Laccase Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis for Glucose Production from Furfural Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Yu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Furfural residues (FRs were pretreated with laccase or a laccase-mediator (1-hydroxybenzotriazole, HBT system to produce fermentable sugar for bioethanol production. Compared to laccase-only pretreatment, laccase-mediator pretreatment dissolved more lignin. Approximately 10.5% of the initially present lignin was removed when FRs were treated with a laccase loading of 100 U/g of dry substrate in 1% (w/w HBT at 48 °C for 24 h in an acetate buffer (pH 4.8. The enzymatic saccharification process was carried out by a combined laccase or laccase-mediator pretreatment without washing of the treated solids. The results showed that active laccase had a negative effect on the rate and yield of enzymatic hydrolysis. Laccase-oxidized HBT seriously reduced glucose yield. However, non-oxidized HBT increased glucose yield when laccase was deactivated at 121 °C for 20 min prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest glucose yield, 80.9%, was obtained from the substrate pretreated with 100 U/g of dry substrate laccase and 1% (w/w HBT at 48 °C for 24 h in an acetate buffer (pH 4.8. Furthermore, the structures of FRs before and after laccase-mediator pretreatment were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR.

  11. Pyrolysis of forest residues: an approach to techno-economics for bio-fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The techno-economics for producing liquid fuels from Maine forest residues were determined from a combination of: (1) laboratory experiments at USDA-ARS’s Eastern Regional Research Center using hog fuel (a secondary woody residue produced from mill byproducts such as sawdust, bark and shavings) as a...

  12. Measurement of the absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring product nuclei (daughter) activity increase or by studing its radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, L.C. de.

    1981-01-01

    A new method for determining absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring daughter product radioactive decay is presented. The separation method of UX from hexahydrated uranyl nitrate UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 6H 2 O based on its dissolution in ethyl ether is described and the accuracy of this method is shown. The factors which accuate on total efficiency of a Geiger Mueller detector for beta particles are determined. The possibility to determine the mass of precursor element by daughter nuclei activity is shown. The results are compared with the one obtained by direct measurement of the mass (or number of atoms) of precursor radioactive substance and with theoretical values calculated for isotopes in secular equilibrium. (Author) [pt

  13. Bioethanol production from corn stover residues. Process design and Life Cycle Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bari, I.; Dinnino, G.; Braccio, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, the mass and energy balance along with a land-to-wheel Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is described for a corn stover-to-ethanol industrial process assumed to consist of the main technologies being researched at ENEA TRISAIA: pretreatment by steam explosion and enzymatic hydrolysis. The modelled plant has a processing capacity of 60kt/y (dimensioned on realistic supplying basins of residues in Italy); biomass is pre-treated by acid catalyzed-steam explosion; cellulose and hemicelluloses are hydrolyzed and separately fermented; enzymes are on-site produced. The main target was to minimize the consumption of fresh water, enzymes and energy. The results indicate that the production of 1kg bio ethanol (95.4 wt%) requires 3.5 kg biomass dry matter and produces an energy surplus up to 740 Wh. The main purpose of the LCA analysis was to assess the environmental impact of the entire life cycle from the bio ethanol production up to its end-use as E10 blended gasoline. Boustead Model was used as tool to compile the life cycle inventory. The results obtained and discussed in this reports suffer of some limitations deriving from the following main points: some process yields have been extrapolated according to optimistic development scenarios; the energy and steam recovery could be lower than that projected because of lacks in the real systems; water recycle could be limited by the yeast tolerance toward the potential accumulation of toxic compounds. Nevertheless, the detailed process analysis here provided has its usefulness in: showing the challenging targets (even if they are ambitious) to bet on to make the integrated process feasible; driving the choice of the most suitable technologies to bypass some process bottlenecks [it

  14. Analysis of veterinary drug residue monitoring results for commercial livestock products in Taiwan between 2011 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Chun; Chen, Chi-Min; Wei, Jen-Ting; Chiu, Hsiu-Yi

    2018-04-01

    Antibiotics have been widely used in the treatment of livestock diseases. However, the emergence of issues related to drug resistance prompted governments to enact a series of laws regulating the use of antibiotics in livestock. Following control of the problem of drug resistant bacteria, public attention has shifted to the recurring incidence of human health and safety issues caused by residual veterinary drugs in livestock products. To guarantee the safety and hygiene of meat, milk, and eggs from food-producing animals, governments and relevant agencies established laws and regulations for the use of veterinary drugs. It is, therefore, necessary to monitor the content of residual drugs in livestock products at regular intervals to assess whether the regulations have resulted in the effective management of food product safety, and to prevent and manage sudden problems related to this issue. A 2011-2015 livestock product post-marketing monitoring program launched by the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) inspected 1487 livestock products. Over the past 5 years, there were 34 samples identified that did not conform to the regulations; these samples included residue drugs such as β-agonists, chloramphenicols, β-lactam antibiotics, sulfa drugs, enrofloxacin, and lincomycin. Inspections of commercial livestock products with the consistent cooperation of agricultural authorities did not detect the drugs that were banned by the government, whereas the detection of other drugs decreased annually with an increase in the post-market monitoring sample size. In the future, the TFDA will continue to monitor the status of residual veterinary drugs in commercial livestock products, adjust the sampling of food products annually according to monitoring results, and closely cooperate with agricultural authorities on source management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The Effect of Fungicide Residues and Yeast Assimilable Nitrogen on Fermentation Kinetics and H2S Production during Cider Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreau IV, Thomas Francis

    2016-01-01

    The Virginia cider industry has grown rapidly in the past decade, and demands research-based recommendations for cider fermentation. This study evaluated relationships between the unique chemistry of apples and production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in cider fermentations. Yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and composition and residual fungicides influence H2S production by yeast during fermentation, but these factors have to date only been studied in wine grape fermentations. This ...

  16. Fertilizer nitrogen recovery efficiencies in crop production systems of China with and without consideration of the residual effect of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Xiaoyuan; Ti, Chaopu; Zhu, Zhaoliang; Vitousek, Peter; Chen, Deli; Leip, Adrian; Cai, Zucong

    2014-01-01

    China is the world’s largest consumer of synthetic nitrogen (N), where very low rates of fertilizer N recovery in crops have been reported, raising discussion around whether fertilizer N use can be significantly reduced without yield penalties. However, using recovery rates as indicator ignores a possible residual effect of fertilizer N—a factor often unknown at large scales. Such residual effect might store N in the soil increasing N availability for subsequent crops. The objectives of the present study were therefore to quantify the residual effect of fertilizer N in China and to obtain more realistic rates of the accumulative fertilizer N recovery efficiency (RE) in crop production systems of China. Long-term spatially-extensive data on crop production, fertilizer N and other N inputs to croplands in China were used to analyze the relationship between crop N uptake and fertilizer N input (or total N input), and to estimate the amount of residual fertilizer N. Measurement results of cropland soil N content in two time periods were obtained to compare the change in the soil N pool. At the provincial scale, it was found that there is a linear relationship between crop N uptake and fertilizer N input or total N input. With the increase in fertilizer N input, annual direct fertilizer N RE decreased and was indeed low (below 30% in recent years), while its residual effect increased continuously, to the point that 40–68% of applied fertilizer was used for crop production sooner or later. The residual effect was evidenced by a buildup of soil N and a large difference between nitrogen use efficiencies of long-term and short-term experiments. (paper)

  17. The potential of agro-industrial residues and municipal solid waste for production of biogas and electricity in Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivaisi, A K [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Botany Dept., Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    This paper gives an overview of the energy demands in Tanzania, and highlights the current serious shortage of electricity. Government strategy to alleviate the problem include exploitation of the country`s big natural gas reserves for power generation, and utilization of the renewable energies such as solar, wind and biogas. Important agro-industrial residues and municipal solid wastes with large potentials for anaerobic converstion into biogas and electricity have been identified and quantified. Tanzania is estimated to generate about 615,000 organic matter from coffee, sisal, sugar and cereal residues and households in main towns are estimated to generate about 600,000 tons of organic matter annually. Laboratory scale determinations of methane yields from the residues gave 400 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of sisal pulp; 400 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of sisal production wastewater; 400 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of Robusta coffee solid waste, 350 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of sugar processing wastewater; 250 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of sugar filter mat, 450 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS maize bran and 300 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of mixed household waste. Based on these results the estimated total annual potential electricity production from these residues is 1.4 million MW. The total oil substitution from these residues has been estimated at 0.35 million tonnes crude diesel oil per annum equivalent to 2% of the total energy consumption in Tanzania. Case studies onthe coffee and sisal processing factories indicate that exploitation of the residues for the production of electricity on site these factories is feasible. Utilization of agro-industrial residues and municipal waste for biogas production has enormous potential for reduction of environmental pollution. The potential substitution of fossil fuel with biogas represents an annual reduction in the net CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere of approximately 1.3 million tonnes. By treating the residues in controlled

  18. The potential of agro-industrial residues and municipal solid waste for production of biogas and electricity in Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivaisi, A.K. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Botany Dept., Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper gives an overview of the energy demands in Tanzania, and highlights the current serious shortage of electricity. Government strategy to alleviate the problem include exploitation of the country`s big natural gas reserves for power generation, and utilization of the renewable energies such as solar, wind and biogas. Important agro-industrial residues and municipal solid wastes with large potentials for anaerobic converstion into biogas and electricity have been identified and quantified. Tanzania is estimated to generate about 615,000 organic matter from coffee, sisal, sugar and cereal residues and households in main towns are estimated to generate about 600,000 tons of organic matter annually. Laboratory scale determinations of methane yields from the residues gave 400 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of sisal pulp; 400 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of sisal production wastewater; 400 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of Robusta coffee solid waste, 350 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of sugar processing wastewater; 250 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of sugar filter mat, 450 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS maize bran and 300 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/ton VS of mixed household waste. Based on these results the estimated total annual potential electricity production from these residues is 1.4 million MW. The total oil substitution from these residues has been estimated at 0.35 million tonnes crude diesel oil per annum equivalent to 2% of the total energy consumption in Tanzania. Case studies onthe coffee and sisal processing factories indicate that exploitation of the residues for the production of electricity on site these factories is feasible. Utilization of agro-industrial residues and municipal waste for biogas production has enormous potential for reduction of environmental pollution. The potential substitution of fossil fuel with biogas represents an annual reduction in the net CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere of approximately 1.3 million tonnes. By treating the residues in controlled

  19. The potential of agro-industrial residues and municipal solid waste for production of biogas and electricity in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivaisi, A.K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the energy demands in Tanzania, and highlights the current serious shortage of electricity. Government strategy to alleviate the problem include exploitation of the country's big natural gas reserves for power generation, and utilization of the renewable energies such as solar, wind and biogas. Important agro-industrial residues and municipal solid wastes with large potentials for anaerobic converstion into biogas and electricity have been identified and quantified. Tanzania is estimated to generate about 615,000 organic matter from coffee, sisal, sugar and cereal residues and households in main towns are estimated to generate about 600,000 tons of organic matter annually. Laboratory scale determinations of methane yields from the residues gave 400 m 3 CH 4 /ton VS of sisal pulp; 400 m 3 CH 4 /ton VS of sisal production wastewater; 400 m 3 CH 4 /ton VS of Robusta coffee solid waste, 350 m 3 CH 4 /ton VS of sugar processing wastewater; 250 m 3 CH 4 /ton VS of sugar filter mat, 450 m 3 CH 4 /ton VS maize bran and 300 m 3 CH 4 /ton VS of mixed household waste. Based on these results the estimated total annual potential electricity production from these residues is 1.4 million MW. The total oil substitution from these residues has been estimated at 0.35 million tonnes crude diesel oil per annum equivalent to 2% of the total energy consumption in Tanzania. Case studies onthe coffee and sisal processing factories indicate that exploitation of the residues for the production of electricity on site these factories is feasible. Utilization of agro-industrial residues and municipal waste for biogas production has enormous potential for reduction of environmental pollution. The potential substitution of fossil fuel with biogas represents an annual reduction in the net CO 2 emission to the atmosphere of approximately 1.3 million tonnes. By treating the residues in controlled anaerobic systems it is possible to reduce the methane emission by

  20. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for residue analysis of the insecticide emamectin benzoate in agricultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Mika; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Uchigashima, Mikiko; Kono, Takeshi; Takemoto, Toshihide; Fujita, Masahiro; Saka, Machiko; Iwasa, Seiji; Ito, Shigekazu; Miyake, Shiro

    2009-01-28

    A direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dc-ELISA) for the analysis of emamectin residues in agricultural products was developed using a prepared mouse monoclonal antibody. The working range was 0.3-3.0 ng/mL, and the 50% inhibition concentration (IC(50)) was 1.0 ng/mL. The assay was sufficiently sensitive for analysis of the maximum residue limits in agricultural products in Japan (>0.1 microg/g). Emamectin residues contain the following metabolites: the 4''-epi-amino analogue, the 4''-epi-(N-formyl)amino analogue, the 4''-epi-(N-formyl-N-methyl)amino analogue, and the 8,9-Z isomer. The dc-ELISA reacted with these compounds at ratios of 113, 55, 38, and 9.1% of the IC(50) value of emamectin benzoate. Seven kinds of vegetables were spiked with emamectin benzoate at concentrations of 15-300 ng/g, and the recoveries were 91-117% in the dc-ELISA. The dc-ELISA results agreed reasonably well with results obtained by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using spiked samples and actual (incurred) samples. The results indicate that the dc-ELISA was useful for the analysis of emamectin benzoate residues in agricultural products.

  1. Chemical analysis and biorefinery of red algae Kappaphycus alvarezii for efficient production of glucose from residue of carrageenan extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarin, Fernando; Cedeno, Fernando Roberto Paz; Chavez, Eddyn Gabriel Solorzano; de Oliveira, Levi Ezequiel; Gelli, Valéria Cress; Monti, Rubens

    2016-01-01

    Biorefineries serve to efficiently utilize biomass and their by-products. Algal biorefineries are designed to generate bioproducts for commercial use. Due to the high carbohydrate content of algal biomass, biorefinery to generate biofuels, such as bioethanol, is of great interest. Carrageenan is a predominant polysaccharide hydrocolloid found in red macroalgae and is widely used in food, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. In this study, we report the biorefinery of carrageenan derived from processing of experimental strains of the red macroalgae Kappaphycus alvarezii. Specifically, the chemical composition and enzymatic hydrolysis of the residue produced from carrageenan extraction were evaluated to determine the conditions for efficient generation of carbohydrate bioproducts. The productivity and growth rates of K. alvarezii strains were assessed along with the chemical composition (total carbohydrates, ash, sulfate groups, proteins, insoluble aromatics, galacturonic acid, and lipids) of each strain. Two strains, brown and red, were selected based on their high growth rates and productivity and were treated with 6 % KOH for extraction of carrageenan. The yields of biomass from treatment with 6 % KOH solution of the brown and red strains were 89.3 and 89.5 %, respectively. The yields of carrageenan and its residue were 63.5 and 23 %, respectively, for the brown strain and 60 and 27.8 %, respectively, for the red strain. The residues from the brown and red strains were assessed to detect any potential bioproducts. The galactan, ash, protein, insoluble aromatics, and sulfate groups of the residue were reduced to comparable extents for the two strains. However, KOH treatment did not reduce the content of glucan in the residue from either strain. Glucose was produced by enzymatic hydrolysis for 72 h using both strains. The glucan conversion was 100 % for both strains, and the concentrations of glucose from the brown and red strains were 13.7 and 11.5 g L(-1

  2. Study on production mechanism of welding residual stress at the juncture of a pipe penetrating a thick plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Enomoto, Kunio; Okamoto, Noriaki; Saitoh, Hideyo; Hayashi, Eisaku.

    1994-01-01

    This paper studies welding residual stresses at the intersection of a small diameter pipe penetrating a thick plate. The pipe is welded to the plate, and Tungsten Innert Gas (TIG) cladding is melted on the inner surface of the pipe to protect it from stress corrosion cracking due to long operation in nuclear power plants. Stresses are calculated by heat conduction analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis, and also measured by strain gauges. Welding residual stresses are shown to have no corrosive influence on the inner pipe surface, and the stresses are compressed enough to protect the pipe against stress corrosion cracking on the outer surface. It was also studied to make clear the production mechanism of the residual stresses which were generated by welding processes at the pipe. (author)

  3. Leptoproduction of nuclei as an analogue to production in hadron-hadron interactions (at the example of J/psi)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batunin, A.V.; Smirnov, A.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    The role of states with hidden colour inside a nucleus in leptoproduction processes (at the example of J/psi-meson) production is investigated. A concrete production mechanism is proposed, appealing to the dual parton model of hadron-hadron interactions. Comparison with experiment is made

  4. Optimization of Thermostable Alpha-Amylase Production Via Mix Agricultural-Residues and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini RAI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports utilization of mixture of wheat and barley bran (1:1 for the production of thermostable alpha-amylase enzyme through a spore former, heat tolerant strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in solid state fermentation. Maximum yield of alpha-amylase (252.77 U mL-1 was obtained in following optimized conditions, inoculums size 2 mL (2 × 106 CFU/mL, moisture 80%, pH 7±0.02, NaCl (3%, temperature 38±1°C, incubation for 72 h, maltose (1% and tryptone (1%. After SSF crude enzyme was purified via ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange and column chromatography by DEAE Cellulose. Purified protein showed a molecular weight of 42 kDa by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. After purification, purified enzyme was characterized against several enzymes inhibitors such as temperature, NaCl, pH, metal and surfactants. Pure enzyme was highly active over broad temperature (50-70°C, NaCl concentration (0.5-4 M, and pH (6-10 ranges, indicating it’s a thermoactive and alkali-stable nature. Moreover, CaCl2, MnCl2, =-mercaptoethanol were found to stimulate the amylase activity, whereas FeCl3, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, CuCl3 and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA strongly inhibited the enzyme. Moreover, enzyme specificity and thermal stability conformed by degradation of different soluble starch up to 55°C. Therefore, the present study proved that the extracellular alpha-amylase extracted through wheat flour residues by organism B. amyloliquefaciens MCCB0075, both have considerable potential for industrial application owing to its properties.

  5. Optimizing production of hydroxyapatite from alkaline residue for removal of Pb{sup 2+} from wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yubo; Wang, YanPeng; Sun, Xiuyun, E-mail: sunxyun@njust.edu.cn; Li, Jiansheng; Shen, Jinyou; Han, Weiqing; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Lianjun, E-mail: wanglj@njust.edu.cn

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The solid waste from Soda Ash Plants was firstly converted into the high-efficiency adsorbent (O-HAP). • The response surface methodology was used to optimize the preparation conditions of O-HAP. • The O-HAP showed excellent immobilization ability for Pb{sup 2+} in both aqueous and soil medium. • The maximum adsorption capacity for Pb{sup 2+} (1429 mg/g) was considerably greater than other familiar adsorbents. - Abstract: Alkaline residue, a common solid waste generated from the ammonia-soda process for the production of soda ash, has been converted into hydroxyapatite for Pb{sup 2+} removal from wastewater. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the preparation conditions which were Ca/P (molar ratio), reaction temperature and reaction time, with the Pb{sup 2+} removal percentage as targeted response. The optimum conditions were identified to be Ca/P of 1.29, reaction temperature of 165.87 °C and reaction time of 14.5 h. Batch tests were conducted to evaluate the adsorption performance of optimum adsorbent (O-HAP), and the adsorption data were analyzed with different kinetic and isotherm models. The results showed that the pseudo-second order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model could best describe the adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} on O-HAP. The maximum adsorption capacity calculated from Langmuir equation was 1429 mg/g, which was greater than other familiar adsorbents. The MINTEQ results predicted that the formation of different Pb precipitates was the main mechanism in Pb{sup 2+} removal process, which was in good agreement with the kinetic and thermodynamic studies and were confirmed by the SEM-EDS and XRD analysis. In addition to aqueous medium, the O-HAP also could efficiently immobilize Pb{sup 2+} from contaminated soil.

  6. Biogas Production by Co-Digestion of Goat Manure with Three Crop Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Liu, Linlin; Song, Zilin; Ren, Guangxin; Feng, Yongzhong; Han, Xinhui; Yang, Gaihe

    2013-01-01

    Goat manure (GM) is an excellent raw material for anaerobic digestion because of its high total nitrogen content and fermentation stability. Several comparative assays were conducted on the anaerobic co-digestion of GM with three crop residues (CRs), namely, wheat straw (WS), corn stalks (CS) and rice straw (RS), under different mixing ratios. All digesters were implemented simultaneously under mesophilic temperature at 35±1 °C with a total solid concentration of 8%. Result showed that the combination of GM with CS or RS significantly improved biogas production at all carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratios. GM/CS (30:70), GM/CS (70:30), GM/RS (30:70) and GM/RS (50:50) produced the highest biogas yields from different co-substrates (14840, 16023, 15608 and 15698 mL, respectively) after 55 d of fermentation. Biogas yields of GM/WS 30:70 (C/N 35.61), GM/CS 70:30 (C/N 21.19) and GM/RS 50:50 (C/N 26.23) were 1.62, 2.11 and 1.83 times higher than that of CRs, respectively. These values were determined to be the optimal C/N ratios for co-digestion. However, compared with treatments of GM/CS and GM/RS treatments, biogas generated from GM/WS was only slightly higher than the single digestion of GM or WS. This result was caused by the high total carbon content (35.83%) and lignin content (24.34%) in WS, which inhibited biodegradation. PMID:23825574

  7. Recovery of Glucose from Residual Starch of Sago Hampas for Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awg-Adeni, D. S.; Bujang, K. B.; Hassan, M. A.; Abd-Aziz, S.

    2013-01-01

    Lower concentration of glucose was often obtained from enzymatic hydrolysis process of agricultural residue due to complexity of the biomass structure and properties. High substrate load feed into the hydrolysis system might solve this problem but has several other drawbacks such as low rate of reaction. In the present study, we have attempted to enhance glucose recovery from agricultural waste, namely, “sago hampas,” through three cycles of enzymatic hydrolysis process. The substrate load at 7% (w/v) was seen to be suitable for the hydrolysis process with respect to the gelatinization reaction as well as sufficient mixture of the suspension for saccharification process. However, this study was focused on hydrolyzing starch of sago hampas, and thus to enhance concentration of glucose from 7% substrate load would be impossible. Thus, an alternative method termed as cycles I, II, and III which involved reusing the hydrolysate for subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis process was introduced. Greater improvement of glucose concentration (138.45 g/L) and better conversion yield (52.72%) were achieved with the completion of three cycles of hydrolysis. In comparison, cycle I and cycle II had glucose concentration of 27.79 g/L and 73.00 g/L, respectively. The glucose obtained was subsequently tested as substrate for bioethanol production using commercial baker's yeast. The fermentation process produced 40.30 g/L of ethanol after 16 h, which was equivalent to 93.29% of theoretical yield based on total glucose existing in fermentation media. PMID:23509813

  8. Recovery of Glucose from Residual Starch of Sago Hampas for Bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Awg-Adeni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower concentration of glucose was often obtained from enzymatic hydrolysis process of agricultural residue due to complexity of the biomass structure and properties. High substrate load feed into the hydrolysis system might solve this problem but has several other drawbacks such as low rate of reaction. In the present study, we have attempted to enhance glucose recovery from agricultural waste, namely, “sago hampas,” through three cycles of enzymatic hydrolysis process. The substrate load at 7% (w/v was seen to be suitable for the hydrolysis process with respect to the gelatinization reaction as well as sufficient mixture of the suspension for saccharification process. However, this study was focused on hydrolyzing starch of sago hampas, and thus to enhance concentration of glucose from 7% substrate load would be impossible. Thus, an alternative method termed as cycles I, II, and III which involved reusing the hydrolysate for subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis process was introduced. Greater improvement of glucose concentration (138.45 g/L and better conversion yield (52.72% were achieved with the completion of three cycles of hydrolysis. In comparison, cycle I and cycle II had glucose concentration of 27.79 g/L and 73.00 g/L, respectively. The glucose obtained was subsequently tested as substrate for bioethanol production using commercial baker’s yeast. The fermentation process produced 40.30 g/L of ethanol after 16 h, which was equivalent to 93.29% of theoretical yield based on total glucose existing in fermentation media.

  9. Glucose(xylose isomerase production by Streptomyces sp. CH7 grown on agricultural residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankiya Chanitnun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces sp. CH7 was found to efficiently produce glucose(xylose isomerase when grown on either xylan or agricultural residues. This strain produced a glucose(xylose isomerase activity of roughly 1.8 U/mg of protein when it was grown in medium containing 1% xylose as a carbon source. Maximal enzymatic activities of about 5 and 3 U/mg were obtained when 1% xylan and 2.5% corn husks were used, respectively. The enzyme was purified from a mycelial extract to 16-fold purity with only two consecutive column chromatography steps using Macro-prep DEAE and Sephacryl-300, respectively. The approximate molecular weight of the purified enzyme is 170 kDa, and it has four identical subunits of 43.6 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. Its Km values for glucose and xylose were found to be 258.96 and 82.77 mM, respectively, and its Vmax values are 32.42 and 63.64 μM/min/mg, respectively. The purified enzyme is optimally active at 85ºC and pH 7.0. It is stable at pH 5.5-8.5 and at temperatures up to 60ºC after 30 min. These findings indicate that glucose(xylose isomerase from Streptomyces sp. CH7 has the potential for industrial applications, especially for high-fructose syrup production and bioethanol fermentation from hemicellulosic hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  10. Multi-residue determination of pharmaceutical and personal care products in vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqin; Conkle, Jeremy Landon; Gan, Jay

    2012-09-07

    Treated wastewater irrigation and biosolid amendment are increasingly practiced worldwide and contamination of plants, especially produces that may be consumed raw by humans, by pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), is an emerging concern. A sensitive method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of 19 frequently-occurring PPCPs in vegetables using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) for detection, combined with ultrasonic extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE) cleanup for sample preparation. Deuterated standards were used as surrogates to quantify corresponding analytes. The corrected recoveries ranged between 87.1 and 123.5% for iceberg lettuce, with intra- and inter-day variations less than 20%, and the method detection limits (MDLs) in the range of 0.04-3.0 ng g⁻¹ dry weight (dw). The corrected recoveries were equally good when the method was used on celery, tomato, carrot, broccoli, bell pepper and spinach. The method was further applied to examine uptake of PPCPs by iceberg lettuce and spinach grown in hydroponic solutions containing each PPCP at 500 ng L⁻¹. Twelve PPCPs were detected in lettuce leaves with concentrations from 0.2 to 28.7 ng g⁻¹ dw, while 11 PPCPs were detected in spinach leaves at 0.04-34.0 ng g⁻¹ dw. Given the diverse chemical structures of PPCPs considered in this study, this method may be used for screening PPCP residues in vegetables and other plants impacted by treated wastewater or biosolids, and to estimate potential human exposure via dietary uptake. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Biogas Production from Vietnamese Animal Manure, Plant Residues and Organic Waste: Influence of Biomass Composition on Methane Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. T. Cu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is an efficient and renewable energy technology that can produce biogas from a variety of biomasses such as animal manure, food waste and plant residues. In developing countries this technology is widely used for the production of biogas using local biomasses, but there is little information about the value of these biomasses for energy production. This study was therefore carried out with the objective of estimating the biogas production potential of typical Vietnamese biomasses such as animal manure, slaughterhouse waste and plant residues, and developing a model that relates methane (CH4 production to the chemical characteristics of the biomass. The biochemical methane potential (BMP and biomass characteristics were measured. Results showed that piglet manure produced the highest CH4 yield of 443 normal litter (NL CH4 kg−1 volatile solids (VS compared to 222 from cows, 177 from sows, 172 from rabbits, 169 from goats and 153 from buffaloes. Methane production from duckweed (Spirodela polyrrhiza was higher than from lawn grass and water spinach at 340, 220, and 110.6 NL CH4 kg−1 VS, respectively. The BMP experiment also demonstrated that the CH4 production was inhibited with chicken manure, slaughterhouse waste, cassava residue and shoe-making waste. Statistical analysis showed that lipid and lignin are the most significant predictors of BMP. The model was developed from knowledge that the BMP was related to biomass content of lipid, lignin and protein from manure and plant residues as a percentage of VS with coefficient of determination (R-square at 0.95. This model was applied to calculate the CH4 yield for a household with 17 fattening pigs in the highlands and lowlands of northern Vietnam.

  12. Biogas production from vietnamese animal manure, plant residues and organic waste: influence of biomass composition on methane yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cu, T T T; Nguyen, T X; Triolo, J M; Pedersen, L; Le, V D; Le, P D; Sommer, S G

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an efficient and renewable energy technology that can produce biogas from a variety of biomasses such as animal manure, food waste and plant residues. In developing countries this technology is widely used for the production of biogas using local biomasses, but there is little information about the value of these biomasses for energy production. This study was therefore carried out with the objective of estimating the biogas production potential of typical Vietnamese biomasses such as animal manure, slaughterhouse waste and plant residues, and developing a model that relates methane (CH4) production to the chemical characteristics of the biomass. The biochemical methane potential (BMP) and biomass characteristics were measured. Results showed that piglet manure produced the highest CH4 yield of 443 normal litter (NL) CH4 kg(-1) volatile solids (VS) compared to 222 from cows, 177 from sows, 172 from rabbits, 169 from goats and 153 from buffaloes. Methane production from duckweed (Spirodela polyrrhiza) was higher than from lawn grass and water spinach at 340, 220, and 110.6 NL CH4 kg(-1) VS, respectively. The BMP experiment also demonstrated that the CH4 production was inhibited with chicken manure, slaughterhouse waste, cassava residue and shoe-making waste. Statistical analysis showed that lipid and lignin are the most significant predictors of BMP. The model was developed from knowledge that the BMP was related to biomass content of lipid, lignin and protein from manure and plant residues as a percentage of VS with coefficient of determination (R-square) at 0.95. This model was applied to calculate the CH4 yield for a household with 17 fattening pigs in the highlands and lowlands of northern Vietnam.

  13. Comparison of various pretreatments for ethanol production enhancement from solid residue after rumen fluid digestion of rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haibo; Zhang, Panyue; Ye, Jie; Wu, Yan; Liu, Jianbo; Fang, Wei; Xu, Dong; Wang, Bei; Yan, Li; Zeng, Guangming

    2018-01-01

    The rumen digested residue of rice straw contains high residual carbohydrates, which makes it a potential cellulosic ethanol feedstock. This study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of applying microwave assisted alkali (MAP), ultrasound assisted alkali (UAP), and ball milling pretreatment (BMP) to enhance ethanol production from two digested residues (2.5%-DR and 10%-DR) after rumen fluid digestion of rice straw at 2.5% and 10.0% solid content. Results revealed that 2.5%-DR and 10%-DR had a cellulose content of 36.4% and 41.7%, respectively. MAP and UAP improved enzymatic hydrolysis of digested residue by removing the lignin and hemicellulose, while BMP by decreasing the particle size and crystallinity. BMP was concluded as the suitable pretreatment, resulting in an ethanol yield of 116.65 and 147.42mgg -1 for 2.5%-DR and 10%-DR, respectively. The integrated system including BMP for digested residue at 2.5% solid content achieved a maximum energy output of 7010kJkg -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimization of prehydrolysis time and substrate feeding to improve ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of furfural process residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianlong; Zhang, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Ning; Xiong, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Ethanol is a very important industrial chemical. In order to improve ethanol productivity using Saccharomyces cerevisiae in fermentation from furfural process residue, we developed a process of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of furfural process residue, optimizing prehydrolysis cellulase loading concentration, prehydrolysis time, and substrate feeding strategy. The ethanol concentration obtained from the optimized process was 19.3 g/L, corresponding 76.5% ethanol yield, achieved by running SSF for 48 h from 10% furfural process residue with prehydrolysis at 50°C for 4 h and cellulase loading of 15 FPU/g furfural process residue. For higher ethanol concentrations, fed-batch fermentation was performed. The optimized fed-batch process increased the ethanol concentration to 37.6 g/L, 74.5% yield, obtained from 10% furfural process residue with two additions of 5% substrate at 12 and 24 h. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of ground calcite/water heavy media cyclone suspensions for production of residual plastic concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Malcolm; Sierra, Héctor Muñiz; Menéndez, Mario; de Cos Juez, Francisco Javier

    2018-01-01

    Viable recycled residual plastic (RP) product(s) must be of sufficient quality to be reusable as a plastic or source of hydrocarbons or fuel. The varied composition and large volumes of such wastes usually requires a low cost, high through-put recycling method(s) to eliminate contaminants. Cyclone separation of plastics by density is proposed as a potential method of achieving separations of specific types of plastics. Three ground calcite separation medias of different grain size distributions were tested in a cylindrical cyclone to evaluate density separations at 1.09, 1.18 and 1.27 g/cm 3 . The differences in separation recoveries obtained with these medias by density offsets produced due to displacement of separation media solid particles within the cyclone caused by centrifugal settling is evaluated. The separation density at which 50% of the material of that density is recovered was found to increase from 0.010 to 0.026 g/cm 3 as the separation media density increased from 1.09 to 1.27 g/cm 3 . All separation medias were found to have significantly low Ep 95 values of 0.012-0.033 g/cm 3 . It is also demonstrated that the presence of an excess content of 75%) resulted in reduced separation efficiencies. It is shown that the optimum separations were achieved when the media density offset was 0.03-0.04 g/cm 3 . It is shown that effective heavy media cyclone separations of RP denser than 1.0 g/cm 3 can produce three sets of mixed plastics containing: PS and ABS/SAN at densities of >1.0-1.09 g/cm 3 ; PC, PMMA at a density of 1.09-1.18 g/cm 3 ; and PVC and PET at a density of >1.27 g/cm 3 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Production of crude enzyme from Aspergillus nidulans AKB-25 using black gram residue as the substrate and its industrial applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The production of crop residues in India is estimated to be about 500–550 million tons annually. It is estimated that about 93 million tons of crop residues is burnt annually which is not only wastage of valuable biomass resources but pollution of the environment with the production of green house gases also. Among different low cost crop residues, black gram residue as the substrate produced maximal endoglucanase, FPase, and β-glucosidase activities from Aspergillus nidulans AKB-25 under solid-state fermentation. During optimisation of cultural parameters A. nidulans AKB-25 produced maximal endoglucanase (152.14 IU/gds, FPase (3.42 FPU/gds and xylanase (2441.03 IU/gds activities. The crude enzyme was found effective for the saccharification of pearl millet stover and bio-deinking of mixed office waste paper. The crude enzyme from A. nidulans AKB-25 produced maximum fermentable sugars of 546.91 mg/g from alkali-pretreated pearl millet stover by saccharification process at a dose of 15 FPU/g of substrate. Pulp brightness and deinking efficiency of mixed office waste paper improved by 4.6% and 25.01% respectively and mitigated dirt counts by 74.70% after bio-deinking. Physical strength properties like burst index, tensile index and double fold number were also improved during bio-deinking of mixed office waste paper.

  17. Residual efficacy of pyriproxyfen and hydroprene applied to wood, metal and concrete for control of stored-product insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Frank H; Liu, Siwei; Zhao, Baige; Phillips, Thomas W

    2009-07-01

    Pyriproxyfen and hydroprene are insect growth regulators (IGRs) that have been evaluated to control insect pests of field crops, but there are limited reports of efficacy against stored-product insects. A laboratory study was conducted to determine residual efficacy of pyriproxyfen and hydroprene on wood, metal and concrete surfaces. Pyriproxyfen was applied to the surfaces at 1.15 and 2.3 mg active ingredient [AI] m(-2), while hydroprene was applied at the label rate of 19 mg AI m(-2). Late-instar larvae of Tribolium confusum Jacqueline DuVal, T. castaneum (Herbst), Oryzaephilus surinamenis L., Lasioderma serricorne (F.) and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) were exposed with a food source on the treated surfaces. Residual testing was conducted at 1, 28 and 56 days post-treatment. Hydroprene was least persistent on concrete and generally most persistent on metal. Pyriproxyfen gave greater residual persistence than hydroprene, and there was no consistent difference in efficacy among the three surfaces. Efficacy varied among the five insect species, but generally P. interpunctella was the most tolerant species to both IGRs. Pyriproxyfen gave effective residual control of primary stored-product insect species by inhibiting adult emergence of exposed larvae. Results show that pyriproxyfen can be a useful addition for pest management programs in mills, warehouses and food storage facilities. (c) John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Feasibility of biogas production from anaerobic co-digestion of herbal-extraction residues with swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yan, Xi-Luan; Fan, Jie-Ping; Zhu, Jian-Hang; Zhou, Wen-Bin

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this work was to examine the feasibility of biogas production from the anaerobic co-digestion of herbal-extraction residues with swine manure. Batch and semi-continuous experiments were carried out under mesophilic anaerobic conditions. Batch experiments revealed that the highest specific biogas yield was 294 mL CH(4) g(-1) volatile solids added, obtained at 50% of herbal-extraction residues and 3.50 g volatile solids g(-1) mixed liquor suspended solids. Specific methane yield from swine manure alone was 207 mL CH(4) g(-1) volatile solid added d(-1) at 3.50 g volatile solids g(-1) mixed liquor suspended solids. Furthermore, specific methane yields were 162, 180 and 220 mL CH(4) g (-1) volatile solids added d(-1) for the reactors co-digesting mixtures with 10%, 25% and 50% herbal-extraction residues, respectively. These results suggested that biogas production could be enhanced efficiently by the anaerobic co-digestion of herbal-extraction residues with swine manure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The morphology of cometary nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H. U.; Jorda, L.

    comets display residual activity or clouds of dust grains around their nuclei. Taking the residual signal into account (mostly using simple models for the brightness distribution) the size estimates of the nuclei could be improved. The (nuclear) magnitude of a comet depends on the product of its albedo and cross-section. Only in a few cases could the albedo and size of a cometary nucleus be separated by additional observation of its thermal emission at infrared wavelengths. By comparison with outer Solar System asteroids Cruikshank et al. (1985) derived a surprisingly low albedo of about 0.04. A value in clear contradiction to the perception of an icy surface but fully confirmed by the first resolved images of a cometary nucleus during the flybys of the Vega and Giotto spacecraft of comet Halley (Sagdeev et al. 1986, Keller et al. 1986). The improvements of radar techniques led to the detection of reflected signals and finally to the derivation of nuclear dimensions and rotation rates. The observations, however, are also model dependent (rotation and size are similarly interwoven as are albedo and size) and sensitive to large dust grains in the vicinity of a nucleus. As an example, Kamoun et al. (1982) determined the radius of comet Encke to 1.5 (2.3, 1.0) km using the spin axis determination of Whipple and Sekanina (1979). The superb spatial resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is not quite sufficient to resolve a cometary nucleus. The intensity distribution of the inner coma, however, can be observed and extrapolated toward the nucleus based on models of the dust distribution. If this contribution is subtracted from the central brightness the signal of the nucleus can be derived and hence its product of albedo times cross-section (Lamy and Toth 1995, Rembor 1998, Keller and Rembor 1998; Section 4.3). It has become clear that cometary nuclei are dark, small, often irregular bodies with dimensions ranging from about a kilometre (comet Wirtanen, the target of

  20. The production of hadrons in the muon scattering on deuterium and xenon nuclei at 480 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeldner-Rembold, S.

    1992-10-01

    For the present thesis the hadronic final states of 6309 muon-deuterium events and 2064 muon-xenon events in the kinematical range Q 2 >1 (GeV/c) 2 , x>0.002, 0.1 3.5 mrad were studied. The multiplicity distributions of the muon-deuterium events and the muon-xenon events were described by means of the negative binomial distribution in intervals of the c.m. energy W. The two parameters anti n (mean multiplicity) and 1/k show for the muon-deuterium events a linear dependence on ln W 2 . The mean multiplicity anti n on xenon (anti n=10.43±0.19) is distinctly higher than on deuterium (anti n=7.76±0.07). The rapidity distributions of the positively charged and the negatively charged hadrons from muon-deuterium events are very well described by the Monte-Carlo program LUND. In the two-particle rapidity correlation both short-range and long-range correlations can be detected. The two-particle rapidity correlation in the xenon data are different from the deuterium data in the backward range. This difference indicates that the intranuclear cascade takes place in a limited range of small rapidities - relatively independently on the residual fragmentation process. (orig.) [de

  1. Inelastic cross sections and π- -meson production in relativistic nuclear collisions induced by p, d, 4He and 12C on 12C and 181Ta target-nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasnikov, I.Ya.; Izbasarov, M.I.; Vinitsky, A.Kh.; Abdinov, O.B.; Agakishiev, G.N.; Backovic, S.; Damianovich, V.; Drndarevic, S.; Krmpotic, D.; Krpic, D.

    1981-12-01

    Experimental data on inelastic cross sections and PI - -meson production in interactions initiated by protons with the incident momentum in the range (2-10) GeV/c and by deuterons, alphas and carbon nuclei with the incident momentum per nucleon in the range (2-5) GeV/c on carbon and tantalum target-nuclei are presented. The experimental data have been obtained using the 2 m propane bubble chamber. The analysis of the experimental data has been made in the framework of various theoretical models. (authors)

  2. Formation of heavy compound nuclei, their survival and correlation with longtime-scale fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamyan, S.A.; Yakushev, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion of two massive nuclei with formation of super-heavy compound nucleus (CN) is driven by the potential energy gradient, as follows from the analysis of nuclear reaction cross-sections. The conservative energy of the system is deduced in simple approximation using regularized nuclear mass and interaction barrier values. Different reactions for the synthesis of Z c 110-118 nuclei are compared and the favourable conditions are found for fusion of the stable (W-Pt) isotopes with radioactive fission fragment projectiles, like 94 Kr or 100 Sr. Thus, the cold fusion method can be extended for a synthesis of elements with Z > 113. Survival of the evaporation residue is defined by the neutron-to-fission probability ratio and by the successful emission of gammas at the final step of the reaction. Numerical estimates are presented. Fixation of evaporation residue products must correlate with longtime-scale fission and available experimental results are discussed

  3. TiO2–AgCl Based Nanoparticles for Photocatalytic Production of Phenolic Compounds from Lignocellulosic Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Boscaro, Davide

    2018-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass residues can be used as an interesting resource for the production of biochemicals or sustainable fuels. In this optic, lignin represents an interesting raw material for the production of chemicals, such as aromatic compounds, or fuels. This can contribute in moving away...... for optimal phenolic compounds production. It was found that the photocatalytic treatment boosted the phenolic production from wheat straw. The efficiency of the process depended on the initial pH and catalyst concentration. Process optimization towards increased phenolic compounds production was performed...... of toxic compounds presented in the catalyst-straw solution and specifically, HNO3 was toxic to methanogenic communities. Hence, to succeed in an efficient biorefinery framework where total phenols and biogas production are combined, the usage of HNO3 for catalyst synthesis should be avoided....

  4. Life cycle assessment of residual lignocellulosic biomass-based jet fuel with activated carbon and lignosulfonate as co-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierobon, Francesca; Eastin, Ivan L; Ganguly, Indroneil

    2018-01-01

    Bio-jet fuels are emerging as a valuable alternative to petroleum-based fuels for their potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel dependence. In this study, residual woody biomass from slash piles in the U.S. Pacific Northwest is used as a feedstock to produce iso-paraffinic kerosene, through the production of sugar and subsequent patented proprietary fermentation and upgrading. To enhance the economic viability and reduce the environmental impacts of iso-paraffinic kerosene, two co-products, activated carbon and lignosulfonate, are simultaneously produced within the same bio-refinery. A cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment (LCA) is performed for the residual woody biomass-based bio-jet fuel and compared against the cradle-to-grave LCA of petroleum-based jet fuel. This paper also discusses the differences in the environmental impacts of the residual biomass-based bio-jet fuel using two different approaches, mass allocation and system expansion, to partition the impacts between the bio-fuel and the co-products, which are produced in the bio-refinery. The environmental assessment of biomass-based bio-jet fuel reveals an improvement along most critical environmental criteria, as compared to its petroleum-based counterpart. However, the results present significant differences in the environmental impact of biomass-based bio-jet fuel, based on the partitioning method adopted. The mass allocation approach shows a greater improvement along most of the environmental criteria, as compared to the system expansion approach. However, independent of the partitioning approach, the results of this study reveal that more than the EISA mandated 60% reduction in the global warming potential could be achieved by substituting petroleum-based jet fuel with residual woody biomass-based jet fuel. Converting residual woody biomass from slash piles into bio-jet fuel presents the additional benefit of avoiding the impacts of slash pile burning in the forest, which

  5. Charm Production in Interactions of Antiproton with Proton and Nuclei at \\bar{it{P}}it{ANDA} Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, R.; Tsushima, K.

    2018-05-01

    We study the production of charmed baryons in the antiproton-proton and antiproton-nucleus interactions within a fully covariant model that is based on an effective Lagrangian approach. The baryon production proceeds via the t-channel D^0 and D^{*0} meson-exchange diagrams. We have also explored the production of the charm-baryon hypernucleus ^{16}_{Λ_c^+}O in the antiproton-^{16}O collisions. For antiproton beam momenta of interest to the {\\bar{P}}ANDA experiment, the 0° differential cross sections for the formation of ^{16}_{Λ_c^+}O hypernuclear states with simple particle-hole configurations, have magnitudes in the range of a few μ b/sr.

  6. Multi-Residue studies of pesticides in fermented dried cocoa beans and selected cocoa products produced in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frimpong, S. K

    2011-01-01

    Cocoa is a major cash crop and contributes significantly to Ghana's economy. Majority of this contribution is as a result of foreign earnings in foreign trade partnership. Cocoa products are consumed locally aside it generating foreign income for the country. Pesticide residues above allowable limits in cocoa beans have potential detrimental effects on human health, depending on the frequency of exposure and/or the potency or toxicity of the pesticide. Pesticide residues on cocoa also attract trade sanctions from international trading partners. The approved pesticides, which are used to control pests in the growing cocoa in Ghana, are: Diazinon, Cypermethrin, Deltamethrin, Acetamiprid, Imidicloprid and Pyrethrums; nevertheless some unapproved pesticides on cocoa such as Pirimiphos-methyl, Chlorpyrifos, Endosulfan, Fenitrotion, Fenvalerate, Permethrin and others find their way for use on cocoa in Ghana. The main objective of this study was to determine the levels of pesticide residues in fermented dried cocoa beans produced and ready for export in Ghana, using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. It also seeks to provide the baseline information on contamination levels of pesticide residues in semi-finished and selected finished fermented dried cocoa beans products. Fermented dried cocoa beans were sampled at random in the two main COCOBOD warehouses located in Tema and Takoradi. Semi-finished and finished cocoa products were obtained from processing industries in Tema. Two extraction methods were used. The second extraction method was as by the QuEChERS method for vegetable oils which was used for the cocoa butter samples only, after being liquefied in water bath at 40 degrees celsius. The investigated pesticides consisted of fifteen organochlorine pesticides, thirteen organophosphorous pesticides and nine synthetic pyrethroids pesticides. Percentage recoveries ranged from 70-110 percent, with instrumental detection limits of 0.3ug/kg, 0.15ug/g and 0.15ug/g for

  7. Grain coma production by comet nuclei during their vaporization, under solar radiation action and through collision with meteoroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, O.T.

    1976-07-01

    For a model of compact cometary nucleus made up of hydrates mixed or unmixed with meteoric dust, some observable properties for long period comets are derived. The dust production is first considered to be due only to the vaporization of the nucleus under the action of the solar radiation. Then, taking into account the probability for the occurrence of collision of a nucleus with a meteoroid, a production due to a collisional process is studied. Using previously catalogued observational data, an evaluation of the main results coming from the present model is carried out. (Author) [pt

  8. Evaluation of electricity generation from lignin residue and biogas in cellulosic ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Bao, Jie

    2017-11-01

    This study takes the first insight on the rigorous evaluation of electricity generation based on the experimentally measured higher heating value (HHV) of lignin residue, as well as the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD 5 ) of wastewater. For producing one metric ton of ethanol fuel from five typical lignocellulose substrates, including corn stover, wheat straw, rice straw, sugarcane bagasse and poplar sawdust, 1.26-1.85tons of dry lignin residue is generated from biorefining process and 0.19-0.27tons of biogas is generated from anaerobic digestion of wastewater, equivalent to 4335-5981kWh and 1946-2795kWh of electricity by combustion of the generated lignin residue and biogas, respectively. The electricity generation not only sufficiently meets the electricity needs of process requirement, but also generates more than half of electricity surplus selling to the grid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of veterinary drug residue monitoring results for commercial livestock products in Taiwan between 2011 and 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Hsin-Chun Lee; Chi-Min Chen; Jen-Ting Wei; Hsiu-Yi Chiu

    2018-01-01

    Antibiotics have been widely used in the treatment of livestock diseases. However, the emergence of issues related to drug resistance prompted governments to enact a series of laws regulating the use of antibiotics in livestock. Following control of the problem of drug resistant bacteria, public attention has shifted to the recurring incidence of human health and safety issues caused by residual veterinary drugs in livestock products. To guarantee the safety and hygiene of meat, milk, and egg...

  10. Cellulase and xylanase productions by isolated Amazon Bacillus strains using soybean industrial residue based solid-state cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heck Júlio X.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, a large amount of a fibrous residue is generated as result of soybean (Glycine max protein production. This material, which is rich in hemicellulose and cellulose, can be used in solid state cultivations for the production of valuable metabolites and enzymes. In this work, we studied the bioconversion of this residue by bacteria strains isolated from water and soil collected in the Amazon region. Five strains among 87 isolated bacteria selected for their ability to produce either celullases or xylanases were cultivated on the aforementioned residue. From strain BL62, identified as Bacillus subtilis, it was obtained a preparation showing the highest specific cellulase activity, 1.08 UI/mg protein within 24 hours of growth. Concerning xylanase, the isolate BL53, also identified as Bacillus subtilis, showed the highest specific activity for this enzyme, 5.19 UI/mg protein within 72 hours of cultivation. It has also been observed the production of proteases that were associated with the loss of cellulase and xylanase activities. These results indicated that the selected microorganisms, and the cultivation process, have great biotechnological potential.

  11. Simulated production rates of exotic nuclei from the ion guide for neutron-induced fission at IGISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Kaj; Al-Adili, Ali; Nilsson, Nicklas; Norlin, Martin; Solders, Andreas [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-12-15

    An investigation of the stopping efficiency of fission products, in the new ion guide designed for ion production through neutron-induced fission at IGISOL in Jyvaeskylae, Finland, has been conducted. Our simulations take into account the new neutron converter, enabling measurements of neutron-induced fission yields, and thereby provide estimates of the obtained yields as a function of primary proton beam current. Different geometries, targets, and pressures, as well as models for the effective charge of the stopped ions were tested, and optimisations to the setup for higher yields are suggested. The predicted number of ions stopped in the gas lets us estimate the survival probability of the ions reaching the downstream measurements stations. (orig.)

  12. Coherent production of pions in nuclei with ({sup 3}He,t) charge exchange reaction at 2. GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhi, L.; Roy-Stephan, M.; Boyard, J.L. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Hennino, T.; Kagarlis, M.; Radvanyi, P. [Laboratoire National Saturne - Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dahl, R.; Ellegaard, C. [Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark); Augustiniak, W.; Zupranski, P. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The ({sup 3}He,t) charge exchange reaction at 2. GeV incident energy with the new setup SPES IV-{pi} has been realized in order to study the coherent production process of pions. This setup allows to isolate the ground state of the target nucleus, and to sign this process without ambiguity. Some preliminary results in target excitation energy and transferred energy are given. (author). 8 refs.

  13. Study of correlation of production and decay planes in π → 3π diffractive dissociation process on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremov, A.V.; Ivan'shin, Yu.I.; Tkachev, L.G.; Zul'karneev, R.Ya.

    1998-01-01

    A large correlation of production and decay planes of (π - π + π - )-system in dissociation of π - -beam 40 GeV/c on nuclear targets was observed. The dependences of the correlation on atomic number, Feynman variable and transverse momentum as well as on invariant mass of the pion triple and neutral pion pair were investigated. It was shown that the phenomenon has a clear dynamic origin and resembles the single spin asymmetry behaviour

  14. Management of crop residues for sustainable crop production. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    Since ancient times, farmers have recognized the importance of organic matter inputs to enhance crop yields. Organic matter contributes to plant growth through beneficial effects on the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the soil, including (i) provision of a carbon and energy source for soil microbes, (ii) improvement of soil aggregation, thus reducing the hazard of erosion, (iii) retaining of nutrients and water, (iv) provision of nutrients through decomposition, and (v) reduction of soil compaction. The amount of soil organic matter is controlled by the balance between additions of plant and animal materials and losses by decomposition. Both additions and losses are directly affected by management practices. This CRP supported national efforts in eleven Member States to identify options managing crop residues for sustainable agricultural production and environmental preservation in a wide range of soils and cropping systems. Various options for the recycling of crop residues that are sustainable and economically attractive to farmers were examined using isotopic techniques. The specific options of this CRP were: to increase the quantity of nutrients available to crops from organic sources and for more effective recycling of those nutrients; to enhance the efficiency of use of nutrients by crops, and minimize losses through improved synchrony between process-level understanding of carbon and nutrient flow through the use of isotopic techniques so that management recommendations can be extrapolated to a wide range of environments using models. A simple mathematical model, descriptive in nature, was developed to synthesize information collected from all experimental sites, allowing comparisons between treatments and sites. Most of the fertilizer N was lost during the first cropping season and only insignificant losses occurred in the following seasons. The losses of N from applied fertilizer ranged from 45 to 85% irrespective of crop-residue

  15. Crop residue management in arable cropping systems under a temperate climate. Part 2: Soil physical properties and crop production. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiel, MP.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Residues of previous crops provide a valuable amount of organic matter that can be used either to restore soil fertility or for external use. A better understanding of the impact of crop residue management on the soil-water-plant system is needed in order to manage agricultural land sustainably. This review focuses on soil physical aspects related to crop residue management, and specifically on the link between soil structure and hydraulic properties and its impact on crop production. Literature. Conservation practices, including crop residue retention and non-conventional tillage, can enhance soil health by improving aggregate stability. In this case, water infiltration is facilitated, resulting in an increase in plant water availability. Conservation practices, however, do not systematically lead to higher water availability for the plant. The influence of crop residue management on crop production is still unclear; in some cases, crop production is enhanced by residue retention, but in others crop residues can reduce crop yield. Conclusions. In this review we discuss the diverse and contrasting effects of crop residue management on soil physical properties and crop production under a temperate climate. The review highlights the importance of environmental factors such as soil type and local climatic conditions, highlighting the need to perform field studies on crop residue management and relate them to specific pedo-climatic contexts.

  16. Spatio-temporal availability of field crop residues for biofuel production in Northwest and Southwest China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, L.; Wang, X.; Spiertz, J.H.J.; Yang, L.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, J.; Xie, G.

    2015-01-01

    Developing bioenergy from plant feedstocks is considered an opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and secure biofuel supply. This study is an assessment of the availability of field crop residues for bioenergy feedstocks in northwest China (NWC) and southwest China (SWC). The amount of

  17. Crop residue is key for sustaining maximum food production and for conservation of our biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop residue is key in our efforts to move towards agricultural sustainability. This paper provides a quick overview of some selected references and looks at some of the newest advances related to cover crops. Several authors have described in detail the benefits derived from improving soil quality ...

  18. Studies of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelique, J.C.; Orr, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    The study of the nuclei far off stability valley is of much interest for testing the nuclear models established for the stable nuclei but also for astrophysics to understand the nucleosynthesis. Experiments aim to measure the mass and lifetime, to build the decay schemes and also to study the structure and the properties of these nuclei. The radioactive beam group focused its research on light neutron-rich nuclei having a halo neutron structure. Mass measurements in N ∼ Z nuclei namely in A ∼ 60-80 proton-rich nuclei, important for understanding the rp process, are mentioned, as well as in nuclei in the 100 Sn region. In the newly obtained 26 O and 28 O nuclei the lifetimes, the probabilities of emission of one for more neutrons were determined. The data analysis has permitted to determine also for the first time the lifetimes of 27,29 F and 30 Ne. Studies of nuclei in the 100 Sn region, near the proton drip line in the ground and isomeric states are now under way. The spectroscopy (energy levels, gamma emissions, etc.) of the neutron-rich nuclei produced by the 36 S fragmentation has been carried out in 31 Ne, 17 B and 29 F. Studies by Coulomb excitation of the 2 + excited states and associated probability B (E2) in O, Ne, Ni and Zn are now analysed

  19. CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery from the Residual Zone - A Sustainable Vision for North Sea Oil Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jamie; Haszeldine, Stuart; Wilkinson, Mark; Johnson, Gareth

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a 'new vision for North Sea oil production' where previously unattainable residual oil can be produced with the injection of CO2 that has been captured at power stations or other large industrial emitters. Not only could this process produce incremental oil from a maturing basin, reducing imports, it also has the capability to store large volumes of CO2 which can offset the emissions of additional carbon produced. Around the world oil production from mature basins is in decline and production from UK oil fields peaked in 1998. Other basins around the world have a similar story. Although in the UK a number of tax regimes, such as 'brown field allowances' and 'new field allowances' have been put in place to re-encourage investment, it is recognised that the majority of large discoveries have already been made. However, as a nation our demand for oil remains high and in the last decade imports of crude oil have been steadily increasing. The UK is dependent on crude oil for transport and feedstock for chemical and plastics production. Combined with the necessity to provide energy security, there is a demand to re-assess the potential for CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (CO2-EOR) in the UK offshore. Residual oil zones (ROZ) exist where one of a number of natural conditions beyond normal capillary forces have caused the geometry of a field's oil column to be altered after filling [1]. When this re-structuring happens the primary interest to the hydrocarbon industry has in the past been in where the mobile oil has migrated to. However it is now considered that significant oil resource may exist in the residual zone play where the main oil column has been displaced. Saturations within this play are predominantly close to residual saturation (Sr) and would be similar to that of a water-flooded field [2]. Evidence from a number of hydrocarbon fairways shows that, under certain circumstances, these residual zones in US fields are comparable in thickness to the

  20. Isotopic production cross sections of fission residues in 197Au-on-proton collisions at 800 A MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benlliure, J.; Armbruster, P.; Bernas, M.

    2000-02-01

    Interactions of 197 Au projectiles at 800 A MeV with protons leading to fission are investigated. We measured the production cross sections and velocities of all fission residues which are fully identified in atomic and mass number by using the in-flight separator FRS at GSI. The new data are compared with partial measurements of the characteristics of fission in similar reactions. Both the production cross sections and the recoil energies are relevant for a better understanding of spallation reactions. (orig.)

  1. Sustainable reuse of rice residues as feedstocks in vermicomposting for organic fertilizer production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, Katrina Pui Yee; Wu, Ta Yeong; Lim, Su Lin; Lee, Chieh Ai

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, rice (Oryza sativa or Oryza glaberrima) cultivation has increased in many rice-growing countries due to the increasing export demand and population growth and led to a copious amount of rice residues, consisting mainly of rice straw (RS) and rice husk (RH), being generated during and after harvesting. In this study, Eudrilus eugeniae was used to decompose rice residues alone and rice residues amended with cow dung (CD) for bio-transformation of wastes into organic fertilizer. Generally, the final vermicomposts showed increases in macronutrients, namely, calcium (11.4-34.2%), magnesium (1.3-40.8%), phosphorus (1.2-57.3%), and potassium (1.1-345.6%) and a decrease in C/N ratio (26.8-80.0%) as well as increases in heavy metal content for iron (17-108%), copper (14-120%), and manganese (6-60%) after 60 days of vermicomposting. RS as a feedstock was observed to support healthier growth and reproduction of earthworms as compared to RH, with maximum adult worm biomass of 0.66 g/worm (RS) at 60 days, 31 cocoons (1RS:2CD), and 23 hatchlings (1RS:1CD). Vermicomposting of RS yielded better results than RH among all of the treatments investigated. RS that was mixed with two parts of CD (1RS:2CD) showed the best combination of nutrient results as well as the growth of E. eugeniae. In conclusion, vermicomposting could be used as a green technology to bio-convert rice residues into nutrient-rich organic fertilizers if the residues are mixed with CD in the appropriate ratio.

  2. Production of antimatter 5,6Li nuclei in central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jia Sun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining the covariant coalescence model and a blast-wave-like analytical parametrization for (anti-nucleon phase–space freezeout configuration, we explore light (anti-nucleus production in central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. Using the nucleon freezeout configuration (denoted by FO1 determined from the measured spectra of protons (p, deutrons (d and 3He, we find the predicted yield of 4He is significantly smaller than the experimental data. We show this disagreement can be removed by using a nucleon freezeout configuration (denoted by FO2 in which the nucleons are assumed to freeze out earlier than those in FO1 to effectively consider the effect of large binding energy value of 4He. Assuming the binding energy effect also exists for the production of 5Li, Li‾5, 6Li and Li‾6 due to their similar binding energy values as 4He, we find the yields of these heavier (anti-nuclei can be enhanced by a factor of about one order, implying that although the stable (anti-6Li nucleus is unlikely to be observed, the unstable (anti-5Li nucleus could be produced in observable abundance in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV where it may be identified through the p–4He (p‾–He‾4 invariant mass spectrum. The future experimental measurement on (anti-5Li would be very useful to understand the production mechanism of heavier antimatter.

  3. Dynamic integrated assessment of bioenergy technologies for energy production utilizing agricultural residues: An input–output approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Junnian; Yang, Wei; Higano, Yoshiro; Wang, Xian’en

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A dynamic input–output model is developed with bioenergy technologies complemented. • Availability of agricultural residues for bioenergy technologies is evaluated. • Trends in electricity and biofuel production are simulated dynamically. • Net profit and GHG mitigation contribution of bioenergy technologies are assessed. • Combustion power generation and briquette fuel are more advantageous. - Abstract: In order to facilitate regional agricultural residue utilization for energy production through bioenergy technologies, a dynamic input–output model is developed to estimate and assess the energy, economic and environmental performances of industrialization of five bioenergy technologies within a 15-year time horizon. Electricity and solid, gaseous and liquid biofuels are energy products of bioenergy technologies. Bioenergy technologies are complemented into regional input–output framework and combined with socioeconomic activities aided by their bottom-up economic and energy parameters. The simulation results for the target area indicate that the agricultural residues available for bioenergy technologies could amount to 55.16 million t, facilitating to 8.38 million t coal-equivalent bioenergy production by 2025. A 3.1% net reduction in accumulative greenhouse gas emission compared with the “business as usual” case could be achieved owing to substitution of fossil energy with electricity and biofuels produced by bioenergy technologies. From energy production, economic benefits and greenhouse gas mitigation three aspects integratedly, direct-combustion power generation and briquette fuel are more advantageous in the target area. The quantified energy, economic and environmental performances of bioenergy technologies are expected to give recommendations for their industrial development.

  4. Entrance channel influence on the formation and decay of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harar, S.

    1987-04-01

    Different entrance channels have been investigated to form very hot nuclei and to study their decay properties. i) Argon and Nickel projectiles accelerated around the Fermi energy show that central collisions induce momentum transfers to target nuclei which are proportional to the mass of the projectile and not to its velocities in the studied energy range. The preequilibrium model fits nicely the experimental results. The decay properties of the fission products for hot nuclei will be presented. Both head-on collisions and peripheral massive transfers contribute to the formation of very excited nuclei. The question of the influence of the energy deposit in the composite like system in limiting their yields is discussed. ii) Investigations have been also achieved with alpha projectiles at much higher incident energy (around 1 GeV/u). It is shown that hot and thermalized nuclei are also formed even when the nucleon-nucleon collisions are predominant. A sensitive parameter of the transition from binary fission to multifragmentation seems to be the energy deposit in the target residues rather than the projectile velocity

  5. Lab-scale pyrolysis of the Automotive Shredder Residue light fraction and characterization of tar and solid products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzano, Manuela; Collina, Elena; Piccinelli, Elsa; Lasagni, Marina

    2017-06-01

    The general aim of this study is the recovery of Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR). The ASR light fraction, or car fluff, that was collected at an Italian shredding plant was pyrolysed at various temperatures (500-800°C) in a lab-scale reactor. The condensable gases (tar) and solid residue yields increased with decreasing temperature, and these products were characterized to suggest a potential use to reclaim them. The higher heating value (HHV) of tar was 34-37MJ/kg, which is comparable with those of fossil fuels. Furthermore, the ash content was low (0.06-4.98%). Thus, tar can be used as an alternative fuel. With this prospect, the concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in tar were determined. The toxicity of tar changes with temperature (1-5ng I-TEQ/g), and the PCDFs significantly contribute to tar toxicity, which was 75-100% with a maximum of 99.6% at 700°C. Regarding the characterization of the solid residue, the low HHV (2.4-3.3MJ/kg) does not make it suitable for energy recovery. Regarding material recovery, we considered its use as a filler in construction materials or a secondary source for metals. It shows a high metal concentration (280,000-395,000mg/kg), which is similar at different pyrolysis temperatures. At 500°C, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were not detected in the solid residue, whereas the maximum total PAH concentration (19.41ng/g, 700°C) was lower than that in fly ash from MSWI. In conclusion, 500°C is a suitable pyrolysis temperature to obtain valuable tar and solid residue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Formation, separation and detection of evaporation residues produced in complete fusion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sagaidak, R N

    2015-01-01

    Some aspects of formation, separation and detection of evaporation residues (ERs) produced in complete fusion reactions induced by accelerated heavy ions are considered. These reactions allow to obtain heavy neutron-deficient nuclei and to study their properties. The statistical model analysis of the production cross sections for these nuclei obtained in a wide range of their neutron numbers allows to trace the changes in their macroscopic properties such as fission barriers. The fusion probability of massive projectile and target nuclei is of interest. Empirical estimates of this value allow to verify the predictions of theoretical models for the optimal ways of synthesis of unknown nuclei. Some peculiarities in the separation and detection of ERs in experiments are briefly considered by the example of the Ra ERs produced in the 12 C+Pb reactions. The reliable cross sections for ERs produced in very asymmetric projectile-target combination, such as 12 C+Pb, are important for the em...

  7. Nuclei and quantum worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    This document gathers the slides and their commentaries that have been presented at the conference 'physics and fundamental questions' by P. Chomaz. The author reviews the different quantum aspects of nuclei: tunnel effect, symmetries, magic numbers, wave functions, size, shapes and deformations. The author shows that nuclei are quantum objects of great complexity, their structures are not yet well understood and the study of exotic nuclei will continue bringing valuable information

  8. Espresso coffee residues as a nitrogen amendment for small-scale vegetable production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Soraia; Marques dos Santos Cordovil, Cláudia S C

    2015-12-01

    Espresso coffee grounds constitute a residue which is produced daily in considerable amounts, and is often pointed out as being potentially interesting for plant nutrition. Two experiments (incubations and field experiments) were carried out to evaluate the potential nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) supply for carrot (Daucus carota L.), spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) nutrition. Immobilisation of nitrogen and phosphorus was detected in all the incubations and, in the field experiments, germination and yield growth were decreased by the presence of espresso coffee grounds, in general for all the species studied. The study showed an inhibition of N and P mineralisation and a reduction of plant germination and growth. Further research is required to determine whether this is related to the immobilising capacity of the residue or possibly due to the presence of caffeine. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Assessment of cellulose purification methods from the residue of enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse for the production of cellulose nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, Lais Angelice de; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez; Marconcini, José Manoel; Mattoso, Luiz Henrique Capparelli; Pereira, Sandra Cerqueira

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Over the years, there is a growing trend in the reuse of residues from the agricultural industries due to social, environmental and economic demands. The production of Brazilian sugarcane in the 2014/15 season was more than 640 million tons, estimating that one third of this total is bagasse [1]. After enzymatic hydrolysis of bagasse in order to give the 2G ethanol, remains a solid fibrous residue which can be repurposed in other processes. This study evaluated four methods for the purification of the resulting solid fibrous residue from the enzymatic hydrolysis process of bagasse, with the intention of obtaining cellulose. Measurements of the crystallinity index (CI) of the cellulose contained in the samples were determined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The enzymatic hydrolysis of generates a fibrous solid residue with contents of lignin and cellulose. This residue was subjected to four purification methods: I) 100 mL of NaOH (5%, w/w) at 55 °C was added to 5 g of residue and 43 mL of H 2 O 2 (35%, v/v) under stirring for 1.5 hours; II) the same procedure was repeated on the resulting material from I; III) 105 mL of solution 10:1 (ν/ν) of CH 3 COOH and HNO 3 at 60 °C was added to 5 g of residue under stirring for 30 minutes; IV) reaction with a solution composed of 1 ml of CH 3 COOH and 2.5 g of NaClO 2 at 70 °C under stirring for 1 hour and after that time, the procedure was repeated twice and then the solution was kept under stirring for further 3 hours. The crystallinity indexes found for the purification procedures were: I) 81.7%; II) 83.2%; III) 52.1% e IV) 77.2%. The best result was found for the material subjected to the method II. This process (II) generated a material composed of high content of crystalline cellulose. References: [1] CONAB (National Supply Company), 2015. (author)

  10. Considerations on the utilisation of the extraction residue from U, Th production from low grade ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huwyler, S.

    1979-11-01

    A literature review about processes for the winning of metals from the extraction residue of low grade U, Th-ores has been made. Among the metals recoverable aluminium is being considered as the most interesting one. The aluminium extraction processes discussed here include high temperature chlorination, the BAYER-process, acid and SO 3 digestion processes, winning of an AlSiFe-alloy by electrometallurgy. The merits of the different processes are compared. (Auth.)

  11. Production of residual nuclides by proton-induced reactions on target W at the energy of 72 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, Moazzem Hossain [Univ. of Chittagong, Dept. of Physics, Chittagong (Bangladesh); Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Herpers, Ulrich [Univ. of Cologne, Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry, Cologne (Germany); Michel, Rolf [University of Hannover, Centre for Radiation Protection and Radioecology (Germany); Kubik, Peter [Paul Scherrer Inst., c/o Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2002-08-01

    Investigations of cross-sections for residual nuclide production on the target element W by proton-induced reactions were performed by irradiating the target with 72 MeV protons using the cyclotron facilities at Paul-Scherrer Institute, Zurich, Switzerland. Residual nuclides were measured by gamma-spectrometry of HpGe detectors calibrated with standard gamma sources. The measured data contains 104 individual cross-sections for 20 identified nuclides in the proton energies between 52.5 - 68.9 MeV. These nuclear data is important in the study of spallation neutron source and in accelerator driven technologies such as waste transmutation and energy amplification. The present data are compared with the shape of the excitation functions of earlier only one measurement at higher energies and they are in good agreement to each other. (author)

  12. Cross Sections for the Production of Residual Nuclides by Proton-Induced Reactions with Uranium at Medium Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issa, S.A.M.; Michel, R.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Issa, S.A.M.; Flamentc, J.L.; David, J.C.; Leray, S.

    2009-01-01

    The production of residual nuclides by proton-induced reactions on uranium is investigated using activated targets from irradiation experiments at Saturne II synchrocyclotron at the Laboratory National Saturne/Saclay. These investigations contribute to the European research project NUDATRA within the IP EUROTRANS in which the feasibility of accelerator-driven transmutation of nuclear waste is evaluated. Experimental cross sections are derived from gamma-spectrometric measurements. A total of 1894 cross-section was deter-mined covering 44 residual nuclides in the energy range from 211 MeV to 2530 MeV. The experimental data together with those of earlier work of our group are discussed in the context of theoretical excitation functions calculated by the newly developed INCL4 + ABLA and the TALYS codes

  13. Diffraction scattering and disintegration of 3He nuclei by atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval'chuk, V.I.

    2006-01-01

    Within diffraction model framework a method of cross sections calculation for scattering and disintegration of weakly-bounded two-clustered nuclei by nuclei when both of its clusters are changed has been proposed. The experimental elastic scattering cross sections of 3 He by 40 Ca, 90 Zr and coincidence spectra of disintegration products from 28 Si( 3 He,dp) have been described

  14. High-spin excitations of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Furong; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, Lanzhou; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2004-01-01

    The authors used the cranking shell model to investigate the high-spin motions and structures of atomic nuclei. The authors focus the collective rotations of the A∼50, 80 and 110 nuclei. The A∼50 calculations show complicated g spectroscopy, which can have significant vibration effects. The A≅80 N≅Z nuclei show rich shape coexistence with prolate and oblate rotational bands. The A≅110 nuclei near the r-process path can have well-deformed oblate shapes that become yrast and more stable with increasing rotational frequency. As another important investigation, the authors used the configuration-constrained adiabatic method to calculate the multi-quasiparticle high-K states in the A∼130, 180 and superheavy regions. The calculations show significant shape polarizations due to quasi-particle excitations for soft nuclei, which should be considered in the investigations of high-K states. The authors predicted some important high-K isomers, e.g., the 8 - isomers in the unstable nuclei of 140 Dy and 188 Pb, which have been confirmed in experiments. In superheavy nuclei, our calculations show systematic existence of high-K states. The high-K excitations can increase the productions of synthesis and the survival probabilities of superheavy nuclei. (authors)

  15. Pairing correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, C.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    There are many similarities between the properties of nucleons in nuclei and electrons in metals. In addition to the properties explainable in terms of independent particle motion, there are many important co-operative effects suggesting correlated motion. Pairing correlation which leads to superconductivity in metals and several important properties in nuclei , is an exmple of such correlations. An attempt has been made to review the effects of pairing correlations in nuclei. Recent indications of reduction in pairing correlations at high angular momenta is discussed. A comparision between pairing correlations in the cases of nuclei and electrons in metals is attempted. (author). 20 refs., 10 figs

  16. PLANT PROTECTION PRODUCT RESIDUES IN APPLES, CAULIFLOWER, CEREALS, GRAPE, LETTUCE, PEAS, PEPPERS, POTATOES AND STRAWBERRIES OF THE SLOVENE ORIGIN IN 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena BAŠA ČESNIK

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2006, 181 apple, cauliflower, cereal, grape, lettuce, pea, pepper, potato and strawberry samples from Slovene producers were analysed for plant protection product residues. The samples were analysed for the presence of 86 different active compounds using four analytical methods. In nine samples (5.0 % exceeded maximum residue levels (MRLs were determined which is comparable with the results of the monitoring of plant protection product residues in products of plant origin in the European union, Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein in 2005 (4.9 %.

  17. Momentum and correlation characteristics of products of fragmentation of relativistic carbon nuclei at 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, R.A.; Gulamov, K.G.; Gulyamov, U.G.; Chernov, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    We present the basic characteristics (multiplicities, distributions in transverse momenta, and correlations in the transverse plane) of fragments of the incident nucleus in inelastic interactions of relativistic 12 C nuclei in nuclear emulsion. We observe effects of the transverse motion of the fragmenting nucleus and its angular momentum. A qualitative and critical analysis of a number of commonly used theoretical approaches to the fragmentation of relativistic nuclei is given

  18. The interactive effect of fungicide residues and yeast assimilable nitrogen on fermentation kinetics and hydrogen sulfide production during cider fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2017-01-01

    Fungicide residues on fruit may adversely affect yeast during cider fermentation, leading to sluggish or stuck fermentation or the production of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which is an undesirable aroma compound. This phenomenon has been studied in grape fermentation but not in apple fermentation. Low nitrogen availability, which is characteristic of apples, may further exacerbate the effects of fungicides on yeast during fermentation. The present study explored the effects of three fungicides: elemental sulfur (S 0 ) (known to result in increased H 2 S in wine); fenbuconazole (used in orchards but not vineyards); and fludioxonil (used in post-harvest storage of apples). Only S 0 led to increased H 2 S production. Fenbuconazole (≥0.2 mg L -1 ) resulted in a decreased fermentation rate and increased residual sugar. An interactive effect of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and fenbuconazole was observed such that increasing the YAN concentration alleviated the negative effects of fenbuconazole on fermentation kinetics. Cidermakers should be aware that residual fenbuconazole (as low as 0.2 mg L -1 ) in apple juice may lead to stuck fermentation, especially when the YAN concentration is below 250 mg L -1 . These results indicate that fermentation problems attributed to low YAN may be caused or exacerbated by additional factors such as fungicide residues, which have a greater impact on fermentation performance under low YAN conditions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. How far are we on the way to the superheavy nuclei?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenzenberg, G.

    1989-10-01

    The discovery of the elements 107, 108, and 109 in a region of dominating shell stabilization is the most important step on the way to the superheavy nuclei in recent years. These experiments leading to the presently upper end of the periodic table were possible with the velocity filter SHIP to separate the heavy nuclei produced in complete fusion reactions of heavy ions. The identification of the unknown nuclei was established by α-α mother-daughter correlation of the nuclei decaying after the implantation into position sensitive surface-barrier detectors. With this method it is possible to identify even single nuclei of unknown isotopes unambiguously. The limits of sensitivity are production cross-sections of a few picobarns and about 2 μs of nuclear lifetime. With this method the elements 107, 108, and 109 were observed for the first time by their α-decay and identified unambiguously. For element 107 the isotopes with masses 261 and 262, for the element 108 the isotopes with masses 264 and 265, and for element 109 the isotope with mass 266 were found. The halflives range from 0.1 ms to 0.1 s. The highly fissile transactinide nuclei were produced in cold fusion of heavy ions using 207,208 Pb and 209 Bi targets, respectively, and 50 Ti, 54 Cr, or 58 Fe beams. The evaluation of the excitation functions for the production of very heavy evaporation residues shows a strong decrease above 25 MeV excitation energy caused by a destruction of the groundstate shell effects at high excitation energies. The strong competition of barrier transmission and survival probability results in rather narrow excitation functions and small production cross sections. The maximum cross section is observed close to the Coulomb barrier and corresponding to projectile energies near 5 MeV/u. (orig.) [de

  20. Dynamical symmetries for odd-odd nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balantekin, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Recent work for developing dynamical symmetries and supersymmetries is reviewed. An accurate description of odd-odd nuclei requires inclusion of the fermion-fermion force (the residual interaction) and the distinguishing of fermion configurations which are particle like and those which are hole like. A parabolic dependence of the proton-neutron multiplet in odd-odd nuclei is demonstrated. It is shown that a group structure for Bose-Fermi symmetries can be embedded in a supergroup. These methods are used to predict level schemes for Au-196 and Au-198. 11 refs., 3 figs

  1. Measurement of recoil nuclei of Ta photofission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amroyan, K.A.; Barsegyan, S.A.; Demekhina, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    The results of measuring the characteristics of nuclei leaving the Ta target bombarded by 4,5 GeV bremsstrahlung photons are presented. The thick-target-trap technique is used. The radioactive residual nuclei were detected by the induced activity with the help of the Ge(Li) detector. The forward-backward nucleus ratio is measured, and the kinematical characteristics are calculated in the framework of the two-step vector model of velocities. The data analysis and systematization is carried out in comparison with the results of hardon-nuclear interactions

  2. Selfconsistent theory of Coulomb mixing in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatov, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of isobaric states is considered according to the Coulomb mixing in nuclei. For a given form of the isovestor potential the separable residual interactions are constructed by means of the isotopic invariance principle. The strength parameter of the force is found from a selfconsistency condition. The charge dependent force is represented by the Coulomb effective potential. The theory of the isobaric states is developed using the random phase approximation. The Coulomb mixing effects in the ground and isobaric 0 + states of even-mass nuclei are investigated

  3. Biodiesel Production from Residual Palm Oil Contained in Spent Bleaching Earth by In Situ Trans-Esterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Fahmil QRM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spent Bleaching Earth (SBE is an industrial solid waste of vegetable oil industry that has a high residual oil to be potentialy converted to biodiesel. This study aims at developing a biodiesel production process technology by utilizing residual palm oil contained in SBE and to test the use of hexane in the trans-esterification process. Optimization process was done by using the Response Surface Method (RSM. The variables studied included catalyst concentration and reaction time. On the other hand, the deoiled SBE resulted from biodiesel production was tested as an adsorbent on biodiesel purification after being reactivated. The method used in the biodiesel production included an in situ acid catalysed esterification followed by in situ base catalysed trans-esterification. The results of RSM showed that the optimum process was obtained at NaOH concentration of 1.8% and reaction time of 104.73 minutes, with a predicted response rate of 97.18% and 95.63% for validation results. The use of hexane could also increase the yield of biodiesel which was obtained on the ratio of hexane to methanol of 0.4:1 (volume of hexane: volume of methanol. On the other hand, the reactivated bleaching earth was effective as an adsorbent in biodiesel production, which was still conform with the Indonesian National Standard.

  4. Nuclear treasure island [superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Soon after the experiments at Dubna, which synthesized element 114 and made the first footprints on the beach of the "island of nuclear stability", two new superheavy elements have been discovered at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Element 118 and its immediate decay product, element 116, were manufactured at Berkeley's 88 inch cyclotron by fusing targets of lead-208 with an intense beam of 449 MeV krypton-86 ions. Although both new nuclei almost instantly decay into lighter ones, the decay sequence is consistent with theories that have long predicted the island of stability for nuclei with approximately 114 protons and 184 neutrons. Theorist Robert Smolanczuk, visiting from the Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in Poland, had calculated that this reaction should have particularly favourable production rates. Now that this route has been signposted, similar reactions could be possible: new elements and isotopes, tests of nuclear stability and mass models, and a new under...

  5. Energies and media nr 28. Uranium mining exploitations and residues. Uranium mines in Niger. Depleted uranium as a by-product of enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    After some comments on recent events in the nuclear sector in different countries (USA, China, India, UK, Sweden, Italy and France), this publication addresses the issue of uranium mining exploitations and of their residues. It comments the radioactivity in mining areas, briefly discusses the issue of low doses, describes the uranium ore and its processing, indicates which are the various residues of the mining activity (sterile uncovered tailings, non exploitable mineralized rocks, ore and residue processing, residue radioactivity, mine closing down, witnesses on health in ancient mines). Some reflections are stated about uranium mines in Niger, and about depleted uranium as a by-product of the enrichment activity

  6. Recognition and Survey the Productive Residues of the Curing Centers and Presenting the Management Methods. (The case study: the 7th zone of Karaj municipality)

    OpenAIRE

    P. Gohari Mokammel; sh. Sajedi; M. Mobasherie; N. Samkhaniany

    2016-01-01

    The high risk of residues of curing centre and extensive use of them endangered all over the world. According to the reports of the world health organization (WHO) 75-90% of productive residue of curing centre is usual kind and is out of danger and management of them is like the urban waste material. On the basis of this reports 10 to 25% (percent) of the mentioned residues are placed in the group of dangerous residues, and it needs a precise and wise management program. The aim o...

  7. Two residues determine the product profile of the class II diterpene synthases TPS14 and TPS21 of Tripterygium wilfordii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Nikolaj Lervad; Nissen, Jakob N.; Hamberger, Björn Robert

    2017-01-01

    residue gave mixed product profiles. Two mutants, TwTPS14:Y265H and TwTPS21:A325V, also produced ent-copalyl diphosphate, highlighting the evolutionary potential of enzymes of this family to drive rapid diversification of plant diterpene biosynthesis through neo-functionalization. Our study contributes......The medicinal plant Tripterygium wilfordii (Celastraceae) contains a pair of class II diterpene synthases (diTPS) of specialized labdane-type metabolism that, despite remarkably close homology, form strikingly different products. TwTPS21 catalyzes bicyclization of the linear C20 precursor......-directed mutagenesis, we generated a panel of six variants, where one, or both positions were exchanged between the enzymes. In coupled heterologous assays with a corresponding class I diTPS, TwTPS2, complete product interchange was observed in variants with both reciprocal mutations, while substitutions of either...

  8. Innovative bioelectrochemical-anaerobic-digestion integrated system for ammonia recovery and bioenergy production from ammonia-rich residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    (SMRC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), to prevent ammonia toxicity during anaerobic digestion by in-situ ammonia recovery and electricity production (Figure 1). In batch experiment, the ammonia concentration in the CSTR decreased from 6 to 0.7 g-N/L with an average recovery rate of 0.18 g-N/L(CSTR...... performance was enhanced. In addition, the coexistence of other cations in CSTR or cathode had no negative effect on the ammonia transportation. In continuous reactor operation, 112% extra biogas production was achieved due to ammonia recovery. High-throughput molecular sequencing analysis showed an impact...... of ammonia recovery on the microbial community composition in the integrated system. Results clearly indicate the great potential of the SMRC-CSTR-coupled system for efficient and cost-effective ammonia recovery, energy production and treatment of ammonia-rich residues....

  9. Initial Effects of Reproduction Cutting Treatments on Residual Hard Mast Production in the Ouachita Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill

    2003-01-01

    We compared indices of total hard mast production (oak and hickory combined) in 20, second-growth, pine-hardwood stands under five treatments to determine the effects of different reproduction treatments on mast production in the Ouachita Mountains. We evaluated mast production in mature unharvested controls and stands under four reproduction cutting methods (single-...

  10. Farmers Participatory Research in the Evaluation of Maize Crop Residues for Improved Dairy Cattle Production in Eastern Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiruiro, E.M.; Kariuki, I.W.; Kang'ara, J.; Ouma, O.

    1999-01-01

    Informal and formal surveys, and participatory rural appraisal conducted within the coffee land-use system of Embu District in Eastern Kenya identified feed shortage as a major constraint to increased dairy production on small holder farms. To address this constraint, a two-year (1996-1998) on-farm research project involving 20 farms in Manyatta division, Embu District was initiated with broad objectives of developing components technologies that would use maize crop residues. This was due to the recognition of the fact that the greatest potential for improving field availability would be in the exploitation of crop residues, especially those derived from maize, the main staple crop in the region. Based on these reality appropriate technologies that would offer viable offers for the use of crop residues were identified and discussed during workshops and meetings with farmers. Component technologies considered included drying of maize leaves after defoliation and post-harvest storage methods for dry maize stover. this paper discussed the results of the participatory research in context of farmers' involvement in the technology development, testing, evaluation and promotion. The study demonstrated that involving farmers in all stages of the research process, enhanced their interest and participation in the testing and subsequent adoption of appropriate technologies

  11. Rapid ion-pair liquid chromatographic method for the determination of fenbendazole marker residue in fermented dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vousdouka, Venetia I; Papapanagiotou, Elias P; Angelidis, Apostolos S; Fletouris, Dimitrios J

    2017-04-15

    A simple, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatographic method that allows for the quantitative determination of fenbendazole residues in fermented dairy products is described. Samples were extracted with a mixture of acetonitrile-phosphoric acid and the extracts were defatted with hexane to be further partitioned into ethyl acetate. The organic layer was evaporated to dryness and the residue was reconstituted in mobile phase. Separation of fenbendazole and its sulphoxide, sulphone, and p-hydroxylated metabolites was carried out isocratically with a mobile phase containing both positively and negatively charged pairing ions. Overall recoveries ranged from 79.8 to 88.8%, while precision data, based on within and between days variations, suggested an overall relative standard deviation of 6.3-11.0%. The detection and quantification limits were lower than 9 and 21μg/kg, respectively. The method has been successfully applied to quantitate fenbendazole residues in Feta cheese and yoghurt made from spiked and incurred ovine milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiotracer studies on the fate and transformation of pesticide residues in the environment and food chains. Part of a coordinated programme on isotopic-tracer-aided studies of chemical residues in cotton seed, feed, oil and related products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.R.

    1980-10-01

    The magnitude and fate of some pesticide chemicals in Korean foods were studied with particular reference to oil-bearing crops and related products. Application of the chemicals was made under conditions of actual agricultural practice. Analytical methodologies included nuclear activation, gas chromatographic, spectrophotometric and radiotracer techniques. Residues of benzene hexachloride, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin and DDT found in refined vegetable oil samples were below or within the tolerance limits set by international organizations and as such, these are unlikely to present any toxicological hazard to the consumer. Also, residues of the herbicides nitrogen, alachlor and butachlor applied to oil-bearing crops were not detected in the seeds. Studies on 14 C-BHC residues in rice revealed that polishing and washing play an important role in removing a considerable portion of the residue. Data on the arsenic-containing neoasozine residues suggest that the products consumed by the human (grain and oil) contained residues below the tolerance limit and are unlikely to present any toxicological hazard to the consumer. On the other hand, relatively high arsenic concentrations (2.2 mg/kg) were found in the cake (serving as animal feed) and should be carefully evaluated in the light of toxicological data

  13. Nuclei with exotic constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1990-08-01

    We discuss various interesting features in the behavior of exotic constituents of nuclei such as hyperons and mesons, in particular, with emphases on the aspect of exotic halos which are formed in general by short-range repulsion and long-range attraction. Specifically, Λ and Σ hypernuclei and pionic nuclei are discussed. (author)

  14. Neutron rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, R.

    1979-01-01

    If some β - emitters are particularly interesting to study in light, medium, and heavy nuclei, another (and also) difficult problem is to know systematically the properties of these neutron rich nuclei far from the stability line. A review of some of their characteristics is presented. How far is it possible to be objective in the interpretation of data is questioned and implications are discussed

  15. Baryon resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenhoevel, H.

    1977-01-01

    The field of baryon resonances in nuclei is reviewed. Theoretical developments and experimental evidence as well are discussed. Special emphasis is laid on electromagnetic processes for the two nucleon system. Some aspects of real isobars in nuclei are touched upon. (orig.) [de

  16. Nuclei in high forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanski, Z.; Berger, J.F.; Heenen, P.H.; Heyde, K.; Haas, B.; Janssens, R.; Paya, D.; Gogny, D.; Huber, G.; Bjoernholm, S.; Brack, M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of 1991 Joliot-Curie Summer School is to review the most advances in the understanding of the nuclei physics after the considerable progress in gamma spectroscopy. It covers the following topics: Highly and super-deformed nuclei, nuclear structures, mean-field approach and beyond, fission isomers, nuclear excitations with long lifetime and metal clusters

  17. Pair correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi

    2009-01-01

    Except for the closed shell nuclei, almost all nuclei are in the superconducting state at their ground states. This well-known pair correlation in nuclei causes various interesting phenomena. It is especially to be noted that the pair correlation becomes weak in the excited states of nuclei with high angular momentum, which leads to the pair phase transition to the normal state in the high spin limit. On the other hand, the pair correlation becomes stronger in the nuclei with lower nucleon density than in those with normal density. In the region of neutron halo or skin state of unstable nuclei, this phenomenon is expected to be further enhanced to be observed compared to the ground state of stable nuclei. An overview of those interesting aspects caused via the pair correlation is presented here in the sections titled 'pair correlations in ground states', pair correlations in high spin states' and 'pair correlations in unstable nuclei' focusing on the high spin state. (S. Funahashi)

  18. Eta mesons in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of producing eta-mesic nuclei by the use of pions is discussed. If these nuclei are observed experimentally, then the binding energies of the eta in this new nuclear matter can be used to extract accurately the eta-N-N* coupling constant in a nucleus. The framework for these calculations is the coupled channel isobar model

  19. Hot nuclei: high temperatures, high angular momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1991-01-01

    A review is made of the present status concerning the production of hot nuclei above 5 MeV temperature, concentrating mainly on the possible experimental evidences for the attainment of a critical temperature, on the existence of dynamical limitations to the energy deposition and on the experimental signatures for the formation of hot spinning nuclei. The data strongly suggest a nuclear disassembly in collisions involving very heavy ions at moderate incident velocities. Furthermore, hot nuclei seem to be quite stable against rotation on a short time scale. (author) 26 refs.; 12 figs

  20. Evaluation of the biomass potential for the production of lignocellulosic bioethanol from various agricultural residues in Austria and Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahr, Heike; Steindl, Daniel; Wimberger, Julia; Schürz, Daniel; Jäger, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Due to the fact that the resources of fossil fuels are steadily decreasing, researchers have been trying to find alternatives over the past few years. As bioethanol of the first generation is based on potential food, its production has become an increasingly controversial topic. Therefore the focus of research currently is on the production of bioethanol of the second generation, which is made from cellulosic and lignocellulosic materials. However, for the production of bioethanol of the second generation the fibres have to be pre-treated. In this work the mass balances of various agricultural residues available in Austria were generated and examined in lab scale experiments for their bioethanol potential. The residues were pretreatment by means of state of the art technology (steam explosion), enzymatically hydrolysed and fermented with yeast to produce ethanol. Special attention was paid the mass balance of the overall process. Due to the pretreatment the proportion of cellulose increases with the duration of the pre-treatment, whereby the amount of hemicellulose decreases greatly. However, the total losses were increasing with the duration of the pre-treatment, and the losses largely consist of hemicellulose. The ethanol yield varied depending on the cellulose content of the substrates. So rye straw 200 °C 20 min reaches an ethanol yield of 169 kg/t, by far the largest yield. As result on the basis of the annual straw yield in Austria, approximately 210 000 t of bioethanol (266 million litres) could be produced from the straw of wheat (Triticum vulgare), rye (Secale cereale), oat (Avena sativa) and corn (Zea mays) as well as elephant grass (Miscanthus sinensis) using appropriate pre-treatment. So the greenhouse gas emissions produced by burning fossil fuels could be reduced significantly. About 1.8 million tons of motor gasoline are consumed in Austria every year. The needed quantity for a transition to E10 biofuels could thus be easily provided by bioethanol

  1. Residual insecticides, inert dusts and botanicals for the protection of durable stored products against pest infestation in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obeng-Ofori, D.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Insect pests associated with durable grains and processed food cause considerable quantitative and qualitative losses throughout the world. Insect infestation can occur just prior to harvest, during storage in traditional storage structures, cribs, metal or concrete bins, and in warehouses, food handling facilities, retail grocery stores as well as in-transit. Many tools are available for managing insects associated with grains and processed food. Although pest management strategies are changing to meet consumer’s demand for food free of insecticide residues, address concerns about safety of insecticides to humans, delay insecticide resistance development in insects and comply with stricter insecticide regulations, the use of synthetic residual insecticides will continue to be a major component of stored-product pest management programmes. Selective use of residual insecticides requires a through understanding and evaluation of risks, costs and benefits. The use of plant and inert materials may be a safe, cost-effective and environmentally friendly method of grain preservation against pest infestation among low-resource poor farmers who store small amounts of grains. There is a dearth of information on the use of plant materials by rural farmers in Africa for stored-product protection. The most promising candidate plant materials for future utilization as grain protectants are Azadirachta, Acorus, Chenopodium, Eucalyptus, Mentha, Ocimum, Piper and Tetradenia together with vegetable oils from various sources. Neem is the only plant from which several commercial products have been developed worldwide. However, unlike synthetic insecticides these alternatives often do not provide effective or rapid suppression of pest populations and may not be effective against all species of pests. These alternatives are also more expensive than synthetic insecticides, and have not been tested extensively under field conditions in the tropics. This paper

  2. Effect of residual nitrogen and fertilizer nitrogen on sugar beet production in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veikko Brummer

    1974-09-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary determinations for NO3- and NH4-N in topsoil from nitrogen field experiments are discussed. The amounts of residual nitrogen as well as the dates and depth for sampling are considerd in order to investigate the need of fertilizer-N for continuous sugar beet. Tops ploughed down as manure increased the available soil nitrogen by about 50 kg/ha. In practice nitrogen from fertilizer and farmyard manure given to previous beet crops seems to accumulate in the beet soils of Finland. The concentrations of nitrate and ammonium nitrogen in topsoil were low in the spring of 1972 and 1973. NO3-N increased in topsoil during the early summer, and the highest concentrations were found at the beginning of July. Starting from the middle of July the amount of NH4-N began to increase both in topsoil and in subsoil. With increasing amounts of nitrogen in the topsoil the sugar content decreases continuously. Also the α-amio N content of beets correlates with the soil nitrogen. There is experimental evidence that 150 180 kg/ha nitrate nitrogen in topsoil (residual + fertilizer N in early July gives the best economic result. The effects of fertilizer and accumulated soil nitrogen on the sugar beet quality together with som other experimental data have been statistically analysed. Regression coefficients indicated that both forms of nitrogen affected the suger content, the α-amino N concentration and clear juice purity, in a similar way.

  3. Simple detection of residual enrofloxacin in meat products using microparticles and biochips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Mi-Sun; Chung, Myung-Sub; Bae, Dong-Ho

    2016-05-01

    A simple and sensitive method for detecting enrofloxacin, a major veterinary fluoroquinolone, was developed. Monoclonal antibody specific for enrofloxacin was immobilised on a chip and fluorescent dye-labelled microparticles were covalently bound to the enrofloxacin molecules. Enrofloxacin in solution competes with the microparticle-immobilised enrofloxacin (enroMPs) to bind to the antibody on the chip. The presence of enrofloxacin was verified by detecting the fluorescence of enrofloxacin-bound microparticles. Under optimum conditions, a high dynamic range was achieved at enrofloxacin concentrations ranging from 1 to 1000 μg kg(-1). The limits of detection and quantification for standard solutions were 5 and 20 μg kg(-1) respectively, which are markedly lower than the maximum residue limit. Using simple extraction methods, recoveries from fortified beef, pork and chicken samples were 43.4-62.3%. This novel method also enabled approximate quantification of enrofloxacin concentration: the enroMP signal intensity decreased with increasing enrofloxacin concentration. Because of its sensitivity, specificity, simplicity and rapidity, the method described herein will facilitate the detection and approximate quantification of enrofloxacin residues in foods in a high-throughput manner.

  4. Residual Salt Separation from the Metal Products Reduced in a LiCl-Li2O Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Jin Mok; Hong, Sun Seok; Kang, Dae Seung; Jeong, Meong Soo; Seo, Chung Seok

    2006-02-01

    The electrochemical reduction of spent nuclear fuel in a LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt for the conditioning of spent nuclear fuel requires the separation of the residual salts from a reduced metal product after the reduction process. Considering the behavior of spent nuclear fuel during the electrochemical reduction process, a surrogate material matrix was constructed and inactive tests on a salt separation were carried out to produce the data required for the active tests. Fresh uranium metal prepared from the electrochemical reduction of U 3 O 8 powder was used as the surrogates of the spent nuclear fuel components which might be metallized by the electrochemical reduction process. LiCl, Li 2 O, Y 2 O 3 and SrCl 2 were selected as the components of the residual salts. Interactions between the salts and their influence on the separation of the residual salts were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). Eutectic melting of LiCl-Li 2 O and LiCl-SrCl 2 led to a melting point which was lower than that of a LiCl molten salt was observed. Residual salts were separated by a vaporization method. Co-vaporization of LiCl-Li 2 O and LiCl-SrCl 2 was achieved below temperatures which could make the uranium metal oxidation by Li 2 O possible. The salt vaporization rates at 950 .deg. C were measured as follows: LiCl-8 wt% Li 2 O > LiCl > LiCl-8 wt% SrCl 2 > SrCl 2

  5. Residual Salt Separation from the Metal Products Reduced in a LiCl-Li{sub 2}O Molten Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Jin Mok; Hong, Sun Seok; Kang, Dae Seung; Jeong, Meong Soo; Seo, Chung Seok

    2006-02-15

    The electrochemical reduction of spent nuclear fuel in a LiCl-Li{sub 2}O molten salt for the conditioning of spent nuclear fuel requires the separation of the residual salts from a reduced metal product after the reduction process. Considering the behavior of spent nuclear fuel during the electrochemical reduction process, a surrogate material matrix was constructed and inactive tests on a salt separation were carried out to produce the data required for the active tests. Fresh uranium metal prepared from the electrochemical reduction of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder was used as the surrogates of the spent nuclear fuel components which might be metallized by the electrochemical reduction process. LiCl, Li{sub 2}O, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SrCl{sub 2} were selected as the components of the residual salts. Interactions between the salts and their influence on the separation of the residual salts were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). Eutectic melting of LiCl-Li{sub 2}O and LiCl-SrCl{sub 2} led to a melting point which was lower than that of a LiCl molten salt was observed. Residual salts were separated by a vaporization method. Co-vaporization of LiCl-Li{sub 2}O and LiCl-SrCl{sub 2} was achieved below temperatures which could make the uranium metal oxidation by Li{sub 2}O possible. The salt vaporization rates at 950 .deg. C were measured as follows: LiCl-8 wt% Li{sub 2}O > LiCl > LiCl-8 wt% SrCl{sub 2} > SrCl{sub 2}.

  6. Life cycle efficiency of beef production: VIII. Relationship between residual feed intake of heifers and subsequent cow efficiency ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M E; Lancaster, P A; Rutledge, J J; Cundiff, L V

    2016-11-01

    Data were collected from 1953 through 1980 from identical and fraternal twin beef and dairy females born in 1953, 1954, 1959, 1964, and 1969, and from crossbred females born as singles in 1974, and their progeny. Numbers of dams that weaned at least 1 calf and were included in the first analysis were 37, 45, and 56 in the 1964, 1969, and 1974 data sets, respectively. Respective numbers of dams that weaned 3 calves and were included in a second analysis were 6, 8, 8, 22, 33, and 33 in the 1953, 1954, 1959, 1964, 1969, and 1974 experiments. Individual feed consumption was measured at 28-d intervals from the time females were placed on the experiment until 3 calves were weaned or the dams had reached 5 yr of age. Residual feed intake (RFI) and residual gain (RG) of the heifers that subsequently became the dams in this study were determined based on ADG and DMI from 240 d of age to first calving. Various measures of cow efficiency were calculated on either a life cycle or actual lifetime basis using ratios of progeny and dam weight outputs to progeny and dam feed inputs. Residual feed intake was phenotypically independent of ADG and metabolic midweight (MMW), whereas the correlation between RFI and DMI was positive and highly significant ( = 0.67; calving had superior efficiency ratios as cows. Residual feed intake was not significantly correlated with age at puberty, age at calving, or milk production. Results of this study do not indicate any serious antagonisms of postweaning heifer RFI with subsequent cow and progeny performance traits or with life cycle or actual lifetime cow efficiency. In addition, selection for increased RG would result in earlier ages at calving, but would also tend to result in taller and heavier cows.

  7. Fragmentation of relativistic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cork, B.

    1975-06-01

    Nuclei with energies of several GeV/n interact with hadrons and produce fragments that encompass the fields of nuclear physics, meson physics, and particle physics. Experimental results are now available to explore problems in nuclear physics such as the validity of the shell model to explain the momentum distribution of fragments, the contribution of giant dipole resonances to fragment production cross sections, the effective Coulomb barrier, and nuclear temperatures. A new approach to meson physics is possible by exploring the nucleon charge-exchange process. Particle physics problems are explored by measuring the energy and target dependence of isotope production cross sections, thus determining if limiting fragmentation and target factorization are valid, and measuring total cross sections to determine if the factorization relation, sigma/sub AB/ 2 = sigma/sub AA/ . sigma/sub BB/, is violated. Also, new experiments have been done to measure the angular distribution of fragments that could be explained as nuclear shock waves, and to explore for ultradense matter produced by very heavy ions incident on heavy atoms. (12 figures, 2 tables)

  8. Marketing strategies and consumer preferences for fertilizers and soils from organic residues of biogas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlin, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to show marketing possibilities for fermentation products and to generate sepcific recommendations for potential producers and marketers of fermentation products. Since the marketing of fermenting products is largely unexplored and a research gap, this project was launched with an exploratory phase. After the exploratory phase, private gardeners were identified as a promising customer group. Knowledge about the preferences of private gardeners when purchasing soil and fertilizer are crucial for the market success of processed fermentation products. In order to fathom the decision-making behavior of this potential customer group, personal interviews were conducted with private gardeners. These results enable potential producers and marketers of fermentation products to create a product that is in demand on the market because it meets the needs of potential consumers. The personal preferences, however, can be very different, for which reason a segmentation into different groups with similar preferences is made. [de

  9. Weak pion production from nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and renormalization of weak ∆ properties ... Furthermore, the angular distribution and the energy distribution of ... Here ψα(p ) and u(p) are the Rarita Schwinger and Dirac spinors for ∆ and nucleon.

  10. Simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation of lignocellulosic residues from commercial furfural production and corn kernels using different nutrient media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristhian Carrasco

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the supply of starch grain and sugar cane, currently the main feedstocks for bioethanol production, become limited, lignocelluloses will be sought as alternative materials for bioethanol production. Production of cellulosic ethanol is still cost-inefficient because of the low final ethanol concentration and the addition of nutrients. We report the use of simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF of lignocellulosic residues from commercial furfural production (furfural residue, FR and corn kernels to compare different nutritional media. The final ethanol concentration, yield, number of live yeast cells, and yeast-cell death ratio were investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of integrating cellulosic and starch ethanol. Results Both the ethanol yield and number of live yeast cells increased with increasing corn-kernel concentration, whereas the yeast-cell death ratio decreased in SSCF of FR and corn kernels. An ethanol concentration of 73.1 g/L at 120 h, which corresponded to a 101.1% ethanol yield based on FR cellulose and corn starch, was obtained in SSCF of 7.5% FR and 14.5% corn kernels with mineral-salt medium. SSCF could simultaneously convert cellulose into ethanol from both corn kernels and FR, and SSCF ethanol yield was similar between the organic and mineral-salt media. Conclusions Starch ethanol promotes cellulosic ethanol by providing important nutrients for fermentative organisms, and in turn cellulosic ethanol promotes starch ethanol by providing cellulosic enzymes that convert the cellulosic polysaccharides in starch materials into additional ethanol. It is feasible to produce ethanol in SSCF of FR and corn kernels with mineral-salt medium. It would be cost-efficient to produce ethanol in SSCF of high concentrations of water-insoluble solids of lignocellulosic materials and corn kernels. Compared with prehydrolysis and fed-batch strategy using lignocellulosic materials, addition of starch

  11. High energy particle interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czyz, W.

    1978-01-01

    The recent interest in multiparticle production processes on nuclei was triggered by re-discovering their 'enigmatic simplicity' which has been known to cosmic ray physicists for over 20 years: the mean multiplicity and angular distributions of relativistic secondaries produced on nuclei do not differ markedly from what emerges from p-p collisions. The author considers how such reactions may provide a way of obtaining details of hadron structure. (Auth.)

  12. Production of vanillin from waste residue of rice bran oil by Aspergillus niger and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lirong; Zheng, Pu; Sun, Zhihao; Bai, Yanbing; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xinfu

    2007-03-01

    A new technology of transforming ferulic acid, which was from waste residue of rice bran oil, into vanillin was developed by a combination of fungal strains Aspergillus niger CGMCC0774 and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus CGMCC1115. Various concentrations of ferulic acid were compared, and the highest yield reached 2.2 g l(-1) of vanillic acid by A. niger CGMCC0774 in a 25 l fermenter when concentration of ferulic acid was 4 g l(-1). The filtrate of A. niger CGMCC0774 culture was concentrated and vanillic acid in the filtrate was bio-converted into vanillin by P. cinnabarinus CGMCC1115. The yield of vanillin reached 2.8 g l(-1) when 5 g l(-1) of glucose and 25 g of HZ802 resin were supplemented in the bioconversion medium. The 13C isotope analysis indicated that delta13C(PDB) of vanillin prepared was much different from chemically synthesized vanillin.

  13. Residues of bioenergy production chains as soil amendments: Immediate and temporal phytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gell, K.; Groenigen, van J.W.; Cayuela, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    The current shift towards bioenergy production increases streams of bioenergy rest-products (RPs), which are likely to end-up as soil amendments. However, their impact on soil remains unclear. In this study we evaluated crop phytotoxicity of 15 RPs from common bioenergy chains (biogas, biodiesel,

  14. Production of Bioethanol from Agricultural Wastes Using Residual Thermal Energy of a Cogeneration Plant in the Distillation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaela Cutzu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic fermentations were performed, adapting the technology to exploit the residual thermal energy (hot water at 83–85 °C of a cogeneration plant and to valorize agricultural wastes. Substrates were apple, kiwifruit, and peaches wastes; and corn threshing residue (CTR. Saccharomyces bayanus was chosen as starter yeast. The fruits, fresh or blanched, were mashed; CTR was gelatinized and liquefied by adding Liquozyme® SC DS (Novozymes, Dittingen, Switzerland; saccharification simultaneous to fermentation was carried out using the enzyme Spirizyme® Ultra (Novozymes, Dittingen, Switzerland. Lab-scale static fermentations were carried out at 28 °C and 35 °C, using raw fruits, blanched fruits and CTR, monitoring the ethanol production. The highest ethanol production was reached with CTR (10.22% (v/v and among fruits with apple (8.71% (v/v. Distillations at low temperatures and under vacuum, to exploit warm water from a cogeneration plant, were tested. Vacuum simple batch distillation by rotary evaporation at lab scale at 80 °C (heating bath and 200 mbar or 400 mbar allowed to recover 93.35% (v/v and 89.59% (v/v of ethanol, respectively. These results support a fermentation process coupled to a cogeneration plant, fed with apple wastes and with CTR when apple wastes are not available, where hot water from cogeneration plant is used in blanching and distillation phases. The scale up in a pilot plant was also carried out.

  15. Nucleons in nuclei, however

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grange, P.; Mathiot, J.F.; Roy-Stephan, M.; Frascaria, R.; Gales, S.

    1990-01-01

    The topics presented at the 1989 Joliot-Curie Lectures are reported. Two main subjects were retained: a simplified description of the N-body motion of particles in the quasi-particle configuration; study of the dynamics of nuclear components which are not described by nucleons in their ground state. The following themes were presented: quasiparticles and the Green functions, relativistic aspects of the quasiparticle concept, the dimensions of nucleons in the nuclei and the EMC effect, quarks and gluons in the nuclei, the delta in the nuclei, the strangeness, quasiparticles far from the Fermi sea, diffusion of electrons, stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis [fr

  16. Dynamic polarisation of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghini, M.; Abragam, A.

    1961-01-01

    In magnetic fields of about 13000 gauss, at a temperature of 1.5 deg. K, in samples of about 2 mm 3 , we have obtained by the 'solid effect' (application of a magnetic field at an appropriate frequency around 35000 MHz), nuclear polarizations /I of a few percent: 19 per cent for hydrogen nuclei in single crystals of La 2 Mg 3 (NO 3 ) 12 , 24H 2 O; 5 per cent for hydrogen nuclei in polystyrene; 6 per cent for fluorine nuclei in single crystals of LiF. (author) [fr

  17. Impact of residual elements on zinc quality in the production of zinc oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Luptáková

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on zinc oxide manufacturing process. The present work deals with the character and morphology of the input material for the production of ZnO by the indirect pyrometallurgical process. Undesirable phases in the feedstock can be identified through profound recognition of the source material and the nature of its microstructure. If these compounds diffuse into the lining during thermal processes, they become the cause of stress in metallurgical ceramics. The emergence of these chemical reactions may subsequently affect the entire metallurgical zinc smelting process. The results obtained by analysis are used to minimize waste - zinc slag and to eliminate the conditions which enable the formation of the undesired product, thereby increasing the productivity of the ZnO production.

  18. Enhanced production of xylanase from locally isolated fungal strain using agro-industrial residues under solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Roheena; Nisar, Kinza; Aslam, Aafia; Iqtedar, Mehwish; Naz, Shagufta

    2015-01-01

    This study is related to the isolation of fungal strain for xylanase production using agro-industrial residues. Forty fungal strains with xylanolytic potential were isolated by using xylan agar plates and quantitatively screened in solid-state fermentation. Of all the tested isolates, the strain showing highest ability to produce xylanase was assigned the code Aspergillus niger LCBT-14. For the enhanced production of the enzyme, five different fermentation media were evaluated. Out of all media, M4 containing wheat bran gave maximum enzyme production. Effect of different variables including incubation time, temperature, pH, carbon and nitrogen sources has been investigated. The optimum enzyme production was obtained after 72 h at 30°C and pH 4. Glucose as a carbon source while ammonium sulphate and yeast extract as nitrogen sources gave maximum xylanase production (946 U/mL/min). This study was successful in producing xylanase by A. niger LCBT-14 economically by utilising cheap indigenous substrate.

  19. In vitro ability of beer fermentation residue and yeast-based products to bind aflatoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovo, Fernanda; Franco, Larissa Tuanny; Rosim, Roice Eliana; Barbalho, Ricardo; de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Fernandes

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to verify the in vitro ability of beer fermentation residue (BFR) containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and five commercial products that differed in the viability and integrity of S. cerevisiae cells to remove aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) from a citrate-phosphate buffer solution (CPBS). BFR was collected at a microbrewery and prepared by drying and milling. The commercial yeast-based products were as follows: inactive intact yeast cells from beer alcoholic fermentation, inactive intact yeast cells from sugarcane alcoholic fermentation, hydrolyzed yeast cells, yeast cell walls and active yeast cells. Adsorption assays were performed in CPBS spiked with 1.0 μg AFB1/mL at pH 3.0 and 6.0 for a contact time of 60 min at room temperature. Analysis of AFB1 in the samples was performed by high performance liquid chromatography. AFB1 adsorption by the products ranged from 45.5% to 69.4% at pH 3.0 and from 24.0% to 63.8% at pH 6.0. The higher percentages (p 0.05) from commercial products containing inactive intact yeast cells. The results of this trial indicate that the yeast-based products tested, especially the BFR, have potential applications in animal feeds as a suitable biological method for reducing the adverse effects of aflatoxins.

  20. In vitro ability of beer fermentation residue and yeast-based products to bind aflatoxin B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Bovo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify the in vitro ability of beer fermentation residue (BFR containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and five commercial products that differed in the viability and integrity of S. cerevisiae cells to remove aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 from a citrate-phosphate buffer solution (CPBS. BFR was collected at a microbrewery and prepared by drying and milling. The commercial yeast-based products were as follows: inactive intact yeast cells from beer alcoholic fermentation, inactive intact yeast cells from sugarcane alcoholic fermentation, hydrolyzed yeast cells, yeast cell walls and active yeast cells. Adsorption assays were performed in CPBS spiked with 1.0 μg AFB1/mL at pH 3.0 and 6.0 for a contact time of 60 min at room temperature. Analysis of AFB1 in the samples was performed by high performance liquid chromatography. AFB1 adsorption by the products ranged from 45.5% to 69.4% at pH 3.0 and from 24.0% to 63.8% at pH 6.0. The higher percentages (p 0.05 from commercial products containing inactive intact yeast cells. The results of this trial indicate that the yeast-based products tested, especially the BFR, have potential applications in animal feeds as a suitable biological method for reducing the adverse effects of aflatoxins.

  1. Valorization of lignite combustion residues and ferroalumina in the production of aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, I M; Stivanakis, V E; Angelopoulos, G N; Papamantellos, D C

    2010-02-15

    The present research study investigates the synergy of industrial solid by-products from lignite combustion (fly ash and bottom ash) and aluminum production (ferroalumina) in the production of lightweight aggregates (LWA). The process consists of two stages, pelletization and sintering. Bottom ash (BA) is used as the principal raw material in mixtures while ferroalumina (FAL) is added in lower percentages (5-30 wt%). BA carbon content is used as the fuel of sintering process in high temperatures, around 1250 degrees C, and gas generation is responsible for porous structure formation. Physical properties such as porosity, water absorption and bulk density, of sintering products are measured. Increase of FAL percentage in sintering mixtures results in decrease of porosity from 61% to 35% and of water absorption from 61% to 21% and in increase of bulk density from 1.02 g/cm(3) to 1.80 g/cm(3) of the produced aggregates. Aggregates produced by FAL addition up to 20 wt% are characterized as LWA. Aggregates formed are used in the production of concrete specimens. Compressive strength of concrete increases by increasing FAL addition in aggregates from 5 wt% to 15 wt% (highest strength value), while decrease by increasing FAL addition from 20 wt% to 30 wt%. FAL addition in lignite ashes sintering mixtures (up to 15 wt%) is considered as an important parameter for enhancing aggregates strength.

  2. Quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.G.

    1984-11-01

    The paper concerns the behaviour of quarks in nuclei. Confinement size changes and dynamical rescaling; A dependence; low-x region; gluons and confinement size; and nucleons in a nucleus; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  3. The shape of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackintosh, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    For the class of nuclei which are 'strongly deformed' it is possible to introduce the idea of an empirically measurable static nuclear shape. The limitations of this concept as applied to nuclei (fundamentally quantum-mechanical objects) are discussed. These are basically the limitations of the rotational model which must be introduced in order to define and measure nuclear shape. A unified discussion of the ways in which the shape has been parametrized is given with emphasis on the fact that different parametrizations correspond to different nuclear structures. Accounts of the various theoretical procedures for calculating nuclear shapes and of the interaction between nuclear shapes and nuclear spectroscopy are given. A coherent account of a large subset of nuclei (strongly deformed nuclei) can be given by means of a model in which the concept of nuclear shape plays a central role. (author)

  4. Structure of Warm Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaberg, S.; Uhrenholt, H.

    2009-01-01

    We study the structure of nuclei in the energy region between the ground state and the neutron separation energy, here called warm nuclei. The onset of chaos in the nucleus as excitation energy is increased is briefly reviewed. Chaos implies fluctuations of energies and wave functions qualitatively the same for all chaotic nuclei. On the other hand, large structure effects are seen, e.g. in the level-density function at same excitation energies. A microscopic model for the level density is reviewed and we discuss effects on structure of the total level-density function, parity enhancement, and the spin distribution function. Comparisons to data are performed at the neutron separation energy for all observed nuclei, and structure of the level-density function for a few measured cases. The role of structure effects in the level-density function for fission dynamics is exemplified.

  5. Hybrid-renewable processes for biofuels production: concentrated solar pyrolysis of biomass residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Anthe [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Geier, Manfred [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dedrick, Daniel E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The viability of thermochemically-derived biofuels can be greatly enhanced by reducing the process parasitic energy loads. Integrating renewable power into biofuels production is one method by which these efficiency drains can be eliminated. There are a variety of such potentially viable "hybrid-renewable" approaches; one is to integrate concentrated solar power (CSP) to power biomass-to-liquid fuels (BTL) processes. Barriers to CSP integration into BTL processes are predominantly the lack of fundamental kinetic and mass transport data to enable appropriate systems analysis and reactor design. A novel design for the reactor has been created that can allow biomass particles to be suspended in a flow gas, and be irradiated with a simulated solar flux. Pyrolysis conditions were investigated and a comparison between solar and non-solar biomass pyrolysis was conducted in terms of product distributions and pyrolysis oil quality. A novel method was developed to analyse pyrolysis products, and investigate their stability.

  6. Bioethanol production from residual lignocellulosic materials: A review – Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTIAN-TEODOR BURUIANA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic materials (LCM are produced in large quantities and without clear application and their use as raw material for bioethanol production shows economic and ecologic benefits. LCM are composed mainly of three polymers: cellulose made up of glucose units, hemicellulose made up of several sugars (as xylose or arabinose, and lignin made up of phenylpropane units, interconnected in a strong structure. Pretreatment is an important step for bioethanol production from LCM, causing the solubilisation of hemicellulosic fraction (leading to the recovery of hemicellulose-derived saccharides in order to obtain a solid phase enriched in cellulose and more susceptible to enzymatic attack. This study provides a comparative data regarding the chemical composition of various LCM used for bioethanol production, as well as different pretreatment technologies for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of LCM.

  7. Dietary risk ranking for residual antibiotics in cultured aquatic products around Tai Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chao; Li, Le; Zhang, Cong; Qiu, Liping; Fan, Limin; Wu, Wei; Meng, Shunlong; Hu, Gengdong; Chen, Jiazhang; Liu, Ying; Mao, Aimin

    2017-10-01

    Antibiotics are widely used in aquaculture and therefore may be present as a dietary risk in cultured aquatic products. Using the Tai Lake Basin as a study area, we assessed the presence of 15 antibiotics in 5 widely cultured aquatic species using a newly developed dietary risk ranking approach. By assigning scores to each factor involved in the ranking matrices, the scores of dietary risks per antibiotic and per aquatic species were calculated. The results indicated that fluoroquinolone antibiotics posed the highest dietary risk in all aquatic species. Then, the total scores per aquatic species were summed by all 15 antibiotic scores of antibiotics, it was found that Crab (Eriocheir sinensis) had the highest dietary risks. Finally, the most concerned antibiotic category and aquatic species were selected. This study highlighted the importance of dietary risk ranking in the production and consumption of cultured aquatic products around Tai Lake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Review on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for sulfonamide residues in edible animal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Wang, Shuo

    2009-10-31

    The current status of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for sulfonamides in edible animal products is reviewed. The attention was focused on the design and synthesis of haptens, conjugation to carrier protein, production of antibody, application of homologous and heterologous systems, as well as the molecular modeling of the haptens and sulfonamides. Researches have shown that sulfonamides seem to be particularly resistant to attempts to produce broad specificity antibodies. By summarizing the available research on sulfonamide ELISAs, it is hoped that it can be considered as a basis for further investigation aimed at developing the most efficient approaches for detection.

  9. [Pretreatment of oil palm residues by dilute alkali for cellulosic ethanol production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Zhou, Yujie; Li, Jinping; Dai, Lingmei; Liu, Dehua; Zhang, Jian'an; Choo, Yuen May; Loh, Soh Kheang

    2013-04-01

    In the study, we used oil palm residues (empty fruit bunch, EFB) as raw material to produce cellulosic ethanol by pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. Firstly, the pretreatment of EFB with alkali, alkali/hydrogen peroxide and the effects on the components and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose were studied. The results show that dilute alkali was the suitable pretreatment method and the conditions were first to soak the substrate with 1% sodium hydroxide with a solid-liquid ratio of 1:10 at 40 degrees C for 24 h, and then subjected to 121 degrees C for 30 min. Under the conditions, EFB solid recovery was 74.09%, and glucan, xylan and lignin content were 44.08%, 25.74% and 13.89%, respectively. After separated with alkali solution, the pretreated EFB was washed and hydrolyzed for 72 h with 5% substrate concentration and 30 FPU/g dry mass (DM) enzyme loading, and the conversion of glucan and xylan reached 84.44% and 89.28%, respectively. We further investigated the effects of substrate concentration and enzyme loading on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). The results show that when enzyme loading was 30 FPU/g DM and substrate concentration was increased from 5% to 25%, ethanol concentration were 9.76 g/L and 35.25 g/L after 72 h fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (inoculum size 5%, V/V), which was 79.09% and 56.96% of ethanol theory yield.

  10. Life cycle assessment of innovative technology for energy production from automotive shredder residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Caterina; Masoni, Paolo; Salvati, Fabio; Tolve, Pietro

    2015-07-01

    Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR) is a problematic waste material remaining after shredding and recovery processes of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs). Its heterogeneous grain size and composition make difficult its recovery or disposal. Although ASR accounts for approximately 20% to 25% of the weight of an ELV, the European Union (EU)'s ELV Directive (2000/53/EC) requires that by 2015 a minimum 95% of the weight of an ELV must be reused or recovered, including a 10% weight energy recovery. The quantity of ASR is relevant: Approximately 2.4 million tons are generated in the EU each year and most of it is sent to landfills. This article describes a life cycle model of the "TEKNE-Fluff" process designed to make beneficial use of ASR that is based on the results of an experimental pilot plant for pyro-gasification, combustion, cogeneration, and emissions treatment of ASR. The goal of the research was the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology to identify the environmental hot spots of the "TEKNE system" and use scenario analysis to check solutions to improve its environmental profile, supporting the design and industrialization process. The LCA was conducted based on data modeled from the experimental campaign. Moreover, different scenarios on shares of electricity and thermal energy produced by the cogeneration system and alternative treatment processes for the waste produced by the technology were compared. Despite the limitation of the research (results based on scaling up experimental data by modeling), impact assessment results are promising and sufficiently robust, as shown by Monte Carlo analysis. The TEKNE technology may become an interesting solution for the problem of ASR management: Besides representing an alternative to landfill disposal, the energy produced could avoid significant impacts on fossil resources depletion (a plant of 40,000 tons/y capacity could produce ∼ 147,000 GJ/yr, covering the annual need of ∼ 13,500 households). © 2015

  11. Probabilistic risk assessment of exposure to leucomalachite green residues from fish products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yung-Lin; Chimeddulam, Dalaijamts; Sheen, Lee-Yan; Wu, Kuen-Yuh

    2013-12-01

    To assess the potential risk of human exposure to carcinogenic leucomalachite green (LMG) due to fish consumption, the probabilistic risk assessment was conducted for adolescent, adult and senior adult consumers in Taiwan. The residues of LMG with the mean concentration of 13.378±20.56 μg kg(-1) (BFDA, 2009) in fish was converted into dose, considering fish intake reported for three consumer groups by NAHSIT (1993-1996) and body weight of an average individual of the group. The lifetime average and high 95th percentile dietary intakes of LMG from fish consumption for Taiwanese consumers were estimated at up to 0.0135 and 0.0451 μg kg-bw(-1) day(-1), respectively. Human equivalent dose (HED) of 2.875 mg kg-bw(-1) day(-1) obtained from a lower-bound benchmark dose (BMDL10) in mice by interspecies extrapolation was linearly extrapolated to oral cancer slope factor (CSF) of 0.035 (mgkg-bw(-1)day(-1))(-1) for humans. Although, the assumptions and methods are different, the results of lifetime cancer risk varying from 3×10(-7) to 1.6×10(-6) were comparable to those of margin of exposures (MOEs) varying from 410,000 to 4,800,000. In conclusions, Taiwanese fish consumers with the 95th percentile LADD of LMG have greater risk of liver cancer and need to an action of risk management in Taiwan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anaerobic digestion of residues from production and refining of vegetable oils as an alternative to conventional solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrijos, M; Thalla, Arun Kumar; Sousbie, P; Bosque, F; Delgenès, J P

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the anaerobic digestion of by-products generated during the production and refining of oil with the objective of proposing an alternative solution (methanisation) to the conventional solutions while reducing the energy consumption of fossil origin on refinery sites. The production of sunflower oil was taken as example. Glycerine from the production of biodiesel was also included in this study. The results show that glycerine has a high potential for methanisation because of its high methane potential (465 ml CH4/g VS) and high metabolization rates (0.42 g VS/g VSS.d). The use of oil cake as substrate for anaerobic digestion is not interesting because it has a low methane potential of 215 ml CH4/g VS only and because it is easily recovered in animal feed. Six residues have quite a high methane potential (465 to 850 ml CH4/g VS) indicating a good potential for anaerobic digestion. However, they contain a mixture of rapidly and slowly biodegradable organic matter and the loading rates must remain quite low (0.03 to 0.09 g VS/g VSS.d) to prevent any accumulation of slowly biodegradable solids in the digesters. IWA Publishing 2008.

  13. Impact of residual elements on zinc quality in the production of zinc oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luptáková, Natália; Dymáček, Petr; Pešlová, F.; Jurkovič, Z.; Barborák, O.; Stodola, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2016), s. 407-410 ISSN 0543-5846 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : zinc * metallography * microstructure of zinc * zinc oxide * production of zinc oxide Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.959, year: 2014

  14. Production of polyhydroxyalcanoates (PHAs) using milk whey and dairy wastewater activated sludge production of bioplastics using dairy residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Francesca; Chiampo, Fulvia

    2010-04-01

    The production of polyhydroxyalcanoates (PHAs), which are biodegradable plastics, was studied using milk whey and dairy wastewater activated sludge to define a suitable C/N ratio, the pre-treatments required to reduce the protein content, and the effect of pH correction. The results show good production of PHAs at a C/N=50 and without pH correction. The use of dairy wastewater activated sludge has the advantage of not requiring aseptic conditions. Copyright 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Plant protection products and their residues : Aspects of consumer safety in context of the new EU regulations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasiak, U; Michalski, B; Pfeil, R; Solecki, R

    2010-06-01

    The law regulating plant protection products (PPP) in the European Union (EU) was fundamentally revised through the introduction of Regulation (EC) No. 1107/2009 which is due to enter into force on 14 June 2011. EU-wide harmonized maximum residue levels (MRLs) for the active substances of PPP in foods are laid down in Regulation (EC) No. 396/2005 and apply since entry into force of the regulation on 1 September 2008. The goal of both regulations is to strengthen the level of consumer protection. PPP are subject to a strict assessment of active substances, which is regulated at the EU level as well as an authorization procedure in the EU Member States. Prior to application for authorization of a PPP, the active substance(s) it contains must be included in a positive list. Tests regarding the toxicity and residue behavior of PPP must be conducted by the applicant, and the respective documents must be submitted to the authorities for evaluation. Following review of the required data, toxicological threshold values are derived, consumer exposure is assessed, and the risk to health is evaluated. The goal of this evaluation is to ensure that the use of PPP according to good plant protection practice does not have any harmful effects on human health.

  16. Utilization of HSC-ROSE residue as coking aid for the production of high quality coke from brown coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlmann, D.; Limmer, H.; Naundorf, W.; Hood, R.L.; Washimi, K. (VEB Petrolchemisches Kombinat, Schwedt (German Democratic Republic))

    1989-04-01

    Evaluates suitability of HSC-ROSE petroleum pitch as binder for production of brown coal coke. This pitch has been available in the GDR since installation in 1988 of a 750 kt/a HSC (high conversion soaker cracking) plant, which processes 360 C visbreaker residue from Soviet crude oil, and the building of a ROSE (residue oil supercritical reaction) plant. Laboratory as well as semi-industrial experiments were carried out at the Freiberg Academy, GDR on pulverizing, briquetting and coking various brown coal types with HSC-ROSE pitch. Briquetting and coking results are shown in tables. Experiments showed that the resulting coke has 124% higher compression strength and 100% higher abrasion strength than regular brown coal coke without HSC-ROSE binder. The high quality coke is adequate for use as metallurgical blast furnace coke. An economic assessment of modifying an existing brown coal coking plant to process 2 Mt/a brown coal with 10% pitch binder is made. Required investment amounts to 54 million US dollars, estimated annual profits based on 1987 prices are 19.5 million US dollars. 4 refs.

  17. Radii of nuclei off stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Kenzo

    1982-01-01

    An experiment is proposed to determine systematically the radii of the nuclei produced through the projectile fragmentation process in high energy heavy-ion collision. The measurement of total reaction cross section using the projectile fragments of a single nuclide on a target give information about nuclear radii. The production cross section of the fragments is appreciable for many nuclides. Therefore, it is possible to map systematically the reaction radii of the nuclei which can be produced as the projectile fragments. In an experiment using the projectile fragments as the incident beam, the cross section can be expressed as a function of the radii of a projectile and a target. An experiment with He-8 produced by the fragmentation of C-12 is proposed. The He-8 has four neutrons in the p-3/2 orbit outside the He-4 core. Proton and neutron distributions for He isotopes were calculated on the basis of the Hartree-Fock method. The information related to this kind of distribution can be obtained by the proposed experiment. The nuclear structure effect is seen in the nuclear radii of other unstable nuclei. The experimental examples of the isotope shift measurement and the excitation energy are presented. (Kato, T.)

  18. Solid biofuels production from agricultural residues and processing by-products by means of torrefaction treatment: the case of sunflower chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Duca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The high heterogeneity of some residual biomasses makes rather difficult their energy use. Their standardisation is going to be a key aspect to get good quality biofuels from those residues. Torrefaction is an interesting process to improve the physical and chemical properties of lignocellulosic biomasses and to achieve standardisation. In the present study torrefaction has been employed on residues and by-products deriving from sunflower production chain, in particular sunflower stalks, husks and oil press cake. The thermal behaviour of these materials has been studied at first by thermogravimetric analysis in order to identify torrefaction temperatures range. Afterwards, different residence time and torrefaction temperatures have been tested in a bench top torrefaction reactor. Analyses of raw and torrefied materials have been carried out to assess the influence of the treatment. As a consequence of torrefaction, the carbon and ash contents increase while the volatilisation range reduces making the material more stable and standardised. Mass yield, energy yield and energy densification reach values of about 60%, 80% and 1.33 for sunflower stalks and 64%, 85% and 1.33 for sunflower oil press cake respectively. As highlighted by the results, torrefaction is more interesting for sunflower stalks than oil cake and husks due to their different original characteristics. Untreated oil press cake and husks, in fact, already show a good high heating value and, for this reason, their torrefaction should be mild to avoid an excessive ash concentration. On the contrary, for sunflower stalks the treatment is more useful and could be more severe.

  19. Cost estimate for the production of ethanol from spent sulphite liquors and wood residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Q.

    1990-03-01

    A Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet model for estimating the production cost of 95 wt % ethanol from spent sulfite liquors (SSL) and from a wood hydrolysis front-end is described. The most economically attractive process is the fermentation of softwood SSL (SSSL) by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yielding a production cost estimate of $0.47/liter. The cost of producing ethanol from cellulosic waste (clarifier sludge) via acid hydrolysis is approximately $0.55/liter, still below the market price of ca $0.60/liter for industrial ethanol. Neither the fermentation of hardwood SSL nor the conversion of sawdust to ethanol, using current technology, are economically viable. However, these processes can become commercially viable if acetic acid-tolerant xylose-fermenting yeasts can be found. 17 refs., 12 figs., 16 tabs

  20. Bioethanol production from residual lignocellulosic materials: A review – Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTIAN-TEODOR BURUIANA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic material (LCM can be employed as feedstock for biorefineries, a concept related to industries designed to process biomass for producing chemicals, fuels and/or electrical power. According to this philosophy, LCM can be fractionated and the resulting fractions employed for specific applications. Bioethanol production from cellulosic fraction of LCM involves: hydrolysis of polysaccharides and fermentation of the monomers into bioethanol. Enzymatic hydrolysis is catalyzed by cellulolytic enzymes and fermentation is carried out by bacteria, yeasts or fungi. The main objective of this article is to review different process integration technologies for bioethanol production from LCM. This paper include: separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF, and simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF methods. Furthermore, the fermentation process and a comparative data of cellulases, hemicellulases and ethanol producing-microorganisms were presented.

  1. Phytostabilization of semiarid soils residually contaminated with trace elements using by-products: Sustainability and risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-de-Mora, Alfredo, E-mail: perezdemora@gmail.com [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (IRNAS), CSIC, PO Box 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Madejon, Paula; Burgos, Pilar; Cabrera, Francisco [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (IRNAS), CSIC, PO Box 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Lepp, Nicholas W. [35, Victoria Road, Formby, Liverpool L37 7DH (United Kingdom); Madejon, Engracia [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia de Sevilla (IRNAS), CSIC, PO Box 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    We investigated the efficiency of various by-products (sugarbeet lime, biosolid compost and leonardite), based on single or repeated applications to field plots, on the establishment of a vegetation cover compatible with a stabilization strategy on a multi-element (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) contaminated soil 4-6 years after initial amendment applications. Results indicate that the need for re-treatment is amendment- and element-dependent; in some cases, a single application may reduce trace element concentrations in above-ground biomass and enhance the establishment of a healthy vegetation cover. Amendment performance as evaluated by % cover, biomass and number of colonizing taxa differs; however, changes in plant community composition are not necessarily amendment-specific. Although the translocation of trace elements to the plant biotic compartment is greater in re-vegetated areas, overall loss of trace elements due to soil erosion and plant uptake is usually smaller compared to that in bare soil. - Highlights: > By-products enhance vegetation dynamics in contaminated semiarid soils. > Depending on the situation single or repeated incorporations may be required. > The structure of the plant community established is not amendment-dependent. > Phytostabilization reduces overall loss of trace elements in semiarid soils. - Phytostabilization using by-products as amendments is a suitable approach for long-term immobilization of various trace elements in semiarid contaminated soils.

  2. Phytostabilization of semiarid soils residually contaminated with trace elements using by-products: Sustainability and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Madejon, Paula; Burgos, Pilar; Cabrera, Francisco; Lepp, Nicholas W.; Madejon, Engracia

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of various by-products (sugarbeet lime, biosolid compost and leonardite), based on single or repeated applications to field plots, on the establishment of a vegetation cover compatible with a stabilization strategy on a multi-element (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) contaminated soil 4-6 years after initial amendment applications. Results indicate that the need for re-treatment is amendment- and element-dependent; in some cases, a single application may reduce trace element concentrations in above-ground biomass and enhance the establishment of a healthy vegetation cover. Amendment performance as evaluated by % cover, biomass and number of colonizing taxa differs; however, changes in plant community composition are not necessarily amendment-specific. Although the translocation of trace elements to the plant biotic compartment is greater in re-vegetated areas, overall loss of trace elements due to soil erosion and plant uptake is usually smaller compared to that in bare soil. - Highlights: → By-products enhance vegetation dynamics in contaminated semiarid soils. → Depending on the situation single or repeated incorporations may be required. → The structure of the plant community established is not amendment-dependent. → Phytostabilization reduces overall loss of trace elements in semiarid soils. - Phytostabilization using by-products as amendments is a suitable approach for long-term immobilization of various trace elements in semiarid contaminated soils.

  3. Stopped pion absorption by medium and heavy nuclei in the cascade-exciton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashnik, S.G.

    1992-03-01

    A large variety of experimental data on stopped negative pion absorption by nuclei from C to Bi (energy spectra and multiplicities of n, p, d, t, 3 He and 4 He; angular correlations of two secondary particles; spectra of the energy release in the ''live'' 28 Si target on recording protons, deuterons and tritons in the energy range 40-70 MeV, 30-60 MeV and 30-50 MeV, respectively; isotope yields; momentum and angular momentum distributions of residual nuclei) are analyzed within the framework of the cascade-exciton model of nuclear reactions. Comparison is made with other up-to-date models of the process. The contributions of different pion absorption mechanisms and the relative role of different particle production mechanisms in these reactions are discussed. (author). 59 refs, 13 figs, 4 tabs

  4. Evaluation of Mediterranean Agricultural Residues as a Potential Feedstock for the Production of Biogas via Anaerobic Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsos, Christos; Matsakas, Leonidas; Triantafyllidis, Kostas; Rova, Ulrika; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal, dilute acid, and steam explosion pretreatment methods, were evaluated for their efficiency to improve the methane production yield of three Mediterranean agricultural lignocellulosic residues such as olive tree pruning, grapevine pruning, and almond shells. Hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreatments provided low to moderate increase in the digestibility of the biomass samples, whereas steam explosion enabled the highest methane yields to be achieved for almond shells at 232.2 ± 13.0 mL CH4/gVS and olive pruning at 315.4 ± 0.0 mL CH4/gVS. Introduction of an enzymatic prehydrolysis step moderately improved methane yields for hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreated samples but not for the steam exploded ones.

  5. Evaluation of Mediterranean Agricultural Residues as a Potential Feedstock for the Production of Biogas via Anaerobic Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Nitsos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal, dilute acid, and steam explosion pretreatment methods, were evaluated for their efficiency to improve the methane production yield of three Mediterranean agricultural lignocellulosic residues such as olive tree pruning, grapevine pruning, and almond shells. Hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreatments provided low to moderate increase in the digestibility of the biomass samples, whereas steam explosion enabled the highest methane yields to be achieved for almond shells at 232.2 ± 13.0 mL CH4/gVS and olive pruning at 315.4 ± 0.0 mL CH4/gVS. Introduction of an enzymatic prehydrolysis step moderately improved methane yields for hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreated samples but not for the steam exploded ones.

  6. Validation of a standard field test method in four countries to assess the toxicity of residues in dung of cattle treated with veterinary medical products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floate, Kevin D.; Düring, Rolf Alexander; Hanafi, Jamal; Jud, Priska; Lahr, Joost; Lumaret, Jean Pierre; Scheffczyk, Adam; Tixier, Thomas; Wohde, Manuel; Römbke, Jörg; Sautot, Lucille; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U.

    2016-01-01

    Registration of veterinary medical products includes the provision that field tests may be required to assess potential nontarget effects associated with the excretion of product residues in dung of treated livestock (phase II, tier B testing). However, regulatory agencies provide no guidance on

  7. Surplus electricity production in sugarcane mills using residual bagasse and straw as fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Moises; Ponce, Gustavo H.S.F.; Silva, Maria Aparecida; Ensinas, Adriano V.

    2015-01-01

    The cogeneration system is one of the most important parts of sugarcane mills which use the bagasse as fuel. In the recent years, modern equipments and energy efficiency measures made possible to the sugarcane industry, the production of surplus electricity which become, besides the sugar and ethanol, a third product from the same renewable source, the sugarcane. This work analyses the surplus electric power systems for three different schemes of cogeneration system in the sugarcane industry through the simulator Thermoflow"®. The analysis is made considering both the available bagasse and sugarcane straw recovery as fuel in three different scenarios for the industrial process energy requirements. The results show that the CEST (Condensing Extraction Steam Turbine) system can have a surplus of electricity of up to four times higher than the BPST (Backpressure Steam Turbine) system. The system CEST can have an increase in surplus power above 23% and 102% for the rate of 10% and 50% of cane straw recovery in the field respectively. The BPST-C (Backpressure and Condensing Turbines) system can produce similar values of surplus electricity when compared with the system CEST, but may represent an opportunity of flexible operation of the cogeneration systems in harvest and off-seasons. - Highlights: • At least three cogeneration system options are available in sugarcane mills. • Nowadays, only steam-based cycle cogeneration systems are used in sugarcane mills. • BPST system is limited to 70 e kWh/t cane of surplus electricity production. • CEST system increases the surplus electricity up to four times than the BPST. • Operation during off-season of the BPST-C system is an advantage for this option.

  8. Contamination Detection and Mitigation Strategies for Unsymmetric Dimethylhydrazine/Nitrogen Tetroxide Non-Combustion Product Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Benjamin; Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Baker, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Dimethylamine and nitrite, which are non-combustion reaction products of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, can contaminate spacesuits during extra-vehicular activity (EVA) operations. They can react with water in the International Space Station (ISS) airlock to form N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a carcinogen. Detection methods for assessing nitrite and dimethylamine contamination were investigated. The methods are based on color-forming reactions in which intensity of color is proportional to concentration. A concept color detection kit using a commercially available presumptive field test for methamphetamine coupled with nitrite test strips was developed and used to detect dimethylamine and nitrite. Contamination mitigation strategies were also developed.

  9. Lipid Production of Heterotrophic Chlorella sp. from Hydrolysate Mixtures of Lipid-Extracted Microalgal Biomass Residues and Molasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongli; Ma, Xiaochen; Gao, Zhen; Wan, Yiqin; Min, Min; Zhou, Wenguang; Li, Yun; Liu, Yuhuan; Huang, He; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of lipid production of Chlorella sp. from waste materials. Lipid-extracted microalgal biomass residues (LMBRs) and molasses were hydrolyzed, and their hydrolysates were analyzed. Five different hydrolysate mixture ratios (w/w) of LMBRs/molasses (1/0, 1/1, 1/4, 1/9, and 0/1) were used to cultivate Chlorella sp. The results showed that carbohydrate and protein were the two main compounds in the LMBRs, and carbohydrate was the main compound in the molasses. The highest biomass concentration of 5.58 g/L, Y biomass/sugars of 0.59 g/g, lipid productivity of 335 mg/L/day, and Y lipids/sugars of 0.25 g/g were obtained at the hydrolysate mixture ratio of LMBRs/molasses of 1/4. High C/N ratio promoted the conversion of sugars into lipids. The lipids extracted from Chlorella sp. shared similar lipid profile of soybean oil and is therefore a potential viable biodiesel feedstock. These results showed that Chlorella sp. can utilize mixed sugars and amino acids from LMBRs and molasses to accumulate lipids efficiently, thus reducing the cost of microalgal biodiesel production and improving its economic viability.

  10. A mechanism for corrosion product deposition on the carbon steel piping in the residual heat removal system of BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Motohiro; Chiba, Yoshinori; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Ishizawa, Noboru

    2002-01-01

    The dose rate of the residual heat removal (RHR) piping has been considered to be caused by accumulation of insoluble (crud) radioactive corrosion products on carbon steel surfaces. Soft shutdown procedures (i.e., plant shutdown with moderate coolant temperature reduction rate) used to be applied to reduce crud radioactivity release from the fuel surface, but these are no longer used because of the need for shorter plant shutdown times. In order to apply other suitable countermeasures to reduce RHR dose rate, assessment of plant data, experiments on deposition of crud and ion species on carbon steel, and mass balance evaluation of radioactive corrosion products based on plant and laboratory data were carried out and the following findings were made. (1) Deposits of ion species on carbon steel surfaces of the RHR piping was much more numerous than for crud. (2) Ion species accumulation behavior on RHR piping, which is temperature dependent, can be evaluated with the calculation model used for the dehydration reaction of corrosion products generated during the wet lay-up period. (3) Deposition amounts could be reduced to 1/2.5 when the starting RHR system operation temperature was lowered from 155degC to 120degC. (author)

  11. Techno-economic Assessment of Integrated Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Combined Heat and Power Production from Lignocellulose Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Magdeldin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Waste biomass as a mean for global carbon dioxide emissions mitigation remains under-utilized. This is mainly due to the low calorific value of virgin feedstock, characterized generally with high moisture content. Aqueous processing, namely hydrothermal liquefaction in subcritical water conditions, has been demonstrated experimentally to thermally densify solid lignocellulose into liquid fuels without the pre-requisite and energy consuming drying step. This study presents a techno-economic evaluation of an integrated hydrothermal liquefaction system with downstream combined heat and power production from forest residues. The utilization of the liquefaction by-products and waste heat from the elevated processing conditions, coupled with the chemical upgrading of the feedstock enables the poly-generation of biocrude, electricity and district heat. The plant thermal efficiency increases by 3.5 to 4.6% compared to the conventional direct combustion case. The economic assessment showed that the minimum selling price of biocrude, based on present co-products market prices, hinders commercialization and ranges between 138 EUR to 178 EUR per MWh. A sensitivity analysis and detailed discussion on the techno-economic assessment results are presented for the different process integration and market case scenarios.

  12. Treatment of waste incinerator air-pollution-control residues with FeSO4: Concept and product characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtorp, Kasper; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a new concept for treatment of air- pollution-control (APC) residues from waste incineration and characterises the wastewater and stabilised residues generated by the process. The process involves mixing of APC-residues with a ferrous sulphate solution and subsequent oxidation...

  13. Hydroponic potato production on nutrients derived from anaerobically-processed potato plant residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Garland, J. L.; Finger, B. W.; Ruffe, L. M.

    1997-01-01

    Bioregenerative methods are being developed for recycling plant minerals from harvested inedible biomass as part of NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) research. Anaerobic processing produces secondary metabolites, a food source for yeast production, while providing a source of water soluble nutrients for plant growth. Since NH_4-N is the nitrogen product, processing the effluent through a nitrification reactor was used to convert this to NO_3-N, a more acceptable form for plants. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cv. Norland plants were used to test the effects of anaerobically-produced effluent after processing through a yeast reactor or nitrification reactor. These treatments were compared to a mixed-N treatment (75:25, NO_3:NH_4) or a NO_3-N control, both containing only reagent-grade salts. Plant growth and tuber yields were greatest in the NO_3-N control and yeast reactor effluent treatments, which is noteworthy, considering the yeast reactor treatment had high organic loading in the nutrient solution and concomitant microbial activity.

  14. Jatropha curcas, L. Pruning Residues for Energy: Characteristics of an Untapped By-Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Pari

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha (Jatropha curcas, L. is an energy crop mainly cultivated for the oil-seed, and the oil is usually used as bio-fuel. However, few studies have reported information about the utilization of the wood as a fuel for boiler heating systems. With 2500 jatropha trees per hectare, it is possible to produce about 3 t·ha−1·y−1 of woody biomass from pruning. In addition, jatropha trees are commonly cut down to a height of 45 cm once every 10 years, with a production of 80 t·ha−1 of dry matter of woody biomass. The use of this biomass has not yet been investigated. During the European project JatroMed, woody biomass from jatropha pruning was collected in Morocco. Chemical and physical characteristics of the wood were conducted according to UNI EN ISO standards. The following jatropha wood characteristics have been analyzed: Moisture and ash contents, the ash melting point, heating value, and concentrations of C, H, N, and S. This research focused on the evaluation of the potential use of jatropha pruning for energy production, and the results represent critical data that is useful for future studies and business potential.

  15. Divergence for residual feed intake of Holstein-Friesian cattle during growth did not affect production and reproduction during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, K A; Thomson, B P; Waghorn, G C

    2016-11-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI) is the difference between actual and predicted dry matter intake (DMI) of individual animals. Recent studies with Holstein-Friesian calves have identified an ~20% difference in RFI during growth (calf RFI) and these groups remained divergent in RFI during lactation. The objective of the experiment described here was to determine if cows selected for divergent RFI as calves differed in milk production, reproduction or in the profiles of BW and body condition score (BCS) change during lactation, when grazing pasture. The cows used in the experiment (n=126) had an RFI of -0.88 and +0.75 kg DM intake/day for growth as calves (efficient and inefficient calf RFI groups, respectively) and were intensively grazed at four stocking rates (SR) of 2.2, 2.6, 3.1 and 3.6 cows/ha on self-contained farmlets, over 3 years. Each SR treatment had equal number of cows identified as low and high calf RFI, with 24, 28, 34 and 40/11 ha farmlet. The cows divergent for calf RFI were randomly allocated to each SR. Although SR affected production, calf RFI group (low or high) did not affect milk production, reproduction, BW, BCS or changes in these parameters throughout lactation. The most efficient animals (low calf RFI) lost similar BW and BCS as the least efficient (high calf RFI) immediately post-calving, and regained similar BW and BCS before their next calving. These results indicate that selection for RFI as calves to increase efficiency of feed utilisation did not negatively affect farm productivity variables (milk production, BCS, BW and reproduction) as adults when managed under an intensive pastoral grazing system.

  16. Cosmology and unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1995-01-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis has established itself as one of the three pillars of Big Bang cosmology. Many of the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis reactions involve unstable nuclei. Hence there is a tight relationship hetween the subject of this conference and cosmology. The prime role of unstable nuclei in cosmology is related to lithium synthesis and the lack of cosmological synthesis of Be and B. These nuclei will thus be focused upon. Nucleosynthesis involves comparing calculated abundances with observed abundances. In general, abundance determinations are dominated by systematic rather than statistical errors, and work on bounding systematics is crucial. The quark-hadron inspired inhomogeneous calculations now unanimously agree that only relatively small variations in Ω b are possible vis-a-vis the homogeneous model; hence the robustness of Ω b ∼0.05 is now apparent. (These calculations depend critically on unstable nuclei.) The above argues that the bulk of the baryons in the universe are not producing visible light. A comparison with the ROSAT cluster data is also shown to be consistent with the standard BBN model. Ω b ∼1 seems to be definitely excluded, so if Ω TOTAL =1, as some recent observations may hint, then non-baryonic dark matter is required. The implications of the recently reported halo microlensing events are discussed. In summary, it is argued that the physics of unstable nuclei affects the fundamental dark matter argument. ((orig.))

  17. Quest for superheavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heenen, P.H. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Physique Nucleaire Theorique (Belgium); Nazarewicz, W. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Teoretycznej

    2002-02-01

    This article draws the long history of the discovery of new heavy nuclei since its beginning in 1940 when neptunium was found, and presents the current status of research in this field. The last 3 years have brought a number of experimental surprises which have truly rejuvenated the field. In January 1999, scientists from Dubna (Russia) reported the synthesis of 1 atom of element 114 ({sup 298}Uuq) in a hot fusion reaction between a {sup 48}Ca beam and a {sup 244}Pu target. This discovery was followed by 3 other reports from Dubna. First using the {sup 242}Pu({sup 48}Ca,3n) reaction, they produced {sup 287}Uuq. In 1999 the synthesis of another isotope of Z=114, the even-even {sup 288}Uuq was reported. The element Z=116 ({sup 292}Uuh) was discovered as a product of the {sup 248}Cm({sup 48}Ca,4n) reaction. The GSI (Germany) group found a new even isotope of the element 110: {sup 270}Uun and also {sup 272}Uuu (element 111) and {sup 277}Uub (element 112). 2 new isotopes of the element 107: {sup 266}Bh and {sup 267}Bh have been found at Berkeley (Usa). The synthesis of the new element Z=118 ({sup 293}Uuo) announced in 1999 by the Berkeley group was retracted 2 years later. The lifetimes reported for the elements {sup 284}Uub and {sup 280}Uun are by many orders of magnitude longer than those of the isotopes with Z{<=}112 previously discovered at GSI. (A.C.)

  18. Isotopic yields and kinetic energies of primary residues in 1 A GeV 208Pb + p reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, T.; Wlazlo, W.; Armbruster, P.

    2000-09-01

    The production of primary residual nuclei in the reaction 1 A GeV 208 Pb on proton has been studied by measuring isotopic distributions for all elements from titanium (Z=22) to lead (Z=82). Kinematical properties of the residues were also determined and used to disentangle the relevant reaction mechanisms, spallation (projectile fragmentation) and fission. The fragment separator FRS at GSI, Darmstadt, was used to separate and identify the reaction products. The measured production cross sections are highly relevant for the design of accelerator-driven subcritical reactors and for the planning of future radioactive-beam facilities. (orig.)

  19. Tetracycline residues and tetracycline resistance genes in groundwater impacted by swine production facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, R.I.; Koike, S.; Krapac, I.; Chee-Sanford, J.; Maxwell, Susan; Aminov, R.I.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotics are used at therapeutic levels to treat disease; at slightly lower levels as prophylactics; and at low, subtherapeutic levels for growth promotion and improvement of feed efficiency. Over 88% of swine producers in the United States gave antimicrobials to grower/finisher pigs in feed as a growth promoter in 2000. It is estimated that ca. 75% of antibiotics are not absorbed by animals and are excreted in urine and feces. The extensive use of antibiotics in swine production has resulted in antibiotic resistance in many intestinal bacteria, which are also excreted in swine feces, resulting in dissemination of resistance genes into the environment.To assess the impact of manure management on groundwater quality, groundwater samples have been collected near two swine confinement facilities that use lagoons for manure storage and treatment. Several key contaminant indicators-including inorganic ions, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance genes-were analyzed in groundwater collected from the monitoring wells. Chloride, ammonium, potassium, and sodium were predominant inorganic constituents in the manure samples and served as indicators of groundwater contamination. Based on these analyses, shallow groundwater has been impacted by lagoon seepage at both sites. Liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) was used to measure the dissolved concentrations of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, and oxytetracycline in groundwater and manure. Although tetracyclines were regularly used at both facilities, they were infrequently detected in manure samples and then at relatively trace concentrations. Concentrations of all tetracyclines and their breakdown products in the groundwater sampled were generally less than 0.5 ??g/L.Bacterial tetracycline resistance genes served as distinct genotypic markers to indicate the dissemination and mobility of antibiotic resistance genes that originated from the lagoons. Applying PCR to genomic DNA extracted from the lagoon and

  20. Multifamily determination of pesticide residues in soya-based nutraceutical products by GC/MS-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páleníková, Agneša; Martínez-Domínguez, Gerardo; Arrebola, Francisco Javier; Romero-González, Roberto; Hrouzková, Svetlana; Frenich, Antonia Garrido

    2015-04-15

    An analytical method based on a modified QuEChERS extraction coupled with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was evaluated for the determination of 177 pesticides in soya-based nutraceutical products. The QuEChERS method was optimised and different extraction solvents and clean-up approaches were tested, obtaining the most efficient conditions with a mixture of sorbents (PSA, C18, GBC and Zr-Sep(+)). Recoveries were evaluated at 10, 50 and 100 μg/kg and ranged between 70% and 120%. Precision was expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), and it was evaluated for more than 160 pesticides as intra and inter-day precision, with values always below 20% and 25%, respectively. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.1 to 10 μg/kg, whereas limits of quantification (LOQs) from 0.5 to 20 μg/kg. The applicability of the method was proved by analysing soya-based nutraceuticals. Two pesticides were found in these samples, malathion and pyriproxyfen, at 11.1 and 1.5 μg/kg respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.