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Sample records for residual hsv dna

  1. HSV-I and the cellular DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samantha; Weller, Sandra K

    2015-04-01

    Peter Wildy first observed genetic recombination between strains of HSV in 1955. At the time, knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms was limited, and it has only been in the last decade that particular DNA damage response (DDR) pathways have been examined in the context of viral infections. One of the first reports addressing the interaction between a cellular DDR protein and HSV-1 was the observation by Lees-Miller et al . that DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit levels were depleted in an ICP0-dependent manner during Herpes simplex virus 1 infection. Since then, there have been numerous reports describing the interactions between HSV infection and cellular DDR pathways. Due to space limitations, this review will focus predominantly on the most recent observations regarding how HSV navigates a potentially hostile environment to replicate its genome.

  2. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice

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    Hongzhi Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP. However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6 and Hegu (LI4 in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP.

  3. False-negative type-specific glycoprotein G antibody responses in STI clinic patients with recurrent HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNA positive genital herpes, The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooijen, Martijn S; Roest, Wim; Hansen, Gino; Kwa, David; de Vries, Henry J C

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-discriminating antibody tests (glycoprotein G (gG) directed) are used to identify naïve persons and differentiate acute infections from recurrences. We studied test characteristics of three commercially available antibody tests in patients with recurrent (established by viral PCR tests) herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital herpes episodes. Serum samples (at minimum 3 months after t=0) were examined for the presence of gG-1-specific or gG-2-specific antibodies using the HerpeSelect 1 and 2 Immunoblot IgG, the HerpeSelect 1 and 2 enzyme linked immunoassays IgG and the LIAISON HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgG indirect chemiluminescence immunoassays. The immunoblot was HSV-1 positive in 70.6% (95% CI 44.0% to 89.7%), the LIAISON in 88.2% (95% CI 63.5% to 98.5%) and the ELISA in 82.4% (95% CI 56.6% to 96.2%) of the 17 patients with a recurrent HSV-1 episode. From 33 patients with a recurrent HSV-2 episode, the immunoblot was HSV-2 positive in 84.8% (95% CI 68.1% to 94.9%), the LIAISON in 69.7% (95% CI 51.3% to 84.4%) and the ELISA in 84.8% (95% CI 68.1% to 94.9%). Among 15/17 (88.2%; 95% CI 63.5% to 98.5%) patients with HSV-1 and 30/33 (90.1%; 95% CI 75.7% to 98.1%) patients with HSV-2, HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibodies, respectively, were detected in at least one of the three antibody tests. Commercial type-specific gG HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibody assays were false negative in 12-30% of patients with recurrent HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNA positive genital lesions. The clinical and epidemiological use of type-specific HSV serology can be hampered by false-negative results, especially if based on a single test. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Characterization of Wild-type and Temperature Sensitive Mutants of HSV-1 DNA Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-15

    serum; PEI, polyethyleneimine; DEAE, diethylaminomethyl; DEAE-T~M, DEAE-Trisacryl-M chromatography resin; HAP, Hydroxyapatite PC...is currently much interest in assigjing enzymatic activities to the five unidenti- fied gene products, anl ir purifying these products to determine...mM potassium phosphate. The final purification step i n this scheme was a hydroxyapatite column from which the HSV DNA poly- merase was eluted with

  5. Solid-to-fluid DNA transition inside HSV-1 capsid close to the temperature of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sae-Ueng, Udom; Li, Dong; Zuo, Xiaobing; Huffman, Jamie B.; Homa, Fred L.; Rau, Donald; Evilevitch, Alex

    2014-10-01

    DNA in the human Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid is packaged to a tight density. This leads to tens of atmospheres of internal pressure responsible for the delivery of the herpes genome into the cell nucleus. In this study we show that, despite its liquid crystalline state inside the capsid, the DNA is fluid-like, which facilitates its ejection into the cell nucleus during infection. We found that the sliding friction between closely packaged DNA strands, caused by interstrand repulsive interactions, is reduced by the ionic environment of epithelial cells and neurons susceptible to herpes infection. However, variations in the ionic conditions corresponding to neuronal activity can restrict DNA mobility in the capsid, making it more solid-like. This can inhibit intranuclear DNA release and interfere with viral replication. In addition, the temperature of the human host (37 °C) induces a disordering transition of the encapsidated herpes genome, which reduces interstrand interactions and provides genome mobility required for infection.

  6. Genital herpes evaluation by quantitative TaqMan PCR: correlating single detection and quantity of HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage fluids with cross-sectional and longitudinal clinical data

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    Cox Christopher

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the utility of a single quantitative PCR (qPCR measurement of HSV (HSV-1&2 DNA in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL specimens collected from women with predominantly chronic HSV-2 infection in assessing genital HSV shedding and the clinical course of genital herpes (GH within a cohort with semiannual schedule of follow up and collection of specimens. Methods Two previously described methods used for detection of HSV DNA in mucocutaneous swab samples were adapted for quantification of HSV DNA in CVLs. Single CVL specimens from 509 women were tested. Presence and quantity of CVL HSV DNA were explored in relation to observed cross-sectional and longitudinal clinical data. Results The PCR assay was sensitive and reproducible with a limit of quantification of ~50 copies per milliliter of CVL. Overall, 7% of the samples were positive for HSV-2 DNA with median log10 HSV-2 DNA copy number of 3.9 (IQR: 2.6-5.7. No HSV-1 was detected. Presence and quantity of HSV-2 DNA in CVL directly correlated with the clinical signs and symptoms of presence of active symptomatic disease with frequent recurrences. Conclusion Single qPCR measurement of HSV DNA in CVL fluids of women with chronic HSV-2 infection provided useful information for assessing GH in the setting of infrequent sampling of specimens. Observed positive correlation of the presence and quantity of HSV-2 DNA with the presence of active and more severe course of HSV-2 infection may have clinical significance in the evaluation and management of HSV-2 infected patients.

  7. Identity of zinc finger nucleases with specificity to herpes simplex virus type II genomic DNA: novel HSV-2 vaccine/therapy precursors

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    Wayengera Misaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex type II (HSV-2 is a member of the family herpesviridae. Human infection with this double stranded linear DNA virus causes genital ulcerative disease and existing treatment options only serve to resolve the symptomatology (ulcers associated with active HSV-2 infection but do not eliminate latent virus. As a result, infection with HSV-2 follows a life-long relapsing (active versus latent course. On the basis of a primitive bacterium anti-phage DNA defense, the restriction modification (R-M system, we previously identified the Escherichia coli restriction enzyme (REase EcoRII as a novel peptide to excise or irreversibly disrupt latent HSV-2 DNA from infected cells. However, sequences of the site specificity palindrome of EcoRII 5'-CCWGG-3' (W = A or T are equally present within the human genome and are a potential source of host-genome toxicity. This feature has limited previous HSV-2 EcoRII based therapeutic models to microbicides only, and highlights the need to engineer artificial REases (zinc finger nucleases-ZFNs with specificity to HSV-2 genomic-DNA only. Herein, the therapeutic-potential of zinc finger arrays (ZFAs and ZFNs is identified and modeled, with unique specificity to the HSV-2 genome. Methods and results Using the whole genome of HSV-2 strain HG52 (Dolan A et al.,, and with the ZFN-consortium's CoDA-ZiFiT software pre-set at default, more than 28,000 ZFAs with specificity to HSV-2 DNA were identified. Using computational assembly (through in-silico linkage to the Flavobacterium okeanokoites endonuclease Fok I of the type IIS class, 684 ZFNs with specificity to the HSV-2 genome, were constructed. Graphic-analysis of the HSV-2 genome-cleavage pattern using the afore-identified ZFNs revealed that the highest cleavage-incidence occurred within the 30,950 base-pairs (~between the genomic context coordinates 0.80 and 1.00 at the 3' end of the HSV-2 genome. At approximately 3,095 bp before and after the

  8. [Development of a novel real-time PCR method for detection of HSV types 1 and 2 DNA using HybProbe chemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzik, Emilia; Karabin, Karolina; Dzieciątkowski, Tomasz; Majewska, Anna; Przybylski, Maciej; Midak-Siewirska, Anna; Łuczak, Mirosław; Młynarczyk, Grazyna

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 are members of the Alphaherpesviridae subfamily, as they can infect both skin and nerves and develop latent infection within the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. Infections with these viruses are common worldwide and cause wide range of clinical syndromes. Although HSV-1/2 infect healthy children and adults, disease is more severe and extensive in the immunocompromised individuals and/or during neuroinfections. The aim of the study was development of real-time PCR assay for detection and differentiation of herpes simplex viruses type 1 and 2. DNA in clinical samples, using specific dual-channel HybProbe chemistry. The nalytical sensitivity of assay was tested using serial dilutions of HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA in range between 10 degrees and 10(-5). (4.35 x 10(5)-4.00 x 10(2) copies/ml and 4.18 x 10(5)-3.82 x 10(2) copies/ml, respectively). Thirty four cell line isolates and sixteen clinical samples taken from a group of adult patients with neurological signs were tested for the presence of HSV-1/2 DNA in the LightCycler instrument. Described in-house real-time PCR assay detected herpesviral DNA in all cell line isolates (31 of them were HSV-1 positive; 3 were HSV-2 positive) and in 10 clinical samples (positive only for HSV-1). The conclusion is that developed HybProbe-based real-time PCR test is very reliable and valuable tool for detection and differentiation of HSV-1/2 viremia in different kind of samples. The high level of sensitivity and accuracy provided by this assay is favorable for the quantification of herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 DNA in clinical specimens, especially during low-copy infections.

  9. False-negative type-specific glycoprotein G antibody responses in STI clinic patients with recurrent HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNA positive genital herpes, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, Martijn S.; Roest, Wim; Hansen, Gino; Kwa, David; de Vries, Henry J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-discriminating antibody tests (glycoprotein G (gG) directed) are used to identify naïve persons and differentiate acute infections from recurrences. We studied test characteristics of three commercially available antibody tests in patients with recurrent (established

  10. In vitro inactivation of Chlamydia trachomatis and of a panel of DNA (HSV-2, CMV, adenovirus, BK virus) and RNA (RSV, enterovirus) viruses by the spermicide benzalkonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélec, L; Tevi-Benissan, C; Bianchi, A; Cotigny, S; Beumont-Mauviel, M; Si-Mohamed, A; Malkin, J E

    2000-11-01

    Kinetics of inactivation by the detergent spermicide benzalkonium chloride (BZK) of Chlamydia trachomatis and of a panel of DNA viruses [herpes simplex virus hominis type 2 (HSV-2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), adenovirus (ADV) and BK virus (BKV)] and RNA [respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and enterovirus (ENV)] were established in accordance with a standardized in vitro protocol. After a 5 min incubation, inactivation of >95% of HSV-2 and CMV was obtained at a concentration of 0.0025% (w/v) (25 Ig/L); concentrations as low as 0.0005%, 0.0050% and 0.0125%, induced a 3.0 log10 reduction in infectivity of HSV-2 and CMV, RSV and ADV, respectively. After a 60 min incubation, concentrations of 0.0125% and 0.050% provided a 3.0 log10 reduction in infectivity of ENV and BKV, respectively. These features indicate that sensitivity to BZK was very high (HSV-2 and CMV) or high (RSV) for enveloped viruses, intermediate (ADV) or low (ENV and BKV) for non-enveloped viruses. Furthermore, BZK had marked antichlamydial activity, showing >99% killing after only a 1 min incubation at a concentration of 0.00125%. BZK demonstrates potent in vitro activity against the majority of microorganisms causing sexually transmitted infectious diseases, including those acting as major genital cofactors of human immunodeficiency virus transmission. These attributes qualify BZK as a particularly attractive candidate for microbicide development.

  11. A signal amplification assay for HSV type 1 viral DNA detection using nanoparticles and direct acoustic profiling

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    Hammond Richard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleic acid based recognition of viral sequences can be used together with label-free biosensors to provide rapid, accurate confirmation of viral infection. To enhance detection sensitivity, gold nanoparticles can be employed with mass-sensitive acoustic biosensors (such as a quartz crystal microbalance by either hybridising nanoparticle-oligonucleotide conjugates to complimentary surface-immobilised ssDNA probes on the sensor, or by using biotin-tagged target oligonucleotides bound to avidin-modified nanoparticles on the sensor. We have evaluated and refined these signal amplification assays for the detection from specific DNA sequences of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV type 1 and defined detection limits with a 16.5 MHz fundamental frequency thickness shear mode acoustic biosensor. Results In the study the performance of semi-homogeneous and homogeneous assay formats (suited to rapid, single step tests were evaluated utilising different diameter gold nanoparticles at varying DNA concentrations. Mathematical models were built to understand the effects of mass transport in the flow cell, the binding kinetics of targets to nanoparticles in solution, the packing geometries of targets on the nanoparticle, the packing of nanoparticles on the sensor surface and the effect of surface shear stiffness on the response of the acoustic sensor. This lead to the selection of optimised 15 nm nanoparticles that could be used with a 6 minute total assay time to achieve a limit of detection sensitivity of 5.2 × 10-12 M. Larger diameter nanoparticles gave poorer limits of detection than smaller particles. The limit of detection was three orders of magnitude lower than that observed using a hybridisation assay without nanoparticle signal amplification. Conclusions An analytical model was developed to determine optimal nanoparticle diameter, concentration and probe density, which allowed efficient and rapid optimisation of assay parameters

  12. DNA quantification of basidiomycetous fungi during storage of logging residues

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    Isabella Børja

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The demand for bioenergy caused an increased use of logging residues, branches and treetops that were previously left on the ground after harvesting. Residues are stored outdoors in piles and it is unclear to what extent fungi transform this material. Our objective was to quantify the amount of wood degrading fungi during storage using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR to detect basidiomycetous DNA in logging residues, a novel approach in this field. We found that the qPCR method was accurate in quantifying the fungal DNA during storage. As the moisture content of the piled logging residues decreased during the storage period, the fungal DNA content also decreased. Scots pine residues contained more fungal DNA than residues from Norway spruce. Loose piles had generally more fungal DNA than bundled ones.

  13. Inhibition of DNA virus: Herpes-1 (HSV-1 in cellular culture replication, through an antioxidant treatment extracted from rosemary spice

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    Dalva Assunção Portari Mancini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate antiviral properties in antioxidants from spices. Phenolic compounds extracted from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinallis, L by hot water, had their antioxidant activity determined by spectrophotometry using β carotene/linoleic acid system. The rosemary extract was evaluated by antiviral assay of Herpes Virus type-1 (HSV-1 replication in VERO cells, in the presence or absence of the spice. 10,000 TCID50/mL of the HSV-1 was kept for 3 h at 4º C, with 300 ppm of rosemary extract, and 100 ppm of butyl hydroxyl toluene (BHT. Then, these viruses were inoculated in VERO cells incubated at 37º C in CO2-5 %, for seven days. Daily, they were examined and the end point was based on 100% of CPE in virus control (without antioxidants. The HSV-1 replication inhibition percentage (IP measured the antiviral action from antioxidants, showing viral reductions of the 82.0, 82.5%, in the presence of rosemary and rosemary + BHT, respectively. As an extension, cell test corresponded to the similar viral decrease (IP = 85.0 and 86.3% in both aforementioned situations. Results lead to conclude that phenolic compounds from rosemary revealed an antiviral action on herpesvirus-1.Neste estudo foi avaliada a ação antiviral de antioxidantes de especiaria. Extrato aquoso de alecrim (Rosmarinus officinalis, L, que apresentou atividade antioxidante através de espectrofotometria usando o sistema β caroteno/ácido linoléico, foi avaliado em ensaios com vírus herpes-1 na replicação em células VERO. Nestes ensaios foram utilizados 10.000 TCID50%/mL do vírus HSV-1, mantidos em contato com 300 ppm do extrato de alecrim e com 100 ppm de butil hidroxi tolueno (BHT, durante 3h a 4°C. Esses vírus, em seguida, foram inoculados em células VERO incubadas a 37 °C/5% de CO2 por sete dias. Pelo efeito citopático (ECP e o "end point" de ECP do controle de vírus (sem antioxidante, foi possível observar que houve reduções na replicação viral de 82

  14. Identification of a divalent metal cation binding site in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP8 required for HSV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Kevin F; Yan, Zhipeng; Dreyfus, David H; Knipe, David M

    2012-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP8 is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that is necessary for viral DNA replication and exhibits recombinase activity in vitro. Alignment of the HSV-1 ICP8 amino acid sequence with ICP8 homologs from other herpesviruses revealed conserved aspartic acid (D) and glutamic acid (E) residues. Amino acid residue D1087 was conserved in every ICP8 homolog analyzed, indicating that it is likely critical for ICP8 function. We took a genetic approach to investigate the functions of the conserved ICP8 D and E residues in HSV-1 replication. The E1086A D1087A mutant form of ICP8 failed to support the replication of an ICP8 mutant virus in a complementation assay. E1086A D1087A mutant ICP8 bound DNA, albeit with reduced affinity, demonstrating that the protein is not globally misfolded. This mutant form of ICP8 was also recognized by a conformation-specific antibody, further indicating that its overall structure was intact. A recombinant virus expressing E1086A D1087A mutant ICP8 was defective in viral replication, viral DNA synthesis, and late gene expression in Vero cells. A class of enzymes called DDE recombinases utilize conserved D and E residues to coordinate divalent metal cations in their active sites. We investigated whether the conserved D and E residues in ICP8 were also required for binding metal cations and found that the E1086A D1087A mutant form of ICP8 exhibited altered divalent metal binding in an in vitro iron-induced cleavage assay. These results identify a novel divalent metal cation-binding site in ICP8 that is required for ICP8 functions during viral replication.

  15. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péré, Héléne; Rascanu, Aida; LeGoff, Jérome; Matta, Mathieu; Bois, Frédéric; Lortholary, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Launay, Odile; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of genital shedding of HSV-2 DNA was assessed in HIV-1-infected women taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV-1 RNA, HIV-1 DNA and HSV DNA loads were measured during 12-18 months using frozen plasma, PBMC and cervicovaginal lavage samples from 22 HIV-1-infected women, including 17 women naive for antiretroviral therapy initiating cART and 5 women with virological failure switching to a new regimen. Nineteen (86%) women were HSV-2-seropositive. Among HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women, HIV-1 RNA loads showed a rapid fall from baseline after one month of cART, in parallel in paired plasma and cervicovaginal secretions. In contrast, HIV-1 DNA loads did not show significant variations from baseline up to 18 months of treatment in both systemic and genital compartments. HSV DNA was detected at least once in 12 (63%) of 19 women during follow up: HSV-2 shedding in the genital compartment was observed in 11% of cervicovaginal samples at baseline and in 16% after initiating or switching cART. Cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA loads were strongly associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA loads over time, but not with cervicovaginal HSV DNA loads. Reactivation of genital HSV-2 replication frequently occurred despite effective cART in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women. Genital HSV-2 replication under cART does not influence cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA or DNA shedding. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Prediction of Active Site and Distal Residues in E. coli DNA Polymerase III alpha Polymerase Activity.

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    Parasuram, Ramya; Coulther, Timothy A; Hollander, Judith M; Keston-Smith, Elise; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Beuning, Penny J

    2018-02-20

    The process of DNA replication is carried out with high efficiency and accuracy by DNA polymerases. The replicative polymerase in E. coli is DNA Pol III, which is a complex of 10 different subunits that coordinates simultaneous replication on the leading and lagging strands. The 1160-residue Pol III alpha subunit is responsible for the polymerase activity and copies DNA accurately, making one error per 10 5 nucleotide incorporations. The goal of this research is to determine the residues that contribute to the activity of the polymerase subunit. Homology modeling and the computational methods of THEMATICS and POOL were used to predict functionally important amino acid residues through their computed chemical properties. Site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical assays were used to validate these predictions. Primer extension, steady-state single-nucleotide incorporation kinetics, and thermal denaturation assays were performed to understand the contribution of these residues to the function of the polymerase. This work shows that the top 15 residues predicted by POOL, a set that includes the three previously known catalytic aspartate residues, seven remote residues, plus five previously unexplored first-layer residues, are important for function. Six previously unidentified residues, R362, D405, K553, Y686, E688, and H760, are each essential to Pol III activity; three additional residues, Y340, R390, and K758, play important roles in activity.

  17. The use of permanganate as a sequencing reagent for identification of 5-methylcytosine residues in DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzsche, E; Hayatsu, H; Igloi, G L; Iida, S; Kössel, H

    1987-01-01

    The use of permanganate as a reagent for DNA sequencing by chemical degradation has been studied with respect to its specificity for 5-methylcytosine residues. At weakly acidic pH and room temperature, 0.2 mM potassium permanganate reacts preferentially with thymine, 5-methylcytosine, and to a lesser extent with purine residues, while cytosine remains essentially intact. Permanganate oxidation is, therefore, a suitable DNA sequencing reaction for positive discrimination between 5-methylcytosi...

  18. UV-C irradiation of HSV-1 infected fibroblasts (HSV-FS) enhances human natural killer (NK) cell activity against these targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettera, L.; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, P.

    1991-01-01

    Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene products has been bound to be sufficient for NK cell mediated lysis of HSV-1 infected FS. To block the targets at various stages in the infectious cycle, HSV-FS were irradiated with UV light for 1 min at 2, 6, and 20 hr post-infection. NK mediated lysis of 2 hr and 5 hr UV treated HSV-FS was 2-fold higher than non-UV treated HSV-FS despite a >99% inhibition in virus yield. In contrast, 20 hr infected targets were lysed less well than 2 and 6 hr targets despite strong glycoprotein expression and induction of high levels of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production by effector PBMC's; this lysis was not enhanced by UV treatment. Since NK lysis of HSV-FS has been found to be dependent on an HLA-DR + accessory cell (AC), lysis of irradiated HSV-FS by PBMC's depleted of AC was measured. Such depletion eradicated NK lysis of the UV treated HSV-FS indicating that irradiation does not overcome the AC requirement for NK lysis. UV irradiation of another HLA-DR + dependent target, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) infected FS led to a dramatic reduction in both NK lysis and IFN-α induction. HSV-1 is a DNA virus whose genes are expressed in a cascade fashion whereas VSV is an RNA virus. The authors hypothesize that the enhancement in AC dependent NK activity observed for UV irradiated HSV-FS, but not VSV-FS, targets is due to overproduction of either a cellular or viral gene product which specifically occurs early in the HSV-1 infectious cycle and is downregulated by 20 hr post-infection

  19. Correlation between residual level of DNA double-strand breaks and the radiosensitivity of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jianxiang; Sun Weijian; Sui Jianli; Zhou Pingkun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To understand the variation of the DNA double-strand break rejoining capacity among different cultured cancer cell lines and the primary cancer cells from brain cancer patients, and to explore the predictor of radiotherapy responses of cancers. Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were induced by 60 Co γ-irradiation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the initial production and rejoining of DNA DSBs. Radiosensitivity was determined by in vitro assay of clonogenic-forming capacity. Results: A wide variation of radiosensitivity, e.g. the survival parameter of Do varied from 0.65 to 2.15 Gy, was displayed among the eight cell lines derived from different type of cancers. Although differential level of initial DNA DSBs induced by 20 Gy γ-rays was observed among various cell lines, it was not correlated with the radiosensitivity. The deficiency of DNA DSB rejoining in radiosensitive cell lines was shown either in the early rapid-rejoining phase (SX-10 cells) or in the late slow-rejoining phase (A2780 cells). A significant relationship was observed between the residual level of DNA DSBs measured at 2 h post-20 Gy irradiation and the cellular radiosensitivity (D 0 or SF 2 ). The kinetic curves of rejoining DNA DSBs in the primary human brain tumor cells indicated a variation on DSB rejoining capacity among different individual tumor. The residual level of DNA DSBs after 2 h of rejoining post 20 Gy irradiation in primary human brain tumor cells is compatible to the results obtained in vitro culture cancer cell lines. Conclusions: The residual level of DNA DSBs is correlated with radioresistance of cancer cells, and the residual DNA damage is a useful parameter in predicting the response of tumor tissue to radiotherapy. (authors)

  20. Maternal Antiviral Immunoglobulin Accumulates in Neural Tissue of Neonates To Prevent HSV Neurological Disease

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    Yike Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While antibody responses to neurovirulent pathogens are critical for clearance, the extent to which antibodies access the nervous system to ameliorate infection is poorly understood. In this study on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1, we demonstrate that HSV-specific antibodies are present during HSV-1 latency in the nervous systems of both mice and humans. We show that antibody-secreting cells entered the trigeminal ganglion (TG, a key site of HSV infection, and persisted long after the establishment of latent infection. We also demonstrate the ability of passively administered IgG to enter the TG independently of infection, showing that the naive TG is accessible to antibodies. The translational implication of this finding is that human fetal neural tissue could contain HSV-specific maternally derived antibodies. Exploring this possibility, we observed HSV-specific IgG in HSV DNA-negative human fetal TG, suggesting passive transfer of maternal immunity into the prenatal nervous system. To further investigate the role of maternal antibodies in the neonatal nervous system, we established a murine model to demonstrate that maternal IgG can access and persist in neonatal TG. This maternal antibody not only prevented disseminated infection but also completely protected the neonate from neurological disease and death following HSV challenge. Maternal antibodies therefore have a potent protective role in the neonatal nervous system against HSV infection. These findings strongly support the concept that prevention of prenatal and neonatal neurotropic infections can be achieved through maternal immunization.

  1. Recurrent herpes labialis and HSV-1 herpes genitalis: which is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonte, Sergio; Sidoti, Francesca; Ribero, Simone; Dal Conte, Ivano; Curtoni, Antonio; Ciccarese, Giulia; Stroppiana, Elena; Stella, Maria L; Costa, Cristina; Cavallo, Rossana; Rebora, Alfredo; Drago, Francesco

    2017-02-08

    Recently, Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 seroprevalence declined among adolescents, rendering young people lacking HSV-1 antibodies more susceptible to genital HSV-1 acquisition, if sexually exposed. The aim of the present study was to identify the possible risk factors for the development of HSV-1 related herpes genitalis (HG). From January 2012 to December 2015, patients with HG attending three Sexually Transmitted Infections Units in Northern Italy were recruited. A genital swab on the lesions for the search of HSV-1/2 DNA through Real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a serum sample for HSV-1/2 specific serology were performed. Moreover, patients were asked whether they had personal history of herpes labialis (HL). Patients with PCR proved HSV-1 HG were included as cases; asymptomatic subjects attending STI Units for a blood check were recruited as controls and were checked for HSV-1/2 serology. 141 cases and 70 controls were enrolled. Specific HSV-1 antibodies were found in 34.7% of the cases and 67% of the controls. History of recurrent herpes labialis (RHL) was found in 4% of the cases and 31% of the controls. The occurrence of RHL in HSV-1 seropositive patients resulted lower in the case group compared to the control group. We can speculate about a protective role for RHL against the clinical appearance of HSV-1 HG. The clinical usefulness of our study involved especially the counseling in serodiscordant couples. The presence of HSV-1 antibodies in asymptomatic sexual partners does appear protective for HG manifestation only in presence of RHL history.

  2. Molecular modeling studies of 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline ribonucleosides with anti-HSV-1 activity

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    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Seidl, Peter Rudolf; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca

    2011-12-01

    Eight human herpes viruses ( e.g., herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, Kaposi's sarcoma) are responsible for several diseases from sub-clinic manifestations to fatal infections, mostly in immunocompromised patients. The major limitations of the currently available antiviral drug therapy are drug resistance, host toxicity, and narrow spectrum of activity. However, some non-nucleoside 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline derivatives ( e.g., PNU-183792) [4] shows broad spectrum antiviral activity. We have developed molecular modeling studies, including molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, based on a model proposed by Liu and co-workers [14] in order to understand the mechanism of action of a 6-chloro substituted 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline ribonucleoside, synthesized by the synthetic group, which showed anti-HSV-1 activity [9]. The molecular docking simulations confirmed the Liu's model showing that the ligand needs to dislocate template residues from the active site in order to interact with the viral DNA polymerase enzyme, reinforcing that the interaction with the Val823 residue is pivotal for the inhibitory activity of non-nucleoside 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline derivatives, such as PNU-183792, with the HSV-1. The molecular dynamics simulations showed that the 6-chloro-benzyl group of PNU-183792 maintains its interaction with residues of the HSV-1 DNA polymerase hydrophobic pocket, considered important according to the Liu's model, and also showed that the methyl group bounded to the nitrogen atom from PNU-183792 is probably contributing to a push-pull effect with the carbonyl group.

  3. HSV-1 Remodels Host Telomeres to Facilitate Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Deng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres protect the ends of cellular chromosomes. We show here that infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 results in chromosomal structural aberrations at telomeres and the accumulation of telomere dysfunction-induced DNA damage foci (TIFs. At the molecular level, HSV-1 induces transcription of telomere repeat-containing RNA (TERRA, followed by the proteolytic degradation of the telomere protein TPP1 and loss of the telomere repeat DNA signal. The HSV-1-encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase ICP0 is required for TERRA transcription and facilitates TPP1 degradation. Small hairpin RNA (shRNA depletion of TPP1 increases viral replication, indicating that TPP1 inhibits viral replication. Viral replication protein ICP8 forms foci that coincide with telomeric proteins, and ICP8-null virus failed to degrade telomere DNA signal. These findings suggest that HSV-1 reorganizes telomeres to form ICP8-associated prereplication foci and to promote viral genomic replication.

  4. Determination of thymine glycol residues in irradiated or oxidized DNA by formation of methylglyceric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellenberg, K.A.; Shaeffer, J.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of DNA solutions with X-irradiation various oxidants including hydrogen peroxide plus ferrous ion, hydrogen peroxide plus copper ion and ascorbate, permanganate, or sonication in the presence of dissolved oxygen all produced varying amounts of thymine glycol residues. After denaturing the DNA with heat, the glycol residues were reduced and labeled at the 6 position with tritium- labeled sodium borohydride. Subsequent reaction with anhydrous methanolic HCl gave a quantitative yield of the methyl ester of methylglyceric acid, which was determined by thin layer chromatography. The method, developed using thymidine as a model, was used to ascertain the requirements for glycol formation in DNA. It was shown that hydroxyl radical generating systems, permanganate, X-irradiation, or sonication in presence of oxygen were required, but hydrogen peroxide in the absence of iron or copper and ascorbate was inactive. Application to determination of DNA damage in vivo is being explored

  5. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Residual DNA-bound proteins are a source of in vitro transcription inhibitor peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venanzi, F.M.

    1989-01-01

    Enzymatic breakdown of residual proteins occurs at mild alkaline pH (pH optimum 8.5) as monitored by using radioiodinated, purified genomic DNA from calf thymus. These DNA fibers also possess a differential ability to hydrolyze added exogenous small and linker histones. The results described argue strongly that a putative protease activity, co-purified with DNA, is the source of short chain peptides which inhibit transcription in vitro. Therefore, we propose that RNA repressor peptides must be of higher molecular weight than previously reported

  7. Quantification of residual host cell DNA in adenoviral vectors produced on PER.C6 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, Linda; Koel, Björn; Weggeman, Miranda; Goudsmit, Jaap; Havenga, Menzo; Marzio, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors for gene therapy and vaccination are routinely prepared on cultures of immortalized cells, allowing the production of vector batches of high titer and consistent quality. Quantification of residual DNA from the producing cell line is part of the purity tests for

  8. Experimental Oral Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1 Co-infection in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meropi Aravantinou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2 similarly initiate infection in mucosal epithelia and establish lifelong neuronal latency. Anogenital HSV-2 infection augments the risk for sexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission and is associated with higher HIV viral loads. However, whether oral HSV-1 infection contributes to oral HIV susceptibility, viremia, or oral complications of HIV infection is unknown. Appropriate non-human primate (NHP models would facilitate this investigation, yet there are no published studies of HSV-1/SIV co-infection in NHPs. Thus, we performed a pilot study for an oral HSV-1 infection model in SIV-infected rhesus macaques to describe the feasibility of the modeling and resultant immunological changes. Three SIV-infected, clinically healthy macaques became HSV-1-infected by inoculation with 4 × 108 pfu HSV-1 McKrae on buccal, tongue, gingiva, and tonsils after gentle abrasion. HSV-1 DNA was shed in oral swabs for up to 21 days, and shedding recurred in association with intra-oral lesions after periods of no shedding during 56 days of follow up. HSV-1 DNA was detected in explant cultures of trigeminal ganglia collected at euthanasia on day 56. In the macaque with lowest baseline SIV viremia, SIV plasma RNA increased following HSV-1 infection. One macaque exhibited an acute pro-inflammatory response, and all three animals experienced T cell activation and mobilization in blood. However, T cell and antibody responses to HSV-1 were low and atypical. Through rigorous assessesments, this study finds that the virulent HSV-1 strain McKrae resulted in a low level HSV-1 infection that elicited modest immune responses and transiently modulated SIV infection.

  9. Genital HSV Detection among HIV-1-Infected Pregnant Women in Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Patterson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare genital HSV shedding among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. Methods. Women with and without known HIV infection who delivered at the University of Washington Medical Center between 1989–1996 had HSV serologies done as part of clinical care. Genital swabs from HSV-2-seropositive women were evaluated by real-time quantitative HSV DNA PCR. Results. HSV-2 seroprevalence was 71% and 30% among 75 HIV-positive and 3051 HIV-negative women, respectively, (P<.001. HSV was detected at delivery in the genital tract of 30.8% of HIV-seropositive versus 9.5% of HIV-negative women (RR=3.2, 95% CI 1.6 to 6.5, P=.001. The number of virion copies shed per mL was similar (log 3.54 for HIV positive versus 3.90 for HIV negative, P=.99. Conclusions. Our study demonstrated that HIV-, HSV-2-coinfected women are more likely to shed HSV at delivery.

  10. HSV-1-induced chemokine expression via IFI16-dependent and IFI16-independent pathways in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søby, Stine; Laursen, Rune R; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Innate recognition is essential in the antiviral response against infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV). Chemokines are important for control of HSV via recruitment of natural killer cells, T lymphocytes, and antigen-presenting cells. We previously found that early HSV-1......-mediated chemokine responses are not dependent on TLR2 and TLR9 in human macrophages. Here, we investigated the role of the recently identified innate IFN-inducible DNA receptor IFI16 during HSV-1 infection in human macrophages. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were purified from buffy coats...

  11. Genital Shedding of Herpes Simplex Virus Among Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Persons with HSV-2 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronstein, Elizabeth; Johnston, Christine; Huang, Meei-Li; Selke, Stacy; Magaret, Amalia; Warren, Terri; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Context Since HSV-2 antibody tests have become commercially available, an increasing number of persons learn that they have genital herpes through serologic testing. The course of natural history of HSV-2 in asymptomatic, seropositive persons is uncertain. Objective To evaluate the virologic and clinical course of HSV genital shedding among participants with symptomatic and asymptomatic HSV-2 infection. Design, Setting and Participants Cohort of 498 immunocompetent HSV-2 seropositive persons enrolled in prospective studies of genital HSV shedding at the University of Washington Virology Research Clinic, Seattle, Washington, and Westover Heights Clinic in Portland, Oregon, between 1992 and 2008. Each participant obtained daily self-collected swabs of genital secretions for ≥ 30 days. Main Outcome Measurement The rate of viral shedding measured by quantitative real-time fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HSV DNA from genital swabs. Results HSV was detected on 4,753 of 23,683 days (20.1%; 95% CI, 18.3 to 22.0) in persons with symptomatic genital HSV-2 infection compared with 519 of 5,070 days (10.2%; 95% CI, 7.7 to 13.6) in persons with asymptomatic infection, pgenital viral shedding among persons with symptomatic genital HSV-2 infection compared with 85 of 519 days (16.4%; 95% CI, 11.2 to 23.9) among persons with asymptomatic infection, pgenital tract less frequently than persons with symptomatic infection, but much of the difference is attributable to less frequent genital lesions, as lesions are accompanied by frequent viral shedding. PMID:21486977

  12. Residual DNA analysis in biologics development: review of measurement and quantitation technologies and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Morgan, Donna M; Wang, Gan; Mozier, Ned M

    2012-02-01

    Residual DNA (rDNA) is comprised of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments and longer length molecules originating from the host organism that may be present in samples from recombinant biological processes. Although similar in basic structural base pair units, rDNA may exist in different sizes and physical forms. Interest in measuring rDNA in recombinant products is based primarily on demonstration of effective purification during manufacturing, but also on some hypothetical concerns that, in rare cases, depending on the host expression system, some DNA sequences may be potentially infectious or oncogenic (e.g., HIV virus and the Ras oncogene, respectively). Recent studies suggest that a sequence known as long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1), widely distributed in the mammalian genome, is active as a retrotransposon that can be transcribed to RNA, reverse-transcribed into DNA and inserts into a new site in genome. This integration process could potentially disrupt critical gene functions or induce tumorigenesis in mammals. Genomic DNA from microbial sources, on the other hand, could add to risk of immunogenicity to the target recombinant protein being expressed, due to the high CpG content and unmethylated DNA sequence. For these and other reasons, it is necessary for manufacturers to show clearance of DNA throughout production processes and to confirm low levels in the final drug substance using an appropriately specific and quantitative analytical method. The heterogeneity of potential rDNA sequences that might be makes the testing of all potential analytes challenging. The most common methodology for rDNA quantitation used currently is real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), a robust and proven technology. Like most rDNA quantitation methods, the specificity of RT-PCR is limited by the sequences to which the primers are directed. To address this, primase-based whole genome amplification is introduced herein. This paper will review the recent

  13. HSV presence in brains of individuals without dementia: the TASTY brain series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Olsson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 affects a majority of the population and recent evidence suggests involvement in Alzheimer's disease aetiology. We investigated the prevalence of HSV type 1 and 2 in the Tampere Autopsy Study (TASTY brain samples using PCR and sero-positivity in plasma, and associations with Alzheimer's disease neuropathology. HSV was shown to be present in human brain tissue in 11/584 (1.9% of samples in the TASTY cohort, of which six had Alzheimer's disease neuropathological amyloid beta (Aβ aggregations. Additionally, serological data revealed 86% of serum samples tested were IgG-positive for HSV. In conclusion, we report epidemiological evidence of the presence of HSV in brain tissue free from encephalitis symptoms in a cohort most closely representing the general population (a minimum prevalence of 1.9%. Whereas 6/11 samples with HSV DNA in the brain tissue had Aβ aggregations, most of those with Aβ aggregations did not have HSV present in the brain tissue.

  14. Introduction of a unique tryptophan residue into various positions of Bacillus licheniformis DnaK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo-En; Lin, Min-Guan; Lo, Huei-Fen; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Chi, Meng-Chun; Lin, Long-Liu

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis together with biochemical and biophysical techniques were used to probe effects of single-tryptophan-incorporated mutations on a bacterial molecular chaperone, Bacillus licheniformis DnaK (BlDnaK). Specifically, five phenylalanine residues (Phe(120), Phe(174), Phe(186), Phe(378) and Phe(396)) of BlDnaK were individually replaced by single tryptophans, thus creating site-specific probes for the fluorescence analysis of the protein. The steady-state ATPase activity for BlDnaK, F120W, F174W, F186W, F378W, and F396W was determined to be 76.01, 52.82, 25.32, 53.31, 58.84, and 47.53 nmol Pi/min/mg, respectively. Complementation test revealed that the single mutation at codons 120, 186, and 378 of the dnaK gene still allowed an Escherichia coli dnaK756-Ts strain to grow at a stringent temperature of 44°C. Simultaneous addition of co-chaperones and NR-peptide did not synergistically stimulate the ATPase activity of F174W and F396W, and these two proteins were unable to assist the refolding of GdnHCl-denatured luciferase. The heat-induced denaturation of all variants could be fitted adequately to a three-state model, in agreement with the observation for the wild-type protein. By CD spectral analysis, GdnHCl-induced unfolding transition for BlDnaK was 1.51 M corresponding to ΔG(N-U) of 1.69 kcal/mol; however, the transitions for mutant proteins were 1.07-1.55 M equivalent to ΔG(N-U) of 0.94-2.93 kcal/mol. The emission maximum of single-tryptophan-incorporated variants was in the range of 333.2-335.8 nm. Acrylamide quenching analysis showed that the mutant proteins had a dynamic quenching constant of 3.0-4.2 M(-1). Taken together, these results suggest that the molecular properties of BlDnaK have been significantly changed upon the individual replacement of selected phenylalanine residues by tryptophan. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. antibodies against Herpes simplex virus (HSV)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chi-square analysis was used to determine the association of infection with ... tibody. No statistical association existed between the prevalence of HSV-1&-2 IgG antibodies and the socio-demographic variables ... concern, established by the widespread of genital HSV .... Chi-square test was employed to define relationships.

  16. Biologic interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1 and possible implications for HSV vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Gottlieb, Sami L

    2017-09-25

    Development of a safe and effective vaccine against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) has the potential to limit the global burden of HSV-2 infection and disease, including genital ulcer disease and neonatal herpes, and is a global sexual and reproductive health priority. Another important potential benefit of an HSV-2 vaccine would be to decrease HIV infections, as HSV-2 increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition several-fold. Acute and chronic HSV-2 infection creates ulcerations and draws dendritic cells and activated CD4+ T cells into genital mucosa. These cells are targets for HIV entry and replication. Prophylactic HSV-2 vaccines (to prevent infection) and therapeutic vaccines (to modify or treat existing infections) are currently under development. By preventing or modifying infection, an effective HSV-2 vaccine could limit HSV-associated genital mucosal inflammation and thus HIV risk. However, a vaccine might have competing effects on HIV risk depending on its mechanism of action and cell populations generated in the genital mucosa. In this article, we review biologic interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1, consider HSV-2 vaccine development in the context of HIV risk, and discuss implications and research needs for future HSV vaccine development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA Three Way Junction Core Decorated with Amino Acids-Like Residues-Synthesis and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Addamiano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Construction and physico-chemical behavior of DNA three way junction (3WJ functionalized by protein-like residues (imidazole, alcohol and carboxylic acid at unpaired positions at the core is described. One 5′-C(S-propargyl-thymidine nucleotide was specifically incorporated on each strand to react through a post synthetic CuACC reaction with either protected imidazolyl-, hydroxyl- or carboxyl-azide. Structural impacts of 5′-C(S-functionalization were investigated to evaluate how 3WJ flexibility/stability is affected.

  18. An N-Glycosidase from Escherichia coli That Releases Free Uracil from DNA Containing Deaminated Cytosine Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas

    1974-01-01

    An enzyme that liberates uracil from single-stranded and double-stranded DNA containing deaminated cytosine residues and from deoxycytidylate-deoxyuridylate copolymers in the absence of Mg++ has been purified 30-fold from cell extracts of E. coli. The enzyme does not release uracil from deoxyuridine, dUMP, uridine, or RNA, nor does it liberate the normally occurring pyrimidine bases, cytosine and thymine, from DNA. The enzymatic cleavage of N-glycosidic bonds in DNA occurs without concomitant cleavage of phosphodiester bonds, resulting in the formation of free uracil and DNA strands of unaltered chain length that contain apyrimidinic sites as reaction products. The enzyme may be active in DNA repair, converting deaminated dCMP residues to an easily repairable form. PMID:4610583

  19. Residual γH2AX foci as an indication of lethal DNA lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banuelos C Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that tumor cells exposed to some DNA damaging agents are more likely to die if they retain microscopically visible γH2AX foci that are known to mark sites of double-strand breaks. This appears to be true even after exposure to the alkylating agent MNNG that does not cause direct double-strand breaks but does produce γH2AX foci when damaged DNA undergoes replication. Methods To examine this predictive ability further, SiHa human cervical carcinoma cells were exposed to 8 DNA damaging drugs (camptothecin, cisplatin, doxorubicin, etoposide, hydrogen peroxide, MNNG, temozolomide, and tirapazamine and the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci 24 hours after a 30 or 60 min treatment was compared with the fraction of cells that lost clonogenicity. To determine if cells with residual repair foci are the cells that die, SiHa cervical cancer cells were stably transfected with a RAD51-GFP construct and live cell analysis was used to follow the fate of irradiated cells with RAD51-GFP foci. Results For all drugs regardless of their mechanism of interaction with DNA, close to a 1:1 correlation was observed between clonogenic surviving fraction and the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci 24 hours after treatment. Initial studies established that the fraction of cells that retained RAD51 foci after irradiation was similar to the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci and subsequently lost clonogenicity. Tracking individual irradiated live cells confirmed that SiHa cells with RAD51-GFP foci 24 hours after irradiation were more likely to die. Conclusion Retention of DNA damage-induced γH2AX foci appears to be indicative of lethal DNA damage so that it may be possible to predict tumor cell killing by a wide variety of DNA damaging agents simply by scoring the fraction of cells that retain γH2AX foci.

  20. Residual γH2AX foci as an indication of lethal DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banáth, Judit P; Klokov, Dmitry; MacPhail, Susan H; Banuelos, C Adriana; Olive, Peggy L

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that tumor cells exposed to some DNA damaging agents are more likely to die if they retain microscopically visible γH2AX foci that are known to mark sites of double-strand breaks. This appears to be true even after exposure to the alkylating agent MNNG that does not cause direct double-strand breaks but does produce γH2AX foci when damaged DNA undergoes replication. To examine this predictive ability further, SiHa human cervical carcinoma cells were exposed to 8 DNA damaging drugs (camptothecin, cisplatin, doxorubicin, etoposide, hydrogen peroxide, MNNG, temozolomide, and tirapazamine) and the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci 24 hours after a 30 or 60 min treatment was compared with the fraction of cells that lost clonogenicity. To determine if cells with residual repair foci are the cells that die, SiHa cervical cancer cells were stably transfected with a RAD51-GFP construct and live cell analysis was used to follow the fate of irradiated cells with RAD51-GFP foci. For all drugs regardless of their mechanism of interaction with DNA, close to a 1:1 correlation was observed between clonogenic surviving fraction and the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci 24 hours after treatment. Initial studies established that the fraction of cells that retained RAD51 foci after irradiation was similar to the fraction of cells that retained γH2AX foci and subsequently lost clonogenicity. Tracking individual irradiated live cells confirmed that SiHa cells with RAD51-GFP foci 24 hours after irradiation were more likely to die. Retention of DNA damage-induced γH2AX foci appears to be indicative of lethal DNA damage so that it may be possible to predict tumor cell killing by a wide variety of DNA damaging agents simply by scoring the fraction of cells that retain γH2AX foci

  1. FY99 Status Report on the HSV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    'The HSV in storage in MTF has been monitored during FY99, and its overpressure has been sampled and analyzed. The HSV''s internal pressure continues to rise slowly, and the overpressure still analyzes as 100 percent 3He. The titanium tritide sample that was to be monitored annually and which had developed a leak last year has been repaired and isotherms measured. Unfortunately the sample was showing significant unexpected 3He release, so the isotherm data is corrupted by unknown levels of 3He. This release has disqualified this sample for future use, as it is now seriously divergent from the HSV material. A different sample must be selected for subsequent studies.The unexpected 3He releases of the Ti-3 sample and the possible release in other Ti samples have raised a serious issue. It should be determined why this release is occurring, so that an unexpected release of 3He during HSV unloading can be assessed as unlikely.'

  2. Assessing the contribution of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase to spontaneous mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leary Jeffry J

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thymidine kinase (tk mutagenesis assay is often utilized to determine the frequency of herpes simplex virus (HSV replication-mediated mutations. Using this assay, clinical and laboratory HSV-2 isolates were shown to have a 10- to 80-fold higher frequency of spontaneous mutations compared to HSV-1. Methods A panel of HSV-1 and HSV-2, along with polymerase-recombinant viruses expressing type 2 polymerase (Pol within a type 1 genome, were evaluated using the tk and non-HSV DNA mutagenesis assays to measure HSV replication-dependent errors and determine whether the higher mutation frequency of HSV-2 is a distinct property of type 2 polymerases. Results Although HSV-2 have mutation frequencies higher than HSV-1 in the tk assay, these errors are assay-specific. In fact, wild type HSV-1 and the antimutator HSV-1 PAAr5 exhibited a 2–4 fold higher frequency than HSV-2 in the non-HSV DNA mutatagenesis assay. Furthermore, regardless of assay, HSV-1 recombinants expressing HSV-2 Pol had error rates similar to HSV-1, whereas the high mutator virus, HSV-2 6757, consistently showed signficant errors. Additionally, plasmid DNA containing the HSV-2 tk gene, but not type 1 tk or LacZ DNA, was shown to form an anisomorphic DNA stucture. Conclusions This study suggests that the Pol is not solely responsible for the virus-type specific differences in mutation frequency. Accordingly, it is possible that (a mutations may be modulated by other viral polypeptides cooperating with Pol, and (b the localized secondary structure of the viral genome may partially account for the apparently enhanced error frequency of HSV-2.

  3. A direct qPCR method for residual DNA quantification in monoclonal antibody drugs produced in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Musaddeq

    2015-11-10

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the host cell of choice for manufacturing of monoclonal antibody (mAb) drugs in the biopharmaceutical industry. Host cell DNA is an impurity of such manufacturing process and must be controlled and monitored in order to ensure drug purity and safety. A conventional method for quantification of host residual DNA in drug requires extraction of DNA from the mAb drug substance with subsequent quantification of the extracted DNA using real-time PCR (qPCR). Here we report a method where the DNA extraction step is eliminated prior to qPCR. In this method, which we have named 'direct resDNA qPCR', the mAb drug substance is digested with a protease called KAPA in a 96-well PCR plate, the protease in the digest is then denatured at high temperature, qPCR reagents are added to the resultant reaction wells in the plate along with standards and controls in other wells of the same plate, and the plate subjected to qPCR for analysis of residual host DNA in the samples. This direct resDNA qPCR method for CHO is sensitive to 5.0fg of DNA with high precision and accuracy and has a wide linear range of determination. The method has been successfully tested with four mAbs drug, two IgG1 and two IgG4. Both the purified drug substance as well as a number of process intermediate samples, e.g., bioreactor harvest, Protein A column eluate and ion-exchange column eluates were tested. This method simplifies the residual DNA quantification protocol, reduces time of analysis and leads to increased assay sensitivity and development of automated high-throughput methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Inactivated HSV-2 in MPL/alum adjuvant provides nearly complete protection against genital infection and shedding following long term challenge and rechallenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Christopher S; Kraynyak, Kimberly A; Levinson, Michael S; Chen, Zhijiang; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Spector, Deborah H

    2012-10-12

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2) infection can result in life-long recurrent genital disease, asymptomatic virus shedding, and transmission. No vaccine to date has shown significant protection clinically. Here, we used a mouse model of genital HSV-2 infection to test the efficacy of a vaccine consisting of whole, formalin-inactivated HSV-2 (FI-HSV2) formulated with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and alum adjuvants. Vaccine components were administered alone or as a prime-boost immunization together with DNA vaccines encoding a truncated glycoprotein D2 (gD2t) and two conserved HSV-2 genes necessary for virus replication, UL5 (DNA helicase) and UL30 (DNA polymerase). Our results show: (1) compared with mock immunized controls, mice immunized with FI-HSV2 plus MPL/alum consistently showed protection against disease burden and total viral shedding while the mice immunized with gD2t protein with MPL/alum did not; (2) protection against genital disease and viral replication correlated with the type of boost in a prime-boost immunization with little advantage afforded by a DNA prime; (3) intramuscular (i.m.) immunization with FI-HSV2 in MPL/Alhydrogel adjuvant provided nearly complete protection against vaginal HSV-2 shedding after a lethal intravaginal (i.vag.) short-term challenge and long-term rechallenge; (4) single formulation immunization with DNA vaccines, FI-HSV2, and MPL in an aluminum phosphate (Adju-Phos) adjuvant did not increase protection relative to FI-HSV2/MPL/Adju-Phos alone; and (5) addition of MPL/alum to the FI-HSV2 was required for optimal protection against disease, viral replication, and latent virus load in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Most notably, an optimized vaccine formulation of FI-HSV2 MPL/Alhydrogel given i.m. completely protected against detectable vaginal HSV-2 shedding in the majority of animals and HSV-2 latent DNA in the DRG of all animals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Predicting DNA-binding proteins and binding residues by complex structure prediction and application to human proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Zhao

    Full Text Available As more and more protein sequences are uncovered from increasingly inexpensive sequencing techniques, an urgent task is to find their functions. This work presents a highly reliable computational technique for predicting DNA-binding function at the level of protein-DNA complex structures, rather than low-resolution two-state prediction of DNA-binding as most existing techniques do. The method first predicts protein-DNA complex structure by utilizing the template-based structure prediction technique HHblits, followed by binding affinity prediction based on a knowledge-based energy function (Distance-scaled finite ideal-gas reference state for protein-DNA interactions. A leave-one-out cross validation of the method based on 179 DNA-binding and 3797 non-binding protein domains achieves a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.77 with high precision (94% and high sensitivity (65%. We further found 51% sensitivity for 82 newly determined structures of DNA-binding proteins and 56% sensitivity for the human proteome. In addition, the method provides a reasonably accurate prediction of DNA-binding residues in proteins based on predicted DNA-binding complex structures. Its application to human proteome leads to more than 300 novel DNA-binding proteins; some of these predicted structures were validated by known structures of homologous proteins in APO forms. The method [SPOT-Seq (DNA] is available as an on-line server at http://sparks-lab.org.

  6. Detecting single-abasic residues within a DNA strand immobilized in a biological nanopore using an integrated CMOS sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsuk; Maitra, Raj D; Pedrotti, Ken; Dunbar, William B

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the application of a novel current-measuring sensor (CMS) customized for nanopore applications. The low-noise CMS is fabricated in a 0.35μm CMOS process and is implemented in experiments involving DNA captured in an α-hemolysin (α-HL) nanopore. Specifically, the CMS is used to build a current amplitude map as a function of varying positions of a single-abasic residue within a homopolymer cytosine single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is captured and held in the pore. Each ssDNA is immobilized using a biotin-streptavidin linkage. Five different DNA templates are measured and compared: one all-cytosine ssDNA, and four with a single-abasic residue substitution that resides in or near the ~1.5nm aperture of the α-HL channel when the strand is immobilized. The CMOS CMS is shown to resolves the ~5Å displacements of the abasic residue within the varying templates. The demonstration represents an advance in application-specific circuitry that is optimized for small-footprint nanopore applications, including genomic sequencing.

  7. Identification of Critical Residues for the Tight Binding of Both Correct and Incorrect Nucleotides to Human DNA Polymerase λ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jessica A.; Pack, Lindsey R.; Sherrer, Shanen M.; Kshetry, Ajay K.; Newmister, Sean A.; Fowler, Jason D.; Taylor, John-Stephen; Suo, Zucai

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymerase λ (Pol λ) is a novel X-family DNA polymerase that shares 34% sequence identity with DNA polymerase β (Pol β). Pre-steady state kinetic studies have shown that the Pol λ•DNA complex binds both correct and incorrect nucleotides 130-fold tighter on average than the Pol β•DNA complex, although, the base substitution fidelity of both polymerases is 10−4 to 10−5. To better understand Pol λ’s tight nucleotide binding affinity, we created single- and double-substitution mutants of Pol λ to disrupt interactions between active site residues and an incoming nucleotide or a template base. Single-turnover kinetic assays showed that Pol λ binds to an incoming nucleotide via cooperative interactions with active site residues (R386, R420, K422, Y505, F506, A510, and R514). Disrupting protein interactions with an incoming correct or incorrect nucleotide impacted binding with each of the common structural moieties in the following order: triphosphate ≫ base > ribose. In addition, the loss of Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between the nucleotide and template base led to a moderate increase in the Kd. The fidelity of Pol λ was maintained predominantly by a single residue, R517, which has minor groove interactions with the DNA template. PMID:20851705

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR Study for the Detection and Quantitation of Cholesterol in HSV529 Therapeutic Vaccine Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahima Khatun

    Full Text Available This study describes the NMR-based method to determine the limit of quantitation (LOQ and limit of detection (LOD of cholesterol, a process-related impurity in the replication-deficient Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV type 2 candidate vaccine HSV529. Three signature peaks from the 1D 1H NMR of a cholesterol reference spectrum were selected for the identification of cholesterol. The LOQ for a cholesterol working standard was found to be 1 μg/mL, and the LOD was found to be 0.1 μg/mL. The identity of cholesterol, separated from the formulation of growth supplement by thin layer chromatography (TLC, was confirmed by 1D 1H NMR and 2D 1H-13C HSQC NMR. The three signature peaks of cholesterol were detected only in a six-times concentrated sample of HSV529 candidate vaccine sample and not in the single dose HSV529 vaccine sample under similar experimental conditions. Taken together, the results demonstrated that NMR is a direct method that can successfully identify and quantify cholesterol in viral vaccine samples, such as HSV529, and as well as in the growth supplement used during the upstream stages of HSV529 manufacturing. Keywords: Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2, Viral vaccine, NMR, Residuals, LOD and LOQ, TLC, Growth supplement

  9. Highly conserved intragenic HSV-2 sequences: Results from next-generation sequencing of HSV-2 UL and US regions from genital swabs collected from 3 continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christine; Magaret, Amalia; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Greninger, Alexander L; Cheng, Anqi; Diem, Kurt; Fitzgibbon, Matthew P; Huang, Meei-Li; Selke, Stacy; Lingappa, Jairam R; Celum, Connie; Jerome, Keith R; Wald, Anna; Koelle, David M

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the variability in circulating herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genomic sequences is critical to the development of HSV-2 vaccines. Genital lesion swabs containing ≥ 10 7 log 10 copies HSV DNA collected from Africa, the USA, and South America underwent next-generation sequencing, followed by K-mer based filtering and de novo genomic assembly. Sites of heterogeneity within coding regions in unique long and unique short (U L _U S ) regions were identified. Phylogenetic trees were created using maximum likelihood reconstruction. Among 46 samples from 38 persons, 1468 intragenic base-pair substitutions were identified. The maximum nucleotide distance between strains for concatenated U L_ U S segments was 0.4%. Phylogeny did not reveal geographic clustering. The most variable proteins had non-synonymous mutations in < 3% of amino acids. Unenriched HSV-2 DNA can undergo next-generation sequencing to identify intragenic variability. The use of clinical swabs for sequencing expands the information that can be gathered directly from these specimens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. DNABP: Identification of DNA-Binding Proteins Based on Feature Selection Using a Random Forest and Predicting Binding Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Guo, Jing; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins are fundamentally important in cellular processes. Several computational-based methods have been developed to improve the prediction of DNA-binding proteins in previous years. However, insufficient work has been done on the prediction of DNA-binding proteins from protein sequence information. In this paper, a novel predictor, DNABP (DNA-binding proteins), was designed to predict DNA-binding proteins using the random forest (RF) classifier with a hybrid feature. The hybrid feature contains two types of novel sequence features, which reflect information about the conservation of physicochemical properties of the amino acids, and the binding propensity of DNA-binding residues and non-binding propensities of non-binding residues. The comparisons with each feature demonstrated that these two novel features contributed most to the improvement in predictive ability. Furthermore, to improve the prediction performance of the DNABP model, feature selection using the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) method combined with incremental feature selection (IFS) was carried out during the model construction. The results showed that the DNABP model could achieve 86.90% accuracy, 83.76% sensitivity, 90.03% specificity and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.727. High prediction accuracy and performance comparisons with previous research suggested that DNABP could be a useful approach to identify DNA-binding proteins from sequence information. The DNABP web server system is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/DNABP/.

  11. NMR assignments for the amino-terminal residues of trp repressor and their role in DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrowsmith, C.H.; Carey, J.; Treat-Clemons, L.; Jardetzky, O.

    1989-01-01

    The trp repressor of Escherichia coli specifically binds to operator DNAs in three operons involved in tryptophan metabolism. The NMR spectra of repressor and a chymotryptic fragment lacking the six amino-terminal residues are compared. Two-dimensional J-correlated spectra of the two forms of the protein are superimposable except for cross-peaks that are associated with the N-terminal region. The chemical shifts and relaxation behavior of the N-terminal resonances suggest mobile arms. Spin-echo experiments on a ternary complex of repressor with L-tryptophan and operator DNA indicate that the termini are also disordered in the complex, although removal of the arms reduces the DNA binding energy. Relaxation measurements on the armless protein show increased mobility for several residues, probably due to helix fraying in the newly exposed N-terminal region. DNA binding by the armless protein does not reduce the mobility of these residues. Thus, it appears that the arms serve to stabilize the N-terminal helix but that this structural role does not explain their contribution to the DNA binding energy. These results suggest that the promiscuous DNA binding by the arms seen in the X-ray crystal structure is found in solution as well

  12. Ribosomal DNA transcription in the dorsal raphe nucleus is increased in residual but not in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyżanowska, Marta; Steiner, Johann; Brisch, Ralf; Mawrin, Christian; Busse, Stefan; Braun, Katharina; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bogerts, Bernhard; Gos, Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    The central serotonergic system is implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, where the imbalance between dopamine, serotonin and glutamate plays a key pathophysiological role. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is the main source of serotonergic innervation of forebrain limbic structures disturbed in schizophrenia patients. The study was carried out on paraffin-embedded brains from 17 (8 paranoid and 9 residual) schizophrenia patients and 28 matched controls without mental disorders. The transcriptional activity of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in DRN neurons was evaluated by the AgNOR silver-staining method. An increased rDNA transcriptional activity was found in schizophrenia patients in the cumulative analysis of all DRN subnuclei (t test, P = 0.02). Further subgroup analysis revealed that it was an effect specific for residual schizophrenia versus paranoid schizophrenia or control groups (ANOVA, P = 0.002). This effect was confounded neither by suicide nor by antipsychotic medication. Our findings suggest that increased activity of rDNA in DRN neurons is a distinct phenomenon in schizophrenia, particularly in residual patients. An activation of the rDNA transcription in DRN neurons may represent a compensatory mechanism to overcome the previously described prefrontal serotonergic hypofunction in this diagnostic subgroup.

  13. Joint capsule treatment with enkephalin-encoding HSV-1 recombinant vector reduces inflammatory damage and behavioural sequelae in rat CFA monoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; McNearney, Terry A; Wilson, Steven P; Yeomans, David C; Westlund, Karin N

    2008-03-01

    This study assessed enkephalin expression induced by intra-articular application of recombinant, enkephalin-encoding herpes virus (HSV-1) and the impact of expression on nociceptive behaviours and synovial lining inflammation in arthritic rats. Replication-conditional HSV-1 recombinant vectors with cDNA encoding preproenkephalin (HSV-ENK), or control transgene beta-galactosidase cDNA (HSV-beta-gal; control) were injected into knee joints with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Joint temperatures, circumferences and nociceptive behaviours were monitored on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 post CFA and vector treatments. Lumbar (L4-6) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cords were immunostained for met-enkephalin (met-ENK), beta-gal, HSV-1 proteins and Fos. Joint tissues were immunostained for met-ENK, HSV-1 proteins, and inflammatory mediators Regulated on Activation, Normal T-cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES) and cyclo-oxygenase-2, or stained with haematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Compared to exuberant synovial hypertrophy and inflammatory cell infiltration seen in arthritic rats treated with CFA only or CFA and HSV-beta-gal, the CFA- and HSV-ENK-treated arthritic rats had: (i) striking preservation of synovial membrane cytoarchitecture with minimal inflammatory cell infiltrates; (ii) significantly improved nociceptive behavioural responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli; (iii) normalized Fos staining in lumbar dorsal horn; and (iv) significantly increased met-ENK staining in ipsilateral synovial tissue, lumbar DRG and spinal cord. The HSV-1 and transgene product expression were confined to ipsilateral lumbar DRG (HSV-1, met-ENK, beta-gal). Only transgene product (met-ENK and beta-gal) was seen in lumbar spinal cord sections. Targeted delivery of enkephalin-encoding HSV-1 vector generated safe, sustained opioid-induced analgesia with protective anti-inflammatory blunting in rat inflammatory arthritis.

  14. HSV-1 ICP0: An E3 Ubiquitin Ligase That Counteracts Host Intrinsic and Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Perusina Lanfranca

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0, is required for efficient lytic viral replication and regulates the switch between the lytic and latent states of HSV-1. As an E3 ubiquitin ligase, ICP0 directs the proteasomal degradation of several cellular targets, allowing the virus to counteract different cellular intrinsic and innate immune responses. In this review, we will focus on how ICP0’s E3 ubiquitin ligase activity inactivates the host intrinsic defenses, such as nuclear domain 10 (ND10, SUMO, and the DNA damage response to HSV-1 infection. In addition, we will examine ICP0’s capacity to impair the activation of interferon (innate regulatory mediators that include IFI16 (IFN γ-inducible protein 16, MyD88 (myeloid differentiation factor 88, and Mal (MyD88 adaptor-like protein. We will also consider how ICP0 allows HSV-1 to evade activation of the NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B inflammatory signaling pathway. Finally, ICP0’s paradoxical relationship with USP7 (ubiquitin specific protease 7 and its roles in intrinsic and innate immune responses to HSV-1 infection will be discussed.

  15. Seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus type-2 (HSV-2) among pregnant women who participated in a national HIV surveillance activity in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domercant, Jean Wysler; Jean Louis, Frantz; Hulland, Erin; Griswold, Mark; Andre-Alboth, Jocelyne; Ye, Tun; Marston, Barbara J

    2017-08-18

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), one the most common causes of genital ulcers, appears to increase both the risk of HIV acquisition and HIV transmission. HSV-2/HIV co-infection among pregnant women may increase the risk of perinatal transmission of HIV. This study describes rates of HSV-2 among pregnant women in Haiti and HSV-2 test performance in this population. Unlinked residual serum specimens from the 2012 National HIV and Syphilis Sentinel Surveillance Survey among pregnant women in Haiti were tested using two commercial kits (Focus HerpeSelect, Kalon) for HSV-2 antibodies. We evaluated rates of HSV-2 seropositivity and HSV-2/HIV co-infection, associations between HSV-2 and demographic characteristics using multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling, and HSV-2 test performance in this population. Serum samples from 1000 pregnant women (all 164 HIV positive and 836 random HIV negative) were selected. The overall weighted prevalence of HSV-2 was 31.4% (95% CI: 27.7-35.4) and the prevalence of HIV-positivity among HSV-2 positive pregnant women was five times higher than the prevalence among HSV-2 negative women (4.8% [95% CI: 3.9-6.0] vs. 0.9% [95% CI: 0.6-1.3], respectively). Factors significantly associated with HSV-2 positivity were HIV-positivity (PR: 2.27 [95% CI: 1.94-2.65]) and older age (PRs: 1.41 [95% CI: 1.05-1.91] for 20-24 years, 1.71 [95% CI:1.13-2.60] for 30-34 years, and 1.55 [95% CI: 1.10-2.19] for 35 years or greater]), while rural residence was negatively associated with HSV-2 positivity (PR 0.83 [95% CI: 0.69-1.00]), after controlling for other covariables. For this study a conservative Focus index cutoff of 3.5 was used, but among samples with a Focus index value ≥2.5, 98.4% had positive Kalon tests. The prevalence of HSV-2 is relatively high among pregnant women in Haiti. Public health interventions to increase access to HSV-2 screening in antenatal services are warranted.

  16. FY99 Status Report on the HSV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1999-10-15

    'The HSV in storage in MTF has been monitored during FY99, and its overpressure has been sampled and analyzed. The HSV''s internal pressure continues to rise slowly, and the overpressure still analyzes as 100 percent 3He. The titanium tritide sample that was to be monitored annually and which had developed a leak last year has been repaired and isotherms measured. Unfortunately the sample was showing significant unexpected 3He release, so the isotherm data is corrupted by unknown levels of 3He. This release has disqualified this sample for future use, as it is now seriously divergent from the HSV material. A different sample must be selected for subsequent studies.The unexpected 3He releases of the Ti-3 sample and the possible release in other Ti samples have raised a serious issue. It should be determined why this release is occurring, so that an unexpected release of 3He during HSV unloading can be assessed as unlikely.'

  17. The replicative DNA polymerase of herpes simplex virus 1 exhibits apurinic/apyrimidinic and 5′-deoxyribose phosphate lyase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Federica; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is essential for maintaining genome stability both to counter the accumulation of unusual bases and to protect from base loss in the DNA. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a large dsDNA virus that encodes its own DNA replication machinery, including enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism. We report on a replicative family B and a herpesvirus-encoded DNA Pol that possesses DNA lyase activity. We have discovered that the catalytic subunit of the HSV-1 DNA polymerase (Pol) (UL30) exhibits apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) and 5′-deoxyribose phosphate (dRP) lyase activities. These activities are integral to BER and lead to DNA cleavage on the 3′ side of abasic sites and 5′-dRP residues that remain after cleavage by 5′-AP endonuclease. The UL30-catalyzed reaction occurs independently of divalent cation and proceeds via a Schiff base intermediate, indicating that it occurs via a lyase mechanism. Partial proteolysis of the Schiff base shows that the DNA lyase activity resides in the Pol domain of UL30. These observations together with the presence of a virus-encoded uracil DNA glycosylase indicates that HSV-1 has the capacity to perform critical steps in BER. These findings have implications on the role of BER in viral genome maintenance during lytic replication and reactivation from latency. PMID:18695225

  18. Mutational analysis of an archaeal minichromosome maintenance protein exterior hairpin reveals critical residues for helicase activity and DNA binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Aaron S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mini-chromosome maintenance protein (MCM complex is an essential replicative helicase for DNA replication in Archaea and Eukaryotes. While the eukaryotic complex consists of six homologous proteins (MCM2-7, the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has only one MCM protein (ssoMCM, six subunits of which form a homohexamer. We have recently reported a 4.35Å crystal structure of the near full-length ssoMCM. The structure reveals a total of four β-hairpins per subunit, three of which are located within the main channel or side channels of the ssoMCM hexamer model generated based on the symmetry of the N-terminal Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (mtMCM structure. The fourth β-hairpin, however, is located on the exterior of the hexamer, near the exit of the putative side channels and next to the ATP binding pocket. Results In order to better understand this hairpin's role in DNA binding and helicase activity, we performed a detailed mutational and biochemical analysis of nine residues on this exterior β-hairpin (EXT-hp. We examined the activities of the mutants related to their helicase function, including hexamerization, ATPase, DNA binding and helicase activities. The assays showed that some of the residues on this EXT-hp play a role for DNA binding as well as for helicase activity. Conclusions These results implicate several current theories regarding helicase activity by this critical hexameric enzyme. As the data suggest that EXT-hp is involved in DNA binding, the results reported here imply that the EXT-hp located near the exterior exit of the side channels may play a role in contacting DNA substrate in a manner that affects DNA unwinding.

  19. Identification of restriction endonuclease with potential ability to cleave the HSV-2 genome: Inherent potential for biosynthetic versus live recombinant microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes Simplex virus types 1 and 2 are enveloped viruses with a linear dsDNA genome of ~120–200 kb. Genital infection with HSV-2 has been denoted as a major risk factor for acquisition and transmission of HIV-1. Developing biomedical strategies for HSV-2 prevention is thus a central strategy in reducing global HIV-1 prevalence. This paper details the protocol for the isolation of restriction endunucleases (REases with potent activity against the HSV-2 genome and models two biomedical interventions for preventing HSV-2. Methods and Results Using the whole genome of HSV-2, 289 REases and the bioinformatics software Webcutter2; we searched for potential recognition sites by way of genome wide palindromics. REase application in HSV-2 biomedical therapy was modeled concomitantly. Of the 289 enzymes analyzed; 77(26.6% had potential to cleave the HSV-2 genome in > 100 but 400 but Conclusion Viral genome slicing by way of these bacterially- derived R-M enzymatic peptides may have therapeutic potential in HSV-2 infection; a cofactor for HIV-1 acquisition and transmission.

  20. A role for the JAK-STAT1 pathway in blocking replication of HSV-1 in dendritic cells and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Town Terrence

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs play key roles in host defense against HSV-1 infection. Although macrophages and DCs can be infected by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, both cell types are resistant to HSV-1 replication. The aim of our study was to determine factor (s that are involved in the resistance of DCs and macrophages to productive HSV-1 infection. Results We report here that, in contrast to bone marrow-derived DCs and macrophages from wild type mice, DCs and macrophages isolated from signal transducers and activators of transcription-1 deficient (STAT1-/- mice were susceptible to HSV-1 replication and the production of viral mRNAs and DNA. There were differences in expression of immediate early, early, and late gene transcripts between STAT1+/+ and STAT1-/- infected APCs. Conclusion These results suggest for the first time that the JAK-STAT1 pathway is involved in blocking replication of HSV-1 in DCs and macrophages.

  1. A role for the JAK-STAT1 pathway in blocking replication of HSV-1 in dendritic cells and macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Kevin R; UnderHill, David; Wechsler, Steven L; Town, Terrence; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2009-01-01

    Background Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) play key roles in host defense against HSV-1 infection. Although macrophages and DCs can be infected by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), both cell types are resistant to HSV-1 replication. The aim of our study was to determine factor (s) that are involved in the resistance of DCs and macrophages to productive HSV-1 infection. Results We report here that, in contrast to bone marrow-derived DCs and macrophages from wild type mice, DCs and macrophages isolated from signal transducers and activators of transcription-1 deficient (STAT1-/-) mice were susceptible to HSV-1 replication and the production of viral mRNAs and DNA. There were differences in expression of immediate early, early, and late gene transcripts between STAT1+/+ and STAT1-/- infected APCs. Conclusion These results suggest for the first time that the JAK-STAT1 pathway is involved in blocking replication of HSV-1 in DCs and macrophages. PMID:19439086

  2. DNA immunization with a herpes simplex virus 2 bacterial artificial chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meseda, Clement A.; Schmeisser, Falko; Pedersen, Robin; Woerner, Amy; Weir, Jerry P.

    2004-01-01

    Construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) is described. BAC vector sequences were inserted into the thymidine kinase gene of HSV-2 by homologous recombination. DNA from cells infected with the resulting recombinant virus was transformed into E. coli, and colonies containing the HSV-2 BAC (HSV2-BAC) were isolated and analyzed for the expected genotype. HSV2-BAC DNA was infectious when transfected back into mammalian cells and the resulting virus was thymidine kinase negative. When used to immunize mice, the HSV2-BAC DNA elicited a strong HSV-2 specific antibody response that was equal to or greater than live virus immunization. Further, HSV2-BAC immunization was protective when animals were challenged with a lethal dose of virus. The utility of the HSV2-BAC for construction of recombinant virus genomes was demonstrated by elimination of the HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) gene. A recombinant HSV-2 BAC with the gD gene deleted was isolated and shown to be incapable of producing infectious virus following transfection unless an HSV gD gene was expressed in a complementing cell line. Immunization of mice with the HSV2 gD-BAC also elicited an HSV-2 specific antibody response and was protective. The results demonstrate the feasibility of DNA immunization with HSV-2 bacterial artificial chromosomes for replicating and nonreplicating candidate HSV-2 vaccines, as well as the utility of BAC technology for construction and maintenance of novel HSV-2 vaccines. The results further suggest that such technology will be a powerful tool for dissecting the immune response to HSV-2

  3. Digital PCR analysis of circulating tumor DNA: a biomarker for chondrosarcoma diagnosis, prognostication, and residual disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutteridge, Alice; Rathbone, Victoria M; Gibbons, Rebecca; Bi, Mark; Archard, Nicholas; Davies, Kate E J; Brown, Jake; Plagnol, Vincent; Pillay, Nischalan; Amary, Fernanda; O'Donnell, Paul; Gupta, Manu; Tirabosco, Roberto; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Forshew, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Conventional chondrosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in adults. Prognosis corresponds with tumor grade but remains variable, especially for individuals with grade (G) II disease. There are currently no biomarkers available for monitoring or prognostication of chondrosarcoma. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) has recently emerged as a promising biomarker for a broad range of tumor types. To date, little has been done to study the presence of ctDNA and its potential utility in the management of sarcomas, including chondrosarcoma. In this study, we have assessed ctDNA levels in a cohort of 71 patients, 32 with sarcoma, including 29 individuals with central chondrosarcoma (CS) and 39 with locally aggressive and benign bone and soft tissue tumors, using digital PCR. In patients with CS, ctDNA was detected in pretreatment samples in 14/29 patients, which showed clear correlation with tumor grade as demonstrated by the detection of ctDNA in all patients with GIII and dedifferentiated disease (n = 6) and in 8/17 patients with GII disease, but never associated with GI CS. Notably detection of ctDNA preoperatively in GII disease was associated with a poor outcome. A total of 14 patients with CS had ctDNA levels assessed at multiple time points and in most patients there was a clear reduction following surgical removal. This research lays the foundation for larger studies to assess the utility of ctDNA for chondrosarcoma diagnosis, prognostication, early detection of residual disease and monitoring disease progression. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. ATYPICAL CSF PICTURE IN VIRAL MENINGITIS HSV- TYPE-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Acute infections of nervous system are among the most important problems in medicine because early recognition, efficient decision making and rapid institution of therapy can be lifesaving. Making a clinical diagnosis of acute meningitis depends on the cornerstone of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination. We present a case with the above-mentioned difficulty and the approach involved in establishing the exact diagnosis and institution of appropriate treatment. CONCLUSION About findings in viral meningitis one should be careful while evaluating a CSF report so as to not make a mistaken diagnosis and delay treatment. The most important analysis in patients whose symptoms are consistent with herpes simplex meningitis is the detection of Herpes simplex Virus deoxy-ribo-nucleic acid (HSV-DNA in CSF with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR.

  5. Small animal PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression with {sup 124}IVDU in liver by the hydrodynamic injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, I. H.; Lee, T. S.; Woo, S. G.; Jeong, J. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kim, K. M.; Chun, K. J.; Choi, C. W.; Lim, S. M. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The liver is an important target organ for gene transfer due to its capacity for synthesizing serum protein and its involvement in numerous genetic diseases. High level of foreign gene expression in liver can be achieved by a large-volume and high-speed intravenous injection of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA), so called hydrodynamic injection. This study is aimed to evaluate liver specific-gene expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase(HSV1-tk) by hydrodynamic injection and image HSV1-tk expression using {sup 124}IVDU-PET. We constructed herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk)-expressing pDNA (pHSV1-tk) modified from pEGFP-N1. Hydrodynamic injection was performed using 40 {mu}g of plasmid (pEGFP/N1 or pHSV1-tk) in 2 ml of 0.85% saline solution for 20{approx}22g mice in 5 seconds intravenously. At 1 d post-hydrodynamic injection, biodistribution study was performed at 2 h post-injection of radiolabeled IVDU, fluorescence image was obtained using optical imager and small animal PET image was acquired with {sup 124}IVDU at 2 h post-injection. After PET imaging, digital whole body autoradiography (DWBA) was performed. Expression of HSV1-tk and EGFP was confirmed by RT-PCR in each liver tissue. In liver of pHSV1-tk and pEGFP/N1 injection groups, {sup 123}IVDU uptake was 5.65%ID/g and 0.98%ID/g, respectively. {sup 123}IVDU uptake in liver of pHSV1-tk injection group showed 5.7-fold higher than that of pEGFP/N1 injection group (p<0.01). On the other hand, the liver of pEGFP/N1 injection group showed fluorescence activity. In small animal PET images, {sup 124}IVDU uptake was selectively localized in liver of pHSV1-tk injection group and also checked in DWBA, but showed minimal uptake in liver of pEGFP/N1 injection mice. Hydrodynamic injection was effective to liver-specific delivery of plasmid DNA. Small animal PET image of {sup 124}IVDU could be used in the evaluation of noninvasive reporter gene imaging in liver.

  6. Prophylactic Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Vaccines Adjuvanted with Stable Emulsion and Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Induce a Robust HSV-2-Specific Cell-Mediated Immune Response, Protect against Symptomatic Disease, and Reduce the Latent Viral Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Michael T; Marshall, Jason D; Dorwart, Michael R; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Tummala, Padmaja; Yu, Li; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Sloan, Derek D

    2017-05-01

    Several prophylactic vaccines targeting herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) have failed in the clinic to demonstrate sustained depression of viral shedding or protection from recurrences. Although these vaccines have generated high titers of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), their induction of robust CD8 T cells has largely been unreported, even though evidence for the importance of HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cells is mounting in animal models and in translational studies involving subjects with active HSV-2-specific immune responses. We developed a subunit vaccine composed of the NAb targets gD and gB and the novel T cell antigen and tegument protein UL40, and we compared this vaccine to a whole-inactivated-virus vaccine (formaldehyde-inactivated HSV-2 [FI-HSV-2]). We evaluated different formulations in combination with several Th1-inducing Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in vivo In mice, the TLR9 agonist cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide formulated in a squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion promoted most robust, functional HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cell responses and high titers of neutralizing antibodies, demonstrating its superiority to vaccines adjuvanted by monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL)-alum. We further established that FI-HSV-2 alone or in combination with adjuvants as well as adjuvanted subunit vaccines were successful in the induction of NAbs and T cell responses in guinea pigs. These immunological responses were coincident with a suppression of vaginal HSV-2 shedding, low lesion scores, and a reduction in latent HSV-2 DNA in dorsal root ganglia to undetectable levels. These data support the further preclinical and clinical development of prophylactic HSV-2 vaccines that contain appropriate antigen and adjuvant components responsible for programming elevated CD8 T cell responses. IMPORTANCE Millions of people worldwide are infected with herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), and to date, an efficacious prophylactic vaccine has not met the rigors

  7. Image of HSV1-TK gene expression with {sup 123}IVDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The liver is an important target organ for gene transfer due to its capacity for synthesizing serum protein and its involvement in numerous genetic diseases. So livertargeted gene transfer is significant tool for expanding the treatment options and gene function studies. Gene transfer methods commonly use recombinant viral vector. However, viral vectors also have various disadvantages for example immune recognition after adenoviral vector delivery and potential viralassociated toxicity including helper virus replication and insertional mutagenesis. In contrast, nonviral vectors such as naked plasmid DNA(pDNA) and cationic liposomal systems exhibit low immunogenicity and repeated administration is possible(Ledley et al.,1992; Nabel et al.,1993). These are attractive vectors for in vivo gene transfer because of their suitable characteristics such as biodegradability, minimal toxicity, nonimmunogenicity, and simplicity of use. But non-viral gene delivery, has problems associated with limited efficiency at gene expression. hydrodynamic-based produce has very high level efficiency of gene extraction in liver or soild tumor. In mice, hydrodynamic-based produce was reported that a high level of transgene expression could be obtained in the liver by intravenous injection of large volume( 8{approx}10% of body weight) and high-speed ( Kobayashi N et al., 2004 ). HSV1-TK is one of the most widely use effect gene systems sued for imaging gene expression, in association with its use as a suicide gene, or as a reporter gene In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have developed as prodrug for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. Several 5-substituted uracil nucleoside derivatives have been identified to have high sensitivity and selective accumulation in HSV1-TK expression cell. This producer has been used hydrodynamic-based produce, we investigated to image of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene with (E

  8. Enhanced replication of attenuated HSV-1 in irradiated human glioma xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advani, Sunil J.; Kataoka, Yasushi; Sibley, Greg S.; Song, Paul Y.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Roizman, Bernard; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Previously we had shown that combining ionizing radiation (IR) with attenuated replication competent HSV-1 (R3616) significantly increased glioma xenograft eradication compared to IR or virus alone. One hypothesis is that IR induces cell factors that contribute to augment viral replication thereby increasing the efficacy of attenuated HSV-1. The purpose of this study was to examine if IR altered viral replication of attenuated HSV-1 in glioma xenografts Material and Methods: Human U-87MG glioma cells were grown in the hindlimb of athymic mice and grown to >200 mm 3 . Tumors were infected with 2x10 7 plaque forming units (pfu) of R3616 ( γ1 34.5 - ) or R7020 (multimutated, γ1 34.5 + ) on day 0 and irradiated with 20 Gy on day 1 and 25 Gy on day 2. Tumors were harvested 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after viral injection. Tumors were homogenized and sonnicated. Serial dilutions of tumor extract were overlaid on Vero cells to determine the number of pfu. In addition, in-situ hybridization to HSV-1 DNA was performed on tumors harvested at day 7. Results: In-situ hybridization revealed larger numbers of glial cells infected with HSV along with a greater distribution in the irradiated tumors compared to non-irradiated tumors. We next quantified viral particles in infected tumors +/- IR: Conclusion: Herein we demonstrate radiation enhanced viral replication as one of the interactive effects of combining IR and attenuated HSV in treating glioma xenografts and a potential therapeutic motif in the treatment of gliomas. To reduce normal tissue toxicity of HSV in glioma therapy, viruses must be attenuated. However, attenuating the virus compromises its replication and thus its potential efficacy. Our results indicate that IR augments the amount of virus recovered from human glioma xenografts for up to 3 days post IR. The results do not appear to be related to a specific mutation in the herpes genome but rather to herpes viruses in general. Yields of R7020 were greater than R

  9. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-derived recombinant vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Peggy; Fraefel, Cornel; Epstein, Alberto L

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153-kilobase pair (kbp) double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes the approach most commonly used to prepare recombinant HSV-1 vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria.

  10. Radioimmunoassay for herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuirt, P.V.; Keller, P.M.; Elion, G.B.

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive RIA for HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) has been developed. This assay is based on competition for the binding site of a rabbit antibody against purified HSV-1 TK, between a purified 3 H-labeled HSV-1 TK and a sample containing an unknown amount of viral TK. The assay is capable of detecting 8 ng or more of the HSV enzyme. Purified HSV-1 TK denatured to <1% of its original kinase activity is as effective in binding to the antibody as is native HSV-1 TK. Viral TK is detectable at ranges of 150-460 ng/mg protein of cell extract from infected cells or cells transformed by HSV or HSV genetic material. HSV-2 TK appears highly cross-reactive, VZV TK is slightly less so, and the vaccinia TK shows little or no cross-reactivity. This RIA may serve as a tool for monitoring the expression of the HSV TK during an active herpes virus infection, a latent ganglionic infection, or in neoplastic cells which may have arisen by viral transformation

  11. Inter-individual and inter-cell type variation in residual DNA damage after in vivo irradiation of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, Melvin Lee Kiang; Somaiah, Navita; Bourne, Sara; Daley, Frances; A'Hern, Roger; Nuta, Otilia; Davies, Sue; Herskind, Carsten; Pearson, Ann; Warrington, Jim; Helyer, Sarah; Owen, Roger; Yarnold, John; Rothkamm, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare inter-individual and inter-cell type variation in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair following in vivo irradiation of human skin. Materials and methods: Duplicate 4 mm core biopsies of irradiated and unirradiated skin were collected from 35 patients 24 h after 4 Gy exposure using 6 MeV electrons. Residual DSB were quantified by scoring 53BP1 foci in dermal fibroblasts, endothelial cells, superficial keratinocytes and basal epidermal cells. Results: Coefficients of inter-individual variation for levels of residual foci 24 h after in vivo irradiation of skin were 39.9% in dermal fibroblasts, 44.3% in endothelial cells, 32.9% in superficial keratinocytes and 46.4% in basal epidermal cells (p < 0.001, ANOVA). In contrast, the coefficient of inter-cell type variation for residual foci levels was only 11.3% in human skin between the different epidermal and dermal cells (p = 0.034, ANOVA). Foci levels between the different skin cell types were correlated (Pearson's R = 0.855-0.955, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Patient-specific factors appear to be more important than cell type-specific factors in determining residual foci levels following in vivo irradiation of human skin.

  12. Efficacy of the anti-VZV (anti-HSV3 vaccine in HSV1 and HSV2 recurrent herpes simplex disease: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Goaster J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Le Goaster,1 Sylvie Gonzalo,2 Patrice Bourée,1 Frederic Tangy,3 Anne-Lise Haenni41Department of Tropical Diseases, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire (CHU, University of Paris XI, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, 2Biomnis Laboratory, Ivry-sur-Seine, 3Retro-Virology, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, Pasteur Institute, Paris; 4Jacques Monod Institute, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, University of Paris VII, Paris, FranceBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using the anti-varicella zoster virus (anti-VZV, also known as anti-HSV3 vaccine against orobuccal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 and genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV2. This was suggested by study of the phylogenetic tree of members of the herpes virus family, which showed a close relationship between VZV (HSV3 and the HSV1 and HSV2 herpes viruses.Methods: The present prospective study was conducted from January 2005 through January 2011. Twenty-four patients afflicted with HSV1 and HSV2 herpes recurrences over a period of years, numbering 6–8 and more recurrences per year, agreed to receive the anti-VZV vaccine. They were compared with 26 nonvaccinated patients presenting with herpes simplex diseases 2–5 times a year. All 50 patients were documented with anti-HSV1, anti-HSV2, and anti-VZV antibody serological testing.Results: From 2005 through 2011, for the 24 anti-VZV vaccinated patients, the average number of herpes relapses decreased to 0, correlated with an increased anti-VZV antibody level and clinical recovery of all patients, whereas no improvement was observed for the 26 nonvaccinated herpes patients.Conclusion: Data for the anti-VZV serological antibody levels tested before and after anti-VZV vaccination showed a significant (P < 0.001 increase among vaccinated patients. This suggests defective anti-VZV immune power in these patients. After 6 years of positive results for anti-VZV vaccine, this is a logical and

  13. Covalent Bonding of Pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) to Terminal Guanine Residues within Duplex and Hairpin DNA Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantaj, Julia; Jackson, Paul J. M.; Karu, Kersti; Rahman, Khondaker M.; Thurston, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) are covalent-binding DNA-interactive agents with growing importance as payloads in Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs). Until now, PBDs were thought to covalently bond to C2-NH2 groups of guanines in the DNA-minor groove across a three-base-pair recognition sequence. Using HPLC/MS methodology with designed hairpin and duplex oligonucleotides, we have now demonstrated that the PBD Dimer SJG-136 and the C8-conjugated PBD Monomer GWL-78 can covalently bond to a terminal guanine of DNA, with the PBD skeleton spanning only two base pairs. Control experiments with the non-C8-conjugated anthramycin along with molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the C8-substituent of a PBD Monomer, or one-half of a PBD Dimer, may provide stability for the adduct. This observation highlights the importance of PBD C8-substituents, and also suggests that PBDs may bind to terminal guanines within stretches of DNA in cells, thus representing a potentially novel mechanism of action at the end of DNA strand breaks. PMID:27055050

  14. Comparison of herpes simplex (HSV) proteins synthesized in Vero, HEP-2 and human megakaryocyte-like cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soslau, G.; Pastorino, M.B.; Morgan, D.A.; Brodsky, I.; Howett, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    The natural human host blood cell capable of supporting herpes virus replication has yet to be defined. They found that a recently cultured human megakaryocyte-like (Meg) cell line can support HSV 1 and 2 replication as demonstrated by growth inhibition, CPE, virus production and HSV DNA synthesis. The HSV proteins synthesized and post-translationally modified in Vero and HEp-2 infected cells were compared to the protein species produced in the infected Meg cell since differences may influence antigenic properties and host range. Host cell protein synthesis was greatly reduced in all three cell lines within hours post infection (pi). However, maximum viral protein synthesis occurs between 4 and 24 hrs pi with the Meg cells as compared to 24-48 hrs pi with the other cell lines. The immunoprecipitated 35 S-methionine labeled HSV protein gel patterns for each infected cell line are qualitatively and quantitatively very different from each other. Dramatic differences were also observed when infected cells were labeled with 32 P-ATP (in vitro method) or 32 Pi (in vivo method). Finally, analysis of 3 H-mannose labeled HSV glycoproteins demonstrates that the post-translational modifications of these proteins are significantly altered in the Meg cell as compared to the Vero and HEp-2 cells

  15. Novel essential residues of Hda for interaction with DnaA in the regulatory inactivation of DnaA: unique roles for Hda AAA Box VI and VII motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenta; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2010-04-01

    Escherichia coli ATP-DnaA initiates chromosomal replication. For preventing extra-initiations, a complex of ADP-Hda and the DNA-loaded replicase clamp promotes DnaA-ATP hydrolysis, yielding inactive ADP-DnaA. However, the Hda-DnaA interaction mode remains unclear except that the Hda Box VII Arg finger (Arg-153) and DnaA sensor II Arg-334 within each AAA(+) domain are crucial for the DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Here, we demonstrate that direct and functional interaction of ADP-Hda with DnaA requires the Hda residues Ser-152, Phe-118 and Asn-122 as well as Hda Arg-153 and DnaA Arg-334. Structural analyses suggest intermolecular interactions between Hda Ser-152 and DnaA Arg-334 and between Hda Phe-118 and the DnaA Walker B motif region, in addition to an intramolecular interaction between Hda Asn-122 and Arg-153. These interactions likely sustain a specific association of ADP-Hda and DnaA, promoting DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Consistently, ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA interact with the ADP-Hda-DNA-clamp complex with similar affinities. Hda Phe-118 and Asn-122 are contained in the Box VI region, and their hydrophobic and electrostatic features are basically conserved in the corresponding residues of other AAA(+) proteins, suggesting a conserved role for Box VI. These findings indicate novel interaction mechanisms for Hda-DnaA as well as a potentially fundamental mechanism in AAA(+) protein interactions.

  16. Radiation-induced DNA damage in tumors and normal tissues. II. Influence of dose, residual DNA damage and physiological factors in oxygenated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Wheeler, K.T.

    1994-01-01

    Detection and quantification of hypoxic cells in solid tumors is important for many experimental and clinical situations. Several laboratories, including ours, have suggested that assays which measure radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) might be used to detect or quantify hypoxic cells in tumors and normal tissues. Recently, we demonstrated the feasibility of using an alkaline elution assay that measures strand breaks and DPCs to detect and/or quantify hypoxic cells in tissues. For this approach to be valid, DPCs must not be formed to any great extent in irradiated oxygenated cells, and the formation and repair of strand breaks and DPCs in oxygenated cells must not be modified appreciably by physiological factors (e.g., temperature, pH and nutrient depletion) that are often found in solid tumors. To address these issues, two sets of experiments were performed. In one set of experiments, oxygenated 9L cells in tissue culture, subcutaneous 9L tumors and rat cerebella were irradiated with doses of 15 or 50 Gy and allowed to repair until the residual strand break damage was low enough to detect DPCs. In another set of experiments, oxygenated exponentially growing or plateau-phase 9L cells in tissue culture were irradiated with a dose of 15 Gy at 37 or 20 degrees C, while the cells were maintained at a pH of either 6.6 or 7.3. DNA-protein crosslinks were formed in oxygenated cells about 100 times less efficiently than in hypoxic cells. In addition, temperature, pH, nutrient depletion and growth phase did not appreciably alter the formation and repair of strand breaks or the formation of DPCs in oxygenated 9L cells. These results support the use of this DNA damage assay for the detection and quantification of hypoxic cells in solid tumors. 27 refs., 5 tabs

  17. Residual Cdk1/2 activity after DNA damage promotes senescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllers, E.; Cascales, H.S.; Burdová, Kamila; Macůrek, Libor; Lindqvist, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2017), s. 575-584 ISSN 1474-9726 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18392S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Cdk1 * Cdk2 * cell cycle * checkpoint recovery * DNA damage response * G2phase * p21 * senescence Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  18. Quantitative real-time PCR technique for the identification of E. coli residual DNA in streptokinase recombinant product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazelahi, Mansoureh; Kia, Vahid; Kaghazian, Hooman; Paryan, Mahdi

    2017-11-26

    Recombinant streptokinase is a biopharmaceutical which is usually produced in E. coli. Residual DNA as a contamination and risk factor may remain in the product. It is necessary to control the production procedure to exclude any possible contamination. The aim of the present study was to develop a highly specific and sensitive quantitative real-time PCR-based method to determine the amount of E. coli DNA in recombinant streptokinase. A specific primers and a probe was designed to detect all strains of E. coli. To determine the specificity, in addition to using NCBI BLASTn, 28 samples including human, bacterial, and viral genomes were used. The results confirmed that the assay detects no genomic DNA but E. coli's and the specificity was determined to be 100%. To determine the sensitivity and limit of detection of the assay, a 10-fold serial dilution (10 1 to 10 7 copies/µL) was tested in triplicate. The sensitivity of the test was determined to be 101 copies/µL or 35 fg/µL. Inter-assay and intra-assay were determined to be 0.86 and 1.69%, respectively. Based on the results, this assay can be used as an accurate method to evaluate the contamination of recombinant streptokinase in E. coli.

  19. HSV neutralization by the microbicidal candidate C5A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Witte, L.; Bobardt, M.D.; Chatterji, U.; van Loenen, F.B.; Verjans, G.M.G.M.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Gallay, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Genital herpes is a major risk factor in acquiring human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and is caused by both Herpes Simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. The amphipathic peptide C5A, derived from the non-structural hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein 5A, was shown to prevent HIV-1

  20. HSV neutralization by the microbicidal candidate C5A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. de Witte (Lot); M.D. Bobardt (Michael); U. Chatterji (Udayan); F.B. van Loenen (Freek); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); T.B.H. Geijtenbeek (Teunis); P.A. Gallay (Philippe)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractGenital herpes is a major risk factor in acquiring human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and is caused by both Herpes Simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. The amphipathic peptide C5A, derived from the non-structural hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein 5A, was shown to

  1. Genital HSV Shedding among Kenyan Women Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffins O Manguro

    Full Text Available Genital ulcer disease (GUD prevalence increases in the first month of antiretroviral treatment (ART, followed by a return to baseline prevalence by month 3. Since most GUD is caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2, we hypothesized that genital HSV detection would follow a similar pattern after treatment initiation.We conducted a prospective cohort study of 122 HSV-2 and HIV-1 co-infected women with advanced HIV disease who initiated ART and were followed closely with collection of genital swab specimens for the first three months of treatment.At baseline, the HSV detection rate was 32%, without significant increase in genital HSV detection noted during the first month or the third month of ART. HIV-1 shedding declined during this period; no association was also noted between HSV and HIV-1 shedding during this period.Because other studies have reported increased HSV detection in women initiating ART and we have previously reported an increase in GUD during early ART, it may be prudent to counsel HIV-1 infected women initiating ART that HSV shedding in the genital tract may continue after ART initiation.

  2. DnaK as Antibiotic Target: Hot Spot Residues Analysis for Differential Inhibition of the Bacterial Protein in Comparison with the Human HSP70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Chiappori

    Full Text Available DnaK, the bacterial homolog of human Hsp70, plays an important role in pathogens survival under stress conditions, like antibiotic therapies. This chaperone sequesters protein aggregates accumulated in bacteria during antibiotic treatment reducing the effect of the cure. Although different classes of DnaK inhibitors have been already designed, they present low specificity. DnaK is highly conserved in prokaryotes (identity 50-70%, which encourages the development of a unique inhibitor for many different bacterial strains. We used the DnaK of Acinetobacter baumannii as representative for our analysis, since it is one of the most important opportunistic human pathogens, exhibits a significant drug resistance and it has the ability to survive in hospital environments. The E.coli DnaK was also included in the analysis as reference structure due to its wide diffusion. Unfortunately, bacterial DnaK and human Hsp70 have an elevated sequence similarity. Therefore, we performed a differential analysis of DnaK and Hsp70 residues to identify hot spots in bacterial proteins that are not present in the human homolog, with the aim of characterizing the key pharmacological features necessary to design selective inhibitors for DnaK. Different conformations of DnaK and Hsp70 bound to known inhibitor-peptides for DnaK, and ineffective for Hsp70, have been analysed by molecular dynamics simulations to identify residues displaying stable and selective interactions with these peptides. Results achieved in this work show that there are some residues that can be used to build selective inhibitors for DnaK, which should be ineffective for the human Hsp70.

  3. [F-18]FHPG positron emission tomography for detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in experimental HSV encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buursma, AR; de Vries, EFJ; Garssen, J; Kegler, D; van Waarde, A; Schirm, J; Hospers, GAP; Mulder, NH; Vaalburg, W; Klein, HC

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is one of the most common causes of sporadic encephalitis. The initial clinical course of HSV encephalitis (HSE) is highly variable, and the infection may be rapidly fatal. For effective treatment with antiviral medication, an early diagnosis of HSE is crucial.

  4. DNA Methylation Adds Prognostic Value to Minimal Residual Disease Status in Pediatric T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borssén, Magnus; Haider, Zahra; Landfors, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    . In modern protocols, therapy response is monitored by minimal residual disease (MRD) analysis and used for postinduction risk group stratification. DNA methylation profiling is a candidate for subtype discrimination at diagnosis and we investigated its role as a prognostic marker in pediatric T......: 29% vs. 6%, P = 0.01). Most importantly, CIMP classification at diagnosis allowed subgrouping of high-risk T-ALL patients (MRD ≥0.1% at day 29) into two groups with significant differences in outcome (CIR3y rates: CIMP negative 50% vs. CIMP positive 12%; P = 0.02). These groups did not differ...... regarding ETP phenotype, but the CIMP-negative group was younger (P = 0.02) and had higher white blood cell count at diagnosis (P = 0.004) compared with the CIMP-positive group. CONCLUSIONS: CIMP classification at diagnosis in combination with MRD during induction therapy is a strong candidate for further...

  5. Concerted bis-alkylating reactivity of clerocidin towards unpaired cytosine residues in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sara N.; Menegazzo, Ileana; Fabris, Daniele; Palumbo, Manlio

    2004-01-01

    Clerocidin (CL) is a topoisomerase II poison, which cleaves DNA irreversibly at guanines (G) and reversibly at cytosines (C). Furthermore, the drug can induce enzyme-independent strand breaks at the G and C level. It has been previously shown that G-damage is induced by alkylation of the guanine N7, followed by spontaneous depurination and nucleic acid cleavage, whereas scission at C is obtained only after treatment with hot alkali, and no information is available to explain the nature of this damage. We present here a systematic study on the reactivity of CL towards C both in the DNA environment and in solution. Selected synthetic derivatives were employed to evaluate the role of each chemical group of the drug. The structure of CL–dC adduct was then characterized by tandem mass spectrometry and NMR: the adduct is a stable condensed ring system resulting from a concerted electrophilic attack of the adjacent carbonyl and epoxide groups of CL towards the exposed NH2 and N3, respectively. This reaction mechanism, shown here for the first time, is characterized by faster kinetic rates than alkylation at G, due to the fact that the rate-determining step, alkylation at the epoxide, is an intramolecular process, provided a Schiff base linking CL and C can rapidly form, whereas the corresponding reaction of G N7 is intermolecular. These results provide helpful hints to explain the reversible/irreversible nature of topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage produced by CL at C/G steps. PMID:15494453

  6. The Roles of Several Residues of Escherichia coli DNA Photolyase in the Highly Efficient Photo-Repair of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli DNA photolyase is an enzyme that repairs the major kind of UV-induced lesions, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD in DNA utilizing 350–450 nm light as energy source. The enzyme has very high photo-repair efficiency (the quantum yield of the reaction is ~0.85, which is significantly greater than many model compounds that mimic photolyase. This suggests that some residues of the protein play important roles in the photo-repair of CPD. In this paper, we have focused on several residues discussed their roles in catalysis by reviewing the existing literature and some hypotheses.

  7. Efficacy of the Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Glycoprotein D/AS04 Vaccine against Genital HSV-2 and HSV-1 Infection and Disease in the Cotton Rat Sigmodon hispidus Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalova, Marina; McKay, Jamall; Mbaye, Aissatou; Sanford-Crane, Hannah; Blanco, Jorge C G; Huber, Ashley; Herold, Betsy C

    2015-10-01

    Subunit vaccines based on the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD-2) have been the major focus of HSV-2 vaccine development for the past 2 decades. Based on the promising data generated in the guinea pig model, a formulation containing truncated gD-2, aluminum salt, and MPL (gD/AS04) advanced to clinical trials. The results of these trials, however, were unexpected, as the vaccine protected against HSV-1 infection but not against HSV-2. To address this discrepancy, we developed a Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA)-treated cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus model of HSV-2 and HSV-1 genital infection. The severity of HSV-1 genital herpes was less than that of HSV-2 genital herpes in cotton rats, and yet the model allowed for comparative evaluation of gD/AS04 immunogenicity and efficacy. Cotton rats were intramuscularly vaccinated using a prime boost strategy with gD/AS04 (Simplirix vaccine) or control vaccine formulation (hepatitis B vaccine FENDrix) and subsequently challenged intravaginally with HSV-2 or HSV-1. The gD/AS04 vaccine was immunogenic in cotton rats and induced serum IgG directed against gD-2 and serum HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies but failed to efficiently protect against HSV-2 disease or to decrease the HSV-2 viral load. However, gD/AS04 significantly reduced vaginal titers of HSV-1 and better protected animals against HSV-1 compared to HSV-2 genital disease. The latter finding is generally consistent with the clinical outcome of the Herpevac trial of Simplirix. Passive transfer of serum from gD/AS04-immunized cotton rats conferred stronger protection against HSV-1 genital disease. These findings suggest the need for alternative vaccine strategies and the identification of new correlates of protection. In spite of the high health burden of genital herpes, there is still no effective intervention against the disease. The significant gap in knowledge on genital herpes pathogenesis has been further highlighted by the recent failure of GSK

  8. Hydrogen-Bonding Capability of a Templating Difluorotoluene Nucleotide Residue in an RB69 DNA Polymerase Ternary Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Shuangluo; Konigsberg, William H.; Wang, Jimin (Yale)

    2011-08-29

    Results obtained using 2,4-difluorotoluene nucleobase (dF) as a nonpolar thymine isostere by Kool and colleagues challenged the Watson-Crick dogma that hydrogen bonds between complementary bases are an absolute requirement for accurate DNA replication. Here, we report crystal structure of an RB69 DNA polymerase L561A/S565G/Y567A triple mutant ternary complex with a templating dF opposite dTTP at 1.8 {angstrom}-resolution. In this structure, direct hydrogen bonds were observed between: (i) dF and the incoming dTTP, (ii) dF and residue G568 of the polymerase, and (iii) dF and ordered water molecules surrounding the nascent base pair. Therefore, this structure provides evidence that a templating dF can form novel hydrogen bonds with the incoming dTTP and with the enzyme that differ from those formed with a templating dT.

  9. A high resolution melting (HRM) technology-based assay for cost-efficient clinical detection and genotyping of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and HSV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieveld, M; Carregosa, A; Benoy, I; Redzic, N; Berth, M; Vanden Broeck, D

    2017-10-01

    Genital herpes can be caused by two very similar viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 or HSV-2. These two HSV types cannot be distinguished clinically, but genotyping is recommended in the first-episodes of genital herpes to guide counselling and management. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is the preferred diagnostic method for HSV typing. However, commercial qPCR methods use expensive fluorescent labeled probes for detection. Furthermore, most low-cost methods are not able to differentiate between HSV-1 and -2. The aim of this study was to develop a high resolution melting (HRM) technology-based assay for sensitive HSV-1 and HSV-2 detection and genotyping. Using a panel of 46 clinical specimens, the performance of the HRM assay was compared to two commercial HSV tests: the HRM assay detected HSV in all 23 positive samples, with no false positive results (100% concordance with HSV I/II Real-TM assay). Additionally, the HRM assay correctly genotyped both HSV types in a subset of these clinical samples, as determined by the Realstar HSV PCR Kit. The HSV HRM assay provides a cost-effective alternative method to conventional more expensive assays and can be used in routine clinical specimens, in cases where it is particularly necessary to detect and distinguish HSV-1 from -2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of shRNA-containing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based gene therapy for HSV-2-induced genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihong; Xiang, Yang; Wei, Zhun; Yu, Bo; Shao, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Hong; Li, Manmei; Guan, Ming; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    HSV-1-based vectors have been widely used to achieve targeted delivery of genes into the nervous system. In the current study, we aim to use shRNA-containing HSV-1-based gene delivery system for the therapy of HSV-2 infection. Guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with HSV-2 and scored daily for 100 days for the severity of vaginal disease. HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 was applied intravaginally daily between 8 and 14 days after HSV-2 challenge. Delivery of HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 had no effect on the onset of disease and acute virus shedding in animals, but resulted in a significant reduction in both the cumulative recurrent lesion days and the number of days with recurrent disease. Around half of the animals in the HSV-2 shRNA group did not develop recurrent disease 100 days post HSV-2 infection. In conclusion, HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 particles are effective in reducing the recurrence of genital herpes caused by HSV-2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Strong Country Level Correlation between Syphilis and HSV-2 Prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chris Richard; Tsoumanis, Achilleas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Syphilis is curable but Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2) is not. As a result, the prevalence of syphilis but not HSV-2 may be influenced by the efficacy of national STI screening and treatment capacity. If the prevalence of syphilis and HSV-2 is found to be correlated, then this makes it more likely that something other than differential STI treatment is responsible for variations in the prevalence of both HSV-2 and syphilis. Methods. Simple linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between national antenatal syphilis prevalence and HSV-2 prevalence in women in two time periods: 1990–1999 and 2008. Adjustments were performed for the laboratory syphilis testing algorithm used and the prevalence of circumcision. Results. The prevalence of syphilis was positively correlated with that of HSV-2 for both time periods (adjusted correlations, 20–24-year-olds: 1990–99: R 2 = 0.54, P < 0.001; 2008: R 2 = 0.41, P < 0.001 and 40–44-year-olds: 1990–99: R 2 = 0.42, P < 0.001; 2008: R 2 = 0.49, P < 0.001). Conclusion. The prevalence of syphilis and HSV-2 is positively correlated. This could be due to a common set of risk factors underpinning both STIs. PMID:27069710

  12. The impact of HSV for inflammatory arthropathy patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Mortimer B

    2012-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), also known as herpes labialis, is the etiologic agent of vesicular lesions of the oral mucosa commonly referred to as "cold sores". HSV-1 can also cause clinical disease in a wide variety of other anatomic locations including the genitalia, liver, lung, eye, and central nervous system. These infections can be severe, particularly in the setting of immunosuppression, such as inflammatory arthropathy patients on Methotrexate ± biological therapies. Here, we highlight the importance of physician awareness of HSV due to its potential impact for rheumatology patients.

  13. Seroprevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies in Canadian women screened for enrolment in a herpes simplex virus vaccine trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorfinkel, I S; Aoki, F; McNeil, S; Dionne, M; Shafran, S D; Zickler, P; Halperin, S; Langley, J; Bellamy, A; Schulte, J; Heineman, T; Belshe, R

    2013-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infections continue to be among the most common and unrecognized sexually transmitted infections in the world. Although treatable, HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections remain incurable. Hence, there is interest in the development of a vaccine to prevent genital herpes. As part of a multicentre, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to test such a vaccine, healthy women 18-30 years were enrolled as volunteers in several Canadian centres between 2005 and 2007. This study reports the seroprevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies in this group. A total of 2694 adult female volunteers in Canada with no known history of herpes simplex were screened for HSV antibodies using Western blot assay (the gold standard for diagnosis of HSV) for potential participation in a randomized, double-blind efficacy field trial of a herpes simplex vaccine. This trial provides a unique opportunity to examine the prevalence of antibodies to HSV-1 and of antibodies to HSV-2 in women with no known history of herpes simplex infection. The prevalence of antibodies to HSV-1 and to HSV-2 is compared with that found in previous Canadian studies that focused on a more general population. The overall seroprevalence of antibody to HSV-1 was 43%; that of HSV-2 was 2.5% and seropositivity to both was 2%. The prevalence of antibody to both HSV-1 and to HSV-2 increased with age. Seronegativity to both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was 56% in participating centres with populations under 250,000 and 46% in participating centres with populations over 250,000. Significant racial differences in seropositivity to HSV-1 and to HSV-2 were noted. The likelihood of participants being seropositive to HSV-1 and to HSV-2 was found to increase with age and to positively correlate with the population of the city in which they resided. Hypotheses are proposed to account for differences in racial seropositivity to HSV-1 and to HSV-2.

  14. A correlation between residual radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in cultured fibroblasts and late radiotherapy reactions in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiltie, A.E.; Ryan, A.J.; Swindell, R.; Barber, J.B.P.; West, C.M.L.; Magee, B.; Hendry, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: Prediction of late normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy would permit tailoring of dosage to each patient. Measurement of residual DNA double strand breaks using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) shows promise in this field. The aim of this study was to test the predictive potential of PFGE in a group of retrospectively studied breast cancer patients.Materials and methods: Thirty nine patients, treated uniformly for breast cancer 9-15 years previously, with excision of the tumour and radiotherapy to the breast and drainage areas, were assessed clinically using the LENT SOMA scale, and a 5-mm punch biopsy taken from the buttock. Fibroblast cell strains were established and used to study residual DNA double strand breaks, using PFGE.Results: There were significant correlations between the DNA assay results and the fibrosis score (r s =0.46; P=0.003), the combined fibrosis and retraction score (r s =0.45, P=0.004) and the overall LENT score (r s =0.43; P=0.006). Using polychotomous logistic regression, the fibroblast DNA assay result was an independent prognostic factor for fibrosis severity.Conclusions: There is a relationship between residual radiation-induced DNA damage in fibroblasts and the severity of the late normal tissue damage seen in the patients from whom the cells were cultured. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and nonencephalitic HSV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salovin, Amy; Glanzman, Jason; Roslin, Kylie; Armangue, Thais; Lynch, David R; Panzer, Jessica A

    2018-07-01

    To determine whether there is an association between nonencephalitic herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis (anti-NMDARE). Antibody testing was performed using samples from 2 cohorts in a case-control observational study. The cohort "Philadelphia" included 16 serum samples of pediatric anti-NMDARE cases and 42 age-matched controls with other neuroinflammatory disorders studied at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania. The cohort "Barcelona" contained 23 anti-NMDARE patient samples and 26 age-matched participants with other neuroinflammatory disorders studied at IDIBAPS-Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona. The presence of HSV-1 IgG antibodies was examined by ELISA. As an additional control, IgG antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA) were determined. In each cohort, more participants with anti-NMDARE than controls had anti-HSV-1 IgG antibodies. In the Philadelphia cohort (58 participants), 44% of anti-NMDARE cases had antibodies to HSV-1 compared with 14% controls (OR 4.67, 95% CI 1.3-17.3, p = 0.031). In the Barcelona cohort (49 participants), 52% of participants with anti-NMDARE had antibodies to HSV-1 compared with 31% of controls (OR 2.45, 95% CI 0.7-7.9, p = 0.155). Overall, 49% of anti-NMDARE cases have antibodies to HSV-1 in these 2 combined cohorts compared with 21% of controls (Mantel-Haenszel OR 3.21, 95% CI 1.3-7.7, p = 0.007). Past HSV-1 infection was found in significantly more anti-NMDARE cases than controls. This suggests a meaningful association between nonencephalitic HSV-1 infection and development of anti-NMDARE.

  16. DNA Methylation Adds Prognostic Value to Minimal Residual Disease Status in Pediatric T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borssén, Magnus; Haider, Zahra; Landfors, Mattias; Norén-Nyström, Ulrika; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Åsberg, Ann E; Kanerva, Jukka; Madsen, Hans O; Marquart, Hanne; Heyman, Mats; Hultdin, Magnus; Roos, Göran; Forestier, Erik; Degerman, Sofie

    2016-07-01

    Despite increased knowledge about genetic aberrations in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), no clinically feasible treatment-stratifying marker exists at diagnosis. Instead patients are enrolled in intensive induction therapies with substantial side effects. In modern protocols, therapy response is monitored by minimal residual disease (MRD) analysis and used for postinduction risk group stratification. DNA methylation profiling is a candidate for subtype discrimination at diagnosis and we investigated its role as a prognostic marker in pediatric T-ALL. Sixty-five diagnostic T-ALL samples from Nordic pediatric patients treated according to the Nordic Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology ALL 2008 (NOPHO ALL 2008) protocol were analyzed by HumMeth450K genome wide DNA methylation arrays. Methylation status was analyzed in relation to clinical data and early T-cell precursor (ETP) phenotype. Two distinct CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) groups were identified. Patients with a CIMP-negative profile had an inferior response to treatment compared to CIMP-positive patients (3-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR3y ) rate: 29% vs. 6%, P = 0.01). Most importantly, CIMP classification at diagnosis allowed subgrouping of high-risk T-ALL patients (MRD ≥0.1% at day 29) into two groups with significant differences in outcome (CIR3y rates: CIMP negative 50% vs. CIMP positive 12%; P = 0.02). These groups did not differ regarding ETP phenotype, but the CIMP-negative group was younger (P = 0.02) and had higher white blood cell count at diagnosis (P = 0.004) compared with the CIMP-positive group. CIMP classification at diagnosis in combination with MRD during induction therapy is a strong candidate for further risk classification and could confer important information in treatment decision making. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. On the Formation and Properties of Interstrand DNA-DNA Cross-links Forged by Reaction of an Abasic Site With the Opposing Guanine Residue of 5′-CAp Sequences in Duplex DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin M.; Price, Nathan E.; Wang, Jin; Fekry, Mostafa I.; Dutta, Sanjay; Seiner, Derrick R.; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S.

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the aldehyde residue of an abasic (Ap) site in duplex DNA can generate an interstrand cross-link via reaction with a guanine residue on the opposing strand. This finding is intriguing because the highly deleterious nature of interstrand cross-links suggests that even small amounts of Ap-derived cross-links could make a significant contribution to the biological consequences stemming from the generation of Ap sites in cellular DNA. Incubation of 21-bp duplexes containing a central 5′-CAp sequence under conditions of reductive amination (NaCNBH3, pH 5.2) generated much higher yields of cross-linked DNA than reported previously. At pH 7, in the absence of reducing agents, these Ap-containing duplexes also produced cross-linked duplexes that were readily detected on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Cross-link formation was not highly sensitive to reaction conditions and, once formed, the cross-link was stable to a variety of work-up conditions. Results of multiple experiments including MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, gel mobility, methoxyamine capping of the Ap aldehyde, inosine-for-guanine replacement, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and LCMS/MS were consistent with a cross-linking mechanism involving reversible reaction of the Ap aldehyde residue with the N2-amino group of the opposing guanine residue in 5′-CAp sequences to generate hemiaminal, imine, or cyclic hemiaminal cross-links (7-10) that were irreversibly converted under conditions of reductive amination (NaCNBH3/pH 5.2) to a stable amine linkage. Further support for the importance of the exocyclic N2-amino group in this reaction was provided by an experiment showing that installation of a 2-aminopurine-thymine base pair at the cross-linking site produced high yields (15-30%) of a cross-linked duplex at neutral pH, in the absence of NaCNBH3. PMID:23215239

  18. Pneumomediastinum and Pneumothorax Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rivera, Fermín; Colón Rivera, Xavier; González Monroig, Hernán A; Garcia Puebla, Juan

    2018-01-30

    BACKGROUND Pneumonia is one of the most common causes of death from infectious disease in the United States (US). Although most cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are secondary to bacterial infection, up to one-third of cases are secondary to viral infection, most commonly due to rhinovirus and influenza virus. Pneumonia due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) is rare, and there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis and clinical complications. This report is of a fatal case of HSV pneumonia associated with bilateral pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. CASE REPORT A 36-year-old homeless male Hispanic patient, who was a chronic smoker, with a history of intravenous drug abuse and a medical history of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), was admitted to hospital as an emergency with a seven-day history of productive purulent cough. The patient was admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) with a diagnosis of CAP, with intubation and mechanical ventilation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and was positive for HSV. The patient developed bilateral pneumothorax with pneumomediastinum, which was fatal, despite aggressive clinical management. CONCLUSIONS Pneumonia due to HSV infection is uncommon but has a high mortality. Although HSV pneumonia has been described in immunocompromised patients, further studies are required to determine the pathogenesis, early detection, identification of patients who are at risk and to determine the most effective approaches to prophylaxis and treatment for HSV pneumonia.

  19. HIV-DNA in the genital tract of women on long-term effective therapy is associated to residual viremia and previous AIDS-defining illnesses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Prazuck

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of long-term combined antiretroviral therapy (cART on HIV-RNA and HIV-DNA levels in cervicovaginal secretions of HIV-1-infected women with sustained undetectable plasma RNA viral load (PVL; to explore factors predictive of residual viral shedding; and to evaluate the risk of heterosexual transmission. METHODS: Women with undetectable PVL (6 months were included in this cross-sectional study. HIV-RNA and HIV-DNA were measured in blood and cervicovaginal lavage fluid (CVL. Women were systematically tested for genital infections. The risk of transmission to male partners during unprotected intercourse was estimated. RESULTS: Eighty-one women composed the study population: all had HIV-RNA <40 copies/mL in CVL. HIV-DNA was detectable in CVL of 29/78 patients (37%. There was a weak positive correlation between HIV-DNA levels in PBMCs and CVL (r = 0.20; p = 0.08. In multivariate analysis, two factors were associated with HIV-DNA detection in CVL: previous AIDS-defining illnesses (OR = 11; 95%CI = 2-61 and current residual viremia (20DNA detection in CVL. Twenty-eight percent of the women had unprotected intercourse with their regular HIV-seronegative male partner, for between 8 and 158 months. None of their male partners became infected, after a total of 14 000 exposures. CONCLUSION: In our experience, HIV-RNA was undetectable in the genital tract of women with sustained control of PVL on cART. HIV-DNA shedding persisted in about one third of cases, with no substantial evidence of residual infectiousness.

  20. Construction of Various γ34.5 Deleted Fluorescent-Expressing Oncolytic herpes Simplex type 1 (oHSV) for Generation and Isolation of HSV-Based Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Shahriyar; Roohvand, Farzin; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bahrololoumi, Mina; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2017-07-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV)-based vectors lacking γ34.5 gene, are considered as ideal templates to construct efficient vectors for (targeted) cancer gene therapy. Herein, we reported the construction of three single/dually-flourescence labeled and γ34.5-deleted, recombinant HSV-1 vectors for rapid generation and easy selection/isolation of different HSV-Based vectors. Generation of recombinant viruses was performed with conventional homologous recombination methods using green fluorescent protein (GFP) and BleCherry harboring shuttle vectors. Viruses were isolated by direct fluorescence observation and standard plaque purifying methods and confirmed by PCR and sequencing and flow cytometry. XTT and plaque assay titration were performed on Vero, U87MG, and T98 GBM cell lines. We generated three recombinant viruses, HSV-GFP, HSV-GR (Green-Red), and HSV-Red. The HSV-GFP showed two log higher titer (1010 PFU) than wild type (108 PFU). In contrast, HSV-GR and HSV-Red showed one log lower titer (107 PFU) than parental HSV. Cytotoxicity analysis showed that HSV-GR and HSV-Red can lyse target tumor cells at multiplicity of infection of 10 and 1 (Pidentification via fluorescence activated cell sorting. These vectors can also be used for tracing the efficacy of therapeutic agents on target cells, imaging of neural or tumoral cells in vitro/in vivo and as oncolytic agents in cancer therapy.

  1. A subset of herpes simplex virus replication genes induces DNA amplification within the host cell genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilbronn, R.; zur Hausen, H. (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (West Germany))

    1989-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces DNA amplification of target genes within the host cell chromosome. To characterize the HSV genes that mediate the amplification effect, combinations of cloned DNA fragments covering the entire HSV genome were transiently transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells. This led to amplification of the integrated SV40 DNA sequences to a degree comparable to that observed after transfection of intact virion DNA. Transfection of combinations of subclones and of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-driven expression constructs for individual open reading frames led to the identification of sic HSV genes which together were necessary and sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification: UL30 (DNA polymerase), UL29 (major DNA-binding protein), UL5, UL8, UL42, and UL52. All of these genes encode proteins necessary for HSV DNA replication. However, an additional gene coding for an HSV origin-binding protein (UL9) was required for origin-dependent HSV DNA replication but was dispensable for SV40 DNA amplification. The results show that a subset of HSV replication genes is sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification. This opens the possibility that HSV expresses functions sufficient for DNA amplification but separate from those responsible for lytic viral growth. HSV infection may thereby induce DNA amplification within the host cell genome without killing the host by lytic viral growth. This may lead to persistence of a cell with a new genetic phenotype, which would have implications for the pathogenicity of the virus in vivo.

  2. Short hairpin-loop-structured oligodeoxynucleotides reduce HSV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Jochen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Herpes simplex virus (HSV is known as an infectious agent and widespread in the human population. The symptoms of HSV infections can range from mild to life threatening, especially in immune-compromised individuals. HSV infections are commonly treated with the guanosine analogue Aciclovir, but reports of resistance are increasing. Efforts are made to establish single-stranded antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (as and small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs for antiviral treatment. Recently, another class of short interfering nucleic acids, partially double-stranded hairpin loop-structured 54 mer oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs, was shown to allow hydrolysis of HIV RNA by binding to the viral RNA. This leads to a substrate for the viral RNase H. To assess the potential of such ODNs for inhibition of HSV-1 replication, five partially double-stranded ODNs were designed based on the sequences of known siRNAs against HSV-1 with antiviral activity. Three of them are directed against early and two against leaky late genes. Primary human lung fibroblasts, MRC-5, and African green monkey kidney cells, Vero, were transfected with ODNs and subsequently infected. The effect on HSV-1 replication was determined by analyzing the virus titer in cell culture supernatants by quantitative PCR and plaque assays. An inhibitory effect was observed with all five selected ODNs, with two cases showing statistical significance in both cell types. The observed effect was sequence-specific and dose dependent. In one case the ODN was more efficient than a previously described siRNA directed against the same target site in the mRNA of UL5, a component of the helicase/primase complex. HSV-1 virions and ODNs can be applied simultaneously without transfection reagent, but at a 50-fold higher concentration to Vero cells with similar efficiencies. The results underline the potential of partially double-stranded hairpin loop-structured ODNs as antiviral agents.

  3. Ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model using human normal vaginal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaqi; Yang, Yan; Guo, Juanjuan; Dai, Ying; Ye, Lina; Qiu, Jianbin; Zeng, Zhihong; Wu, Xiaoting; Xing, Yanmei; Long, Xiang; Wu, Xufeng; Ye, Lin; Wang, Shubin; Li, Hui

    2017-02-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infects human genital mucosa and establishes life-long latent infection. It is unmet need to establish a human cell-based microphysiological system for virus biology and anti-viral drug discovery. One of barriers is lacking of culture system of normal epithelial cells in vitro over decades. In this study, we established human normal vaginal epithelial cell (HNVEC) culture using co-culture system. HNVEC cells were then propagated rapidly and stably in a defined culture condition. HNVEC cells exhibited a normal diploid karyotype and formed the well-defined and polarized spheres in matrigel three-dimension (3D) culture, while malignant cells (HeLa) formed disorganized and nonpolar solid spheres. HNVEC cells had a normal cellular response to DNA damage and had no transforming property using soft agar assays. HNVEC expressed epithelial marker cytokeratin 14 (CK14) and p63, but not cytokeratin 18 (CK18). Next, we reconstructed HNVEC-derived 3D vaginal epithelium using air-liquid interface (ALI) culture. This 3D vaginal epithelium has the basal and apical layers with expression of epithelial markers as its originated human vaginal tissue. Finally, we established an HSV-2 infection model based on the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium. After inoculation of HSV-2 (G strain) at apical layer of the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium, we observed obvious pathological effects gradually spreading from the apical layer to basal layer with expression of a viral protein. Thus, we established an ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model that can be used for HSV-2 virology and anti-viral drug discovery.

  4. An attenuated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) encoding the HIV-1 Tat protein protects mice from a deadly mucosal HSV1 challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicurella, Mariaconcetta; Nicoli, Francesco; Gallerani, Eleonora; Volpi, Ilaria; Berto, Elena; Finessi, Valentina; Destro, Federica; Manservigi, Roberto; Cafaro, Aurelio; Ensoli, Barbara; Caputo, Antonella; Gavioli, Riccardo; Marconi, Peggy C

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2) are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat). In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ), induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1 infection and

  5. Immunogenicity, protective efficacy, and non-replicative status of the HSV-2 vaccine candidate HSV529 in mice and guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Marie-Clotilde; Barban, Véronique; Pradezynski, Fabrine; de Montfort, Aymeric; Ryall, Robert; Caillet, Catherine; Londono-Hayes, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    HSV-2 vaccine is needed to prevent genital disease, latent infection, and virus transmission. A replication-deficient mutant virus (dl5-29) has demonstrated promising efficacy in animal models of genital herpes. However, the immunogenicity, protective efficacy, and non-replicative status of the highly purified clinical vaccine candidate (HSV529) derived from dl5-29 have not been evaluated. Humoral and cellular immune responses were measured in mice and guinea pigs immunized with HSV529. Protection against acute and recurrent genital herpes, mortality, latent infection, and viral shedding after vaginal HSV-2 infection was determined in mice or in naïve and HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. HSV529 replication and pathogenicity were investigated in three sensitive models of virus replication: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID/Beige) mice inoculated by the intramuscular route, suckling mice inoculated by the intracranial route, and vaginally-inoculated guinea pigs. HSV529 immunization induced HSV-2-neutralizing antibody production in mice and guinea pigs. In mice, it induced production of specific HSV-2 antibodies and splenocytes secreting IFNγ or IL-5. Immunization effectively prevented HSV-2 infection in all three animal models by reducing mortality, acute genital disease severity and frequency, and viral shedding. It also reduced ganglionic viral latency and recurrent disease in naïve and HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. HSV529 replication/propagation was not detected in the muscles of SCID/Beige mice, in the brains of suckling mice, or in vaginal secretions of inoculated guinea pigs. These results confirm the non-replicative status, as well as its immunogenicity and efficacy in mice and guinea pigs, including HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. In mice, HSV529 produced Th1/Th2 characteristic immune response thought to be necessary for an effective vaccine. These results further support the clinical investigation of HSV529 in human subjects as a prophylactic vaccine.

  6. An attenuated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 encoding the HIV-1 Tat protein protects mice from a deadly mucosal HSV1 challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaconcetta Sicurella

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2 are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat. In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ, induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1

  7. Immunogenicity, protective efficacy, and non-replicative status of the HSV-2 vaccine candidate HSV529 in mice and guinea pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Clotilde Bernard

    Full Text Available HSV-2 vaccine is needed to prevent genital disease, latent infection, and virus transmission. A replication-deficient mutant virus (dl5-29 has demonstrated promising efficacy in animal models of genital herpes. However, the immunogenicity, protective efficacy, and non-replicative status of the highly purified clinical vaccine candidate (HSV529 derived from dl5-29 have not been evaluated. Humoral and cellular immune responses were measured in mice and guinea pigs immunized with HSV529. Protection against acute and recurrent genital herpes, mortality, latent infection, and viral shedding after vaginal HSV-2 infection was determined in mice or in naïve and HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. HSV529 replication and pathogenicity were investigated in three sensitive models of virus replication: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID/Beige mice inoculated by the intramuscular route, suckling mice inoculated by the intracranial route, and vaginally-inoculated guinea pigs. HSV529 immunization induced HSV-2-neutralizing antibody production in mice and guinea pigs. In mice, it induced production of specific HSV-2 antibodies and splenocytes secreting IFNγ or IL-5. Immunization effectively prevented HSV-2 infection in all three animal models by reducing mortality, acute genital disease severity and frequency, and viral shedding. It also reduced ganglionic viral latency and recurrent disease in naïve and HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. HSV529 replication/propagation was not detected in the muscles of SCID/Beige mice, in the brains of suckling mice, or in vaginal secretions of inoculated guinea pigs. These results confirm the non-replicative status, as well as its immunogenicity and efficacy in mice and guinea pigs, including HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. In mice, HSV529 produced Th1/Th2 characteristic immune response thought to be necessary for an effective vaccine. These results further support the clinical investigation of HSV529 in human subjects as a

  8. Modelling efforts needed to advance herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccine development: Key findings from the World Health Organization Consultation on HSV Vaccine Impact Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sami L; Giersing, Birgitte; Boily, Marie-Claude; Chesson, Harrell; Looker, Katharine J; Schiffer, Joshua; Spicknall, Ian; Hutubessy, Raymond; Broutet, Nathalie

    2017-06-21

    Development of a vaccine against herpes simplex virus (HSV) is an important goal for global sexual and reproductive health. In order to more precisely define the health and economic burden of HSV infection and the theoretical impact and cost-effectiveness of an HSV vaccine, in 2015 the World Health Organization convened an expert consultation meeting on HSV vaccine impact modelling. The experts reviewed existing model-based estimates and dynamic models of HSV infection to outline critical future modelling needs to inform development of a comprehensive business case and preferred product characteristics for an HSV vaccine. This article summarizes key findings and discussions from the meeting on modelling needs related to HSV burden, costs, and vaccine impact, essential data needs to carry out those models, and important model components and parameters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Distribution of cellular HSV-1 receptor expression in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathe, Richard; Haas, Juergen G

    2017-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus linked to a range of acute and chronic neurological disorders affecting distinct regions of the brain. Unusually, HSV-1 entry into cells requires the interaction of viral proteins glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) with distinct cellular receptor proteins. Several different gD and gB receptors have been identified, including TNFRSF14/HVEM and PVRL1/nectin 1 as gD receptors and PILRA, MAG, and MYH9 as gB receptors. We investigated the expression of these receptor molecules in different areas of the adult and developing human brain using online transcriptome databases. Whereas all HSV-1 receptors showed distinct expression patterns in different brain areas, the Allan Brain Atlas (ABA) reported increased expression of both gD and gB receptors in the hippocampus. Specifically, for PVRL1, TNFRFS14, and MYH9, the differential z scores for hippocampal expression, a measure of relative levels of increased expression, rose to 2.9, 2.9, and 2.5, respectively, comparable to the z score for the archetypical hippocampus-enriched mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2, z = 3.1). These data were confirmed at the Human Brain Transcriptome (HBT) database, but HBT data indicate that MAG expression is also enriched in hippocampus. The HBT database allowed the developmental pattern of expression to be investigated; we report that all HSV1 receptors markedly increase in expression levels between gestation and the postnatal/adult periods. These results suggest that differential receptor expression levels of several HSV-1 gD and gB receptors in the adult hippocampus are likely to underlie the susceptibility of this brain region to HSV-1 infection.

  10. Developing de novo human artificial chromosomes in embryonic stem cells using HSV-1 amplicon technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralli, Daniela; Monaco, Zoia L

    2015-02-01

    De novo artificial chromosomes expressing genes have been generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) and are maintained following differentiation into other cell types. Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are small, functional, extrachromosomal elements, which behave as normal chromosomes in human cells. De novo HAC are generated following delivery of alpha satellite DNA into target cells. HAC are characterized by high levels of mitotic stability and are used as models to study centromere formation and chromosome organisation. They are successful and effective as gene expression vectors since they remain autonomous and can accommodate larger genes and regulatory regions for long-term expression studies in cells unlike other viral gene delivery vectors currently used. Transferring the essential DNA sequences for HAC formation intact across the cell membrane has been challenging for a number of years. A highly efficient delivery system based on HSV-1 amplicons has been used to target DNA directly to the ES cell nucleus and HAC stably generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) at high frequency. HAC were detected using an improved protocol for hESc chromosome harvesting, which consistently produced high-quality metaphase spreads that could routinely detect HAC in hESc. In tumour cells, the input DNA often integrated in the host chromosomes, but in the host ES genome, it remained intact. The hESc containing the HAC formed embryoid bodies, generated teratoma in mice, and differentiated into neuronal cells where the HAC were maintained. The HAC structure and chromatin composition was similar to the endogenous hESc chromosomes. This review will discuss the technological advances in HAC vector delivery using HSV-1 amplicons and the improvements in the identification of de novo HAC in hESc.

  11. Anti-HSV-1 and HSV-2 Flavonoids and a New Kaempferol Triglycoside from the Medicinal Plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ürményi, Fernanda Gouvêa Gomes; Saraiva, Georgia do Nascimento; Casanova, Livia Marques; Matos, Amanda Dos Santos; de Magalhães Camargo, Luiza Maria; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela; Costa, Sônia Soares

    2016-12-01

    Kalanchoe daigremontiana (Crassulaceae) is a medicinal plant native to Madagascar. The aim of this study was to investigate the flavonoid content of an aqueous leaf extract from K. daigremontiana (Kd), and assess its antiherpetic potential. The major flavonoid, kaempferol 3-O-β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-α-l-rhamnopyranoside (1), was isolated from the AcOEt fraction (Kd-AC). The BuOH-soluble fraction afforded quercetin 3-O-β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-α-l-rhamnopyranoside (2) and the new kaempferol 3-O-β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-α-l-rhamnopyranoside-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (3), named daigremontrioside. The crude extract, Kd-AC fraction, flavonoids 1 and 2 were evaluated using acyclovir-sensitive strains of HSV-1 and HSV-2. Kd-AC was highly active against HSV-1 (EC 50  = 0.97 μg/ml, SI > 206.1) and HSV-2 (EC 50  = 0.72 μg/ml, SI > 277.7). Flavonoids 1 and 2 showed anti-HSV-1 (EC 50  = 7.4 μg/ml; SI > 27 and EC 50  = 5.8 μg/ml; SI > 8.6, respectively) and anti-HSV-2 (EC 50  = 9.0 μg/ml; SI > 22.2 and EC 50  = 36.2 μg/ml; SI > 5.5, respectively) activities, suggesting the contribution of additional substances to the antiviral activity. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  12. A remote palm domain residue of RB69 DNA polymerase is critical for enzyme activity and influences the conformation of the active site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Jacewicz

    Full Text Available Non-conserved amino acids that are far removed from the active site can sometimes have an unexpected effect on enzyme catalysis. We have investigated the effects of alanine replacement of residues distant from the active site of the replicative RB69 DNA polymerase, and identified a substitution in a weakly conserved palm residue (D714A, that renders the enzyme incapable of sustaining phage replication in vivo. D714, located several angstroms away from the active site, does not contact the DNA or the incoming dNTP, and our apoenzyme and ternary crystal structures of the Pol(D714A mutant demonstrate that D714A does not affect the overall structure of the protein. The structures reveal a conformational change of several amino acid side chains, which cascade out from the site of the substitution towards the catalytic center, substantially perturbing the geometry of the active site. Consistent with these structural observations, the mutant has a significantly reduced k pol for correct incorporation. We propose that the observed structural changes underlie the severe polymerization defect and thus D714 is a remote, non-catalytic residue that is nevertheless critical for maintaining an optimal active site conformation. This represents a striking example of an action-at-a-distance interaction.

  13. Acute urinary retention due to HSV-1: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancino, P; Dalessandro, M; Falasca, K; Ucciferri, C; Pizzigallo, E; Vecchiet, J

    2009-03-01

    Complications in urinary tract nervous routes due to herpes viruses as VZV and HSV-2 are well known. Acute urinary retention and chronic neuropathic pain are not rare when sacral dermatomes are involved by these viruses. However, an analogous condition has not yet been clearly ascribed to HSV-1 infection. We present a 32-year-old immunocompetent patient with fever, lumbar pain and acute urinary retention who had never had herpetic clinical manifestations. Urodynamic studies diagnosed a neurologic bladder with an absent filling sensation. Cystoscopic assessment revealed the presence of reddened and isolated small mucosal areas in the bladder walls. The search for herpes viruses in plasma and CSF by PCR assay were positive for HSV-1. After treatment with antiviral therapy the disease resolved. Intermittent catheterization was necessary and voiding dysfunction resolved after three weeks by its appearance. Neurological damage to the central nervous system (CNS) and/or PNS due to HSV-1 seems to be the most likely reason. The course of disease was benign and self-remitting.

  14. Roles of the active site residues and metal cofactors in noncanonical base-pairing during catalysis by human DNA polymerase iota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Alena V; Ignatov, Artem; Miropolskaya, Nataliya; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2014-10-01

    Human DNA polymerase iota (Pol ι) is a Y-family polymerase that can bypass various DNA lesions but possesses very low fidelity of DNA synthesis in vitro. Structural analysis of Pol ι revealed a narrow active site that promotes noncanonical base-pairing during catalysis. To better understand the structure-function relationships in the active site of Pol ι we investigated substitutions of individual amino acid residues in its fingers domain that contact either the templating or the incoming nucleotide. Two of the substitutions, Y39A and Q59A, significantly decreased the catalytic activity but improved the fidelity of Pol ι. Surprisingly, in the presence of Mn(2+) ions, the wild-type and mutant Pol ι variants efficiently incorporated nucleotides opposite template purines containing modifications that disrupted either Hoogsteen or Watson-Crick base-pairing, suggesting that Pol ι may use various types of interactions during nucleotide addition. In contrast, in Mg(2+) reactions, wild-type Pol ι was dependent on Hoogsteen base-pairing, the Y39A mutant was essentially inactive, and the Q59A mutant promoted Watson-Crick interactions with template purines. The results suggest that Pol ι utilizes distinct mechanisms of nucleotide incorporation depending on the metal cofactor and reveal important roles of specific residues from the fingers domain in base-pairing and catalysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification and characterization of a DNA primase activity present in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.M.; Wietstock, S.M.; Ruyechan, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    A novel DNA primase activity has been identified in HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Such an activity has not been detected in mock-infected cells. The primase activity coeluted with a portion of HSV-1 DNA polymerase from single-stranded DNA agarose columns loaded with high-salt extracts derived from infected cells. This DNA primase activity could be distinguished from host HeLa cell DNA primase by several criteria. First, the pH optimum of the HSV primase was relatively broad and peaked at 8.2 to 8.7 pH units. Second, freshly isolated HSV DNA primase was less salt sensitive than the HeLa primase. Third, antibodies raised against individual peptides of the calf thymus DNA polymerase:primase complex cross-reacted with the HeLa primase but did not react with the HSV DNA primase. Fourth, freshly prepared HSV DNA primase appeared to be associated with the HSV polymerase, but after storage at 4 degree C for several weeks, the DNA primase separated from the viral DNA polymerase. This free DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 40 kilodaltons, whereas free HeLa DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 110 kilodaltons. On the basis of these data, the authors believe that the novel DNA primase activity in HSV-infected cells may be virus coded and that this enzyme represents a new and important function involved in the replication of HSV DNA

  16. Function of the EGR-1/TIS8 radiation inducible promoter in a minimal HSV-1 amplicon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spear, M.A.; Sakamoto, K.M.; Herrlinger, U.; Pechan, P.; Breakefield, X.O.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate function of the EGR-1/TIS8 promoter region in minimal HSV-1 amplicon system in order to determine the feasibility of using the system to regulate vector replication with radiation. Materials and Methods: A 600-base pair 5' upstream region of the EGR-1 promoter linked to chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) was recombined into a minimal HSV-1 amplicon vector system (pONEC). pONEC or a control plasmid was transfected into U87 glioma cells using the Lipofectamine method. Thirty-six hours later one aliquot of cells from each transfection was irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy and another identical aliquot served as a control. CAT activity was assayed 8 hours after irradiation. Results: pONEC transfected cells irradiated with 20 Gy demonstrated 2.0 fold increase in CAT activity compared to non-irradiated cells. Cells transfected with control plasmid showed no change in CAT activity. Unirradiated pONEC cells had CAT activity 1.3 times those transfected with control plasmid. Conclusion: We have previously created HSV-1 gene therapy amplicon vector systems which allow virus-amplicon interdependent replication, with the intent of regulating replication. The above data demonstrates that a minimal amplicon system will allow radiation dependent regulation by the EGR-1 promoter, thus indicating the possibility of using this system to regulate onsite, spatially and temporally regulated vector production. Baseline CAT activity was higher and relative induction lower than other reported expression constructs, which raises concern for the ability of the system to produce a differential in transcription levels sufficient for this purpose. This is possibly the result of residual promoter/enhancer elements remaining in the HSV-1 sequences. We are attempting to create constructs lacking these elements. Addition of secondary promoter sequences may also be of use. We are also currently evaluating the efficacy of the putative IEX-1 radiation inducible promoter region in

  17. Enhanced therapeutic effect of multiple injections of HSV-TK + GCV gene therapy in combination with ionizing radiation in a mouse mammary tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlachaki, Maria T.; Chhikara, Madhu; Aguilar, Laura; Zhu Xiaohong; Chiu, Kam J.; Woo, Shiao; Teh, Bin S.; Thompson, Timothy C.; Butler, E. Brian; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Standard therapies for breast cancer lack tumor specificity and have significant risk for recurrence and toxicities. Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene therapy combined with radiation therapy (XRT) may be effective because of complementary mechanisms and distinct toxicity profiles. HSV-tk gene therapy followed by systemic administration of ganciclovir (GCV) enhances radiation-induced DNA damage by generating high local concentrations of phosphorylated nucleotide analogs that increase radiation-induced DNA breaks and interfere with DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, radiation-induced membrane damage enhances the 'bystander effect' by facilitating transfer of nucleotide analogs to neighboring nontransduced cells and by promoting local and systemic immune responses. This study assesses the effect of single and multiple courses of HSV-tk gene therapy in combination with ionizing radiation in a mouse mammary cancer model. Methods and Materials: Mouse mammary TM40D tumors transplanted s.c. in syngeneic immunocompetent BALB-c mice were treated with either adenoviral-mediated HSV-tk gene therapy or local radiation or the combination of gene and radiation therapy. A vector consisting of a replication-deficient (E1-deleted) adenovirus type 5 was injected intratumorally to administer the HSV-tk gene, and GCV was initiated 24 h later for a total of 6 days. Radiation was given as a single dose of 5 Gy 48 h after the HSV-tk injection. A metastatic model was developed by tail vein injection of TM40D cells on the same day that the s.c. tumors were established. Systemic antitumor effect was evaluated by counting the number of lung nodules after treating only the primary tumors with gene therapy, radiation, or the combination of gene and radiation therapy. To assess the therapeutic efficacy of multiple courses of this combinatorial approach, one, two, and three courses of HSV-tk + GCV gene therapy, in combination with radiation, were compared to HSV-tk or

  18. Performance evaluation of the Aptima HSV-1 and 2 assay for the detection of HSV in cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesion specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Soya S; Caliendo, Angela M; Ingersoll, Jessica; Abdul-Ali, Deborah; Kraft, Colleen S

    Timely and precise laboratory diagnosis of Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) is required to guide clinical management. The study evaluated limit of detection (LOD) and performance characteristics of the Aptima HSV 1 & 2 assay in comparison to four assays. The multi-center study compared qualitative detection of HSV-1 and 2 by the Aptima HSV-1 and 2 assay (Hologic) to ELVIS culture, Lyra Direct (Quidel), AmpliVue (Quidel) and a laboratory developed test (LDT). LOD was performed using VTM and STM diluted viral concentrations and clinical performance was evaluated using 505 swab specimens. The Aptima LOD studies performed showed a lower detection limit for STM specimens as 1450 copies/mL and 430 copies/mL for HSV1 and HSV-2 respectively; the LOD for VTM specimens was 9370 copies/mL and 8045 copies/mL for HSV-1 and HSV-2 respectively. When the assays were analyzed based on the positive consensus result established the Aptima had 95% of percent positive agreement (PPA) and 100% negative percent agreement (NPA) for the HSV-1. For the HSV-2, the PPA and NPA for Aptima were 96% and 100% respectively. AmpliVue had 1.8% invalid rate, while Lyra had no invalid results but an inhibition rate of 0.8%. Aptima and LDT did not have any invalid or inhibited results. The results indicate that the Aptima HSV-1 & 2 assay is sensitive and the performance characteristics of the Aptima assay is comparable to the assays analyzed for the detection and differentiation of HSV-1 and 2 from cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression

  20. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipe, David M., E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression.

  1. Assessment of IgG Antibodies Against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and EBV in Patients with Pemphigus Vulgaris versus Healthy People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichehr Ghalayani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Regarding the implication of viruses particularly herpes in pemphigus vulgaris, we sought to assess and compare the level of immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2, cytomegalovirus (CMV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in patients with pemphigus vulgaris and healthy people.    Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 25 patients with pemphigus vulgaris and 27 healthy individuals comprised the experimental and control groups, respectively. Serum samples were taken from both groups; the levels of IgG antibodies against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and EBV were measured using ELISA.  Results: Immunoglobulin G titer was higher for all four viruses in the patient group in comparison to the control group. This difference was significant for anti-EBV (P= 0.005, anti-CMV (P=0.0001 and anti-HSV2 (P=0.001 but not significant for anti-HSV1 (P= 0.36.Conclusion: Viruses including EBV, CMV, and HSV2 probably play a role in the pathogenesis of pemphigus in addition to the effects of genetics, toxins and other predisposing factors. In this study, no statistically significant relationship was observed between HSV1 and pemphigus vulgaris, which was probably due to the high titer of anti-HSV1 IgG in healthy individuals in the community. More studies must be done in this regard.

  2. Clinical evaluation of a helicase-dependant amplification (HDA)-based commercial assay for the simultaneous detection of HSV-1 and HSV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Jeanette W P; Chiang, Donald; Jureen, Roland; Lin, Raymond T P

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we evaluate the performance of a commercial assay, the AmpliVue HSV 1+2 Assay (Quidel), which employs HDA for the detection of both HSV-1 and HSV-2. The assay was tested on 307 clinical specimens (genital, oral, and dermal). When compared to shell vial virus culture and immunofluorescence typing of HSV, the positive percent agreement and negative percent agreement values were 98.2% and 90.9%, respectively. Excellent assay performance was demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct temporal roles for the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML protein in the sequential regulation of intracellular host immunity to HSV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamir Alandijany

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of viral nucleic acids plays a critical role in the induction of intracellular host immune defences. However, the temporal recruitment of immune regulators to infecting viral genomes remains poorly defined due to the technical difficulties associated with low genome copy-number detection. Here we utilize 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU labelling of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 DNA in combination with click chemistry to examine the sequential recruitment of host immune regulators to infecting viral genomes under low multiplicity of infection conditions. Following viral genome entry into the nucleus, PML-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs rapidly entrapped viral DNA (vDNA leading to a block in viral replication in the absence of the viral PML-NB antagonist ICP0. This pre-existing intrinsic host defence to infection occurred independently of the vDNA pathogen sensor IFI16 (Interferon Gamma Inducible Protein 16 and the induction of interferon stimulated gene (ISG expression, demonstrating that vDNA entry into the nucleus alone is not sufficient to induce a robust innate immune response. Saturation of this pre-existing intrinsic host defence during HSV-1 ICP0-null mutant infection led to the stable recruitment of PML and IFI16 into vDNA complexes associated with ICP4, and led to the induction of ISG expression. This induced innate immune response occurred in a PML-, IFI16-, and Janus-Associated Kinase (JAK-dependent manner and was restricted by phosphonoacetic acid, demonstrating that vDNA polymerase activity is required for the robust induction of ISG expression during HSV-1 infection. Our data identifies dual roles for PML in the sequential regulation of intrinsic and innate immunity to HSV-1 infection that are dependent on viral genome delivery to the nucleus and the onset of vDNA replication, respectively. These intracellular host defences are counteracted by ICP0, which targets PML for degradation from the outset of nuclear infection to promote vDNA

  4. HSV Serologic Testing for Pregnant Women: Willingness to Be Tested and Factors Affecting Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Baker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This prospective study was undertaken to evaluate pregnant women's willingness to undergo HSV type-specific serologic testing and factors affecting willingness in an obstetrics/gynecology ambulatory unit. Methods. At prenatal Visit 1, pregnant women (n=303 with no history of HSV-2 were tested for HSV-1/HSV-2 before and after they received counseling on genital and neonatal herpes. Results. In both the Unwilling Subgroup and the group that changed from being willing to being unwilling, the most common reasons for choosing not to be tested were not being at risk for genital herpes, being tested is too personal, and concern about what will be done with the results. Of the 134 participants in the Willing/Tested Subgroup, 27 (20% were HSV-2 seropositive and 81 (60% were HSV-1 seropositive. Conclusions. These results support the feasibility of HSV serologic testing and counseling in pregnant women.

  5. Charged residues in the H-NS linker drive DNA binding and gene silencing in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yunfeng; Foo, Yong Hwee; Winardhi, Ricksen S; Tang, Qingnan; Yan, Jie; Kenney, Linda J

    2017-11-21

    Nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) facilitate chromosome organization in bacteria, but the precise mechanism remains elusive. H-NS is a NAP that also plays a major role in silencing pathogen genes. We used genetics, single-particle tracking in live cells, superresolution microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations to examine H-NS/DNA interactions in single cells. We discovered a role for the unstructured linker region connecting the N-terminal oligomerization and C-terminal DNA binding domains. In the present work we demonstrate that linker amino acids promote engagement with DNA. In the absence of linker contacts, H-NS binding is significantly reduced, although no change in chromosome compaction is observed. H-NS is not localized to two distinct foci; rather, it is scattered all around the nucleoid. The linker makes DNA contacts that are required for gene silencing, while chromosome compaction does not appear to be an important H-NS function.

  6. Study on constructing retroviral vector carrying HSV-tk gene and its antitumor effect in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yujun; Hui Guozhen; Hu Jin

    1997-01-01

    The author reports the construction of retroviral vector PLNTK carrying HsV-tk gene driven by pgk promoter and the successful transferring into cells NBA 2 and SHG 44 respectively as shown by PCR. In vitro study, HSV-tk-expressed-cells prove to be more sensitive to ACV than parent cells. The sensitivity of SHGLNTK and NBALNTK to ACV is 1000 and 500 times that of their parent cells respectively. 3 H-TdR test demonstrated that the DNA replication in gene modified cells is more suppressed than that of parent cells when treated with ACV. Moreover, the ACV sensitivity level of parent cells is enhanced when co-cultured with gene modified cells, which suggests the existence of the bystander effect

  7. Crystal structure of the gamma-2 herpesvirus LANA DNA binding domain identifies charged surface residues which impact viral latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Correia

    Full Text Available Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA mediates γ2-herpesvirus genome persistence and regulates transcription. We describe the crystal structure of the murine gammaherpesvirus-68 LANA C-terminal domain at 2.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals an alpha-beta fold that assembles as a dimer, reminiscent of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA1. A predicted DNA binding surface is present and opposite this interface is a positive electrostatic patch. Targeted DNA recognition substitutions eliminated DNA binding, while certain charged patch mutations reduced bromodomain protein, BRD4, binding. Virus containing LANA abolished for DNA binding was incapable of viable latent infection in mice. Virus with mutations at the charged patch periphery exhibited substantial deficiency in expansion of latent infection, while central region substitutions had little effect. This deficiency was independent of BRD4. These results elucidate the LANA DNA binding domain structure and reveal a unique charged region that exerts a critical role in viral latent infection, likely acting through a host cell protein(s.

  8. Implementation of Nearest Neighbor using HSV to Identify Skin Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhana, Y. A.; Zulfikar, W. B.; Ramdani, A. H.; Ramdhani, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    Today, Android is one of the most widely used operating system in the world. Most of android device has a camera that could capture an image, this feature could be optimized to identify skin disease. The disease is one of health problem caused by bacterium, fungi, and virus. The symptoms of skin disease usually visible. In this work, the symptoms that captured as image contains HSV in every pixel of the image. HSV can extracted and then calculate to earn euclidean value. The value compared using nearest neighbor algorithm to discover closer value between image testing and image training to get highest value that decide class label or type of skin disease. The testing result show that 166 of 200 or about 80% is accurate. There are some reasons that influence the result of classification model like number of image training and quality of android device’s camera.

  9. In House HSV PCR, Process Improvement and Cost Effectiveness Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-15

    TYPE 09/15/2017 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cost-Analysis: In-hous(l HSV P(’R capabilities 6. AUTHOR(S) Ma.i Nich() las R CaJT 7. PERFORMING...ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMIT A TIC ".’ OF 18. NUMBER a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE ABSTRACT OF PAGES 3

  10. Base residue release from 3H-thymine labeled DNA in irradiated E. coli under conditions of enzyme inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, R.C.; Zimbrick, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    E. coli C and E. coli K12 cells were incorporated with ( 3 H-C-6)-thymine, irradiated with 60 Co-gamma rays, and then variously treated with EDTA and lysed with sodium lauryl sulfate. The 3 H-material released from DNA was then measured by Sephadex G-10 gel filtration. Because the focus of this work was the examination of the radiolytic lesions within the DNA, an attempt was made to exclude enzymatic contributions to in vivo product yields from these cells which were irradiated in the presence and absence of O 2

  11. Role of specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients for the assessment of tumor stage and residual disease following tumor resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcic, Gregor; Jelenc, Franc; Cerkovnik, Petra; Stegel, Vida; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the detection of tumor-specific KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (KRAS) and B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) mutations in the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients at all stages and adenomas was used for the estimation of disease stage prior to surgery and for residual disease following surgery. A total of 65 CRC patients were enrolled. The primary tumor tested positive for the specific mutations (KRAS mutations in codons 12, 13, 61, 117 or 146 and BRAF mutations in codon 600) in 35 patients. In all these patients, the specimen of normal bowel resected with the tumor was also tested for the presence of the same mutations in order to exclude the germ-line mutations. Only patients who tested positive for the specific mutation in the primary tumor were included in further analysis for the presence of tumor-specific mutation in the peripheral blood. No statistically significant differences were found between the detection rates of tumor mutations in the blood and different tumor stages (P=0.491). However, statistically significant differences in the proportions of patients with detected tumor-specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood were found when comparing the groups of patients with R0 and R2 resections (P=0.038). Tumor-specific DNA mutations in the peripheral blood were more frequently detected in the patients with an incomplete surgical clearance of the tumor due to macroscopic residual disease (R2 resections). Therefore, the study concludes that the follow-up of somatic KRAS- and BRAF-mutated DNA in the peripheral blood of CRC patients may be useful in assessing the surgical clearance of the disease. PMID:27900004

  12. Incident HSV-2 Infections Are Common Among HIV-1-discordant Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muiru, Anthony N.; Guthrie, Brandon L.; Bosire, Rose; Merkel, Michele; Liu, Amy Y.; Choi, Robert Y.; Lohman-Payne, Barbara; Gatuguta, Ann; Mackelprang, Romel D.; Kiarie, James N.; Farquhar, Carey

    2013-01-01

    Background. The synergy between herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is well known, but lack of knowledge about the epidemiology of HSV-2 acquisition in HIV-1-discordant couples hampers development of HSV-2 prevention interventions that could reduce HIV-1 transmission. Methods. HIV-1-discordant couples were enrolled in Nairobi, Kenya, and followed for up to 2 years. HSV-2 status was determined using HerpeSelect HSV-2 ELISA. Correlates of prevalence and incidence were assessed. Results. Of 469 HIV-1-discordant couples, at baseline, 353 (75.3%) were affected by HSV-2, of which 189 (53.5%) were concordantly HSV-2 seropositive and 164 (46.5%) were HSV-2-discordant. Prevalence was lowest among HIV-1-uninfected men (39.9%) compared to HIV-1-infected women (64.8%), HIV-1-infected men (66.7%), and HIV-1-uninfected women (68.5%). During follow-up, HSV-2 seroincidence was 14.9 per 100 person-years. Incidence was 1.6-fold higher among females compared to males (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–2.48) and 2.5-fold higher in HIV-1-infected compared to uninfected women (95% CI, 1.12–5.74). At least 30% of incident HSV-2 infections originated from an outside partner. Conclusions. The high HSV-2 prevalence and incidence in HIV-1-discordant couples in sub-Saharan Africa suggest HSV-2 treatment and prevention could be an effective targeted strategy to reduce HSV-2 and HIV-1 transmission in this high-risk population. PMID:23840044

  13. Residual DNA double strand breaks in perfused but not in unperfused areas determine different radiosensitivity of tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menegakis, Apostolos; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Yaromina, Ala; Thames, Howard D.; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Micromilieu-dependent quantification of γH2AX after irradiation in vivo and correlation with local tumour control. Materials and methods: Local tumour control was evaluated after irradiation of FaDu and SKX xenografts with ambient single doses. γH2AX foci were quantified in perfused and unperfused regions after different irradiation doses and at different time points. Results: The TCD 50 of FaDu was 2-times higher compared to SKX (28.0 Gy [95% C.I. 24.6; 31.3 Gy] for FaDu; 14.9 Gy [10.9; 18.9] for SKX, p < 0.001). The induction of foci did not differ between the tumour models. Residual foci were twice higher in perfused SKX regions compared to FaDu, no difference was observed in the non-perfused region between both tumour models. The number of residual foci increased with a 2-times higher slope in perfused SKX-regions compared to FaDu, while no difference was detected in unperfused regions. Already within the perfused regions, this slope decreased with distance from perfused vessels. Conclusion: The dose-response of residual γH2AX foci is highly dependent on tumour cell oxygenation in well perfused areas. This dependence decreases further away from tumour vessels. Only γH2AX evaluation in perfused tumour areas can distinguish between the different radiocurability of the two tumour models.

  14. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) -specific cell-mediated immune responses in guinea pigs during latent HSV-2 genital infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clarice L; Banasik, Brianne N; Gorder, Summer R; Xia, Jingya; Auclair, Sarah; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N

    2016-12-01

    Genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) are a source of considerable morbidity and are a health concern for newborns exposed to virus during vaginal delivery. Additionally, HSV-2 infection diminishes the integrity of the vaginal epithelium resulting in increased susceptibility of individuals to infection with other sexually transmitted pathogens. Understanding immune protection against HSV-2 primary infection and immune modulation of virus shedding events following reactivation of the virus from latency is important for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. Although the murine model of HSV-2 infection is useful for understanding immunity following immunization, it is limited by the lack of spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency. Genital infection of guinea pigs with HSV-2 accurately models the disease of humans including the spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency and provides a unique opportunity to examine virus-host interactions during latency. Although the guinea pig represents an accurate model of many human infections, relatively few reagents are available to study the immunological response to infection. To analyze the cell-mediated immune response of guinea pigs at extended periods of time after establishment of HSV-2 latency, we have modified flow-cytometry based proliferation assays and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays to detect and quantify HSV-specific cell-mediated responses during latent infection of guinea pigs. Here we demonstrate that a combination of proliferation and ELISPOT assays can be used to quantify and characterize effecter function of virus-specific immune memory responses during HSV-latency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure of unliganded HSV gD reveals a mechanism for receptor-mediated activation of virus entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krummenacher, Claude; Supekar, Vinit M.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Lazear, Eric; Connolly, Sarah A.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Wiley, Don C.; Carfi, Andrea (UPENN); (IRBM); (CHLMM)

    2010-07-19

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry into cells requires binding of the envelope glycoprotein D (gD) to one of several cell surface receptors. The 50 C-terminal residues of the gD ectodomain are essential for virus entry, but not for receptor binding. We have determined the structure of an unliganded gD molecule that includes these C-terminal residues. The structure reveals that the C-terminus is anchored near the N-terminal region and masks receptor-binding sites. Locking the C-terminus in the position observed in the crystals by an intramolecular disulfide bond abolished receptor binding and virus entry, demonstrating that this region of gD moves upon receptor binding. Similarly, a point mutant that would destabilize the C-terminus structure was nonfunctional for entry, despite increased affinity for receptors. We propose that a controlled displacement of the gD C-terminus upon receptor binding is an essential feature of HSV entry, ensuring the timely activation of membrane fusion.

  16. DNA immunization against experimental genital herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N; Stanberry, L R; Bernstein, D I; Lew, D

    1996-04-01

    A nucleic acid vaccine, expressing the gene encoding herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 glycoprotein D (gD2) under control of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene promoter, was used to immunize guinea pigs against genital HSV-2 infection. The vaccine elicited humoral immune responses comparable to those seen after HSV-2 infection. Immunized animals exhibited protection from primary genital HSV-2 disease with little or no development of vesicular skin lesions and significantly reduced HSV-2 replication in the genital tract. After recovery from primary infection, immunized guinea pigs experienced significantly fewer recurrences and had significantly less HSV-2 genomic DNA detected in the sacral dorsal root ganglia compared with control animals. Thus, immunization reduced the burden of latent infection resulting from intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, and a nucleic acid vaccine expressing the HSV-2 gD2 antigen protected guinea pigs against genital herpes, limiting primary infection and reducing the magnitude of latent infection and the frequency of recurrent disease.

  17. Comparison of two freshwater turtle species as monitors of radionuclide and chemical contamination: DNA damage and residue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers-Schoene, L.; Shugart, L.R.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Walton, B.T.

    1993-01-01

    Two species of turtles that occupy different ecological niches were compared for their usefulness as monitors of freshwater ecosystems where both low-level radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants are present. The pond slider (Trachemys scripta) and common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) were analyzed for the presence of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 60 Co, and Hg, radionuclides and chemicals known to be present at the contaminated site, and single-strand breaks in liver DNA. The integrity of the DNA was examined by the alkaline unwinding assay, a technique that detects strand breaks as a biological marker of possible exposure to genotoxic agents. This measure of DNA damage was significantly increased in both species of turtles at the contaminated site compared with turtles of the same species at a reference site, and shows that contaminant-exposed populations were under more severe genotoxic stress than those at the reference site. The level of strand breaks observed at the contaminated site was high and in the range reported for other aquatic species exposed to deleterious concentrations of genotoxic agents such as chemicals and ionizing radiation. Statistically significantly higher concentrations of radionuclides and Hg were detected in the turtles from the contaminated area. Mercury concentrations were significantly higher in the more carnivorous snapping turtle compared with the slider; however, both species were effective monitors of the contaminants

  18. Herpes virus and viral DNA synthesis in ultraviolet light-irradiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppey, J; Nocentini, S [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. Curie

    1976-07-01

    The rate of virus DNA synthesis and the production of infectious virus are impaired in stationary monkey kidney CV-I cells irradiated with u.v. before infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). The inhibition of HSV multiplication is due to u.v.-induced damage in cell DNA. CV-I cells recover their capacity to support HSV growth during the 40 to 48 h after irradiation, and the final virus yield is enhanced by factor of 10. The time course of the recovery is similar to that of the excision repair process occurring in u.v.-irradiated mammalian cells. Caffeine, hydroxyurea and cycloheximide inhibit the recovery. Fluorodeoxyuridine is without effect. A small but significant amount of labelled dThd coming from irradiated cell DNA is incorporated into virus DNA. HSV specified thymidine kinase seems to be more effective for virus DNA synthesis in irradiated than in control cells.

  19. Human Antiviral Protein IFIX Suppresses Viral Gene Expression during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Infection and Is Counteracted by Virus-induced Proteasomal Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Marni S; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-04-01

    The interferon-inducible protein X (IFIX), a member of the PYHIN family, was recently recognized as an antiviral factor against infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). IFIX binds viral DNA upon infection and promotes expression of antiviral cytokines. How IFIX exerts its host defense functions and whether it is inhibited by the virus remain unknown. Here, we integrated live cell microscopy, proteomics, IFIX domain characterization, and molecular virology to investigate IFIX regulation and antiviral functions during HSV-1 infection. We find that IFIX has a dynamic localization during infection that changes from diffuse nuclear and nucleoli distribution in uninfected cells to discrete nuclear puncta early in infection. This is rapidly followed by a reduction in IFIX protein levels. Indeed, using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry, we define IFIX interactions during HSV-1 infection, finding an association with a proteasome subunit and proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome processes. Using synchronized HSV-1 infection, microscopy, and proteasome-inhibition experiments, we demonstrate that IFIX co-localizes with nuclear proteasome puncta shortly after 3 h of infection and that its pyrin domain is rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to several other host defense factors, IFIX degradation is not dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the viral protein ICP0. However, we show IFIX degradation requires immediate-early viral gene expression, suggesting a viral host suppression mechanism. The IFIX interactome also demonstrated its association with transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the 5FMC complex. We validate this interaction using microscopy and reciprocal isolations and determine it is mediated by the IFIX HIN domain. Finally, we show IFIX suppresses immediate-early and early viral gene expression during infection. Altogether, our study demonstrates that IFIX antiviral

  20. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1.

  1. Immunization with a dominant-negative recombinant Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV type 1 protects against HSV-2 genital disease in guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brans Richard

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CJ9-gD is a novel dominant-negative recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 that is completely replication-defective, cannot establish detectable latent infection in vivo, and expresses high levels of the major HSV-1 antigen glycoprotein D immediately following infection. In the present study, CJ9-gD was evaluated as a vaccine against HSV-2 genital infection in guinea pigs. Results Animals immunized with CJ9-gD developed at least 700-fold higher titers of HSV-2-specific neutralization antibodies than mock-immunized controls. After challenge with wild-type HSV-2, all 10 control guinea pigs developed multiple genital lesions with an average of 21 lesions per animal. In contrast, only 2 minor lesions were found in 2 of 8 CJ9-gD-immunized animals, representing a 40-fold reduction on the incidence of primary genital lesions in immunized animals (p Conclusions Collectively, we demonstrate that vaccination with the HSV-1 recombinant CJ9-gD elicits strong and protective immune responses against primary and recurrent HSV-2 genital disease and significantly reduces the extent of latent infection.

  2. Virus-specific DNA sequences present in cells which carry the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minson, A C; Darby, G K; Wildy, P

    1979-11-01

    Two independently derived cell lines which carry the herpes simplex type 2 thymidine kinase gene have been examined for the presence of HSV-2-specific DNA sequences. Both cell lines contained 1 to 3 copies per cell of a sequence lying within map co-ordinates 0.2 to 0.4 of the HSV-2 genome. Revertant cells, which contained no detectable thymidine kinase, did not contain this DNA sequence. The failure of EcoR1-restricted HSV-2 DNA to act as a donor of the thymidine kinase gene in transformation experiments suggests that the gene lies close to the EcoR1 restriction site within this sequence at a map position of approx. 0.3. The HSV-2 kinase gene is therefore approximately co-linear with the HSV-1 gene.

  3. Analysis of the SUMO2 Proteome during HSV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Sloan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Covalent linkage to members of the small ubiquitin-like (SUMO family of proteins is an important mechanism by which the functions of many cellular proteins are regulated. Sumoylation has roles in the control of protein stability, activity and localization, and is involved in the regulation of transcription, gene expression, chromatin structure, nuclear transport and RNA metabolism. Sumoylation is also linked, both positively and negatively, with the replication of many different viruses both in terms of modification of viral proteins and modulation of sumoylated cellular proteins that influence the efficiency of infection. One prominent example of the latter is the widespread reduction in the levels of cellular sumoylated species induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ubiquitin ligase ICP0. This activity correlates with relief from intrinsic immunity antiviral defence mechanisms. Previous work has shown that ICP0 is selective in substrate choice, with some sumoylated proteins such the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML being extremely sensitive, while RanGAP is completely resistant. Here we present a comprehensive proteomic analysis of changes in the cellular SUMO2 proteome during HSV-1 infection. Amongst the 877 potentially sumoylated species detected, we identified 124 whose abundance was decreased by a factor of 3 or more by the virus, several of which were validated by western blot and expression analysis. We found many previously undescribed substrates of ICP0 whose degradation occurs by a range of mechanisms, influenced or not by sumoylation and/or the SUMO2 interaction motif within ICP0. Many of these proteins are known or are predicted to be involved in the regulation of transcription, chromatin assembly or modification. These results present novel insights into mechanisms and host cell proteins that might influence the efficiency of HSV-1 infection.

  4. Residue-and-polymer-free graphene transfer: DNA-CTMA/graphene/GaN bio-hybrid photodiode for light-sensitive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M. Siva Pratap; Park, Herie; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we present a residue-and-polymer-free graphene transfer method by using the adhesive force between graphene and a target substrate, the hydrophobic property of graphene, and the surface tension of the solutions. We used an n-type GaN substrate as the target substrate to make a photodiode (PD). Recently, the inclusion of biomolecules in photodetection technology has attracted considerable attention in the electronics and photonics research, particularly due to the rapid evolution of organic-inorganic bio-hybrid PDs (Bio-HPDs). This report presents a significant photoresponse of the bioinspired graphene-based PD fabricated with deoxyribonucleic acid-cetyltrimetylammonium chloride (DNA-CTMA) biomolecules on the n-type GaN substrate. Bio-HPDs respond to the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet wavelengths. Moreover, the Bio-HPDs show photosensitivities (Iphoto/Idark) of 21, 143, and 1194 for infrared, visible, and ultraviolet wavebands, respectively, which can be attributed to the integration of high-mobility graphene and photosensitive DNA-CTMA biomolecules. In addition, the corresponding charge transfer mechanisms in the PDs are explained by energy band diagrams.

  5. cDNA cloning of porcine brain prolyl endopeptidase and identification of the active-site seryl residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennex, D.; Hemmings, B.A.; Hofsteenge, J.; Stone, S.R. (Friedrich Miescher-Institut, Basel (Switzerland))

    1991-02-26

    Prolyl endopeptidase is a cytoplasmic serine protease. The enzyme was purified from porcine kidney, and oligonucleotides based on peptide sequences from this protein were used to isolate a cDNA clone from a porcine brain library. This clone contained the complete coding sequence of prolyl endopeptidase and encoded a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 80751 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of prolyl endopeptidase showed no sequence homology with other known serine proteases. ({sup 3}H)Diisopropyl fluorophosphate was used to identify the active-site serine of prolyl endopeptidase. One labeled peptide was isolated and sequenced. The sequence surrounding the active-site serine was Asn-Gly-Gly-Ser-Asn-Gly-Gly. This sequence is different from the active-site sequences of other known serine proteases. This difference and the lack of overall homology with the known families of serine proteases suggest that prolyl endopeptidase represents a new type of serine protease.

  6. Antiviral Action of Hydromethanolic Extract of Geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica against Antiherpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Rabelo Coelho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The studies on chemical composition and biological activity of propolis had focused mainly on species Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae. There are few studies about the uncommon propolis collected by stingless bees of the Meliponini tribe known as geopropolis. The geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica was collected in the region of Barra do Corda, Maranhão state, Brazil. The chemical analysis of hydromethanolic extract of this geopropolis (HMG was carried out through HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and the main constituents found were pyrrolizidine alkaloids and C-glycosyl flavones. The presence of alkaloids in extracts of propolis is detected for the first time in this sample. The antiviral activity of HMG was evaluated through viral DNA quantification experiments and electron microscopy experiments. Quantification of viral DNA from herpes virus showed reduction of about 98% in all conditions and concentration tested of the HMG extract. The results obtained were corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, in which the images did not show particle or viral replication complex. The antiviral activity of C-glycosyl flavones was reported for a variety of viruses, being observed at different points in the viral replication. This work is the first report about the antiviral activity of geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica, in vitro, against antiherpes simplex virus (HSV.

  7. Antiviral Action of Hydromethanolic Extract of Geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica against Antiherpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Guilherme Rabelo; Mendonça, Ronaldo Zucatelli; Vilar, Karina de Senna; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide; Badari, Juliana Cuoco; Taniwaki, Noemi; Namiyama, Gisleine; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Curti, Suely Pires; Evelyn Silva, Patricia; Negri, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    The studies on chemical composition and biological activity of propolis had focused mainly on species Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). There are few studies about the uncommon propolis collected by stingless bees of the Meliponini tribe known as geopropolis. The geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica was collected in the region of Barra do Corda, Maranhão state, Brazil. The chemical analysis of hydromethanolic extract of this geopropolis (HMG) was carried out through HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and the main constituents found were pyrrolizidine alkaloids and C-glycosyl flavones. The presence of alkaloids in extracts of propolis is detected for the first time in this sample. The antiviral activity of HMG was evaluated through viral DNA quantification experiments and electron microscopy experiments. Quantification of viral DNA from herpes virus showed reduction of about 98% in all conditions and concentration tested of the HMG extract. The results obtained were corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, in which the images did not show particle or viral replication complex. The antiviral activity of C-glycosyl flavones was reported for a variety of viruses, being observed at different points in the viral replication. This work is the first report about the antiviral activity of geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica, in vitro, against antiherpes simplex virus (HSV).

  8. Seroprevalence of serum IgG of HSV-1 coinfected with HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the seroprevalence of IgG of HSV-1 coinfected HIV patients who attended Offa General Hospital, Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Clinic (HAART). Methods: A cross sectional study used to study the seroprevalence of IgG of HSV-1 coinfected HIV infected patients that attended Offa Highly Active ...

  9. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 Encephalitis Mimicking Glioblastoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM often presents as a brain mass with encephalitis. In a patient with GBM, subsequent presentation with new onset encephalitis may be due to another GBM or Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 encephalitis. We present a case of HSV-1 encephalitis mimicking GBM in a patient with previous GBM.

  10. Serological profile of HSV-2 in patients attending STI clinic: Evaluation of diagnostic utility of HSV-2 IgM detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhry Shilpee

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was done to evaluate the serological profile of herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2 among patients attending sexually transmitted infections (STI clinic and to determine the utility of detecting HSV-2 IgM antibodies in such patients. A correlation of HSV-2 infection with other STI including HIV has also been attempted. Materials and Methods: Hundred consecutive patients who attended STI clinic, with one or more of the complaints as enunciated by WHO in syndromic approach for the diagnosis of STI, were included as subjects. All subjects were screened for common STI by standard laboratory procedures/ commercially available kits. HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgM antibody was detected by commercially available enzyme immuno assay kit in all patient′s sera. Sera were also tested for other STI, namely HIV, Hepatitis B virus, Hepatitis C virus and Treponema pallidum. Antigen detection for Chlamydia trachomatis was done in genital swabs of all patients by Bio-Rad Chlamydia Microplate EIA 31189 (United States kit. Results: Thirty patients were found to have genital herpes. In 17/30 (56.6% patients, HSV-2 serology was found to correlate with the clinical diagnosis. The coexistence of other infection in HSV-2 seropositive patients was detected in 8/30 patients. None of the patients having concomitant infections were clinically diagnosed accurately. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of IgM antibodies for the diagnosis of genital herpes was 73.91%, 90.91%, 70.83% and 92.91% respectively. Conclusion: HSV-2 IgM detection could only be used as a supportive test for the diagnosis of genital herpes . It needs to be emphasized that the sensitivity and positive predictive value scores are pointers for further improvement in the commercial assay systems and a large sample size may determine the broader utility of such systems.

  11. Potentiated virucidal activity of pomegranate rind extract (PRE and punicalagin against Herpes simplex virus (HSV when co-administered with zinc (II ions, and antiviral activity of PRE against HSV and aciclovir-resistant HSV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M J Houston

    Full Text Available There is a clinical need for new therapeutic products against Herpes simplex virus (HSV. The pomegranate, fruit of the tree Punica granatum L, has since ancient times been linked to activity against infection. This work probed the activity of pomegranate rind extract (PRE and co-administered zinc (II ions.PRE was used in conjunction with zinc (II salts to challenge HSV-1 and aciclovir-resistant HSV in terms of virucidal plaque assay reduction and antiviral activities in epithelial Vero host cells. Cytotoxicity was determined by the MTS assay using a commercial kit.Zinc sulphate, zinc citrate, zinc stearate and zinc gluconate demonstrated similar potentiated virucidal activity with PRE against HSV-1 by up to 4-fold. A generally parabolic relationship was observed when HSV-1 was challenged with PRE and varying concentrations of ZnSO4, with a maximum potentiation factor of 5.5. Punicalagin had 8-fold greater virucidal activity than an equivalent mass of PRE. However, antiviral data showed that punicalagin had significantly lower antiviral activity compared to the activity of PRE (EC50 = 0.56 μg mL-1 a value comparable to aciclovir (EC50 = 0.18 μg mL-1; however, PRE also demonstrated potency against aciclovir-resistant HSV (EC50 = 0.02 μg mL-1, whereas aciclovir showed no activity. Antiviral action of PRE was not influenced by ZnSO4. No cytotoxicity was detected with any test solution.The potentiated virucidal activity of PRE by coadministered zinc (II has potential as a multi-action novel topical therapeutic agent against HSV infections, such as coldsores.

  12. Pesticide residues, heavy metals, and DNA damage in sentinel oysters Crassostrea gigas from Sinaloa and Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Boucard, Celia; Anguiano-Vega, Gerardo; Mercier, Laurence; Rojas del Castillo, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides and heavy metals were analyzed in sentinel Crassostrea gigas oysters placed in six aquaculture sites close to a contaminated agricultural region. Each site was sampled twice. Tests revealed the presence of organochlorine (OC) pesticides in the oysters at concentrations varying from 31.8 to 72.5 μg/kg for gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH); from 1.2 to 3.1 μg/kg for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4-DDE); from 1.6 to 2.3 μg/kg for endosulfan I; and from 1.4 to 41.2 μg/kg for endosulfan II, as well as heavy metals in concentrations that exceeded Mexican tolerance levels (405.5 to 987.8 μg/g for zinc; 4.2 to 7.3 μg/g for cadmium; and 7.2 to 9.9 μg/g for lead). Significant levels of DNA damage in oyster hemocytes were also detected. There was a significant, positive correlation between genotoxic damage and concentration of nickel or the presence of endosulfan II. Cellular viability evaluated by cytotoxic analyses was found to be high at 80%. Marked inhibition in activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE ) and induction of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity was noted. Data demonstrated a significant relation between AChE activity inhibition and presence of endosulfan II, γ-HCH, copper, lead, and 4,4-DDE, as well as between AChE and GST activity at different sites.

  13. Herpes simplex virus serotype and entry receptor availability alter CNS disease in a mouse model of neonatal HSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Sarah J; Ranaivo, Hantamalala R; Wilcox, Douglas R; Karaba, Andrew H; Wainwright, Mark S; Muller, William J

    2014-12-01

    Outcomes of neonates with herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis are worse after infection with HSV-2 when compared with HSV-1. The proteins herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1 mediate HSV entry into susceptible cells. Prior studies have shown receptor-dependent differences in pathogenesis that depend on route of inoculation and host developmental age. We investigated serotype-related differences in HSV disease and their relationship to entry receptor availability in a mouse model of encephalitis. Mortality was attenuated in 7-d-old, wild-type (WT) mice inoculated with HSV-1(F) when compared with HSV-2(333). No serotype-specific differences were seen after inoculation of adult mice. HSV-1 pathogenesis was also attenuated relative to HSV-2 in newborn but not adult mice lacking HVEM or nectin-1. HSV-2 requires nectin-1 for encephalitis in adult but not newborn mice; in contrast, nectin-1 was important for HSV-1 pathogenesis in both age groups. Early viral replication was independent of age, viral serotype, or mouse genotype, suggesting host responses influence outcomes. In this regard, significantly greater amounts of inflammatory mediators were detected in brain homogenates from WT newborns 2 d after infection compared with adults and receptor-knockout newborns. Dysregulation of inflammatory responses induced by infection may influence the severity of HSV encephalitis.

  14. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

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    Irna Sufiawati

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD. Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  15. A role for 3-O-sulfotransferase isoform-4 in assisting HSV-1 entry and spread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; O'Donnell, Christopher D.; Oh, Myung-Jin; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Shukla, Deepak

    2005-01-01

    Many heparan sulfate (HS) 3-O-sulfotransferase (3-OST) isoforms generate cellular receptors for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD). Interestingly, the ability of 3-OST-4 to mediate HSV-1 entry and cell-to-cell fusion has not been determined, although it is predominantly expressed in the brain, a primary target of HSV-1 infections. We report that expression of 3-OST-4 can render Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells susceptible to entry of wild-type and a mutant (Rid1) strain of HSV-1. Evidence for generation of gD receptors by 3-OST-4 was suggested by gD-mediated interference assay and the ability of 3-OST-4 expressing CHO-K1 cells to preferentially bind HSV-1 gD, which could be reversed by prior treatment of cells with HS lyases (heparinases-II/III). In addition, 3-OST-4 expressing CHO-K1 cells acquired the ability to fuse with cells-expressing HSV-1 glycoproteins. Demonstrating specificity, the cell fusion was inhibited by soluble 3-O-sulfated forms of HS, but not unmodified HS. Taken together our results suggest a role of 3-OST-4 in HSV-1 pathogenesis

  16. Low acceptance of HSV-2 testing among high-risk women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, A M; Dodge, B M; Van Der Pol, B; Reece, M; Zimet, G D

    2011-06-01

    We evaluated the acceptability of a community-based herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) screening programme for at-risk women and assessed factors related to uptake of point of care HSV-2 testing. One hundred recently arrested women (median age 34 years) were recruited from a community court handling lower-level misdemeanour cases in Indianapolis, Indiana. Individuals completed a survey assessing factors related to HSV-2 screening intentions and were offered point of care HSV-2 testing. Rates of HSV-2 infection in this population are high; 61.1% of women tested were positive. The majority (81%) accepted a prescription for suppressive therapy. Women in this sample indicated that HSV-2 screening is an important component of health care but were unwilling to pay the US$10 it cost to be tested. To encourage this and other high-risk populations to be screened for HSV-2, public health resources will be needed to help individuals overcome cost-related barriers to care.

  17. Avidity of Antibodies against HSV-2 and Risk to Neonatal Transmission among Mexican Pregnant Women

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    Antonia Herrera-Ortiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine HSV-2 seroprevalence, risk factors, and antibody avidity among a sample of Mexican pregnant women. Material and Methods. The avidity test was standardized with different urea concentrations and incubation times; the cut-off point was calculated to determine the low avidity (early infection. IgG antibodies against HSV-2 were detected from pregnant and postpartum women from Morelos, Mexico, and the avidity test was performed to positive samples. Multivariate regression logistic analysis was employed to evaluate demographic and sexual behavior characteristics associated with HSV-2 infection. Results. HSV-2 seroprevalence among Mexican women analyzed was 14.5% (333/2300, demographic factors (location of General Hospital, age, education level, and civil status, and risky sexual behaviors (STI self-report and number of sexual partners during last year were associated with HSV-2 infection. Seventeen women were detected with low avidity antibodies (early infection with a cut-off point of 66.1%. Conclusions. HSV-2 infection was common among this group of women from Mexico; the avidity test detected women with recent infections, and these women were more likely to transmit HSV-2 to their neonates. Neonatal herpes has no epidemiological surveillance, the disease could be overlooked, and so more studies are needed to estimate the magnitude of neonatal infection.

  18. Establishment of HSV1 latency in immunodeficient mice facilitates efficient in vivo reactivation.

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    Chandran Ramakrishna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of latent infections in sensory neurons is a remarkably effective immune evasion strategy that accounts for the widespread dissemination of life long Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV1 infections in humans. Periodic reactivation of latent virus results in asymptomatic shedding and transmission of HSV1 or recurrent disease that is usually mild but can be severe. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms regulating the maintenance of latency and reactivation are essential for developing new approaches to block reactivation. However, the lack of a reliable mouse model that supports efficient in vivo reactivation (IVR resulting in production of infectious HSV1 and/or disease has hampered progress. Since HSV1 reactivation is enhanced in immunosuppressed hosts, we exploited the antiviral and immunomodulatory activities of IVIG (intravenous immunoglobulins to promote survival of latently infected immunodeficient Rag mice. Latently infected Rag mice derived by high dose (HD, but not low dose (LD, HSV1 inoculation exhibited spontaneous reactivation. Following hyperthermia stress (HS, the majority of HD inoculated mice developed HSV1 encephalitis (HSE rapidly and synchronously, whereas for LD inoculated mice reactivated HSV1 persisted only transiently in trigeminal ganglia (Tg. T cells, but not B cells, were required to suppress spontaneous reactivation in HD inoculated latently infected mice. Transfer of HSV1 memory but not OVA specific or naïve T cells prior to HS blocked IVR, revealing the utility of this powerful Rag latency model for studying immune mechanisms involved in control of reactivation. Crossing Rag mice to various knockout strains and infecting them with wild type or mutant HSV1 strains is expected to provide novel insights into the role of specific cellular and viral genes in reactivation, thereby facilitating identification of new targets with the potential to block reactivation.

  19. HSV-1 strain McKrae is more neuroinvasive than HSV-1 KOS after corneal or vaginal inoculation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Davido, David J; Morrison, Lynda A

    2013-05-01

    Strains of HSV-1 have been noted to vary in their pathogenesis. We compared the replication of strains KOS and McKrae in mice by two routes of infection, ocular and vaginal. Peripheral replication of KOS was similar (cornea) or attenuated over time (vagina) compared with McKrae; however, McKrae replicated in the nervous system to significantly higher levels than KOS after inoculation by either route. Host genetic background strongly influenced the capacity for virus entry into the nervous system from the vagina. KOS and McKrae replicated equivalently after intracranial inoculation, indicating that McKrae's pathogenic phenotype is linked to neuroinvasiveness rather than neurovirulence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In Situ Detection of Regulatory T Cells in Human Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2) Reactivation and Their Influence on Spontaneous HSV-2 Reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Neta; Zhu, Jia; Johnston, Christine; Cheng, Anqi; Magaret, Amalia; Koelle, David M; Huang, Meei-Li; Jin, Lei; Klock, Alexis; Layton, Erik D; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivation is accompanied by a sustained influx of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that persist in genital tissue for extended periods. While CD4(+) T cells have long been recognized as being present in herpetic ulcerations, their role in subclinical reactivation and persistence is less well known, especially the role of CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). We characterized the Treg (CD4(+)Foxp3(+)) population during human HSV-2 reactivation in situ in sequential genital skin biopsy specimens obtained from HSV-2-seropositive subjects at the time of lesion onset up to 8 weeks after healing. High numbers of Tregs infiltrated to the site of viral reactivation and persisted in proximity to conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconvs) and CD8(+) T cells. Treg density peaked during the lesion stage of the reactivation. The number of Tregs from all time points (lesion, healed, 2 weeks after healing, 4 weeks after healing, and 8 weeks after healing) was significantly higher than in control biopsy specimens from unaffected skin. There was a direct correlation between HSV-2 titer and Treg density. The association of a high Treg to Tconv ratio with high viral shedding suggests that the balance between regulatory and effector T cells influences human HSV-2 disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Dual-strain genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection in the US, Peru, and 8 countries in sub-Saharan Africa: A nested cross-sectional viral genotyping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christine; Magaret, Amalia; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Greninger, Alexander L; Reeves, Daniel; Schiffer, Joshua; Jerome, Keith R; Sather, Cassandra; Diem, Kurt; Lingappa, Jairam R; Celum, Connie; Koelle, David M; Wald, Anna

    2017-12-01

    Quantitative estimation of the extent to which the immune system's protective effect against one herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection protects against infection with additional HSV-2 strains is important for understanding the potential for HSV-2 vaccine development. Using viral genotyping, we estimated the prevalence of HSV-2 dual-strain infection and identified risk factors. People with and without HIV infection participating in HSV-2 natural history studies (University of Washington Virology Research Clinic) and HIV prevention trials (HIV Prevention Trials Network 039 and Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study) in the US, Africa, and Peru with 2 genital specimens each containing ≥105 copies herpes simplex virus DNA/ml collected a median of 5 months apart (IQR: 2-11 months) were included. It is unlikely that 2 strains would be detected in the same sample simultaneously; therefore, 2 samples were required to detect dual-strain infection. We identified 85 HSV-2 SNPs that, in aggregate, could determine whether paired HSV-2 strains were the same or different with >90% probability. These SNPs were then used to create a customized high-throughput array-based genotyping assay. Participants were considered to be infected with more than 1 strain of HSV-2 if their samples differed by ≥5 SNPs between the paired samples, and dual-strain infection was confirmed using high-throughput sequencing (HTS). We genotyped pairs of genital specimens from 459 people; 213 (46%) were men, the median age was 34 years (IQR: 27-44), and 130 (28%) were HIV seropositive. Overall, 272 (59%) people were from the US, 59 (13%) were from Peru, and 128 (28%) were from 8 countries in Africa. Of the 459 people, 18 (3.9%) met the criteria for dual-strain infection. HTS and phylogenetic analysis of paired specimens confirmed shedding of 2 distinct HSV-2 strains collected at different times in 17 pairs, giving an estimated dual-strain infection prevalence of 3.7% (95% CI = 2

  2. Dual-strain genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection in the US, Peru, and 8 countries in sub-Saharan Africa: A nested cross-sectional viral genotyping study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Johnston

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative estimation of the extent to which the immune system's protective effect against one herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection protects against infection with additional HSV-2 strains is important for understanding the potential for HSV-2 vaccine development. Using viral genotyping, we estimated the prevalence of HSV-2 dual-strain infection and identified risk factors.People with and without HIV infection participating in HSV-2 natural history studies (University of Washington Virology Research Clinic and HIV prevention trials (HIV Prevention Trials Network 039 and Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study in the US, Africa, and Peru with 2 genital specimens each containing ≥105 copies herpes simplex virus DNA/ml collected a median of 5 months apart (IQR: 2-11 months were included. It is unlikely that 2 strains would be detected in the same sample simultaneously; therefore, 2 samples were required to detect dual-strain infection. We identified 85 HSV-2 SNPs that, in aggregate, could determine whether paired HSV-2 strains were the same or different with >90% probability. These SNPs were then used to create a customized high-throughput array-based genotyping assay. Participants were considered to be infected with more than 1 strain of HSV-2 if their samples differed by ≥5 SNPs between the paired samples, and dual-strain infection was confirmed using high-throughput sequencing (HTS. We genotyped pairs of genital specimens from 459 people; 213 (46% were men, the median age was 34 years (IQR: 27-44, and 130 (28% were HIV seropositive. Overall, 272 (59% people were from the US, 59 (13% were from Peru, and 128 (28% were from 8 countries in Africa. Of the 459 people, 18 (3.9% met the criteria for dual-strain infection. HTS and phylogenetic analysis of paired specimens confirmed shedding of 2 distinct HSV-2 strains collected at different times in 17 pairs, giving an estimated dual-strain infection prevalence of 3.7% (95% CI = 2

  3. Dual-strain genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection in the US, Peru, and 8 countries in sub-Saharan Africa: A nested cross-sectional viral genotyping study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Joshua; Sather, Cassandra; Diem, Kurt; Celum, Connie

    2017-01-01

    Background Quantitative estimation of the extent to which the immune system’s protective effect against one herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection protects against infection with additional HSV-2 strains is important for understanding the potential for HSV-2 vaccine development. Using viral genotyping, we estimated the prevalence of HSV-2 dual-strain infection and identified risk factors. Methods and findings People with and without HIV infection participating in HSV-2 natural history studies (University of Washington Virology Research Clinic) and HIV prevention trials (HIV Prevention Trials Network 039 and Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study) in the US, Africa, and Peru with 2 genital specimens each containing ≥105 copies herpes simplex virus DNA/ml collected a median of 5 months apart (IQR: 2–11 months) were included. It is unlikely that 2 strains would be detected in the same sample simultaneously; therefore, 2 samples were required to detect dual-strain infection. We identified 85 HSV-2 SNPs that, in aggregate, could determine whether paired HSV-2 strains were the same or different with >90% probability. These SNPs were then used to create a customized high-throughput array-based genotyping assay. Participants were considered to be infected with more than 1 strain of HSV-2 if their samples differed by ≥5 SNPs between the paired samples, and dual-strain infection was confirmed using high-throughput sequencing (HTS). We genotyped pairs of genital specimens from 459 people; 213 (46%) were men, the median age was 34 years (IQR: 27–44), and 130 (28%) were HIV seropositive. Overall, 272 (59%) people were from the US, 59 (13%) were from Peru, and 128 (28%) were from 8 countries in Africa. Of the 459 people, 18 (3.9%) met the criteria for dual-strain infection. HTS and phylogenetic analysis of paired specimens confirmed shedding of 2 distinct HSV-2 strains collected at different times in 17 pairs, giving an estimated dual-strain infection

  4. Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-specific proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell responses in humans immunized with an HSF type 2 glycoprotein subunit vaccine

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    Zarling, J.M.; Moran, P.A.; Brewer, L.; Ashley, R.; Corey, L.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether immunization of humans with a herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein-subunit vaccine would result in the priming of both HSV-specific proliferating cells and cytotoxic T cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from all eight vaccinees studied responded by proliferating after stimulation with HSV-2, HSV-1, and glycoprotein gB-1. The PBL of five of these eight vaccinees proliferated following stimulation with gD-2, whereas stimulation with Gd-1 resulted in relatively low or no proliferative responses. T-cell clones were generated from HSV-2-stimulated PBL of three vaccinees who demonstrated strong proliferative responses to HSV-1 and HSV-2. Of 12 clones studied in lymphoproliferative assays, 9 were found to be cross-reactive for HSV-1 and HSV-2. Of the approximately 90 T-cell clones isolated, 14 demonstrated HSV-specific cytotoxic activity. Radioimmunoprecipitation-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses confirmed that the vaccinees had antibodies only to HSV glycoproteins, not to proteins which are absent in the subunit vaccine, indicating that these vaccinees had not become infected with HSV. Immunization of humans with an HSV-2 glycoprotein-subunit vaccine thus results in the priming of T cells that proliferate in response to stimulation with HSV and its glycoproteins and T cells that have cytotoxic activity against HSV-infected cells. Such HSV-specific memory T cells were detected as late as 2 years following the last boost with the subunit vaccine.

  5. Virus-specific immune memory at peripheral sites of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection in guinea pigs.

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    Jingya Xia

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in modulating HSV-2 pathogenesis, the nature of tissue-resident immune memory to HSV-2 is not completely understood. We used genital HSV-2 infection of guinea pigs to assess the type and location of HSV-specific memory cells at peripheral sites of HSV-2 infection. HSV-specific antibody-secreting cells were readily detected in the spleen, bone marrow, vagina/cervix, lumbosacral sensory ganglia, and spinal cord of previously-infected animals. Memory B cells were detected primarily in the spleen and to a lesser extent in bone marrow but not in the genital tract or neural tissues suggesting that the HSV-specific antibody-secreting cells present at peripheral sites of HSV-2 infection represented persisting populations of plasma cells. The antibody produced by these cells isolated from neural tissues of infected animals was functionally relevant and included antibodies specific for HSV-2 glycoproteins and HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies. A vigorous IFN-γ-secreting T cell response developed in the spleen as well as the sites of HSV-2 infection in the genital tract, lumbosacral ganglia and spinal cord following acute HSV-2 infection. Additionally, populations of HSV-specific tissue-resident memory T cells were maintained at these sites and were readily detected up to 150 days post HSV-2 infection. Unlike the persisting plasma cells, HSV-specific memory T cells were also detected in uterine tissue and cervicothoracic region of the spinal cord and at low levels in the cervicothoracic ganglia. Both HSV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ resident memory cell subsets were maintained long-term in the genital tract and sensory ganglia/spinal cord following HSV-2 infection. Together these data demonstrate the long-term maintenance of both humoral and cellular arms of the adaptive immune response at the sites of HSV-2 latency and virus shedding and highlight the utility of the guinea pig infection model to investigate tissue-resident memory in the

  6. Virus-specific immune memory at peripheral sites of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jingya; Veselenak, Ronald L; Gorder, Summer R; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N

    2014-01-01

    Despite its importance in modulating HSV-2 pathogenesis, the nature of tissue-resident immune memory to HSV-2 is not completely understood. We used genital HSV-2 infection of guinea pigs to assess the type and location of HSV-specific memory cells at peripheral sites of HSV-2 infection. HSV-specific antibody-secreting cells were readily detected in the spleen, bone marrow, vagina/cervix, lumbosacral sensory ganglia, and spinal cord of previously-infected animals. Memory B cells were detected primarily in the spleen and to a lesser extent in bone marrow but not in the genital tract or neural tissues suggesting that the HSV-specific antibody-secreting cells present at peripheral sites of HSV-2 infection represented persisting populations of plasma cells. The antibody produced by these cells isolated from neural tissues of infected animals was functionally relevant and included antibodies specific for HSV-2 glycoproteins and HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies. A vigorous IFN-γ-secreting T cell response developed in the spleen as well as the sites of HSV-2 infection in the genital tract, lumbosacral ganglia and spinal cord following acute HSV-2 infection. Additionally, populations of HSV-specific tissue-resident memory T cells were maintained at these sites and were readily detected up to 150 days post HSV-2 infection. Unlike the persisting plasma cells, HSV-specific memory T cells were also detected in uterine tissue and cervicothoracic region of the spinal cord and at low levels in the cervicothoracic ganglia. Both HSV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ resident memory cell subsets were maintained long-term in the genital tract and sensory ganglia/spinal cord following HSV-2 infection. Together these data demonstrate the long-term maintenance of both humoral and cellular arms of the adaptive immune response at the sites of HSV-2 latency and virus shedding and highlight the utility of the guinea pig infection model to investigate tissue-resident memory in the setting of HSV-2 latency

  7. Pyrrolo-dC Metal-Mediated Base Pairs in the Reverse Watson-Crick Double Helix: Enhanced Stability of Parallel DNA and Impact of 6-Pyridinyl Residues on Fluorescence and Silver-Ion Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haozhe; Mei, Hui; Seela, Frank

    2015-07-06

    Reverse Watson-Crick DNA with parallel-strand orientation (ps DNA) has been constructed. Pyrrolo-dC (PyrdC) nucleosides with phenyl and pyridinyl residues linked to the 6 position of the pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine base have been incorporated in 12- and 25-mer oligonucleotide duplexes and utilized as silver-ion binding sites. Thermal-stability studies on the parallel DNA strands demonstrated extremely strong silver-ion binding and strongly enhanced duplex stability. Stoichiometric UV and fluorescence titration experiments verified that a single (2py) PyrdC-(2py) PyrdC pair captures two silver ions in ps DNA. A structure for the PyrdC silver-ion base pair that aligns 7-deazapurine bases head-to-tail instead of head-to-head, as suggested for canonical DNA, is proposed. The silver DNA double helix represents the first example of a ps DNA structure built up of bidentate and tridentate reverse Watson-Crick base pairs stabilized by a dinuclear silver-mediated PyrdC pair. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Combined CMV- and HSV-1 brainstem encephalitis restricted to medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchanov, J; Branding, G; Stocker, H

    2014-04-15

    We report a very rare case of a combined CMV- and HSV-1 isolated brainstem encephalitis restricted to medulla oblongata in a patient with advanced HIV disease. Neither limbic nor general ventricular involvement was detected on neuroimaging. The case highlights the importance of testing for HSV-1 and CMV in HIV-infected patients presenting with an isolated brainstem syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biological Education of IVFRU and FIAU for HSV1-TK Reporter Gene Monitoring

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    Hong, Su Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Eun Ah; Lee, Jong Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus Type1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) system is a useful gene therapy monitoring method. HSV1-TK is one of the most widely used effector gene systems used for imaging gene expression, in association with its use as a reporter gene. It has resulted the development of a number of radiolabeled HSV1-TK substrates for the non-invasive detection of HSV1-TK expression. In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have been developed as prodrugs for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. Prodrug activation or sucide gene therapy has been shown to be successful in potentiating the therapeutic index by sensitizing genetically modified tumor cells to various prodrugs or enhancing the action of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. The most studied prodrug activation approaches involve transfection of tumors with HSV1-TK gene. (Z)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro- 2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) possesses a 2'-fluoro substituent in the ribose configuration, is considered to protect IVFRU from enzyme mediated degradation in vivo. It is obviously potential substrates for HSV1-TK imaging. 2'-Fiuoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl- 5-iodo-uridine (FIAU), an anticancer drug widely used in clinical practice, is an analogue of thymidine. In a series of studies using adenovirus vector for gene transfer described the appropriate combination of exogenously introduced HSV1-TK as a 'marker/reporter gene' and radiolabelled FIAU as a 'marker substrate/reporter probe' for monitoring gene therapy and gene expression.

  10. Biological Education of IVFRU and FIAU for HSV1-TK Reporter Gene Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Su Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Eun Ah; Lee, Jong Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2006-01-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus Type1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) system is a useful gene therapy monitoring method. HSV1-TK is one of the most widely used effector gene systems used for imaging gene expression, in association with its use as a reporter gene. It has resulted the development of a number of radiolabeled HSV1-TK substrates for the non-invasive detection of HSV1-TK expression. In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have been developed as prodrugs for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. Prodrug activation or sucide gene therapy has been shown to be successful in potentiating the therapeutic index by sensitizing genetically modified tumor cells to various prodrugs or enhancing the action of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. The most studied prodrug activation approaches involve transfection of tumors with HSV1-TK gene. (Z)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro- 2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) possesses a 2'-fluoro substituent in the ribose configuration, is considered to protect IVFRU from enzyme mediated degradation in vivo. It is obviously potential substrates for HSV1-TK imaging. 2'-Fiuoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl- 5-iodo-uridine (FIAU), an anticancer drug widely used in clinical practice, is an analogue of thymidine. In a series of studies using adenovirus vector for gene transfer described the appropriate combination of exogenously introduced HSV1-TK as a 'marker/reporter gene' and radiolabelled FIAU as a 'marker substrate/reporter probe' for monitoring gene therapy and gene expression

  11. Assessment of Anti HSV-1 Activity of Aloe Vera Gel Extract: an In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Alyaseri, Montazer

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is one of the most common and debilitating oral diseases; yet, there is no standard topical treatment to control it. The extract of Aloe vera leaves has been previously reported to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and also antiviral effects. There is no data on anti-Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) activity of Aloe vera gel. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the anti-HSV-1 activity of Aloe vera gel in Vero cell line. Materials and Method In this study, gel extraction and cytotoxicity of various increasing concentrations of Aloe vera gel (0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5%) was evaluated in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Having been washed with phosphate buffered saline, 50 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1 was added to each well. After 1 hour of incubation at 37°C, cell monolayers in 24 well plates were exposed to different increasing concentrations of Aloe vera gel. The anti-HSV-1 activity of Aloe vera gel in different concentrations was assessed by plaque reduction assays. Data were analyzed by using One-way ANOVA. Results The cytotoxicity assay showed that Aloe vera in prearranged concentrations was cell-compatible. The inhibitory effect of various concentrations of Aloe vera was observed one hour after the Vero cell was infected with HSV-1. However, there was no significant difference between two serial concentrations (p> 0.05). One-way ANOVA also revealed no significant difference between the groups. The findings indicated a dose-dependent antiviral effect of Aloe vera. Conclusion The findings showed significant inhibitory effect of 0.2-5% Aloe vera gel on HSV-1 growth in Vero cell line. Therefore, this gel could be a useful topical treatment for oral HSV-1 infections without any significant toxicity. PMID:26966709

  12. Identification of a novel NLS of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) VP19C and its nuclear localization is required for efficient production of HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Shuai; Xing, Junji; Zheng, Chunfu

    2012-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) triplex is a complex of three protein subunits, consisting of two copies of VP23 and one copy of VP19C. Here, we identified a non-classical NLS of VP19C between aa 50 and 61, and the nuclear import of VP19C was mediated by RanGTP and importin β1-, but not importin α5-, dependent pathway. Additionally, recombinant virus harbouring this NLS mutation (NLSm) replicates less efficiently as wild-type. These data strongly suggested that the nuclear import of VP19C is required for efficient HSV-1 production.

  13. [Identification of occult disseminated tumor cells by recombinant herpes simplex virus expressing GFP (HSV(GFP))].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiang-ping; Shi, Gui-lan; Wang, Cheng-feng; Li, Jie; Zhang, Jian-wei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Shu-ren; Liu, Bin-lei

    2012-12-01

    To develop a novel rapid protocol for the detection of occult disseminated tumor cells by a recombinant herpes simplex virus expressing GFP (HSV(GFP)). Tumor cells of seven cell lines were exposed to HSV(GFP) and then examined for GFP expression by fluorescence microscopy. Various numbers of tumor cells (10, 100, 1000, 10 000) were mixed into 2 ml human whole blood, separated with lymphocytes separation medium, exposed to HSV(GFP), incubated at 37°C for 6 - 24 h and then counted for the number of green cells under the fluorescence microscope. Some clinical samples including peripheral blood, pleural effusion, ascites, spinal fluid from tumor-bearing patients were screened using this protocol in parallel with routine cytological examination. HSV(GFP) was able to infect all 7 tumor cell lines indicating that the HSV(GFP) can be used to detect different types of tumor cells. The detection sensitivity was 10 cancer cells in 2 ml whole blood. In the clinical samples, there were 4/15 positive by routine cytological examination but 11/15 positive by HSV(GFP), indicating a higher sensitivity of this new protocol. Recombinant herpes simplex virus-mediated green fluorescence is a simple and sensitive technique for the identification of occult disseminated cancer cells including circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

  14. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the HSV-2 serine/threonine kinase Us3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnen, Renee L.; Johnston, Susan M.; Neron, Casey E.; Banfield, Bruce W.

    2011-01-01

    The alphaherpesvirus serine/threonine kinase Us3 plays diverse roles in virus multiplication and modifies both nuclear and cytoplasmic substrates. We recently reported that treatment of HSV-2 Us3-transfected and HSV-2-infected cells with leptomycin B, an inhibitor of nuclear export mediated by interaction of chromosomal regional maintenance protein (CRM1) with leucine rich nuclear export signals (NESs), resulted in nuclear trapping of Us3. Here, we utilized fluorescence loss in photobleaching to monitor nuclear export of HSV-2 Us3 and confirm that this process proceeds solely via a CRM1-mediated mechanism. Analysis of deletion derivatives of HSV-2 Us3 fused to a nuclear export reporter protein implicated the involvement of NES-like sequences in nuclear export. However, nuclear trapping of HSV-2 Us3 proteins carrying mutations in these potential NESs was not observed, indicating that these sequences are not functional in the context of full-length protein. Our analyses also revealed previously unidentified regions of HSV-2 Us3 that contribute to its kinase activity.

  15. Herpes Simplex Vaccines: Prospects of Live-attenuated HSV Vaccines to Combat Genital and Ocular infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, Brent; Kousoulas, Konstantin Gus

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and its closely related type-2 (HSV-2) viruses cause important clinical manifestations in humans including acute ocular disease and genital infections. These viruses establish latency in the trigeminal ganglionic and dorsal root neurons, respectively. Both viruses are widespread among humans and can frequently reactivate from latency causing disease. Currently, there are no vaccines available against herpes simplex viral infections. However, a number of promising vaccine approaches are being explored in pre-clinical investigations with few progressing to early phase clinical trials. Consensus research findings suggest that robust humoral and cellular immune responses may partially control the frequency of reactivation episodes and reduce clinical symptoms. Live-attenuated viral vaccines have long been considered as a viable option for generating robust and protective immune responses against viral pathogens. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the same alphaherpesvirus subfamily with herpes simplex viruses. A live-attenuated VZV vaccine has been extensively used in a prophylactic and therapeutic approach to combat primary and recurrent VZV infection indicating that a similar vaccine approach may be feasible for HSVs. In this review, we summarize pre-clinical approaches to HSV vaccine development and current efforts to test certain vaccine approaches in human clinical trials. Also, we discuss the potential advantages of using a safe, live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine strain to protect against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections. PMID:27114893

  16. Pediatric glioma stem cells: biologic strategies for oncolytic HSV virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory K Friedman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common adult malignant brain tumor, GBMs in childhood represent less than 10% of pediatric malignant brain tumors and are phenotypically and molecularly distinct from adult GBMs. Similar to adult patients, outcomes for children with high-grade gliomas (HGGs remain poor. Furthermore, the significant morbidity and mortality yielded by pediatric GBM is compounded by neurotoxicity for the developing brain caused by current therapies. Poor outcomes have been attributed to a subpopulation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant cells, termed ‘glioma stem cells’ (GSCs, ‘glioma progenitor cells’, or ‘glioma-initiating cells', which have the ability to initiate and maintain the tumor and to repopulate the recurring tumor after conventional therapy. Future innovative therapies for pediatric HGGs must be able to eradicate these therapy-resistant GSCs. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses, genetically engineered to be safe for normal cells and to express diverse foreign anti-tumor therapeutic genes, have been demonstrated in preclinical studies to infect and kill GSCs and tumor cells equally while sparing normal brain cells. In this review, we discuss the unique aspects of pediatric GSCs, including markers to identify them, the microenvironment they reside in, signaling pathways that regulate them, mechanisms of cellular resistance, and approaches to target GSCs, with a focus on the promising therapeutic, genetically engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV.

  17. FASTSAT-HSV01 Thermal Math Model Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Callie

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the thermal math model correlation effort for the Fast Affordable Science and Technology SATellite (FASTSAT-HSV01), which was designed, built and tested by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and multiple partners. The satellite launched in November 2010 on a Minotaur IV rocket from the Kodiak Launch Complex in Kodiak, Alaska. It carried three Earth science experiments and two technology demonstrations into a low Earth circular orbit with an inclination of 72deg and an altitude of 650 kilometers. The mission has been successful to date with science experiment activities still taking place daily. The thermal control system on this spacecraft was a passive design relying on thermo-optical properties and six heaters placed on specific components. Flight temperature data is being recorded every minute from the 48 Resistance Temperature Devices (RTDs) onboard the satellite structure and many of its avionics boxes. An effort has been made to correlate the thermal math model to the flight temperature data using Cullimore and Ring's Thermal Desktop and by obtaining Earth and Sun vector data from the Attitude Control System (ACS) team to create an "as-flown" orbit. Several model parameters were studied during this task to understand the spacecraft's sensitivity to these changes. Many "lessons learned" have been noted from this activity that will be directly applicable to future small satellite programs.

  18. Meeting report: Initial World Health Organization consultation on herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccine preferred product characteristics, March 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sami L; Giersing, Birgitte K; Hickling, Julian; Jones, Rebecca; Deal, Carolyn; Kaslow, David C

    2017-12-07

    The development of vaccines against herpes simplex virus (HSV) is an important global goal for sexual and reproductive health. A key priority to advance development of HSV vaccines is the definition of preferred product characteristics (PPCs), which provide strategic guidance on World Health Organization (WHO) preferences for new vaccines, specifically from a low- and middle-income country (LMIC) perspective. To start the PPC process for HSV vaccines, the WHO convened a global stakeholder consultation in March 2017, to define the priority public health needs that should be addressed by HSV vaccines and discuss the key considerations for HSV vaccine PPCs, particularly for LMICs. Meeting participants outlined an initial set of overarching public health goals for HSV vaccines in LMICs, which are: to reduce the acquisition of HIV associated with HSV-2 infection in high HIV-prevalence populations and to reduce the burden of HSV-associated disease, including mortality and morbidity due to neonatal herpes and impacts on sexual and reproductive health. Participants also considered the role of prophylactic versus therapeutic vaccines, whether both HSV-2 and HSV-1 should be targeted, important target populations, and infection and disease endpoints for clinical trials. This article summarizes the main discussions from the consultation. Copyright © 2017.

  19. Co-infection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in women with reproductive tract infections (RTI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Ksh Mamta; Devi, Kh Sulochana; Singh, Ng Brajachand; Singh, N Nabakishore; Singh, I Dorendra

    2008-09-01

    In India, HSV seroprevalence and its coinfection with HIV among female patients with reproductive tract infections (RTI) are sparse. We aim to ascertain the seroprevalence of HSV and its coinfection with HIV and common sexually transmitted infections attending Obstetrics and Gynaecology outpatient department, RIMS. The study included 92 female patients with RTI. Diagnostic serology was done for HSV-1 and HSV-2 using group specific IgM indirect immunoassay using ELISA, HIV by 3 ELISA/Rapid/Simple (E/R/S) test of different biological antigen. Diagnosis of RTI was made on clinical grounds with appropriate laboratory investigations--microscopy, Gram stain smear etc. Bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed using Nugent's criteria, Syphilis by rapid plasma reagin (RPR) card test and Chlamydia trachomatis by IgG ELISA. Out of 92 sera tested for HSV, 18 (19.6%) were IgM HSV positive and 9 (9.8%) were HIV positive. Co-infection rate of HSV in HIV positive was 16.7%. None of the patients had clinical herpes genitalis, all were subclinical cases. 55.5% of HSV positives belongs to age group 21 to 30 years. Of the HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgM positives 3 (15%) had HIV, 4 (22.2%) bacterial vaginosis, 2 (11.1%) were RPR positive, 4 (22.2%) Chlamydia trachomatis, 3 (15%) were pregnant. 16 (88.8%) were unemployed, 14 (77.7%) had education level below 10 standard. Our study suggest that every case of RTI, be it an ulcerative or nonulcerative must be thoroughly evaluated by laboratory testing for primary subclinical genital HSV coinfection as this has profound implications on their judicious management and aversion of complications. Early diagnosis and treatment of HSV infection together with prophylaxis for recurrent HSV disease will prevent progression and spread of HIV disease.

  20. Population-level effect of potential HSV2 prophylactic vaccines on HIV incidence in sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Esther E.; White, Richard G.; Bakker, Roel; Orroth, Kate K.; Weiss, Helen A.; Buvé, Anne; Hayes, Richard J.; Glynn, Judith R.

    2009-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV2) infection increases HIV transmission. We explore the impact of a potential prophylactic HSV2 vaccination on HIV incidence in Africa using STDSIM an individual-based model. A campaign that achieved 70% coverage over 5 years with a vaccine that reduced susceptibility to HSV2 acquisition and HSV2 reactivation by 75% for 10 years, reduced HIV incidence by 30–40% after 20 years (range 4–66%). Over 20 years, in most scenarios fewer than 100 vaccinations were required to avert one HIV infection. HSV2 vaccines could have a substantial impact on HIV incidence. Intensified efforts are needed to develop an effective HSV2 vaccine. PMID:19071187

  1. The replicative DNA polymerase of herpes simplex virus 1 exhibits apurinic/apyrimidinic and 5′-deoxyribose phosphate lyase activities

    OpenAIRE

    Bogani, Federica; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is essential for maintaining genome stability both to counter the accumulation of unusual bases and to protect from base loss in the DNA. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a large dsDNA virus that encodes its own DNA replication machinery, including enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism. We report on a replicative family B and a herpesvirus-encoded DNA Pol that possesses DNA lyase activity. We have discovered that the catalytic subunit of the HSV-1 DNA polymeras...

  2. Targeting Herpes Simplex Virus-1 gD by a DNA Aptamer Can Be an Effective New Strategy to Curb Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejabhiram Yadavalli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 is an important factor for vision loss in developed countries. A challenging aspect of the ocular infection by HSV-1 is that common treatments, such as acyclovir, fail to provide effective topical remedies. Furthermore, it is not very clear whether the viral glycoproteins, required for HSV-1 entry into the host, can be targeted for an effective therapy against ocular herpes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that HSV-1 envelope glycoprotein gD, which is essential for viral entry and spread, can be specifically targeted by topical applications of a small DNA aptamer to effectively control ocular infection by the virus. Our 45-nt-long DNA aptamer showed high affinity for HSV-1 gD (binding affinity constant [Kd] = 50 nM, which is strong enough to disrupt the binding of gD to its cognate host receptors. Our studies showed significant restriction of viral entry and replication in both in vitro and ex vivo studies. In vivo experiments in mice also resulted in loss of ocular infection under prophylactic treatment and statistically significant lower infection under therapeutic modality compared to random DNA controls. Thus, our studies validate the possibility that targeting HSV-1 entry glycoproteins, such as gD, can locally reduce the spread of infection and define a novel DNA aptamer-based approach to control HSV-1 infection of the eye.

  3. Role of nitric oxide in the onset of facial nerve palsy by HSV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hato, Naohito; Kohno, Hisashi; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2013-12-01

    Although herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a causative agent of Bell palsy, the precise mechanism of the paralysis remains unknown. It is necessary to investigate the pathogenesis and treatment of Bell palsy due to HSV-1 infection. This study elucidated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the incidence of facial nerve paralysis caused by HSV-1 in mice and to evaluate the possible role of edaravone, a free radical scavenger, in preventing the paralysis. Sixty-two mice served as animal models of Bell palsy in this laboratory study conducted at an academic institution. Levels of NO in the facial nerve were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography and absorption photometry. The incidence of facial palsy was assessed following administration of edaravone immediately after HSV-1 inoculation and daily for 11 days thereafter. The ratio of NO (inoculated side to control side) and incidence of facial palsy. RESULTS Before the onset of facial palsy, no substantial difference in the NO level was noted between the HSV-1-inoculated side and the control side. When facial palsy occurred, usually at 7 days after inoculation, the NO level was significantly higher on the inoculated side than on the control side. Following recovery from the palsy, the high NO level of the inoculated side decreased. No increase in the NO level was observed in animals without transient facial palsy. When edaravone was administered, the incidence of facial palsy decreased significantly. These findings suggest that NO produced by inducible NO synthase in the facial nerve plays an important role in the onset of facial palsy caused by HSV-1 infection, which is considered a causative virus of Bell palsy. Hato and colleagues elucidate the role of nitric oxide in HSV-1–related facial nerve paralysis in mice and evaluate the role of edaravone, a free radical scavenger, in preventing the paralysis.

  4. Pedilanthus tithymaloides Inhibits HSV Infection by Modulating NF-κB Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durbadal Ojha

    Full Text Available Pedilanthus tithymaloides (PT, a widely used ethnomedicinal plant, has been employed to treat a number of skin conditions. To extend its utility and to fully exploit its medicinal potential, we have evaluated the in vitro antiviral activity of a methanolic extract of PT leaves and its isolated compounds against Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2. Bioactivity-guided studies revealed that the extract and one of its constituents, luteolin, had potent antiviral activity against wild-type and clinical isolates of HSV-2 (EC50 48.5-52.6 and 22.4-27.5 μg/ml, respectively, with nearly complete inhibition at 86.5-101.8 and 40.2-49.6 μg/ml, respectively. The inhibitory effect was significant (p<0.001 when the drug was added 2 h prior to infection, and was effective up to 4 h post-infection. As viral replication requires NF-κB activation, we examined whether the observed extract-induced inhibition of HSV-2 was related to NF-κB inhibition. Interestingly, we observed that treatment of HSV-2-infected cells with extract or luteolin suppressed NF-κB activation. Although NF-κB, JNK and MAPK activation was compromised during HSV replication, neither the extract nor luteolin affected HSV-2-induced JNK1/2 and MAPK activation. Moreover, the PT leaf extract and luteolin potently down-regulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, Interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, NO and iNOS and the production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ, which are directly involved in controlling the NF-κB signaling pathway. Thus, our results indicate that both PT leaf extract and luteolin modulate the NF-κB signaling pathway, resulting in the inhibition of HSV-2 replication.

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 DNA Polymerase RNase H Activity Acts in a 3'-to-5' Direction and Is Dependent on the 3'-to-5' Exonuclease Active Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Jessica L; Mukherjee, Purba; Coen, Donald M

    2018-03-01

    The catalytic subunit (Pol) of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) DNA polymerase has been extensively studied both as a model for other family B DNA polymerases and for its differences from these enzymes as an antiviral target. Among the activities of HSV-1 Pol is an intrinsic RNase H activity that cleaves RNA from RNA-DNA hybrids. There has long been a controversy regarding whether this activity is due to the 3'-to-5' exonuclease of Pol or whether it is a separate activity, possibly acting on 5' RNA termini. To investigate this issue, we compared wild-type HSV-1 Pol and a 3'-to-5' exonuclease-deficient mutant, D368A Pol, for DNA polymerase activity, 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity, and RNase H activity in vitro Additionally, we assessed the RNase H activity using differentially end-labeled templates with 5' or 3' RNA termini. The mutant enzyme was at most modestly impaired for DNA polymerase activity but was drastically impaired for 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity, with no activity detected even at high enzyme-to-DNA substrate ratios. Importantly, the mutant showed no detectable ability to excise RNA with either a 3' or 5' terminus, while the wild-type HSV-1 Pol was able to cleave RNA from the annealed RNA-DNA hairpin template, but only detectably with a 3' RNA terminus in a 3'-to-5' direction and at a rate lower than that of the exonuclease activity. These results suggest that HSV-1 Pol does not have an RNase H separable from its 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity and that this activity prefers DNA degradation over degradation of RNA from RNA-DNA hybrids. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a member of the Herpesviridae family of DNA viruses, several of which cause morbidity and mortality in humans. Although the HSV-1 DNA polymerase has been studied for decades and is a crucial target for antivirals against HSV-1 infection, several of its functions remain to be elucidated. A hypothesis suggesting the existence of a 5'-to-3' RNase H activity intrinsic to this enzyme

  6. Enrichment of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactive mucosal T cells in the human female genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posavad, C M; Zhao, L; Dong, L; Jin, L; Stevens, C E; Magaret, A S; Johnston, C; Wald, A; Zhu, J; Corey, L; Koelle, D M

    2017-09-01

    Local mucosal cellular immunity is critical in providing protection from HSV-2. To characterize and quantify HSV-2-reactive mucosal T cells, lymphocytes were isolated from endocervical cytobrush and biopsy specimens from 17 HSV-2-infected women and examined ex vivo for the expression of markers associated with maturation and tissue residency and for functional T-cell responses to HSV-2. Compared with their circulating counterparts, cervix-derived CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were predominantly effector memory T cells (CCR7-/CD45RA-) and the majority expressed CD69, a marker of tissue residency. Co-expression of CD103, another marker of tissue residency, was highest on cervix-derived CD8+ T cells. Functional HSV-2 reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in cervical samples and a median of 17% co-expressed CD103. HSV-2-reactive CD4+ T cells co-expressed IL-2 and were significantly enriched in the cervix compared with blood. This first direct ex vivo documentation of local enrichment of HSV-2-reactive T cells in the human female genital mucosa is consistent with the presence of antigen-specific tissue-resident memory T cells. Ex vivo analysis of these T cells may uncover tissue-specific mechanisms of local control of HSV-2 to assist the development of vaccine strategies that target protective T cells to sites of HSV-2 infection.

  7. Effect of genital herpes on cervicovaginal HIV shedding in women co-infected with HIV AND HSV-2 in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Jim; Riedner, Gabriele; Maboko, Leonard; Hoelscher, Michael; Weiss, Helen A; Lyamuya, Eligius; Mabey, David; Rusizoka, Mary; Belec, Laurent; Hayes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To compare the presence and quantity of cervicovaginal HIV among HIV seropositive women with clinical herpes, subclinical HSV-2 infection and without HSV-2 infection respectively; to evaluate the association between cervicovaginal HIV and HSV shedding; and identify factors associated with quantity of cervicovaginal HIV. Four groups of HIV seropositive adult female barworkers were identified and examined at three-monthly intervals between October 2000 and March 2003 in Mbeya, Tanzania: (1) 57 women at 70 clinic visits with clinical genital herpes; (2) 39 of the same women at 46 clinic visits when asymptomatic; (3) 55 HSV-2 seropositive women at 60 clinic visits who were never observed with herpetic lesions; (4) 18 HSV-2 seronegative women at 45 clinic visits. Associations of genital HIV shedding with HIV plasma viral load (PVL), herpetic lesions, HSV shedding and other factors were examined. Prevalence of detectable genital HIV RNA varied from 73% in HSV-2 seronegative women to 94% in women with herpetic lesions (geometric means 1634 vs 3339 copies/ml, p = 0.03). In paired specimens from HSV-2 positive women, genital HIV viral shedding was similar during symptomatic and asymptomatic visits. On multivariate regression, genital HIV RNA (log10 copies/mL) was closely associated with HIV PVL (β = 0.51 per log10 copies/ml increase, 95%CI:0.41-0.60, pgenital HIV than the presence of herpetic lesions. These data support a role of HSV-2 infection in enhancing HIV transmissibility.

  8. Akt Kinase-Mediated Checkpoint of cGAS DNA Sensing Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Ju Seo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Upon DNA stimulation, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS synthesizes the second messenger cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP that binds to the STING, triggering antiviral interferon-β (IFN-β production. However, it has remained undetermined how hosts regulate cGAS enzymatic activity after the resolution of DNA immunogen. Here, we show that Akt kinase plays a negative role in cGAS-mediated anti-viral immune response. Akt phosphorylated the S291 or S305 residue of the enzymatic domain of mouse or human cGAS, respectively, and this phosphorylation robustly suppressed its enzymatic activity. Consequently, expression of activated Akt led to the reduction of cGAMP and IFN-β production and the increase of herpes simplex virus 1 replication, whereas treatment with Akt inhibitor augmented cGAS-mediated IFN-β production. Furthermore, expression of the phosphorylation-resistant cGAS S291A mutant enhanced IFN-β production upon DNA stimulation, HSV-1 infection, and vaccinia virus infection. Our study identifies an Akt kinase-mediated checkpoint to fine-tune hosts’ immune responses to DNA stimulation.

  9. Akt Kinase-Mediated Checkpoint of cGAS DNA Sensing Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Gil Ju; Yang, Aerin; Tan, Brandon; Kim, Sungyoon; Liang, Qiming; Choi, Younho; Yuan, Weiming; Feng, Pinghui; Park, Hee-Sung; Jung, Jae U

    2015-10-13

    Upon DNA stimulation, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) synthesizes the second messenger cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) that binds to the STING, triggering antiviral interferon-β (IFN-β) production. However, it has remained undetermined how hosts regulate cGAS enzymatic activity after the resolution of DNA immunogen. Here, we show that Akt kinase plays a negative role in cGAS-mediated anti-viral immune response. Akt phosphorylated the S291 or S305 residue of the enzymatic domain of mouse or human cGAS, respectively, and this phosphorylation robustly suppressed its enzymatic activity. Consequently, expression of activated Akt led to the reduction of cGAMP and IFN-β production and the increase of herpes simplex virus 1 replication, whereas treatment with Akt inhibitor augmented cGAS-mediated IFN-β production. Furthermore, expression of the phosphorylation-resistant cGAS S291A mutant enhanced IFN-β production upon DNA stimulation, HSV-1 infection, and vaccinia virus infection. Our study identifies an Akt kinase-mediated checkpoint to fine-tune hosts' immune responses to DNA stimulation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of HSV cell-to-cell spread by lactoferrin and lactoferricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Sandvik, Kjersti; Andersen, Jeanette H; Hancock, Robert E W; Gutteberg, Tore J

    2008-09-01

    The milk protein lactoferrin (Lf) has multiple functions, including immune stimulation and antiviral activity towards herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2); antiviral activity has also been reported for the N-terminal pepsin-derived fragment lactoferricin (Lfcin). The anti-HSV mode of action of Lf and Lfcin is assumed to involve, in part, their interaction with the cell surface glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate, thereby blocking of viral entry. In this study we investigated the ability of human and bovine Lf and Lfcin to inhibit viral cell-to-cell spread as well as the involvement of cell surface glycosaminoglycans during viral cell-to-cell spread. Lf and Lfcin from both human and bovine origin, inhibited cell-to-cell spread of both HSV-1 and HSV-2. Inhibition of cell-to-cell spread by bovine Lfcin involved cell surface chondroitin sulfate. Based on transmission electron microscopy studies, human Lfcin, like bovine Lfcin, was randomly distributed intracellularly, thus differences in their antiviral activity could not be explained by differences in their distribution. In contrast, the cellular localization of iron-saturated (holo)-Lf appeared to differ from that of apo-Lf, indicating that holo- and apo-Lf may exhibit different antiviral mechanisms.

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies, Derived from Humans Vaccinated with the RV144 HIV Vaccine Containing the HVEM Binding Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Glycoprotein D, Neutralize HSV Infection, Mediate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity, and Protect Mice from Ocular Challenge with HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Tomaras, Georgia D; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Goodman, Kyle N; Berman, Phillip W; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Haynes, Barton F; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-10-01

    The RV144 HIV vaccine trial included a recombinant HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120) construct fused to a small portion of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) so that the first 40 amino acids of gp120 were replaced by the signal sequence and the first 27 amino acids of the mature form of gD. This region of gD contains most of the binding site for HVEM, an HSV receptor important for virus infection of epithelial cells and lymphocytes. RV144 induced antibodies to HIV that were partially protective against infection, as well as antibodies to HSV. We derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from peripheral blood B cells of recipients of the RV144 HIV vaccine and showed that these antibodies neutralized HSV-1 infection in cells expressing HVEM, but not the other major virus receptor, nectin-1. The MAbs mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and mice that received the MAbs and were then challenged by corneal inoculation with HSV-1 had reduced eye disease, shedding, and latent infection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of MAbs derived from human recipients of a vaccine that specifically target the HVEM binding site of gD. In summary, we found that monoclonal antibodies derived from humans vaccinated with the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD (i) neutralized HSV-1 infection in a cell receptor-specific manner, (ii) mediated ADCC, and (iii) reduced ocular disease in virus-infected mice. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes cold sores and neonatal herpes and is a leading cause of blindness. Despite many trials, no HSV vaccine has been approved. Nectin-1 and HVEM are the two major cellular receptors for HSV. These receptors are expressed at different levels in various tissues, and the role of each receptor in HSV pathogenesis is not well understood. We derived human monoclonal antibodies from persons who received the HIV RV144 vaccine that contained the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD fused to HIV gp120. These antibodies were

  12. Effect of genital herpes on cervicovaginal HIV shedding in women co-infected with HIV AND HSV-2 in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Todd

    Full Text Available To compare the presence and quantity of cervicovaginal HIV among HIV seropositive women with clinical herpes, subclinical HSV-2 infection and without HSV-2 infection respectively; to evaluate the association between cervicovaginal HIV and HSV shedding; and identify factors associated with quantity of cervicovaginal HIV.Four groups of HIV seropositive adult female barworkers were identified and examined at three-monthly intervals between October 2000 and March 2003 in Mbeya, Tanzania: (1 57 women at 70 clinic visits with clinical genital herpes; (2 39 of the same women at 46 clinic visits when asymptomatic; (3 55 HSV-2 seropositive women at 60 clinic visits who were never observed with herpetic lesions; (4 18 HSV-2 seronegative women at 45 clinic visits. Associations of genital HIV shedding with HIV plasma viral load (PVL, herpetic lesions, HSV shedding and other factors were examined.Prevalence of detectable genital HIV RNA varied from 73% in HSV-2 seronegative women to 94% in women with herpetic lesions (geometric means 1634 vs 3339 copies/ml, p = 0.03. In paired specimens from HSV-2 positive women, genital HIV viral shedding was similar during symptomatic and asymptomatic visits. On multivariate regression, genital HIV RNA (log10 copies/mL was closely associated with HIV PVL (β = 0.51 per log10 copies/ml increase, 95%CI:0.41-0.60, p<0.001 and HSV shedding (β = 0.24 per log10 copies/ml increase, 95% CI:0.16-0.32, p<0.001 but not the presence of herpetic lesions (β = -0.10, 95%CI:-0.28-0.08, p = 0.27.HIV PVL and HSV shedding were more important determinants of genital HIV than the presence of herpetic lesions. These data support a role of HSV-2 infection in enhancing HIV transmissibility.

  13. Varicella zoster vaccines and their implications for development of HSV vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershon, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccines to prevent varicella and zoster have been available in the US for the past 17 years, with a resultant dramatic decrease in varicella incidence and a predicted future decrease in the incidence of zoster. The pathogenesis and immune responses to varicella zoster virus (VZV) as well as the safety and effectiveness of VZV vaccines are reviewed. The lack of sterilizing immunity provided by VZV vaccines has not prevented them from being safe and effective. Virological and pathological information concerning parallels and differences between VZV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) are highlighted. Although VZV and HSV are distinct pathogens, they appear to have similarities in target organs and immunity that provide an expectation of a high likelihood for the success of vaccination against HSV, and predicted to be similar to that of VZV.

  14. Varicella zoster vaccines and their implications for development of HSV vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershon, Anne A., E-mail: aag1@columbia.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 620W. 168th Street, NY, NY 10032 (United States)

    2013-01-05

    Live attenuated vaccines to prevent varicella and zoster have been available in the US for the past 17 years, with a resultant dramatic decrease in varicella incidence and a predicted future decrease in the incidence of zoster. The pathogenesis and immune responses to varicella zoster virus (VZV) as well as the safety and effectiveness of VZV vaccines are reviewed. The lack of sterilizing immunity provided by VZV vaccines has not prevented them from being safe and effective. Virological and pathological information concerning parallels and differences between VZV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) are highlighted. Although VZV and HSV are distinct pathogens, they appear to have similarities in target organs and immunity that provide an expectation of a high likelihood for the success of vaccination against HSV, and predicted to be similar to that of VZV.

  15. Calibration and LOD/LOQ estimation of a chemiluminescent hybridization assay for residual DNA in recombinant protein drugs expressed in E. coli using a four-parameter logistic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K R; Dipaolo, B; Ji, X

    2000-06-01

    Calibration is the process of fitting a model based on reference data points (x, y), then using the model to estimate an unknown x based on a new measured response, y. In DNA assay, x is the concentration, and y is the measured signal volume. A four-parameter logistic model was used frequently for calibration of immunoassay when the response is optical density for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or adjusted radioactivity count for radioimmunoassay (RIA). Here, it is shown that the same model or a linearized version of the curve are equally useful for the calibration of a chemiluminescent hybridization assay for residual DNA in recombinant protein drugs and calculation of performance measures of the assay.

  16. Dual monitoring using 124I-FIAU and bioluminescence for HSV1-tk suicide gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kwon, H. C.

    2007-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) is the most common reporter gene and is used in cancer gene therapy with a prodrug nucleoside analog, ganciclovir (GCV). The aim of this study is to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of suicide gene therapy with 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-[ 124 I] iodouracil ( 124 I - FIAU) and bioluminescence in retrovirally HSV -tk and firefly luciferase transduced hepatoma model. The HSV -tk and firefly luciferase (Luc) was retrovirally transduced and expressed in MCA rat Morris hepatoma cells. Nude mice with subcutaneous tumors, MCA and MCA-TK-Luc, were subjected to GCV treatment (50mg/Kg/d intraperitoneally) for 5 day. PET imaging and biodistribution with ( 124 I-FIAU) were performed at before and after initiation of therapy with GCV. Bioluminescent signal was also measured during GCV treatment. Before GCV treatment, no significant difference in tumor volume was found in tumors between MCA and MCA-TK-Luc. After GCV treatment, tumor volume of MCA-TK-Luc markedly reduced compared to that of MCA. In biodistribution study, 124 I-FIAU uptake after GCV therapy significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels (34.8 13.67 %ID/g vs 7.6 2.59 %ID/g) and bioluminescent signal was also significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels. In small animal PET imaging, 124 I-FIAU selectively localized in HSV -tk expressing tumor and the therapeutic efficacy of GCV treatment was evaluated by 124 I-FIAU PET imaging. 124 I-FIAU PET and bioluminescence imaging in HSV-tk suicide gene therapy were effective to evaluate the therapeutic response. 124 I-FIAU may serve as an efficient and selective agent for monitoring of transduced HSV1-tk gene expression in vivo in clinical trials

  17. T cell-derived Lymphotoxin is Essential for anti-HSV-1 Humoral Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kaiting; Liang, Yong; Sun, Zhichen; Xue, Diyuan; Xu, Hairong; Zhu, Mingzhao; Fu, Yang-Xin; Peng, Hua

    2018-05-09

    B cell-derived lymphotoxin (LT) is required for the development of follicular dendritic cell clusters for the formation of primary and secondary lymphoid follicles, but the role of T cell-derived LT in antibody response has not been well demonstrated. We observed that lymphotoxin-β-receptor (LTβR) signaling is essential for optimal humoral immune response and protection against an acute HSV-1 infection. Blocking the LTβR pathway caused poor maintenance of germinal center B (GC-B) cells and follicular helper T (Tfh) cells. Using bone marrow chimeric mice and adoptive transplantation, we determined that T cell-derived LT played an indispensable role in the humoral immune response to HSV-1. Up-regulation of IFNγ by the LTβR-Ig blockade impairs the sustainability of Tfh-like cells, thus leading to an impaired humoral immune response. Our findings have identified a novel role of T cell-derived LT in the humoral immune response against HSV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE Immunocompromised people are susceptible for HSV-1 infection and lethal recurrence, which could be inhibited by anti-HSV-1 humoral immune response in the host. This study sought to explore the role of T cell-derived LT in the anti-HSV-1 humoral immune response using LT-LTβR signaling deficient mice and the LTβR-Ig blockade. The data indicate that the T cell-derived LT may play an essential role in sustaining Tfh-like cells and ensure Tfh-like cells' migration into primary or secondary follicles for further maturation. This study provides insights for vaccine development against infectious diseases. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Acyclovir and Transmission of HIV-1 from Persons Infected with HIV-1 and HSV-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celum, Connie; Wald, Anna; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Magaret, Amalia S.; Wang, Richard S.; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Baeten, Jared M.; Mullins, James I.; Hughes, James P.; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Craig R.; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey; Stewart, Grace John; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Myron; Were, Edwin; Fife, Kenneth H.; de Bruyn, Guy; Gray, Glenda E.; McIntyre, James A.; Manongi, Rachel; Kapiga, Saidi; Coetzee, David; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Karita, Etienne; Kanweka, William; Delany, Sinead; Rees, Helen; Vwalika, Bellington; Stevens, Wendy; Campbell, Mary S.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Coombs, Robert W.; Morrow, Rhoda; Whittington, William L.H.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Barnes, Linda; Ridzon, Renee; Corey, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most persons who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are also infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which is frequently reactivated and is associated with increased plasma and genital levels of HIV-1. Therapy to suppress HSV-2 reduces the frequency of reactivation of HSV-2 as well as HIV-1 levels, suggesting that suppression of HSV-2 may reduce the risk of transmission of HIV-1. METHODS We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of suppressive therapy for HSV-2 (acyclovir at a dose of 400 mg orally twice daily) in couples in which only one of the partners was seropositive for HIV-1 (CD4 count, ≥250 cells per cubic millimeter) and that partner was also infected with HSV-2 and was not taking antiretroviral therapy at the time of enrollment. The primary end point was transmission of HIV-1 to the partner who was not initially infected with HIV-1; linkage of transmissions was assessed by means of genetic sequencing of viruses. RESULTS A total of 3408 couples were enrolled at 14 sites in Africa. Of the partners who were infected with HIV-1, 68% were women, and the baseline median CD4 count was 462 cells per cubic millimeter. Of 132 HIV-1 seroconversions that occurred after randomization (an incidence of 2.7 per 100 person-years), 84 were linked within couples by viral sequencing: 41 in the acyclovir group and 43 in the placebo group (hazard ratio with acyclovir, 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 1.41; P = 0.69). Suppression with acyclovir reduced the mean plasma concentration of HIV-1 by 0.25 log10 copies per milliliter (95% CI, 0.22 to 0.29; P<0.001) and the occurrence of HSV-2–positive genital ulcers by 73% (risk ratio, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.36; P<0.001). A total of 92% of the partners infected with HIV-1 and 84% of the partners not infected with HIV-1 remained in the study for 24 months. The level of adherence to the dispensed study drug was 96%. No serious adverse events related to acyclovir

  19. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

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    Guan, Ying [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Science, Kunming, Yunnan 650106 (China); Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Li, Qihan, E-mail: imbcams.lq@gmail.com [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China)

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  20. The kinase domain residue serine 173 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Chk1 kinase is critical for the response to DNA replication stress

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    Naomi Coulton

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available While mammalian Chk1 kinase regulates replication origins, safeguards fork integrity and promotes fork progression, yeast Chk1 acts only in G1 and G2. We report here that the mutation of serine 173 (S173A in the kinase domain of fission yeast Chk1 abolishes the G1-M and S-M checkpoints with little impact on the G2-M arrest. This separation-of-function mutation strongly reduces the Rad3-dependent phosphorylation of Chk1 at serine 345 during logarithmic growth, but not when cells experience exogenous DNA damage. Loss of S173 lowers the restrictive temperature of a catalytic DNA polymerase epsilon mutant (cdc20.M10 and is epistatic with a mutation in DNA polymerase delta (cdc6.23 when DNA is alkylated by methyl-methanesulfate (MMS. The chk1-S173A allele is uniquely sensitive to high MMS concentrations where it displays a partial checkpoint defect. A complete checkpoint defect occurs only when DNA replication forks break in cells without the intra-S phase checkpoint kinase Cds1. Chk1-S173A is also unable to block mitosis when the G1 transcription factor Cdc10 (cdc10.V50 is impaired. We conclude that serine 173, which is equivalent to lysine 166 in the activation loop of human Chk1, is only critical in DNA polymerase mutants or when forks collapse in the absence of Cds1.

  1. Prevalence and Determinants of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2)/Syphilis Co-Infection and HSV-2 Mono-Infection among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men: a Cross-Sectional Study in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing-Hai; Xu, Jun-Jie; Chu, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Yan-Qiu; Yu, Huan; Ding, Hai-Bo; Jiang, Yong-Jun; Geng, Wen-Qing; Wang, Ning; Shang, Hong

    2017-05-24

    This study assessed the prevalence and determinants of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)/syphilis co-infection and HSV-2 mono-infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 545 HIV-positive MSM in Shenyang between February 2009 and October 2014. Participants underwent physical examinations and serological tests for HSV-2 and syphilis. A multinomial logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors associated with HSV-2/syphilis co-infection and HSV-2 mono-infection. The prevalence of HSV-2 mono-infection, syphilis mono-infection, and HSV-2/syphilis co-infection (95% confidence interval) was 48.6% (44.4-52.8%), 34.3% (30.3-38.3%), and 22.9% (19.4-26.5%), respectively. After controlling within HSV-2/syphilis-seropositive cases, regression analysis revealed that the related factors for HSV-2/syphilis co-infection included age (25-50 vs. ≤ 24 years: adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.55; > 50 vs. ≤ 24 years: aOR, 43.02), having regular female sexual partner(s) in the past 6 months (aOR, 0.43), and age at first MSM experience (≤ 18 vs. > 18 years: aOR, 2.59) (all P syphilis co-infection in HIV-positive MSM indicates a high secondary HIV transmission risk. A campaign for detection and treatment of HSV-2 and syphilis is urgently required for HIV-positive MSM in China.

  2. PET imaging of HSV1-tk mutants with acquired specificity toward pyrimidine- and acycloguanosine-based radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likar, Yury; Dobrenkov, Konstantin; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Shenker, Larissa; Hricak, Hedvig; Ponomarev, Vladimir [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Cai, Shangde [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to create an alternative mutant of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene with reduced phosphorylation capacity for acycloguanosine derivatives, but not pyrimidine-based compounds that will allow for successful PET imaging. A new mutant of HSV1-tk reporter gene, suitable for PET imaging using pyrimidine-based radiotracers, was developed. The HSV1-tk mutant contains an arginine-to-glutamine substitution at position 176 (HSV1-R176Qtk) of the nucleoside binding region of the enzyme. The mutant-gene product showed favorable enzymatic characteristics toward pyrimidine-based nucleosides, while exhibiting reduced activity with acycloguanosine derivatives. In order to enhance HSV1-R176Qtk reporter activity with pyrimidine-based radiotracers, we introduced the R176Q substitution into the more active HSV1-sr39tk mutant. U87 human glioma cells transduced with the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk double mutant reporter gene showed high {sup 3}H-FEAU pyrimidine nucleoside and low {sup 3}H-penciclovir acycloguanosine analog uptake in vitro. PET imaging also demonstrated high {sup 18}F-FEAU and low {sup 18}F-FHBG accumulation in HSV1-R176Qsr39tk+ xenografts. The feasibility of imaging two independent nucleoside-specific HSV1-tk mutants in the same animal with PET was demonstrated. Two opposite xenografts expressing the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk reporter gene and the previously described acycloguanosine-specific mutant of HSV1-tk, HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, were imaged using a short-lived pyrimidine-based {sup 18}F-FEAU and an acycloguanosine-based {sup 18}F-FHBG radiotracer, respectively, administered on 2 consecutive days. We conclude that in combination with acycloguanosine-specific HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, a HSV1-tk mutant containing the R176Q substitution could be used for PET imaging of two different cell populations or concurrent molecular biological processes in the same living subject. (orig.)

  3. Disabled infectious single cycle-herpes simplex virus (DISC-HSV) as a vector for immunogene therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Robert C; McArdle, Stephanie; Mian, Shahid; Li, Geng; Ahmad, Murrium; Parkinson, Richard; Ali, Selman A

    2002-02-01

    Disabled infectious single cycle-herpes simplex viruses (DISC-HSV) have been shown to be safe for use in humans and may be considered efficacious as vectors for immunogene therapy in cancer. Preclinical studies show that DISC-HSV is an efficient delivery system for cytokine genes and antigens. DISC-HSV infects a high proportion of cells, resulting in rapid gene expression for at least 72 h. The DISC-HSV-mGM-CSF vector, when inoculated into tumors, induces tumor regression in a high percentage of animals, concomitant with establishing a cytotoxic T-cell response, which is MHC class I restricted and directed against peptides of known tumor antigens. The inherent properties of DISC-HSV makes it a suitable vector for consideration in human immunogene therapy trials.

  4. HSV-2 Infection as a Cause of Female/Male and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in HIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don C Des Jarlais

    Full Text Available To examine the potential contribution of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 infection to female/male and racial/ethnic disparities in HIV among non-injecting heroin and cocaine drug users. HSV-2 infection increases susceptibility to HIV infection by a factor of two to three.Subjects were recruited from entrants to the Beth Israel drug detoxification program in New York City 2005-11. All subjects reported current use of heroin and/or cocaine and no lifetime injection drug use. A structured questionnaire was administered and serum samples collected for HIV and HSV-2 testing. Population-attributable risk percentages (PAR%s were calculated for associations between HSV-2 infection and increased susceptibility to HIV.1745 subjects were recruited from 2005-11. Overall HIV prevalence was 14%. Females had higher prevalence than males (22% vs. 12% (p<0.001, African-Americans had the highest prevalence (15%, Hispanics an intermediate prevalence (12%, and Whites the lowest prevalence (3% (p<.001. There were parallel variations in HSV-2 prevalence (females 86%, males 51%, African-Americans 66%, Hispanics 47%, Whites 36%, HSV-2 prevalence was strongly associated with HIV prevalence (OR  =  3.12 95% CI 2.24 to 4.32. PAR%s for HSV-2 as a cause of HIV ranged from 21% for Whites to 50% for females. Adjusting for the effect of increased susceptibility to HIV due to HSV-2 infection greatly reduced all disparities (adjusted prevalence  =  males 8%, females 11%; Whites 3%, African-Americans 10%, Hispanics 9%.Female/male and racial/ethnic variations in HSV-2 infection provide a biological mechanism that may generate female/male and racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection among non-injecting heroin and cocaine users in New York City. HSV-2 infection should be assessed as a potential contributing factor to disparities in sexually transmitted HIV throughout the US.

  5. Synthesis and Cellular Uptake of Radioiodine labeled 2{sup '}-deoxyuridine derivatives with HSV1-TK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ah; Lee, Kyo Chul; Hong, Su Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Jong Chan; An, Gwang Il; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Several different radiolabeled probes have been developed to image Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 thyrimidine kinase gene (HSV1-TK) expression. The nucleoside prodrugs under investigation for HSV1-TK imaging generally fall into two main chemical and radioisotope categories: the pyrimidine nucleosides, primarily radioiodinated, and the purin nucleosides, primarily radiofluorinated, and their respective analogues. In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have been recommended as HSV1-TK substrates. Most of these nucleoside derivatives have been developed as prodrugs for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. For example, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and IUdR have been used as tumor agents and acyclovir (ACV), ganciclovir (GCV) and (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2{sup '}- deoxyuridine (BVDU) as an anti-viral agents for virus infection several 5-substituted uracil nucleoside derivatives have been identified to have high sensitivity and selective accumulation in HSV1-TK expressing cells. Of those, IVDU was shown to be rapidly accumulated in HSV1- TK expressing cells in vitro. Imaging of the HSV1-TK reporter gene along with various reporter probes is of current interest. In contrast to the mammalian kinase, which phosphorylates thymidine preferentially, HSV1-TK is less discriminative and phosphorylates a wide range of nucleoside analogues such as acycloguanosines and 2{sup '}-fluoro-2{sup '}-deoxyuridine derivatives that are not phosphorylated efficiently by the native enzyme. More specifically, 5-substituted 2{sup '}-fluoro-2{sup '}-deoxyarabinofuranosyluracil nucleosides are efficiently phosphorylated by HSV- TK. This property, together with the presence of fluorine in the 2{sup '}-arabino-position, endows the 2{sup '}-fluoro-2{sup '}-deoxyuridines with antiviral activity against HSV.

  6. Polarized DNA Ejection from the Herpesvirus Capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, William W.; Cockrell, Shelley K.; Homa, Fred L.; Brown, Jay C.

    2009-01-01

    Ejection of DNA from the capsid is an early step in infection by all herpesviruses. Ejection or DNA uncoating occurs after a parental capsid has entered the host cell cytoplasm, migrated to the nucleus and bound to a nuclear pore. DNA exits the capsid through the portal vertex and proceeds by way of the nuclear pore complex into the nucleoplasm where it is transcribed and replicated. Here we describe use of an in vitro uncoating system to determine which genome end exits first from the herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) capsid. Purified DNA-containing capsids were bound to a solid surface and warmed under conditions in which some, but not all, of the DNA was ejected. Restriction endonuclease digestion was then used to identify the genomic origin of the ejected DNA. The results support the view that the S segment end exits the capsid first. Preferential release at the S end demonstrates that herpesvirus DNA uncoating conforms to the paradigm in dsDNA bacteriophage where the last end packaged is the first to be ejected. Release of HSV-1 DNA beginning at the S end causes the first gene to enter the host cell nucleus to be α4, a transcription factor required for expression of early genes. PMID:19631662

  7. Residues of the UL25 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus That Are Required for Its Stable Interaction with Capsids ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Shelley K.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Toropova, Katerina; Conway, James F.; Homa, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated recombinant viruses with either small truncations or amino acid substitutions in the UL25 N terminus. Studies of these mutants demonstrated that there are two important regions within the capsid binding domain. The first 27 amino acids are essential for capsid binding of UL25, while residues 26 to 39, which are highly conserved in the UL25 homologues of other alphaherpesviruses, were found to be critical for stable capsid binding. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of capsids containing either a small tag on the N terminus of UL25 or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused between amino acids 50 and 51 of UL25 demonstrate that residues 1 to 27 of UL25 contact the hexon adjacent to the penton. A second region, most likely centered on amino acids 26 to 39, contacts the triplex that is one removed from the penton. Importantly, both of these UL25 capsid binding regions are essential for the stable packaging of full-length viral genomes. PMID:21411517

  8. Newly Characterized Murine Undifferentiated Sarcoma Models Sensitive to Virotherapy with Oncolytic HSV-1 M002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K. Ring

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in conventional chemotherapy, surgical techniques, and radiation, outcomes for patients with relapsed, refractory, or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas are dismal. Survivors often suffer from lasting morbidity from current treatments. New targeted therapies with less toxicity, such as those that harness the immune system, and immunocompetent murine sarcoma models to test these therapies are greatly needed. We characterized two new serendipitous murine models of undifferentiated sarcoma (SARC-28 and SARC-45 and tested their sensitivity to virotherapy with oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1. Both models expressed high levels of the primary HSV entry molecule nectin-1 (CD111 and were susceptible to killing by interleukin-12 (IL-12 producing HSV-1 M002 in vitro and in vivo. M002 resulted in a significant intratumoral increase in effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and activated monocytes, and a decrease in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in immunocompetent mice. Compared to parent virus R3659 (no IL-12 production, M002 resulted in higher CD8:MDSC and CD8:T regulatory cell (Treg ratios, suggesting that M002 creates a more favorable immune tumor microenvironment. These data provide support for clinical trials targeting sarcomas with oncolytic HSV-1. These models provide an exciting opportunity to explore combination therapies for soft tissue sarcomas that rely on an intact immune system to reach full therapeutic potential.

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of antiviral activities of novel sonochemical silver nanorods against HIV and HSV viruses

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    Mazyar Etemadzade

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of novel sonochemical silver nanorods on HIV and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 viruses in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Methods: The formation of silver nanorods conjugated with sodium 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate (Ag-MES was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. The antiviral activity of this Ag-MES was examined against HIV and HSV-1 virus replication. Results: The characterizations of Ag-MES and physiochemical structure were determined by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. Approximately entire viral replication was inhibited by Ag-MES at 10 µmol/mL concentration. About 90% of HSV virions failed to replicate in the present of this concentration of nanorods. However, HIV showed more sensitivity to Ag-MES than HSV-1. Conclusions: According to the obtained data, the synthesized sonochemical silver nanorod in this study is a promising candidate for further drug discovery investigation.

  10. Hexagonal-shaped chondroitin sulfate self-assemblies have exalted anti-HSV-2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galus, Aurélia; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Lembo, David; Cagno, Valeria; Djabourov, Madeleine; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2016-01-20

    The initial step in mucosal infection by the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) requires its binding to certain glycosaminoglycans naturally present on host cell membranes. We took advantage of this interaction to design biomimetic supramolecular hexagonal-shaped nanoassemblies composed of chondroitin sulfate having exalted anti-HSV-2 activity in comparison with native chondroitin sulfate. Nanoassemblies were formed by mixing hydrophobically-modified chondroitin sulfate with α-cyclodextrin in water. Optimization of alkyl chain length grafted on chondroitin sulfate and the ratio between hydrophobically-modified chondroitin sulfate and α-cyclodextrin showed that more cohesive and well-structured nanoassemblies were obtained using higher α-cyclodextrin concentration and longer alkyl chain lengths. A structure-activity relationship was found between anti-HSV-2 activity and the amphiphilic nature of hydrophobically-modified chondroitin sulfate. Also, antiviral activity of hexagonal nanoassemblies against HSV-2 was further improved in comparison with hydrophobically-modified chondroitin sulfate. This work suggests a new biomimetic formulation approach that can be extended to other heparan-sulfate-dependent viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [The therapeutic effect of HSV1-hGM-CSF combined with doxorubicin on the mouse breast cancer model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X F; Zhang, S R; Liu, B L; Wu, J L; Li, X Q; Gu, H G; Shu, Y

    2018-03-23

    Objective: To evaluate the oncolytic effect of herpes simplex virus type 1 which carried recombined human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (HSV1-hGM-CSF) on the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1 and compare the anticancer effects of HSV1-hGM-CSF, doxorubicin alone or combination on the breast cancer in mice. Methods: We investigated the cytotoxic effect on 4T1 cells in vitro, the cell growth, cell apoptosis and cell cycle of 4T1 cells treated with oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF at different MOIs (0, 0.5, 1 and 2) and doxorubicin at different concentrations (0, 2, 4 and 8 μg/ml). The effects of oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF and doxorubicin on the tumor growth, survival time and their side effects on the mouse breast cancer model were observed. Results: Both oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF and doxorubicin significantly inhibited the proliferation of 4T1 cells in vitro . Doxorubicin induced the G(2)/M phase arrest of 4T1 cells, while the cytotoxicity of oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF was no cell cycle-dependent.At day 16 after treatment with doxorubicin and HSV1-hGM-CSF, the tumor volume of 4T1 tumor bearing mice were (144.40±27.68)mm(3,) (216.80±57.18)mm(3,) (246.10±21.90)mm(3,) (327.50±44.24)mm(3,) (213.30±32.31)mm(3) and (495.80±75.87)mm(3) in the groups of doxorubicin combined with high dose HSV1-hGM-CSF, doxorubicin combined with low dose HSV1-hGM-CSF, doxorubicin alone, high dose HSV1-hGM-CSF alone, low dose HSV1-hGM-CSF alone and control, respectively.Compared with the control group, both doxorubicin and HSV1-hGM-CSF treatment exhibited significant reduction of primary tumor volume in vivo ( P CSF alone and low dose HSV1-hGM-CSF alone were significantly longer than that of control ( P CSF is observed in 4T1 mouse breast cancer.

  12. Spatial modeling of HIV and HSV-2 among women in Kenya with spatially varying coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elphas Okango

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease mapping has become popular in the field of statistics as a method to explain the spatial distribution of disease outcomes and as a tool to help design targeted intervention strategies. Most of these models however have been implemented with assumptions that may be limiting or altogether lead to less meaningful results and hence interpretations. Some of these assumptions include the linearity, stationarity and normality assumptions. Studies have shown that the linearity assumption is not necessarily true for all covariates. Age for example has been found to have a non-linear relationship with HIV and HSV-2 prevalence. Other studies have made stationarity assumption in that one stimulus e.g. education, provokes the same response in all the regions under study and this is also quite restrictive. Responses to stimuli may vary from region to region due to aspects like culture, preferences and attitudes. Methods We perform a spatial modeling of HIV and HSV-2 among women in Kenya, while relaxing these assumptions i.e. the linearity assumption by allowing the covariate age to have a non-linear effect on HIV and HSV-2 prevalence using the random walk model of order 2 and the stationarity assumption by allowing the rest of the covariates to vary spatially using the conditional autoregressive model. The women data used in this study were derived from the 2007 Kenya AIDS indicator survey where women aged 15–49 years were surveyed. A full Bayesian approach was used and the models were implemented in R-INLA software. Results Age was found to have a non-linear relationship with both HIV and HSV-2 prevalence, and the spatially varying coefficient model provided a significantly better fit for HSV-2. Age-at first sex also had a greater effect on HSV-2 prevalence in the Coastal and some parts of North Eastern regions suggesting either early marriages or child prostitution. The effect of education on HIV prevalence among women was more

  13. Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation of the N2 amino groups of guanine residues in DNA by pierisin-2, from the cabbage butterfly, Pieris brassicae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura-Enya, Takeji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Koyama, Kotaro; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2004-01-01

    Pierisin-2 is a cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing protein present in Pieris brassicae with a 91% homology in the deduced amino acid sequences to pierisin-1 from Pieris rapae. We earlier showed pierisin-1 to catalyze mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation of 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) in DNA to form N 2 -(ADP-ribos-1-yl)-2'-deoxyguanosine, this DNA modification appearing linked to its cytotoxicity and ability to induce apoptosis in mammalian cell lines. In this paper, we documented evidence that pierisin-2 also catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of dG in DNA to give the same reaction product as demonstrated for pierisin-1, with similar efficiency. With oligonucleotides as substrates, ADP-ribosylation by pierisin-2 was suggested to occur by one-side attack of the carbon atom at 1 position of the ribose moiety in NAD toward N 2 of dG. The presence of a unique ADP-ribosylation toxin targeting dG in DNA in two distinct species in a Pieris genus could be a quite important finding to better understand biological functions of pierisin-1 and -2 in Pieris butterflies and the generic evolution of these cabbage butterflies

  14. Nerve Regeneration in Conditions of HSV-Infection and an Antiviral Drug Influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumenyuk, Alla; Rybalko, Svetlana; Ryzha, Alona; Savosko, Sergey; Labudzynskyi, Dmytro; Levchuk, Natalia; Chaikovsky, Yuri

    2018-05-05

    Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-I) is a latent neuroinfection which can cause focal brain lesion. The role of HSV-infection in nerve regeneration has not been studied so far. The aim of the work was to study sciatic nerve regeneration in the presence of HSV-infection and the influence of an antiviral drug. BALB/c line mice were divided into five groups. Group 1 animals were infected with HSV-I. After resolution of neuroinfection manifestations the sciatic nerve of these animals was crushed. Group 2 mice were administered acyclovir following the same procedures. Groups 3-5 mice served as controls. Thirty days after the operation distal nerve stumps and m.gastrocnemius were studied morphologically and biochemically. Ultrastructural organization of the sciatic nerve in control animals remained intact. Morphometric parameters of the nerves from the experimental groups have not reach control values. However, in the group 1 diameter of nerve fibers was significantly smaller than in the group 2. Both nerve regeneration and m.gastrocnemius reinnervation were confirmed. The muscle hypotrophy was found in groups 1, 2, and 3 (the muscle fibers diameter decreased). Metabolic changes in the muscles of the infected animals (groups 1 and 2) were more pronounced than in control groups 3 and 4. The levels of TBA-active products, conjugated dienes, carbonyl and SH-groups were reduced in m.gastrocnemius of the experimental groups, however no significant difference associated with acyclovir administration was found. HSV-infection is not limited to the local neurodegenerative changes in the CNS but affects regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve. Anat Rec, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Interleukin-21 receptor signalling is important for innate immune protection against HSV-2 infections.

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    Sine K Kratholm

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL -21 is produced by Natural Killer T (NKT cells and CD4(+ T cells and is produced in response to virus infections, where IL-21 has been shown to be essential in adaptive immune responses. Cells from the innate immune system such as Natural Killer (NK cells and macrophages are also important in immune protection against virus. These cells express the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R and respond to IL-21 with increased cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Currently, however it is not known whether IL-21 plays a significant role in innate immune responses to virus infections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of IL-21 and IL-21R in the innate immune response to a virus infection. We used C57BL/6 wild type (WT and IL-21R knock out (KO mice in a murine vaginal Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection model to show that IL-21 - IL-21R signalling is indeed important in innate immune responses against HSV-2. We found that the IL-21R was expressed in the vaginal epithelium in uninfected (u.i WT mice, and expression increased early after HSV-2 infection. IL-21R KO mice exhibited increased vaginal viral titers on day 2 and 3 post infection (p.i. and subsequently developed significantly higher disease scores and a lower survival rate compared to WT mice. In addition, WT mice infected with HSV-2 receiving intra-vaginal pre-treatment with murine recombinant IL-21 (mIL-21 had decreased vaginal viral titers on day 2 p.i., significantly lower disease scores, and a higher survival rate compared to infected untreated WT controls. Collectively our data demonstrate the novel finding that the IL-21R plays a critical role in regulating innate immune responses against HSV-2 infection.

  16. A novel intravaginal ring to prevent HIV-1, HSV-2, HPV, and unintended pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugaonkar, Shweta R; Wesenberg, Asa; Wilk, Jolanta; Seidor, Samantha; Mizenina, Olga; Kizima, Larisa; Rodriguez, Aixa; Zhang, Shimin; Levendosky, Keith; Kenney, Jessica; Aravantinou, Meropi; Derby, Nina; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Kumar, Narender; Roberts, Kevin; Robbiani, Melissa; Fernández-Romero, José A; Zydowsky, Thomas M

    2015-09-10

    Women urgently need a self-initiated, multipurpose prevention technology (MPT) that simultaneously reduces their risk of acquiring HIV-1, HSV-2, and HPV (latter two associated with increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition) and prevents unintended pregnancy. Here, we describe a novel core-matrix intravaginal ring (IVR), the MZCL IVR, which effectively delivered the MZC combination microbicide and a contraceptive. The MZCL IVR contains four active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs): MIV-150 (targets HIV-1), zinc acetate (ZA; targets HIV-1 and HSV-2), carrageenan (CG; targets HPV and HSV-2), and levonorgestrel (LNG; targets unintended pregnancy). The elastomeric IVR body (matrix) was produced by hot melt extrusion of the non-water swellable elastomer, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA-28), containing the hydrophobic small molecules, MIV-150 and LNG. The solid hydrophilic core, embedded within the IVR by compression, contained the small molecule ZA and the macromolecule CG. Hydrated ZA/CG from the core was released by diffusion via a pore on the IVR while the MIV-150/LNG diffused from the matrix continuously for 94 days (d) in vitro and up to 28 d (study period) in macaques. The APIs released in vitro and in vivo were active against HIV-1ADA-M, HSV-2, and HPV16 PsV in cell-based assays. Serum LNG was at levels associated with local contraceptive effects. The results demonstrate proof-of-concept of a novel core-matrix IVR for sustained and simultaneous delivery of diverse molecules for the prevention of HIV, HSV-2 and HPV acquisition, as well as unintended pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Application and expression of HSV gG1 protein from a recombinant strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hua; Yan, Huishen; Huang, Tao; Li, Guocai; Gong, Weijuan; Jiao, Hongmei; Chen, Hongju; Ji, Mingchun

    2010-11-01

    According to the homologous sequence of glycoprotein G1 (gG1) genes from different strains of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a pair of primers was designed to amplify the gG1 gene fragment by PCR. Both the PCR product and the pGEX-4T-1 vector were digested with EcoR I and Sal I. The gG1 gene fragment was subcloned into the digested pGEX-4T-1 vector to construct a recombinant plasmid (pGEX-4T-1-gG1). The resultant plasmid was identified by dual-enzyme digestion and sequence analysis, and then transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 for expression under the induction of isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG). The expressed GST-gG1 fragment was detected by SDS-PAGE and purified by affinity chromatography. The properties of GST-gG1 fragment were evaluated by immunoblot analysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on the GST-gG1 fragment were used for determining IgG or IgM to HSV-1. The GST-gG1 fragment-specific ELISA was also compared with ELISA with whole-HSV-1 antigen and commercial ELISA kits. The gG1-specific IgG and IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells were induced in mice immunized with the GST-gG1 fragment. These results indicated that the GST-gG1 fragment could be used for replacing whole-virus antigen to detect IgM and IgG to HSV-1 in human sera, which provided a strategy for developing vaccines to protect HSV-1 infection using gG1 fragment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolism of the carbocyclic analogue of (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine in herpes simplex virus-infected cells. Incorporation of C-IVDU into DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Clercq, E.; Bernaerts, R.; Balzarini, J.; Herdewijn, P.; Verbruggen, A.

    1985-01-01

    The carbocyclic analogues of (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (BVDU) and (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (IVDU), in which the sugar moiety is replaced by a cyclopentane ring and which have been designated as C-BVDU and C-IVDU, respectively, are, like their parent compounds BVDU and IVDU, potent and selective inhibitors of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and, to a lesser extent, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) replication. The authors have now synthesized the radiolabeled C-IVDU analogue, C-[ 125 I]IVDU, and determined its metabolism by HSV-infected and mock-infected Vero cells. C-[ 125 I]IVDU was effectively phosphorylated by HSV-1-infected cells and, to a lesser extent, HSV-2-infected cells. C-[ 125 I]IVDU was not phosphorylated to an appreciable extent by either mock-infected cells or cells that had been infected with a thymidine kinase-deficient mutant of HSV-1. Furthermore, C-[ 125 I]IVDU was incorporated into both viral and cellular DNA of HSV-1-infected Vero cells. This finding represents the first demonstration of the incorporation of a cyclopentylpyrimidine into DNA

  19. In vitro uptakes of radiolabeled IVDU and IVFRU in herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene transduced morris hepatoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Sup; Choi, Tae Hyun; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Woo, Kwang Sun; Jeong, Wee Sup; Kwon, Hee Chung; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Awh, Ok Doo [College of Health Sciences, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene(HSV1-tk) is an attractive candidate as a reporter gene in noninvasive reporter gene monitoring system. The HSV1-tk gene was chosen as a reporter gene, because it has been extensively studied, and there are appropriate reporter probes, substrates of HSV1-tk gene product, to apply for HSV1-tk gene imaging. We used radiolabeled 5-iodovinyl-2'-deoxyuridine (IVDU) and 5-lodovinyl-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) as reporter probes for HSV1-tk gene monitoring system. We prepared HSV1-tk gene transduced Morris hepatoma cell line using retroviral vector, MOLTEN containing HSV1-tk gene. And we confirmed the HSV1-tk gene expression by Northern blotting and Western blotting. We compared in vitro uptakes of radioiodinated IVDU and IVFRU to monitor HSV1-tk gene expression in Morris hepatoma cell line (MCA) and HSV1-tk gene tranduced MCA (MAC-tk) cells until 480 minutes. We also performed correlation analysis between percentage of HSV1-tk gene tranduced MCA cell % (MCA-tk%) and uptakes of radiolabeled IVDU or IVFRU. MCA-tk cell expressed HSV1-tk mRNA and HSV1-TK protein. Two compounds showed minimal uptake in MCA, but increased uptake was observed in MCA-tk. IVDU showed 4-fold higher accumulation than IVFRU at 480 min in MCA-tk (p<0.01). Both IVDU and IVFRU uptake were linearly correlated (R{sup 2}>0.96) with increasing MCA-tk%. The rediolabeld IVDU and IVFRU showed higher specific accumulation in retrovirally HSV1-tk gene transfected Morris hepatoma cell line. Both IVDU and IVFRU could be used as good substrates for evaluation of HSV1-tk gene expression.

  20. Effect of HSV-2 infection on subsequent HIV acquisition: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looker, Katharine J; Elmes, Jocelyn A R; Gottlieb, Sami L; Schiffer, Joshua T; Vickerman, Peter; Turner, Katherine M E; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2017-12-01

    HIV and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections cause a substantial global disease burden and are epidemiologically correlated. Two previous systematic reviews of the association between HSV-2 and HIV found evidence that HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition, but these reviews are now more than a decade old. For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched PubMed, MEDLINE, and Embase (from Jan 1, 2003, to May 25, 2017) to identify studies investigating the risk of HIV acquisition after exposure to HSV-2 infection, either at baseline (prevalent HSV-2 infection) or during follow-up (incident HSV-2 infection). Studies were included if they were a cohort study, controlled trial, or case-control study (including case-control studies nested within a cohort study or clinical trial); if they assessed the effect of pre-existing HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition; and if they determined the HSV-2 infection status of study participants with a type-specific assay. We calculated pooled random-effect estimates of the association between prevalent or incident HSV-2 infection and HIV seroconversion. We also extended previous investigations through detailed meta-regression and subgroup analyses. In particular, we investigated the effect of sex and risk group (general population vs higher-risk populations) on the relative risk (RR) of HIV acquisition after prevalent or incident HSV-2 infection. Higher-risk populations included female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with men, serodiscordant couples, and attendees of sexually transmitted infection clinics. We identified 57 longitudinal studies exploring the association between HSV-2 and HIV. HIV acquisition was almost tripled in the presence of prevalent HSV-2 infection among general populations (adjusted RR 2·7, 95% CI 2·2-3·4; number of estimates [N e ]=22) and was roughly doubled among higher-risk populations (1·7, 1·4-2·1; N e =25). Incident HSV-2 infection in general

  1. Anti-HSV-1 activity in vitro of extracellular polysaccharides purification of Paecilomyces lilacinus on isolated from Hainan mangrove

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    Yong-Xia Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the antiviral activity on HSV-1 of the extracellular polysaccharides (EPS purification of Paecilomyces lilacinus (P. lilacinus isolated from mangrove in Hainan province. Methods: The toxicity of the EPS purification on Vero cells and its anti-HSV-1 activity were assessed by cytopathic effect(CPE and MTT assay. The Vero cells survival rates, HSV-1 inhibition rates by the purification and virus titer were calculated. Results: The purification showed little cytotoxic effect on Vero with a CC50 value of 735.49 µg/mL. It could inhibit HSV-1 absorption on Vero cells, and there was a significant difference (P<0.01 compared with control group (virus group, and the highest inhibition ratio was 35.0% at dose of 400 µg/mL; The biosynthesis of HSV-1 could be inhibited by the extract with dose-dependent manner, and the IC50 value to the viruses was 387.26 µg/mL, and the highest inhibition ratio was 61.3% at dose of 400 µg/mL; but the purification couldn’t inactivate HSV-1 directly. Conclusion: The EPS purification had certain antiviral effect, it could inhibit HSV-1 absorption and biosynthesis with a dose effect relationship.

  2. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahotra, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The principal effect of unloading a material strained into the plastic range is to create a permanent set (plastic deformation), which if restricted somehow, gives rise to a system of self-balancing within the same member or reaction balanced by other members of the structure., known as residual stresses. These stresses stay there as locked-in stresses, in the body or a part of it in the absence of any external loading. Residual stresses are induced during hot-rolling and welding differential cooling, cold-forming and extruding: cold straightening and spot heating, fabrication and forced fitting of components constraining the structure to a particular geometry. The areas which cool more quickly develop residual compressive stresses, while the slower cooling areas develop residual tensile stresses, and a self-balancing or reaction balanced system of residual stresses is formed. The phenomenon of residual stresses is the most challenging in its application in surface modification techniques determining endurance mechanism against fracture and fatigue failures. This paper discusses the mechanism of residual stresses, that how the residual stresses are fanned and what their behavior is under the action of external forces. Such as in the case of a circular bar under limit torque, rectangular beam under limt moment, reclaiming of shafts welds and peening etc. (author)

  3. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Leichliter, Jami S.; Lewis, David A.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers (Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, or Chlamydia trachomatis L1–L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be...

  4. Potent efficacy signals from systemically administered oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV1716 in hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft models

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    Braidwood L

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lynne Braidwood, Kirsty Learmonth, Alex Graham, Joe Conner Virttu Biologics Ltd, Department of Neurology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, UK Abstract: Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV1716, lacking the neurovirulence factor ICP34.5, has highly selective replication competence for cancer cells and has been used in clinical studies of glioma, melanoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, pediatric non-central nervous system solid tumors, and malignant pleural mesothelioma. To date, 88 patients have received HSV1716 and the virus is well tolerated, with selective replication in tumor cells and no spread to surrounding normal tissue. We assessed the potential value of HSV1716 in preclinical studies with two human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, HuH7 and HepG2-luc. HSV1716 displayed excellent replication kinetics in vitro in HepG2-luc cells, a cell line engineered to express luciferase, and virus-mediated cell killing correlated with loss of light emissions from the cells. In vivo, the HepG2-luc cells readily formed light-emitting xenografts that were easily visualized by an in vivo imaging system and efficiently eliminated by HSV1716 oncolysis after intratumoral injection. HSV1716 also demonstrated strong efficacy signals in subcutaneous HuH7 xenografts in nude mice after intravenous administration of virus. In the HuH7 model, the intravenously injected virus replicated prolifically immediately after efficient tumor localization, resulting in highly significant reductions in tumor growth and enhanced survival. Our preclinical results demonstrate excellent tumor uptake of HSV1716, with prolific replication and potent oncolysis. These observations warrant a clinical study of HSV1716 in hepatocellular carcinoma. Keywords: oncolytic herpes simplex virus, HSV1716, hepatocellular carcinoma, xenografts, efficacy 

  5. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination.

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    Natalia Guerra-Pérez

    Full Text Available Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques, while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings.

  6. Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

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    Masoomeh Eghtedari

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is one of the mostcommon identifiable causes of open angle glaucoma. It hasunknown etiology and pathogenesis. Infection, possibly viral,is one of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms in this condition.In the present study the presence of herpes simplex virus(HSV in specimens of anterior lens capsule of patients withpseudoexfoliation syndrome has been assessed.Methods: The presence of HSV- DNA was searched by usingpolymerase chain reaction method in specimens of anteriorlens capsule (5 mm diameter of 50 patients with pseudoexfoliationsyndrome (study group and 50 age-matchedpatients without the disease (control group who underwentcataract or combined cataract and glaucoma surgery duringa one-year (2006-2007 period in Khalili Hospital, Shiraz,Iran. The results were compared statistically with Chisquaretest and independent samples t test using SPSS software(version 11.5.Results: HSV type I DNA was detected in 18% of the patientsin the study group compared with 2% in the control group (Chisquare test, P = 0.008. The difference between the ranges ofintraocular pressure in the two groups was not statistically significant.Conclusion: The presence of HSV type I DNA suggests thepossible relationship between the virus and pseudoexfoliationsyndrome. It may be a treatable etiology in this multi-factorialdisorder and may help to future management of patients; especiallyto prevent some of the complications in this syndrome.

  7. Radiometric study of the incorporation of labelled precursors of DNA, RNA and proteins in cell cultures inoculated with Herpes simplex virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dundarov, S.; Todorov, S.; Kavaklova, L.; Tsilka, E.; Rangelova, S.; Dundarova, D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported of a comparative investigation of tritium-labelled thymidine, uridine and leucine incorporation in cells inoculated with HSV-1 and HSV-2. There were no essential differences in the dynamics of the biosynthesis processes in either type of herpes viruses. Viral infection led to a marked activation of DNA synthesis and progressive inhibition of overall RNA synthesis. The rate of labelled amino-acid incorporation remained almost unchanged. There was a gradual increase in 3 H-thymidine incorporation, reaching a minimum by the 12th-16th hour and a rapid decrese thereafter. After the 12th hour part of the thymidine already incorporated in DNA (the thymidine pool) starts leaving the cells as a result of increased cell membrane permeability. The rate of changes in the biosynthesis processes in HSV-inoculated cells depends on infection multiplicity. Even in high inoculation multiplicity the blockade of cell biosynthesis is incomplete which furnishes a better opportunity for HSV reproduction. (author)

  8. Acrolein inhibits cytokine gene expression by alkylating cysteine and arginine residues in the NF-kappaB1 DNA binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Cherie; Li, Jimei; Jonscher, Karen; Yang, Teng-Chieh; Reigan, Philip; Quintana, Megan; Harvey, Jean; Freed, Brian M

    2007-07-06

    Cigarette smoke is a potent inhibitor of pulmonary T cell responses, resulting in decreased immune surveillance and an increased incidence of respiratory tract infections. The alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes in cigarette smoke (acrolein and crotonaldehyde) inhibited production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha by human T cells but did not inhibit production of IL-8. The saturated aldehydes (acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, and butyraldehyde) in cigarette smoke were inactive. Acrolein inhibited induction of NF-kappaB DNA binding activity after mitogenic stimulation of T cells but had no effect on induction of NFAT or AP-1. Acrolein inhibited NF-kappaB1 (p50) binding to the IL-2 promoter in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay by >99%. Using purified recombinant p50 in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we demonstrated that acrolein was 2000-fold more potent than crotonaldehyde in blocking DNA binding to an NF-kappaB consensus sequence. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and tandem mass spectrometry demonstrated that acrolein alkylated two amino acids (Cys-61 and Arg-307) in the DNA binding domain. Crotonaldehyde reacted with Cys-61, but not Arg-307, whereas the saturated aldehydes in cigarette smoke did not react with p50. These experiments demonstrate that aldehydes in cigarette smoke can regulate gene expression by direct modification of a transcription factor.

  9. Microemulsion-based oxyresveratrol for topical treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection: physicochemical properties and efficacy in cutaneous HSV-1 infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasivimolphan, Pattaraporn; Lipipun, Vimolmas; Ritthidej, Garnpimol; Chitphet, Khanidtha; Yoshida, Yoshihiro; Daikoku, Tohru; Sritularak, Boonchoo; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak; Pramyothin, Pornpen; Hattori, Masao; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2012-12-01

    The physicochemical properties of the optimized microemulsion and the permeating ability of oxyresveratrol in microemulsion were evaluated, and the efficacy of oxyresveratrol microemulsion in cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in mice was examined. The optimized microemulsion was composed of 10% w/w of isopropyl myristate, 35% w/w of Tween 80, 35% w/w of isopropyl alcohol, and 20% w/w of water. The mean particle diameter was 9.67 ± 0.58 nm, and the solubility of oxyresveratrol in the microemulsion was 196.34 ± 0.80 mg/ml. After accelerated and long-term stability testing, the microemulsion base and oxyresveratrol-loaded microemulsion were stable. The cumulative amount of oxyresveratrol permeating through shed snake skin from microemulsion at 6 h was 93.04 times compared to that of oxyresveratrol from Vaseline, determined at 20% w/w concentration. In cutaneous HSV-1 infection in mice, oxyresveratrol microemulsion at 20%, 25%, and 30% w/w, topically applied five times daily for 7 days after infection, was significantly effective in delaying the development of skin lesions and protecting from death (p microemulsion at 25% and 30% w/w was significantly more effective than that of 30% w/w of oxyresveratrol in Vaseline (p  0.05). These results demonstrated that topical oxyresveratrol microemulsion at 20-30% w/w was suitable for cutaneous HSV-1 mouse infection.

  10. Enhancement of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV Infection by Seminal Plasma and Semen Amyloids Implicates a New Target for the Prevention of HSV Infection

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    Lilith Torres

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesviruses cause different infectious diseases, resulting in world-wide health problems. Sexual transmission is a major route for the spread of both herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 and -2. Semen plays an important role in carrying the viral particle that invades the vaginal or rectal mucosa and, thereby, initiates viral replication. Previously, we demonstrated that the amyloid fibrils semenogelin (SEM and semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI, and seminal plasma (SP augment cytomegalovirus infection (Tang et al., J. Virol 2013. Whether SEM or SEVI amyloids or SP could also enhance other herpesvirus infections has not been examined. In this study, we found that the two amyloids as well as SP strongly enhance both HSV-1 and -2 infections in cell culture. Along with SP, SEM and SEVI amyloids enhanced viral entry and increased infection rates by more than 10-fold, as assessed by flow cytometry assay and fluorescence microscopy. Viral replication was increased by about 50- to 100-fold. Moreover, viral growth curve assays showed that SEM and SEVI amyloids, as well as SP, sped up the kinetics of HSV replication such that the virus reached its replicative peak more quickly. The interactions of SEM, SEVI, and SP with HSVs are direct. Furthermore, we discovered that the enhancing effects of SP, SEM, and SEVI can be significantly reduced by heparin, a sulfated polysaccharide with an anionic charge. It is probable that heparin abrogates said enhancing effects by interfering with the interaction of the viral particle and the amyloids, which interaction results in the binding of the viral particles and both SEM and SEVI.

  11. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichliter, Jami S; Lewis, David A; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers ( Treponema pallidum , Haemophilus ducreyi , or Chlamydia trachomatis L1-L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be HIV-positive whereas men with acute HSV-2 ulcers were younger with fewer partners. Acute HIV was higher among men with bacterial and acute HSV-2 ulcers; the difference was not statistically significant.

  12. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.

    1978-01-01

    Residual stresses are stresses which exist in a material without the influence of external powers and moments. They come into existence when the volume of a material constantly changes its form as a consequence of mechanical, thermal, and/or chemical processes and is hindered by neighbouring volumes. Bodies with residual stress are in mechanical balance. These residual stresses can be manifested by means of all mechanical interventions disturbing this balance. Acoustical, optical, radiological, and magnetical methods involving material changes caused by residual stress can also serve for determining residual stress. Residual stresses have an ambivalent character. In technical practice, they are feared and liked at the same time. They cause trouble because they can be the cause for unexpected behaviour of construction elements. They are feared since they can cause failure, in the worst case with catastrophical consequences. They are appreciated, on the other hand, because, in many cases, they can contribute to improvements of the material behaviour under certain circumstances. But they are especially liked for their giving convenient and (this is most important) mostly uncontrollable explanations. For only in very few cases we have enough knowledge and possibilities for the objective evaluation of residual stresses. (orig.) [de

  13. Increased Expression of Herpes Virus-Encoded hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9-5p in Cancer-Containing Prostate Tissue Compared to That in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Joong Yun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Previously, we reported the presence of virus-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs in the urine of prostate cancer (CaP patients. In this study, we investigated the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs in prostate tissue. Methods: A total of 175 tissue samples from noncancerous benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, 248 tissue samples from patients with CaP and BPH, and 50 samples from noncancerous surrounding tissues from these same patients were analyzed for the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunocytochemistry using nanoparticles as molecular beacons. Results: Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed significantly higher expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miRH9- 5p in surrounding noncancerous and CaP tissues than that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.001. Of note, these miRNA were expressed equivalently in the CaP tissues and surrounding noncancerous tissues. Moreover, immunocytochemistry clearly demonstrated a significant enrichment of both hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9 beacon-labeled cells in CaP and surrounding noncancerous tissue compared to that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.05 for hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2- miR-H9. Conclusions: These results suggest that increased expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H95p might be associated with tumorigenesis in the prostate. Further studies will be required to elucidate the role of these miRNAs with respect to CaP and herpes viral infections.

  14. Structure-Based Mutagenesis of Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus B204 Reveals Essential Residues in the Virion-Associated DNA-Packaging ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellas, Nikki; Snyder, Jamie C; Dills, Michael; Nicolay, Sheena J; Kerchner, Keshia M; Brumfield, Susan K; Lawrence, C Martin; Young, Mark J

    2015-12-23

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV), an archaeal virus that infects the hyperthermoacidophile Sulfolobus solfataricus, is one of the most well-studied viruses of the domain Archaea. STIV shares structural, morphological, and sequence similarities with viruses from other domains of life, all of which are thought to belong to the same viral lineage. Several of these common features include a conserved coat protein fold, an internal lipid membrane, and a DNA-packaging ATPase. B204 is the ATPase encoded by STIV and is thought to drive packaging of viral DNA during the replication process. Here, we report the crystal structure of B204 along with the biochemical analysis of B204 mutants chosen based on structural information and sequence conservation patterns observed among members of the same viral lineage and the larger FtsK/HerA superfamily to which B204 belongs. Both in vitro ATPase activity assays and transfection assays with mutant forms of B204 confirmed the essentiality of conserved and nonconserved positions. We also have identified two distinct particle morphologies during an STIV infection that differ in the presence or absence of the B204 protein. The biochemical and structural data presented here are not only informative for the STIV replication process but also can be useful in deciphering DNA-packaging mechanisms for other viruses belonging to this lineage. STIV is a virus that infects a host from the domain Archaea that replicates in high-temperature, acidic environments. While STIV has many unique features, there exist several striking similarities between this virus and others that replicate in different environments and infect a broad range of hosts from Bacteria and Eukarya. Aside from structural features shared by viruses from this lineage, there exists a significant level of sequence similarity between the ATPase genes carried by these different viruses; this gene encodes an enzyme thought to provide energy that drives DNA packaging into

  15. HSV-1/HSV-2 Infection-Related Cancers in Bantu Populations Driving HIV-1 Prevalence in Africa: Tracking the Origin of AIDS at the Onset of the 20th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goaster, Jacqueline; Bouree, Patrice; El Sissy, Franck N; Phuong Bui, Florence; Pokossy Epee, Johanna; Rollin, Paul; Tangy, Frédéric; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2016-01-01

    At the onset of the 20th century, ancient clinical observations of cancer epidemics in Bantu populations of Sub-Saharan Africa were discovered. They were reported from 1914 to 1960, but remained unexplained. In 1983, in San Francisco, Calif., USA, cancer epidemics were related to infections by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) known as AIDS disease. Yet since 1996, it is known that HIV-1 strains are not the only ones involved. In Sub-Saharan Africa, recurrent orobuccal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and genital recurrent herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) appeared many times prior to infection by HIV-1. Data on these ancient medical observations regarding African cancer epidemics can today be referred to as the relationship between the unfortunate immune deficiency of herpes in Bantu populations and HIV-1 viral strains. For centuries, the Bantu populations dispersed in forests were living in close proximity to chimpanzees infected by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and were exposed to SIV contamination which became HIV-1 in human beings. Presently, these unexplained Bantu cancer epidemics can be linked to the viral partnership of HSV-1/HSV-2 to HIV-1 strains. The key issue is now to prevent HSV-1/HSV-2 diseases related to HIV-1. An anti-herpes treatment administered early during childhood to Bantu populations will offer a mean of preventing herpes diseases related to HIV-1 infection and hence avoid cancer epidemics.

  16. HSV-1/HSV-2 Infection-Related Cancers in Bantu Populations Driving HIV-1 Prevalence in Africa: Tracking the Origin of AIDS at the Onset of the 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Le Goaster

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: At the onset of the 20th century, ancient clinical observations of cancer epidemics in Bantu populations of Sub-Saharan Africa were discovered. They were reported from 1914 to 1960, but remained unexplained. In 1983, in San Francisco, Calif., USA, cancer epidemics were related to infections by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 known as AIDS disease. Yet since 1996, it is known that HIV-1 strains are not the only ones involved. In Sub-Saharan Africa, recurrent orobuccal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and genital recurrent herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 appeared many times prior to infection by HIV-1. Case Reports: Data on these ancient medical observations regarding African cancer epidemics can today be referred to as the relationship between the unfortunate immune deficiency of herpes in Bantu populations and HIV-1 viral strains. For centuries, the Bantu populations dispersed in forests were living in close proximity to chimpanzees infected by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV and were exposed to SIV contamination which became HIV-1 in human beings. Presently, these unexplained Bantu cancer epidemics can be linked to the viral partnership of HSV-1/HSV-2 to HIV-1 strains. Conclusion: The key issue is now to prevent HSV-1/HSV-2 diseases related to HIV-1. An anti-herpes treatment administered early during childhood to Bantu populations will offer a mean of preventing herpes diseases related to HIV-1 infection and hence avoid cancer epidemics.

  17. Modelling the effects of sexting on the transmission dynamics of HSV-2 amongst adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mhlanga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies have indicated that adolescents who are into sexting are likely to engage in risky sexual behaviours. In this paper, a mathematical model to assess the impact of sexting and peer influence on the spread of HSV-2 amongst adolescents is developed. The threshold parameters of the model are determined and stabilities are analysed. The impact of filtering and awareness campaigns is explored. Results from the study suggest that HSV-2 prevalence is high amongst adolescents who are into sexting as compared to those who do not. Further, we applied optimal control theory to the proposed model. The controls represent filtering and awareness campaigns. The objective is based on minimising the susceptible sexting adolescents, infected non-sexting adolescents and the infected sexting adolescents. The optimal control is characterised and numerically solved. Overall, the application of optimal control theory suggests that more effort should be devoted to both controls, filtering and awareness campaigns.

  18. Imaging expression of adenoviral HSV1-tk suicide gene transfer using the nucleoside analogue FIRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Dharmin; Jong, Marion de; Bakker, Willem; Bijster, Magda; Cox, Peter; Vogels, Ronald; Havenga, Menzo; Driesse, Maarten; Avezaat, Cees; Morin, Kevin; Naimi, Ebrahim; Knaus, Edward; Wiebe, Leonard; Smitt, Peter Sillevis

    2002-01-01

    Substrates for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression include uracil and acycloguanosine derivatives.The most commonly used uracil derivative to monitor HSV1-tk gene transfer is 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (fialuridine; I*-FIAU), where the asterisk denotes any of the radioactive iodine isotopes that can be used. We have previously studied other nucleosides with imaging properties as good as or better than FIAU, including 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (FIRU). The first aim of this study was to extend the biodistribution data of 123 I-labelled FIRU. Secondly, we assessed the feasibility of detecting differences in HSV1-tk gene expression levels following adenoviral gene transfer in vivo with 123 I-FIRU. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were stably transfected with the HSV1-tk gene (9L-tk+). 123 I-FIRU was prepared by radioiodination of 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-tributylstannyl uracil (FTMRSU; precursor compound) and purified using an activated Sep-Pak column. Incubation of 9L-tk+ cells and the parental 9L cells with 123 I-FIRU resulted in a 100-fold higher accumulation of radioactivity in the 9L-tk+ cells after an optimum incubation time of 4 h. NIH-bg-nu-xid mice were then inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk (-) 9L cells or HSV1-tk (+) 9L-tk+ cells into both flanks. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 15 min and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h p.i. At 15 min, the tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios were 5.2, 1.0 and 30.3 respectively. Rapid renal clearance of the tracer from the body resulted in increasing tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios, reaching values of 32.2, 12.5 and 171.6 at 4 h p.i. A maximum specific activity of 22%ID/g tissue was reached in the 9L-tk+ tumours 4 h after 123 I-FIRU injection. Two Ad5-based adenoviral vectors containing the HSV1-tk gene were constructed: a replication-incompetent vector with the transgene in the former E1

  19. Imaging expression of adenoviral HSV1-tk suicide gene transfer using the nucleoside analogue FIRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Dharmin [Department of Neurology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jong, Marion de; Bakker, Willem; Bijster, Magda; Cox, Peter [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Vogels, Ronald; Havenga, Menzo [Crucell Holland BV, Leiden (Netherlands); Driesse, Maarten; Avezaat, Cees [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Morin, Kevin; Naimi, Ebrahim; Knaus, Edward; Wiebe, Leonard [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Smitt, Peter Sillevis [Department of Neurology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    Substrates for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression include uracil and acycloguanosine derivatives.The most commonly used uracil derivative to monitor HSV1-tk gene transfer is 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (fialuridine; I*-FIAU), where the asterisk denotes any of the radioactive iodine isotopes that can be used. We have previously studied other nucleosides with imaging properties as good as or better than FIAU, including 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-{beta}-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (FIRU). The first aim of this study was to extend the biodistribution data of {sup 123}I-labelled FIRU. Secondly, we assessed the feasibility of detecting differences in HSV1-tk gene expression levels following adenoviral gene transfer in vivo with {sup 123}I-FIRU. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were stably transfected with the HSV1-tk gene (9L-tk+). {sup 123}I-FIRU was prepared by radioiodination of 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-{beta}-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-tributylstannyl uracil (FTMRSU; precursor compound) and purified using an activated Sep-Pak column. Incubation of 9L-tk+ cells and the parental 9L cells with {sup 123}I-FIRU resulted in a 100-fold higher accumulation of radioactivity in the 9L-tk+ cells after an optimum incubation time of 4 h. NIH-bg-nu-xid mice were then inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk (-) 9L cells or HSV1-tk (+) 9L-tk+ cells into both flanks. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 15 min and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h p.i. At 15 min, the tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios were 5.2, 1.0 and 30.3 respectively. Rapid renal clearance of the tracer from the body resulted in increasing tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios, reaching values of 32.2, 12.5 and 171.6 at 4 h p.i. A maximum specific activity of 22%ID/g tissue was reached in the 9L-tk+ tumours 4 h after {sup 123}I-FIRU injection. Two Ad5-based adenoviral vectors containing the HSV1-tk gene were constructed: a replication-incompetent vector with

  20. Time-resolved Global and Chromatin Proteomics during Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulej, Katarzyna; Avgousti, Daphne C; Sidoli, Simone; Herrmann, Christin; Della Fera, Ashley N; Kim, Eui Tae; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) lytic infection results in global changes to the host cell proteome and the proteins associated with host chromatin. We present a system level characterization of proteome dynamics during infection by performing a multi-dimensional analysis during HSV-1 lytic infection of human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Our study includes identification and quantification of the host and viral proteomes, phosphoproteomes, chromatin bound proteomes and post-translational modifications (PTMs) on cellular histones during infection. We analyzed proteomes across six time points of virus infection (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 h post-infection) and clustered trends in abundance using fuzzy c-means. Globally, we accurately quantified more than 4000 proteins, 200 differently modified histone peptides and 9000 phosphorylation sites on cellular proteins. In addition, we identified 67 viral proteins and quantified 571 phosphorylation events (465 with high confidence site localization) on viral proteins, which is currently the most comprehensive map of HSV-1 phosphoproteome. We investigated chromatin bound proteins by proteomic analysis of the high-salt chromatin fraction and identified 510 proteins that were significantly different in abundance during infection. We found 53 histone marks significantly regulated during virus infection, including a steady increase of histone H3 acetylation (H3K9ac and H3K14ac). Our data provide a resource of unprecedented depth for human and viral proteome dynamics during infection. Collectively, our results indicate that the proteome composition of the chromatin of HFF cells is highly affected during HSV-1 infection, and that phosphorylation events are abundant on viral proteins. We propose that our epi-proteomics approach will prove to be important in the characterization of other model infectious systems that involve changes to chromatin composition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. An unusual case of acute transverse myelitis caused by HSV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danisha Figueroa

    2016-01-01

    We report here a case of an 18 year old male who presented with weakness that started in his upper extremities and rapidly evolved to quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging of spine was consistent with transverse myelitis. HSV type 1 PCR testing on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was positive. He was started on acyclovir and steroids, but despite therapy, patient did not recover motor function.

  2. Major groove binding track residues of the connection subdomain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase enhance cDNA synthesis at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Tania; Barrioluengo, Verónica; Abia, David; Menéndez-Arias, Luis

    2013-12-23

    At high temperatures, RNA denaturation can improve the efficiency and specificity of reverse transcription. Refined structures and molecular models of HIV-1 reverse transcriptases (RTs) from phylogenetically distant clades (i.e., group M subtype B and group O) revealed a major interaction between the template-primer and the Arg³⁵⁸-Gly³⁵⁹-Ala³⁶⁰ triad in the large subunit of HIV-1M/B RT. However, fewer contacts were predicted for the equivalent Lys³⁵⁸-Ala³⁵⁹-Ser³⁶⁰ triad of HIV-1O RT and the nucleic acid. An engineered HIV-1O K358R/A359G/S360A RT showed increased cDNA synthesis efficiency above 68 °C, as determined by qualitative and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions. In comparison with wild-type HIV-1O RT, the mutant enzyme showed higher thermal stability but retained wild-type RNase H activity. Mutations that increased the accuracy of HIV-1M/B RTs were tested in combination with the K358R/A359G/S360A triple mutation. Some of them (e.g., F61A, K65R, K65R/V75I, and V148I) had a negative effect on reverse transcription efficiency above 65 °C. RTs with improved DNA binding affinities also showed higher cDNA synthesis efficiencies at elevated temperatures. Two of the most thermostable RTs (i.e., mutants T69SSG/K358R/A359G/S360A and K358R/A359G/S360A/E478Q) showed moderately increased fidelity in forward mutation assays. Our results demonstrate that the triad of Arg³⁵⁸, Gly³⁵⁹, and Ala³⁶⁰ in the major groove binding track of HIV-1 RT is a major target for RT stabilization, and most relevant for improving reverse transcription efficiency at high temperatures.

  3. Specificity of DNA-binding by the FAX-1 and NHR-67 nuclear receptors of Caenorhabditis elegans is partially mediated via a subclass-specific P-box residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Eric L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear receptors of the NR2E class play important roles in pattern formation and nervous system development. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of DNA-binding domains, we define two conserved groups of orthologous NR2E genes: the NR2E1 subclass, which includes C. elegans nhr-67, Drosophila tailless and dissatisfaction, and vertebrate Tlx (NR2E2, NR2E4, NR2E1, and the NR2E3 subclass, which includes C. elegans fax-1 and vertebrate PNR (NR2E5, NR2E3. PNR and Tll nuclear receptors have been shown to bind the hexamer half-site AAGTCA, instead of the hexamer AGGTCA recognized by most other nuclear receptors, suggesting unique DNA-binding properties for NR2E class members. Results We show that NR2E3 subclass member FAX-1, unlike NHR-67 and other NR2E1 subclass members, binds to hexamer half-sites with relaxed specificity: it will bind hexamers with the sequence ANGTCA, although it prefers a purine to a pyrimidine at the second position. We use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the difference between FAX-1 and NHR-67 binding preference is partially mediated by a conserved subclass-specific asparagine or aspartate residue at position 19 of the DNA-binding domain. This amino acid position is part of the "P box" that plays a critical role in defining binding site specificity and has been shown to make hydrogen-bond contacts to the second position of the hexamer in co-crystal structures for other nuclear receptors. The relaxed specificity allows FAX-1 to bind a much larger repertoire of half-sites than NHR-67. While NR2E1 class proteins bind both monomeric and dimeric sites, the NR2E3 class proteins bind only dimeric sites. The presence of a single strong site adjacent to a very weak site allows dimeric FAX-1 binding, further increasing the number of dimeric binding sites to which FAX-1 may bind in vivo. Conclusion These findings identify subclass-specific DNA-binding specificities and dimerization properties for the NR2E1

  4. Cervical HSV-2 infection causes cervical remodeling and increases risk for ascending infection and preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Devin; Poncil, Sharra; Patterson, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB), or birth before 37 weeks gestation, is the leading cause of neonatal mortality worldwide. Cervical viral infections have been established as risk factors for PTB in women, although the mechanism leading to increased risk is unknown. Using a mouse model of pregnancy, we determined that intra-vaginal HSV2 infection caused increased rates of preterm birth following an intra-vaginal bacterial infection. HSV2 infection resulted in histological changes in the cervix mimicking cervical ripening, including significant collagen remodeling and increased hyaluronic acid synthesis. Viral infection also caused aberrant expression of estrogen and progesterone receptor in the cervical epithelium. Further analysis using human ectocervical cells demonstrated a role for Src kinase in virus-mediated changes in estrogen receptor and hyaluronic acid expression. In conclusion, HSV2 affects proteins involved in tissue hormone responsiveness, causes significant changes reminiscent of premature cervical ripening, and increases risk of preterm birth. Studies such as this improve our chances of identifying clinical interventions in the future. PMID:29190738

  5. The Synthesis of the Stable IVDU Derivative for Imaging HSV-1 TK Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Jung; Choi, Tae Hyun; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Kim, Byoung Soo; Park, Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; An, Gwang Il; Rhee, Hak June

    2009-01-01

    5-iododeoxyuridine analogues have been exclusively developed for the potential antiviral and antitumor therapeutic agents. In this study, we synthesized carbocyclic radioiododeoxyuridineanalogue (ddIVDU) and carbocyclic intermediate as efficient carbocyclic radiopharmaceuticals. The synthesis is LAH reduction, hetero Diels-Alder reaction as key reactions including Pd(0)-catalyzed coupling reaction together with organotin. MCA-RH7777 (MCA) and MCA-tk (HSV1-tk positive) cells were treated with various concentration of carbocyclic ddIVDU, and GCV. Cytotoxicity was measured by the MTS methods. For in vitro uptake study, MCA and MCA-tk cells were incubated with 1uCi of [ 125 I]carbocyclic ddIVDU. Accumulated radioactivity was measured after various incubation times. The synthesis of ddIVDU and precursor for radioiodination were achieved from cyclopentadiene in good overall yield, respectively. The radioiododemetallation for radiolabeling gave more than 80% yield with > 95% radiochemical purity. GCV was more toxic than carbocyclic ddIVDU in MCA-tk cells. Accumulation of [ 125 I]carbocyclic ddIVDU was higher in MCA-tk cells than MCA cells. Biological data reveal that ddIVDU is stable in vitro, less toxic than ganciclovir (GCV), and selective in HSV1-tk expressed cells. Thus, this new carbocyclic nucleoside, referred to in this paper as carbocyclic 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxy-5- iodovinyluridine (carbocyclic ddIVDU), is a potential imaging probe for HSV1-tk

  6. In vivo comparison of IVDU and IVFRU in HSV1-TK gene expressing tumor bearing rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T.H.Tae Hyun; Ahn, S.H.Soon Hyuk; Kwon, H.-C.Hee-Chung; Choi, C.W.Chang Woon; Awh, O.D.Ok Doo; Lim, S.M.Sang Moo. E-mail: smlim328@kcch.re.kr

    2004-01-01

    (E)-5-(2-Iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (IVDU) and (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) are potential substrates of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1thymidine kinase (HSV-TK). In the present study, cellular uptake of radioiodinated substrates was found to be low in wild type MCA cells, but high in HSV-TK gene expressing cells. The carrier-free substrates, in particular, showed higher cellular uptake than carrier-added compounds. Biodistribution showed that the %ID/g of the MCA-TK/MCA tumor ratio of IVDU injected at 1, 4, and 24 h were 1.1, 0.9 and 1.3, and those of IVFRU were 1.7, 1.7 and 1.8 respectively. Therefore, both IVDU and IVFRU could possibly be used as radiopharmaceuticals to evaluate reporter gene expression. However, IVFRU was more specific and stable than IVDU for selective non-invasive imaging of HSV-TK expression.

  7. An age-structured model for the coupled dynamics of HIV and HSV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitanov, Georgi; Alvey, Christina; Vogt-Geisse, Katia; Feng, Zhilan

    2015-08-01

    Evidence suggests a strong correlation between the prevalence of HSV-2 (genital herpes) and the perseverance of the HIV epidemic. HSV-2 is an incurable viral infection, characterized by periodic reactivation. We construct a model of the co-infection dynamics between the two diseases by incorporating a time-since-infection variable to track the alternating periods of infectiousness of HSV-2. The model considers only heterosexual relationships and distinguishes three population groups: males, general population females, and female sex workers. We calculate the basic reproduction numbers for each disease that provide threshold conditions, which determine whether a disease dies out or becomes endemic in the absence of the other disease. We also derive the invasion reproduction numbers that determine whether or not a disease can invade into a population in which the other disease is endemic. The calculations of the invasion reproduction numbers suggest a new aspect in their interpretation - the class from which the initial disease carrier arises is important for understanding the invasion dynamics and biological interpretation of the expressions of the reproduction numbers. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to examine the role of model parameters in influencing the model outcomes. The results are discussed in the last section.

  8. Validity of genito-urinary discharges, genital ulcers and genital rashes as indicators of seroincident HSV-2 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eziyi Iche Kalu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the validity of vaginal discharges, urethral discharges, genital rashes, and painful genital ulcers as indicators of early detection of incident herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection among pregnant women in Benin metropolis. Methods: Participants were antenatal clinic attendees of University of Benin Teaching Hospital and Central Hospital, Benin. Baseline sociodemographic, obstetric and HSV-2 serological data were collected. The HSV-2-seronegative returned for a repeat HSV-2 antibody assay before delivery date. Data on incidence of genital rashes, abnormal vaginal discharges, painful genital ulcers and urethral discharges were collected. Results: The sensitivities of abnormal vaginal discharges, genital rashes, urethral discharges and painful genital ulcers were 82.3%, 70.6%, 41.2% and 28.6% respectively; while their positive-predictive values were 53.8%, 60.0%, 58.3% and 66.7% respective. All the symptoms had >95% specificities and 95% negative-predictive values for seroincident HSV-2 infection. Conclusions: Abnormal vaginal discharge, genital rashes, urethral discharges and genital ulcers are valid indicators of seroincident HSV-2 infection and could be useful in formulation of screening tools in resource-limited settings.

  9. Sensing of HSV-1 by the cGAS-STING pathway in microglia orchestrates antiviral defence in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line S; Lopušná, Katarína; Winther, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis in industrialized countries. Type I interferon (IFN) is important for control of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that microglia are the main source of HSV-induced t......Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis in industrialized countries. Type I interferon (IFN) is important for control of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that microglia are the main source of HSV......-induced type I IFN expression in CNS cells and these cytokines are induced in a cGAS-STING-dependent manner. Consistently, mice defective in cGAS or STING are highly susceptible to acute HSE. Although STING is redundant for cell-autonomous antiviral resistance in astrocytes and neurons, viral replication...... is strongly increased in neurons in STING-deficient mice. Interestingly, HSV-infected microglia confer STING-dependent antiviral activities in neurons and prime type I IFN production in astrocytes through the TLR3 pathway. Thus, sensing of HSV-1 infection in the CNS by microglia through the cGAS-STING pathway...

  10. A KAS2 cDNA complements the phenotypes of the Arabidopsis fab1 mutant that differs in a single residue bordering the substrate binding pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, A.S.; LaBrie, S.T.; Kinney, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The fab1 mutant of Arabidopsis is partially deficient in activity of ß-ketoacyl-[acyl carrier protein] synthase II (KAS II). This defect results in increased levels of 16 : 0 fatty acid and is associated with damage and death of the mutants at low temperature. Transformation of fab1 plants with a c......DNA from Brassica napus encoding a KAS II enzyme resulted in complementation of both mutant phenotypes. The dual complementation by expression of the single gene proves that low-temperature damage is a consequence of altered membrane unsaturation. The fab1 mutation is a single nucleotide change...... chain to bend. For functional analysis the equivalent Leu207Phe mutation was introduced into the fabB gene encoding the E. coli KAS I enzyme. Compared to wild-type, the Leu207Phe protein showed a 10-fold decrease in binding affinity for the fatty acid substrate, exhibited a modified behavior during size...

  11. Serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in sexually transmitted diseases - more for screening less for diagnosis: An evaluation of clinical manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmishtha G Tada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 is the cause of most genital herpes. Now, HSV-1 has become an important cause and represents even about 30% of genital herpes in some countries. So, study related to genital herpes should consider both HSV-1 and HSV-2. Aim: To examine trends in HSV-1 and 2 seroprevalence by Serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in all type of sexually transmitted disease (STD patients and also to evaluate correlation of serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in STD. Materials and Methods: 150 patients attending the STD clinic attached to a tertiary care hospital of Ahmedabad were included in the study. Serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM correlations with clinical manifestations of recurrent and non-recurrent type of genital herpes patients and other non-herpetic STD patients were studied. Results: The overall serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in STD seroprevalence were 15.66%. Female has significant higher prevalence (P < 0.05. STD cases and HSV seroprevalence were specially concentrated in persons aged 21 to 30 years. Among those positive with HSV, the distribution of STD are wide spread and found in non-herpetic group at high frequency. Out of total 23 serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM positive, 12 and 11 are distributed in herpetic and non-herpetic STDs, respectively. Discussion and Conclusion: Though serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in STDs are less diagnostic, they help to see the iceberg part of the infection among the population concerned in recent scenario or in another words, it provides recent infective burden.

  12. Solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, E.; Duin, P.J. van; Grootenboer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A summary is presented of the many investigations that have been done on solid residues of atmospheric fluid bed combustion (AFBC). These residues are bed ash, cyclone ash and bag filter ash. Physical and chemical properties are discussed and then the various uses of residues (in fillers, bricks, gravel, and for recovery of aluminium) are summarised. Toxicological properties of fly ash and stack ash are discussed as are risks of pneumoconiosis for workers handling fly ash, and contamination of water by ashes. On the basis of present information it is concluded that risks to public health from exposure to emissions of coal fly ash from AFBC appear small or negligible as are health risk to workers in the coal fly ash processing industry. 35 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs

  13. Inhibition of HSV-1 replication by laser diode-irradiation: possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, G; De Gregorio, V; Fusco, A; Farina, E; Baroni, A; Esposito, V; Contaldo, M; Petruzzi, M; Pannone, G; Serpico, R

    2010-01-01

    Herpes labialis are the most frequent clinical manifestations of HSV-1 infection. Epithelial cells are able to respond to HSV-1 presence inducing the expression of IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α and IL-8. These proinflammatory cytokines have a function in the acute-phase response mediation, chemotaxis, inflammatory cell activation and antigen-presenting cells. In the human epithelial cell models, it has been demonstrated that, after an early induction of proinflammatory host response, HSV-1 down-modulates the proinflammatory cytokine production through the accumulation of two viral proteins, ICP4 and ICP27, whose transcription is induced by tegument protein VP16. These viral proteins, through the decreasing of stabilizing the mRNAs of proinflammatory genes, delay cytokine production to an extent that allows the virus to replicate. Moreover, viral transactivating proteins, ICP-0 and VP-16 induce IL-10 expression. The conventional treatment of herpes labialis involves the topical and systemic use of antiviral drugs but it is necessary to find new therapies that can act in a selective and non-cytotoxic manner in viral infection. Laser diode therapy has been considered as a non-invasive alternative treatment to the conventional treatment of herpes labialis in pain therapy, in modulation of inflammation and in wound healing. This study aims to report a possible mechanism of action of laser diode irradiation in prevention and reduction of severity of labial manifestations of herpes labialis virus. We investigated, in an in vitro model of epithelial cells HaCat, the laser-effect on HSV-1 replication and we evaluated the modulation of expression of certain proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), antimicrobial peptide HBD2, chemokine IL-8 and the immunosuppressive cytokine, IL-10. Our results lead us to hypothesize that LD-irradiation acts in the final stage of HSV-1 replication by limiting viral spread from cell to cell and that laser therapy acts also on the host immune

  14. Frequent detection of HPV before and after initiation of antiretroviral therapy among HIV/HSV-2 co-infected women in Uganda.

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    Anne F Rositch

    Full Text Available Most data on HPV and antiretroviral therapy (ART come from high-resource countries with infrequent sampling for HPV pre- and post-ART initiation. Therefore, we examined the frequency of cervical HPV DNA detection among HIV/HSV-2 co-infected women followed monthly for 6 months both before and after initiation of ART in Rakai, Uganda.Linear Array was used to detect 37 HPV genotypes in self-collected cervicovaginal swabs from 96 women who initiated ART. Random-effects log-binomial regression was used to compare the prevalence of HPV detection in the pre- and post-ART periods and determine other potential risk factors, including CD4 counts and HIV viral load.Nearly all women had detectable HPV in the 6 months preceding ART initiation (92% and the cumulative prevalence remained high following initiation of therapy (90%. We found no effect of ART on monthly HPV DNA detection (prevalence ratio: 1.0; 95% confidence interval: 0.96, 1.08, regardless of immune reconstitution or HIV viral suppression. Older age and higher pre-ART CD4 counts were associated with a significantly lower risk of HPV DNA detection.ART did not impact HPV detection within 6 months of therapy initiation, highlighting the importance of continued and consistent screening, even after ART-initiation and immune reconstitution.

  15. Analysis of Select Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Proteins for Restriction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1): HSV-1 gM Protein Potently Restricts HIV-1 by Preventing Intracellular Transport and Processing of Env gp160.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polpitiya Arachchige, Sachith; Henke, Wyatt; Pramanik, Ankita; Kalamvoki, Maria; Stephens, Edward B

    2018-01-15

    Virus-encoded proteins that impair or shut down specific host cell functions during replication can be used as probes to identify potential proteins/pathways used in the replication of viruses from other families. We screened nine proteins from herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for the ability to enhance or restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. We show that several HSV-1 proteins (glycoprotein M [gM], US3, and UL24) potently restricted the replication of HIV-1. Unlike UL24 and US3, which reduced viral protein synthesis, we observed that gM restriction of HIV-1 occurred through interference with the processing and transport of gp160, resulting in a significantly reduced level of mature gp120/gp41 released from cells. Finally, we show that an HSV-1 gM mutant lacking the majority of the C-terminal domain (HA-gM[Δ345-473]) restricted neither gp160 processing nor the release of infectious virus. These studies identify proteins from heterologous viruses that can restrict viruses through novel pathways. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 infection of humans results in AIDS, characterized by the loss of CD4 + T cells and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. Both HIV-1 and HSV-1 can infect astrocytes and microglia of the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, the identification of HSV-1 proteins that directly restrict HIV-1 or interfere with pathways required for HIV-1 replication could lead to novel antiretroviral strategies. The results of this study show that select viral proteins from HSV-1 can potently restrict HIV-1. Further, our results indicate that the gM protein of HSV-1 restricts HIV-1 through a novel pathway by interfering with the processing of gp160 and its incorporation into virus maturing from the cell. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in human iPSC-derived TLR3-deficient CNS cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaille, Fabien G; Pessach, Itai M.; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Herman, Melina; Abhyankar, Avinash; Ying, Shui-Wang; Keros, Sotirios; Goldstein, Peter A.; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Tu, Edmund; Elkabetz, Yechiel; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Tardieu, Marc; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Daley, George Q.; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Studer, Lorenz; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2012-01-01

    In the course of primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), children with inborn errors of TLR3 immunity are prone to HSV-1 encephalitis (HSE) 1–3. We tested the hypothesis that the pathogenesis of HSE involves non hematopoietic central nervous system (CNS)-resident cells. We derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of TLR3- and UNC-93B-deficient patients and from controls. These iPSCs were differentiated into highly purified populations of neural stem cells (NSCs), neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The induction of IFN-β and/or IFN-γ1 in response to poly(I:C) stimulation was dependent on TLR3 and UNC-93B in all cells tested. However, the induction of IFN-β and IFN-γ1 in response to HSV-1 infection was impaired selectively in UNC-93B-deficient neurons and oligodendrocytes. These cells were also much more susceptible to HSV-1 infection than control cells, whereas UNC-93B-deficient NSCs and astrocytes were not. TLR3-deficient neurons were also found to be susceptible to HSV-1 infection. The rescue of UNC-93B- and TLR3-deficient cells with the corresponding wild-type allele demonstrated that the genetic defect was the cause of the poly(I:C) and HSV-1 phenotypes. The viral infection phenotype was further rescued by treatment with exogenous IFN-α/β, but not IFN-γ1.Thus, impaired TLR3- and UNC-93B-dependent IFN-α/β intrinsic immunity to HSV-1 in the CNS, in neurons and oligodendrocytes in particular, may underlie the pathogenesis of HSE in children with TLR3 pathway deficiencies. PMID:23103873

  17. A live-attenuated HSV-2 ICP0 virus elicits 10 to 100 times greater protection against genital herpes than a glycoprotein D subunit vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P Halford

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycoprotein D (gD-2 is the entry receptor of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2, and is the immunogen in the pharmaceutical industry's lead HSV-2 vaccine candidate. Efforts to prevent genital herpes using gD-2 subunit vaccines have been ongoing for 20 years at a cost in excess of $100 million. To date, gD-2 vaccines have yielded equivocal protection in clinical trials. Therefore, using a small animal model, we sought to determine if a live-attenuated HSV-2 ICP0⁻ virus would elicit better protection against genital herpes than a gD-2 subunit vaccine. Mice immunized with gD-2 and a potent adjuvant (alum+monophosphoryl lipid A produced high titers of gD-2 antibody. While gD-2-immunized mice possessed significant resistance to HSV-2, only 3 of 45 gD-2-immunized mice survived an overwhelming challenge of the vagina or eyes with wild-type HSV-2 (MS strain. In contrast, 114 of 115 mice immunized with a live HSV-2 ICP0⁻ virus, 0ΔNLS, survived the same HSV-2 MS challenges. Likewise, 0ΔNLS-immunized mice shed an average 125-fold less HSV-2 MS challenge virus per vagina relative to gD-2-immunized mice. In vivo imaging demonstrated that a luciferase-expressing HSV-2 challenge virus failed to establish a detectable infection in 0ΔNLS-immunized mice, whereas the same virus readily infected naïve and gD-2-immunized mice. Collectively, these results suggest that a HSV-2 vaccine might be more likely to prevent genital herpes if it contained a live-attenuated HSV-2 virus rather than a single HSV-2 protein.

  18. Suppression of IL-12p70 formation by IL-2 or following macrophage depletion causes T-cell autoreactivity leading to CNS demyelination in HSV-1-infected mice.

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    Dhong Hyun Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have established two mouse models of central nervous system (CNS demyelination that differ from most other available models of multiple sclerosis (MS in that they represent a mixture of viral and immune triggers. In the first model, ocular infection of different strains of mice with a recombinant HSV-1 that expresses murine IL-2 constitutively (HSV-IL-2 causes CNS demyelination. In the second model, depletion of macrophages causes CNS demyelination in mice that are ocularly infected with wild-type (WT HSV-1. In the present study, we found that the demyelination in macrophage-intact mice infected with HSV-IL-2 was blocked by depletion of FoxP3-expressing cells, while concurrent depletion of macrophages restored demyelination. In contrast, demyelination was blocked in the macrophage-depleted mice infected with wild-type HSV-1 following depletion of FoxP3-expressing cells. In macrophage-depleted HSV-IL-2-infected mice, demyelination was associated with the activity of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, whereas in macrophage-depleted mice infected with WT HSV-1, demyelination was associated with CD4+ T cells. Macrophage depletion or infection with HSV-IL-2 caused an imbalance of T cells and TH1 responses as well as alterations in IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 but not other members of the IL-12 family or their receptors. Demyelination was blocked by adoptive transfer of macrophages that were infected with HSV-IL-12p70 or HSV-IL-12p40 but not by HSV-IL-12p35. These results indicate that suppression of IL-12p70 formation by IL-2 or following macrophage depletion causes T-cell autoreactivity leading to CNS demyelination in HSV-1-infected mice.

  19. Topical herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) vaccination with human papillomavirus vectors expressing gB/gD ectodomains induces genital-tissue-resident memory CD8+ T cells and reduces genital disease and viral shedding after HSV-2 challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çuburu, Nicolas; Wang, Kening; Goodman, Kyle N; Pang, Yuk Ying; Thompson, Cynthia D; Lowy, Douglas R; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Schiller, John T

    2015-01-01

    No herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) vaccine has been licensed for use in humans. HSV-2 glycoproteins B (gB) and D (gD) are targets of neutralizing antibodies and T cells, but clinical trials involving intramuscular (i.m.) injection of HSV-2 gB and gD in adjuvants have not been effective. Here we evaluated intravaginal (ivag) genetic immunization of C57BL/6 mice with a replication-defective human papillomavirus pseudovirus (HPV PsV) expressing HSV-2 gB (HPV-gB) or gD (HPV-gD) constructs to target different subcellular compartments. HPV PsV expressing a secreted ectodomain of gB (gBsec) or gD (gDsec), but not PsV expressing a cytoplasmic or membrane-bound form, induced circulating and intravaginal-tissue-resident memory CD8(+) T cells that were able to secrete gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as moderate levels of serum HSV neutralizing antibodies. Combined immunization with HPV-gBsec and HPV-gDsec (HPV-gBsec/gDsec) vaccines conferred longer survival after vaginal challenge with HSV-2 than immunization with HPV-gBsec or HPV-gDsec alone. HPV-gBsec/gDsec ivag vaccination was associated with a reduced severity of genital lesions and lower levels of viral shedding in the genital tract after HSV-2 challenge. In contrast, intramuscular vaccination with a soluble truncated gD protein (gD2t) in alum and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) elicited high neutralizing antibody titers and improved survival but did not reduce genital lesions and viral shedding. Vaccination combining ivag HPV-gBsec/gDsec and i.m. gD2t-alum-MPL improved survival and reduced genital lesions and viral shedding. Finally, high levels of circulating HSV-2-specific CD8(+) T cells, but not serum antibodies, correlated with reduced viral shedding. Taken together, our data underscore the potential of HPV PsV as a platform for a topical mucosal vaccine to control local manifestations of primary HSV-2 infection. Genital herpes is a highly prevalent chronic disease caused by

  20. Cutting Edge: Genetic Association between IFI16 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Resistance to Genital Herpes Correlates with IFI16 Expression Levels and HSV-2-Induced IFN-β Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Kristina; Svensson, Alexandra; Hait, Alon S; Schlüter, Kerstin; Tunbäck, Petra; Nordström, Inger; Padyukov, Leonid; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke; Mogensen, Trine H; Paludan, Søren R

    2017-10-15

    IFN-γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) is an immunological DNA sensor proposed to act in the cyclic GMP-AMP synthase-stimulator of IFN genes pathway. Because mice do not have a clear ortholog of IFI16, this system is not suitable for genetic studies of IFI16. In this study, we have compared the dependency on IFI16, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase, and stimulator of IFN genes for type I IFN induction by a panel of pathogenic bacteria and DNA viruses. The IFN response induced by HSV-2 was particularly dependent on IFI16. In a cohort of patients with genital herpes and healthy controls, the minor G allele of the IFI16 single nucleotide polymorphism rs2276404 was associated with resistance to infection. Furthermore, the combination of this allele with the C allele of rs1417806 was significantly overrepresented in uninfected individuals. Cells from individuals with the protective GC haplotype expressed higher levels of IFI16 and induced more IFN-β upon HSV-2 infection. These data provide genetic evidence for a role for IFI16 in protection against genital herpes. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Local CD4 and CD8 T-cell reactivity to HSV-1 antigens documents broad viral protein expression and immune competence in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia.

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    Monique van Velzen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection results in lifelong chronic infection of trigeminal ganglion (TG neurons, also referred to as neuronal HSV-1 latency, with periodic reactivation leading to recrudescent herpetic disease in some persons. HSV-1 proteins are expressed in a temporally coordinated fashion during lytic infection, but their expression pattern during latent infection is largely unknown. Selective retention of HSV-1 reactive T-cells in human TG suggests their role in controlling reactivation by recognizing locally expressed HSV-1 proteins. We characterized the HSV-1 proteins recognized by virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cells recovered from human HSV-1-infected TG. T-cell clusters, consisting of both CD4 and CD8 T-cells, surrounded neurons and expressed mRNAs and proteins consistent with in situ antigen recognition and antiviral function. HSV-1 proteome-wide scans revealed that intra-TG T-cell responses included both CD4 and CD8 T-cells directed to one to three HSV-1 proteins per person. HSV-1 protein ICP6 was targeted by CD8 T-cells in 4 of 8 HLA-discordant donors. In situ tetramer staining demonstrated HSV-1-specific CD8 T-cells juxtaposed to TG neurons. Intra-TG retention of virus-specific CD4 T-cells, validated to the HSV-1 peptide level, implies trafficking of viral proteins from neurons to HLA class II-expressing non-neuronal cells for antigen presentation. The diversity of viral proteins targeted by TG T-cells across all kinetic and functional classes of viral proteins suggests broad HSV-1 protein expression, and viral antigen processing and presentation, in latently infected human TG. Collectively, the human TG represents an immunocompetent environment for both CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition of HSV-1 proteins expressed during latent infection. HSV-1 proteins recognized by TG-resident T-cells, particularly ICP6 and VP16, are potential HSV-1 vaccine candidates.

  2. Analysis of colorectal cancer and polyp for presence herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus DNA sequences by polymerase chain reaction

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    Sahar Mehrabani khasraghi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years, it was demonstrated that there is a clear association between the complicated course of colorectal cancer (CRC and the presence of herpes viruses. Despite a great number of published reports, the exact pathogenic role of herpes viruses remains unclear in these patients. The purpose of this study is to explore the prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV and cytomegalovirus (CMV in patients with CRC and polyp in comparison with healthy subjects using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Methods: In this case-control study, 15 biopsies of patients with CRC and 20 colorectal polyp sample were selected. From each patient, two tissue samples were obtained: one sample from malignant tissue, and the other from normal colorectal tissue in an area located 15 cm away from the malignant tissue. Furthermore, 35 samples from healthy people as controls were selected. After DNA extraction, PCR was used to determine HSV and CMV genomes by specific primers. A statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. Results: Five CRC patients (33.3% had HSV DNA detected in both the malignant and the matched normal tissue. Five CRC patients (33.3% and seven polyp patients (35.0% had CMV DNA detected in both the malignant and the matched normal tissue. HSV DNA was found in 20% and CMV DNA in 37.1% of samples from healthy people as a control group. Thus, no significant association was observed between the prevalence of HSV and CMV, and an incidence of CRC and polyps according to the location of the samples as compared with the control group. Conclusion: The findings demonstrated that there is no direct molecular evidence to support the association between HSV and CMV and human colorectal malignancies. However, the results from this study do not exclude a possible oncogenic role of these viruses in the neoplastic development of colon cells.

  3. A Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus pUL33 Required To Release Monomeric Viral Genomes from Cleaved Concatemeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kui; Dang, Xiaoqun; Baines, Joel D

    2017-10-15

    Monomeric herpesvirus DNA is cleaved from concatemers and inserted into preformed capsids through the actions of the viral terminase. The terminase of herpes simplex virus (HSV) is composed of three subunits encoded by U L 15, U L 28, and U L 33. The U L 33-encoded protein (pU L 33) interacts with pU L 28, but its precise role in the DNA cleavage and packaging reaction is unclear. To investigate the function of pU L 33, we generated a panel of recombinant viruses with either deletions or substitutions in the most conserved regions of U L 33 using a bacterial artificial chromosome system. Deletion of 11 amino acids (residues 50 to 60 or residues 110 to 120) precluded viral replication, whereas the truncation of the last 10 amino acids from the pU L 33 C terminus did not affect viral replication or the interaction of pU L 33 with pU L 28. Mutations that replaced the lysine at codon 110 and the arginine at codon 111 with alanine codons failed to replicate, and the pU L 33 mutant interacted with pU L 28 less efficiently. Interestingly, genomic termini of the large (L) and small (S) components were detected readily in cells infected with these mutants, indicating that concatemeric DNA was cleaved efficiently. However, the release of monomeric genomes as assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was greatly diminished, and DNA-containing capsids were not observed. These results suggest that pU L 33 is necessary for one of the two viral DNA cleavage events required to release individual genomes from concatemeric viral DNA. IMPORTANCE This paper shows a role for pU L 33 in one of the two DNA cleavage events required to release monomeric genomes from concatemeric viral DNA. This is the first time that such a phenotype has been observed and is the first identification of a function of this protein relevant to DNA packaging other than its interaction with other terminase components. Copyright © 2017 Yang et al.

  4. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  5. In vivo image of radioiodinated IVDU and IVFRU in HSV-TK gene tranduced hepatocellular carcinoma bearing buffalo rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Sup; Choi, T. H.; Ahn, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, S. J.; Choi, C. W. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    The extent of gene delivery and expression in gene therapy with suicide genes such as herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) is assessed with measurement of selective localization of radioiodinated HSV-tk substrates in HSV-tk expressing tumor. We compared n vitro uptake of {sup 125}I-IVDU, IVFRU and in vivo image of HSV-tk gene tranduced hepatocellular carcinoma model. Using H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(hydrogen peroxide), IVDU and IVFRU was radiolabeled as carrier free form. The uptake of {sup 125}I-IVDU IVFRU was determined with increasing incubation periods in MCA-tk and MCA cell line (1X10{sup 6}cell/flask). The cell harvested and counted after incubation of 15, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 minutes. For estimating accumulation of radiolabelled IVDU, IVFRU in HSV-tk expressing tumor, MCA-tk cells (1 X 10{sup 6}/100 {mu}l) injected intramuscularly into right thigh of buffalo rats. To determine selective localization of radiolabelled IVDU, IVFRU in HSV-tk expressing hepatocellular carcinoma bearing buffalo rats, MCA-tk cells (1X 10{sup 7} cell/100 {mu}l) were injected subcutaneously into both shoulders of buffalo rats. Established tumor mass implanted into liver of buffalo rats using intra-hepatic tumor injection. Two weeks later, {sup 123}I labelled IVDU, IVFRU(7.4 X 10{sup 7}Bq/200 {mu}l) injected intravenously into tail veins of each buffalo rats. Gamma camera used as revealing localization of {sup 123}I-IVDU, IVFRU in MCA-tk cells grafts rats and in vivo image was taken 2 hrs, 24 hrs after injection. radioiodinated IVDU, IVFRU were radiolabeled with {sup 123}I as labeling yield 70%, {sup 125}I as 84%. Two compounds showed minimal uptake in MCA cell line, but in MCA-tk cell line, increased uptake was observed. The ratio of MCA-tk to MCA was up to 116-fold in {sup 125}I-IVDU, up to 37-fold in {sup 125}I-IVFRU at 480 min. The uptake of IVDU was 4 times higher than IVFRU in MCA-tk cells. Gamma camera images of HSV-tk gene tranduced MCA tumor showed accumulation of {sup 123}I

  6. CD200R1 supports HSV-1 viral replication and licenses pro-inflammatory signaling functions of TLR2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy J Soberman

    Full Text Available The CD200R1:CD200 axis is traditionally considered to limit tissue inflammation by down-regulating pro-inflammatory signaling in myeloid cells bearing the receptor. We generated CD200R1(-/- mice and employed them to explore both the role of CD200R1 in regulating macrophage signaling via TLR2 as well as the host response to an in vivo, TLR2-dependent model, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 infection. CD200R1(-/- peritoneal macrophages demonstrated a 70-75% decrease in the generation of IL-6 and CCL5 (Rantes in response to the TLR2 agonist Pam(2CSK(4 and to HSV-1. CD200R1(-/- macrophages could neither up-regulate the expression of TLR2, nor assemble a functional inflammasome in response to HSV-1. CD200R1(-/- mice were protected from HSV-1 infection and exhibited dysfunctional TLR2 signaling. Finally, both CD200R1(-/- mice and CD200R1(-/- fibroblasts and macrophages showed a markedly reduced ability to support HSV-1 replication. In summary, our data demonstrate an unanticipated and novel requirement for CD200R1 in "licensing" pro-inflammatory functions of TLR2 and in limiting viral replication that are supported by ex vivo and in vivo evidence.

  7. Anti HSV-1 Activity of Halistanol Sulfate and Halistanol Sulfate C Isolated from Brazilian Marine Sponge Petromica citrina (Demospongiae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa Guimarães, Tatiana; Quiroz, Carlos Guillermo; Rigotto, Caroline; de Oliveira, Simone Quintana; Rojo de Almeida, Maria Tereza; Bianco, Éverson Miguel; Moritz, Maria Izabel Goulart; Carraro, João Luís; Palermo, Jorge Alejandro; Cabrera, Gabriela; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Oliveira Simões, Cláudia Maria

    2013-01-01

    The n-butanol fraction (BF) obtained from the crude extract of the marine sponge Petromica citrina, the halistanol-enriched fraction (TSH fraction), and the isolated compounds halistanol sulfate (1) and halistanol sulfate C (2), were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on the replication of the Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1, KOS strain) by the viral plaque number reduction assay. The TSH fraction was the most effective against HSV-1 replication (SI = 15.33), whereas compounds 1 (SI = 2.46) and 2 (SI = 1.95) were less active. The most active fraction and these compounds were also assayed to determine the viral multiplication step(s) upon which they act as well as their potential synergistic effects. The anti-HSV-1 activity detected was mediated by the inhibition of virus attachment and by the penetration into Vero cells, the virucidal effect on virus particles, and by the impairment in levels of ICP27 and gD proteins of HSV-1. In summary, these results suggest that the anti-HSV-1 activity of TSH fraction detected is possibly related to the synergic effects of compounds 1 and 2. PMID:24172213

  8. Impact of congenital anomalies and treatment location on the outcomes of infants hospitalized with herpes simplex virus (HSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Scott A; Millman, Andrea M; Shah, Samir S

    2010-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a rare but costly reason for hospitalization in infants under 60 days of age. The impact of coexisting comorbid conditions and treatment location on hospital outcome is poorly understood. Determine patient and hospital factors associated with poor outcomes or death in infants hospitalized with HSV. : Retrospective cohort study using the 2003 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). U.S. hospitals. Infants under 60 days of age with a diagnosis of HSV. Treatment at different types of hospitals, younger age at admission, and presence of congenital anomalies. Serious complications, in-hospital death. A total of 10% of the 1587 identified HSV hospitalizations had a concurrent congenital anomaly. A total of 267 infants had a serious complication and 50 died. After controlling for clinical and hospital characteristics, concurrent congenital anomalies were associated with higher odds of a serious complication (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.00-5.56) and higher odds of death (adjusted OR, 4.17; 95% CI, 1.74-10.0). Similar results were found for infants admitted under 7 days of age. Although different hospital types had statistically similar clinical outcomes after controlling for case-mix differences, treatment at a children's hospital was associated with an 18% reduction in length of stay (LOS). Infants with concurrent congenital anomalies infected with HSV were at increased risk for serious complications or death. Health resource use may be improved through identification and adoption of care practiced at children's hospitals.

  9. The early UL31 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 encodes a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has a nuclear localization signal sequence at the C-terminus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seongman; Chul Ahn, Byung; O' Callaghan, Dennis J. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Molecular and Tumor Virology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130-3932 (United States); Kim, Seong Kee, E-mail: skim1@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Molecular and Tumor Virology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130-3932 (United States)

    2012-10-25

    The amino acid sequence of the UL31 protein (UL31P) of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) has homology to that of the ICP8 of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Here we show that the UL31 gene is synergistically trans-activated by the IEP and the UL5P (EICP27). Detection of the UL31 RNA transcript and the UL31P in EHV-1-infected cells at 6 h post-infection (hpi) as well as metabolic inhibition assays indicated that UL31 is an early gene. The UL31P preferentially bound to single-stranded DNA over double-stranded DNA in gel shift assays. Subcellular localization of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-UL31 fusion proteins revealed that the C-terminal 32 amino acid residues of the UL31P are responsible for the nuclear localization. These findings may contribute to defining the role of the UL31P single-stranded DNA-binding protein in EHV-1 DNA replication.

  10. The early UL31 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 encodes a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has a nuclear localization signal sequence at the C-terminus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seongman; Chul Ahn, Byung; O’Callaghan, Dennis J.; Kim, Seong Kee

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the UL31 protein (UL31P) of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) has homology to that of the ICP8 of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Here we show that the UL31 gene is synergistically trans-activated by the IEP and the UL5P (EICP27). Detection of the UL31 RNA transcript and the UL31P in EHV-1-infected cells at 6 h post-infection (hpi) as well as metabolic inhibition assays indicated that UL31 is an early gene. The UL31P preferentially bound to single-stranded DNA over double-stranded DNA in gel shift assays. Subcellular localization of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)–UL31 fusion proteins revealed that the C-terminal 32 amino acid residues of the UL31P are responsible for the nuclear localization. These findings may contribute to defining the role of the UL31P single-stranded DNA-binding protein in EHV-1 DNA replication.

  11. SENP7 Potentiates cGAS Activation by Relieving SUMO-Mediated Inhibition of Cytosolic DNA Sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP synthase (cGAS, a.k.a. MB21D1, a cytosolic DNA sensor, catalyzes formation of the second messenger 2'3'-cGAMP that activates the stimulator of interferon genes (STING signaling. How the cGAS activity is modulated remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 7 (SENP7 interacted with and potentiated cGAS activation. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO was conjugated onto the lysine residues 335, 372 and 382 of cGAS, which suppressed its DNA-binding, oligomerization and nucleotidyl-transferase activities. SENP7 reversed this inhibition via catalyzing the cGAS de-SUMOylation. Consistently, silencing of SENP7 markedly impaired the IRF3-responsive gene expression induced by cGAS-STING axis. SENP7-knockdown mice were more susceptible to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 infection. SENP7 was significantly up-regulated in patients with SLE. Our study highlights the temporal modulation of the cGAS activity via dynamic SUMOylation, uncovering a novel mechanism for fine-tuning the STING signaling in innate immunity.

  12. The use of human cornea organotypic cultures to study herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevets, Peter; Chucair-Elliott, Ana; Shrestha, Priyadarsini; Jinkins, Jeremy; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Carr, Daniel J J

    2015-10-01

    To determine the utility of human organotypic cornea cultures as a model to study herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-induced inflammation and neovascularization. Human organotypic cornea cultures were established from corneas with an intact limbus that were retrieved from donated whole globes. One cornea culture was infected with HSV-1 (10(4) plaque-forming units), while the other cornea from the same donor was mock-infected. Supernatants were collected at intervals post-culture with and without infection to determine viral titer (by plaque assay) and pro-angiogenic and proinflammatory cytokine concentration by suspension array analysis. In some experiments, the cultured corneas were collected and evaluated for HSV-1 antigens by immunohistochemical means. Another set of experiments measured susceptibility of human three-dimensional cornea fibroblast constructs, in the presence and absence of TGF-β1, to HSV-1 infection in terms of viral replication and the inflammatory response to infection as a comparison to the organotypic cornea cultures. Organotypic cornea cultures and three-dimensional fibroblast constructs exhibited varying degrees of susceptibility to HSV-1. Fibroblast constructs were more susceptible to infection in terms of infectious virus recovered in a shorter period of time. There were changes in the levels of select pro-angiogenic or proinflammatory cytokines that were dictated as much by the cultures producing them as by whether they were infected with HSV-1 or treated with TGF-β1. Organotypic cornea and three-dimensional fibroblast cultures are likely useful for the identification and short-term study of novel antiviral compounds and virus replication, but are limited in the study of the local immune response to infection.

  13. Identification of broadly reactive epitopes targeting major glycoproteins of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2 - An immunoinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Varun; Goyal, Kapil; Singh, Mini P

    2018-07-01

    Infections due to both HSV-1 and HSV-2 constitute an enormous health burden worldwide. Development of vaccine against herpes infections is a WHO supported public health priority. The viral glycoproteins have always been the major hotspots for vaccine designing. The present study was aimed to identify the conserved T and B cell epitopes in the major glycoproteins of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 via rigorous computational approaches. Identification of promiscuous T cell epitopes is of utmost importance in vaccine designing as such epitopes are capable of binding to several allelic forms of HLA and could generate effective immune response in the host. The criteria designed for identification of T and B cell epitopes was that it should be conserved in both HSV-1 and 2, promiscuous, have high affinity towards HLA alleles, should be located on the surface of glycoproteins and not be present in the glycosylation sites. This study led to the identification of 17 HLA Class II and 26 HLA Class I T cell epitopes, 9 linear and some conformational B cell epitopes. The identified T cell epitopes were further subjected to molecular docking analysis to analyze their binding patterns. Altogether we have identified 4 most promising regions in glycoproteins (2-gB, 1-gD, 1-gH) of HSV-1 and 2 which are promiscuous to HLA Class II alleles and have overlapping HLA Class I and B cell epitopes, which could be very useful in generating both arms of immune response in the host i.e. adaptive as well as humoral immunity. Further the authors propose the cross-validation of the identified epitopes in experimental settings for confirming their immunogenicity to support the present findings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The HSV-1 mechanisms of cell-to-cell spread and fusion are critically dependent on host PTP1B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian C Carmichael

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available All herpesviruses have mechanisms for passing through cell junctions, which exclude neutralizing antibodies and offer a clear path to neighboring, uninfected cells. In the case of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, direct cell-to-cell transmission takes place between epithelial cells and sensory neurons, where latency is established. The spreading mechanism is poorly understood, but mutations in four different HSV-1 genes can dysregulate it, causing neighboring cells to fuse to produce syncytia. Because the host proteins involved are largely unknown (other than the virus entry receptor, we were intrigued by an earlier discovery that cells infected with wild-type HSV-1 will form syncytia when treated with salubrinal. A biotinylated derivative of this drug was used to pull down cellular complexes, which were analyzed by mass spectrometry. One candidate was a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP1B, and although it ultimately proved not to be the target of salubrinal, it was found to be critical for the mechanism of cell-to-cell spread. In particular, a highly specific inhibitor of PTP1B (CAS 765317-72-4 blocked salubrinal-induced fusion, and by itself resulted in a dramatic reduction in the ability of HSV-1 to spread in the presence of neutralizing antibodies. The importance of this phosphatase was confirmed in the absence of drugs by using PTP1B-/- cells. Importantly, replication assays showed that virus titers were unaffected when PTP1B was inhibited or absent. Only cell-to-cell spread was altered. We also examined the effects of salubrinal and the PTP1B inhibitor on the four Syn mutants of HSV-1, and strikingly different responses were found. That is, both drugs individually enhanced fusion for some mutants and reduced fusion for others. PTP1B is the first host factor identified to be specifically required for cell-to-cell spread, and it may be a therapeutic target for preventing HSV-1 reactivation disease.

  15. The HSV-1 mechanisms of cell-to-cell spread and fusion are critically dependent on host PTP1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Jillian C; Yokota, Hiroki; Craven, Rebecca C; Schmitt, Anthony; Wills, John W

    2018-05-01

    All herpesviruses have mechanisms for passing through cell junctions, which exclude neutralizing antibodies and offer a clear path to neighboring, uninfected cells. In the case of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), direct cell-to-cell transmission takes place between epithelial cells and sensory neurons, where latency is established. The spreading mechanism is poorly understood, but mutations in four different HSV-1 genes can dysregulate it, causing neighboring cells to fuse to produce syncytia. Because the host proteins involved are largely unknown (other than the virus entry receptor), we were intrigued by an earlier discovery that cells infected with wild-type HSV-1 will form syncytia when treated with salubrinal. A biotinylated derivative of this drug was used to pull down cellular complexes, which were analyzed by mass spectrometry. One candidate was a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP1B), and although it ultimately proved not to be the target of salubrinal, it was found to be critical for the mechanism of cell-to-cell spread. In particular, a highly specific inhibitor of PTP1B (CAS 765317-72-4) blocked salubrinal-induced fusion, and by itself resulted in a dramatic reduction in the ability of HSV-1 to spread in the presence of neutralizing antibodies. The importance of this phosphatase was confirmed in the absence of drugs by using PTP1B-/- cells. Importantly, replication assays showed that virus titers were unaffected when PTP1B was inhibited or absent. Only cell-to-cell spread was altered. We also examined the effects of salubrinal and the PTP1B inhibitor on the four Syn mutants of HSV-1, and strikingly different responses were found. That is, both drugs individually enhanced fusion for some mutants and reduced fusion for others. PTP1B is the first host factor identified to be specifically required for cell-to-cell spread, and it may be a therapeutic target for preventing HSV-1 reactivation disease.

  16. Dual monitoring using {sup 124}I-FIAU and bioluminescence for HSV1-tk suicide gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kwon, H. C. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) is the most common reporter gene and is used in cancer gene therapy with a prodrug nucleoside analog, ganciclovir (GCV). The aim of this study is to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of suicide gene therapy with 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-[{sup 124}I] iodouracil ({sup 124}I - FIAU) and bioluminescence in retrovirally HSV -tk and firefly luciferase transduced hepatoma model. The HSV -tk and firefly luciferase (Luc) was retrovirally transduced and expressed in MCA rat Morris hepatoma cells. Nude mice with subcutaneous tumors, MCA and MCA-TK-Luc, were subjected to GCV treatment (50mg/Kg/d intraperitoneally) for 5 day. PET imaging and biodistribution with ({sup 124}I-FIAU) were performed at before and after initiation of therapy with GCV. Bioluminescent signal was also measured during GCV treatment. Before GCV treatment, no significant difference in tumor volume was found in tumors between MCA and MCA-TK-Luc. After GCV treatment, tumor volume of MCA-TK-Luc markedly reduced compared to that of MCA. In biodistribution study, {sup 124}I-FIAU uptake after GCV therapy significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels (34.8 13.67 %ID/g vs 7.6 2.59 %ID/g) and bioluminescent signal was also significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels. In small animal PET imaging, {sup 124}I-FIAU selectively localized in HSV -tk expressing tumor and the therapeutic efficacy of GCV treatment was evaluated by {sup 124}I-FIAU PET imaging. {sup 124}I-FIAU PET and bioluminescence imaging in HSV-tk suicide gene therapy were effective to evaluate the therapeutic response. {sup 124}I-FIAU may serve as an efficient and selective agent for monitoring of transduced HSV1-tk gene expression in vivo in clinical trials.

  17. Prospective cohort study showing persistent HSV-2 shedding in women with genital herpes 2 years after acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchandani, Meena; Selke, Stacy; Magaret, Amalia; Barnum, Gail; Huang, Meei-Li Wu; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2017-11-25

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a prevalent infection with great variability in clinical and virological manifestations among individuals. This prospective cohort study aims to evaluate the natural history of HSV-2 reactivation in the genital area in the same group of women over time. Eighteen immunocompetent HSV-2 seropositive women were evaluated for viral shedding for 70 consecutive days within a median of 8 months (range 1-24 months) of HSV-2 acquisition and again approximately 2.5 years later from the original study. Participants obtained daily swabs of genital secretions for HSV PCR and recorded genital symptoms. The viral shedding rate was 29% during the initial study and 19% in the follow-up study (32% reduction, P=0.019). Subclinical shedding rate also decreased from 24% to 13% (37% reduction, P=0.032), as did the rate of days with genital lesions from 22% to 15% (33% reduction, P=0.24). The mean copy number during viral shedding remained unchanged over time at 4.8 log 10 c/mL (SD=2.0 and 1.6 during each study, respectively, P=0.33). Women with high viral shedding rates in the past were likely to continue to have high shedding rates (r=0.63, P=0.005). Despite some reduction, high viral shedding rates persist in women with genital HSV-2 greater than 2 years after acquisition. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. MZC Gel Inhibits SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in Macaque Vaginal Mucosa and SHIV-RT in Rectal Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calenda, Giulia; Villegas, Guillermo; Barnable, Patrick; Litterst, Claudia; Levendosky, Keith; Gettie, Agegnehu; Cooney, Michael L; Blanchard, James; Fernández-Romero, José A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Teleshova, Natalia

    2017-03-01

    The Population Council's microbicide gel MZC (also known as PC-1005) containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate dihydrate (ZA) in carrageenan (CG) has shown promise as a broad-spectrum microbicide against HIV, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and human papillomavirus. Previous data show antiviral activity against these viruses in cell-based assays, prevention of vaginal and rectal simian-human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) infection, and reduction of vaginal HSV shedding in rhesus macaques and also excellent antiviral activity against HSV and human papillomavirus in murine models. Recently, we demonstrated that MZC is safe and effective against SHIV-RT in macaque vaginal explants. Here we established models of ex vivo SHIV-RT/HSV-2 coinfection of vaginal mucosa and SHIV-RT infection of rectal mucosa in macaques (challenge of rectal mucosa with HSV-2 did not result in reproducible tissue infection), evaluated antiviral activity of MZC, and compared quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay readouts for monitoring SHIV-RT infection. MZC (at nontoxic dilutions) significantly inhibited SHIV-RT in vaginal and rectal mucosas and HSV-2 in vaginal mucosa when present during viral challenge. Analysis of SHIV-RT infection and MZC activity by 1-step simian immunodeficiency virus gag quantitative RT-PCR and p27 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated similar virus growth dynamics and MZC activity by both methods and higher sensitivity of quantitative RT-PCR. Our data provide more evidence that MZC is a promising dual compartment multipurpose prevention technology candidate.

  19. Role of cell surface carbohydrate on herpes virus type I (HSV-1) entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massare, M.J.; Blough, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    The role of cell surface glycopeptides (GP) or oligosaccharides (OS) on HSV-1 (strain HF) attachment was studied by isolating those macromolecules by proteolytic digestion of uninfected cells and/or hydrazinolysis of whole cells or plasma membrane fractions. Variable amounts of GP or OS were mixed with 100-200 pfu of [ 3 H]-HSV incubated for 45 min at 20 0 C, and infectivity determined. GP were fractionated by lectin affinity-, ion exchange- and molecular sieve column chromatography. A GP fraction containing 13 μg reducing sugar/ml inhibited plaque formation by 80%. σ-elimination or the removal of NeuNAc had no affect. OS obtained by hydrazinolysis, inhibited plaque formation by 86-100% at concentrations of 14-20 μg reducing sugars/ml. Only complex OS, obtained by treating delipidated, whose cells with endoglycosidase D, blocked attachment; whereas high mannose fractions had no effect. These OS failed to inhibit fusion suggesting that N-linked complex OS are part of the receptor site(s)

  20. NKT cell activation by local α-galactosylceramide administration decreases susceptibility to HSV-2 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie Beck; Jensen, Simon Kok; Hansen, Anne Louise

    2015-01-01

    . The marine sponge derived lipid αGalCer has recently been demonstrated as a specific agonist for activation of human and murine NKT cells. In the present study we investigated the applicability of αGalCer pre-treatment for immune protection against intra-vaginal HSV-2 infection. We found that C57BL/6 WT mice...... that received local pre-treatment with αGalCer prior to intra-vaginal HSV-2 infection had a lower mean disease score, mortality and viral load in the vagina following infection, compared to mice that did not receive αGalCer pre-treatment. Further, we found increased numbers of CD45 and NK1.1 positive cells...... in vaginal tissue and elevated levels of IFN-γ in the vaginal tissue and in vaginal fluids 24h after αGalCer pre-treatment. Collectively our data demonstrate a protective effect of αGalCer induced activation of NKT cells in the innate immune protection against viral infection....

  1. Ribonucleotides Linked to DNA of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Ivan; Vonka, Vladimír

    1974-01-01

    Cells of a continuous cell line derived from rabbit embryo fibroblasts were infected with herpes simplex type 1 virus (HSV-1) and maintained in the presence of either [5-3H]uridine or [methyl-3H]thymidine or 32PO43−. Nucleocapsids were isolated from the cytoplasmic fraction, partially purified, and treated with DNase and RNase. From the pelleted nucleocapsids, DNA was extracted and purified by centrifugation in sucrose and cesium sulfate gradients. The acid-precipitable radioactivity of [5-3H]uridine-labeled DNA was partially susceptible to pancreatic RNase and alkaline treatment; the susceptibility to the enzyme decreased with increasing salt concentration. No drop of activity of DNA labeled with [3H]thymidine was observed either after RNase or alkali treatment. Base composition analysis of [5-3H]uridine-labeled DNA showed that the radioactivity was recovered as uracil and cytosine. In the cesium sulfate gradient, the purified [5-3H]uridine-labeled DNA banded at the same position as the 32P-labeled DNA. The present data tend to suggest that ribonucleotide sequences are present in HSV DNA, that they are covalently attached to the viral DNA, and that they can form double-stranded structures. PMID:4364894

  2. Topical Administration Is a Promising Inoculating Route versus Intramuscular Inoculation for the Nanoparticle-Carried DNA Vaccine to Prevent Corneal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kai; Malla, Tejsu; Zhai, Yujia; Dong, Lili; Tang, Ru

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the comparative effect of topical versus intramuscular administration of nanoparticle-carried DNA vaccine in preventing corneal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. Nanoparticle [polyethylenimine (PEI)-Fe3O4]-carried DNA vaccine (PEI-Fe3O4-pRSC-gD-IL-21) or DNA vaccine (pRSC-gD-IL-21) alone were topically versus intramuscularly inoculated into one eye each of mice on days 0, 14 and 28. Three weeks after the final immunization, the specific immune responses and clinical degrees of primary herpes simplex keratitis were evaluated. Topical inoculation of nanoparticle-carried DNA vaccine induced mice to generate similar levels of specific HSV-1-neutralizing antibody, IFN-γ and IL-4 in serum and specific killing (cytotoxicity) and proliferative activities of the splenic lymphocytes, but a significantly higher level of secretory IgA in tears compared to those of intramuscular inoculation. More importantly, the mice inoculated topically showed a significantly decreased herpes simplex keratitis severity than the mice inoculated intramuscularly after HSV-1 challenge on the corneas of the mice. Topical inoculation of nanoparticle-carried DNA vaccine elicits a stronger specific local immune response and more effectively inhibits herpes simplex keratitis as compared to intramuscular inoculation in an HSV-1 ocular challenge mouse model. Thus, topical administration may be a promising inoculating route for the nanoparticle-carried DNA vaccine to prevent corneal infections. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  4. Herpesvirus capsid assembly and DNA packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heming, Jason D.; Conway, James F.; Homa, Fred L.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) is the causative agent of several pathologies ranging in severity from the common cold sore to life-threatening encephalitic infection. During productive lytic infection, over 80 viral proteins are expressed in a highly regulated manner, resulting in the replication of viral genomes and assembly of progeny virions. The virion of all herpesviruses consists of an external membrane envelope, a proteinaceous layer called the tegument, and an icosahedral capsid containing the double-stranded linear DNA genome. The capsid shell of HSV-1 is built from four structural proteins: a major capsid protein, VP5, which forms the capsomers (hexons and pentons), the triplex consisting of VP19C and VP23 found between the capsomers, and VP26 which binds to VP5 on hexons but not pentons. In addition, the dodecameric pUL6 portal complex occupies one of the 12 capsid vertices, and the capsid vertex specific component (CVSC), a heterotrimer complex of pUL17, pUL25 and pUL36 binds specifically to the triplexes adjacent to each penton. The capsid is assembled in the nucleus where the viral genome is packaged into newly assembled closed capsid shells. Cleavage and packaging of replicated, concatemeric viral DNA requires the seven viral proteins encoded by the UL6, UL15, UL17, UL25, UL28, UL32, and UL33 genes. Considerable advances have been made in understanding the structure of the herpesvirus capsid and the function of several of the DNA packaging proteins by applying biochemical, genetic, and structural techniques. This review is a summary of recent advances with respect to the structure of the HSV-1 virion capsid and what is known about the function of the seven packaging proteins and their interactions with each other and with the capsid shell. PMID:28528442

  5. Contribution of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Sukun [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu, Kai [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); He, Siyi; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Mudan; Huang, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Du, Tao [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zheng, Chunfu [Soochow University, Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Yalan [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hu, Qinxue, E-mail: qhu@wh.iov.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Institute for Infection and Immunity, St George' s University of London, London SW17 0RE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    HSV-2 is the major cause of genital herpes and its infection increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. HSV-2 glycoprotein B together with glycoproteins D, H and L are indispensable for viral entry, of which gB, as a class III fusogen, plays an essential role. HSV-2 gB has seven potential N-linked glycosylation (N-CHO) sites, but their significance has yet to be determined. For the first time, we systematically analyzed the contributions of N-linked glycans on gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry. Our results demonstrated that, of the seven potential N-CHO sites on gB, mutation at N390, N483 or N668 decreased cell–cell fusion and viral entry, while mutation at N133 mainly affected protein expression and the production of infectious virus particles by blocking the transport of gB from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Our findings highlight the significance of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB expression and function. - Highlights: • N-linked glycan at N133 is important for gB intracellular trafficking and maturation. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal cell–cell fusion. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal viral entry.

  6. Contribution of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Sukun; Hu, Kai; He, Siyi; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Mudan; Huang, Xin; Du, Tao; Zheng, Chunfu; Liu, Yalan; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-01-01

    HSV-2 is the major cause of genital herpes and its infection increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. HSV-2 glycoprotein B together with glycoproteins D, H and L are indispensable for viral entry, of which gB, as a class III fusogen, plays an essential role. HSV-2 gB has seven potential N-linked glycosylation (N-CHO) sites, but their significance has yet to be determined. For the first time, we systematically analyzed the contributions of N-linked glycans on gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry. Our results demonstrated that, of the seven potential N-CHO sites on gB, mutation at N390, N483 or N668 decreased cell–cell fusion and viral entry, while mutation at N133 mainly affected protein expression and the production of infectious virus particles by blocking the transport of gB from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Our findings highlight the significance of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB expression and function. - Highlights: • N-linked glycan at N133 is important for gB intracellular trafficking and maturation. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal cell–cell fusion. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal viral entry

  7. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  8. Feasibility of sodium/iodide symporter gene as a new imaging reporter gene: comparison with HSV1-tk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; Kang, Joo Hyun; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Chul Woo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reporter genes, such as HSV1-tk and D 2 receptor genes, make it possible to visualise gene expression non-invasively and repetitively in vivo. However, these systems require the synthesis of complicated substrates and the availability of expensive PET equipment. Expression of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene can be easily monitored with radioiodines and technetium-99m using a gamma camera. To evaluate the possibility of using NIS as an imaging reporter gene, we compared its characteristics with those of the conventional HSV1-tk gene. The CM cell line was made by transfecting the HSV1-tk gene into CT-26 (mouse colon carcinoma cell line). The CTN and CMN cell lines were then made by transfecting the NIS gene into CT-26 and CM. We measured the uptake of iodine-125 iodovinyldeoxyuridine ([ 125 I]IVDU) and 125 I to evaluate the expression of the HSV1-tk and NIS genes, respectively. Each cell line was injected into four flank sites in Balb/c mice. The biodistribution study was performed after intravenously injecting [ 125 I]IVDU and 131 I, and 131 I scintigraphy was performed for the evaluation of NIS expression. In vitro studies indicated that CTN and CMN had 40- to 79-fold and 150- to 256-fold higher uptake of 125 I than CT-26 and CM, respectively. Furthermore, CM and CMN showed 57- to 69-fold higher uptake of [ 125 I]IVDU than CT-26 and CTN. NIS gene expression and 125 I accumulation were found to be directly correlated (R 2 =0.923), as were HSV1-tk gene expression and [ 125 I]IVDU accumulation (R 2 =0.956). Calculated signal per unit NIS and HSV1-tk mRNA expression was 23,240±3,755 cpm and 34,039±5,346 cpm, respectively. In vivo study indicated that CTN and CMN had 2.3- and 5.8-fold higher uptake of 131 I than CT-26 and CM, and 1.8- and 3.5-fold higher uptake of [ 125 I]IVDU than CT-26 and CTN. Scintigraphy using 131 I easily visualised CTN and CMN tumours. In conclusion, the NIS gene may be viewed as an imaging

  9. The epidemiology of HIV and HSV-2 infections among women participating in microbicide and vaccine feasibility studies in Northern Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidi H Kapiga

    Full Text Available To prepare for future HIV prevention trials, we conducted prospective cohort studies among women working in food and recreational facilities in northern Tanzania. We examined the prevalence and incidence of HIV and HSV-2, and associated risk factors.Women aged 18-44 years working in food and recreational facilities were screened to determine their eligibility for the studies. Between 2008-2010, HIV-negative women were enrolled and followed for 12 months. At enrolment and 3-monthly, we collected socio-demographic and behavioural data, and performed clinical examinations for collection of biological specimens that were tested for reproductive tract infections. Risk factors for HIV and HSV-2 incidence were investigated using Poisson regression models.We screened 2,229 and enrolled 1,378 women. The median age was 27 years (interquartile range, IQR 22, 33, and median duration working at current facility was 2 years. The prevalences of HIV at screening and HSV-2 at enrolment were 16% and 67%, respectively. Attendance at the 12-month visit was 86%. HIV and HSV-2 incidence rates were 3.7 (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.8,5.1 and 28.6 (95% CI: 23.5,35.0/100 person-years, respectively. Women who were separated, divorced, or widowed were at increased risk of HIV (adjusted incidence rate ratio, aRR = 6.63; 95% CI: 1.97,22.2 and HSV-2 (aRR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.15,3.47 compared with married women. Women reporting ≥3 partners in the past 3 months were at higher HIV risk compared with women with 0-1 partner (aRR = 4.75; 95% CI: 2.10,10.8, while those who had reached secondary education or above were at lower risk of HSV-2 compared with women with incomplete primary education (aRR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.22,0.82.HIV and HSV-2 rates remain substantially higher in this cohort than in the general population, indicating urgent need for effective interventions. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of conducting trials to test new interventions in this

  10. HSV-2-Driven Increase in the Expression of α4β7 Correlates with Increased Susceptibility to Vaginal SHIVSF162P3 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Villegas, Guillermo; Calenda, Giulia; Guerra-Perez, Natalia; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Blanchard, James; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The availability of highly susceptible HIV target cells that can rapidly reach the mucosal lymphoid tissues may increase the chances of an otherwise rare transmission event to occur. Expression of α4β7 is required for trafficking of immune cells to gut inductive sites where HIV can expand and it is expressed at high level on cells particularly susceptible to HIV infection. We hypothesized that HSV-2 modulates the expression of α4β7 and other homing receptors in the vaginal tissue and that this correlates with the increased risk of HIV acquisition in HSV-2 positive individuals. To test this hypothesis we used an in vivo rhesus macaque (RM) model of HSV-2 vaginal infection and a new ex vivo model of macaque vaginal explants. In vivo we found that HSV-2 latently infected RMs appeared to be more susceptible to vaginal SHIVSF162P3 infection, had higher frequency of α4β7 high CD4+ T cells in the vaginal tissue and higher expression of α4β7 and CD11c on vaginal DCs. Similarly, ex vivo HSV-2 infection increased the susceptibility of the vaginal tissue to SHIVSF162P3. HSV-2 infection increased the frequencies of α4β7 high CD4+ T cells and this directly correlated with HSV-2 replication. A higher amount of inflammatory cytokines in vaginal fluids of the HSV-2 infected animals was similar to those found in the supernatants of the infected explants. Remarkably, the HSV-2-driven increase in the frequency of α4β7 high CD4+ T cells directly correlated with SHIV replication in the HSV-2 infected tissues. Our results suggest that the HSV-2-driven increase in availability of CD4+ T cells and DCs that express high levels of α4β7 is associated with the increase in susceptibility to SHIV due to HSV-2. This may persists in absence of HSV-2 shedding. Hence, higher availability of α4β7 positive HIV target cells in the vaginal tissue may constitute a risk factor for HIV transmission. PMID:25521298

  11. HSV-2-driven increase in the expression of α4β7 correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV(SF162P3) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Villegas, Guillermo; Calenda, Giulia; Guerra-Perez, Natalia; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Blanchard, James; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2014-12-01

    The availability of highly susceptible HIV target cells that can rapidly reach the mucosal lymphoid tissues may increase the chances of an otherwise rare transmission event to occur. Expression of α4β7 is required for trafficking of immune cells to gut inductive sites where HIV can expand and it is expressed at high level on cells particularly susceptible to HIV infection. We hypothesized that HSV-2 modulates the expression of α4β7 and other homing receptors in the vaginal tissue and that this correlates with the increased risk of HIV acquisition in HSV-2 positive individuals. To test this hypothesis we used an in vivo rhesus macaque (RM) model of HSV-2 vaginal infection and a new ex vivo model of macaque vaginal explants. In vivo we found that HSV-2 latently infected RMs appeared to be more susceptible to vaginal SHIVSF162P3 infection, had higher frequency of α4β7high CD4+ T cells in the vaginal tissue and higher expression of α4β7 and CD11c on vaginal DCs. Similarly, ex vivo HSV-2 infection increased the susceptibility of the vaginal tissue to SHIVSF162P3. HSV-2 infection increased the frequencies of α4β7high CD4+ T cells and this directly correlated with HSV-2 replication. A higher amount of inflammatory cytokines in vaginal fluids of the HSV-2 infected animals was similar to those found in the supernatants of the infected explants. Remarkably, the HSV-2-driven increase in the frequency of α4β7high CD4+ T cells directly correlated with SHIV replication in the HSV-2 infected tissues. Our results suggest that the HSV-2-driven increase in availability of CD4+ T cells and DCs that express high levels of α4β7 is associated with the increase in susceptibility to SHIV due to HSV-2. This may persists in absence of HSV-2 shedding. Hence, higher availability of α4β7 positive HIV target cells in the vaginal tissue may constitute a risk factor for HIV transmission.

  12. HSV-2-driven increase in the expression of α4β7 correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV(SF162P3 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Goode

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The availability of highly susceptible HIV target cells that can rapidly reach the mucosal lymphoid tissues may increase the chances of an otherwise rare transmission event to occur. Expression of α4β7 is required for trafficking of immune cells to gut inductive sites where HIV can expand and it is expressed at high level on cells particularly susceptible to HIV infection. We hypothesized that HSV-2 modulates the expression of α4β7 and other homing receptors in the vaginal tissue and that this correlates with the increased risk of HIV acquisition in HSV-2 positive individuals. To test this hypothesis we used an in vivo rhesus macaque (RM model of HSV-2 vaginal infection and a new ex vivo model of macaque vaginal explants. In vivo we found that HSV-2 latently infected RMs appeared to be more susceptible to vaginal SHIVSF162P3 infection, had higher frequency of α4β7high CD4+ T cells in the vaginal tissue and higher expression of α4β7 and CD11c on vaginal DCs. Similarly, ex vivo HSV-2 infection increased the susceptibility of the vaginal tissue to SHIVSF162P3. HSV-2 infection increased the frequencies of α4β7high CD4+ T cells and this directly correlated with HSV-2 replication. A higher amount of inflammatory cytokines in vaginal fluids of the HSV-2 infected animals was similar to those found in the supernatants of the infected explants. Remarkably, the HSV-2-driven increase in the frequency of α4β7high CD4+ T cells directly correlated with SHIV replication in the HSV-2 infected tissues. Our results suggest that the HSV-2-driven increase in availability of CD4+ T cells and DCs that express high levels of α4β7 is associated with the increase in susceptibility to SHIV due to HSV-2. This may persists in absence of HSV-2 shedding. Hence, higher availability of α4β7 positive HIV target cells in the vaginal tissue may constitute a risk factor for HIV transmission.

  13. Autoradiography study and SPECT imaging of reporter gene HSV1-tk expression in heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: LXL730724@hotmail.com; Liu Ying; He Yong; Wu Tao; Zhang Binqing; Gao Zairong; An Rui [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2010-04-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the feasibility and optimal conditions of imaging herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene transferred into hearts with {sup 131}I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 131}I-FIAU) using autoradiography (ARG) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in animal models. Methods: HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (Ad5-tk) and adenovirus (Ad5-null) was prepared. Rats or rabbits were divided into a study group receiving intramyocardial injection of Ad5-tk, and a control group receiving Ad-null injection. In the study group of rats, two sets of experiments, time-course study and dose-dependence study, were performed. In time-course experiments, rats were injected with {sup 131}I-FIAU on Days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7, after transfection of 1x10{sup 8} pfu Ad5-tk, to study the feasibility and suitable time course for reporter gene imaging. In dose-dependence study, various titers of Ad5-tk (5x10{sup 8}, 1x10{sup 8}, 5x10{sup 7} and 1x10{sup 7} pfu) were used to determine the threshold and optimal viral titer needed for detection of gene expression. The gamma counts of hearts were measured. The rat myocardium was analyzed by ARG and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SPECT whole-body planar imaging and cardiac tomographic imaging were performed in the rabbit models. Results: From the ARG images, rats injected with Ad5-tk showed significant {sup 131}I-FIAU activity in the anterolateral wall compared with background signals seen in the control Ad5-null rats. In time-course study, the highest radioactivity in the focal myocardium could be seen on Day 1, and then progressively declined with time. In dose-dependence study, the level of {sup 131}I-FIAU accumulation in the transfected myocardium declined with the decrease of Ad viral titers. From the ARG analysis and gamma counting, the threshold viral titer was 5x10{sup 7} pfu, and the optimal Ad titer was 1x10{sup 8} pfu

  14. An efficient rHSV-based complementation system for the production of multiple rAAV vector serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, W; Wang, L; Harrell, H; Liu, J; Thomas, D L; Mayfield, T L; Scotti, M M; Ye, G J; Veres, G; Knop, D R

    2009-02-01

    Recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (rHSV)-assisted recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector production provides a highly efficient and scalable method for manufacture of clinical grade rAAV vectors. Here, we present an rHSV co-infection system for rAAV production, which uses two ICP27-deficient rHSV constructs, one bearing the rep2 and cap (1, 2 or 9) genes of rAAV, and the second bearing an AAV2 ITR-gene of interest (GOI) cassette. The optimum rAAV production parameters were defined by producing rAAV2/GFP in HEK293 cells, yielding greater than 9000 infectious particles per cell with a 14:1 DNase resistance particle to infectious particle (DRP/ip) ratio. The optimized co-infection parameters were then used to generate large-scale stocks of rAAV1/AAT, which encode the human alpha-1-antitrypsin (hAAT) protein, and purified by column chromatography. The purified vector was extensively characterized by rAAV- and rHSV-specific assays and compared to transfection-made vector for in vivo efficacy in mice through intramuscular injection. The co-infection method was also used to produce rAAV9/AAT for comparison to rAAV1/AAT in vivo. Intramuscular administration of 1 x 10(11) DRP per animal of rHSV-produced rAAV1/AAT and rAAV9/AAT resulted in hAAT protein expression of 5.4 x 10(4) and 9.4 x 10(5) ng ml(-1) serum respectively, the latter being clinically relevant.

  15. Association between exposure to HSV1 and cognitive functioning in a general population of adolescents. The TRAILS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Jonker

    Full Text Available Infections with different herpes viruses have been associated with cognitive functioning in psychiatric patients and healthy adults. The aim of this study was to find out whether antibodies to different herpes viruses are prospectively associated with cognitive functioning in a general adolescent population.This study was performed in TRAILS, a large prospective general population cohort (N = 1084, 54% female, mean age 16.2 years (SD 0.6. At age 16, immunoglobulin G antibodies against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and EBV were measured next to high sensitive C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP. Two years later, immediate memory and executive functioning were assessed using the 15 words task and the self ordered pointing task. Multiple linear regression analysis with bootstrapping was performed to study the association between viral infections and cognitive function, adjusting for gender, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and cannabis use.Presence of HSV1 antibodies was associated with memory function ((B = -0.272, 95% CI = -0.556 to -0.016, p = 0.047, while the association with executive functioning did not reach statistical significance (B = 0.560, 95% CI is -0.053 to 1.184, p = 0.075. The level of HSV1 antibodies was associated with both memory function (B = -0.160, 95% CI = -0.280 to -0.039, p = 0.014 and executive functioning (B = 0.296, 95% CI = 0.011 to 0.578, p = 0.046. Other herpes viruses and hsCRP were not associated with cognitive functioning.Both presence and level of HSV1 antibodies are prospectively associated with reduced cognitive performance in a large cohort of adolescents.

  16. In vivo and in vitro experimental study on cervix cancer with combination of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system and 60Co radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daozhen; Xue Wenqun; Zhan Huiying; Zhu Yunxia; Yang Youyi; Liu Lu; Tang Qiusha

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the killing effect of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system combined with 60 Co radiotherapy on human cervical cancer HeLa cell line in vivo and in vitro, and to explore radiosensitization by the HSV-TK/GCV system. Methods: The HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system and 60 Co radiotherapy were used separately or in combination for human cervical cancer HeLa cell line in vivo and in vitro to compare their effects. Colony formation test and the rate of radiosensitization effect(E/O) were employed to observed the radiosensitization by the HSV-TK/GCV system. Results: The HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system showed strong therapeutic effects on HeLa cells both in vitro and in vivo (the inhibition rates were 45.8% and 39.5%, respectively). Moreover, the combined application of gene therapy and radiotherapy exhibited stronger therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo (the inhibition rate was 87.5% in vitro, and was 87.9% in vivo) (P 1.4), indicating the HSV-TK/GCV system could exert a sensitizing effect on 60 Co radiotherapy of the transplanted human cervical cancer cells in nude mice. Conclusion: The HSV-TK/GCV system has radiosensitizationaction. Gene therapy combined with radiotherapy may be a good supplementary method for synthetic treatment of cervical cancer. (authors)

  17. Decreased reactivation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) mutant using the in vivo mouse UV-B model of induced reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Simpson, Jennifer L.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivations from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that control the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if reactivation of the HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutant (dLAT2903) was impaired in this model, as it is in the rabbit model of induced and spontaneous reactivation and in the explant TG induced reactivation model in mice. The eyes of mice latently infected with wild type HSV-1 strain McKrae (LAT(+) virus) or dLAT2903 (LAT(−) virus) were irradiated with UV-B and reactivation was determined. We found that compared to LAT(−) virus, LAT(+) virus reactivated at a higher rate as determined by shedding of virus in tears on days 3 to 7 after UV-B treatment. Thus, the UV-B induced reactivation model of HSV-1 appears to be a useful small animal model for studying the mechanisms involved in how LAT enhances the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The utility of the model for investigating the immune evasion mechanisms regulating the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle and for testing the protective efficacy of candidate therapeutic vaccines and drugs are discussed. PMID:26002839

  18. Recombination Promoted by DNA Viruses: Phage λ to Herpes Simplex Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Sandra K.; Sawitzke, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for understanding viral origins as well as the dynamic nature of viral-host interactions. Both bacteriophage λ and herpes simplex virus (HSV) display high rates of recombination, both utilizing their own proteins and commandeering cellular proteins to promote recombination reactions. We focus primarily on λ and HSV, as they have proven amenable to both genetic and biochemical analysis and have recently been shown to exhibit some surprising similarities that will guide future studies. PMID:25002096

  19. Genome-wide mouse mutagenesis reveals CD45-mediated T cell function as critical in protective immunity to HSV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Caignard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a lethal neurological disease resulting from infection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1. Loss-of-function mutations in the UNC93B1, TLR3, TRIF, TRAF3, and TBK1 genes have been associated with a human genetic predisposition to HSE, demonstrating the UNC93B-TLR3-type I IFN pathway as critical in protective immunity to HSV-1. However, the TLR3, UNC93B1, and TRIF mutations exhibit incomplete penetrance and represent only a minority of HSE cases, perhaps reflecting the effects of additional host genetic factors. In order to identify new host genes, proteins and signaling pathways involved in HSV-1 and HSE susceptibility, we have implemented the first genome-wide mutagenesis screen in an in vivo HSV-1 infectious model. One pedigree (named P43 segregated a susceptible trait with a fully penetrant phenotype. Genetic mapping and whole exome sequencing led to the identification of the causative nonsense mutation L3X in the Receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase C gene (Ptprc(L3X, which encodes for the tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Expression of MCP1, IL-6, MMP3, MMP8, and the ICP4 viral gene were significantly increased in the brain stems of infected Ptprc(L3X mice accounting for hyper-inflammation and pathological damages caused by viral replication. Ptprc(L3X mutation drastically affects the early stages of thymocytes development but also the final stage of B cell maturation. Transfer of total splenocytes from heterozygous littermates into Ptprc(L3X mice resulted in a complete HSV-1 protective effect. Furthermore, T cells were the only cell population to fully restore resistance to HSV-1 in the mutants, an effect that required both the CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells and could be attributed to function of CD4⁺ T helper 1 (Th1 cells in CD8⁺ T cell recruitment to the site of infection. Altogether, these results revealed the CD45-mediated T cell function as potentially critical for infection and viral spread to the

  20. Antiviral potential of medicinal plants against HIV, HSV, influenza, hepatitis, and coxsackievirus: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad; Tahir, Imtiaz Mahmood; Shah, Syed Muhammad Ali; Mahmood, Zahed; Altaf, Awais; Ahmad, Khalil; Munir, Naveed; Daniyal, Muhammad; Nasir, Suhaila; Mehboob, Huma

    2018-05-01

    Viral infections are being managed therapeutically through available antiviral regimens with unsatisfactory clinical outcomes. The refractory viral infections resistant to available antiviral drugs are alarming threats and a serious health concern. For viral hepatitis, the interferon and vaccine therapies solely are not ultimate solutions due to recurrence of hepatitis C virus. Owing to the growing incidences of viral infections and especially of resistant viral strains, the available therapeutic modalities need to be improved, complemented with the discovery of novel antiviral agents to combat refractory viral infections. It is widely accepted that medicinal plant heritage is nature gifted, precious, and fueled with the valuable resources for treatment of metabolic and infectious disorders. The aims of this review are to assemble the facts and to conclude the therapeutic potential of medicinal plants in the eradication and management of various viral diseases such as influenza, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), hepatitis, and coxsackievirus infections, which have been proven in diverse clinical studies. The articles, published in the English language since 1982 to 2017, were included from Web of Science, Cochrane Library, AMED, CISCOM, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Scopus, and PubMed by using relevant keywords including plants possessing antiviral activity, the antiviral effects of plants, and plants used in viral disorders. The scientific literature mainly focusing on plant extracts and herbal products with therapeutic efficacies against experimental models of influenza, HIV, HSV, hepatitis, and coxsackievirus were included in the study. Pure compounds possessing antiviral activity were excluded, and plants possessing activity against viruses other than viruses in inclusion criteria were excluded. Hundreds of plant extracts with antiviral effect were recognized. However, the data from only 36 families investigated through in vitro and in vivo

  1. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-01-01

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of 14 C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of ∼ 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA

  2. DNA sequence responsible for the amplification of adjacent genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasion, S G; Hartigan, J A; Kumar, V; Biswas, D K

    1987-10-01

    A 10.3-kb DNA fragment in the 5'-flanking region of the rat prolactin (rPRL) gene was isolated from F1BGH(1)2C1, a strain of rat pituitary tumor cells (GH cells) that produces prolactin in response to 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Following transfection and integration into genomic DNA of recipient mouse L cells, this DNA induced amplification of the adjacent thymidine kinase gene from Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1TK). We confirmed the ability of this "Amplicon" sequence to induce amplification of other linked or unlinked genes in DNA-mediated gene transfer studies. When transferred into the mouse L cells with the 10.3-5'rPRL gene sequence of BrdU-responsive cells, both the human growth hormone and the HSV1TK genes are amplified in response to 5-bromodeoxyuridine. This observation is substantiated by BrdU-induced amplification of the cotransferred bacterial Neo gene. Cotransfection studies reveal that the BrdU-induced amplification capability is associated with a 4-kb DNA sequence in the 5'-flanking region of the rPRL gene of BrdU-responsive cells. These results demonstrate that genes of heterologous origin, linked or unlinked, and selected or unselected, can be coamplified when located within the amplification boundary of the Amplicon sequence.

  3. Evaluation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and poly(DL-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) electrospun fibers for the treatment of HSV-2 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniagyei, Stella E.; Sims, Lee B. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Malik, Danial A. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Tyo, Kevin M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Center for Predictive Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Curry, Keegan C. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Kim, Woihwan [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Hodge, Daniel A. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Duan, Jinghua [Department of Bioengineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Center for Predictive Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Steinbach-Rankins, Jill M., E-mail: jill.steinbach@louisville.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Center for Predictive Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    More diverse multipurpose prevention technologies are urgently needed to provide localized, topical pre-exposure prophylaxis against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In this work, we established the foundation for a multipurpose platform, in the form of polymeric electrospun fibers (EFs), to physicochemically treat herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infection. To initiate this study, we fabricated different formulations of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(DL-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) EFs that encapsulate Acyclovir (ACV), to treat HSV-2 infection in vitro. Our goals were to assess the release and efficacy differences provided by these two different biodegradable polymers, and to determine how differing concentrations of ACV affected fiber efficacy against HSV-2 infection and the safety of each platform in vitro. Each formulation of PLGA and PLCL EFs exhibited high encapsulation efficiency of ACV, sustained-delivery of ACV through one month, and in vitro biocompatibility at the highest doses of EFs tested. Additionally, all EF formulations provided complete and efficacious protection against HSV-2 infection in vitro, regardless of the timeframe of collected fiber eluates tested. This work demonstrates the potential for PLGA and PLCL EFs as delivery platforms against HSV-2, and indicates that these delivery vehicles may be expanded upon to provide protection against other sexually transmitted infections. - Highlights: • PLGA and PLCL EFs exhibit sustained-delivery of ACV through one month. • EFs exhibit high ACV encapsulation efficiency and in vitro biocompatibility. • EFs serve as both physical and chemical barriers to HSV-2 infection. • Potent in vitro efficacy is provided against HSV-2 infection for all formulations. • HSV-2 protection is independent of administration times within one month.

  4. Vaccination with a HSV-2 UL24 mutant induces a protective immune response in murine and guinea pig vaginal infection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visalli, Robert J; Natuk, Robert J; Kowalski, Jacek; Guo, Min; Blakeney, Susan; Gangolli, Seema; Cooper, David

    2014-03-10

    The rational design and development of genetically attenuated HSV-2 mutant viruses represent an attractive approach for developing both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for genital herpes. Previously, HSV-2 UL24 was shown to be a virulence determinant in both murine and guinea pig vaginal infection models. An UL24-βgluc insertion mutant produced syncytial plaques and replicated to nearly wild type levels in tissue culture, but induced little or no pathological effects in recipient mice or guinea pigs following vaginal infection. Here we report that immunization of mice or guinea pigs with high or low doses of UL24-βgluc elicited a highly protective immune response. UL24-βgluc immunization via the vaginal or intramuscular routes was demonstrated to protect mice from a lethal vaginal challenge with wild type HSV-2. Moreover, antigen re-stimulated splenic lymphocytes harvested from immunized mice exhibited both HSV-2 specific CTL activity and IFN-γ expression. Humoral anti-HSV-2 responses in serum were Th1-polarized (IgG2a>IgG1) and contained high-titer anti-HSV-2 neutralizing activity. Guinea pigs vaccinated subcutaneously with UL24-βgluc or the more virulent parental strain (186) were challenged with a heterologous HSV-2 strain (MS). Acute disease scores were nearly indistinguishable in guinea pigs immunized with either virus. Recurrent disease scores were reduced in UL24-βgluc immunized animals but not to the same extent as those immunized with strain 186. In addition, challenge virus was not detected in 75% of guinea pigs subcutaneously immunized with UL24-βgluc. In conclusion, disruption of the UL24 gene is a prime target for the development of a genetically attenuated live HSV-2 vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and poly(DL-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) electrospun fibers for the treatment of HSV-2 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniagyei, Stella E.; Sims, Lee B.; Malik, Danial A.; Tyo, Kevin M.; Curry, Keegan C.; Kim, Woihwan; Hodge, Daniel A.; Duan, Jinghua; Steinbach-Rankins, Jill M.

    2017-01-01

    More diverse multipurpose prevention technologies are urgently needed to provide localized, topical pre-exposure prophylaxis against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In this work, we established the foundation for a multipurpose platform, in the form of polymeric electrospun fibers (EFs), to physicochemically treat herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infection. To initiate this study, we fabricated different formulations of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(DL-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) EFs that encapsulate Acyclovir (ACV), to treat HSV-2 infection in vitro. Our goals were to assess the release and efficacy differences provided by these two different biodegradable polymers, and to determine how differing concentrations of ACV affected fiber efficacy against HSV-2 infection and the safety of each platform in vitro. Each formulation of PLGA and PLCL EFs exhibited high encapsulation efficiency of ACV, sustained-delivery of ACV through one month, and in vitro biocompatibility at the highest doses of EFs tested. Additionally, all EF formulations provided complete and efficacious protection against HSV-2 infection in vitro, regardless of the timeframe of collected fiber eluates tested. This work demonstrates the potential for PLGA and PLCL EFs as delivery platforms against HSV-2, and indicates that these delivery vehicles may be expanded upon to provide protection against other sexually transmitted infections. - Highlights: • PLGA and PLCL EFs exhibit sustained-delivery of ACV through one month. • EFs exhibit high ACV encapsulation efficiency and in vitro biocompatibility. • EFs serve as both physical and chemical barriers to HSV-2 infection. • Potent in vitro efficacy is provided against HSV-2 infection for all formulations. • HSV-2 protection is independent of administration times within one month.

  6. Effects of Female Sex Hormones on Susceptibility to HSV-2 in Vaginal Cells Grown in Air-Liquid Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung; Dizzell, Sara E; Leung, Vivian; Nazli, Aisha; Zahoor, Muhammad A; Fichorova, Raina N; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-08-30

    The lower female reproductive tract (FRT) is comprised of the cervix and vagina, surfaces that are continuously exposed to a variety of commensal and pathogenic organisms. Sexually transmitted viruses, such as herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), have to traverse the mucosal epithelial lining of the FRT to establish infection. The majority of current culture systems that model the host-pathogen interactions in the mucosal epithelium have limitations in simulating physiological conditions as they employ a liquid-liquid interface (LLI), in which both apical and basolateral surfaces are submerged in growth medium. We designed the current study to simulate in vivo conditions by growing an immortalized vaginal epithelial cell line (Vk2/E6E7) in culture with an air-liquid interface (ALI) and examined the effects of female sex hormones on their growth, differentiation, and susceptibility to HSV-2 under these conditions, in comparison to LLI cultures. ALI conditions induced Vk2/E6E7 cells to grow into multi-layered cultures compared to the monolayers present in LLI conditions. Vk2 cells in ALI showed higher production of cytokeratin in the presence of estradiol (E2), compared to cells grown in progesterone (P4). Cells grown under ALI conditions were exposed to HSV-2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the highest infection and replication was observed in the presence of P4. Altogether, this study suggests that ALI cultures more closely simulate the in vivo conditions of the FRT compared to the conventional LLI cultures. Furthermore, under these conditions P4 was found to confer higher susceptibility to HSV-2 infection in vaginal cells. The vaginal ALI culture system offers a better alternative to study host-pathogen interactions.

  7. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Livingston

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70, the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  8. Alanine substitution of conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail of herpes simplex virus gB can enhance or abolish cell fusion activity and viral entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruel, Nancy; Zago, Anna; Spear, Patricia G.

    2006-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B (gB) is one of the four viral glycoproteins required for viral entry and cell fusion and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. Mutants of HSV type 2 gB were generated by substituting conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail with alanine or by deleting 41 amino acids from the C-terminus. Some of the mutations abolished cell fusion activity and also prevented transport of gB to the cell surface, identifying residues in the gB cytoplasmic tail that are critical for intracellular transport of this glycoprotein. These mutations also prevented production of infectious virus, possibly because the mutant forms of gB were not transported to the site of envelopment. Other mutations, particularly the deletion, significantly enhanced cell fusion activity. These mutations, as well as others described previously, identify regions of the gB cytoplasmic domain that modulate cell fusion activity

  9. Purification and characterization of a novel anti-HSV-2 protein with antiproliferative and peroxidase activities from Stellaria media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shan; Yuhong Zheng; Fuqin Guan; Jianjian Zhou; Haiguang Zhao; Bing Xia; Xu Feng

    2013-01-01

    A novel antiviral protein,designated as Stellarmedin A,was purified from Stellaria media (L.) Vill.(Caryophyllaceae) by using ammonium sulfate precipitation,cation-exchange chromatography system.Gel electrophoresis analysis showed that Stellarmedin A is a highly basic glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 35.1 kDa and an isoelectric point of ~8.7.The Nterminal 14-amino acid sequence,MGNTGVLTGERNDR,is similar to those of other plant peroxidases.This protein inhibited herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) replication in vitro with an ICso of 13.18 μg/ml and a therapeutic index exceeding 75.9.It was demonstrated that Stellarmedin A affects the initial stage of HSV-2 infection and is able to inhibit the proliferation of promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 and colon carcinoma LoVo cells with an ICso of 9.09 and 12.32 μM,respectively.Moreover,Stellarmedin A has a peroxidase activity of 36.6 μmol/min/mg protein,when gualacol was used as substrate.To our knowledge,this is the first report about an anti-HSV-2 protein with antiproliferative and peroxidase activities from S.media.

  10. HSV-1 interaction to 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate in mouse-derived DRG explant and profiles of inflammatory markers during virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharthiya, Harsh; Seng, Chanmoly; Van Kuppevelt, T H; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Fornaro, Michele

    2017-06-01

    The molecular mechanism of herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and the associated inflammatory response in the nervous system remain poorly understood. Using mouse-derived ex vivo dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explant model and single cell neurons (SCNs), in this study, we provided a visual evidence for the expression of heparan sulfate (HS) and 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate (3-OS HS) followed by their interactions with HSV-1 glycoprotein B (gB) and glycoprotein D (gD) during cell entry. Upon heparanase treatment of DRG-derived SCN, a significant inhibition of HSV-1 entry was observed suggesting the involvement of HS role during viral entry. Finally, a cytokine array profile generated during HSV-1 infection in DRG explant indicated an enhanced expression of chemokines (LIX, TIMP-2, and M-CSF)-known regulators of HS. Taken together, these results highlight the significance of HS during HSV-1 entry in DRG explant. Further investigation is needed to understand which isoforms of 3-O-sulfotransferase (3-OST)-generated HS contributed during HSV-1 infection and associated cell damage.

  11. Study on antiviral activities, drug-likeness and molecular docking of bioactive compounds of Punica granatum L. to Herpes simplex virus - 2 (HSV-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, Jagadeesan; Rajarajan, Swaminathan

    2018-03-28

    Herpes simplex virus - 2 (HSV-2) causes lifelong persisting infection in the immunocompromised host and intermittent in healthy individuals with high morbidity in neonatals and also increase the transmission of HIV. Acyclovir is widely used drug to treat HSV-2 infection but it unable to control viral latency and recurrent infection and prolonged usage lead to drug resistance. Plant-based bioactive compounds are the lead structural bio-molecules play an inevitable role as a potential antiviral agent with reduced toxicity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop anti-HSV-2 bioactive molecules to prevent viral resistance and control of latent infection. Punica granatum fruit is rich in major bioactive compounds with potential antimicrobial properties. Hence, we evaluated the anti-HSV-2 efficacy of lyophilized extracts and bioactive compounds isolated from fruit peel of P. granatum. As a result, ethanolic peel extract showed significant inhibition at 62.5 μg/ml. Hence, the fruit peel ethanolic extract was subjected for the isolation of bioactive compounds isolation by bioactivity-guided fractionation. Among isolated bioactive compounds, punicalagin showed 100% anti-HSV-2 activity at 31.25 μg/ml with supportive evidence of desirable in silico ADMET properties and strong interactions to selected protein targets of HSV-2 by docking analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of brief messages on HSV-2 screening uptake among female defendants in a court setting: a randomized controlled trial utilizing prospect theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Alexis M; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Dodge, Brian; Reece, Michael; Certo, David; Zimet, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic data demonstrate that women involved with the criminal justice system in the United States are at high risk for sexually transmitted infections, including herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Female defendants were recruited from a misdemeanor court to assess whether brief framed messages utilizing prospect theory could encourage testing for HSV-2. Participants were randomly assigned to a message condition (gain, loss, or control), completed an interviewer-administered survey assessing factors associated with antibody test uptake/refusal and were offered free point-of-care HSV-2 serologic testing. Although individuals in the loss-frame group accepted testing at the highest rate, an overall statistical difference in HSV-2 testing behavior by group (p ≤ .43) was not detected. The majority of the sample (74.6%) characterized receiving a serological test for HSV-2 as health affirming. However, this did not moderate the effect of the intervention nor was it significantly associated with test acceptance (p ≤ .82). Although the effects of message framing are subtle, the findings have important theoretical implications given the participants' characterization of HSV-2 screening as health affirming despite being a detection behavior. Implications of study results for health care providers interested in brief, low cost interventions are also explored.

  13. Synthesis of substrates for gene therapy monitoring of HSV1-TK system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Tae Hyun; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Awh, Ok Doo [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    In gene therapy, tumor cells expressing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase are sensitive to prodrugs. Potential prodrugs IVDU and IVFRU were synthesized and radiolabeled with radioiodine for noninvasive imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 gene expression. 5-(2-trimethysilyl) vinyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-t(2-trimethylsilyl)vinyl-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, precursors of 5-(2-iodo)viny 1-2'-deoxy uridine(IVDU) and 5-(2-iodo)-2'-vinyl-2'-deoxy-2'-fluorotibofuranosyl uracil(IVFRU), were synthesized from reaction of trans-1-trimethylsillyl-2-tri-n-butylstannylethylene with 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-iodo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, respectively, on the condition of Pd catalyst. These precursors were separated from reaction mixture by silica gel column chromatography method. Each precursor was radioiodinated with radioiodine by mixing with ICI oxidizing agent. These radioiodinated compounds were purified with HPLC. Radiohalogen exchange has been shown to be effective for the synthesis of products with lower specific activity. Similarly, carrier-added and high specific activity products have been isolated in respectable radiochemical yields using ICI method. Synthetic yield of precursors, IVDU and IVFRU were 43% and 18%, respectively. Radiochemical purity of both compunds was over 98%. We synthesized precursors of IVDU and IVFRU for monitoring of HSV1-tk gene expression. Radiotracers were radioiodinated with high radiolabeling yield by ICI method.

  14. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Three-year report, February 1, 1981-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    Mutant strains were selected which are deficient in various DNA repair pathways and these were studied with regard to (1) the nature of the defect in repair, and (2) the mutability and transformability of the defective cells by various agents as compared to the wild type parental cells. Lightly mutagenized wild-type cells were infected with irradiated herpes simplex virus (HSV). Cells which repair HSV are lysed so the surviving population is enriched in repair-deficient cells. Six strains which survived two rounds of infection were characterized with respect to their radiosensitivity

  15. Characterization of Inherent Particles and Mechanism of Thermal Stress Induced Particle Formation in HSV-2 Viral Vaccine Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lillian; Kirkitadze, Marina; Bhandal, Kamaljit; Roque, Cristopher; Yang, Eric; Carpick, Bruce; Rahman, Nausheen

    2017-11-10

    Vaccine formulations may contain visible and/or subvisible particles, which can vary in both size and morphology. Extrinsic particles, which are particles not part of the product such as foreign contaminants, are generally considered undesirable and should be eliminated or controlled in injectable products. However, biological products, in particular vaccines, may also contain particles that are inherent to the product. Here we focus on the characterization of visible and subvisible particles in a live, replication-deficient viral vaccine candidate against HSV genital herpes in an early developmental stage. HSV-2 viral vaccine was characterized using a panel of analytical methods, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blot, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-flow imaging (MFI), dynamic light scattering (DLS), right angle light scattering (RALS), and intrinsic fluorescence. Particles in HSV-2 vaccine typically ranged from hundreds of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers in size and were determined to be inherent to the product. The infectious titer did not correlate with any trend in subvisible particle concentration and size distribution as shown by DLS, MFI, and TEM under stressed conditions. This suggested that particle changes in the submicron range were related to HSV-2 virion structure and had direct impact on biological activity. It was also observed that subvisible and visible particles could induce aggregation in the viral product. The temperature induced aggregation was observed by RALS, intrinsic fluorescence, and DLS. The increase of subvisible particle size with temperature could be fitted to a two-step thermokinetic model. Visible and subvisible particles were found to be inherent to the HSV-2 viral vaccine product. The mechanism of protein aggregation was discussed and a two

  16. HIV-1, HSV-2 and syphilis among pregnant women in a rural area of Tanzania: Prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evjen-Olsen Bjørg

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that a substantial proportion of new HIV infections in African countries are associated with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2. Thus, the magnitude of HSV-2 infection in an area may suggest the expected course of the HIV epidemic. We determined prevalence of genital herpes, syphilis and associated factors among pregnant women from a remote rural Tanzanian community that has a low but increasing HIV prevalence. Methods We analysed 1296 sera and responses to a standard structured questionnaire collected from pregnant women aged between 15–49 years, attending six different antenatal clinics within rural Manyara and Singida regions in Tanzania. Linked anonymous testing (with informed consent of the serum for specific antibodies against HSV-2 was done using a non-commercial peptide- 55 ELISA. Antibodies against syphilis were screened by using rapid plasma reagin (RPR and reactive samples confirmed by Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA. Results Previous analysis of the collected sera had shown the prevalence of HIV antibodies to be 2%. In the present study the prevalence of genital herpes and syphilis was 20.7% (95% CI: 18.53–23.00 and 1.6% (95% CI: 1.03–2.51, respectively. The presence of HSV-2 antibodies was associated with polygamy (OR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.62 – 3.01 and the use of contraceptives other than condoms (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.21 – 2.41. Syphilis was associated with reporting more than one lifetime sexual partner (OR 5.4, 95% CI: 1.88 – 15.76 and previous spontaneous abortion (OR 4.3, 95% CI: 1.52–12.02. Conclusion The low prevalence of HIV infection offers a unique opportunity for strengthening HIV prevention in a cost-effective manner. The identification and control of other prevalent curable STIs other than syphilis and specific intervention of HSV-2 in specific populations like pregnant women would be one among approaches towards preventing incident HIV infections.

  17. Evasion of Cytosolic DNA-Stimulated Innate Immune Responses by Herpes Simplex Virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunfu

    2018-03-15

    Recognition of virus-derived nucleic acids by host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is crucial for early defense against viral infections. Recent studies revealed that PRRs also include several newly identified DNA sensors, most of which could activate the downstream adaptor stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and lead to the production of host antiviral factors. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is extremely successful in establishing effective infections, due to its capacity to counteract host innate antiviral responses. In this Gem, I summarize the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms utilized by HSV-1 to target different steps of the cellular DNA-sensor-mediated antiviral signal pathway. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Studies on the DNA excision repair in lymphocytes of patients with recurrent herpes simplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanta, D.; Topaloglou, A.; Altmann, H.

    1979-01-01

    DNA repair was investigated in lymphocytes from patients with recurrent herpes simplex and from healthy controls. From the results - depressed UV type repair, depressed gamma type repair, reduced RF - it may be concluded that mutations can be expected due to the faults remaining in the DNA. This may not only lower cellular immunocompetence, but also activate already present oncogenic virus informations within the cellular DNA. Thus, irrespective of the possible oncogenic potential of HSV, there seems to be an increased risk of late effects in patients with recurrent herpetic manifestations. (Auth.)

  19. DNA vaccine expressing herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein C and D protects mice against herpes simplex keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Li Dong; Ru Tang; Yu-Jia Zhai; Tejsu Malla; Kai Hu

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether DNA vaccine encoding herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein C (gC) and glycoprotein D (gD) will achieve better protective effect against herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) than DNA vaccine encoding gD alone. METHODS: DNA vaccine expressing gD or gC combined gD (gD.gC) were constructed and carried by chitosan nanoparticle. The expression of fusion protein gD and gC were detected in DNA/nanoparticle transfected 293T cells by Western-blot. For immunization, mice w...

  20. miRNAting control of DNA methylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA methylation is a type of epigenetic modification where a methyl group is added to the cytosine or adenine residue of a given DNA sequence. It has been observed that DNA methylation is achieved by some collaborative agglomeration of certain proteins and non-coding RNAs. The assembly of IDN2 and its ...

  1. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin; Moses, Alan M.; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2015-01-01

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families.

  2. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-11-02

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families.

  3. An experimental study on cervix cancer with combination of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system and 60Co radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Daozhen; Tang, Qiusha

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the killing effect of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system combined with 60 Co radiotherapy on human cervical cancer Hela cell line in vitro and in vivo, and to explore the radiosensitization by HSV-TK/GCV system. HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system and 60 Co radiotherapy were used separately or in combination on human cervical cancer Hela cell line in vitro and in vivo to compare their effects. Colony formation test and the rate of radiosensitization effect (E/O) were employed to observed the radiosensitization by HSV-TK/GCV system. HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system had strong therapeutic effects on Hela cells in vitro and in vivo (the inhibition rates were 45.8% and 39.5%, respectively), moreover, the combined administration of gene therapy and radiotherapy had stronger therapeutic effects in vitro and in vivo (the inhibition rate was 87.5% in vitro, and the inhibition rate was 87.9% in vivo) (P < 0.01). The inhibition rate by radiotherapy alone was 42.4% in vitro and 35.8% in vivo. The sensitivity of combined therapy to radiotherapy increased more than that of therapy alone, the ability of colony formation decreased (P < 0.01). The rate of radiosensitivity effect (E/O) was 3.17(> 1.4), indicating HSV-TK/GCV system could exert a sensitizing effect on 60 Co radiotherapy of the transplanted human cervical cancer cell in nude mice. HSV-TK/GCV system had radiosensitization. Gene therapy combined with radiotherapy may be a good supplementary method for cervix cancer synthetic treatment

  4. A single tube PCR assay for simultaneous amplification of HSV-1/-2, VZV, CMV, HHV-6A/-6B, and EBV DNAs in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with virus-related neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T; Nakamura, Y

    2000-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 27 patients with encephalitis, meningitis, and other neurological diseases were studied for the presence of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1/-2), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpesviruses 6A and 6B (HHV-6A/-6B) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The DNAs were amplified using two sets of consensus primer pairs in a single tube, bringing simultaneous amplification of the herpesviruses. The PCR products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, and Southern blot hybridization with virus-type specific probes, thus allowing discrimination between the different types of herpesviruses to be made. Each virus-specific probe was highly specific for identifying the PCR product. Thirty CSF specimens from 13 patients with encephalitis and 10 specimens from 10 patients with meningitis, respectively, were examined using this method. Eight patients with encephalitis and six with meningitis were positive for different herpesviruses, including patients with coinfections (HSV-1/-2 and VZV, VZV and CMV). Among four CSF specimens from four patients with other neurological disorders, dual amplification of CMV and EBV was present. Since identification of the types of herpesviruses in this system requires a very small amount of CSF, and is completed with one PCR, it is useful for routine diagnosis of herpesvirus infections in diagnostic laboratories. The viruses responsible for central nervous system infection are easily detected with various coinfection and serial patterns of herpesviruses, by this consensus primer-based PCR method. This may give an insight into the relationship between virus-related neurological diseases (VRNDS) and herpesvirus infections.

  5. Mechanisms by which herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase limits translesion synthesis through abasic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yali; Song, Liping; Stroud, Jason; Parris, Deborah S

    2008-01-01

    Results suggest a high probability that abasic (AP) sites occur at least once per herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genome. The parameters that control the ability of HSV-1 DNA polymerase (pol) to engage in AP translesion synthesis (TLS) were examined because AP lesions could influence the completion and fidelity of viral DNA synthesis. Pre-steady-state kinetic experiments demonstrated that wildtype (WT) and exonuclease-deficient (exo-) pol could incorporate opposite an AP lesion, but full TLS required absence of exo function. Virtually all of the WT pol was bound at the exo site to AP-containing primer-templates (P/Ts) at equilibrium, and the pre-steady-state rate of excision by WT pol was higher on AP-containing than on matched DNA. However, several factors influencing polymerization work synergistically with exo activity to prevent HSV-1 pol from engaging in TLS. Although the pre-steady-state catalytic rate constant for insertion of dATP opposite a T or AP site was similar, ground-state-binding affinity of dATP for insertion opposite an AP site was reduced 3-9-fold. Single-turnover running-start experiments demonstrated a reduced proportion of P/Ts extended to the AP site compared to the preceding site during processive synthesis by WT or exo- pol. Only the exo- pol engaged in TLS, though inefficiently and without burst kinetics, suggesting a much slower rate-limiting step for extension beyond the AP site.

  6. Genomic localization, sequence analysis, and transcription of the putative human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbronn, T.; Jahn, G.; Buerkle, A.; Freese, U.K.; Fleckenstein, B.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced DNA polymerase has been well characterized biochemically and functionally, but its genomic location has not yet been assigned. To identify the coding sequence, cross-hybridization with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) polymerase gene was used, as suggested by the close similarity of the herpes group virus-induced DNA polymerases to the HCMV DNA polymerase. A cosmid and plasmid library of the entire HCMV genome was screened with the BamHI Q fragment of HSF-1 at different stringency conditions. One PstI-HincII restriction fragment of 850 base pairs mapping within the EcoRI M fragment of HCMV cross-hybridized at T/sub m/ - 25/degrees/C. Sequence analysis revealed one open reading frame spanning the entire sequence. The amino acid sequence showed a highly conserved domain of 133 amino acids shared with the HSV and putative Esptein-Barr virus polymerase sequences. This domain maps within the C-terminal part of the HSV polymerase gene, which has been suggested to contain part of the catalytic center of the enzyme. Transcription analysis revealed one 5.4-kilobase early transcript in the sense orientation with respect to the open reading frame identified. This transcript appears to code for the 140-kilodalton HCMV polymerase protein

  7. Presence of human papilloma virus, herpes simplex virus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA in oral biopsies from Sudanese patients with regard to toombak use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalouli, Jamshid; Ibrahim, Salah O; Sapkota, Dipak; Jalouli, Miranda M; Vasstrand, Endre N; Hirsch, Jan M; Larsson, Per-Anders

    2010-09-01

    Using PCR/DNA sequencing, we investigated the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in brush biopsies obtained from 150 users of Sudanese snuff (toombak) and 25 non-users of toombak in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples obtained from 31 patients with oral dysplasias (25 toombak users and 6 non-users), and from 217 patients with oral cancers (145 toombak users and 72 non-users). In the brush tissue samples from toombak users, HPV was detected in 60 (40%), HSV in 44 (29%) and EBV in 97 (65%) of the samples. The corresponding figures for the 25 samples from non-users were 17 (68%) positive for HPV, 6 (24%) positive for HSV and 21 (84%) for EBV. The formalin-fixed samples with oral dysplasias were all negative for HPV. In the 145 oral cancer samples from toombak users, HPV was detected in 39 (27%), HSV in 15 (10%) and EBV in 53 (37%) of the samples. The corresponding figures for the samples from non-users were 15 (21%) positive for HPV, 5 (7%) for HSV and 16 (22%) for EBV. These findings illustrate that prevalence of HSV, HPV and EBV infections are common and may influence oral health and cancer development. It is not obvious that cancer risk is increased in infected toombak users. These observations warrant further studies involving toombak-associated oral lesions, to uncover the possible mechanisms of these viral infections in the development of oral cancer, and the influence of toombak on these viruses. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Comparison of [{sup 18}F]FHBG and [{sup 14}C]FIAU for imaging of HSV1-tk reporter gene expression: adenoviral infection vs stable transfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung-Jun; Iyer, Meera [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA School of Medicine, B3-399A BRI 700 Westwood Plaza, CA 90095-1770, Los Angeles (United States); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA School of Medicine, B3-399A BRI 700 Westwood Plaza, CA 90095-1770, Los Angeles (United States); Department of Radiology, Bio-X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Earlier studies involving comparison of different reporter probes have shown conflicting results between pyrimidine nucleosides [e.g., 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (FIAU)] and acycloguanosine derivatives [e.g., penciclovir (PCV), 9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)guanine (FHBG)]. We hypothesized that this reported discrepancy may be related to how the reporter gene is delivered to the cells - stably transfected vs adenoviral infection. We directly compared the uptake characteristics of [{sup 18}F]FHBG, [{sup 3}H]PCV, and [{sup 14}C]FIAU in cell culture and in vivo using an adenoviral mediated gene transfer model and stably transfected cells. We further compared the uptake of three reporter probes using both HSV1-tk and a mutant HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells to assess the optimal reporter probe/reporter gene combination. [{sup 14}C]FIAU accumulation was greater than that of [{sup 3}H]PCV and [{sup 18}F]FHBG in control cells and in HSV1-tk stably transfected cells (P<0.001). After infection of C6 cells with AdCMV-HSV1-tk (1.5 x 10{sup 8} pfu), [{sup 18}F]FHBG and [{sup 3}H]PCV accumulation was significantly greater than that of [{sup 14}C]FIAU (P<0.01). [{sup 18}F]FHBG and [{sup 3}H]PCV accumulated to a significantly greater extent than [{sup 14}C]FIAU in C6-stb-sr39tk+ and AdCMV-HSV1-sr39tk infected C6 cells (P<0.001). Results from the nude mice supported the results in cell culture. [{sup 14}C]FIAU led to significantly higher %ID/g in C6-stb-tk+ xenografts than [{sup 18}F]FHBG (P<0.05); however, compared with [{sup 14}C]FIAU, [{sup 18}F]FHBG led to as high %ID/g in HSV1-tk expressing hepatocytes and to significantly greater %ID/g in C6-stb-sr39tk+ xenografts and HSV1-sr39tk expressing hepatocytes. Dynamic sequential images showed that [{sup 18}F]FHBG was well retained in HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells (C6-stb-sr39tk+) for at least 4 h after injection, while it was rapidly cleared from HSV1-tk expressing cells (MH3924A

  9. Cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of pyrimidine nucleosides for imaging herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK) expression in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, Kevin W.; Duan Weili; Xu Lihua; Zhou Aihua; Moharram, Sameh; Knaus, Edward E.; McEwan, Alexander J.B.; Wiebe, Leonard I. E-mail: leonard.wiebe@ualberta.ca

    2004-07-01

    In vivo transfer of the herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK) gene, with subsequent administration of antiviral drugs such as ganciclovir, has emerged as a promising gene therapy protocol for treating proliferative disorders. The in vitro cytotoxicities (IC{sub 50}) for two series of 5-iodo- and (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-substituted 2'-deoxy- and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-pyrimidine nucleosides ranged from millimolar to low nanomolar concentrations in mammalian tumor cell lines (KBALB; R-970-5; 143B; EMT-6) and their counterparts engineered to express HSV-1 TK (KBALB-STK; 143B-LTK). Their HSV-1 TK selectivity indices ranged from one (nonselective) to one million (highly selective) based on cytotoxicity, with FIRU being the least toxic to all cell lines, and FIAU being most toxic. HSV-1 TK selectivity, based on uptake, ranged from 10 to 140, with IVDU being most selective for HSV-1 TK expressing cells, followed by IVFRU, FIRU, FIAU, IVFAU and finally IUDR. Phosphorylation of [{sup 125}I]FIAU led to incorporation of the radiolabel into nucleic acids, whereas IVFRU and FIRU radioactivity was trapped primarily in the nucleotide pool. These data indicate that cytotoxicity does not depend on initial metabolic trapping (e.g., phosphorylation), but on elaboration of the mononucleotides to more cytotoxic anabolites. Lipophilicities and nucleoside transport rates of the six nucleosides tested were within narrow ranges. This supports the premise that cellular biochemistry, and not cellular bioavailability, is responsible for the observed broad range of cytotoxicity and trapping. In vivo biodistribution studies with 5-[{sup 125}I]iodo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyribouridine (FIRU), 5-[{sup 125}I]iodo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyarabinouridine (FIAU) and (E)-5-(2-[{sup 125}I]iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) demonstrate selective accumulation of all three radiotracers in HSV-1 TK-expressing KBABK-STK tumors, compared to their very low

  10. Discordance of HIV and HSV-2 biomarkers and self-reported sexual behaviour among orphan adolescents in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunsan; Luseno, Winnie; Halpern, Carolyn; Zhang, Lei; Mbai, Isabella; Milimo, Benson; Hallfors, Denise Dion

    2015-06-01

    This paper examines the discordance between biological data of HIV and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections and self-reported questionnaire responses among orphan adolescents in Western Kenya. In 2011, 837 orphan adolescents from 26 primary schools were enrolled in an HIV prevention trial. At baseline, blood samples were drawn for HIV and HSV-2 infection biomarker testing, and participants completed an audio computer-assisted self-interviewing survey. Comparing biological data with self-reported responses indicated that 70% of HIV-positive (7 out of 10) and 64% of HSV-2-positive (18 out of 28 positive) participants reported never having had sex. Among ever-married adolescents, 65% (57 out of 88) reported never having had sex. Overall, 10% of study participants appeared to have inconsistently reported their sexual behaviour. Logistic regression analyses indicated that lower educational level and exam scores were significant predictors of inconsistent reporting. Our study demonstrates the discordance between infections measured by biomarkers and self-reports of having had sex among orphan adolescents in Kenya. In order to detect programme effects accurately in prevention research, it is necessary to collect both baseline and endline biological data. Furthermore, it is recommended to triangulate multiple data sources about adolescent participants' self-reported information about marriage and pregnancies from school records and parent/guardians to verify the information. Researchers should recognise potential threats to validity in data and design surveys to consider cognitive factors and/or cultural context to obtain more accurate and reliable information from adolescents regarding HIV/sexually transmitted infection risk behaviours. NCT01501864. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. UPLC-PDA-ESI-qTOF-MS profiling and potent anti-HSV-II activity of Eucalyptus sideroxylon leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okba, Mona M; El Gedaily, Rania A; Ashour, Rehab M

    2017-11-15

    Eucalyptus is one of the most important and highly exploited genus in family Myrtaceae. An UPLC/PDA/ESI-qTOF-MS method was adopted to identify Eucalyptus sideroxylon Cunn. ex Woolls leaves phytoconstituents. Cytotoxicity of E. sideroxylon leaves phloroglucinol-rich extract (PGRE) on VERO cells was determined. The antiviral effect of PGRE against hepatitis A (HAV), herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-I), herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-II), coxsackie (CoxB4), and adenoviruses was in vitro evaluated using MTT assay (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide). UPLC-MS analysis allowed the identification of 70 metabolites including: 26 triterpenes, 13 phloroglucinols, 8 fatty acids, 5 flavonoids, 5 oleuropeic acid glucosides, 3 gallic acid derivatives, and 10 miscellaneous. Twenty four metabolites identified in the leaves of E. sideroxylon and four in the genus Eucalyptus are reported herein for the first time. PGRE was found to be non-cytotoxic; the concentration that reduced the cell viability by 50% (CC 50 ) was 0.808mg/mL. Maximum non-toxic concentration (MNTC) of PGRE on Vero cells was 0.312mg/mL. The best antiviral activity was observed against HSV-II. Its mechanism was through decreasing the viral replication (IC 50 189.36μg/mL, 87.65% inhibition) and attachment on Vero cells (IC 50 199.34μg/mL, 83.13% inhibition) rather than virucidal effect (IC 50 293.1μg/mL, 50.68% inhibition). This study provides a complete map for E. sideroxylon leaves composition. It also suggests the plant as a source of new antiviral agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The presence of lytic HSV-1 transcripts and clonally expanded T cells with a memory effector phenotype in human sensory ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derfuss, Tobias; Arbusow, Viktor; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Theil, Diethilde

    2009-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latent persistence in human trigeminal ganglia (TG) is accompanied by a chronic CD8 T-cell infiltration. Thus far, during HSV-1 latency only a single transcript, namely the latency-associated transcript (LAT), has been identified to be synthesized but not translated into a protein. In contrast, the chronic CD8 T-cell infiltration suggests that an antigen trigger must be present. The focus of the current work was to look for HSV-1 transcription activity as a potential trigger of the immune response and to demonstrate whether the immune cells are clonally expanded and have a phenotype that suggests that they have been triggered by viral antigen. By combining in situ hybridization, laser cutting microscopy, and single-cell real time RT-PCR, we demonstrated expression of the HSV-1 immediate early (IE) genes ICP0 and ICP4 in human trigeminal neurons. Using CDR3 spectratyping, we showed that the infiltrating T cells are clonally expanded, indicating an antigen-driven immune response. Moreover, the persisting CD8(+) T cells had prominent features of the memory effector phenotype. Chemokines CCL5 and CXCL10 were expressed by a subpopulation of infiltrating cells and the corresponding chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3 were co-expressed on virtually all T cells bearing the CD8 phenotype. Thus, HSV-1 IE genes are expressed in human TG, and the infiltrating T cells bear several characteristics that suggest viral antigenic stimulation.

  13. Human herpesvirus-6 and -7 DNA in cerebrospinal fluid of facial palsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, Mervi; Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Suvela, Minna; Piiparinen, Heli; Vaheri, Antti; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Finding human herpesvirus (HHV)-7 and dual HHV-6A and -6B DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two facial palsy (FP) patients is intriguing but does not allow etiologic conclusions as such. HHV-6 or -7 DNA was revealed in 10% of the CSF samples tested from 70 immunocompetent adolescents and adults; a highly unusual result. How these findings are associated with the diseases they accompany remains to be defined. To determine whether herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and -2, varicella-zoster virus (VZV), HHV-6A, -6B, and -7, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA could be found in CSF of FP patients or controls. In all, 33 peripheral FP patients (26 idiopathic, 5 with herpesvirus infection, 1 puerperal, 1 Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome) (34 CSF samples) and 36 controls (16 nonidiopathic FP, 7 hearing loss, 6 vertigo, 5 headache, 2 other) previously tested for HSV-1, VZV, and HHV-6 DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were tested with highly sensitive multiplex-PCR and an oligonucleotide microarray method. One FP patient had HHV-7 DNA and another had HHV-6A and -6B DNA simultaneously. In the control group, one HHV-7, one HHV-6A, and three HHV-6B DNA-positive specimens were found.

  14. Nasal application of HSV encoding human preproenkephalin blocks craniofacial pain in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meidahl, Anders Christian Nørgaard; Tzabazis

    2017-01-01

    pain using nasal application of a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vector expressing human proenkephalin (SHPE) to target the trigeminal ganglia. Mild TBI was induced in rats by the use of a modified fluid percussion model. Two days after mild TBI, following the development of facial mechanical...... lasting at least 45 days. On the other hand, nasal SHPE application 2 days post-TBI attenuated facial allodynia, reaching significance by day 4–7 and maintaining this effect throughout the duration of the experiment. Immunohistochemical examination revealed strong expression of human proenkephalin...

  15. FASTSAT-HSV01 Synergistic Observations of the Magnetospheric Response During Active Periods: MINI-ME, PISA and TTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Joseph C.; Collier, Michael R.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Sigwarth, John B.; Boudreaux, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the complex processes within the inner magnetosphere of Earth particularly during storm periods requires coordinated observations of the particle and field environment using both in-situ and remote sensing techniques. In fact in order to gain a better understanding of our Heliophysics and potentially improve our space weather forecasting capabilities, new observation mission approaches and new instrument technologies which can provide both cost effective and robust regular observations of magnetospheric activity and other space weather related phenomenon are necessary. As part of the effort to demonstrate new instrument techniques and achieve necessary coordinated observation missions, NASA's Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite Huntsville 01 mission (FASTSAT-HSVOI) scheduled for launch in 2010 will afford a highly synergistic solution which satisfies payload mission opportunities and launch requirements as well as contributing iri the near term to our improved understanding of Heliophysics. NASA's FASTSAT-HSV01 spacecraft on the DoD Space Test Program-S26 (STP-S26) Mission is a multi-payload mission executed by the DoD Space Test Program (STP) at the Space Development and Test Wing (SDTW), Kirtland AFB, NM. and is an example of a responsive and economical breakthrough in providing new possibilities for small space technology-driven and research missions. FASTSAT-HSV is a unique spacecraft platform that can carry multiple small instruments or experiments to low-Earth orbit on a wide range of expendable launch vehicles for a fraction of the cost traditionally required for such missions. The FASTSAT-HSV01 mission allows NASA to mature and transition a technical capability to industry while increasing low-cost access to space for small science and technology (ST) payloads. The FASTSAT-HSV01 payload includes three NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) new technology built instruments that will study the terrestrial space environment and

  16. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 UL24 Abrogates the DNA Sensing Signal Pathway by Inhibiting NF-κB Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiyan; Su, Chenhe; Pearson, Angela; Mody, Christopher H; Zheng, Chunfu

    2017-04-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a newly identified DNA sensor that recognizes foreign DNA, including the genome of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Upon binding of viral DNA, cGAS produces cyclic GMP-AMP, which interacts with and activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING) to trigger the transcription of antiviral genes such as type I interferons (IFNs), and the production of inflammatory cytokines. HSV-1 UL24 is widely conserved among members of the herpesviruses family and is essential for efficient viral replication. In this study, we found that ectopically expressed UL24 could inhibit cGAS-STING-mediated promoter activation of IFN-β and interleukin-6 (IL-6), and UL24 also inhibited interferon-stimulatory DNA-mediated IFN-β and IL-6 production during HSV-1 infection. Furthermore, UL24 selectively blocked nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) but not IFN-regulatory factor 3 promoter activation. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that UL24 bound to the endogenous NF-κB subunits p65 and p50 in HSV-1-infected cells, and UL24 was also found to bind the Rel homology domains (RHDs) of these subunits. Furthermore, UL24 reduced the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated nuclear translocation of p65 and p50. Finally, mutational analysis revealed that the region spanning amino acids (aa) 74 to 134 of UL24 [UL24(74-134)] is responsible for inhibiting cGAS-STING-mediated NF-κB promoter activity. For the first time, UL24 was shown to play an important role in immune evasion during HSV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE NF-κB is a critical component of the innate immune response and is strongly induced downstream of most pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to the production of IFN-β as well as a number of inflammatory chemokines and interleukins. To establish persistent infection, viruses have evolved various mechanisms to counteract the host NF-κB pathway. In the present study, for the first time, HSV-1 UL24 was demonstrated to inhibit the activation of NF

  17. My journey to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas

    2013-02-01

    I completed my medical studies at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm but have always been devoted to basic research. My longstanding interest is to understand fundamental DNA repair mechanisms in the fields of cancer therapy, inherited human genetic disorders and ancient DNA. I initially measured DNA decay, including rates of base loss and cytosine deamination. I have discovered several important DNA repair proteins and determined their mechanisms of action. The discovery of uracil-DNA glycosylase defined a new category of repair enzymes with each specialized for different types of DNA damage. The base excision repair pathway was first reconstituted with human proteins in my group. Cell-free analysis for mammalian nucleotide excision repair of DNA was also developed in my laboratory. I found multiple distinct DNA ligases in mammalian cells, and led the first genetic and biochemical work on DNA ligases I, III and IV. I discovered the mammalian exonucleases DNase III (TREX1) and IV (FEN1). Interestingly, expression of TREX1 was altered in some human autoimmune diseases. I also showed that the mutagenic DNA adduct O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)mG) is repaired without removing the guanine from DNA, identifying a surprising mechanism by which the methyl group is transferred to a residue in the repair protein itself. A further novel process of DNA repair discovered by my research group is the action of AlkB as an iron-dependent enzyme carrying out oxidative demethylation. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  19. DnaA protein DNA-binding domain binds to Hda protein to promote inter-AAA+ domain interaction involved in regulatory inactivation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyamura, Kenji; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2011-08-19

    Chromosomal replication is initiated from the replication origin oriC in Escherichia coli by the active ATP-bound form of DnaA protein. The regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA) system, a complex of the ADP-bound Hda and the DNA-loaded replicase clamp, represses extra initiations by facilitating DnaA-bound ATP hydrolysis, yielding the inactive ADP-bound form of DnaA. However, the mechanisms involved in promoting the DnaA-Hda interaction have not been determined except for the involvement of an interaction between the AAA+ domains of the two. This study revealed that DnaA Leu-422 and Pro-423 residues within DnaA domain IV, including a typical DNA-binding HTH motif, are specifically required for RIDA-dependent ATP hydrolysis in vitro and that these residues support efficient interaction with the DNA-loaded clamp·Hda complex and with Hda in vitro. Consistently, substitutions of these residues caused accumulation of ATP-bound DnaA in vivo and oriC-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Leu-422 plays a more important role in these activities than Pro-423. By contrast, neither of these residues is crucial for DNA replication from oriC, although they are highly conserved in DnaA orthologues. Structural analysis of a DnaA·Hda complex model suggested that these residues make contact with residues in the vicinity of the Hda AAA+ sensor I that participates in formation of a nucleotide-interacting surface. Together, the results show that functional DnaA-Hda interactions require a second interaction site within DnaA domain IV in addition to the AAA+ domain and suggest that these interactions are crucial for the formation of RIDA complexes that are active for DnaA-ATP hydrolysis.

  20. DnaA Protein DNA-binding Domain Binds to Hda Protein to Promote Inter-AAA+ Domain Interaction Involved in Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyamura, Kenji; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal replication is initiated from the replication origin oriC in Escherichia coli by the active ATP-bound form of DnaA protein. The regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA) system, a complex of the ADP-bound Hda and the DNA-loaded replicase clamp, represses extra initiations by facilitating DnaA-bound ATP hydrolysis, yielding the inactive ADP-bound form of DnaA. However, the mechanisms involved in promoting the DnaA-Hda interaction have not been determined except for the involvement of an interaction between the AAA+ domains of the two. This study revealed that DnaA Leu-422 and Pro-423 residues within DnaA domain IV, including a typical DNA-binding HTH motif, are specifically required for RIDA-dependent ATP hydrolysis in vitro and that these residues support efficient interaction with the DNA-loaded clamp·Hda complex and with Hda in vitro. Consistently, substitutions of these residues caused accumulation of ATP-bound DnaA in vivo and oriC-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Leu-422 plays a more important role in these activities than Pro-423. By contrast, neither of these residues is crucial for DNA replication from oriC, although they are highly conserved in DnaA orthologues. Structural analysis of a DnaA·Hda complex model suggested that these residues make contact with residues in the vicinity of the Hda AAA+ sensor I that participates in formation of a nucleotide-interacting surface. Together, the results show that functional DnaA-Hda interactions require a second interaction site within DnaA domain IV in addition to the AAA+ domain and suggest that these interactions are crucial for the formation of RIDA complexes that are active for DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. PMID:21708944

  1. Mathematical Modeling Predicts that Increased HSV-2 Shedding in HIV-1 Infected Persons Is Due to Poor Immunologic Control in Ganglia and Genital Mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T Schiffer

    Full Text Available A signature feature of HIV infection is poor control of herpes virus infections, which reactivate from latency and cause opportunistic infections. While the general mechanism underlying this observation is deficient CD4+T-cell function, it is unknown whether increased severity of herpes virus infections is due primarily to poor immune control in latent or lytic sites of infection, or whether CD4+ immunodeficiency leads to more critical downstream deficits in humoral or cell-mediated immunologic responses. Here we compare genital shedding patterns of herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2 in 98 HIV infected and 98 HIV uninfected men matched on length of infection, HSV-1 serostatus and nationality. We demonstrate that high copy HSV-2 shedding is more frequent in HIV positive men, particularly in participants with CD4+ T-cell count <200/μL. Genital shedding is more frequent due to higher rate of shedding episodes, as well as a higher proportion of prolonged shedding episodes. Peak episode viral load was not found to differ between HIV infected and uninfected participants regardless of CD4+ T-cell count. We simulate a mathematical model which recapitulates these findings and identifies that rate of HSV-2 release from neural tissue increases, duration of mucosal cytolytic immune protection decreases, and cell-free viral lifespan increases in HIV infected participants. These results suggest that increased HSV-2 shedding in HIV infected persons may be caused by impaired immune function in both latent and lytic tissue compartments, with deficits in clearance of HSV-2 infected cells and extracellular virus.

  2. Characteristics of HIV-1 discordant couples enrolled in a trial of HSV-2 suppression to reduce HIV-1 transmission: the partners study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairam R Lingappa

    Full Text Available The Partners HSV-2/HIV-1 Transmission Study (Partners Study is a phase III, placebo-controlled trial of daily acyclovir for genital herpes (HSV-2 suppression among HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected persons to reduce HIV-1 transmission to their HIV-1 susceptible partners, which requires recruitment of HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples. We describe the baseline characteristics of this cohort.HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples, in which the HIV-1 infected partner was HSV-2 seropositive, had a CD4 count >or=250 cells/mcL and was not on antiretroviral therapy, were enrolled at 14 sites in East and Southern Africa. Demographic, behavioral, clinical and laboratory characteristics were assessed.Of the 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples enrolled, 67% of the HIV-1 infected partners were women. Couples had cohabitated for a median of 5 years (range 2-9 with 28% reporting unprotected sex in the month prior to enrollment. Among HIV-1 susceptible participants, 86% of women and 59% of men were HSV-2 seropositive. Other laboratory-diagnosed sexually transmitted infections were uncommon (500 relative to <350, respectively, p<0.001.The Partners Study successfully enrolled a cohort of 3408 heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa at high risk for HIV-1 transmission. Follow-up of this cohort will evaluate the efficacy of acyclovir for HSV-2 suppression in preventing HIV-1 transmission and provide insights into biological and behavioral factors determining heterosexual HIV-1 transmission.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00194519.

  3. Intravaginal infection with herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) generates a functional effector memory T cell population that persists in the murine genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Vera A; Rosenthal, Kenneth L

    2010-12-01

    Although the female genital tract is the main portal of entry for sexually transmitted infections in women, we still have limited understanding of the generation, maintenance and characteristics of memory T cells in the local tissue. Here, we utilized a mouse model of intravaginal HSV-2 infection and tetramers against the immunodominant HSV glycoprotein B epitope recognized by CD8+ T cells to examine the generation, maintenance and characteristics of anti-HSV memory T cells in the genital tract following acute infection. Our results show that the highest percentage of HSVgB-specific CD8+ T cells was found in the genital tract compared to the spleen or iliac lymphnode. Indeed, although the actual number of CD8+ T cells contracted following viral clearance, approximately one quarter of the CD8+ population that remained in the genital tissue was HSVgB-specific. Memory gB-tetramer+CD8 T cells in the genital tract were positive for CD127 and KLRG1 and negative for CD62L and CCR7, thus confirming that HSV-specific CD8 cells were effector memory T cells that lack the capacity for homing to lymphoid tissues. Functionally, both memory CD8+ and CD4+ HSV-specific populations in the genital tract produced IFNγ when stimulated in vitro and CD4+ cells also produced TNFα. Genital HSVgB-specific memory T cells expressed tissue-homing integrins CD103 (αE integrin) and CD49a (VLA-1 or α1 integrin). Our findings suggest that HSV-specific memory T cells are retained in the genital tract, poised to act as an early line of defense against future virus encounter. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Co-infections of HIV, syphilis and HSV-2 among men who have sex with men at the voluntary HIV counseling and testing clinics in Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Tang, H F; Ning, Z; Zheng, H; He, N; Zhang, Y Y

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To understand the prevalence rates of HIV-syphilis and HIV-herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) co-infections and related factors among men having sex with men (MSM) who had visited the voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) clinics in Shanghai, China. Methods: 756 eligible MSM who attended the VCT clinics of Shanghai Municipality and Putuo district during March to August, 2015 were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional survey with questionnaire interview and blood testing for HIV, syphilis and HSV-2. Results: A total of 732 participants completed a valid questionnaire survey. The prevalence rates were 3.3 % (24/732) for HIV/Syphilis co-infection, 1.9 % (14/732) for HIV/HSV-2 co-infection, and 0.7 % (5/732) for HIV/Syphilis/HSV-2 co-infection, respectively. HIV prevalence appeared significantly higher among syphilis-infected participants (45.3 % , 24/53) than those without Syphilis (7.2 % , 61/679) (χ(2)=63.11, P Syphilis co-infection. Those participants who had high middle school or lower levels of education ( OR =6.87, 95 %CI : 1.86-25.42; OR =9.82, 95 %CI : 2.25-42.85) were under risk on HIV and HSV-2 co-infection. Conclusion: HIV/Syphilis and HIV/HSV-2 co-infection were seen among MSM who attended the VCT clinics in Shanghai that called for special attention, especially on migrants, those with low education or illicit drug users.

  5. The nectin-1α transmembrane domain, but not the cytoplasmic tail, influences cell fusion induced by HSV-1 glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, Ravi P.; Dunn, Jennifer E.; Geraghty, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Nectin-1 is a receptor for herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, and a cellular adhesion molecule. To study domains of nectin-1α involved in cell fusion, we measured the ability of nectin-1α/nectin-2α chimeras, nectin-1α/CD4 chimeras, and transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail mutants of nectin-1α to promote cell fusion induced by HSV-1 glycoproteins. Our results demonstrate that only chimeras and mutants containing the entire V-like domain and a link to the plasma membrane conferred cell-fusion activity. The transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of nectin-1 were not required for any viral receptor or cell adhesion function tested. Cellular cytoplasmic factors that bind to the nectin-1α cytoplasmic tail, therefore, did not influence virus entry or cell fusion. Interestingly, the efficiency of cell fusion was reduced when membrane-spanning domains of nectin-1α and gD were replaced by glycosylphosphatidylinositol tethers, indicating that transmembrane domains may play a modulatory role in the gD/nectin-1α interaction in fusion

  6. FSL-1, a bacterial-derived toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist, enhances resistance to experimental HSV-2 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyles Richard B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 is a leading cause of genital ulceration that can predispose individuals to an increased risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections. There are no approved HSV-2 vaccines and current suppressive therapies require daily compound administration that does not prevent all recurrences. A promising experimental strategy is the use of toll-like receptor (TLR agonists to induce an innate immune response that provides resistance to HSV-2 infection. Previous studies showed that anti-herpetic activity varied based on origin of the agonists and activation of different TLR indicating that activity likely occurs through elaboration of a specific innate immune response. To test the hypothesis, we evaluated the ability of a bacterial-derived TLR2/6 agonist (FSL-1 to increase resistance to experimental genital HSV-2 infection. Methods Vaginal application of FSL-1 at selected doses and times was evaluated to identify potential increased resistance to genital HSV-2 infection in the mouse model. The FSL-1 induced cytokine profile was quantified using kinetically collected vaginal lavages. Additionally, cytokine elaboration and organ weights were evaluated after single or multiple FSL-1 doses to establish a preliminary safety profile. Human vaginal EC cultures were used to confirm the mouse model outcomes. Results The results showed that vaginally-applied FSL-1 created an environment resistant to a 25-fold higher HSV-2 challenge dose. Mechanistically, vaginal FSL-1 application led to transient elaboration of cytokines linked to anti-herpetic innate immune responses. No gross local or peripheral immunotoxicity was observed even after multiple dosing. FSL-1 also created an anti-herpetic environment in cultures of human vaginal epithelial cells (EC. Conclusion The results showed, for the first time, that the bacterial-derived TLR2/6 agonist FSL-1 induced significant resistance to HSV-2 infection when

  7. DNA labeled during phosphonoacetate inhibition and following its reversal in herpesvirus infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Human embryonic lung cells were pre-equilibrated with phosphonoacetate and 32 P orthophosphate label, then infected with phosphonoacetate-sensitive herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1. Analyses of viral DNA produced in these cells showed the following. i) Viral DNA was synthesized in infected cells exposed to 100 μg of the drug per ml of medium but not in cells exposed to four-fold higher concentrations of the drug. ii) At 300 μg/ml a region of the DNA between 0.58 and 0.69 map units became transiently labeled, but the restriction endonuclease fragment containing these sequences migrated more slowly than the corresponding fragment from virion DNA. iii) Viral DNA extracted from infected cells 1.5 hours post drug withdrawal (300 μg/ml) was preferentially labeled in 2 regions of the genome mapping between 0.17 and 0.23 and 0.58-0.69 map units. This finding is in agreement with a report of Friedman et al. suggesting that HSV DNA contains two different sites if initiation. In addition a 4.8 x 10 6 molecular weight fragment was also preferentially labeled. This fragment could represent a smaller, aberrantly migrating fragment from the 0.17-0.27 map unit region of the DNA. iv) Viral DNA extracted from infected cells at longer intervals after drug withdrawal showed an increasing gradient of radioactivity progressively labeling the genome. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that viral DNA has at least two sites of initiation of DNA synthesis and that both sites are within the L component of the DNA. Alternatively, the results could be interpreted as two sites of localized synthesis (repair) that are detected at high concentrations of phosphonoacetate and immediately following reversal of inhibition of DNA synthesis. The results do not exclude the possibility that secondary sites in both L and S are utilized late in infection or in untreated cells. (Author)

  8. TRIM56-mediated monoubiquitination of cGAS for cytosolic DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Gil Ju; Kim, Charlotte; Shin, Woo-Jin; Sklan, Ella H; Eoh, Hyungjin; Jung, Jae U

    2018-02-09

    Intracellular nucleic acid sensors often undergo sophisticated modifications that are critical for the regulation of antimicrobial responses. Upon recognition of DNA, the cytosolic sensor cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) produces the second messenger cGAMP, which subsequently initiates downstream signaling to induce interferon-αβ (IFNαβ) production. Here we report that TRIM56 E3 ligase-induced monoubiquitination of cGAS is important for cytosolic DNA sensing and IFNαβ production to induce anti-DNA viral immunity. TRIM56 induces the Lys335 monoubiquitination of cGAS, resulting in a marked increase of its dimerization, DNA-binding activity, and cGAMP production. Consequently, TRIM56-deficient cells are defective in cGAS-mediated IFNαβ production upon herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection. Furthermore, TRIM56-deficient mice show impaired IFNαβ production and high susceptibility to lethal HSV-1 infection but not to influenza A virus infection. This adds TRIM56 as a crucial component of the cytosolic DNA sensing pathway that induces anti-DNA viral innate immunity.

  9. Residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, I.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the residual gas composition in vacuum systems by a special mass spectrometric method was presented. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its application in thin film technology was discussed. Results, partial pressure versus time curves as well as the line spectra of the residual gases in case of the vaporization of a Ti-Pd-Au alloy were demonstrated together with the possible construction schemes of QMS residual gas analysers. (Sz.J.)

  10. Tumor regression induced by intratumor therapy with a disabled infectious single cycle (DISC) herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector, DISC/HSV/murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, correlates with antigen-specific adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Selman A; Lynam, June; McLean, Cornelia S; Entwisle, Claire; Loudon, Peter; Rojas, José M; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Li, Geng; Mian, Shahid; Rees, Robert C

    2002-04-01

    Direct intratumor injection of a disabled infectious single cycle HSV-2 virus encoding the murine GM-CSF gene (DISC/mGM-CSF) into established murine colon carcinoma CT26 tumors induced a significant delay in tumor growth and complete tumor regression in up to 70% of animals. Pre-existing immunity to HSV did not reduce the therapeutic efficacy of DISC/mGM-CSF, and, when administered in combination with syngeneic dendritic cells, further decreased tumor growth and increased the incidence of complete tumor regression. Direct intratumor injection of DISC/mGM-CSF also inhibited the growth of CT26 tumor cells implanted on the contralateral flank or seeded into the lungs following i.v. injection of tumor cells (experimental lung metastasis). Proliferation of splenocytes in response to Con A was impaired in progressor and tumor-bearer, but not regressor, mice. A potent tumor-specific CTL response was generated from splenocytes of all mice with regressing, but not progressing tumors following in vitro peptide stimulation; this response was specific for the gp70 AH-1 peptide SPSYVYHQF and correlated with IFN-gamma, but not IL-4 cytokine production. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells from regressor splenocytes before in vitro stimulation with the relevant peptide abolished their cytolytic activity, while depletion of CD4(+) T cells only partially inhibited CTL generation. Tumor regression induced by DISC/mGM-CSF virus immunotherapy provides a unique model for evaluating the immune mechanism(s) involved in tumor rejection, upon which tumor immunotherapy regimes may be based.

  11. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infectivity with a broad range of lectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Vestergaard, B F

    1991-01-01

    Five lectins with specificity for N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 and HSV-1 infectivity in vitro. HIV-1 isolate HTLVIIIB was preincubated with lectin and subsequently inoculated onto MT-4 cells. Lectins specific for N-linked oligosaccharides blocked HIV infe...

  12. Prostate-Specific and Tumor-Specific Targeting of an Oncolytic HSV-1 Amplicon/Helper Virus for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    regulation HSV-1 amplicon and recombinant viruses Molecular cloning Cell culture/gene transfection Xenograft mouse model Histology 20...no herpetic lesions were seen in CMV-ICP4-143T–treated and CMV-ICP4-145T– treated animals, although some gastritis developed 28 days after the viral

  13. HSV-1 interaction to 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate in mouse-derived DRG explant and profiles of inflammatory markers during virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharthiya, H.; Seng, C.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Tiwari, V.; Fornaro, M.

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and the associated inflammatory response in the nervous system remain poorly understood. Using mouse-derived ex vivo dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explant model and single cell neurons (SCNs), in this study, we provided a visual evidence for

  14. Noninvasive theranostic imaging of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy in liver cancer by folate-targeted quantum dot-based liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shao, D.; Li, J.; Pan, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, X.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, H.; Chen, L.

    2015-01-01

    Theranostics is emerging as a popular strategy for cancer therapy; thanks to the development of nano-technology. In this work, we have combined an HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene system and near-infrared quantum dots, as the former is quite effective in liver cancer treatment and the latter facilitates

  15. Design and Integration of an All-Magnetic Attitude Control System for FASTSAT-HSV01's Multiple Pointing Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKock, Brandon; Sanders, Devon; Vanzwieten, Tannen; Capo-Lugo, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    The FASTSAT-HSV01 spacecraft is a microsatellite with magnetic torque rods as it sole attitude control actuator. FASTSAT s multiple payloads and mission functions require the Attitude Control System (ACS) to maintain Local Vertical Local Horizontal (LVLH)-referenced attitudes without spin-stabilization, while the pointing errors for some attitudes be significantly smaller than the previous best-demonstrated for this type of control system. The mission requires the ACS to hold multiple stable, unstable, and non-equilibrium attitudes, as well as eject a 3U CubeSat from an onboard P-POD and recover from the ensuing tumble. This paper describes the Attitude Control System, the reasons for design choices, how the ACS integrates with the rest of the spacecraft, and gives recommendations for potential future applications of the work.

  16. Broadly reactive human CD8 T cells that recognize an epitope conserved between VZV, HSV and EBV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Chiu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesviruses are important causes of potentially severe chronic infections for which T cells are believed to be necessary for control. In order to examine the role of virus-specific CD8 T cells against Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV, we generated a comprehensive panel of potential epitopes predicted in silico and screened for T cell responses in healthy VZV seropositive donors. We identified a dominant HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope in the VZV ribonucleotide reductase subunit 2 and used a tetramer to analyze the phenotype and function of epitope-specific CD8 T cells. Interestingly, CD8 T cells responding to this VZV epitope also recognized homologous epitopes, not only in the other α-herpesviruses, HSV-1 and HSV-2, but also the γ-herpesvirus, EBV. Responses against these epitopes did not depend on previous infection with the originating virus, thus indicating the cross-reactive nature of this T cell population. Between individuals, the cells demonstrated marked phenotypic heterogeneity. This was associated with differences in functional capacity related to increased inhibitory receptor expression (including PD-1 along with decreased expression of co-stimulatory molecules that potentially reflected their stimulation history. Vaccination with the live attenuated Zostavax vaccine did not efficiently stimulate a proliferative response in this epitope-specific population. Thus, we identified a human CD8 T cell epitope that is conserved in four clinically important herpesviruses but that was poorly boosted by the current adult VZV vaccine. We discuss the concept of a "pan-herpesvirus" vaccine that this discovery raises and the hurdles that may need to be overcome in order to achieve this.

  17. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  18. Interferon Regulator Factor 8 (IRF8 Limits Ocular Pathology during HSV-1 Infection by Restraining the Activation and Expansion of CD8+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Sun

    Full Text Available Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 (IRF8 is constitutively expressed in monocytes and B cell lineages and plays important roles in immunity to pathogens and cancer. Although IRF8 expression is induced in activated T cells, the functional relevance of IRF8 in T cell-mediated immunity is not well understood. In this study, we used mice with targeted deletion of Irf8 in T-cells (IRF8KO to investigate the role of IRF8 in T cell-mediated responses during herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 infection of the eye. In contrast to wild type mice, HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice mounted a more robust anti-HSV-1 immune response, which included marked expansion of HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into the cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG and enhanced elimination of virus within the trigeminal ganglion. However, the consequence of the enhanced immunological response was the development of ocular inflammation, limbitis, and neutrophilic infiltration into the cornea of HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice. Surprisingly, we observed a marked increase in virus-specific memory precursor effector cells (MPEC in IRF8KO mice, suggesting that IRF8 might play a role in regulating the differentiation of effector CD8+ T cells to the memory phenotype. Together, our data suggest that IRF8 might play a role in restraining excess lymphocyte proliferation. Thus, modulating IRF8 levels in T cells can be exploited therapeutically to prevent immune-mediated ocular pathology during autoimmune and infectious diseases of the eye.

  19. Nasal and skin delivery of IC31(®)-adjuvanted recombinant HSV-2 gD protein confers protection against genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizel, Benjamin; Persson, Josefine; Thörn, Karolina; Nagy, Eszter; Harandi, Ali M

    2012-06-19

    Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) remains the leading cause of genital ulcers worldwide. Given the disappointing results of the recent genital herpes vaccine trials in humans, development of novel vaccine strategies capable of eliciting protective mucosal and systemic immune responses to HSV-2 is urgently required. Here we tested the ability of the adjuvant IC31(®) in combination with HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD) used through intranasal (i.n.), intradermal (i.d.), or subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization routes for induction of protective immunity against genital herpes infection in C57BL/6 mice. Immunization with gD plus IC31(®) through all three routes of immunization developed elevated gD-specific serum antibody responses with HSV-2 neutralizing activity. Whereas the skin routes promoted the induction of a mixed IgG2c/IgG1 isotype profile, the i.n. route only elicited IgG1 antibodies. All immunization routes were able to induce gD-specific IgG antibody responses in the vaginas of mice immunized with IC31(®)-adjuvanted gD. Although specific lymphoproliferative responses were observed in splenocytes from mice of most groups vaccinated with IC31(®)-adjuvanted gD, only i.d. immunization resulted in a significant splenic IFN-γ response. Further, immunization with gD plus IC31(®) conferred 80-100% protection against an otherwise lethal vaginal HSV-2 challenge with amelioration of viral replication and disease severity in the vagina. These results warrant further exploration of IC31(®) for induction of protective immunity against genital herpes and other sexually transmitted infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P. (Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston (Australia))

    1989-09-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea.

  1. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea

  2. Modeling DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is life's most amazing molecule. It carries the genetic instructions that almost every organism needs to develop and reproduce. In the human genome alone, there are some three billion DNA base pairs. The most difficult part of teaching DNA structure, however, may be getting students to visualize something as small as a…

  3. Characterization of Hospital Residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Meza, A.; Bonilla Jimenez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the characterization of the solid residuals. A description of the handling of the liquid and gassy waste generated in hospitals is also given, identifying the source where they originate. To achieve the proposed objective the work was divided in three stages: The first one was the planning and the coordination with each hospital center, in this way, to determine the schedule of gathering of the waste can be possible. In the second stage a fieldwork was made; it consisted in gathering the quantitative and qualitative information of the general state of the handling of residuals. In the third and last stage, the information previously obtained was organized to express the results as the production rate per day by bed, generation of solid residuals for sampled services, type of solid residuals and density of the same ones. With the obtained results, approaches are settled down to either determine design parameters for final disposition whether for incineration, trituration, sanitary filler or recycling of some materials, and storage politics of the solid residuals that allow to determine the gathering frequency. The study concludes that it is necessary to improve the conditions of the residuals handling in some aspects, to provide the cleaning personnel of the equipment for gathering disposition and of security, minimum to carry out this work efficiently, and to maintain a control of all the dangerous waste, like sharp or polluted materials. In this way, an appreciable reduction is guaranteed in the impact on the atmosphere. (Author) [es

  4. An indole alkaloid from a tribal folklore inhibits immediate early event in HSV-2 infected cells with therapeutic efficacy in vaginally infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paromita Bag

    Full Text Available Herpes genitalis, caused by HSV-2, is an incurable genital ulcerative disease transmitted by sexual intercourse. The virus establishes life-long latency in sacral root ganglia and reported to have synergistic relationship with HIV-1 transmission. Till date no effective vaccine is available, while the existing therapy frequently yielded drug resistance, toxicity and treatment failure. Thus, there is a pressing need for non-nucleotide antiviral agent from traditional source. Based on ethnomedicinal use we have isolated a compound 7-methoxy-1-methyl-4,9-dihydro-3H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole (HM from the traditional herb Ophiorrhiza nicobarica Balkr, and evaluated its efficacy on isolates of HSV-2 in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxicity (CC50, effective concentrations (EC50 and the mode of action of HM was determined by MTT, plaque reduction, time-of-addition, immunofluorescence (IFA, Western blot, qRT-PCR, EMSA, supershift and co-immunoprecipitation assays; while the in vivo toxicity and efficacy was evaluated in BALB/c mice. The results revealed that HM possesses significant anti-HSV-2 activity with EC50 of 1.1-2.8 µg/ml, and selectivity index of >20. The time kinetics and IFA demonstrated that HM dose dependently inhibited 50-99% of HSV-2 infection at 1.5-5.0 µg/ml at 2-4 h post-infection. Further, HM was unable to inhibit viral attachment or penetration and had no synergistic interaction with acyclovir. Moreover, Western blot and qRT-PCR assays demonstrated that HM suppressed viral IE gene expression, while the EMSA and co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that HM interfered with the recruitment of LSD-1 by HCF-1. The in vivo studies revealed that HM at its virucidal concentration was nontoxic and reduced virus yield in the brain of HSV-2 infected mice in a concentration dependent manner, compared to vaginal tissues. Thus, our results suggest that HM can serve as a prototype to develop non-nucleotide antiviral lead targeting the viral IE

  5. An indole alkaloid from a tribal folklore inhibits immediate early event in HSV-2 infected cells with therapeutic efficacy in vaginally infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Paromita; Ojha, Durbadal; Mukherjee, Hemanta; Halder, Umesh Chandra; Mondal, Supriya; Chandra, Nidhi S; Nandi, Suman; Sharon, Ashoke; Sarkar, Mamta Chawla; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad

    2013-01-01

    Herpes genitalis, caused by HSV-2, is an incurable genital ulcerative disease transmitted by sexual intercourse. The virus establishes life-long latency in sacral root ganglia and reported to have synergistic relationship with HIV-1 transmission. Till date no effective vaccine is available, while the existing therapy frequently yielded drug resistance, toxicity and treatment failure. Thus, there is a pressing need for non-nucleotide antiviral agent from traditional source. Based on ethnomedicinal use we have isolated a compound 7-methoxy-1-methyl-4,9-dihydro-3H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole (HM) from the traditional herb Ophiorrhiza nicobarica Balkr, and evaluated its efficacy on isolates of HSV-2 in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxicity (CC50), effective concentrations (EC50) and the mode of action of HM was determined by MTT, plaque reduction, time-of-addition, immunofluorescence (IFA), Western blot, qRT-PCR, EMSA, supershift and co-immunoprecipitation assays; while the in vivo toxicity and efficacy was evaluated in BALB/c mice. The results revealed that HM possesses significant anti-HSV-2 activity with EC50 of 1.1-2.8 µg/ml, and selectivity index of >20. The time kinetics and IFA demonstrated that HM dose dependently inhibited 50-99% of HSV-2 infection at 1.5-5.0 µg/ml at 2-4 h post-infection. Further, HM was unable to inhibit viral attachment or penetration and had no synergistic interaction with acyclovir. Moreover, Western blot and qRT-PCR assays demonstrated that HM suppressed viral IE gene expression, while the EMSA and co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that HM interfered with the recruitment of LSD-1 by HCF-1. The in vivo studies revealed that HM at its virucidal concentration was nontoxic and reduced virus yield in the brain of HSV-2 infected mice in a concentration dependent manner, compared to vaginal tissues. Thus, our results suggest that HM can serve as a prototype to develop non-nucleotide antiviral lead targeting the viral IE transcription for the

  6. Management of NORM Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA attaches great importance to the dissemination of information that can assist Member States in the development, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of systems, programmes and activities that support the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications, and that address the legacy of past practices and accidents. However, radioactive residues are found not only in nuclear fuel cycle activities, but also in a range of other industrial activities, including: - Mining and milling of metalliferous and non-metallic ores; - Production of non-nuclear fuels, including coal, oil and gas; - Extraction and purification of water (e.g. in the generation of geothermal energy, as drinking and industrial process water; in paper and pulp manufacturing processes); - Production of industrial minerals, including phosphate, clay and building materials; - Use of radionuclides, such as thorium, for properties other than their radioactivity. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) may lead to exposures at some stage of these processes and in the use or reuse of products, residues or wastes. Several IAEA publications address NORM issues with a special focus on some of the more relevant industrial operations. This publication attempts to provide guidance on managing residues arising from different NORM type industries, and on pertinent residue management strategies and technologies, to help Member States gain perspectives on the management of NORM residues

  7. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A N; Webster, G A [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P J [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  8. DNA Camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-08

    1 DNA Camouflage Supplementary Information Bijan Zakeri1,2*, Timothy K. Lu1,2*, Peter A. Carr2,3* 1Department of Electrical Engineering and...ll.mit.edu). Distribution A: Public Release   2 Supplementary Figure 1 DNA camouflage with the 2-state device. (a) In the presence of Cre, DSD-2[α...10 1 + Cre 1 500 1,000 length (bp) chromatogram alignment template − Cre   4 Supplementary Figure 3 DNA camouflage with a switchable

  9. Establishment of an indirect solid phase radioimmunoassay for the detection of HSV-type I-specific antibodies in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchow, H.

    1982-01-01

    An indirect solid phase radioimmunoassay (IFRIA) was developed for the detection in human serum of antibodies against Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type I. The IFRIA was carried out according to the 'sandwich' principle. In comparison to other serological routine methods, especially the complement binding reaction (CBR) commonly used for HSV diagnostic, the IFRIA excelled by being a test which is quick to carry out and by lacking the subjectivity by the researcher in the evaluation of the test results, as well as by the use of patients serum which had not been previously treated. Comparative studies between IFRIA and CBR resulted in no agreement between the respectively attained maximum titer. As a reason for this the different qualities of the antibodies which can be determined by each test were discussed. For the addition of this test to the routine diagnostic further studies in the preservation of the specificity of the antigen in the case of longer storage are requisite. (orig.) [de

  10. Mitochondrial DNA copy number threshold in mtDNA depletion myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, S E; Bonilla, E; Samuels, D C; DiMauro, S; Chinnery, P F

    2005-08-09

    The authors measured the absolute amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) within single muscle fibers from two patients with thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency and two healthy controls. TK2 deficient fibers containing more than 0.01 mtDNA/microm3 had residual cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity. This defines the minimum amount of wild-type mtDNA molecules required to maintain COX activity in skeletal muscle and provides an explanation for the mosaic histochemical pattern seen in patients with mtDNA depletion syndrome.

  11. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts. PMID:25278776

  12. Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    involved in DNA unwinding to form a CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand. The protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) is recognized by the PAM-interacting domain. The loop-lysine helix-loop motif in this domain contains three conserved lysine residues that are inserted in a dentate manner...... and the crRNA-DNA hybrid, avoiding DNA re-annealing. Mutations in key residues reveal a mechanism linking the PAM and DNA nuclease sites. Analysis of the Cpf1 structures proposes a singular working model of RNA-guided DNA cleavage, suggesting new avenues for redesign of Cpf1....

  13. Mucosal HSV-2 specific CD8+ T-cells represent containment of prior viral shedding rather than a correlate of future protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Tisdell Schiffer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is largely unknown why certain infected hosts shed Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2 more frequently and have more severe disease manifestations than others. One idea is that different density or functional capacity of tissue resident effector memory CD8+ T-cells between infected persons may explain phenotypic variability. To generate hypotheses for contrasting shedding patterns in different infected hosts, a spatial mathematical model was employed to evaluate the effects of variability in tissue resident effector memory CD8+ T-cell response, and HSV-2 replication and spread, on viral shedding rate. Model simulations suggest that high levels of CD8+ T-cells in the mucosa do not necessarily indicate a protective phenotype but rather an effective response to recent shedding. Moreover, higher CD8+ T-cell expansion rate and lower viral replication rate, which correlate with better short-term control, may have only a minor impact on long term shedding rates. Breakthrough shedding occurs under all sets of model parameter assumptions, because CD8+ T-cell levels only surpass a protective threshold in a minority of genital tract mucosal micro-regions. If CD8+ T-cell levels are artificially increased using an immunotherapeutic approach, better control of shedding is predicted to occur for at least a year. These results highlight the complex co-dependent relationship between HSV-2 and tissue resident CD8+ lymphocytes during the course of natural infection.

  14. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) as a coronary atherosclerosis risk factor in HIV-infected men: multicenter AIDS cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Rulin C; Budoff, Matthew; Hodis, Howard N; Rinaldo, Charles R; Jenkins, Frank J; Jacobson, Lisa P; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Taiwo, Babafemi; Post, Wendy S; Margolick, Joseph B; Detels, Roger

    2012-08-01

    We assessed associations of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and -2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) infection with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in 291 HIV-infected men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by non-contrast coronary CT imaging. Markers for herpesviruses infection were measured in frozen specimens collected 10-12 years prior to case identification. Multivariable logistic regression models and ordinal logistic regression models were performed. HSV-2 seropositivity was associated with coronary atherosclerosis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=4.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.58-10.85) after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, cardiovascular risk factors, and HIV infection related factors. Infection with a greater number of herpesviruses was associated with elevated CAC levels (AOR=1.58, 95% CI=1.06-2.36). Our findings suggest HSV-2 may be a risk factor for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in HIV-infected men. Infection with multiple herpesviruses may contribute to the increased burden of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hibiscus sabdariffa L. and Its Bioactive Constituents Exhibit Antiviral Activity against HSV-2 and Anti-enzymatic Properties against Urease by an ESI-MS Based Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif T. S. Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For decades, Hibiscus sabdariffa L. and its phytochemicals have been shown to possess a wide range of pharmacologic properties. In this study, aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (AEHS and its bioactive constituent protocatechuic acid (PCA, have been evaluated in vitro for their antiviral activity against HSV-2 clinical isolates and anti-enzymatic activity against urease. Antiherpetic activity was evaluated by the titer reduction assay in infected Vero cells, and cytotoxicity was evaluated by the neutral red dye-uptake method. Anti-urease activity was determined by a developed Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS-based assay. PCA showed potent anti-HSV-2 activity compared with that of acyclovir, with EC50 values of 0.92 and 1.43 µg∙mL−1, respectively, and selectivity indices > 217 and > 140, respectively. For the first time, AEHS was shown to exert anti-urease inhibition activity, with an IC50 value of 82.4 µg∙mL−1. This, combined with its safety, could facilitate its use in practical applications as a natural urease inhibitor. Our results present Hibiscus sabdariffa L. and its bioactive compound PCA as potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of HSV-2 infection and the treatment of diseases caused by urease-producing bacteria.

  16. Hibiscus sabdariffa L. and Its Bioactive Constituents Exhibit Antiviral Activity against HSV-2 and Anti-enzymatic Properties against Urease by an ESI-MS Based Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Švajdlenka, Emil; Berchová-Bímová, Kateřina

    2017-04-30

    For decades, Hibiscus sabdariffa L. and its phytochemicals have been shown to possess a wide range of pharmacologic properties. In this study, aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (AEHS) and its bioactive constituent protocatechuic acid (PCA), have been evaluated in vitro for their antiviral activity against HSV-2 clinical isolates and anti-enzymatic activity against urease. Antiherpetic activity was evaluated by the titer reduction assay in infected Vero cells, and cytotoxicity was evaluated by the neutral red dye-uptake method. Anti-urease activity was determined by a developed Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS)-based assay. PCA showed potent anti-HSV-2 activity compared with that of acyclovir, with EC 50 values of 0.92 and 1.43 µg∙mL -1 , respectively, and selectivity indices > 217 and > 140, respectively. For the first time, AEHS was shown to exert anti-urease inhibition activity, with an IC 50 value of 82.4 µg∙mL -1 . This, combined with its safety, could facilitate its use in practical applications as a natural urease inhibitor. Our results present Hibiscus sabdariffa L. and its bioactive compound PCA as potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of HSV-2 infection and the treatment of diseases caused by urease-producing bacteria.

  17. Designing with residual materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walhout, W.; Wever, R.; Blom, E.; Addink-Dölle, L.; Tempelman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many entrepreneurial businesses have attempted to create value based on the residual material streams of third parties. Based on ‘waste’ materials they designed products, around which they built their company. Such activities have the potential to yield sustainable products. Many of such companies

  18. Unsupervised semantic indoor scene classification for robot vision based on context of features using Gist and HSV-SIFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madokoro, H.; Yamanashi, A.; Sato, K.

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents an unsupervised scene classification method for actualizing semantic recognition of indoor scenes. Background and foreground features are respectively extracted using Gist and color scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) as feature representations based on context. We used hue, saturation, and value SIFT (HSV-SIFT) because of its simple algorithm with low calculation costs. Our method creates bags of features for voting visual words created from both feature descriptors to a two-dimensional histogram. Moreover, our method generates labels as candidates of categories for time-series images while maintaining stability and plasticity together. Automatic labeling of category maps can be realized using labels created using adaptive resonance theory (ART) as teaching signals for counter propagation networks (CPNs). We evaluated our method for semantic scene classification using KTH's image database for robot localization (KTH-IDOL), which is popularly used for robot localization and navigation. The mean classification accuracies of Gist, gray SIFT, one class support vector machines (OC-SVM), position-invariant robust features (PIRF), and our method are, respectively, 39.7, 58.0, 56.0, 63.6, and 79.4%. The result of our method is 15.8% higher than that of PIRF. Moreover, we applied our method for fine classification using our original mobile robot. We obtained mean classification accuracy of 83.2% for six zones.

  19. Uptake of 131I-FIAU in BMSCs infected by adenovirus vector-mediated HSV1-TK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Binqing; Wu Tao; Sun Xun; An Rui

    2010-01-01

    Report gene HSV1-TK and therapy gene were connected by IRES, and recombinant adenovirus vector Ad5-TK-IRES-BDNF-EGFP was constructed and infected with BMSCs at MOI of 0, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250, with the control recombinant adenovirus vector of Ad5-EGFP. Green fluorescence cell positive rate was observed under the microscopy. MTT assay was used to determine the cell proliferation. bFGF and EGF were used to induce the BMSCs, and RQ-PCR to determine target gene expression in infection BMSCs. Uptake of 131 I-FIAU was assessed by gamma counter. The data were processed by SPSS11.code. Recombinant adenovirus at MOI 150 had high infectionefficiency and low toxic in BMSCs. There was a strong relation between the mRNA expression of TK and BDNF in infection BMSCs. The significance between the infection BMSCs and control BMSCs for uptake of 131 I-FIAU at all the time points was t=23.06-173.83 and P 131 I-FIAU. This suggests a suitable gene vector for tracing genetically modified stem cells. (authors)

  20. Presence of herpesvirus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with tick-borne encephalitis and enteroviral meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labská, Klára; Roubalová, Kateřina; Pícha, Dušan; Marešová, Vilma

    2015-07-01

    Reactivation of HHVs in the CNS due to inflammation has not been well described yet. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of HHV DNA detection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of immunocompetent patients with meningoencephalitis of other than HHV origin. The secondary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of herpesvirus co-infection on the clinical course and patient outcome. Ninety-six patients with clinically and laboratory proven tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and 77 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of enteroviral meningitis (EVM), along with a control group of 107 patients without evidence of inflammation in the CSF were retrospectively tested by nested PCR for the presence of DNA of the neurotropic herpesviruses HSV1, HSV2, VZV, and HHV6 in the CSF. The clinical course, laboratory tests, antiviral treatment, and neurological complications in a 6-month follow-up were compared between the groups positive or negative for HHV DNA in the CSF. HHV DNA was found in the CSF of 12 (6.9%) patients (6.3% and 7.8% in the TBE and EVM groups, respectively) and in 1 (0.9%) control patient. None of the patients had recent blisters or rash. The clinical course was comparably mild in all patients. No permanent neurological sequelae were observed. Only the CSF total protein level was significantly higher in HHV DNA-positive than in HHV-negative patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  2. Hyperstretching DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, Koen; Biebricher, Andreas S.; Sebregts, Maarten; Ten Bensel, Brian; Peterman, Erwin J.G.; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heller, Iddo; Storm, Cornelis; Van Der Schoot, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA is highly susceptible to changes by mechanical and biochemical cues in vivo and in vitro. In particular, large increases in base pair spacing compared to regular B-DNA are effected by mechanical (over)stretching and by intercalation of compounds that are widely

  3. From nonspecific DNA-protein encounter complexes to the prediction of DNA-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Gao

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA-protein interactions are involved in many essential biological activities. Because there is no simple mapping code between DNA base pairs and protein amino acids, the prediction of DNA-protein interactions is a challenging problem. Here, we present a novel computational approach for predicting DNA-binding protein residues and DNA-protein interaction modes without knowing its specific DNA target sequence. Given the structure of a DNA-binding protein, the method first generates an ensemble of complex structures obtained by rigid-body docking with a nonspecific canonical B-DNA. Representative models are subsequently selected through clustering and ranking by their DNA-protein interfacial energy. Analysis of these encounter complex models suggests that the recognition sites for specific DNA binding are usually favorable interaction sites for the nonspecific DNA probe and that nonspecific DNA-protein interaction modes exhibit some similarity to specific DNA-protein binding modes. Although the method requires as input the knowledge that the protein binds DNA, in benchmark tests, it achieves better performance in identifying DNA-binding sites than three previously established methods, which are based on sophisticated machine-learning techniques. We further apply our method to protein structures predicted through modeling and demonstrate that our method performs satisfactorily on protein models whose root-mean-square Calpha deviation from native is up to 5 A from their native structures. This study provides valuable structural insights into how a specific DNA-binding protein interacts with a nonspecific DNA sequence. The similarity between the specific DNA-protein interaction mode and nonspecific interaction modes may reflect an important sampling step in search of its specific DNA targets by a DNA-binding protein.

  4. Production of bioactive soluble interleukin-15 in complex with interleukin-15 receptor alpha from a conditionally-replicating oncolytic HSV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Gaston

    Full Text Available Oncolytic type-1 herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs lacking the γ134.5 neurovirulence gene are being evaluated for treatment of a variety of malignancies. oHSVs replicate within and directly kill permissive cancer cells. To augment their anti-tumor activity, oHSVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory molecules, including cytokines, to elicit tumor-specific immune responses. Interleukin-15 (IL-15 holds potential as an immunotherapeutic cytokine because it has been demonstrated to promote both natural killer (NK cell-mediated and CD8(+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The purpose of these studies was to engineer an oHSV producing bioactive IL-15. Two oHSVs were constructed encoding murine (mIL-15 alone (J100 or with the mIL-15 receptor α (mIL-15Rα, J100D to determine whether co-expression of these proteins is required for production of bioactive mIL-15 from oHSV. The following were demonstrated: i both oHSVs retain replication competence and cytotoxicity in permissive tumor cell lines. ii Enhanced production of mIL-15 was detected in cell lysates of neuro-2a cells following J100D infection as compared to J100 infection, suggesting that mIL-15Rα improved mIL-15 production. iii Soluble mIL-15 in complex with mIL-15Rα was detected in supernates from J100D-infected, but not J100-infected, neuro-2a, GL261, and CT-2A cells. These cell lines vary in permissiveness to oHSV replication and cytotoxicity, demonstrating soluble mIL-15/IL-15Rα complex production from J100D was independent of direct oHSV effects. iv The soluble mIL-15/IL-15Rα complex produced by J100D was bioactive, stimulating NK cells to proliferate and reduce the viability of syngeneic GL261 and CT-2A cells. v J100 and J100D were aneurovirulent inasmuch as no neuropathologic effects were documented following direct inoculation into brains of CBA/J mice at up to 1x10(7 plaque forming units. The production of mIL-15/mIL-15Rα from multiple tumor lines, as well

  5. Long term follow up of patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and transfusion of HSV-Tk transduced T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Weissinger

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is one of the curative treatments for hematologic malignancies, but is hampered by severe complications, such as acute or chronic graft-versus-host-disease (aGvHD; cGvHD and infections. CD34-selcetion of stem cells reduces the risk of aGvHD, but also leads to increased infectious complications and relapse. Thus, we studied the efficacy, safety and feasibility of transfer of gene modified donor T-cells shortly after allo-HSCT in two clinical trials between 2002 and 2007 and here we compare the results to unmodified donor leukocyte transfusion (DLI. The aim of these trials was to provide patients with the protection of T-cells after T-cell-depleted allo-HSCT in the matched or mismatched donor setting with an option to delete transduced T-cells, if severe aGvHD occurred within the trial period. Donor-T-cells were transduced with the replication-deficient retrovirus SFCMM-3, expressing HSV-Tk and the truncated LNGFR for selection of transduced cells. Transduced cells were transfused either after day +60 (matched donors or on day +42 (haploidentical donors.Nine patients were included in the first trial (MHH; 2002 until 2007 2 were included in TK007 (2005-2009 and 6 serve as a control group for outcome after haploidentical transplantation without HSV-TK-transduced DLI. Three patients developed acute GvHD, two had grade I of the skin, one had aGvHD on day +131 (post-HSCT; +89 post-HSV-Tk DLI grade II, which was successfully controlled by ganciclovir (GCV. Donor chimerism was stabilized after transfusion of the transduced cells in all patients treated. Functionality of HSV-Tk gene expressing T-cells was shown by loss of bcr-abl gene expression as well as by control of cytomegalovirus-reactivation. To date, 6patients have relapsed and died, 2 after a second HSCT without T-cell depletion or administration of unmodified T-cells. Eleven patients (7 post-HSV-Tk DLI are alive and well to date.

  6. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT + colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references

  7. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  8. Lysine residue 185 of Rad1 is a topological but not a functional counterpart of lysine residue 164 of PCNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niek Wit

    Full Text Available Monoubiquitylation of the homotrimeric DNA sliding clamp PCNA at lysine residue 164 (PCNA(K164 is a highly conserved, DNA damage-inducible process that is mediated by the E2/E3 complex Rad6/Rad18. This ubiquitylation event recruits translesion synthesis (TLS polymerases capable of replicating across damaged DNA templates. Besides PCNA, the Rad6/Rad18 complex was recently shown in yeast to ubiquitylate also 9-1-1, a heterotrimeric DNA sliding clamp composed of Rad9, Rad1, and Hus1 in a DNA damage-inducible manner. Based on the highly similar crystal structures of PCNA and 9-1-1, K185 of Rad1 (Rad1(K185 was identified as the only topological equivalent of PCNA(K164. To investigate a potential role of posttranslational modifications of Rad1(K185 in DNA damage management, we here generated a mouse model with a conditional deletable Rad1(K185R allele. The Rad1(K185 residue was found to be dispensable for Chk1 activation, DNA damage survival, and class switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes as well as recruitment of TLS polymerases during somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. Our data indicate that Rad1(K185 is not a functional counterpart of PCNA(K164.

  9. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Tramontano, Anna; Kryshtafovych, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures

  10. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  11. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Fusion of raft-like lipid bilayers operated by a membranotropic domain of the HSV-type I glycoprotein gH occurs through a cholesterol-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Giuseppe; Falanga, Annarita; Petruk, Ariel Alcides; Merlino, Antonello; Fragneto, Giovanna; Paduano, Luigi; Galdiero, Stefania; D'Errico, Gerardino

    2015-04-21

    A wealth of evidence indicates that lipid rafts are involved in the fusion of the viral lipid envelope with the target cell membrane. However, the interplay between these sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched ordered domains and viral fusion glycoproteins has not yet been clarified. In this work we investigate the molecular mechanism by which a membranotropic fragment of the glycoprotein gH of the Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type I (gH625) drives fusion of lipid bilayers formed by palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC)-sphingomyelin (SM)-cholesterol (CHOL) (1 : 1 : 1 wt/wt/wt), focusing on the role played by each component. The comparative analysis of the liposome fusion assays, Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), spectrofluorimetry, Neutron Reflectivity (NR) and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) experiments, and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations shows that CHOL is fundamental for liposome fusion to occur. In detail, CHOL stabilizes the gH625-bilayer association by specific interactions with the peptide Trp residue. The interaction with gH625 causes an increased order of the lipid acyl chains, whose local rotational motion is significantly hampered. SM plays only a minor role in the process, favoring the propagation of lipid perturbation to the bilayer inner core. The stiffening of the peptide-interacting bilayer leaflet results in an asymmetric perturbation of the membrane, which is locally destabilized thus favoring fusion events. Our results show that viral fusion glycoproteins are optimally suited to exert a high fusogenic activity on lipid rafts and support the relevance of cholesterol as a key player of membrane-related processes.

  13. Sharing Residual Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonara, Emanuela; Guerra, Alice; Parisi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of tort law evaluate the efficiency of liability rules in terms of care and activity levels. A liability regime is optimal when it creates incentives to maximize the value of risky activities net of accident and precaution costs. The allocation of primary and residual liability...... for policy makers and courts in awarding damages in a large number of real-world accident cases....

  14. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  15. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  16. DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Nadrian C.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-01-01

    DNA is the molecule that stores and transmits genetic information in biological systems. The field of DNA nanotechnology takes this molecule out of its biological context and uses its information to assemble structural motifs and then to connect them together. This field has had a remarkable impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and has been revolutionary in our ability to control molecular self-assembly. In this Review, we summarize the approaches used to assemble DNA nanostructures and examine their emerging applications in areas such as biophysics, diagnostics, nanoparticle and protein assembly, biomolecule structure determination, drug delivery and synthetic biology. The introduction of orthogonal interactions into DNA nanostructures is discussed, and finally, a perspective on the future directions of this field is presented.

  17. Chemical composition and anti-herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) activity of extracts from Cornus canadensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Serge; Côté, Isabelle; Pichette, André; Gauthier, Charles; Ouellet, Michaël; Nagau-Lavoie, Francine; Mshvildadze, Vakhtang; Legault, Jean

    2017-02-22

    Many plants of boreal forest of Quebec have been used by Native Americans to treat a variety of microbial infections. However, the antiviral activities of these plants have been seldom evaluated on cellular models to validate their in vitro efficiencies. In this study, Cornus canadensis L. (Cornaceae), a plant used in Native American traditional medicine to treat possible antiviral infections, has been selected for further examination. The plant was extracted by decoction and infusion with water, water/ethanol 1:1 and ethanol to obtain extracts similar to those used by Native Americans. The effects of the extracts were tested on herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) using a plaque reduction assay. Moreover, bioassay-guided fractionation was achieved to isolate bioactive compounds. Water/ethanol 1:1 infusion of C. canadensis leaves were the most active extracts to inhibit virus absorption with EC 50 of about 9 μg mL -1 , whereas for direct mode, both extraction methods using water or water/ethanol 1:1 as solvent were relatively similar with EC 50 ranging from 11 to 17 μg mL -1 . The fractionation led to the identification of active fractions containing hydrolysable tannins. Tellimagrandin I was found the most active compound with an EC 50 of 2.6 μM for the direct mode and 5.0 μM for the absorption mode. Altogether, the results presented in this work support the antiviral activity of Cornus canadensis used in Native American traditional medicine.

  18. Spatial and Temporal Resolution of Global Protein Synthesis during HSV Infection Using Bioorthogonal Precursors and Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwa, Remigiusz A.; O’Hare, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We used pulse-labeling with the methionine analogue homopropargylglycine (HPG) to investigate spatiotemporal aspects of protein synthesis during herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. In vivo incorporation of HPG enables subsequent selective coupling of fluorochrome-capture reagents to newly synthesised proteins. We demonstrate that HPG labeling had no effect on cell viability, on accumulation of test early or late viral proteins, or on overall virus yields. HPG pulse-labeling followed by SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed incorporation into newly synthesised proteins, while parallel processing by in situ cycloaddition revealed new insight into spatiotemporal aspects of protein localisation during infection. A striking feature was the rapid accumulation of newly synthesised proteins not only in a general nuclear pattern but additionally in newly forming sub-compartments represented by small discrete foci. These newly synthesised protein domains (NPDs) were similar in size and morphology to PML domains but were more numerous, and whereas PML domains were progressively disrupted, NPDs were progressively induced and persisted. Immediate-early proteins ICP4 and ICP0 were excluded from NPDs, but using an ICP0 mutant defective in PML disruption, we show a clear spatial relationship between NPDs and PML domains with NPDs frequently forming immediately adjacent and co-joining persisting PML domains. Further analysis of location of the chaperone Hsc70 demonstrated that while NPDs formed early in infection without overt Hsc70 recruitment, later in infection Hsc70 showed pronounced recruitment frequently in a coat-like fashion around NPDs. Moreover, while ICP4 and ICP0 were excluded from NPDs, ICP22 showed selective recruitment. Our data indicate that NPDs represent early recruitment of host and viral de novo translated protein to distinct structural entities which are precursors to the previously described VICE domains involved in protein quality control in the nucleus, and reveal

  19. Luciferase assay to study the activity of a cloned promoter DNA fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Nina; Krauss, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Luciferase based assays have become an invaluable tool for the analysis of cloned promoter DNA fragments, both for verifying the ability of a potential promoter fragment to drive the expression of a luciferase reporter gene in various cellular contexts, and for dissecting binding elements in the promoter. Here, we describe the use of the Dual-Luciferase(®) Reporter Assay System created by Promega (Promega Corporation, Wisconsin, USA) to study the cloned 6.7 kilobases (kb) mouse (m) Tcf3 promoter DNA fragment in mouse embryonic derived neural stem cells (NSC). In this system, the expression of the firefly luciferase driven by the cloned mTcf3 promoter DNA fragment (including transcription initiation sites) is correlated with a co-transfected control reporter expressing Renilla luciferase from the herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase promoter. Using an internal control reporter allows to normalize the activity of the experimental reporter to the internal control, which minimizes experimental variability.

  20. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-01-01

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells

  1. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  2. Genome instabilities arising from ribonucleotides in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hannah L

    2017-08-01

    Genomic DNA is transiently contaminated with ribonucleotide residues during the process of DNA replication through misincorporation by the replicative DNA polymerases α, δ and ε, and by the normal replication process on the lagging strand, which uses RNA primers. These ribonucleotides are efficiently removed during replication by RNase H enzymes and the lagging strand synthesis machinery. However, when ribonucleotides remain in DNA they can distort the DNA helix, affect machineries for DNA replication, transcription and repair, and can stimulate genomic instabilities which are manifest as increased mutation, recombination and chromosome alterations. The genomic instabilities associated with embedded ribonucleotides are considered here, along with a discussion of the origin of the lesions that stimulate particular classes of instabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Machine for compacting solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.

    1981-11-01

    Machine for compacting solid residues, particularly bulky radioactive residues, constituted of a horizontally actuated punch and a fixed compression anvil, in which the residues are first compacted horizontally and then vertically. Its salient characteristic is that the punch and the compression anvil have embossments on the compression side and interpenetrating plates in the compression position [fr

  4. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA–RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; Cantor, Eric J.; Evans, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10−3 s−1 and KM DNA ligase produced only 5′-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a KM ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn2+, but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5′-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3′ side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA. PMID:24203707

  5. Quadratic residues and non-residues selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an account of the classical theory of quadratic residues and non-residues with the goal of using that theory as a lens through which to view the development of some of the fundamental methods employed in modern elementary, algebraic, and analytic number theory. The first three chapters present some basic facts and the history of quadratic residues and non-residues and discuss various proofs of the Law of Quadratic Reciprosity in depth, with an emphasis on the six proofs that Gauss published. The remaining seven chapters explore some interesting applications of the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity, prove some results concerning the distribution and arithmetic structure of quadratic residues and non-residues, provide a detailed proof of Dirichlet’s Class-Number Formula, and discuss the question of whether quadratic residues are randomly distributed. The text is a valuable resource for graduate and advanced undergraduate students as well as for mathematicians interested in number theory.

  6. Escherichia coli DnaE Polymerase Couples Pyrophosphatase Activity to DNA Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lapenta

    Full Text Available DNA Polymerases generate pyrophosphate every time they catalyze a step of DNA elongation. This elongation reaction is generally believed as thermodynamically favoured by the hydrolysis of pyrophosphate, catalyzed by inorganic pyrophosphatases. However, the specific action of inorganic pyrophosphatases coupled to DNA replication in vivo was never demonstrated. Here we show that the Polymerase-Histidinol-Phosphatase (PHP domain of Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III α subunit features pyrophosphatase activity. We also show that this activity is inhibited by fluoride, as commonly observed for inorganic pyrophosphatases, and we identified 3 amino acids of the PHP active site. Remarkably, E. coli cells expressing variants of these catalytic residues of α subunit feature aberrant phenotypes, poor viability, and are subject to high mutation frequencies. Our findings indicate that DNA Polymerases can couple DNA elongation and pyrophosphate hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for the control of DNA extension rate, and suggest a promising target for novel antibiotics.

  7. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  8. GAP junctional intercellular communication confers an enhanced bystander effect as well as a protective effect in HSV-TK/gancyclovir mediated cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wygoda, Marc R.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Davis, Mary A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The 'Bystander Effect' is the phenomenon by which cells which are not transduced with the Herpes Simplex Virus - Thymidine Kinase (HSV-TK) gene are killed by the guanosine analog Gancyclovir (GCV) when they are nearby HSV-TK positive cells. Since currently available gene transfer technologies have a low efficiency (typically less than 10% of cells are transduced), a better understanding of the mechanism underlying the bystander effect is crucial for the success of the HSV-TK/GCV enzyme prodrug gene therapy approach. Gap junctions, which are specialized cell membrane channels allowing the passage of molecules < 1000 daltons in size directly from cell to cell, have been proposed as a possible mediator of the bystander effect. In particular, gap junctions could permit the transfer of toxic metabolites from the HSV-TK positive cells to the bystander cells. Our aim was to assess the role of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in the bystander effect. Materials and Methods: Co-culture of an HSV-TK transduced rat liver epithelial cell line (WB-TK), with either its communication competent parental cell line (WB), or an isogenic cell line differing by its communication incompetence (aB1). The ratios of effector cells (WB-TK) to bystander cells (WB or aB1), were (100(0)), (50(50)), (5(95)), or(0(100)) . These various mixed populations were exposed for 24 hours to 10μM GCV and thereafter placed at clonal density into selective media, allowing for growth of either the bystander (TK negative) cells or the effector (TK-positive) cells. Results: 1) When the effector/bystander ratio was (50(50)) the surviving fraction of the bystander cells was 3.5% and 37% for the WB and aB1, respectively. When the effector/bystander ratio was (5(95)), the surviving fraction was 51% and 65% for the WB and aB1, respectively. Either cell line (WB or aB1) cultured alone was unaffected by GCV. These results demonstrate that the bystander effect is much higher when

  9. TRIM30α Is a Negative-Feedback Regulator of the Intracellular DNA and DNA Virus-Triggered Response by Targeting STING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanming Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled immune responses to intracellular DNA have been shown to induce autoimmune diseases. Homeostasis regulation of immune responses to cytosolic DNA is critical for limiting the risk of autoimmunity and survival of the host. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 30α (TRIM30α was induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection in dendritic cells (DCs. Knockdown or genetic ablation of TRIM30α augmented the type I IFNs and interleukin-6 response to intracellular DNA and DNA viruses. Trim30α-deficient mice were more resistant to infection by DNA viruses. Biochemical analyses showed that TRIM30α interacted with the stimulator of interferon genes (STING, which is a critical regulator of the DNA-sensing response. Overexpression of TRIM30α promoted the degradation of STING via K48-linked ubiquitination at Lys275 through a proteasome-dependent pathway. These findings indicate that E3 ligase TRIM30α is an important negative-feedback regulator of innate immune responses to DNA viruses by targeting STING.

  10. Bioenergy from sisal residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungersen, G. [Dansk Teknologisk Inst. (Denmark); Kivaisi, A.; Rubindamayugi, M. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The main objectives of this report are: To analyse the bioenergy potential of the Tanzanian agro-industries, with special emphasis on the Sisal industry, the largest producer of agro-industrial residues in Tanzania; and to upgrade the human capacity and research potential of the Applied Microbiology Unit at the University of Dar es Salaam, in order to ensure a scientific and technological support for future operation and implementation of biogas facilities and anaerobic water treatment systems. The experimental work on sisal residues contains the following issues: Optimal reactor set-up and performance; Pre-treatment methods for treatment of fibre fraction in order to increase the methane yield; Evaluation of the requirement for nutrient addition; Evaluation of the potential for bioethanol production from sisal bulbs. The processing of sisal leaves into dry fibres (decortication) has traditionally been done by the wet processing method, which consumes considerable quantities of water and produces large quantities of waste water. The Tanzania Sisal Authority (TSA) is now developing a dry decortication method, which consumes less water and produces a waste product with 12-15% TS, which is feasible for treatment in CSTR systems (Continously Stirred Tank Reactors). (EG)

  11. Morphological changes in different populations of bladder afferent neurons detected by herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors with cell-type-specific promoters in mice with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobutaka; Doyal, Mark F; Goins, William F; Kadekawa, Katsumi; Wada, Naoki; Kanai, Anthony J; de Groat, William C; Hirayama, Akihide; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Glorioso, Joseph C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2017-11-19

    Functional and morphological changes in C-fiber bladder afferent pathways are reportedly involved in neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) after spinal cord injury (SCI). This study examined the morphological changes in different populations of bladder afferent neurons after SCI using replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors encoding the mCherry reporter driven by neuronal cell-type-specific promoters. Spinal intact (SI) and SCI mice were injected into the bladder wall with HSV mCherry vectors driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, CGRP promoter, TRPV1 promoter or neurofilament 200 (NF200) promoter. Two weeks after vector inoculation into the bladder wall, L1 and L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were removed bilaterally for immunofluorescent staining using anti-mCherry antibody. The number of CMV promoter vector-labeled neurons was not altered after SCI. The number of CGRP and TRPV1 promoter vector-labeled neurons was significantly increased whereas the number of NF200 vector-labeled neurons was decreased in L6 DRG after SCI. The median size of CGRP promoter-labeled C-fiber neurons was increased from 247.0 in SI mice to 271.3μm 2 in SCI mice whereas the median cell size of TRPV1 promoter vector-labeled neurons was decreased from 245.2 in SI mice to 216.5μm 2 in SCI mice. CGRP and TRPV1 mRNA levels of laser-captured bladder afferent neurons labeled with Fast Blue were significantly increased in SCI mice compared to SI mice. Thus, using a novel HSV vector-mediated neuronal labeling technique, we found that SCI induces expansion of the CGRP- and TRPV1-expressing C-fiber cell population, which could contribute to C-fiber afferent hyperexcitability and NDO after SCI. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of HIV, HSV-2 and pregnancy among high school students in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: a bio-behavioural cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Kharsany, Ayesha B M; Leask, Kerry; Ntombela, Fanelisibonge; Humphries, Hilton; Frohlich, Janet A; Samsunder, Natasha; Grobler, Anneke; Dellar, Rachael; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2014-12-01

    Adolescents in southern African high schools are a key population for HIV prevention interventions. We report on the prevalence of HIV, HSV-2 and pregnancy as indicators of high-risk sexual behaviour among high school students in rural KwaZulu-Natal. Bio-behavioural cross-sectional survey. Students completed a self-administered structured, standardised demographic and sexual behavioural questionnaire. Dried blood spot specimens were collected for HIV and HSV-2 testing. Urine specimens were used for pregnancy testing in female students. A total of 2675 (1423 females, 1252 males) consenting students were enrolled from 14 high schools between September and November 2010. The median age of students was 16 years (IQR 15-18). HIV prevalence was 1.4% (95% CI 0.9 to 1.9) in males and 6.4% (95% CI 4.6 to 8.3) in females (pPregnancy prevalence was 3.6% (95% CI 2.6 to 4.5). Risk factors for prevalent HIV infection in female students included being over 18 years of age (adjusted OR (aOR)=2.67, 95% CI 1.67 to 4.27; ppregnancy (aOR=1.66, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.51; p=0.016) and experience of two or more deaths in the household in the previous year (aOR=1.97, 95% CI 1.13 to 3.44; p=0.016). The high prevalence of HIV, HSV-2 and pregnancy underscore the need for school-based sexual and reproductive health services, and provide further impetus for the inclusion of adolescents in behavioural and biomedical trials with HIV incidence endpoints. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Direct Comparison of Radiolabeled Probes FMAU, FHBG, and FHPG as PET Imaging Agents for HSV1-tk Expression in a Human Breast Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian M. Alauddin

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available 2′-Deoxy-2′-fluoro-5-methyl-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyluracil (FMAU, 9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxy-methyl-butylguanine (FHBG and 9-[(3-fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxymethyl]-guanine (FHPG have been evaluated in a human breast cancer model as potential radiotracers for PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression. In vitro accumulation of [14C]FMAU, [18F]FHBG, and [18F]FHPG in HSV1-tk-expressing cells was 14- to 16-fold (p < .001, 9- to 13-fold (p < .001, and 2- to 3-fold (p < .05 higher than tk-negative control cells, respectively, between 30 and 240 min. Accumulation of FMAU and FHBG in vector-transduced cells was 10- to 14-fold and 6- to 10-fold higher than wild-type cells, respectively. At 2 hr, uptake of [14C]FMAU in tk-positive cells was 6.3-fold and 60-fold higher than [18F]FHBG and [18F]FHPG, respectively. In vivo, tumor uptake of [14C]FMAU in HSV1-tk-expressing cells was 3.7-fold and 5.5-fold (p < .001 higher than tk-negative control cells at 1 and 2 hr, respectively. Tumor uptake of [18F]FHBG was 4.2-fold and 12.6-fold higher (p < .001 than tk-negative cells at the same time points. Incorporation of [14C]FMAU in tk-positive tumor was 18-fold and 24-fold higher (p < .001 than [18F]FHBG at 1 and 2 hr, respectively. Micro-PET images support the biodistribution results and indicate that both [18F]FMAU and [18F]FHBG are useful for imaging HSV1-tk expression in breast cancer. Although FMAU demonstrates higher total incorporation (%dose/g in tumor tissue compared with the other tracers, FHBG is superior in terms of specific accumulation in transfected cells at later time points.

  14. Novel radiosynthesis of PET HSV-tk gene reporter probes [18F]FHPG and [18F]FHBG employing dual Sep-Pak SPE techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Quan; Zheng, Qi-Huang; Fei, Xiangshu; Mock, Bruce H; Hutchins, Gary D

    2003-11-17

    Positron emission tomography (PET) herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene reporter probes 9-[(3-[(18)F]fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine ([(18)F]FHPG) and 9-(4-[(18)F]fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)guanine ([(18)F]FHBG) were prepared by nucleophilic substitution of the appropriate tosylated precursors with [(18)F]KF/Kryptofix 2.2.2 followed by a quick deprotection reaction and purification with a simplified dual Silica Sep-Pak solid-phase extraction (SPE) method in 15-30% radiochemical yield.

  15. Spontaneous unscheduled DNA synthesis in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forell, B.; Myers, L.S. Jr.; Norman, A.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous unscheduled DNA synthesis in human lymphocytes was estimated from measurements of tritiated thymidine incorporation into double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) during incubation of cells in vitro. The contribution of scheduled DNA synthesis to the observed incorporation was reduced by inhibiting replication with hydroxyurea and by separating freshly replicated single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) from repaired ds-DNA by column chromatography. The residual contribution of scheduled DNA synthesis was estimated by observing effects on thymidine incorporation of: (a) increasing the rate of production of apurinic sites, and alternatively, (b) increasing the number of cells in S-phase. Corrections based on estimates of endogenous pool size were also made. The rate of spontaneous unscheduled DNA synthesis is estimated to be 490 +- 120 thymidine molecules incorporated per cell per hour. These results compare favorably with estimates made from rates of depurination and depyrimidination of DNA, measured in molecular systems if we assume thymidine is incorporated by a short patch mechanism which incorporates an average of four bases per lesion

  16. Role of DNA conformation & energetic insights in Msx-1-DNA recognition as revealed by molecular dynamics studies on specific and nonspecific complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachhap, Sangita; Singh, Balvinder

    2015-01-01

    In most of homeodomain-DNA complexes, glutamine or lysine is present at 50th position and interacts with 5th and 6th nucleotide of core recognition region. Molecular dynamics simulations of Msx-1-DNA complex (Q50-TG) and its variant complexes, that is specific (Q50K-CC), nonspecific (Q50-CC) having mutation in DNA and (Q50K-TG) in protein, have been carried out. Analysis of protein-DNA interactions and structure of DNA in specific and nonspecific complexes show that amino acid residues use sequence-dependent shape of DNA to interact. The binding free energies of all four complexes were analysed to define role of amino acid residue at 50th position in terms of binding strength considering the variation in DNA on stability of protein-DNA complexes. The order of stability of protein-DNA complexes shows that specific complexes are more stable than nonspecific ones. Decomposition analysis shows that N-terminal amino acid residues have been found to contribute maximally in binding free energy of protein-DNA complexes. Among specific protein-DNA complexes, K50 contributes more as compared to Q50 towards binding free energy in respective complexes. The sequence dependence of local conformation of DNA enables Q50/Q50K to make hydrogen bond with nucleotide(s) of DNA. The changes in amino acid sequence of protein are accommodated and stabilized around TAAT core region of DNA having variation in nucleotides.

  17. A novel DNA vaccine technology conveying protection against a lethal herpes simplex viral challenge in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Dutton

    Full Text Available While there are a number of licensed veterinary DNA vaccines, to date, none have been licensed for use in humans. Here, we demonstrate that a novel technology designed to enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines protects against lethal herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 challenge in a murine model. Polynucleotides were modified by use of a codon optimization algorithm designed to enhance immune responses, and the addition of an ubiquitin-encoding sequence to target the antigen to the proteasome for processing and to enhance cytotoxic T cell responses. We show that a mixture of these codon-optimized ubiquitinated and non-ubiquitinated constructs encoding the same viral envelope protein, glycoprotein D, induced both B and T cell responses, and could protect against lethal viral challenge and reduce ganglionic latency. The optimized vaccines, subcloned into a vector suitable for use in humans, also provided a high level of protection against the establishment of ganglionic latency, an important correlate of HSV reactivation and candidate endpoint for vaccines to proceed to clinical trials.

  18. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... or HIV/AIDS ) as well as those with eczema . For people with any of these conditions, an ...

  19. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    diseases. Keywords. DNA vaccine, immune response, antibodies, infectious diseases. GENERAL .... tein vaccines require expensive virus/protein purification tech- niques as ... sphere continue to remain major health hazards in developing nations. ... significance since it can be produced at a very low cost and can be stored ...

  20. DNA Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  1. Sites of termination of in vitro DNA synthesis on psoralen phototreated single-stranded templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piette, J.; Hearst, J.

    1985-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA has been photochemically induced to react with 4'-hydroxymethyl-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (HMT) and used as substrate for DNA replication with E. coli DNA polymerase I large fragment. By using the dideoxy sequencing procedure, it is possible to map the termination sites on the template photoreacted with HMT. These sites occur at the nucleotides preceding each thymine residue (and a few cytosine residues), emphasizing the fact that in a single-stranded stretch of DNA, HMT reacts with each thymine residue without any specificity regarding the flanking base sequence of the thymine residues. In addition, termination of DNA synthesis due to psoralen-adducted thymine is not influenced by the efficiency of the 3'-5' exonuclease proof-reading activity of the DNA polymerase. (author)

  2. Unlocking the Sugar ‘Steric Gate’ of DNA Polymerases†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jessica A.; Suo, Zucai

    2011-01-01

    To maintain genomic stability, ribonucleotide incorporation during DNA synthesis is controlled predominantly at the DNA polymerase level. A steric clash between the 2′-hydroxyl of an incoming ribonucleotide and a bulky active site residue, known as the ‘steric gate’, establishes an effective mechanism for most DNA polymerases to selectively insert deoxyribonucleotides. Recent kinetic, structural, and in vivo studies have illuminated novel features about ribonucleotide exclusion and the mechanistic consequences of ribonucleotide misincorporation on downstream events, such as the bypass of a ribonucleotide in a DNA template and the subsequent extension of the DNA lesion bypass product. These important findings are summarized in this review article. PMID:21226515

  3. Disabled infectious single cycle herpes simplex virus (DISC-HSV) is a candidate vector system for gene delivery/expression of GM-CSF in human prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Richard J; Mian, Shahid; Bishop, Michael C; Gray, Trevor; Li, Geng; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Ali, Selman; Rees, Robert C

    2003-06-15

    DISC-HSV is a replication incompetent herpes simplex virus that is a highly efficient vector for the transduction of genes in vivo and in vitro. We examine the ability of DISC-HSV to infect human prostate cancer cell-lines and xenograft tumor models, and induce expression of reporter and therapeutic cytokine genes. Infection was confirmed by cellular staining for the beta-galactosidase reporter gene product, and by EM. Human GM-CSF production following DISC-hGMCSF infection was measured using ELISA. The metabolic activity of infected cells was determined by NADP/NADPH assay. Cell death was estimated by cell-cycle analysis using flow cytometry with propidium iodide staining. Infection of DU145, PC3 and LNCaP cells with DISC-HSV was dose dependent. Cells infected with DISC-hGM-CSF released significant levels of hGM-CSF for 3 days. NADP/NADPH assay suggested that infected cells continued to be metabolically active for 3 days post-infection, which was consistent with flow cytometry findings that cell death did not occur within 7 days of infection. Tumor xenografts injected with DISC-HSV expressed beta-galactosidase, and intracellular viral particles were demonstrated using EM. We have previously reported the rejection of established tumors following intra-tumoral injection of DISC-GMCSF. This study demonstrates the ability of DISC-HSV to infect prostate cancer and express GMCSF at significant levels. We suggest that prostate cancer is a potential target for therapy using DISC-HSV containing GM-CSF. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Immobilization of acid digestion residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.; Allen, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Acid digestion treatment of nuclear waste is similar to incineration processes and results in the bulk of the waste being reduced in volume and weight to some residual solids termed residue. The residue is composed of various dispersible solid materials and typically contains the resultant radioactivity from the waste. This report describes the immobilization of the residue in portland cement, borosilicate glass, and some other waste forms. Diagrams showing the cement and glass virtification parameters are included in the report as well as process steps and candidate waste product forms. Cement immobilization is simplest and probably least expensive; glass vitrification exhibits the best overall volume reduction ratio

  5. Introduction of Exogenous HSV-TK Suicide Gene Increases Safety of Keratinocyte-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Providing Genetic “Emergency Exit” Switch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Sułkowski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their invention in 2006, induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells remain a great promise for regenerative medicine circumventing the ethical issues linked to Embryonic Stem (ES cell research. iPS cells can be generated in a patient-specific manner as an unlimited source of various cell types for in vitro drug screening, developmental biology studies and regenerative use. Having the capacity of differentiating into the cells of all three primary germ layers, iPS cells have high potential to form teratoma tumors. This remains their main disadvantage and hazard which, until resolved, prevents utilization of iPS cells in clinic. Here, we present an approach for increasing iPS cells safety by introducing genetic modification—exogenous suicide gene Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase (HSV-TK. Its expression results in specific vulnerability of genetically modified cells to prodrug—ganciclovir (GCV. We show that HSV-TK expressing cells can be eradicated both in vitro and in vivo with high specificity and efficiency with low doses of GCV. Described strategy increases iPS cells safety for future clinical applications by generating “emergency exit” switch allowing eradication of transplanted cells in case of their malfunction.

  6. Introduction of Exogenous HSV-TK Suicide Gene Increases Safety of Keratinocyte-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Providing Genetic "Emergency Exit" Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułkowski, Maciej; Konieczny, Paweł; Chlebanowska, Paula; Majka, Marcin

    2018-01-09

    Since their invention in 2006, induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells remain a great promise for regenerative medicine circumventing the ethical issues linked to Embryonic Stem (ES) cell research. iPS cells can be generated in a patient-specific manner as an unlimited source of various cell types for in vitro drug screening, developmental biology studies and regenerative use. Having the capacity of differentiating into the cells of all three primary germ layers, iPS cells have high potential to form teratoma tumors. This remains their main disadvantage and hazard which, until resolved, prevents utilization of iPS cells in clinic. Here, we present an approach for increasing iPS cells safety by introducing genetic modification-exogenous suicide gene Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase ( HSV-TK ). Its expression results in specific vulnerability of genetically modified cells to prodrug-ganciclovir (GCV). We show that HSV-TK expressing cells can be eradicated both in vitro and in vivo with high specificity and efficiency with low doses of GCV. Described strategy increases iPS cells safety for future clinical applications by generating "emergency exit" switch allowing eradication of transplanted cells in case of their malfunction.

  7. The novel HSV-1 US5-1 RNA is transcribed off a domain encoding US 5, US 4, US 3, US 2 and α22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roizman Bernard

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of herpes simplex virus 1 encodes at least 84 transcripts from which proteins are translated and several additional RNAs whose status as mRNAs is unknown. These RNAs include latency-associated transcript, OriS1 and OriS2 RNAs and in case of α4 null mutant additional transcript that spans the junction between L and S component of the HSV-1 genome. Current data do not suggest that a peptide is translated from these RNAs. Results We describe here a novel RNA designated US5-1 that spans 4.5 kb of the unique-short (US region. The RNA initiates in US5 and terminates in the α22 open reading frame. It is expressed antisense to US5, US4, US3 and ICP22 mRNAs. This transcript is expressed with γ2 kinetics and has a half-life of 80 minutes. Conclusion These results identify a novel transcript encoded within HSV-1 genome. Since no major hypothetical open-reading frames are present in this transcript it is feasible that this RNA exerts its function as a non-coding RNA.

  8. Unlocking the Sugar ‘Steric Gate’ of DNA Polymerases†

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jessica A.; Suo, Zucai

    2011-01-01

    To maintain genomic stability, ribonucleotide incorporation during DNA synthesis is controlled predominantly at the DNA polymerase level. A steric clash between the 2′-hydroxyl of an incoming ribonucleotide and a bulky active site residue, known as the ‘steric gate’, establishes an effective mechanism for most DNA polymerases to selectively insert deoxyribonucleotides. Recent kinetic, structural, and in vivo studies have illuminated novel features about ribonucleotide exclusion and the mechan...

  9. Comparative study of cellular kinetics of reporter probe [{sup 131}I]FIAU in neonatal cardiac myocytes after transfer of HSV1-tk reporter gene with two vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China)], E-mail: lxl730724@hotmail.com; Yin Xiaohua; Wang Ruihua; Liu Ying [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China) and Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2009-02-15

    Aim: Reporter gene imaging is a promising approach for noninvasive monitoring of cardiac gene therapy. In this study, HSV1-tk (herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase) and FIAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil) were used as the reporter gene and probe, respectively. Cellular uptakes of radiolabeled FIAU of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes transferred with HSV1-tk were compared between two vectors, adenovirus and liposome. The aims of this study were to choose the better vector and to provide a theoretical basis for good nuclide images. Methods: Neonatal cardiac myocytes were obtained from rat heart by single collagenase digestion. HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (recombinant adenovirus type 5, Ad5-tk) and plasmid (pDC316-tk) coated with Lipofectamine 2000 (pDC316-tk/lipoplex) were developed; thus, HSV1-tk could be transferred into neonatal cardiac myocytes. FAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil) was labeled with {sup 131}I, and the product was assessed after purification with reversed-phase Sep-Pak C-18 column. The uptake rates of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in the transferred cardiac myocytes at different times (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h) were detected. Furthermore, mRNA expression and protein expression of HSV1-tk were detected by semiquantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Results: FAU could be labeled with {sup 131}I, and the labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity rates were 53.82{+-}2.05% and 94.85{+-}1.76%, respectively. Time-dependent increase of the accumulation of [{sup 131}I]FIAU was observed in both the Ad5-tk group and the pDC316/lipoplex group, and the highest uptake rate occurred at 5 h, with peak values of 12.55{+-}0.37% and 2.09{+-}0.34%, respectively. Greater uptakes of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in Ad5-tk-infected cells compared with pDC316/lipoplex-transfected ones occurred at all the time points (t=12.978-38.253, P<.01). The exogenous gene

  10. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures being the precision in recognizing contacts and the difference between the distribution of distances in the subset of predicted contact pairs versus all pairs of residues in the structure. The emphasis is placed on the prediction of long-range contacts (i.e., contacts between residues separated by at least 24 residues along sequence) in target proteins that cannot be easily modeled by homology. Although there is considerable activity in the field, the current analysis reports no discernable progress since CASP8.

  11. [Molecular dynamics of immune complex of photoadduct-containing DNA with Fab-Anti-DNA antibody fragment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akberova, N I; Zhmurov, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to DNA play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of structural mechanisms of both the antigen recognition and the interaction of anti-DNA antibodies with DNA will help to understand the role of DNA-containing immune complexes in various pathologies and can provide a basis for new treatment modalities. Moreover, the DNA-antibody complex is an analog of specific intracellular DNA-protein interactions. In this work, we used in silico molecular dynamic simulations of bimolecular complexes of the dsDNA segment containing the Fab fragment of an anti-DNA antibody to obtain the detailed thermodynamic and structural characteristics of dynamic intermolecular interactions. Using computationally modified crystal structure of the Fab-DNA complex (PDB ID: 3VW3), we studied the equilibrium molecular dynamics of the 64M-5 antibody Fab fragment associated with the dsDNA fragment containing the thymine dimer, the product of DNA photodamage. Amino acid residues that constitute paratopes and the complementary nucleotide epitopes for the Fab-DNA construct were identified. Stacking and electrostatic interactions were found to play the main role in mediating the most specific antibody-dsDNA contacts, while hydrogen bonds were less significant. These findings may shed light on the formation and properties of pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus associated with skin photosensitivity and DNA photodamage.

  12. Viral DNA Sensors IFI16 and Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Possess Distinct Functions in Regulating Viral Gene Expression, Immune Defenses, and Apoptotic Responses during Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Benjamin A; Lum, Krystal K; Toettcher, Jared E; Cristea, Ileana M

    2016-11-15

    The human interferon-inducible protein IFI16 is an important antiviral factor that binds nuclear viral DNA and promotes antiviral responses. Here, we define IFI16 dynamics in space and time and its distinct functions from the DNA sensor cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Live-cell imaging reveals a multiphasic IFI16 redistribution, first to viral entry sites at the nuclear periphery and then to nucleoplasmic puncta upon herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Optogenetics and live-cell microscopy establish the IFI16 pyrin domain as required for nuclear periphery localization and oligomerization. Furthermore, using proteomics, we define the signature protein interactions of the IFI16 pyrin and HIN200 domains and demonstrate the necessity of pyrin for IFI16 interactions with antiviral proteins PML and cGAS. We probe signaling pathways engaged by IFI16, cGAS, and PML using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated knockouts in primary fibroblasts. While IFI16 induces cytokines, only cGAS activates STING/TBK-1/IRF3 and apoptotic responses upon HSV-1 and HCMV infections. cGAS-dependent apoptosis upon DNA stimulation requires both the enzymatic production of cyclic dinucleotides and STING. We show that IFI16, not cGAS or PML, represses HSV-1 gene expression, reducing virus titers. This indicates that regulation of viral gene expression may function as a greater barrier to viral replication than the induction of antiviral cytokines. Altogether, our findings establish coordinated and distinct antiviral functions for IFI16 and cGAS against herpesviruses. How mammalian cells detect and respond to DNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus is poorly understood. Here, we decipher the distinct functions of two viral DNA sensors, IFI16 and cGAS, during active immune signaling upon infection with two herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). We show that IFI16

  13. Tritium/protium fractionation near and inside DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, F.; Kim, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The fractionation factor of tritium between water and DNA as well as between water and the first hydration shell of DNA is determined. For this purpose the sublimation kinetics of water from DNA dissolved in water were determined at -200 deg C and tritium was measured in the remaining water free DNA. The last sublimating water fractions showed a tritium level of about 1.4, the residual water free DNA about 1.9 units above the bulk water. The tritium accumulation inside and near DNA is attributed to the thermodynamic triton-proton exchange isotope effect existing between the strong hydrogen bridges of water and weaker hydrogen bridges as well as inside DNA as between the first hydration shell and DNA. (author)

  14. Microbial diversity in fecal samples depends on DNA extraction method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi, Hengameh; Persson, Søren; Struve, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    was to evaluate two different DNA extraction methods in order to choose the most efficient method for studying intestinal bacterial diversity using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). FINDINGS: In this study, a semi-automatic DNA extraction system (easyMag®, BioMérieux, Marcy I'Etoile, France......BACKGROUND: There are challenges, when extracting bacterial DNA from specimens for molecular diagnostics, since fecal samples also contain DNA from human cells and many different substances derived from food, cell residues and medication that can inhibit downstream PCR. The purpose of the study...... by easyMag® from the same fecal samples. Furthermore, DNA extracts obtained using easyMag® seemed to contain inhibitory compounds, since in order to perform a successful PCR-analysis, the sample should be diluted at least 10 times. DGGE performed on PCR from DNA extracted by QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit DNA...

  15. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  16. Trabectedin – the DNA minor groove binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Belitsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trabectedin (ET-743, Yondelis is an alkaloid that was originally isolated from the Caribbean Sea squirt, Ecteinascidia turbinata and is now produced synthetically. Its chemical structure consists in three fused tetrahydroisoquinoline rings. Two of them, A and B, binds covalently to guanine residues in the minor groove of the DNA double helix to bend the molecule toward the major groove and the third ring C protrudes from the DNA duplex, apparently allowing interactions with several nuclear proteins. Binding to the minor groove of DNA, trabectedin trigger a cascade of events that interfere with several transcription factors, DNA binding proteins, and DNA repair pathways in particular nucleotide excision repair. It acts both as a DNA-alkylating drug and topoisomerase poison. Trabectedin-DNA adduct traps the nucleotide excision repair proteins repairing the DNA damage in transcribing genes and induces DNA strand breaks. Cells deficient in homologous recombination pathway which repairs these double-strand breaks show increased sensitivity to trabectedin. The most sensitive of them were myxoid liposarcomas. Trabectedin is also effective in chemotherapy-experienced patients with advanced, recurrent liposarcoma or leiomyosarcoma as well as in women with ovarian cancer and breast cancer with BRCAness phenotype. Besides of tumor cells Trabectedin inhibits inflammatory cells by affecting directly monocytes and tumorassociated macrophages and indirectly by inhibiting production of inflammatory mediators, the cytokines and chemokines. It inhibits also the MDR-1 gene, which is responsible for the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents and strikes tumor angiogenesis.

  17. Minimal residual disease in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Vela, José Antonio; García Marco, José Antonio

    2018-02-23

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) assessment is an important endpoint in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). It is highly predictive of prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival and could be considered a surrogate for PFS in the context of chemoimmunotherapy based treatment. Evaluation of MRD level by flow cytometry or molecular techniques in the era of the new BCR and Bcl-2 targeted inhibitors could identify the most cost-effective and durable treatment sequencing. A therapeutic approach guided by the level of MRD might also determine which patients would benefit from an early stop or consolidation therapy. In this review, we discuss the different MRD methods of analysis, which source of tumour samples must be analysed, the future role of the detection of circulating tumour DNA, and the potential role of MRD negativity in clinical practice in the modern era of CLL therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Landfilling of waste incineration residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas; Cai, Zuansi

    2002-01-01

    Residues from waste incineration are bottom ashes and air-pollution-control (APC) residues including fly ashes. The leaching of heavy metals and salts from the ashes is substantial and a wide spectrum of leaching tests and corresponding criteria have been introduced to regulate the landfilling...

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of DNA-free and DNA-bound TAL effectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wan

    Full Text Available TAL (transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs are DNA-binding proteins, containing a modular central domain that recognizes specific DNA sequences. Recently, the crystallographic studies of TALEs revealed the structure of DNA-recognition domain. In this article, molecular dynamics (MD simulations are employed to study two crystal structures of an 11.5-repeat TALE, in the presence and absence of DNA, respectively. The simulated results indicate that the specific binding of RVDs (repeat-variable diresidues with DNA leads to the markedly reduced fluctuations of tandem repeats, especially at the two ends. In the DNA-bound TALE system, the base-specific interaction is formed mainly by the residue at position 13 within a TAL repeat. Tandem repeats with weak RVDs are unfavorable for the TALE-DNA binding. These observations are consistent with experimental studies. By using principal component analysis (PCA, the dominant motions are open-close movements between the two ends of the superhelical structure in both DNA-free and DNA-bound TALE systems. The open-close movements are found to be critical for the recognition and binding of TALE-DNA based on the analysis of free energy landscape (FEL. The conformational analysis of DNA indicates that the 5' end of DNA target sequence has more remarkable structural deformability than the other sites. Meanwhile, the conformational change of DNA is likely associated with the specific interaction of TALE-DNA. We further suggest that the arrangement of N-terminal repeats with strong RVDs may help in the design of efficient TALEs. This study provides some new insights into the understanding of the TALE-DNA recognition mechanism.

  20. Statistical inference on residual life

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Jong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    This is a monograph on the concept of residual life, which is an alternative summary measure of time-to-event data, or survival data. The mean residual life has been used for many years under the name of life expectancy, so it is a natural concept for summarizing survival or reliability data. It is also more interpretable than the popular hazard function, especially for communications between patients and physicians regarding the efficacy of a new drug in the medical field. This book reviews existing statistical methods to infer the residual life distribution. The review and comparison includes existing inference methods for mean and median, or quantile, residual life analysis through medical data examples. The concept of the residual life is also extended to competing risks analysis. The targeted audience includes biostatisticians, graduate students, and PhD (bio)statisticians. Knowledge in survival analysis at an introductory graduate level is advisable prior to reading this book.

  1. DNA-binding proteins essential for protein-primed bacteriophage ø29 DNA replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Salas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5’ ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP, is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3’-5’ exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding

  2. DNA FROM ANCIENT STONE TOOLS AND BONES EXCAVATED AT BUGAS-HOLDING, WYOMING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traces of DNA may preserve on ancient stone tools. We examined 24 chipped stone artifacts recovered from the Bugas-Holding site in northwestern Wyoming for the presence of DNA residues, and we compared DNA preservation in bones and stone tools from the same stratigraphic context...

  3. Ability of herpes simplex virus vectors to boost immune responses to DNA vectors and to protect against challenge by simian immunodeficiency virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Amitinder; Sanford, Hannah B.; Garry, Deirdre; Lang, Sabine; Klumpp, Sherry A.; Watanabe, Daisuke; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rosati, Margherita; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.; Knipe, David M.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2007-01-01

    The immunogenicity and protective capacity of replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector-based vaccines were examined in rhesus macaques. Three macaques were inoculated with recombinant HSV vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Tat-Rev-Nef fusion protein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Three other macaques were primed with recombinant DNA vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Pol-Tat-Nef-Vif fusion protein prior to boosting with the HSV vectors. Robust anti-Gag and anti-Env cellular responses were detected in all six macaques. Following intravenous challenge with wild-type, cloned SIV239, peak and 12-week plasma viremia levels were significantly lower in vaccinated compared to control macaques. Plasma SIV RNA in vaccinated macaques was inversely correlated with anti-Rev ELISPOT responses on the day of challenge (P value < 0.05), anti-Tat ELISPOT responses at 2 weeks post challenge (P value < 0.05) and peak neutralizing antibody titers pre-challenge (P value 0.06). These findings support continued study of recombinant herpesviruses as a vaccine approach for AIDS

  4. Inactivation of microbial infectiousness by silver nanoparticles-coated condom: a new approach to inhibit HIV- and HSV-transmitted infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Fayaz A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A Mohammed Fayaz,1,* Zhujun Ao,1,3,* Morkattu Girilal,2 Liyu Chen,3,4 Xianzhong Xiao,4 PT Kalaichelvan,2 Xiaojian Yao1,31Laboratory of Molecular Human Retrovirology, Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 2CAS in Botany, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; 3Department of Microbiology, 4School of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of China*Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Recent research suggests that today’s condoms are only 85% effective in preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. In response, there has been a push to develop more effective ways of decreasing the spread of the disease. The new nanotechnology-based condom holds the promise of being more potent than the first-generation products. The preliminary goal of this study was to develop a silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs-coated polyurethane condom (PUC and to investigate its antimicrobial potential including the inactivation of HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV infectiousness. The Ag-NPs-coated PUC was characterized by using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive analysis of X-ray spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were stable on the PUC and not washed away by water. Morphology of the PUC was retained after coating. The NP binding is due to its interaction with the nitrogen atom of the PUC. No significant toxic effects was observed when human HeLa cells, 293T and C8166 T cells were contacted to Ag-NPs-coated PUC for three hours. Interestingly, our results demonstrated that the contact of the Ag-NPs-coated PUC with HIV-1 and HSV-1/2 was able to efficiently inactivate their infectiousness. In an attempt to elucidate the antiviral action of the Ag-NPs, we have demonstrated that the

  5. Combination therapy and evaluation of therapeutic effect in hepatocellular carcinoma cell using triple reporter genes; containing for NIS, HSV1-sr39tk and GFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, You La; Lee, Yong Jin; Ahn, Sohn Joo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Soo; Lee, Jae Tae [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    To identify therapeutic effect after combine Sodium Iodine Symporter (NIS) and Mutant Herpes-simplex virus type 1 sr39tk (HSV1-sr39tk) expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cell, we transfected triple gene and investigated the properties of these gene ability in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After making vector with gene encoding a fusion protein comprised of HSV1-sr39tk and green florescence protein (GFP), to make triple reporter genes NIS gene was further fused to the vector using IRES vector. The vector expressing triple reporter gene was transfected to the Huh-7 cell line using liposome. Functions of hNIS and HSV1-sr39tk expression were confirmed by radio iodine uptake with and without perchlorate and [3H]-penciclovir (3-H PCV) uptake, respectively. To evaluate therapeutic effect in vitro, GCV and I-131 was treated in Huh-7/NTG cell and dual therapy performed. An animal imaging acquired using Optix and microPET in vivo. I-125 uptake was increased up to 100-fold compare to that of non-transfected cells. The transfected cell accumulated H-3 PCV up to 53 times higher at 2 hour than that of non-transfected cells. With fluorescence microscopy, green fluorescence was detected in the transfected cell. In cytotoxic studies, the cell viability of Huh-7/NTG cell was decreased to 41 % of control cell at 10ug/ml GCV concentrations. The survival rate of the Huh-7/NTG cell treated with I-131 decreased up to 16%. In I-131 and GCV dual therapy, Huh-7/NTG cell survival rate decreased up to 4%. In animal studies, Huh-7/NTG tumors showed higher uptake of 18F-FHBG and I-124 than Huh-7 tumors. GFP signal is also higher in Huh-7/NTG tumor than control. We successfully constructed a vector with delivery two therapeutic genes and one reporter gene and transfected the vector to a Huh-7 cell. The hepatocellular carcinoma cell transfected with the vector can be treated with GCV and I-131. The effect of dual gene therapy could be easily assessed by the optical reporter gene imaging.

  6. Novel multipurpose pod-intravaginal ring for the prevention of HIV, HSV, and unintended pregnancy: Pharmacokinetic evaluation in a macaque model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James M; Moss, John A; Srinivasan, Priya; Butkyavichene, Irina; Gunawardana, Manjula; Fanter, Rob; Miller, Christine S; Sanchez, Debbie; Yang, Flora; Ellis, Shanon; Zhang, Jining; Marzinke, Mark A; Hendrix, Craig W; Kapoor, Amita; Baum, Marc M

    2017-01-01

    Globally, women bear an uneven burden for sexual HIV acquisition. Results from two clinical trials evaluating intravaginal rings (IVRs) delivering the antiretroviral agent dapivirine have shown that protection from HIV infection can be achieved with this modality, but high adherence is essential. Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) can potentially increase product adherence by offering protection against multiple vaginally transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy. Here we describe a coitally independent, long-acting pod-IVR MPT that could potentially prevent HIV and HSV infection as well as unintended pregnancy. The pharmacokinetics of MPT pod-IVRs delivering tenofovir alafenamide hemifumarate (TAF2) to prevent HIV, acyclovir (ACV) to prevent HSV, and etonogestrel (ENG) in combination with ethinyl estradiol (EE), FDA-approved hormonal contraceptives, were evaluated in pigtailed macaques (N = 6) over 35 days. Pod IVRs were exchanged at 14 days with the only modification being lower ENG release rates in the second IVR. Plasma progesterone was monitored weekly to determine the effect of ENG/EE on menstrual cycle. The mean in vivo release rates (mg d-1) for the two formulations over 30 days ranged as follows: TAF2 0.35-0.40; ACV 0.56-0.70; EE 0.03-0.08; ENG (high releasing) 0.63; and ENG (low releasing) 0.05. Mean peak progesterone levels were 4.4 ± 1.8 ng mL-1 prior to IVR insertion and 0.075 ± 0.064 ng mL-1 for 5 weeks after insertion, suggesting that systemic EE/ENG levels were sufficient to suppress menstruation. The TAF2 and ACV release rates and resulting vaginal tissue drug concentrations (medians: TFV, 2.4 ng mg-1; ACV, 0.2 ng mg-1) may be sufficient to protect against HIV and HSV infection, respectively. This proof of principle study demonstrates that MPT-pod IVRs could serve as a potent biomedical prevention tool to protect women's sexual and reproductive health and may increase adherence to HIV PrEP even among younger high-risk populations.