WorldWideScience

Sample records for residual gravity field

  1. Generalized Residual Terrain Model and Its Application in Regional Gravity Field Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Yihao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied the so-called non-harmonic problem in residual terrain model (RTM and compared the RTM corrections based on prisms and tesseroids. Moreover, we proposed the generalized RTM based on tesseroids, together with which the regional gravity field was modeled based on Poisson wavelets basis function by using heterogeneous gravity data sets. The results show that the RTM correction based on prism integral has a poor performance in mountainous regions, which may introduce errors with the magnitude of several mGal. Thus, we suggest using RTM based on tesseroids, which lead to a better approximation of the topography. Compared to original residual terrain model,the generalized one leads a better approximation of the regional gravity filed at the high-frequency part caused by local topographical variation.

  2. Venus gravity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Ananda, M.; Williams, B. G.; Birkeland, P. W.; Esposito, P. S.; Wimberly, R. N.; Ritke, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    Results of Pioneer Venus Orbiter observations concerning the gravity field of Venus are presented. The gravitational data was obtained from reductions of Doppler radio tracking data for the Orbiter, which is in a highly eccentric orbit with periapsis altitude varying from 145 to 180 km and nearly fixed periapsis latitude of 15 deg N. The global gravity field was obtained through the simultaneous estimation of the orbit state parameters and gravity coefficients from long-period variations in orbital element rates. The global field has been described with sixth degree and order spherical harmonic coefficients, which are capable of resolving the three major topographical features on Venus. Local anomalies have been mapped using line-of-sight accelerations derived from the Doppler residuals between 40 deg N and 10 deg S latitude at approximately 300 km spatial resolution. Gravitational data is observed to correspond to topographical data obtained by radar altimeter, with most of the gravitational anomalies about 20-30 milligals. Simulations evaluating the isostatic states of two topographic features indicate that at least partial isostasy prevails, with the possibility of complete compensation.

  3. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  4. Magnetic Fields Versus Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-04-01

    Deep within giant molecular clouds, hidden by dense gas and dust, stars form. Unprecedented data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveal the intricate magnetic structureswoven throughout one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Milky Way.How Stars Are BornThe Horsehead Nebulasdense column of gas and dust is opaque to visible light, but this infrared image reveals the young stars hidden in the dust. [NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team]Simple theory dictates that when a dense clump of molecular gas becomes massive enough that its self-gravity overwhelms the thermal pressure of the cloud, the gas collapses and forms a star. In reality, however, star formation is more complicated than a simple give and take between gravity and pressure. Thedusty molecular gas in stellar nurseries is permeated with magnetic fields, which are thought to impede the inward pull of gravity and slow the rate of star formation.How can we learn about the magnetic fields of distant objects? One way is by measuring dust polarization. An elongated dust grain will tend to align itself with its short axis parallel to the direction of the magnetic field. This systematic alignment of the dust grains along the magnetic field lines polarizes the dust grains emission perpendicular to the local magnetic field. This allows us to infer the direction of the magnetic field from the direction of polarization.Magnetic field orientations for protostars e2 and e8 derived from Submillimeter Array observations (panels a through c) and ALMA observations (panels d and e). Click to enlarge. [Adapted from Koch et al. 2018]Tracing Magnetic FieldsPatrick Koch (Academia Sinica, Taiwan) and collaborators used high-sensitivity ALMA observations of dust polarization to learn more about the magnetic field morphology of Milky Way star-forming region W51. W51 is one of the largest star-forming regions in our galaxy, home to high-mass protostars e2, e8, and North.The ALMA observations reveal

  5. The gravity field and GGOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Sideris, M.G.; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    The gravity field of the earth is a natural element of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). Gravity field quantities are like spatial geodetic observations of potential very high accuracy, with measurements, currently at part-per-billion (ppb) accuracy, but gravity field quantities are also...... unique as they can be globally represented by harmonic functions (long-wavelength geopotential model primarily from satellite gravity field missions), or based on point sampling (airborne and in situ absolute and superconducting gravimetry). From a GGOS global perspective, one of the main challenges...... is to ensure the consistency of the global and regional geopotential and geoid models, and the temporal changes of the gravity field at large spatial scales. The International Gravity Field Service, an umbrella "level-2" IAG service (incorporating the International Gravity Bureau, International Geoid Service...

  6. Heavy fields and gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goon, Garrett [Institute of Physics, Universiteit van Amsterdam,Science Park 904, Amsterdam, 1090 GL (Netherlands)

    2017-01-11

    We study the effects of heavy fields on 4D spacetimes with flat, de Sitter and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. At low energies, matter generates specific, calculable higher derivative corrections to the GR action which perturbatively alter the Schwarzschild-(A)dS family of solutions. The effects of massive scalars, Dirac spinors and gauge fields are each considered. The six-derivative operators they produce, such as ∼R{sup 3} terms, generate the leading corrections. The induced changes to horizon radii, Hawking temperatures and entropies are found. Modifications to the energy of large AdS black holes are derived by imposing the first law. An explicit demonstration of the replica trick is provided, as it is used to derive black hole and cosmological horizon entropies. Considering entropy bounds, it’s found that scalars and fermions increase the entropy one can store inside a region bounded by a sphere of fixed size, but vectors lead to a decrease, oddly. We also demonstrate, however, that many of the corrections fall below the resolving power of the effective field theory and are therefore untrustworthy. Defining properties of black holes, such as the horizon area and Hawking temperature, prove to be remarkably robust against higher derivative gravitational corrections.

  7. Normal gravity field in relativistic geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Vlasov, Igor; Han, Wen-Biao

    2018-02-01

    intrinsically connected to the existence of the residual gauge freedom, and derive the post-Newtonian normal gravity field of the rotating spheroid both inside and outside of the rotating fluid body. The normal gravity field is given, similarly to the Newtonian gravity, in a closed form by a finite number of the ellipsoidal harmonics. We employ transformation from the ellipsoidal to spherical coordinates to deduce a more conventional post-Newtonian multipolar expansion of scalar and vector gravitational potentials of the rotating spheroid. We compare these expansions with that of the normal gravity field generated by the Kerr metric and demonstrate that the Kerr metric has a fairly limited application in relativistic geodesy as it does not match the normal gravity field of the Maclaurin ellipsoid already in the Newtonian limit. We derive the post-Newtonian generalization of the Somigliana formula for the normal gravity field measured on the surface of the rotating spheroid and employed in practical work for measuring Earth's gravitational field anomalies. Finally, we discuss the possible choice of the gauge-dependent parameters of the normal gravity field model for practical applications and compare it with the existing EGM2008 model of a gravitational field.

  8. Nevada Isostatic Residual Gravity Over Basement

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study of gravity data from Nevada is part of a statewide analysis of mineral resources. The main objective of the gravity study were: 1) to infer the structure...

  9. Analysis of crustal structure of Venus utilizing residual Line-of-Sight (LOS) gravity acceleration and surface topography data. A trial of global modeling of Venus gravity field using harmonic spline method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ming; Bowin, Carl

    1992-01-01

    To construct Venus' gravity disturbance field (or gravity anomaly) with the spacecraft-observer line of site (LOS) acceleration perturbation data, both a global and a local approach can be used. The global approach, e.g., spherical harmonic coefficients, and the local approach, e.g., the integral operator method, based on geodetic techniques are generally not the same, so that they must be used separately for mapping long wavelength features and short wavelength features. Harmonic spline, as an interpolation and extrapolation technique, is intrinsically flexible to both global and local mapping of a potential field. Theoretically, it preserves the information of the potential field up to the bound by sampling theorem regardless of whether it is global or local mapping, and is never bothered with truncation errors. The improvement of harmonic spline methodology for global mapping is reported. New basis functions, a singular value decomposition (SVD) based modification to Parker & Shure's numerical procedure, and preliminary results are presented.

  10. Polar gravity fields from GOCE and airborne gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Yidiz, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Airborne gravity, together with high-quality surface data and ocean satellite altimetric gravity, may supplement GOCE to make consistent, accurate high resolution global gravity field models. In the polar regions, the special challenge of the GOCE polar gap make the error characteristics...... of combination models especially sensitive to the correct merging of satellite and surface data. We outline comparisons of GOCE to recent airborne gravity surveys in both the Arctic and the Antarctic. The comparison is done to new 8-month GOCE solutions, as well as to a collocation prediction from GOCE gradients...... in Antarctica. It is shown how the enhanced gravity field solutions improve the determination of ocean dynamic topography in both the Arctic and in across the Drake Passage. For the interior of Antarctica, major airborne gravity programs are currently being carried out, and there is an urgent need...

  11. Toward a gauge field theory of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, H.

    Joint use of two differential identities (Bianchi and Freud) permits a gauge field theory of gravity in which the gravitational energy is localizable. The theory is compatible with quantum mechanics and is experimentally viable.

  12. Gravity Field Atlas of the S. Ocean

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Gravity Field Atlas of the Southern Ocean from GEOSAT is MGG Report 7. In many areas of the global ocean, the depth of the seafloor is not well known because...

  13. Dual geometric-gauge field aspects of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huei Peng; Wang, K.

    1992-01-01

    We propose that the geometric and standard gauge field aspects of gravity are equally essential for a complete description of gravity and can be reconciled. We show that this dualism of gravity resolves the dimensional Newtonian constant problem in both quantum gravity and unification schemes involving gravity (i.e., the Newtonian constant is no longer the coupling constant in the gauge aspect of gravity) and reveals the profound similarity between gravity and other fields. 23 refs., 3 tabs

  14. Emergent Abelian Gauge Fields from Noncommutative Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Stern

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We construct exact solutions to noncommutative gravity following the formulation of Chamseddine and show that they are in general accompanied by Abelian gauge fields which are first order in the noncommutative scale. This provides a mechanism for generating cosmological electromagnetic fields in an expanding space-time background, and also leads to multipole-like fields surrounding black holes. Exact solutions to noncommutative Einstein-Maxwell theory can give rise to first order corrections to the metric tensor, as well as to the electromagnetic fields. This leads to first order shifts in the horizons of charged black holes.

  15. Weak gravity conjecture and effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    The weak gravity conjecture (WGC) is a proposed constraint on theories with gauge fields and gravity, requiring the existence of light charged particles and/or imposing an upper bound on the field theory cutoff Λ . If taken as a consistency requirement for effective field theories (EFTs), it rules out possibilities for model building including some models of inflation. I demonstrate simple models which satisfy all forms of the WGC, but which through Higgsing of the original gauge fields produce low-energy EFTs with gauge forces that badly violate the WGC. These models illustrate specific loopholes in arguments that motivate the WGC from a bottom-up perspective; for example the arguments based on magnetic monopoles are evaded when the magnetic confinement that occurs in a Higgs phase is accounted for. This indicates that the WGC should not be taken as a veto on EFTs, even if it turns out to be a robust property of UV quantum gravity theories. However, if the latter is true, then parametric violation of the WGC at low energy comes at the cost of nonminimal field content in the UV. I propose that only a very weak constraint is applicable to EFTs, Λ ≲(log 1/g )-1 /2Mpl , where g is the gauge coupling, motivated by entropy bounds. Remarkably, EFTs produced by Higgsing a theory that satisfies the WGC can saturate but not violate this bound.

  16. Gravity Field Parameter Estimation Using QR Factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klokocnik, J.; Wagner, C. A.; McAdoo, D.; Kostelecky, J.; Bezdek, A.; Novak, P.; Gruber, C.; Marty, J.; Bruinsma, S. L.; Gratton, S.; Balmino, G.; Baboulin, M.

    2007-12-01

    This study compares the accuracy of the estimated geopotential coefficients when QR factorization is used instead of the classical method applied at our institute, namely the generation of normal equations that are solved by means of Cholesky decomposition. The objective is to evaluate the gain in numerical precision, which is obtained at considerable extra cost in terms of computer resources. Therefore, a significant increase in precision must be realized in order to justify the additional cost. Numerical simulations were done in order to examine the performance of both solution methods. Reference gravity gradients were simulated, using the EIGEN-GL04C gravity field model to degree and order 300, every 3 seconds along a near-circular, polar orbit at 250 km altitude. The simulation spanned a total of 60 days. A polar orbit was selected in this simulation in order to avoid the 'polar gap' problem, which causes inaccurate estimation of the low-order spherical harmonic coefficients. Regularization is required in that case (e.g., the GOCE mission), which is not the subject of the present study. The simulated gravity gradients, to which white noise was added, were then processed with the GINS software package, applying EIGEN-CG03 as the background gravity field model, followed either by the usual normal equation computation or using the QR approach for incremental linear least squares. The accuracy assessment of the gravity field recovery consists in computing the median error degree-variance spectra, accumulated geoid errors, geoid errors due to individual coefficients, and geoid errors calculated on a global grid. The performance, in terms of memory usage, required disk space, and CPU time, of the QR versus the normal equation approach is also evaluated.

  17. Classical gravity and quantum matter fields in unified field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borzeszkowski, Horst-Heino; Treder, Hans-Jürgen

    1996-01-01

    The Einstein-Schrödinger purely affine field theory of the non-symmetric field provides canonical field equations without constraints. These equations imply the Heisenberg-Pauli commutation rules of quantum field theory. In the Schrödinger gauging of the Einstein field coordinatesU {/kl i }=Γ{/kl i }-δ{/l i }Γ{/km m }, this unified geometric field theory becomes a model of the coupling between a quantized Maxwellian field in a medium and classical gravity. Therefore, independently of the question as to the physical truth of this model, its analysis performed in the present paper demonstrates that, in the framework of a quantized unified field theory, gravity can appear as a genuinely classical field.

  18. Fluid/Gravity Correspondence with Scalar Field and Electromagnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Chia-Jui; Wu, Xiaoning; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Pei-Hung

    2016-01-01

    We consider fluid/gravity correspondence in a general rotating black hole background with scalar and electromagnetic fields. Using the method of Petrov-like boundary condition, we show that the scalar and the electromagnetic fields contribute external forces to the dual Navier-Stokes equation and the rotation of black hole induces the Coriolis force.

  19. Electric field replaces gravity in laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgolewski, S.

    For several years experiments in physical laboratories and in the fitotron have shown that one can replace gravitational field with electrical fields for plants. First obvious experiments in strong electrical fields in the MV/m regi on show that any materials and living plants respond immediately to Coulomb forces. Such fields are found in nature during thunderstorms. One has to be very careful in handling such strong fields for safety reasons. The fair weather global electrical field is about 20,000 times weaker. The coulomb forces are proportional to the square of the field strength and are thus 400 milion times weaker for a field of the order of 100 V/m.Yet it was found that some plants respond to such "weak" fields. We must remember that the electrical field is a factor of 10 38 times stronger than gravitational interaction. In plants we have dissociated in water mineral salts and the ions are subject to such ernormous forces. It was shown and published that the positive charges in the air in fields of the order of 3kV/m enhance lettuce growth by a factor of four relative to fields about 30 times weaker (100V/m). Reversal of the field polarity reverses the direction of plant growth and retards the plant's growth. Such fields overpower the gravitropism in the laboratory. More so horizontal electrical field is othogonal to gravity, now the fields do not see each other. Lettuce now growth horizontally ignoring the gravitational field. We can thus select the plants whose electrotropism even in the laboratory overwhelms gravity. This is important for the long space flights that we must grow vegetarian food for the crew. The successful harvesting of wheat in orbit does not contradict our experimental findings because wheat is not electrotropic like all plants from the grass family. The results of fitotron experiments with kV/m electrical fields are richly illustrated with colour digital photographs. We also subjected the candle flame to very strong horizontal

  20. Gravity large field phlebography of the limbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.; Robillard, P.; Fontaine, A.; Galand, C. (Hotel-Dieu de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1983-06-01

    For the last two decades the most common method of radiographic study of the venous system of the lower limbs has been ascending phlebography, by injection of contrast material in a superficial vein on the dorsum of the foot. We report our own experience with another approach, using a large field technique on recumbent patients, with elevation of the limbs, thus taking advantage of gravity. The contrast injection is usually made in a more distal superficial vein of the foot after a tiny cut-down. Excellent results are consistently obtained in demonstrating all the deep veins, including the iliac vessels. The same principles may be applied to upper limb phlebography.

  1. Gravity large field phlebography of the limbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Paul; Robillard, Pierre; Fontaine, Andre; Galand, Claude

    1983-01-01

    For the last two decades the most common method of radiographic study of the venous system of the lower limbs has been ascending phlebography, by injection of contrast material in a superficial vein on the dorsum of the foot. We report our own experience with another approach, using a large field technique on recumbent patients, with elevation of the limbs, thus taking advantage of gravity. The contrast injection is usually made in a more distal superficial vein of the foot after a tiny cut-down. Excellent results are consistently obtained in demonstrating all the deep veins, including the iliac vessels. The same principles may be applied to upper limb phlebography

  2. Noncommutative gauge fields coupled to noncommutative gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschieri, Paolo; Castellani, Leonardo

    2013-03-01

    We present a noncommutative (NC) version of the action for vielbein gravity coupled to gauge fields. Noncommutativity is encoded in a twisted star -product between forms, with a set of commuting background vector fields defining the (abelian) twist. A first order action for the gauge fields avoids the use of the Hodge dual. The NC action is invariant under diffeomorphisms and star -gauge transformations. The Seiberg-Witten map, adapted to our geometric setting and generalized for an arbitrary abelian twist, allows to re-express the NC action in terms of classical fields: the result is a deformed action, invariant under diffeomorphisms and usual gauge transformations. This deformed action is a particular higher derivative extension of the Einstein-Hilbert action coupled to Yang-Mills fields, and to the background vector fields defining the twist. Here noncommutativity of the original NC action dictates the precise form of this extension. We explicitly compute the first order correction in the NC parameter of the deformed action, and find that it is proportional to cubic products of the gauge field strength and to the symmetric anomaly tensor D_{IJK}.

  3. Towards combined global monthly gravity field solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, Adrian; Meyer, Ulrich; Beutler, Gerhard; Weigelt, Matthias; van Dam, Tonie; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Flury, Jakob; Flechtner, Frank; Dahle, Christoph; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Bruinsma, Sean

    2014-05-01

    Currently, official GRACE Science Data System (SDS) monthly gravity field solutions are generated independently by the Centre for Space Research (CSR) and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ). Additional GRACE SDS monthly fields are provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for validation and outside the SDS by a number of other institutions worldwide. Although the adopted background models and processing standards have been harmonized more and more by the various processing centers during the past years, notable differences still exist and the users are more or less left alone with a decision which model to choose for their individual applications. This procedure seriously limits the accessibility of these valuable data. Combinations are well established in the area of other space geodetic techniques, such as the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Regularly comparing and combining space-geodetic products has tremendously increased the usefulness of the products in a wide range of disciplines and scientific applications. Therefore, we propose in a first step to mutually compare the large variety of available monthly GRACE gravity field solutions, e.g., by assessing the signal content over selected regions, by estimating the noise over the oceans, and by performing significance tests. We make the attempt to assign different solution characteristics to different processing strategies in order to identify subsets of solutions, which are based on similar processing strategies. Using these subsets we will in a second step explore ways to generate combined solutions, e.g., based on a weighted average of the individual solutions using empirical weights derived from pair-wise comparisons. We will also assess the quality of such a combined solution and discuss the potential benefits for the GRACE and GRACE-FO user community, but also address minimum processing

  4. High Performance Clocks and Gravity Field Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J.; Dirkx, D.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Lion, G.; Panet, I.; Petit, G.; Visser, P. N. A. M.

    2018-02-01

    Time measured by an ideal clock crucially depends on the gravitational potential and velocity of the clock according to general relativity. Technological advances in manufacturing high-precision atomic clocks have rapidly improved their accuracy and stability over the last decade that approached the level of 10^{-18}. This notable achievement along with the direct sensitivity of clocks to the strength of the gravitational field make them practically important for various geodetic applications that are addressed in the present paper. Based on a fully relativistic description of the background gravitational physics, we discuss the impact of those highly-precise clocks on the realization of reference frames and time scales used in geodesy. We discuss the current definitions of basic geodetic concepts and come to the conclusion that the advances in clocks and other metrological technologies will soon require the re-definition of time scales or, at least, clarification to ensure their continuity and consistent use in practice. The relative frequency shift between two clocks is directly related to the difference in the values of the gravity potential at the points of clock's localization. According to general relativity the relative accuracy of clocks in 10^{-18} is equivalent to measuring the gravitational red shift effect between two clocks with the height difference amounting to 1 cm. This makes the clocks an indispensable tool in high-precision geodesy in addition to laser ranging and space geodetic techniques. We show how clock measurements can provide geopotential numbers for the realization of gravity-field-related height systems and can resolve discrepancies in classically-determined height systems as well as between national height systems. Another application of clocks is the direct use of observed potential differences for the improved recovery of regional gravity field solutions. Finally, clock measurements for space-borne gravimetry are analyzed along with

  5. Topological gravity from a transgression gauge field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino, N.; Perez, A.; Salgado, P.; Valdivia, O.

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that a topological action for gravity in even dimensions can be obtained from a gravity theory whose Lagrangian is given by a transgression form invariant under the Poincare group. The field φ a , which is necessary to construct this type of topological gravity in even dimensions, is identified with the coset field associated with the non-linear realizations of the Poincare group ISO(d-1,1).

  6. Bouguer gravity regional and residual separation application to geology and environment

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, K; Sharma, KK

    2012-01-01

    Resolving regional and residual components arising out of deeper and shallower sources in observed Bouguer gravity anomalies is an old problem. The technique covered here is an attempt to sort out the difficulties that performs better than existing methods.

  7. GRACE gravity field modeling with an investigation on correlation between nuisance parameters and gravity field coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan; Cai, Hua; Liu, Xianglin

    2011-05-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) monthly gravity models have been independently produced and published by several research institutions, such as Center for Space Research (CSR), GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Delft Institute of Earth Observation and Space Systems (DEOS). According to their processing standards, above institutions use the traditional variational approach except that the DEOS exploits the acceleration approach. The background force models employed are rather similar. The produced gravity field models generally agree with one another in the spatial pattern. However, there are some discrepancies in the gravity signal amplitude between solutions produced by different institutions. In particular, 10%-30% signal amplitude differences in some river basins can be observed. In this paper, we implemented a variant of the traditional variational approach and computed two sets of monthly gravity field solutions using the data from January 2005 to December 2006. The input data are K-band range-rates (KBRR) and kinematic orbits of GRACE satellites. The main difference in the production of our two types of models is how to deal with nuisance parameters. This type of parameters is necessary to absorb low-frequency errors in the data, which are mainly the aliasing and instrument errors. One way is to remove the nuisance parameters before estimating the geopotential coefficients, called NPARB approach in the paper. The other way is to estimate the nuisance parameters and geopotential coefficients simultaneously, called NPESS approach. These two types of solutions mainly differ in geopotential coefficients from degree 2 to 5. This can be explained by the fact that the nuisance parameters and the gravity field coefficients are highly correlated, particularly at low degrees. We compare these solutions with the official and published ones by means of spectral analysis. It is

  8. Edge detection in gravity field of the Gheshm sedimentary basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Hosseini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Edge detection and edge enhancement techniques play an essential role in interpreting potential field data. This paper describes the application of various edge detection techniques to gravity data in order to delineate the edges of subsurface structures. The edge detection methods comprise analytic signal, total horizontal derivative (THDR, theta angle, tilt angle, hyperbolic of tilt angle (HTA, normalised total horizontal gradient (TDX and normalised horizontal derivative (NTHD. The results showed that almost all filters delineated edges of anomalies successfully. However, the capability of these filters in edge detection decreased as the depth of sources increased. Of the edge enhancement filters, normalized standard deviation filter provided much better results in delineating deeper sources. The edge detection techniques were further applied on a real gravity data from the Gheshm sedimentary basin in the Persian Gulf in Iran. All filters specified a northeast-southwest structural trend. The THDR better outlined the structural morphology and trend. Moreover, it indicated the salt plugs much better than other filters. Analytic signal and THDR successfully enhanced the edges of the shorter wavelength residual structures. Normalized standard deviation (NSTD, TDX and hyperbolic of tilt angle (HTA filters highlighted the likely fault pattern and lineaments, with a dominant northeast-southwest structural trend. This case study shows that the edge detection techniques provides valuable information for geologists and petroleum engineers to outline the horizontal location of geological sources including salt plugs and stand out buried faults, contacts and other tectonic and geological features.

  9. From quantum gravity to quantum field theory via noncommutative geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aastrup, Johannes; Grimstrup, Jesper Møller

    2014-01-01

    A link between canonical quantum gravity and fermionic quantum field theory is established in this paper. From a spectral triple construction, which encodes the kinematics of quantum gravity, we construct semi-classical states which, in a semi-classical limit, give a system of interacting fermions in an ambient gravitational field. The emergent interaction involves flux tubes of the gravitational field. In the additional limit, where all gravitational degrees of freedom are turned off, a free fermionic quantum field theory emerges. (paper)

  10. Regional models of the gravity field from terrestrial gravity data of heterogeneous quality and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talvik, Silja; Oja, Tõnis; Ellmann, Artu; Jürgenson, Harli

    2014-05-01

    Gravity field models in a regional scale are needed for a number of applications, for example national geoid computation, processing of precise levelling data and geological modelling. Thus the methods applied for modelling the gravity field from surveyed gravimetric information need to be considered carefully. The influence of using different gridding methods, the inclusion of unit or realistic weights and indirect gridding of free air anomalies (FAA) are investigated in the study. Known gridding methods such as kriging (KRIG), least squares collocation (LSCO), continuous curvature (CCUR) and optimal Delaunay triangulation (ODET) are used for production of gridded gravity field surfaces. As the quality of data collected varies considerably depending on the methods and instruments available or used in surveying it is important to somehow weigh the input data. This puts additional demands on data maintenance as accuracy information needs to be available for each data point participating in the modelling which is complicated by older gravity datasets where the uncertainties of not only gravity values but also supplementary information such as survey point position are not always known very accurately. A number of gravity field applications (e.g. geoid computation) demand foran FAA model, the acquisition of which is also investigated. Instead of direct gridding it could be more appropriate to proceed with indirect FAA modelling using a Bouguer anomaly grid to reduce the effect of topography on the resulting FAA model (e.g. near terraced landforms). The inclusion of different gridding methods, weights and indirect FAA modelling helps to improve gravity field modelling methods. It becomes possible to estimate the impact of varying methodical approaches on the gravity field modelling as statistical output is compared. Such knowledge helps assess the accuracy of gravity field models and their effect on the aforementioned applications.

  11. Gravity field of Venus - A preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. J.; Sjogren, W. L.; Abbott, E. A.; Smith, J. C.; Wimberly, R. N.; Wagner, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    The gravitational field of Venus obtained by tracking the Pioneer Venus Orbiter is examined. For each spacecraft orbit, two hours of Doppler data centered around periapsis were used to estimate spacecraft position and velocity and the velocity residuals obtained were spline fit and differentiated to produce line of sight gravitational accelerations. Consistent variations in line of sight accelerations from orbit to orbit reveal the presence of gravitational anomalies. A simulation of isostatic compensation for an elevated region on the surface of Venus indicates that the mean depth of compensation is no greater than about 100 km. Gravitational spectra obtained from a Fourier analysis of line of sight accelerations from selected Venus orbits are compared to the earth's gravitational spectrum and spherical harmonic gravitational potential power spectra of the earth, the moon and Mars. The Venus power spectrum is found to be remarkably similar to that of the earth, however systematic variations in the harmonics suggest differences in dynamic processes or lithospheric behavior.

  12. Geostatistical methods applied to field model residuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maule, Fox; Mosegaard, K.; Olsen, Nils

    consists of measurement errors and unmodelled signal), and is typically assumed to be uncorrelated and Gaussian distributed. We have applied geostatistical methods to analyse the residuals of the Oersted(09d/04) field model [http://www.dsri.dk/Oersted/Field_models/IGRF_2005_candidates/], which is based......The geomagnetic field varies on a variety of time- and length scales, which are only rudimentary considered in most present field models. The part of the observed field that can not be explained by a given model, the model residuals, is often considered as an estimate of the data uncertainty (which...... on 5 years of Ørsted and CHAMP data, and includes secular variation and acceleration, as well as low-degree external (magnetospheric) and induced fields. The analysis is done in order to find the statistical behaviour of the space-time structure of the residuals, as a proxy for the data covariances...

  13. Combination of GRACE monthly gravity field solutions from different processing strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Yoomin; Meyer, Ulrich; Jäggi, Adrian

    2018-02-01

    We combine the publicly available GRACE monthly gravity field time series to produce gravity fields with reduced systematic errors. We first compare the monthly gravity fields in the spatial domain in terms of signal and noise. Then, we combine the individual gravity fields with comparable signal content, but diverse noise characteristics. We test five different weighting schemes: equal weights, non-iterative coefficient-wise, order-wise, or field-wise weights, and iterative field-wise weights applying variance component estimation (VCE). The combined solutions are evaluated in terms of signal and noise in the spectral and spatial domains. Compared to the individual contributions, they in general show lower noise. In case the noise characteristics of the individual solutions differ significantly, the weighted means are less noisy, compared to the arithmetic mean: The non-seasonal variability over the oceans is reduced by up to 7.7% and the root mean square (RMS) of the residuals of mass change estimates within Antarctic drainage basins is reduced by 18.1% on average. The field-wise weighting schemes in general show better performance, compared to the order- or coefficient-wise weighting schemes. The combination of the full set of considered time series results in lower noise levels, compared to the combination of a subset consisting of the official GRACE Science Data System gravity fields only: The RMS of coefficient-wise anomalies is smaller by up to 22.4% and the non-seasonal variability over the oceans by 25.4%. This study was performed in the frame of the European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM; http://www.egsiem.eu) project. The gravity fields provided by the EGSIEM scientific combination service (ftp://ftp.aiub.unibe.ch/EGSIEM/) are combined, based on the weights derived by VCE as described in this article.

  14. Developments in Lunar Gravity Field Recovery Within the Project GRAZIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirnsberger, Harald; Klinger, Beate; Krauss, Sandro; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    The project GRAZIL addresses the highly accurate recovery of the lunar gravity field using intersatellite Ka-band ranging (KBR) measurements collected by the Lunar Gravity Ranging System (LGRS) of the Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission. Dynamic precise orbit determination is an indispensable task in order to recover the lunar gravity field based on LGRS measurements. The concept of variational equations is adopted to determine the orbit of the two GRAIL satellites based on radio science data. In this contribution we focus on the S-band two-way Doppler data collected by the Deep Space Network.As far as lunar gravity field recovery is concerned, we apply an integral equation approach using short orbital arcs. In this contribution we demonstrate the progress of Graz lunar gravity field models (GrazLGM) from the beginning, till the end of the projet GRAZIL. For the latest GrazLGM version special attention is given to the refinement of our processing strategy in conjunction with an increase of the spectral resolution. Furthermore, we present the first GrazLGM based on KBR observations during the primary and the extended mission phase. Our results are validated against state of the art lunar gravity field models computed at NASA-GSFC and NASA-JPL.

  15. The combined gravity field model GOCO05c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecher, Thomas; Pail, Roland; Gruber, Thomas; GOCO Project Team

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the static gravity field is of importance for various scientific disciplines, such as geodesy, geophysics and oceanography. While for geophysics the gravity field provides insight into the Earth's interior, the geoid serves as an important reference surface for oceanographic applications. Moreover this reference surface is a key parameter on the way to a globally unified height system. In order to exploit the full potential of gravity measurements and to achieve the best gravity field solution, all kinds of complementary gravity field information have to be combined. By combining GRACE and GOCE information, a state of the art satellite-only gravity field is available, which is highly accurate at the very long to medium wavelengths (80-100 km). By adding information from terrestrial/airborne gravimetry and satellite altimetry, which both are measurement techniques providing short wavelength gravity information beyond the resolution of GOCE, the full gravity field spectrum can be obtained. This paper focuses on the presentation of the combined gravity field model GOCO05c, a global gravity field model up to degree and order 720 based on full normal equation systems (more than 500,000 parameters). During the calculation of GOCO05c we put emphasis on the question how the complementary data types can be combined in a global gravity field model in the way that all data types keep their specific strengths and are not degraded by the combination with other information in certain wavelengths. Realistic stochastic modelling and a tailored weighting scheme among all available data results in different regional relative weighting of satellite and terrestrial data in the combined solution, mainly depending on the quality of the available terrestrial gravity information. From this procedure, as complementary product realistic error estimates are available in terms of a full-covariance matrix, which can be mapped in a spatial error grid reflecting regionally specific

  16. Residual stress field of ballised holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Man On; He, Zhimin

    2012-01-01

    Ballising, involving pushing a slightly over-sized ball made of hard material through a hole, is a kind of cold working process. Applying ballising process to fastener holes produces compressive residual stress on the edge of the holes, and therefore increases the fatigue life of the components or structures. Quantification of the residual stress field is critical to define and precede the ballising process. In this article, the ballised holes are modeled as cold-expanded holes. Elastic-perfectly plastic theory is employed to analyze the holes with cold expansion process. For theoretical simplification, an axially symmetrical thin plate with a cold expanded hole is assumed. The elasticplastic boundaries and residual stress distribution surrounding the cold expanded hole are derived. With the analysis, the residual stress field can be obtained together with actual cold expansion process in which only the diameters of hole before and after cold expansion need to be measured. As it is a non-destructive method, it provides a convenient way to estimate the elastic-plastic boundaries and residual stresses of cold worked holes. The approach is later extended to the case involving two cold-worked holes. A ballised hole is looked upon as a cold expanded hole and therefore is investigated by the approach. Specimens ballised with different interference levels are investigated. The effects of interference levels and specimen size on residual stresses are studied. The overall residual stresses of plates with two ballised holes are obtained by superposing the residual stresses induced on a single ballised hole. The effects of distance between the centers of the two holes with different interference levels on the residual stress field are revealed

  17. Numerical Study of Buoyancy Convection of Air under Permanent Magnetic Field and Comparison with That under Gravity Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kewei Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetothermal free convection of air in a square enclosure under a nonuniform magnetic field provided by a permanent neodymium-iron-boron magnet is numerically studied. The natural convection under the gravity field alone is also studied for comparison. The physical fields of magnetizing force, velocity, and temperature as well as the local distribution characteristic of Nusselt number are all presented in this paper. The results show that the buoyancy convection of air in the square enclosure under magnetic field is quite different from that under the gravity field. The local value of Nusselt number under the magnetic field supplied by a permanent magnet with a residual magnetic flux density of about 4.5 Tesla can reach a high value of about three times larger than the maximum local value of Nusselt number under the gravity field. Relatively uniform distributions of temperature gradient and Nusselt number can be obtained along the cold wall of the enclosure under the magnetic field. A permanent magnet with high magnetic energy product with Br reaching to 3.5 Tesla can play a comparative role on the averaged Nusselt number compared with that under the gravity environment.

  18. Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

  19. Time lapse gravity monitoring at Coso geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Rachel Vest

    An extensive time lapse gravity data set was acquired over the Coso geothermal field near Ridgecrest, California starting in 1987, with the latest data set acquired in 2013. In this thesis I use these gravity data to obtain a better understanding of mass changes occurring within the geothermal field. Geothermal energy is produced by flashing naturally heated ground water into steam which is used to turn turbines. Brine and re-condensed steam are then re-injected into the reservoir. A percentage of the water removed from the system is lost to the process. The time lapse gravity method consists of gravity measurements taken at the same locations over time, capturing snap shots of the changing field. After careful processing, the final data are differenced to extract the change in gravity over time. This change in gravity can then be inverted to recover the change in density and therefore mass over time. The inversion process also produces information on the three dimensional locations of these mass changes. Thirty five gravity data sets were processed and a subsection were inverted with two different starting times, a sixteen point data set collected continuously between 1991 and 2005, and a thirty-eight point data set collected between 1996 and 2005. The maximum change in gravity in the 1991 data group was -350 microGal observed near station CSE2. For the 1996 data group the maximum gravity change observed over the nine year period was -248 microGal. The gravity data were then inverted using the surface inversion method. Three values of density contrast were used, -0.05 g/cm3, -0.10 g/cm3, and -0.20 g/cm3. The starting surface in 1991 was set to 2,500 ft above sea level. The changes in surfaces were then converted to mass changes. The largest total mass change recovered was -1.39x1011 kg. This mass value is of the same order of magnitude as published well production data for the field. Additionally, the gravity data produces a better understanding of the spatial

  20. Quantizing higher-spin gravity in free-field variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoleoni, Andrea; Fredenhagen, Stefan; Raeymaekers, Joris

    2018-02-01

    We study the formulation of massless higher-spin gravity on AdS3 in a gauge in which the fundamental variables satisfy free field Poisson brackets. This gauge choice leaves a small portion of the gauge freedom unfixed, which should be further quotiented out. We show that doing so leads to a bulk version of the Coulomb gas formalism for W N CFT's: the generators of the residual gauge symmetries are the classical limits of screening charges, while the gauge-invariant observables are classical W N charges. Quantization in these variables can be carried out using standard techniques and makes manifest a remnant of the triality symmetry of W ∞[λ]. This symmetry can be used to argue that the theory should be supplemented with additional matter content which is precisely that of the Prokushkin-Vasiliev theory. As a further application, we use our formulation to quantize a class of conical surplus solutions and confirm the conjecture that these are dual to specific degenerate W N primaries, to all orders in the large central charge expansion.

  1. Effect of Numerical Error on Gravity Field Estimation for GRACE and Future Gravity Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Christopher; Bettadpur, Srinivas

    2015-04-01

    In recent decades, gravity field determination from low Earth orbiting satellites, such as the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), has become increasingly more effective due to the incorporation of high accuracy measurement devices. Since instrumentation quality will only increase in the near future and the gravity field determination process is computationally and numerically intensive, numerical error from the use of double precision arithmetic will eventually become a prominent error source. While using double-extended or quadruple precision arithmetic will reduce these errors, the numerical limitations of current orbit determination algorithms and processes must be accurately identified and quantified in order to adequately inform the science data processing techniques of future gravity missions. The most obvious numerical limitation in the orbit determination process is evident in the comparison of measured observables with computed values, derived from mathematical models relating the satellites' numerically integrated state to the observable. Significant error in the computed trajectory will corrupt this comparison and induce error in the least squares solution of the gravitational field. In addition, errors in the numerically computed trajectory propagate into the evaluation of the mathematical measurement model's partial derivatives. These errors amalgamate in turn with numerical error from the computation of the state transition matrix, computed using the variational equations of motion, in the least squares mapping matrix. Finally, the solution of the linearized least squares system, computed using a QR factorization, is also susceptible to numerical error. Certain interesting combinations of each of these numerical errors are examined in the framework of GRACE gravity field determination to analyze and quantify their effects on gravity field recovery.

  2. Scalar fields and higher-derivative gravity in brane worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, S.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the brane world picture in the context of higher-derivative theories of gravity and tackle the problematic issues fine-tuning and brane-embedding. First, we give an overview of extra-dimensional physics, from the Kaluza-Klein picture up to modern brane worlds with large extra dimensions. We describe the different models and their physical impact on future experiments. We work within the framework of Randall-Sundrum models in which the brane is a gravitating object, which warps the background metric. We add scalar fields to the original model and find new and self-consistent solutions for quadratic potentials of the fields. This gives us the tools to investigate higher-derivative gravity theories in brane world models. Specifically, we take gravitational Lagrangians that depend on an arbitrary function of the Ricci scalar only, so-called f(R)-gravity. We make use of the conformal equivalence between f(R)-gravity and Einstein-Hilbert gravity with an auxiliary scalar field. We find that the solutions in the higher-derivative gravity framework behave very differently from the original Randall-Sundrum model: the metric functions do not have the typical kink across the brane. Furthermore, we present solutions that do not rely on a cosmological constant in the bulk and so avoid the fine-tuning problem. We address the issue of brane-embedding, which is important in perturbative analyses. We consider the embedding of codimension one hypersurfaces in general and derive a new equation of motion with which the choice for the embedding has to comply. In particular, this allows for a consistent consideration of brane world perturbations in the case of higher-derivative gravity. We use the newly found background solutions for quadratic potentials and find that gravity is still effectively localized on the brane, i.e that the Newtonian limit holds

  3. Vector fields and gravity on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsymovsky, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of discretization of vector field on Regge lattice is considered. Our approach is based on geometrical interpretation of the vector field as the field of infinitesimal coordinate transformation. A discrete version of the vector field action is obtained as a particular case of the continuum action, and it is shown to have the true continuum limit

  4. Modeling the Earth's Gravity Field in Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, S.; Panet, I.; Ramillien, G.; Guilloux, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth constantly deforms as it undergoes dynamic phenomena, such as earthquakes, post-glacial rebound and water displacement in its fluid envelopes. These processes have different spatial and temporal scales and are accompanied by mass displacements, which create temporal variations of the gravity field. Since 2002, satellite missions such as GOCE and GRACE provide an unprecedented view of the spatial and temporal variations of the Earth's gravity field. Gravity models built from these data are essential to study the Earth's dynamic processes. The gravity field and its time variations are usually modelled using spatial spherical harmonics functions averaged over a fixed period, as 10 days or 1 month. This approach is well suited for modeling global phenomena. To better estimate gravity variations related to local and/or transient processes, such as earthquakes or floods, and take into account the trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution resulting from the satellites sampling, we propose to model the gravity field as a four-dimensional quantity using localized functions in space and time. For that, we first design a four-dimensional multi-scale basis, well localized both in space and time, by combining spatial Poisson wavelets with an orthogonal temporal wavelet basis. In such approach, the temporal resolution can be adjusted to the spatial one. Then, we set-up the inverse problem to model potential differences between the twin GRACE satellites in 4D, and propose a regularization using prior knowledge on the water cycle signal amplitude. We validate our 4D modelling method on a synthetic test over Africa, using synthetic data on potential differences along the orbits constructed from a global hydrological model. A perspective of this work is to apply it on real data, in order to better model and understand the non-stationnary gravity field variations and associated processes at regional scales.

  5. Measurement of Jupiter’s asymmetric gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, L.; Folkner, W. M.; Durante, D.; Parisi, M.; Kaspi, Y.; Galanti, E.; Guillot, T.; Hubbard, W. B.; Stevenson, D. J.; Anderson, J. D.; Buccino, D. R.; Casajus, L. Gomez; Milani, A.; Park, R.; Racioppa, P.; Serra, D.; Tortora, P.; Zannoni, M.; Cao, H.; Helled, R.; Lunine, J. I.; Miguel, Y.; Militzer, B.; Wahl, S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S. M.; Bolton, S. J.

    2018-03-01

    The gravity harmonics of a fluid, rotating planet can be decomposed into static components arising from solid-body rotation and dynamic components arising from flows. In the absence of internal dynamics, the gravity field is axially and hemispherically symmetric and is dominated by even zonal gravity harmonics J2n that are approximately proportional to qn, where q is the ratio between centrifugal acceleration and gravity at the planet’s equator. Any asymmetry in the gravity field is attributed to differential rotation and deep atmospheric flows. The odd harmonics, J3, J5, J7, J9 and higher, are a measure of the depth of the winds in the different zones of the atmosphere. Here we report measurements of Jupiter’s gravity harmonics (both even and odd) through precise Doppler tracking of the Juno spacecraft in its polar orbit around Jupiter. We find a north–south asymmetry, which is a signature of atmospheric and interior flows. Analysis of the harmonics, described in two accompanying papers, provides the vertical profile of the winds and precise constraints for the depth of Jupiter’s dynamical atmosphere.

  6. Finite field-dependent symmetries in perturbative quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the absolutely anticommuting nilpotent symmetries for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime in linear and non-linear gauges. Further, we analyze the finite field-dependent BRST (FFBRST) transformation for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime. The FFBRST transformation changes the gauge-fixing and ghost parts of the perturbative quantum gravity within functional integration. However, the operation of such symmetry transformation on the generating functional of perturbative quantum gravity does not affect the theory on physical ground. The FFBRST transformation with appropriate choices of finite BRST parameter connects non-linear Curci–Ferrari and Landau gauges of perturbative quantum gravity. The validity of the results is also established at quantum level using Batalin–Vilkovisky (BV) formulation. -- Highlights: •The perturbative quantum gravity is treated as gauge theory. •BRST and anti-BRST transformations are developed in linear and non-linear gauges. •BRST transformation is generalized by making it finite and field dependent. •Connection between linear and non-linear gauges is established. •Using BV formulation the results are established at quantum level also

  7. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere.

  8. High-Resolution Gravity and Time-Varying Gravity Field Recovery using GRACE and CHAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research work conducted under NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards Program 1998 (SENH98) entitled High Resolution Gravity and Time Varying Gravity Field Recovery Using GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) and CHAMP (Challenging Mini-satellite Package for Geophysical Research and Applications), which included a no-cost extension time period. The investigation has conducted pilot studies to use the simulated GRACE and CHAMP data and other in situ and space geodetic observable, satellite altimeter data, and ocean mass variation data to study the dynamic processes of the Earth which affect climate change. Results from this investigation include: (1) a new method to use the energy approach for expressing gravity mission data as in situ measurements with the possibility to enhance the spatial resolution of the gravity signal; (2) the method was tested using CHAMP and validated with the development of a mean gravity field model using CHAMP data, (3) elaborate simulation to quantify errors of tides and atmosphere and to recover hydrological and oceanic signals using GRACE, results show that there are significant aliasing effect and errors being amplified in the GRACE resonant geopotential and it is not trivial to remove these errors, and (4) quantification of oceanic and ice sheet mass changes in a geophysical constraint study to assess their contributions to global sea level change, while the results improved significant over the use of previous studies using only the SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging)-determined zonal gravity change data, the constraint could be further improved with additional information on mantle rheology, PGR (Post-Glacial Rebound) and ice loading history. A list of relevant presentations and publications is attached, along with a summary of the SENH investigation generated in 2000.

  9. MODEL FOR THE CORRECTION OF THE SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF BIODIESEL FROM RESIDUAL OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Aparecida Rosa da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a important fuel with economic benefits, social and environmental. The production cost of the biodiesel can be significantly lowered if the raw material is replaced by a alternative material as residual oil. In this study, the variation of specific gravity with temperature increase for diesel and biodiesel from residual oil obtained by homogeneous basic catalysis. All properties analyzed for biodiesel are within specification Brazil. The determination of the correction algorithm for the specific gravity function of temperature is also presented, and the slope of the line to diesel fuel, methylic biodiesel (BMR and ethylic biodiesel (BER from residual oil were respectively the values -0.7089, -0.7290 and -0.7277. This demonstrates the existence of difference of the model when compared chemically different fuels, like diesel and biodiesel from different sources, indicating the importance of determining the specific algorithm for the operations of conversion of volume to the reference temperature.

  10. Zwei-Dreibein Gravity : A Two-Frame-Field Model of 3D Massive Gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; de Haan, Sjoerd; Hohm, Olaf; Merbis, Wout; Townsend, Paul K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a generally covariant and parity-invariant two-frame field ("zwei-dreibein") action for gravity in three space-time dimensions that propagates two massive spin-2 modes, unitarily, and we use Hamiltonian methods to confirm the absence of unphysical degrees of freedom. We show how

  11. A data-driven approach to local gravity field modelling using spherical radial basis functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klees, R.; Tenzer, R.; Prutkin, I.; Wittwer, T.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a methodology for local gravity field modelling from gravity data using spherical radial basis functions. The methodology comprises two steps: in step 1, gravity data (gravity anomalies and/or gravity disturbances) are used to estimate the disturbing potential using least-squares

  12. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-09-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  13. Gravity field and internal structure of Mercury from MESSENGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Phillips, Roger J; Solomon, Sean C; Hauck, Steven A; Lemoine, Frank G; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Peale, Stanton J; Margot, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Catherine L; Torrence, Mark H; Perry, Mark E; Rowlands, David D; Goossens, Sander; Head, James W; Taylor, Anthony H

    2012-04-13

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR(2) = 0.353 ± 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(m)/C = 0.452 ± 0.035. A model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core.

  14. Self-organizing physical fields and gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestov, I.B.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that the Theory of Self-Organizing Physical Fields provides the adequate and consistent consideration of the gravitational phenomena. The general conclusion lies in the fact that the essence of gravidynamics is the new field concept of time and the general covariant law of energy conservation which in particular means that dark energy is simply the energy of the gravitational field. From the natural geometrical laws of gravidynamics the dynamical equations of the gravitational field are derived. Two exact solutions of these equations are obtained. One of them represents a shock gravitational wave and the other represents the Universe filled up with the gravitational energy only. These solutions are compared with the Schwarzschild and Friedmann solutions in the Einstein general theory of relativity

  15. Noncommutative gravity and quantum field theory on noncummutative curved spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenkel, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the first part of this thesis is to understand symmetry reduction in noncommutative gravity, which then allows us to find exact solutions of the noncommutative Einstein equations. We propose an extension of the usual symmetry reduction procedure, which is frequently applied to the construction of exact solutions of Einstein's field equations, to noncommutative gravity and show that this leads to preferred choices of noncommutative deformations of a given symmetric system. We classify in the case of abelian Drinfel'd twists all consistent deformations of spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies and of the Schwarzschild black hole. The deformed symmetry structure allows us to obtain exact solutions of the noncommutative Einstein equations in many of our models, for which the noncommutative metric field coincides with the classical one. In the second part we focus on quantum field theory on noncommutative curved spacetimes. We develop a new formalism by combining methods from the algebraic approach to quantum field theory with noncommutative differential geometry. The result is an algebra of observables for scalar quantum field theories on a large class of noncommutative curved spacetimes. A precise relation to the algebra of observables of the corresponding undeformed quantum field theory is established. We focus on explicit examples of deformed wave operators and find that there can be noncommutative corrections even on the level of free field theories, which is not the case in the simplest example of the Moyal-Weyl deformed Minkowski spacetime. The convergent deformation of simple toy-models is investigated and it is shown that these quantum field theories have many new features compared to formal deformation quantization. In addition to the expected nonlocality, we obtain that the relation between the deformed and the undeformed quantum field theory is affected in a nontrivial way, leading to an improved behavior of the noncommutative

  16. Noncommutative gravity and quantum field theory on noncummutative curved spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, Alexander

    2011-10-24

    The purpose of the first part of this thesis is to understand symmetry reduction in noncommutative gravity, which then allows us to find exact solutions of the noncommutative Einstein equations. We propose an extension of the usual symmetry reduction procedure, which is frequently applied to the construction of exact solutions of Einstein's field equations, to noncommutative gravity and show that this leads to preferred choices of noncommutative deformations of a given symmetric system. We classify in the case of abelian Drinfel'd twists all consistent deformations of spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies and of the Schwarzschild black hole. The deformed symmetry structure allows us to obtain exact solutions of the noncommutative Einstein equations in many of our models, for which the noncommutative metric field coincides with the classical one. In the second part we focus on quantum field theory on noncommutative curved spacetimes. We develop a new formalism by combining methods from the algebraic approach to quantum field theory with noncommutative differential geometry. The result is an algebra of observables for scalar quantum field theories on a large class of noncommutative curved spacetimes. A precise relation to the algebra of observables of the corresponding undeformed quantum field theory is established. We focus on explicit examples of deformed wave operators and find that there can be noncommutative corrections even on the level of free field theories, which is not the case in the simplest example of the Moyal-Weyl deformed Minkowski spacetime. The convergent deformation of simple toy-models is investigated and it is shown that these quantum field theories have many new features compared to formal deformation quantization. In addition to the expected nonlocality, we obtain that the relation between the deformed and the undeformed quantum field theory is affected in a nontrivial way, leading to an improved behavior of the

  17. Gravity field models derived from Swarm GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira da Encarnação, João; Arnold, Daniel; Bezděk, Aleš; Dahle, Christoph; Doornbos, Eelco; van den IJssel, Jose; Jäggi, Adrian; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Sebera, Josef; Visser, Pieter; Zehentner, Norbert

    2017-04-01

    The Swarm satellites, with primary mission to measure Earth's Magnetic Field, continue to provide high-quality hl-SST data. We use these data to derive the time-varying gravity field of the Earth up to Spherical Harmonic degree and order 12, on a monthly basis since December 2013. We combine the gravity field solutions computed with the data of all three satellites, as provided by a number of institutes, namely at the Astronomical Institute (ASU) of the Czech Academy of Sciences (Bezděk et al., 2016), the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB, Jäggi et al., 2016) and the Institute of Geodesy (IfG) of the Graz University of Technology (Zehentner et al., 2015) and demonstrate that this uninterrupted time series of gravity field models are in good agreement with the temporal variations observed by the GRACE satellites. Therefore, these data can be used to study large-scale mass changes globally, e.g. i) in the context of low-latency applications, such as the European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management project (http://egsiem.eu), ii) in those months where GRACE solutions are not available, and iii) as an important source of independent information for mitigating the GRACE/GRACE Follow-On gap.

  18. GOCE Science Orbits and their Application to Gravity Field Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, A.; Bock, H.; Meyer, U.; Beutler, G.; Visser, P. N.; van den Ijssel, J.; van Helleputte, T.; Heinze, M.

    2010-12-01

    ESA's first Earth Explorer Core Mission GOCE is equipped with a 12-channel, dual-frequency GPS receiver for precise orbit determination, instrument time-tagging, and the determination of the long wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. A rapid science orbit (RSO) product with sub-dm accuracy is provided by the GOCE High-level Processing Facility (HPF) with a latency of 1-day for quick-look analyses. A precise science orbit (PSO) product with 2-cm accuracy is provided with a latency of 1-week for final analyses. We present the reduced-dynamic and kinematic RSO and PSO results obtained from the first year of science operations. Orbit comparisons and validations with independent Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements demonstrate that the mission requirements are fully met for both orbit products. We use the 1-sec kinematic positions of the GOCE PSO product for gravity field determination. We analyze the contribution of the GOCE kinematic orbit positions to gravity field recovery and present solutions that resolve the Earth's gravity field up to degree 120.

  19. Parallel Vector Fields and Einstein Equations of Gravity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Rwanda Journal Volume 20, Series C, 2011: Mathematical Sciences, Engineering and Technology. 106. Parallel Vector Fields and. Einstein Equations of Gravity. By Isidore Mahara. National University of Rwanda. Department of Applied Mathematics. Abstract. In this paper, we prove that no nontrivial timelike or spacelike ...

  20. Global gravity field from recent satellites (DTU15) - Arctic improvements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O. B.; Knudsen, P.; Kenyon, S.

    2017-01-01

    Global marine gravity field modelling using satellite altimetry is currently undergoing huge improvement with the completion of the Jason-1 end-of-life geodetic mission, but particularly with the continuing Cryosat-2 mission. These new satellites provide three times as many geodetic mission altim...

  1. Stochastic quantization of gravity and string fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, H.

    1986-01-01

    The stochastic quantization method of Parisi and Wu is generalized so as to make it applicable to Einstein's theory of gravitation. The generalization is based on the existence of a preferred metric in field configuration space, involves Ito's calculus, and introduces a complex stochastic process adapted to Lorentzian spacetime. It implies formally the path integral measure of DeWitt, a causual Feynman propagator, and a consistent stochastic perturbation theory. The lineraized version of the theory is also obtained from the stochastic quantization of the free string field theory of Siegel and Zwiebach. (Author)

  2. Dirac fields in loop quantum gravity and big bang nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojowald, Martin; Das, Rupam; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Big bang nucleosynthesis requires a fine balance between equations of state for photons and relativistic fermions. Several corrections to equation of state parameters arise from classical and quantum physics, which are derived here from a canonical perspective. In particular, loop quantum gravity allows one to compute quantum gravity corrections for Maxwell and Dirac fields. Although the classical actions are very different, quantum corrections to the equation of state are remarkably similar. To lowest order, these corrections take the form of an overall expansion-dependent multiplicative factor in the total density. We use these results, along with the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis, to place bounds on these corrections and especially the patch size of discrete quantum gravity states.

  3. Gravity field and zonal winds of rotationally distorted Jupiter (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, D.; Zhang, K.; Schubert, G.

    2013-12-01

    Interpretation of JUNO's gravity measurements requires an accurate description of Jupiter's gravitational field in its equilibrium under the balance of self-gravity, internal pressure and strong rotational effects. Rotational distortion cannot be treated as a small perturbation on a spherically symmetric state. We report the results of two related problems pertinent to the interpretation of Jupiter's gravitational coefficients. In the first problem, we carry out the accurate computation of the zonal gravitational coefficients J_2, J_4,...,J_{12} taking into account the full rotational distortion. The first 3 coefficients J_2, J_4, J_6 are found to be in a good agreement with the measured values for Jupiter. In the second problem we compute an upper bound to the effects of zonal winds on the gravitational coefficients of rotationally distorted Jupiter with non-spherical geometry. We argue that the two problems are mathematically and physically coupled and inseparable for the interpretation of JUNO's gravity measurements.

  4. Gravity Field of the Orientale Basin from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Goossens, Sander; Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Head, James W.; Kiefer, Walter S.; Asmar, Sami W.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Lemoine, Frank G.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Orientale basin is the youngest and best-preserved major impact structure on the Moon. We used the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft to investigate the gravitational field of Orientale at 3- to 5-kilometer (km) horizontal resolution. A volume of at least (3.4 +/- 0.2) × 10(exp 6) cu km of crustal material was removed and redistributed during basin formation. There is no preserved evidence of the transient crater that would reveal the basin's maximum volume, but its diameter may now be inferred to be between 320 and 460 km. The gravity field resolves distinctive structures of Orientale's three rings and suggests the presence of faults associated with the outer two that penetrate to the mantle. The crustal structure of Orientale provides constraints on the formation of multiring basins.

  5. Tunable Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer for Mars Climate, Atmosphere, and Gravity Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, C. E.; Paik, H. J.; Moody, M. V.; Han, S.-C.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Shirron, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a compact tensor superconducting gravity gradiometer (SGG) for obtaining gravimetric measurements from planetary orbits. A new and innovative design gives a potential sensitivity of approximately 10(sup -4) E Hz(sup - 1/2)( 1 E = 10(sup -9 S(sup -2) in the measurement band up to 0.1 Hz (suitale for short wavelength static gravity) and of approximately 10(sup -4) E Hz(sup - 1/2) in the frequency band less than 1 mHz (for long wavelength time-variable gravity) from the same device with a baseline just over 10 cm. The measurement band and sensitiy can be optimally tuned in-flight during the mission by changing resonance frequencies, which allows meaurements of both static and time-variable gravity fields from the same mission. Significant advances in the technologies needed for space-based cryogenic instruments have been made in the last decade. In particular, the use of cryocoolers will alleviate the previously severe constraint on mission lifetime imposed by the use of liquid helium, enabling mission durations in the 5 - 10 year range.

  6. Strings - Links between conformal field theory, gauge theory and gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troost, J.

    2009-05-01

    String theory is a candidate framework for unifying the gauge theories of interacting elementary particles with a quantum theory of gravity. The last years we have made considerable progress in understanding non-perturbative aspects of string theory, and in bringing string theory closer to experiment, via the search for the Standard Model within string theory, but also via phenomenological models inspired by the physics of strings. Despite these advances, many deep problems remain, amongst which a non-perturbative definition of string theory, a better understanding of holography, and the cosmological constant problem. My research has concentrated on various theoretical aspects of quantum theories of gravity, including holography, black holes physics and cosmology. In this Habilitation thesis I have laid bare many more links between conformal field theory, gauge theory and gravity. Most contributions were motivated by string theory, like the analysis of supersymmetry preserving states in compactified gauge theories and their relation to affine algebras, time-dependent aspects of the holographic map between quantum gravity in anti-de-Sitter space and conformal field theories in the bulk, the direct quantization of strings on black hole backgrounds, the embedding of the no-boundary proposal for a wave-function of the universe in string theory, a non-rational Verlinde formula and the construction of non-geometric solutions to supergravity

  7. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Elliott D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite

  8. Gravity field of the Moon from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Maria T; Smith, David E; Watkins, Michael M; Asmar, Sami W; Konopliv, Alexander S; Lemoine, Frank G; Melosh, H Jay; Neumann, Gregory A; Phillips, Roger J; Solomon, Sean C; Wieczorek, Mark A; Williams, James G; Goossens, Sander J; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Mazarico, Erwan; Park, Ryan S; Yuan, Dah-Ning

    2013-02-08

    Spacecraft-to-spacecraft tracking observations from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) have been used to construct a gravitational field of the Moon to spherical harmonic degree and order 420. The GRAIL field reveals features not previously resolved, including tectonic structures, volcanic landforms, basin rings, crater central peaks, and numerous simple craters. From degrees 80 through 300, over 98% of the gravitational signature is associated with topography, a result that reflects the preservation of crater relief in highly fractured crust. The remaining 2% represents fine details of subsurface structure not previously resolved. GRAIL elucidates the role of impact bombardment in homogenizing the distribution of shallow density anomalies on terrestrial planetary bodies.

  9. From Mars to Greenland: Charting gravity with space and airborne instruments - Fields, tides, methods, results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Oscar L. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This symposium on space and airborne techniques for measuring gravity fields, and related theory, contains papers on gravity modeling of Mars and Venus at NASA/GSFC, an integrated laser Doppler method for measuring planetary gravity fields, observed temporal variations in the earth's gravity field from 16-year Starlette orbit analysis, high-resolution gravity models combining terrestrial and satellite data, the effect of water vapor corrections for satellite altimeter measurements of the geoid, and laboratory demonstrations of superconducting gravity and inertial sensors for space and airborne gravity measurements. Other papers are on airborne gravity measurements over the Kelvin Seamount; the accuracy of GPS-derived acceleration from moving platform tests; airborne gravimetry, altimetry, and GPS navigation errors; controlling common mode stabilization errors in airborne gravity gradiometry, GPS/INS gravity measurements in space and on a balloon, and Walsh-Fourier series expansion of the earth's gravitational potential.

  10. Decoding the hologram: Scalar fields interacting with gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Daniel; Lifschytz, Gilad

    2014-03-01

    We construct smeared conformal field theory (CFT) operators which represent a scalar field in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space interacting with gravity. The guiding principle is microcausality: scalar fields should commute with themselves at spacelike separation. To O(1/N) we show that a correct and convenient criterion for constructing the appropriate CFT operators is to demand microcausality in a three-point function with a boundary Weyl tensor and another boundary scalar. The resulting bulk observables transform in the correct way under AdS isometries and commute with boundary scalar operators at spacelike separation, even in the presence of metric perturbations.

  11. Les Houches lectures on large N field theories and gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldacena, J.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the holographic correspondence between field theories and string/M theory, focusing on the relation between compactifications of string/M theory on Anti-de Sitter spaces and conformal field theories. We review the background for this correspondence and discuss its motivations and the evidence for its correctness. We describe the main results that have been derived from the correspondence in the regime that the field theory is approximated by classical or semiclassical gravity. We focus on the case of the N = 4 supersymmetric gauge theory in four dimensions. (authors)

  12. Ocean tides in GRACE monthly averaged gravity fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per

    2003-01-01

    The GRACE mission will map the Earth's gravity fields and its variations with unprecedented accuracy during its 5-year lifetime. Unless ocean tide signals and their load upon the solid earth are removed from the GRACE data, their long period aliases obscure more subtle climate signals which GRACE...... aims at. In this analysis the results of Knudsen and Andersen (2002) have been verified using actual post-launch orbit parameter of the GRACE mission. The current ocean tide models are not accurate enough to correct GRACE data at harmonic degrees lower than 47. The accumulated tidal errors may affect...... the GRACE data up to harmonic degree 60. A study of the revised alias frequencies confirm that the ocean tide errors will not cancel in the GRACE monthly averaged temporal gravity fields. The S-2 and the K-2 terms have alias frequencies much longer than 30 days, so they remain almost unreduced...

  13. Domain decomposition methods in FVM approach to gravity field modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macák, Marek

    2017-04-01

    The finite volume method (FVM) as a numerical method can be straightforwardly implemented for global or local gravity field modelling. This discretization method solves the geodetic boundary value problems in a space domain. In order to obtain precise numerical solutions, it usually requires very refined discretization leading to large-scale parallel computations. To optimize such computations, we present a special class of numerical techniques that are based on a physical decomposition of the global solution domain. The domain decomposition (DD) methods like the Multiplicative Schwarz Method and Additive Schwarz Method are very efficient methods for solving partial differential equations. We briefly present their mathematical formulations and we test their efficiency. Presented numerical experiments are dealing with gravity field modelling. Since there is no need to solve special interface problems between neighbouring subdomains, in our applications we use the overlapping DD methods.

  14. Model parameter estimations from residual gravity anomalies due to simple-shaped sources using Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Yunus Levent; Balkaya, Çağlayan; Göktürkler, Gökhan; Turan, Seçil

    2016-06-01

    An efficient approach to estimate model parameters from residual gravity data based on differential evolution (DE), a stochastic vector-based metaheuristic algorithm, has been presented. We have showed the applicability and effectiveness of this algorithm on both synthetic and field anomalies. According to our knowledge, this is a first attempt of applying DE for the parameter estimations of residual gravity anomalies due to isolated causative sources embedded in the subsurface. The model parameters dealt with here are the amplitude coefficient (A), the depth and exact origin of causative source (zo and xo, respectively) and the shape factors (q and ƞ). The error energy maps generated for some parameter pairs have successfully revealed the nature of the parameter estimation problem under consideration. Noise-free and noisy synthetic single gravity anomalies have been evaluated with success via DE/best/1/bin, which is a widely used strategy in DE. Additionally some complicated gravity anomalies caused by multiple source bodies have been considered, and the results obtained have showed the efficiency of the algorithm. Then using the strategy applied in synthetic examples some field anomalies observed for various mineral explorations such as a chromite deposit (Camaguey district, Cuba), a manganese deposit (Nagpur, India) and a base metal sulphide deposit (Quebec, Canada) have been considered to estimate the model parameters of the ore bodies. Applications have exhibited that the obtained results such as the depths and shapes of the ore bodies are quite consistent with those published in the literature. Uncertainty in the solutions obtained from DE algorithm has been also investigated by Metropolis-Hastings (M-H) sampling algorithm based on simulated annealing without cooling schedule. Based on the resulting histogram reconstructions of both synthetic and field data examples the algorithm has provided reliable parameter estimations being within the sampling limits of

  15. In-orbit Calibration and Local Gravity Field Continuation Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pail, R.

    In the course of the GOCE data processing many calibration tasks have to be per- formed. Towards the final part of the data stream, an absolute calibration and vali- dation of the gradiometer signal is required. One of the most promising methods for such an in-orbit calibration is the use of well-surveyed areas on the Earth's surface, where the accuracy of the known gravity field information is high enough to meet the mission requirements. For this purpose ground gravity data have to be continued upward to the GOCE satellite altitude of approximately 250 km, where a comparison with the actual observations is performed. Since there are only very few regions on the globe which fulfil the accuracy requirements, the corresponding gravity information is extremely locally bounded, dismissing standard global continuation strategies and simultaneously resulting in edge effect and windowing problems. Based on a synthetic gravity test environment ­ providing in addition to statistical er- ror information also absolute error estimates ­ several upward continuation methods, e.g. least squares collocation, equivalent source techniques using point masses or area density distributions defined on a spherical surface section, are described, assessed and compared. It turns out that all these strictly local approaches fail to work suffi- ciently accurate. Consequently, a combined solution strategy is proposed, supporting the high-quality gravity field information within the well-surveyed test area with a low accuracy, but globally defined Earth model. Under quite realistic assumptions the upward continuation is performed with rms errors of gravity gradients in the order of 1 mE. The most crucial limiting factor of this method is spectral leakage in the course of an adequate representation of the initial gravity information. We will particularly focus on the consequences and effects of the different approaches on the accuracy of GOCE level 1b and 2 products. In order to demonstrate

  16. Sensitivity analysis of crustal correction and its error propagation to upper mantle residual gravity and density anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the crustal structure heterogeneity and uncertainty in its determination on stripped gravity field. The analysis is based on interpretation of residual upper mantle gravity anomalies which are calculated by subtracting (stripping) the gravitational effect of the crust...... a relatively small range of expected density variations in the lithospheric mantle, knowledge on the uncertainties associated with incomplete knowledge of density structure of the crust is of utmost importance for further progress in such studies......) uncertainties in the velocity-density conversion and (ii) uncertainties in knowledge of the crustal structure (thickness and average Vp velocities of individual crustal layers, including the sedimentary cover). In this study, we address both sources of possible uncertainties by applying different conversions...... from velocity to density and by introducing variations into the crustal structure which corresponds to the uncertainty of its resolution by high-quality and low-quality seismic models. We examine the propagation of these uncertainties into determinations of lithospheric mantle density. The residual...

  17. The role of vector fields in modified gravity scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Koyama, Kazuya; Khosravi, Nima

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational vector degrees of freedom typically arise in many examples of modified gravity models. We start to systematically explore their role in these scenarios, studying the effects of coupling gravitational vector and scalar degrees of freedom. We focus on set-ups that enjoy a Galilean symmetry in the scalar sector and an Abelian gauge symmetry in the vector sector. These symmetries, together with the requirement that the equations of motion contain at most two space-time derivatives, only allow for a small number of operators in the Lagrangian for the gravitational fields. We investigate the role of gravitational vector fields for two broad classes of phenomena that characterize modified gravity scenarios. The first is self-acceleration: we analyze in general terms the behavior of vector fluctuations around self-accelerating solutions, and show that vanishing kinetic terms of vector fluctuations lead to instabilities on cosmological backgrounds. The second phenomenon is the screening of long range fifth forces by means of Vainshtein mechanism. We show that if gravitational vector fields are appropriately coupled to a spherically symmetric source, they can play an important role for defining the features of the background solution and the scale of the Vainshtein radius. Our general results can be applied to any concrete model of modified gravity, whose low-energy vector and scalar degrees of freedom satisfy the symmetry requirements that we impose

  18. Consolidated science requirements for a next generation gravity field mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pail, Roland; Bingham, Rory; Braitenberg, Carla; Eicker, Annette; Floberghagen, Rune; Haagmans, Roger; Horwath, Martin; LaBrecque, John; Longuevergne, Laurent; Panet, Isabelle; Rolstad-Denby, Cecile; Wouters, Bert

    2014-05-01

    As a joint initiative of the IAG (International Association of Geodesy) Sub-Commissions 2.3 and 2.6, the GGOS (Global Geodetic Observing System) Working Group on Satellite Missions, and the IUGG (International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics), science requirements for a next generation gravity field mission (beyond GRACE-FO) shall be defined and consolidated. A consolidation of the user requirements is required, because several future gravity field studies have resulted in quite different performance numbers as a target for a future gravity mission (2025+). For this purpose, the science requirements shall be accorded by the different user groups, i.e. hydrology, ocean, cryosphere, solid Earth and atmosphere, under the boundary condition of the technical feasibility of the mission concepts and before the background of double- and multi-pair formations. This initiative shall mainly concentrate on the consolidation of the science requirements, and should result in a document that can be used as a solid basis for further programmatic and technological developments. Based on limited number of realistic mission scenarios, a consolidated view on the science requirements within the international user communities shall be derived, research fields that could not be tackled by current gravity missions shall be identified, and the added value (qualitatively and quantitatively) of these scenarios with respect to science return shall be evaluated. The final science requirements shall be agreed upon during a workshop which will be held in September 2014. In this contribution, the mission scenarios will be discussed and first results of the consolidation process will be presented.

  19. Combination of monthly gravity field solutions from different processing centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Yoomin; Meyer, Ulrich; Jäggi, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the official GRACE Science Data System (SDS) monthly gravity field solutions are generated independently by the Centre for Space Research (CSR) and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ). Additional GRACE SDS monthly fields are provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for validation and outside the SDS by a number of other institutions worldwide. Although the adopted background models and processing standards have been harmonized more and more by the various processing centers during the past years, notable differences still exist and the users are more or less left alone with a decision which model to choose for their individual applications. Combinations are well-established in the area of other space geodetic techniques, such as the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), where regular comparisons and combinations of space-geodetic products have tremendously increased the usefulness of the products in a wide range of disciplines and scientific applications. In the frame of the recently started Horizon 2020 project European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM), a scientific combination service shall therefore be established to deliver the best gravity products for applications in Earth and environmental science research based on the unified knowledge of the European GRACE community. In a first step the large variety of available monthly GRACE gravity field solutions shall be mutually compared spatially and spectrally. We assess the noise of the raw as well as filtered solutions and compare the secular and seasonal periodic variations fitted to the monthly solutions. In a second step we will explore ways to generate combined solutions, e.g., based on a weighted average of the individual solutions using empirical weights derived from pair-wise comparisons. We will also assess the quality of such a combined solution and discuss the

  20. Combined GRACE-SLR monthly gravity field solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ulrich; Sosnica, Krzysytof; Maier, Andrea; Jäggi, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    Monthly gravity field solutions from GRACE GPS and GRACE K-Band data provide remarkable information about the mass transport in the system Earth by capturing the temporal variability of the gravity field at long to medium wavelengths. The GRACE solutions suffer, however, from the poor determination of the C20 coefficient from GRACE K-Band data, which describes the Earth's oblateness. C20 and its temporal variability can, on the other hand, be very well determined using satellite laser ranges (SLR) to spherical geodetic satellites such as LAGEOS and LARES. It is common practice to replace the C20 coefficient in GRACE solutions by SLR-derived values. We perform a meaningful combination of GRACE and SLR solutions at the level of normal equations using the SLR-only monthly gravity fields from the combined analysis of up to nine geodetic satellites that capture the temporal variability to degree 10 of the global spherical harmonic expansion. We present combined monthly GRACE-SLR solutions and compare them to GRACE GPS/K-Band, GRACE GPS-only, and SLR-only solutions. We discuss the relative weighting scheme of the normal equations and evaluate the secular and seasonal periodic time variations of the combined solutions at long wavelengths. We observe a positive influence of the SLR data not only on C20 but also on the formal errors of the other degree-2 spherical harmonic coefficients, which correspond to the excitation of the polar motion. A possible reduction of the influence of aliasing with the S2 tide on some GRACE-derived coefficients using a combination with SLR data will also be addressed. The analysis of SLR-only solutions indicates sensitivity to time variable signal for selected coefficients at even higher degree but special care has to be taken not to corrupt coefficients with the inferior quality in SLR solutions in the combined solutions with GRACE data. In recent years, K-Band tracking between GRACE satellites was deactivated several times resulting in

  1. Gravity field determination and characteristics: Retrospective and prospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerem, R. S.; Jekeli, C.; Kaula, W. M.

    Gravimetry has had a long history, using pendulums, torsion balances, and static spring gravimeters. Relative accuracy adequate for many geophysical problems was already attained by 1900, but it took another half century to build readily portable gravimeters. Calibration and datum definition remained problems until the 1970s when free-fall absolute gravimeters were developed that now have a precision of 10-3 mGal. The problems of geographic inaccessibility and field party costs (notably in areas of greatest tectonic interest) and now being overcome by airborne gravimetry that has already achieved accuracies of 1-3 mGal with resolutions of 10 to 20 km. Satellite techniques are the best way to determine the long-wavelength variations of the gravity field. The resolution of the models has steadily improved with the number of satellites and the precision of the observations. The best current model includes tracking data from more than 30 satellites, satellite altimetry, and surface gravimetry and has a resolution of about 290 km (harmonic degree 70) with the most recent improvements coming from Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite (DORIS) tracking of the SPOT 2 satellite and satellite laser ranging (SLR), DORIS, and Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking of the TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite. Meanwhile, radar altimetry has become the dominant technique to infer the marine geoid with a resolution of tens of kilometers or shorter. Similarly, the gravity fields of the Moon, Venus, and Mars have been determined to harmonic degrees 70, 75, and 50, respectively, although tracking limitations result in variations of spatial resolution. Modeling Earth's gravity field from the abundance of precise data has become an increasingly complex task, with which the development of computer capacity has kept pace. Contemporary solutions now entail about 10,000 parameters, half of them for effects other than the fixed gravity field of Earth. Temporal variations

  2. Quantum gravity with matter and group field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2007-01-01

    A generalization of the matrix model idea to quantum gravity in three and higher dimensions is known as group field theory (GFT). In this paper we study generalized GFT models that can be used to describe 3D quantum gravity coupled to point particles. The generalization considered is that of replacing the group leading to pure quantum gravity by the twisted product of the group with its dual-the so-called Drinfeld double of the group. The Drinfeld double is a quantum group in that it is an algebra that is both non-commutative and non-cocommutative, and special care is needed to define group field theory for it. We show how this is done, and study the resulting GFT models. Of special interest is a new topological model that is the 'Ponzano-Regge' model for the Drinfeld double. However, as we show, this model does not describe point particles. Motivated by the GFT considerations, we consider a more general class of models that are defined not using GFT, but the so-called chain mail techniques. A general model of this class does not produce 3-manifold invariants, but has an interpretation in terms of point particle Feynman diagrams

  3. Gravity Field and Internal Structure of Mercury from MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Hauck, Steven A., II; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Peale, Stanton J.; Margot, Jean-Luc; hide

    2012-01-01

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/M(R(exp 2) = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(sub m)/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. A model for Mercury s radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core.

  4. Towards quantum gravity via quantum field theory. Problems and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenhagen, Klaus [II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    General Relativity is a classical field theory; the standard methods for constructing a corresponding quantum field theory, however, meet severe difficulties, in particular perturbative non-renormalizability and the problem of background independence. Nevertheless, modern approaches to quantum field theory have significantly lowered these obstacles. On the side of non-renormalizability, this is the concept of effective theories, together with indications for better non-perturbative features of the renormalization group flow. On the side of background independence the main progress comes from an improved understanding of quantum field theories on generic curved spacetimes. Combining these informations, a promising approach to quantum gravity is an expansion around a classical solution which then is a quantum field theory on a given background, augmented by an identity which expresses independence against infinitesimal shifts of the background. The arising theory is expected to describe small corrections to classical general relativity. Inflationary cosmology is expected to arise as a lowest order approximation.

  5. Action and entanglement in gravity and field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Yasha

    2013-12-27

    In nongravitational quantum field theory, the entanglement entropy across a surface depends on the short-distance regularization. Quantum gravity should not require such regularization, and it has been conjectured that the entanglement entropy there is always given by the black hole entropy formula evaluated on the entangling surface. We show that these statements have precise classical counterparts at the level of the action. Specifically, we point out that the action can have a nonadditive imaginary part. In gravity, the latter is fixed by the black hole entropy formula, while in nongravitating theories it is arbitrary. From these classical facts, the entanglement entropy conjecture follows by heuristically applying the relation between actions and wave functions.

  6. Wormholes, emergent gauge fields, and the weak gravity conjecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlow, Daniel [Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature, Physics Department, Harvard University,Cambridge MA, 02138 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    This paper revisits the question of reconstructing bulk gauge fields as boundary operators in AdS/CFT. In the presence of the wormhole dual to the thermofield double state of two CFTs, the existence of bulk gauge fields is in some tension with the microscopic tensor factorization of the Hilbert space. I explain how this tension can be resolved by splitting the gauge field into charged constituents, and I argue that this leads to a new argument for the “principle of completeness”, which states that the charge lattice of a gauge theory coupled to gravity must be fully populated. I also claim that it leads to a new motivation for (and a clarification of) the “weak gravity conjecture”, which I interpret as a strengthening of this principle. This setup gives a simple example of a situation where describing low-energy bulk physics in CFT language requires knowledge of high-energy bulk physics. This contradicts to some extent the notion of “effective conformal field theory”, but in fact is an expected feature of the resolution of the black hole information problem. An analogous factorization issue exists also for the gravitational field, and I comment on several of its implications for reconstructing black hole interiors and the emergence of spacetime more generally.

  7. Gravity, Topography, and Magnetic Field of Mercury from Messenger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Barnouin, Olivier; Ernst, Carolyn; Goosens, Sander; Hauck, Steven A., II; Head, James W., III; Johnson, Catherine L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    On 18 March 2011, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was inserted into a 12-hour, near-polar orbit around Mercury, with an initial periapsis altitude of 200 km, initial periapse latitude of 60 deg N, and apoapsis at approximately 15,200 km altitude in the southern hemisphere. This orbit has permitted the mapping of regional gravitational structure in the northern hemisphere, and laser altimetry from the MESSENGER spacecraft has yielded a geodetically controlled elevation model for the same hemisphere. The shape of a planet combined with gravity provides fundamental information regarding its internal structure and geologic and thermal evolution. Elevations in the northern hemisphere exhibit a unimodal distribution with a dynamic range of 9.63 km, less than that of the Moon (19.9 km), but consistent with Mercury's higher surface gravitational acceleration. After one Earth-year in orbit, refined models of gravity and topography have revealed several large positive gravity anomalies that coincide with major impact basins. These candidate mascons have anomalies that exceed 100 mGal and indicate substantial crustal thinning and superisostatic uplift of underlying mantle. An additional uncompensated 1000-km-diameter gravity and topographic high at 68 deg N, 33 deg E lies within Mercury's northern volcanic plains. Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is generally thicker at low latitudes than in the polar region. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR2 = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M=3.30 x 10(exp 23) kg and R=2440 km are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of Cm/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. One proposed model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes silicate crust and mantle layers overlying a dense solid (possibly Fe-S) layer, a liquid Fe

  8. The role of satellite altimetry in gravity field modelling in coastal areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2000-01-01

    global uniform gravity information with very high resolution, and these global marine gravity fields are registered on a two by two minute grid corresponding to 4 by 4 kilometres at the equator. In this presentation several coastal complications in deriving the marine gravity field from satellite...

  9. A new class of group field theories for 1st order discrete quantum gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oriti, D.; Tlas, T.

    2008-01-01

    Group Field Theories, a generalization of matrix models for 2d gravity, represent a 2nd quantization of both loop quantum gravity and simplicial quantum gravity. In this paper, we construct a new class of Group Field Theory models, for any choice of spacetime dimension and signature, whose Feynman

  10. A Unified Field Theory of Gravity, Electromagnetism, and the Yang-Mills Gauge Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhendro I.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we attempt at constructing a comprehensive four-dimensional unified field theory of gravity, electromagnetism, and the non-Abelian Yang-Mills gauge field in which the gravitational, electromagnetic, and material spin fields are unified as intrinsic geometric objects of the space-time manifold S4 via the connection, with the general- ized non-Abelian Yang-Mills gauge field appearing in particular as a sub-field of the geometrized electromagnetic interaction.

  11. Large N Field Theories, String Theory and Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Aharony, O; Maldacena, J M; Ooguri, H; Oz, Y

    2000-01-01

    We review the holographic correspondence between field theories and string/M theory, focusing on the relation between compactifications of string/M theory on Anti-de Sitter spaces and conformal field theories. We review the background for this correspondence and discuss its motivations and the evidence for its correctness. We describe the main results that have been derived from the correspondence in the regime that the field theory is approximated by classical or semiclassical gravity. We focus on the case of the N=4 supersymmetric gauge theory in four dimensions, but we discuss also field theories in other dimensions, conformal and non-conformal, with or without supersymmetry, and in particular the relation to QCD. We also discuss some implications for black hole physics.

  12. Control of colloids with gravity, temperature gradients, and electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, M; Harrison, C; Austin, R H; Megens, M; Hollingsworth, A; Russel, W B; Cheng Zhen; Mason, T; Chaikin, P M

    2003-01-01

    We have used a variety of different applied fields to control the density, growth, and structure of colloidal crystals. Gravity exerts a body force proportional to the buoyant mass and in equilibrium produces a height-dependent concentration profile. A similar body force can be obtained with electric fields on charged particles (electrophoresis), a temperature gradient on all particles, or an electric field gradient on uncharged particles (dielectrophoresis). The last is particularly interesting since its magnitude and sign can be changed by tuning the applied frequency. We study these effects in bulk (making 'dielectrophoretic bottles' or traps), to control concentration profiles during nucleation and growth and near surfaces. We also study control of non-spherical and optically anisotropic particles with the light field from laser tweezers.

  13. A Unified Field Theory of Gravity, Electromagnetism, and theA Unified Field Theory of Gravity, Electromagnetism, and the Yang-Mills Gauge Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhendro I.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we attempt at constructing a comprehensive four-dimensional unified field theory of gravity, electromagnetism, and the non-Abelian Yang-Mills gauge field in which the gravitational, electromagnetic, and material spin fields are unified as intrinsic geometric objects of the space-time manifold $S_4$ via the connection, with the generalized non-Abelian Yang-Mills gauge field appearing in particular as a sub-field of the geometrized electromagnetic interaction.

  14. Quantum field theory and gravity in causal sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlov, Roman M.

    Causal set is a model of space time that allows to reconcile discreteness and manifest relativistic invariance. This is done by viewing space time as finite, partially ordered set. The elements of the set are viewed as points of space time, or events; the partial ordering between them is viewed as causal relations. It has been shown that, in discrete scenario, the information about causal relations between events can, indeed, approximate the metric. The goal of this thesis is to introduce matter fields and their Lagrangians into causal set context. This is a two step process. The first step is to re-define gauge fields, gravity, and distances in such a way that no reference to Lorentz index is made. This is done by defining gauge fields as two-point real valued functions, and gravitational field as causal structure itself. Once the above is done, Lagrangians have to be defined in a way that they don't refer to Lorentzian indices either. This is done by introducing a notion of type 1 and type 2 Lagrangian generators, coupled with respective machinery that "translates" each generator into corresponding Lagrangian. The fields that are subject to these generators are, respectively, defined as type 1 and type 2. The main difference between two kinds of fields is the prediction of different behavior in different dimensions of type 2 fields. However, despite our inability to travel to different dimensions, gravity was shown to be type 2 based on the erroneous predictions of its 4-dimensional behavior if it was viewed as type 1. However, no erroneous predictions are made if non-gravitational fields are viewed as either type 1 or type 2, thus the nature of the latter is still an open question. Finally, an attempt was made to provide interpretation of quantum mechanics that would allow to limit fluctuations of causal structure to allow some topological background. However, due to its controversial nature, it is placed in the Appendix.

  15. Using Clocks and Atomic Interferometry for Gravity Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    New technology developed in the frame of fundamental physics may lead to enhanced capabilities for geodetic applications such as refined observations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, we will present new sensor measurement concepts that apply atomic interferometry for gravimetry and clock measurements for observing potential values. In the first case, gravity anomalies can be determined by observing free-falling atoms (quantum gravimetry). In the second case, highly precise optical clocks can be used to measure differences of the gravity potential over long distances (relativistic geodesy). Principally, also inter-satellite ranging between test masses in space with nanometer accuracy belongs to these novel developments. We will show, how the new measurement concepts are connected to classical geodetic concepts, e.g. geopotential numbers and clock readings. We will illustrate the application of these new methods and their benefit for geodesy, where local and global mass variations can be observed with unforeseen accuracy and resolution, mass variations that reflect processes in the Earth system. We will present a few examples where geodesy will potentially benefit from these developments. Thus, the novel technologies might be applied for defining and realizing height systems in a new way, but also for fast local gravimetric surveys and exploration.

  16. Three dimensional magnetic solutions in massive gravity with (nonlinear field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Hendi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Noble Prize in physics 2016 motivates one to study different aspects of topological properties and topological defects as their related objects. Considering the significant role of the topological defects (especially magnetic strings in cosmology, here, we will investigate three dimensional horizonless magnetic solutions in the presence of two generalizations: massive gravity and nonlinear electromagnetic field. The effects of these two generalizations on properties of the solutions and their geometrical structure are investigated. The differences between de Sitter and anti de Sitter solutions are highlighted and conditions regarding the existence of phase transition in geometrical structure of the solutions are studied.

  17. Seasonal Gravity Field Variations from GRACE and Hydrological Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Hinderer, Jacques; Lemoine, Frank G.

    2004-01-01

    . Four global hydrological models covering the same period in 2002–2003 as the GRACE observations were investigated to for their mutual consistency in estimates of annual variation in terrestrial water storage and related temporal changes in gravity field. The hydrological models differ by a maximum of 2...... µGal or nearly 5 cm equivalent water storage in selected regions. Integrated over all land masses the standard deviation among the annual signal from the four hydrological models are 0.6 µGal equivalent to around 1.4 cm in equivalent water layer thickness. The estimated accuracy of the annual...

  18. Perturbations of single-field inflation in modified gravity theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taotao Qiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the case of single field inflation within the framework of modified gravity theory where the gravity part has an arbitrary form f(R. Via a conformal transformation, this case can be transformed into its Einstein frame where it looks like a two-field inflation model. However, due to the existence of the isocurvature modes in such a multi-degree-of-freedom (m.d.o.f. system, the (curvature perturbations are not equivalent in two frames, so despite of its convenience, it is illegal to treat the perturbations in its Einstein frame as the “real” ones as we always do for pure f(R theory or single field with nonminimal coupling. Here by pulling the results of curvature perturbations back into its original Jordan frame, we show explicitly the power spectrum and spectral index of the perturbations in the Jordan frame, as well as how it differs from the Einstein frame. We also fit our results with the newest Planck data. Since there is large parameter space in these models, we show that it is easy to fit the data very well.

  19. Warped conformal field theory as lower spin gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego M. Hofman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional Warped Conformal Field Theories (WCFTs may represent the simplest examples of field theories without Lorentz invariance that can be described holographically. As such they constitute a natural window into holography in non-AdS space–times, including the near horizon geometry of generic extremal black holes. It is shown in this paper that WCFTs posses a type of boost symmetry. Using this insight, we discuss how to couple these theories to background geometry. This geometry is not Riemannian. We call it Warped Geometry and it turns out to be a variant of a Newton–Cartan structure with additional scaling symmetries. With this formalism the equivalent of Weyl invariance in these theories is presented and we write two explicit examples of WCFTs. These are free fermionic theories. Lastly we present a systematic description of the holographic duals of WCFTs. It is argued that the minimal setup is not Einstein gravity but an SL(2,R×U(1 Chern–Simons Theory, which we call Lower Spin Gravity. This point of view makes manifest the definition of boundary for these non-AdS geometries. This case represents the first step towards understanding a fully invariant formalism for WN field theories and their holographic duals.

  20. Multi-scale modeling of Earth's gravity field in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Panet, Isabelle; Ramillien, Guillaume; Guilloux, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Since 2002, the GRACE mission has been providing an unprecedented view of the Earth's gravity field spatial and temporal variations. The gravity field models built from these satellite data are essential in order to study the mass redistributions within the Earth system. Often, they are modelled using spatial functions, such as spherical harmonics, averaged over a fixed time window. However, the satellite sampling naturally leads to a trade-off between the achievable spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition, the gravity variations are made of local components in space and time, reflecting the superimposition of sources. With the final aim to better estimate gravity variations related to local processes at different spatial and temporal scales, and adapt the temporal resolution of the model to its spatial resolution, we present an attempt at 4D gravity field modelling using localized functions in space and time. For that, we develop a four-dimensional wavelet basis, well localized in space and time and orthogonal in time. We then analyze the inverse problem of 4D gravity field estimation from GRACE synthetic inter-satellites potential differences along the orbit, and its regularization in a Bayesian framework, using a prior knowledge on the mass sources. We then test our approach in a simplified synthetic test setting, where only one mass source is present: hydrological mass variations over Africa during the year 2005. Applying a purely regional approach, we are able to reconstruct, regionally, the water height signal with a ≈2.5 cm accuracy at 450 km, 21 days resolution. We test the influence of the geophysical prior on this result, and conclude that it cannot explain alone the residuals between original and reconstructed mass signal. redIn contrast, an ideal test case with a perfect adequacy between the 4D basis and the synthetic data, without approximations nor regularization in solving the normal system, leads to a significantly improved reconstruction of

  1. Fugacity and concentration gradients in a gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Equations are reviewed which show that at equilibrium fugacity and concentration gradients can exist in gravitational fields. At equilibrium, the logarithm of the ratio of the fugacities of a species at two different locations in a gravitational field is proportional to the difference in the heights of the two locations and the molecular weight of the species. An analogous relation holds for the concentration ratios in a multicomponent system. The ratio is calculated for a variety of examples. The kinetics for the general process are derived, and the time required to approach equilibrium is calculated for several systems. The following special topics are discussed: ionic solutions, polymers, multiphase systems, hydrostatic pressure, osmotic pressure, and solubility gradients in a gravity field.

  2. Recovery of the Earth's Gravity Field Based on Spaceborne Atom-interferometry and Its Accuracy Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Zhu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrostatic gravity gradiometer has been successfully applied as a core sensor in satellite gravity gradiometric mission GOCE, and its observations are used to recover the Earth's static gravity field with a degree and order above 200. The lifetime of GOCE has been over, and the next generation satellite gravity gradiometry with higher resolution is urgently required in order to recover the global steady-state gravity field with a degree and order of 200~360. High potential precision can be obtained in space by atom-interferometry gravity gradiometer due to its long interference time, and thus the atom-interferometry-based satellite gravity gradiometry has been proposed as one of the candidate techniques for the next satellite gravity gradiometric mission. In order to achieve the science goal for high resolution gravity field measurement in the future, a feasible scheme of atom-interferometry gravity gradiometry in micro-gravity environment is given in this paper, and the gravity gradient measurement can be achieved with a noise of 0.85mE/Hz1/2. Comparison and estimation of the Earth's gravity field recovery precision for different types of satellite gravity gradiometry is discussed, and the results show that the satellite gravity gradiometry based on atom-interferometry is expected to provide the global gravity field model with an improved accuracy of 7~8cm in terms of geoid height and 3×10-5 m/s2 in terms of gravity anomaly respectively at a degree and order of 252~290.

  3. A new class of group field theories for first order discrete quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oriti, D [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Utrecht 3584 TD (Netherlands); Tlas, T [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: d.oriti@phys.uu.nl, E-mail: t.tlas@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2008-04-21

    Group field theories, a generalization of matrix models for 2D gravity, represent a second quantization of both loop quantum gravity and simplicial quantum gravity. In this paper, we construct a new class of group field theory models, for any choice of spacetime dimension and signature, whose Feynman amplitudes are given by path integrals for clearly identified discrete gravity actions, in first order variables. In the three-dimensional case, the corresponding discrete action is that of first order Regge calculus for gravity (generalized to include higher order corrections), while in higher dimensions, they correspond to a discrete BF theory (again, generalized to higher order) with an imposed orientation restriction on hinge volumes, similar to that characterizing discrete gravity. This new class of group field theories may represent a concrete unifying framework for loop quantum gravity and simplicial quantum gravity approaches.

  4. Effect of External Disturbing Gravity Field on Spacecraft Guidance and Surveying Line Layout for Marine Gravity Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Motao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Centred on the support requirement of flying track control for a long range spacecraft, a detail research is made on the computation of external disturbing gravity field, the survey accuracy of gravity anomaly on the earth' surface and the program of surveying line layout for marine gravity survey. Firstly, the solution expression of navigation error for a long range spacecraft is analyzed and modified, and the influence of the earth's gravity field on flying track of spacecraft is evaluated. Then with a given limited quota of biased error of spacecraft drop point, the accuracy requirement for calculating the external disturbing gravity field is discussed and researched. Secondly, the data truncation error and the propagated data error are studied and estimated, and the quotas of survey resolution and computation accuracy for gravity anomaly on the earth' surface are determined. Finally, based on the above quotas, a corresponding program of surveying line layout for marine gravity survey is proposed. A numerical test has been made to prove the reasonableness and validity of the suggested program.

  5. The impact of using jason-1 and cryosat-2 geodetic mission altimetry for gravity field modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Jain, Maulik; Knudsen, Per

    2016-01-01

    operating in a geodetic mission as part its end of life mission. In this presentation, we perform an investigation of the impact of the Cryosat-2 and Jason-1 geodetic missions on high resolution marine gravity field mapping through comparison with recent high quality marine gravity measured by the United...... States Naval Ship Bowditch in the Western Pacific Ocean in 2006. Comparisons of pre and post Cryosat- 2/Jason-1 gravity fields illustrated the importance of these new geodetic missions for altimeter marine gravity field mapping. Altimetric gravity derived using 1 year of either Cryosat-2 or Jason-1...

  6. Einstein gravity 3-point functions from conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami-Jeddi, Nima; Hartman, Thomas; Kundu, Sandipan; Tajdini, Amirhossein

    2017-12-01

    We study stress tensor correlation functions in four-dimensional conformal field theories with large N and a sparse spectrum. Theories in this class are expected to have local holographic duals, so effective field theory in anti-de Sitter suggests that the stress tensor sector should exhibit universal, gravity-like behavior. At the linearized level, the hallmark of locality in the emergent geometry is that stress tensor three-point functions 〈 T T T 〉, normally specified by three constants, should approach a universal structure controlled by a single parameter as the gap to higher spin operators is increased. We demonstrate this phenomenon by a direct CFT calculation. Stress tensor exchange, by itself, violates causality and unitarity unless the three-point functions are carefully tuned, and the unique consistent choice exactly matches the prediction of Einstein gravity. Under some assumptions about the other potential contributions, we conclude that this structure is universal, and in particular, that the anomaly coefficients satisfy a ≈ c as conjectured by Camanho et al. The argument is based on causality of a four-point function, with kinematics designed to probe bulk locality, and invokes the chaos bound of Maldacena, Shenker, and Stanford.

  7. A Revolution in Mars Topography and Gravity and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.

    2002-01-01

    Since the arrival of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) at Mars in September 1997 and the subsequent beginning of observations of the planet there has been a constant stream of surprises and puzzling observations that have kept scientists looking at new 'out of the box' explanations. Observations of the shape and topography have shown a planet with one hemisphere, the southern, several kilometers higher than the north and a northern hemisphere that is so flat and smooth in places that it's difficult to imagine it was not once the bottom of an ocean. And yet the ocean idea presents some enormous difficulties. The measurements of gravity derived from the tracking of MGS have shown that several Mars volcanoes are enormous positive gravity anomalies much larger than we see on Earth and revealed small errors in the orbit of Mars and or Earth. And the magnetic field is found to be composed of a number of extremely large crustal anomalies; but as far as can be ascertained there is no main dipole field such as we have on Earth. Understanding these diverse observations and placing them in the sequence of the evolution of the planet will be a long, challenging but rewarding task.

  8. Entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Georgios; Bierbach, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    's 20 trading partner countries, for a time frame from 1995 to 2013. The calculations -implemented for each country and each crop- display a network that illustrates the gravity of virtual water trade. It is then possible for us to model the entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity field, via the statistical examination of its spatial fragmentation or continuity for each traded crop and for each water footprint type. Hence, with the distribution's entropy we may conduct a targeted analysis on the comparative advantages of the Egyptian agriculture. Keywords: entropy, virtual water trade, gravity model, agricultural trade, water footprint, water subsidies, comparative advantage References 1. Antonelli, Marta and Martina Sartori (2014), Unfolding the potential of the Virtual Water concept. What is still under debate?, MPRA Paper No. 60501, http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60501/ 2. Fracasso, Andrea (2014), A gravity model of virtual water trade, Ecological Economics, Vol. 108, p. 215-228 3. Fracasso, Andrea; Martina Sartori and Stefano Schiavo (2014), Determinants of virtual water flows in the Mediterranean, MPRA Paper No. 60500, https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60500/ 4. Yang, H. et al. (2006), Virtual water trade: An assessment of water use efficiency in the international food trade, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 10, p. 443-454

  9. Time-variable gravity fields derived from GPS tracking of Swarm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezděk, Aleš; Sebera, Josef; de Teixeira da Encarnacao, J.; Klokočnik, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Since 2002 Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provides monthly gravity fields from K-band ranging (KBR) between two GRACE satellites. These KBR gravity monthlies have enabled the global observation of time-varying Earth mass signal at a regional scale (about 400 km resolution). Apart

  10. Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gamow, George

    2003-01-01

    A distinguished physicist and teacher, George Gamow also possessed a special gift for making the intricacies of science accessible to a wide audience. In Gravity, he takes an enlightening look at three of the towering figures of science who unlocked many of the mysteries behind the laws of physics: Galileo, the first to take a close look at the process of free and restricted fall; Newton, originator of the concept of gravity as a universal force; and Einstein, who proposed that gravity is no more than the curvature of the four-dimensional space-time continuum.Graced with the author's own draw

  11. Measurements of the Lunar Gravity Field using a Relay Subsatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, Noriyuki; Hanada, H.; Kawano, N.; Heki, K.; Iwata, T.; Ogawa, M.; Takano, T.

    1998-01-01

    Estimating spherical harmonic coefficients of the lunar gravity field has been a focus in selenodesy since the late 1960s when Doppler tracking data from lunar orbiters were first analyzed. Early analyses were limited by the low degree and order of the spherical harmonic solutions, mostly due to the slow speed and low memory of the then-available computers. However, rapid development of the computational ability has increased the resolution of the lunar gravity models significantly. Doppler tracking data from lunar orbiters 1-5 and Apollo subsatellites up to degree and order 60 (Lun60d) have been analyzed. Further, the tracking data from the Clementine spacecraft launched in 1994 has been incorporated, and a model complete to degree and order 70 (GLGM-2) has been developed. These high-resolution gravity models have been used for studies of internal structure and tectonics of the Moon. Interestingly, Lun60d and GLGM-2 show significant differences in the spherical harmonic coefficients for degree greater than 20. Because the semimajor axis of Clementine's orbit is nearly twice as large as the radius of the Moon, the contribution of the new tracking data is prevailed in the low-degree field. Methodologically, the differences in the high-degree field arise from the different weighting of the tracking data and gravity model, but, in principle, these are caused by a lack of tracking data over the farside. While the current Lunar Prospector mission is expected to improve the spatial resolution over the mid- to high-latitude regions of the nearside significantly, the absence of Doppler tracking data over the farside remains unresolved. To complete the coverage of tracking over the farside, we are developing a satellite-to-satellite (four-way) Doppler tracking experiment in SELENE (the SELenological and ENgineering Explorer) project of Japan. Outline of the Mission: The SELENE is a joint project by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) and the Institute of

  12. First-order discrete Faddeev gravity at strongly varying fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatsymovsky, V. M.

    2017-11-01

    We consider the Faddeev formulation of general relativity (GR), which can be characterized by a kind of d-dimensional tetrad (typically d = 10) and a non-Riemannian connection. This theory is invariant w.r.t. the global, but not local, rotations in the d-dimensional space. There can be configurations with a smooth or flat metric, but with the tetrad that changes abruptly at small distances, a kind of “antiferromagnetic” structure. Previously, we discussed a first-order representation for the Faddeev gravity, which uses the orthogonal connection in the d-dimensional space as an independent variable. Using the discrete form of this formulation, we considered the spectrum of (elementary) area. This spectrum turns out to be physically reasonable just on a classical background with large connection like rotations by π, that is, with such an “antiferromagnetic” structure. In the discrete first-order Faddeev gravity, we consider such a structure with periodic cells and large connection and strongly changing tetrad field inside the cell. We show that this system in the continuum limit reduces to a generalization of the Faddeev system. The action is a sum of related actions of the Faddeev type and is still reduced to the GR action.

  13. Regularization of regional gravity fields from GOCE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, M.; Flury, J.; Brieden, P.

    2014-12-01

    Regional gravity field recovery in spherical radial base functions is a strongly ill-posed problem. The ill-posedness is mainly due the restriction of observations as well as the base functions to a specific area. We investigate this ill-posedness as well as the related regularization process. We compare four different methods for the choice of regularization parameter and discuss their characteristics. Moreover, two different kinds of shape coefficients for the spherical radial base functions are used to assess the impact of shape coefficients on the regularization process. These shape coefficients are the Shannon coefficients with no smoothing properties and the Spline kernel with smoothing features. As the data set, we use two months of real GOCE ultra-sensitive gravity gradient components which are Txx, Tyy, Tzz and Txz. The regional solutions are considered in Amazon. Our results indicate, that the method used for the choice of regularization parameter is directly influenced by the shape of spherical radial base functions. In addition we conclude, that the Shannon kernel along with a proper regularization approach delivers satisfactory results with physically meaningful coefficients.

  14. Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Gravity is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind gravity, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  15. Imprints of quantum gravity on large field inflation and reheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rompineve Sorbello, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the feasibility and phenomenology of transplanckian field displacements during Inflation as well as the production of very light fields during Reheating. We begin by focusing on realisations of axion inflation in the complex structure moduli sector of Type IIB String Theory (ST) flux compactifications. Firstly, we analyse the problem of backreaction of complex structure moduli on the inflationary trajectory in a concrete model of axion monodromy inflation. Secondly, we propose a realisation of natural inflation where the inflaton arises as a combination of two axions. In both cases we find sufficiently flat inflationary potentials over a limited, but transplanckian field range. However, our realisation of axion monodromy inflation requires a potentially large, though realisable, number of tunings to ensure that the inflationary shift symmetry is only weakly broken. The consequences of the Weak Gravity Conjecture (WGC) for axion monodromy inflation are then explored. We find that the conjecture provides a bound on the inflationary field range, but does not forbid transplanckian displacements. Moreover, we provide a strategy to generalise the WGC to general p-form gauge theories in ST. Finally, we focus on the physics of the early post-inflationary phase. We show that axion monodromy inflation can lead to a phase decomposition, followed by the radiation of potentially detectable gravitational waves. We also propose a strategy to evade the overproduction of Dark Radiation in the Large Volume Scenario of moduli stabilisation, by means of flavour branes wrapping the bulk cycle of the compactification manifold.

  16. Imprints of quantum gravity on large field inflation and reheating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rompineve Sorbello, Fabrizio

    2017-04-18

    In this thesis we investigate the feasibility and phenomenology of transplanckian field displacements during Inflation as well as the production of very light fields during Reheating. We begin by focusing on realisations of axion inflation in the complex structure moduli sector of Type IIB String Theory (ST) flux compactifications. Firstly, we analyse the problem of backreaction of complex structure moduli on the inflationary trajectory in a concrete model of axion monodromy inflation. Secondly, we propose a realisation of natural inflation where the inflaton arises as a combination of two axions. In both cases we find sufficiently flat inflationary potentials over a limited, but transplanckian field range. However, our realisation of axion monodromy inflation requires a potentially large, though realisable, number of tunings to ensure that the inflationary shift symmetry is only weakly broken. The consequences of the Weak Gravity Conjecture (WGC) for axion monodromy inflation are then explored. We find that the conjecture provides a bound on the inflationary field range, but does not forbid transplanckian displacements. Moreover, we provide a strategy to generalise the WGC to general p-form gauge theories in ST. Finally, we focus on the physics of the early post-inflationary phase. We show that axion monodromy inflation can lead to a phase decomposition, followed by the radiation of potentially detectable gravitational waves. We also propose a strategy to evade the overproduction of Dark Radiation in the Large Volume Scenario of moduli stabilisation, by means of flavour branes wrapping the bulk cycle of the compactification manifold.

  17. Cosmology from group field theory formalism for quantum gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Steffen; Oriti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2013-07-19

    We identify a class of condensate states in the group field theory (GFT) formulation of quantum gravity that can be interpreted as macroscopic homogeneous spatial geometries. We then extract the dynamics of such condensate states directly from the fundamental quantum GFT dynamics, following the procedure used in ordinary quantum fluids. The effective dynamics is a nonlinear and nonlocal extension of quantum cosmology. We also show that any GFT model with a kinetic term of Laplacian type gives rise, in a semiclassical (WKB) approximation and in the isotropic case, to a modified Friedmann equation. This is the first concrete, general procedure for extracting an effective cosmological dynamics directly from a fundamental theory of quantum geometry.

  18. Correcting GRACE gravity fields for ocean tide effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2002-01-01

    [1] The GRACE mission will be launch in early 2002 and will map the Earth's gravity fields and its variations with unprecedented accuracy during its 5-year lifetime. Unless ocean tide signals and their load upon the solid earth are removed from the GRACE data, their long period aliases obscure more...... subtle climate signals which GRACE aims at. The difference between two existing ocean tide models can be used as an estimate of current tidal model error for the M-2,S-2,K-1, and O-1 constituents. When compared with the expected accuracy of the GRACE system, both expressed as spherical harmonic degree...... variances, we find that the current ocean tide models are not accurate enough to correct GRACE data at harmonic degrees lower that 35. The accumulated tidal errors may affect the GRACE data up to harmonic degree 56. Furthermore, the atmospheric (radiation) tides may cause significant errors in the ocean...

  19. Gravity field, shape, and moment of inertia of Titan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, Luciano; Rappaport, Nicole J; Jacobson, Robert A; Racioppa, Paolo; Stevenson, David J; Tortora, Paolo; Armstrong, John W; Asmar, Sami W

    2010-03-12

    Precise radio tracking of the spacecraft Cassini has provided a determination of Titan's mass and gravity harmonics to degree 3. The quadrupole field is consistent with a hydrostatically relaxed body shaped by tidal and rotational effects. The inferred moment of inertia factor is about 0.34, implying incomplete differentiation, either in the sense of imperfect separation of rock from ice or a core in which a large amount of water remains chemically bound in silicates. The equilibrium figure is a triaxial ellipsoid whose semi-axes a, b, and c differ by 410 meters (a-c) and 103 meters (b-c). The nonhydrostatic geoid height variations (up to 19 meters) are small compared to the observed topographic anomalies of hundreds of meters, suggesting a high degree of compensation appropriate to a body that has warm ice at depth.

  20. Towards strong field tests of beyond Horndeski gravity theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Babichev, Eugeny; Koyama, Kazuya; Langlois, David; Saito, Ryo

    2017-03-01

    Theories of gravity in the beyond Horndeski class encompass a wide range of scalar-tensor theories that will be tested on cosmological scales over the coming decade. In this work, we investigate the possibility of testing them in the strong field regime by looking at the properties of compact objects—neutron, hyperon, and quark stars—embedded in an asymptotically de Sitter space-time, for a specific subclass of theories. We extend previous works to include slow rotation and find a relation between the dimensionless moment of inertia (I ¯ =I c2/GNM3 ) and the compactness C =GNM /R c2 (an I ¯-C relation), independent of the equation of state, that is reminiscent of but distinct from the general relativity prediction. Several of our equations of state contain hyperons and free quarks, allowing us to revisit the hyperon puzzle. We find that the maximum mass of hyperon stars can be larger than 2 M⊙ for small values of the beyond Horndeski parameter, thus providing a resolution of the hyperon puzzle based on modified gravity. Moreover, stable quark stars exist when hyperonic stars are unstable, which means that the phase transition from hyperon to quark stars is predicted just as in general relativity (GR), albeit with larger quark star masses. Two important and potentially observable consequences of some of the theories we consider are the existence of neutron stars in a range of masses significantly higher than in GR and I ¯-C relations that differ from their GR counterparts. In the former case, we find objects that, if observed, could not be accounted for in GR because they violate the usual GR causality condition. We end by discussing several difficult technical issues that remain to be addressed in order to reach more realistic predictions that may be tested using gravitational wave searches or neutron star observations.

  1. Recent developments in high-resolution global altimetric gravity field modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Berry, P. A .M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, dedicated effort has been made to improve high-resolution global marine gravity fields. One new global field is the Danish National Space Center (DNSC) 1-minute grid called DNSC08GRA, released in 2008. DNSC08GRA was derived from double-retracked satellite altimetry, mainly from...... older gravity fields show accuracy improvement of the order of 20-40% due to a combination of retracking, enhanced processing, and the use of the new EGM2008 geoid model. In coastal and polar regions, accuracy improved in many places by 40-50% (or more) compared with older global marine gravity fields....... the ERS-1 geodetic mission data, augmented with new retracked GEOSAT data which have significantly enhanced the range and hence the gravity field accuracy. DNSC08GRA is the first high-resolution global gravity field to cover the entire Arctic Ocean all the way to the North Pole. Comparisons with other...

  2. gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the cosmological dynamics for R p exp( λ R ) gravity theory in the metric formalism, using dynamical systems approach. Considering higher-dimensional FRW geometries in case of an imperfect fluid which has two different scale factors in the normal and extra dimensions, we find the exact solutions, and study its ...

  3. Some aspects of reconstruction using a scalar field in f(T) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, Soumya [Indian Institute of Technology, Centre for Theoretical Studies, Kharagpur (India); Said, Jackson Levi [University of Malta, Institute of Space Sciences and Astronomy, Msida, MSD (Malta); Farrugia, Gabriel [University of Malta, Department of Physics, Msida, MSD (Malta)

    2017-12-15

    General relativity characterizes gravity as a geometric property exhibited on spacetime by massive objects, while teleparallel gravity achieves the same results at the level of equations, by taking a torsional perspective of gravity. Similar to the f(R) theory teleparallel gravity can also be generalized to f(T), with the resulting field equations being inherently distinct from f(R) gravity in that they are second order, while in the former case they turn out to be fourth order. In the present case, a minimally coupled scalar field is investigated in the f(T) gravity context for several forms of the scalar field potential. A number of new f(T) solutions are found for these potentials. Their respective state parameters are also being examined. (orig.)

  4. The role of satellite altimetry in gravity field modelling in coastal areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2000-01-01

    During recent years altimetry from the two geodetic missions of GEOSAT and ERS-1 has enabled the derivation of high resolution near global gravity field from altimetry [Andersen and Knudsen, 1995, 1996; Sandwell and Smith, 1997]. Altimetric gravity fields are unique in the sense that they provide...

  5. Computing black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity from a conformal field theory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agulló, Iván; Borja, Enrique F.; Díaz-Polo, Jacobo

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by the analogy proposed by Witten between Chern-Simons and conformal field theories, we explore an alternative way of computing the entropy of a black hole starting from the isolated horizon framework in loop quantum gravity. The consistency of the result opens a window for the interplay between conformal field theory and the description of black holes in loop quantum gravity

  6. Application of High Resolution Data Sets to Seismicity/Gravity Field Interactions on Local Scale - An Example From Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiesiak, M.; Gutknecht, B. D.; Schaller, T.; Victor, P.; Goetze, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    We used the high resolution aftershock data set from the 1995, Mw 8.1 Antofagasta earthquake and a combined satellite/terrestrial data set of the gravity field in the rupture area to demonstrate the usefulness of local data in parameter correlation between seismicity and gravity field anomalies. With these data sets, we achieved first results on the proposed relation between massive batholithic structures in the overriding plate and the seismogenic part of the subduction interface in the North Chilean subduction zone. Defined areas of high co-seismic moment release on the rupture plane correlated well with pronounced positive isostatic residual anomalies (IRAs) of the gravity field. These findings resulted in a first hypothetic model where the batholithic structures lock the subduction interface during the interseismic cycle, producing increasing slip deficit with surrounding areas and foster stress concentration on suggested asperity structures.In this study we like to present new evidences for the role of batholithic structures in seismogenic processes through a new seismic b-value distribution considering earthquake catalogs from before the 1995 Antofagasta event, providing a detailed map of vertical stress anomalies in the rupture area and linking a gravity derived density model to high seismic velocities from a 3D local tomography study. Combining GPS derived moment release with co-seismic coastal uplift data over Mejillones Peninsula further helped to identify a segment boundary between the Antofagasta and the 2007, Mw 7.9 Tocopilla rupture planes.

  7. Moon Exploration from "apollo" Magnetic and Gravity Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharitonov, Andrey

    Recently, the great value is given to various researches of the Moon, as nearest nature satellite of the Earth, because there is preparation for forthcoming starts on the Moon of the American, European, Russian, Chinese, Indian new Orbiters and Landers. Designing of International Lu-nar bases is planned also. Therefore, in the near future the series of the questions connected with placing of International Lunar bases which coordinates substantially should to be connected with heterogeneity of the internal structure of the Moon can become especially interesting. If in the Moon it will be possible to find large congestions of water ice and those chemical elements which stocks in the Earth are limited this area of the Moon can become perspective for Inter-national Lunar bases. To solve a question of research of the deep structure of the Moon in the locations of International Lunar bases, competently, without excessive expenses for start new various under the form of the Lunar orbit of automatic space vehicles (polar, equatorial, inclined to the rotation axis) and their altitude of flight, which also not always were connected with investigation programs of measured fields (video observation, radio-frequency sounding, mag-netic, gravity), is possible if already from the available information of space vehicles APOLLO, SMART1, KAGUYA, LCROSS, LRO, CHANDRAYAAN-1, CHANG'E-1 it will be possible to analyse simultaneously some various fields, at different altitudes of measuring over the surface (20-300 km) of the Moon. The experimental data of the radial component magnetic field and gravity field the Moon measured at different altitudes, in its equatorial part have been analysed for the research of the deep structure of the Moon. This data has been received as a result of start of space vehicles -APOLLO-15 and APOLLO-16 (USA), and also the Russian space vehicles "LUNOHOD". Authors had been used the data of a magnetic field of the Moon at flight altitude 160, 100, 75, 30, 0 km

  8. Clear and Measurable Signature of Modified Gravity in the Galaxy Velocity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Barreira, Alexandre; Frenk, Carlos S.; Li, Baojiu; Cole, Shaun

    2014-06-01

    The velocity field of dark matter and galaxies reflects the continued action of gravity throughout cosmic history. We show that the low-order moments of the pairwise velocity distribution v12 are a powerful diagnostic of the laws of gravity on cosmological scales. In particular, the projected line-of-sight galaxy pairwise velocity dispersion σ12(r) is very sensitive to the presence of modified gravity. Using a set of high-resolution N-body simulations, we compute the pairwise velocity distribution and its projected line-of-sight dispersion for a class of modified gravity theories: the chameleon f(R) gravity and Galileon gravity (cubic and quartic). The velocities of dark matter halos with a wide range of masses would exhibit deviations from general relativity at the (5-10)σ level. We examine strategies for detecting these deviations in galaxy redshift and peculiar velocity surveys. If detected, this signature would be a "smoking gun" for modified gravity.

  9. Gravity and magnetic investigation of maar volcanoes, Auckland volcanic field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, John; France, Sian J.; Locke, Corinne A.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed gravity and aeromagnetic data over maars in the Auckland volcanic field reveal contrasting anomalies, even where surface geology is similar. Pukaki and Pukekiwiriki, almost identical maars marked by sediment-filled craters and tuff rings, have gravity and magnetic anomalies of - 6 g.u. and 20 nT, and 8 g.u. and 160 nT, respectively. The Domain and Waitomokia maars, with similar tuff rings but each with a small central scoria cone, have gravity and magnetic anomalies of 32 g.u. and 300 nT, and 21 g.u. and 310 nT, respectively. These differences in geophysical expression are attributed to varying volumes of dense, magnetic basalt in the form of shallow bowl-shaped bodies up to several hundreds of metres in diameter and up to 140 m thick beneath the maar centres. These bodies are interpreted as solidified magma that ponded into early-formed phreatomagmatic explosion craters. Where magma supply was limited relative to groundwater availability, no residual subsurface basalt occurs (as at Pukaki); continued magma supply, but limited groundwater, resulted in ponding (e.g. at Pukekiwiriki) and eventually the building of a scoria cone (as at Domain and Waitomokia). There is no evidence in these geophysical data for diatreme structures below the maars or for shallow and/or extensive feeder dykes associated with these maars. If diatreme structures do occur, their lack of geophysical signature must be a consequence of either their small geophysical contrast with host Miocene sediments and/or masking by the stronger anomalies associated with the subsurface basalt. In addition, any magma conduits appear to be confined centrally beneath the maars, at least to shallow depths (upper 100 m).

  10. Effectiveness of empirical orthogonal function used in decorrelation of GRACE time-variable gravity field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Empirical orthogonal function (EOF was used to process the spherical harmonic coefficient (SHC of 115 Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE RL05 monthly gravity field models from March 2003 to February 2013 released by CSR (Center for Space Research. We analyzed the effectiveness of EOF in decorrelation of gravity field. Results show that only a small Gaussian smoothing radius was needed by EOF to significantly weaken the north–south stripes compared with the empirical moving-window filtering algorithm. The comparative experiments with a Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS hydrological model also show that EOF did not much affect the real geophysical signals, and that the removed signals were nearly uncorrelated with the real geophysical signals. As the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE missions continue, EOF can be used to significantly remove the correlated errors from monthly gravity fields and reserve rich effective signals.

  11. Dipole magnetic field of neutron stars in f(R) gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakirova, Elizat; Folomeev, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    The structure of an interior dipole magnetic field of neutron stars in f( R) gravity is considered. For this purpose, the perturbative approaches are used when both the deviations from general relativity and the deformations of spherically symmetric configurations associated with the presence of the magnetic field are assumed to be small. Solutions are constructed which describe relativistic, spherically symmetric configurations consisting of a gravitating magnetized perfect fluid modeled by a realistic equation of state. Comparing configurations from general relativity and modified gravity, we reveal possible differences in the structure of the magnetic field which occur in considering neutron stars in modified gravity.

  12. Linking topological quantum field theory and nonperturbative quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    1995-11-01

    Quantum gravity is studied nonperturbatively in the case in which space has a boundary with finite area. A natural set of boundary conditions is studied in the Euclidean signature theory in which the pullback of the curvature to the boundary is self-dual (with a cosmological constant). A Hilbert space which describes all the information accessible by measuring the metric and connection induced in the boundary is constructed and is found to be the direct sum of the state spaces of all SU(2) Chern-Simon theories defined by all choices of punctures and representations on the spatial boundary S. The integer level k of Chern-Simons theory is found to be given by k=6π/G2Λ+α, where Λ is the cosmological constant and α is a CP breaking phase. Using these results, expectation values of observables which are functions of fields on the boundary may be evaluated in closed form. Given these results, it is natural to make the conjecture that the quantum states of the system are completely determined by measurements made on the boundary. One consequence of this is the Bekenstein bound, which says that once the two metric of the boundary has been measured, the subspace of the physical state space that describes the further information that may be obtained about the interior has finite dimension equal to the exponent of the area of the boundary, in Planck units, times a fixed constant. Finally, these results confirm both the categorical-theoretic ``ladder of dimensions'' picture of Crane and the holographic hypothesis of Susskind and 't Hooft.

  13. EVALUATION OF ERRORS IN PARAMETERS DETERMINATION FOR THE EARTH HIGHLY ANOMALOUS GRAVITY FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Staroseltsev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper presents research results and the simulation of errors caused by determining the Earth gravity field parameters for regions with high segmentation of gravity field. The Kalman filtering estimation of determining errors is shown. Method. Simulation model for the realization of inertial geodetic method for determining the Earth gravity field parameters is proposed. The model is based on high-precision inertial navigation system (INS at the free gyro and high-accuracy satellite system. The possibility of finding the conformity between the determined and stochastic approaches in gravity potential modeling is shown with the example of a point-mass model. Main Results. Computer simulation shows that for determining the Earth gravity field parameters gyro error model can be reduced to two significant indexes, one for each gyro. It is also shown that for regions with high segmentation of gravity field point-mass model can be used. This model is a superposition of attractive and repulsive masses - the so-called gravitational dipole. Practical Relevance. The reduction of gyro error model can reduce the dimension of the Kalman filter used in the integrated system, which decreases the computation time and increases the visibility of the state vector. Finding the conformity between the determined and stochastic approaches allows the application of determined and statistical terminology. Also it helps to create a simulation model for regions with high segmentation of gravity field.

  14. Impact Of GOCE On The Nordic Gravity Field Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yidiz, Hasan; Forsberg, René; Tscherning, C. C.

    2011-01-01

    GOCE level-2 Tzz and Txx gravity gradients at satellite altitude are used in combination as input data to predict surface free air gravity anomalies over the Nordic region using Least Square Collocation. We test the performance of using covariance functions created separately from Tzz gradients a...... Surface model, both the NKG-2004 quasi-geoid model of the Nordic and Baltic Area and the one obtained using second generation GOCE spherical harmonic coefficients based on time-wise method can successfully reproduce the higher level of the Baltic Sea relative to the Atlantic Ocean....

  15. On axionic field ranges, loopholes and the weak gravity conjecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In this short note we clarify some aspects of the impact that the Weak Gravity Conjecture has on models of (generalized) natural inflation. We address in particular certain technical and conceptual concerns recently raised regarding the stringent constraints and conclusions found in our previous work http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP10(2015)023. We also point out the difficulties faced by attempts to evade these constraints. These new considerations improve the understanding of the quantum gravity constraints we found and further support the conclusion that it remains challenging for axions to drive natural inflation.

  16. Residual magnetic field in rotary machines; Campo magnetico residual en maquinas rotatorias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez V, Esteban A; Apanco R, Marcelino [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The residual magnetism is a phenomenon in which the magnetic dipoles of a substance are oriented in a certain degree. On the other hand, when internal forces exist capable of aligning elementary magnetic dipoles of a material, a permanent magnet is obtained. Just as in a conductor or in a material, in the elements of a rotary electrical machine magnetic fields can be induced that produce a residual magnetism or magnetization. In the rotary electrical machines, the magnetization phenomenon causes serious problems, such as the generation of induced currents that propitiate the mechanical wear in bearings, collars, trunnions and inclusive in the shaft, by effects known as pitting, frosting and spark tracks, as well as erroneous readings in vibration and temperature sensors, that in some cases can cause the shut down of the machine. In this article are presented the general concepts on the residual magnetism in rotary electrical machines, the causes that originate it and the problems that arises, as well as the demagnetization of the components that have residual magnetic field. The results obtained by the area of Electrical Equipment of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas are revised, during the execution of activities related to the measurement and elimination of the residual magnetic field in rotary electrical machines. [Spanish] El magnetismo residual es un fenomeno en el que los dipolos magneticos de una sustancia se encuentran orientados en un grado determinado. Por otro lado, cuando existen fuerzas internas capaces de alinear los dipolos magneticos elementales de un material, se tiene un iman permanente. Al igual que en un conductor o un material, en los elementos de una maquina electrica rotatoria se pueden inducir campos magneticos que producen un magnetismo residual o magnetizacion. En las maquinas electricas rotatorias, el fenomeno de magnetizacion causa graves problemas, como la generacion de corrientes inducidas que propician el desgaste mecanico

  17. Classical geometrical interpretation of ghost fields and anomalies in Yang-Mills theory and quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry-Mieg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The reinterpretation of the BRS equations of Quantum Field Theory as the Maurer Cartan equation of a classical principal fiber bundle leads to a simple gauge invariant classification of the anomalies in Yang Mills theory and gravity

  18. A field-theoretic approach to Spin Foam models in Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    We present an introduction to Group Field Theory models, motivating them on the basis of their relationship with discretized BF models of gravity. We derive the Feynmann rules and compute quantum corrections in the coherent states basis.

  19. Field verification of ADCP surface gravity wave elevation spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Peters, H.C.; Schroevers, M.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can measure orbital velocities induced by surface gravity waves, yet the ADCP estimates of these velocities are subject to a relatively high noise level. The present paper introduces a linear filtration technique to significantly reduce the influence of

  20. FIELD SAMPLING OF RESIDUAL AVIATION GASOLINE IN SANDY SOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two complimentary field sampling methods for the determination of residual aviation gasoline content in the contaminated capillary fringe of a fine, uniform, sandy soil were investigated. The first method featured filed extrusion of core barrels into pint size Mason jars, while ...

  1. Approach of regional gravity field modeling from GRACE data for improvement of geoid modeling for Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroishi, Y.; Lemoine, F. G.; Rowlands, D. D.

    2006-12-01

    The latest gravimetric geoid model for Japan, JGEOID2004, suffers from errors at long wavelengths (around 1000 km) in a range of +/- 30 cm. The model was developed by combining surface gravity data with a global marine altimetric gravity model, using EGM96 as a foundation, and the errors at long wavelength are presumably attributed to EGM96 errors. The Japanese islands and their vicinity are located in a region of plate convergence boundaries, producing substantial gravity and geoid undulations in a wide range of wavelengths. Because of the geometry of the islands and trenches, precise information on gravity in the surrounding oceans should be incorporated in detail, even if the geoid model is required to be accurate only over land. The Kuroshio Current, which runs south of Japan, causes high sea surface variability, making altimetric gravity field determination complicated. To reduce the long-wavelength errors in the geoid model, we are investigating GRACE data for regional gravity field modeling at long wavelengths in the vicinity of Japan. Our approach is based on exclusive use of inter- satellite range-rate data with calibrated accelerometer data and attitude data, for regional or global gravity field recovery. In the first step, we calibrate accelerometer data in terms of scales and biases by fitting dynamically calculated orbits to GPS-determined precise orbits. The calibration parameters of accelerometer data thus obtained are used in the second step to recover a global/regional gravity anomaly field. This approach is applied to GRACE data obtained for the year 2005 and resulting global/regional gravity models are presented and discussed.

  2. The latest GrazLGM lunar gravity field model: developments in the framework of project GRAZIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, B.; Wirnsberger, H.; Mayer-Gürr, T.; Krauss, S.

    2016-12-01

    Project GRAZIL aims at recovering a high-accurate lunar gravity field based on the measurements collected by the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission. In order to achieve this objective we perform dynamic precise orbit determination from radio science observations (Doppler range-rates) in combination with the analysis of inter-satellite Ka-band ranging (KBR) observations. For gravity field recovery, we apply an integral equation approach using short orbital arcs (1 hour).We present our latest lunar gravity field model, derived from data collected during primary (March 1 to May 29, 2012) and extended (August 30 to December 14, 2012) mission phase.The extended mission phase improved the resolution due to a lower average altitude (23 km) of the spacecraft. As a result, the latest gravity field shows improvements especially in the shorter wavelengths compared to its predecessor GrazLGM300c.In this contribution we focus on the stepwise improvements of our gravity field solutions, achieved by a refinement of our processing strategy (e.g. incorporation of non-gravitational accelerations, covariance estimation, inclusion of extended mission data) in conjunction with an increase of the spectral resolution. We validate our results against prior GrazLGM models and recent GRAIL models computed at NASA-GSFC and NASA-JPL.

  3. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas; Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-03-01

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth.

  4. On the regularization of regional gravity field solutions in spherical radial base functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Majid; Flury, Jakob; Brieden, Phillip

    2015-08-01

    Regional refinement of the gravity field models from satellite data using spherical radial base functions (SRBF) is an ill-posed problem. This is mainly due to the regional confinement of the data and the base functions, which leads to severe instabilities in the solutions. Here, this ill-posedness as well as the related regularization process are investigated. We compare three methods for the choice of the regularization parameter, which have been frequently used in gravity modelling. These methods are (1) the variance component estimation (VCE), (2) the generalized cross validation (GCV) and (3) the L-curve criterion. A particular emphasis is put on the impact of the SRBF type on the regularization parameter. To do this, we include two types of SRBF which are often used for regional gravity field modelling. These are the Shannon SRBF or the reproducing kernel and the Spline SRBF. The investigations are performed on two months of the real GOCE ultrasensitive gravity gradients over Central Africa and Amazon. The solutions are validated against a state-of-the-art global gravity solution. We conclude that if a proper regularization method is applied, both SRBF deliver more or less the same accuracy. We show that when the Shannon wavelet is used, the L-curve method gives the best results, while with the Spline kernel, the GCV outperforms the other two methods. Moreover, we observe that the estimated coefficients for the Spline kernel cannot be spatially interpreted. In contrast, the coefficients obtained for the Shannon wavelet reflect the energy of the recovered gravity field with a correlation factor of above 95 per cent. Therefore, when combined with the L-curve method, the Shannon SRBF is advantageous for regional gravity field estimation, since it is one of the simplest band-limited SRBF. In addition, it delivers promising solutions and the estimated coefficients represent the characteristics of the gravity field within the target region.

  5. Monthly gravity field recovery from GRACE orbits and K-band measurements using variational equations approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE mission can significantly improve our knowledge of the temporal variability of the Earth's gravity field. We obtained monthly gravity field solutions based on variational equations approach from GPS-derived positions of GRACE satellites and K-band range-rate measurements. The impact of different fixed data weighting ratios in temporal gravity field recovery while combining the two types of data was investigated for the purpose of deriving the best combined solution. The monthly gravity field solution obtained through above procedures was named as the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics (IGG temporal gravity field models. IGG temporal gravity field models were compared with GRACE Release05 (RL05 products in following aspects: (i the trend of the mass anomaly in China and its nearby regions within 2005–2010; (ii the root mean squares of the global mass anomaly during 2005–2010; (iii time-series changes in the mean water storage in the region of the Amazon Basin and the Sahara Desert between 2005 and 2010. The results showed that IGG solutions were almost consistent with GRACE RL05 products in above aspects (i–(iii. Changes in the annual amplitude of mean water storage in the Amazon Basin were 14.7 ± 1.2 cm for IGG, 17.1 ± 1.3 cm for the Centre for Space Research (CSR, 16.4 ± 0.9 cm for the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ and 16.9 ± 1.2 cm for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL in terms of equivalent water height (EWH, respectively. The root mean squares of the mean mass anomaly in Sahara were 1.2 cm, 0.9 cm, 0.9 cm and 1.2 cm for temporal gravity field models of IGG, CSR, GFZ and JPL, respectively. Comparison suggested that IGG temporal gravity field solutions were at the same accuracy level with the latest temporal gravity field solutions published by CSR, GFZ and JPL.

  6. Latest developments in lunar gravity field recovery within the project GRAZIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Sandro; Wirnsberger, Harald; Klinger, Beate; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Baur, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The project GRAZIL addresses the highly accurate recovery of the lunar gravity field using intersatellite Ka-band ranging (KBR) measurements collected by the Lunar Gravity Ranging System (LGRS) of the Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission. Dynamic precise orbit determination is an indispensable task in order to recover the lunar gravity field based on LGRS measurements. The concept of variational equations is adopted to determine the orbit of the two GRAIL satellites based on radio science data. In this contribution we focus on the S-band two-way Doppler data collected by the Deep Space Network. As far as lunar gravity field recovery is concerned, we apply an integral equation approach using short orbital arcs in the order of one hour. In this contribution special attention is given to the refinement of our processing strategy in conjunction with an increase of the spectral resolution. Based on these considerations we present the latest version of a lunar gravity field model developed in Graz which is based on KBR observations during the primary mission phase (March 1 to May 29, 2012). Our results are validated against GRAIL models computed at NASA-GSFC and NASA-JPL.

  7. Geophysical investigation using gravity data in Kinigi geothermal field, northwest Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwiduhaye, Jean d.'Amour; Mizunaga, Hideki; Saibi, Hakim

    2018-03-01

    A land gravity survey was carried out in the Kinigi geothermal field, Northwest Rwanda using 184 gravity stations during August and September, 2015. The aim of the gravity survey was to understand the subsurface structure and its relation to the observed surface manifestations in the study area. The complete Bouguer Gravity anomaly was produced with a reduction density of 2.4 g/cm3. Bouguer anomalies ranging from -52 to -35 mGals were observed in the study area with relatively high anomalies in the east and northwest zones while low anomalies are observed in the southwest side of the studied area. A decrease of 17 mGals is observed in the southwestern part of the study area and caused by the low-density of the Tertiary rocks. Horizontal gradient, tilt angle and analytical signal methods were applied to the observed gravity data and showed that Mubona, Mpenge and Cyabararika surface springs are structurally controlled while Rubindi spring is not. The integrated results of gravity gradient interpretation methods delineated a dominant geological structure trending in the NW-SE, which is in agreement with the regional geological trend. The results of this gravity study will help aid future geothermal exploration and development in the Kinigi geothermal field.

  8. Remediation of deltamethrin contaminated cotton fields: residual and adsorption assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafique Uzaira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pakistan occupies a significant global position in the growing of high quality cotton. The extensive application of pesticides on agricultural products leads to environmental risk due to toxic residues in air, water and soil. This study examined the chemodynamic effect of Deltamethrin on cotton fields. Samples were collected from the cotton fields of D.G. Khan, Pakistan and analyzed for heavy metal speciation patterns. Batch experiments were administered in order to study the adsorption of Deltamethrin in cotton fields. The effect of different factors including pH, adsorbate dose, and adsorbent mass on adsorption were studied. It was observed that in general, adsorption increased with increases in the mass of adsorbate, although the trends were irregular. Residual fractions of deltamethrin in the soil and water of cotton fields were analyzed to assess concentrations of xenobiotics bound to soil particles. Results indicated that such residues are significantly higher in soil samples due to high Koc in comparison to water, indicating the former is an efficient degradation agent. Results from the batch experiment resulted in 95% removal with alkaline pH and an adsorbent-adsorbate ratio of 250:1. These results may be used to environment friendly resource management policies.

  9. Gravity field and ocean tides modeling for precise orbit determination of doris satellites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpánek, P.; Bezděk, Aleš; Kostelecký, J.; Filler, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2016), s. 27-40 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG14026 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GC15-24730J Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : gravity field truncation degree * ocean tides * time variable gravity Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016

  10. Mean field annealing approach to large residual-statics estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Peter W.; Upham, Warren

    1993-12-01

    We present a new method for solving the large residual-statics problem, called mean field annealing, which may be capable of overcoming some of the limitations of stochastic methods. Mean field annealing is a global-search method that is governed by a purely deterministic set of equations. The mean field annealing method approaches global optimization problems in a fundamentally different way from stochastic global-search methods. The mean field approach never samples individual trial solutions in model space. Instead, the mean field equations, which are solved at successively lower temperatures with a fixed-point method, involve solving for the probability distributions of each variable rather than solving for the variables themselves. The probability distribution of each variable is resolved separately by replacing all other variables that occur in the energy function by their expectation values.

  11. Seasonal and Static Gravity Field of Mars from MGS, Mars Odyssey and MRO Radio Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    We present a spherical harmonic solution of the static gravity field of Mars to degree and order 120, GMM-3, that has been calculated using the Deep Space Network tracking data of the NASA Mars missions, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). We have also jointly determined spherical harmonic solutions for the static and time-variable gravity field of Mars, and the Mars k 2 Love numbers, exclusive of the gravity contribution of the atmosphere. Consequently, the retrieved time-varying gravity coefficients and the Love number k 2 solely yield seasonal variations in the mass of the polar caps and the solid tides of Mars, respectively. We obtain a Mars Love number k 2 of 0.1697 +/-0.0027 (3- sigma). The inclusion of MRO tracking data results in improved seasonal gravity field coefficients C 30 and, for the first time, C 50 . Refinements of the atmospheric model in our orbit determination program have allowed us to monitor the odd zonal harmonic C 30 for approx.1.5 solar cycles (16 years). This gravity model shows improved correlations with MOLA topography up to 15% larger at higher harmonics ( l = 60–80) than previous solutions.

  12. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas; Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth. - Highlights: • Comparison of magnetic microstructure with neutron diffraction stress analysis. • High spatial resolution magnetic stray field images of hypereutectoid TIG welds. • Spatial variations of the stray fields are below the magnetic field of the earth. • GMR spin valve gradiometer arrays adapted for the evaluation of magnetic microstructures. • Magnetic stray fields are closely linked to microstructure of the material.

  13. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegemann, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Stegemann@bam.de [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko [HZB Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Kreutzbruck, Marc [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); IKT, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth. - Highlights: • Comparison of magnetic microstructure with neutron diffraction stress analysis. • High spatial resolution magnetic stray field images of hypereutectoid TIG welds. • Spatial variations of the stray fields are below the magnetic field of the earth. • GMR spin valve gradiometer arrays adapted for the evaluation of magnetic microstructures. • Magnetic stray fields are closely linked to microstructure of the material.

  14. Simulation of the time-variable gravity field by means of coupled geophysical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. Gruber

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Time variable gravity fields, reflecting variations of mass distribution in the system Earth is one of the key parameters to understand the changing Earth. Mass variations are caused either by redistribution of mass in, on or above the Earth's surface or by geophysical processes in the Earth's interior. The first set of observations of monthly variations of the Earth gravity field was provided by the US/German GRACE satellite mission beginning in 2002. This mission is still providing valuable information to the science community. However, as GRACE has outlived its expected lifetime, the geoscience community is currently seeking successor missions in order to maintain the long time series of climate change that was begun by GRACE. Several studies on science requirements and technical feasibility have been conducted in the recent years. These studies required a realistic model of the time variable gravity field in order to perform simulation studies on sensitivity of satellites and their instrumentation. This was the primary reason for the European Space Agency (ESA to initiate a study on ''Monitoring and Modelling individual Sources of Mass Distribution and Transport in the Earth System by Means of Satellites''. The goal of this interdisciplinary study was to create as realistic as possible simulated time variable gravity fields based on coupled geophysical models, which could be used in the simulation processes in a controlled environment. For this purpose global atmosphere, ocean, continental hydrology and ice models were used. The coupling was performed by using consistent forcing throughout the models and by including water flow between the different domains of the Earth system. In addition gravity field changes due to solid Earth processes like continuous glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA and a sudden earthquake with co-seismic and post-seismic signals were modelled. All individual model results were combined and converted to gravity field

  15. Drag-Free Motion Control of Satellite for High-Precision Gravity Field Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Bent Lindvig; Blanke, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    High precision mapping of the geoid and the Earth's gravity field are of importance to a wide range of ongoing studies in areas like ocean circulation, solid Earth physics and ice sheet dynamics. Using a satellite in orbit around the Earth gives the opportunity to map the Earth's gravity field in 3...... dimensions with much better accuracy and spatial resolution than ever accomplished. To reach the desired quality of measurements, the satellite must fly in a low Earth orbit where disturbances from atmospheric drag and the Earth's magnetic field will perturb the satellite's motion. These effects...

  16. On the embedding of quantum field theory on curved spacetimes into loop quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stottmeister, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The main theme of this thesis is an investigation into possible connections between loop quantum gravity and quantum field theory on curved spacetimes: On the one hand, we aim for the formulation of a general framework that allows for a derivation of quantum field theory on curved spacetimes in a semi-classical limit. On the other hand, we discuss representation-theoretical aspects of loop quantum gravity and quantum field theory on curved spacetimes as both of the latter presumably influence each other in the aforesaid semi-classical limit. Regarding the first point, we investigate the possible implementation of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in the sense of space-adiabatic perturbation theory in models of loop quantum gravity-type. In the course of this, we argue for the need of a Weyl quantisation and an associated symbolic calculus for loop quantum gravity, which we then successfully define, at least to a certain extent. The compactness of the Lie groups, which models a la loop quantum gravity are based on, turns out to be a main obstacle to a fully satisfactory definition of a Weyl quantisation. Finally, we apply our findings to some toy models of linear scalar quantum fields on quantum cosmological spacetimes and discuss the implementation of space-adiabatic perturbation theory therein. In view of the second point, we start with a discussion of the microlocal spectrum condition for quantum fields on curved spacetimes and how it might be translated to a background-independent Hamiltonian quantum theory of gravity, like loop quantum gravity. The relevance of this lies in the fact that the microlocal spectrum condition selects a class of physically relevant states of the quantum matter fields and is, therefore, expected to play an important role in the aforesaid semi-classical limit of gravity-matter systems. Following this, we switch our perspective and analyse the representation theory of loop quantum gravity. We find some intriguing relations between the

  17. Jupiter's gravity field from Ka-band Doppler tracking of Juno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, D.; Folkner, W. M.; Iess, L.; Galanti, E.; Gomez Casajus, L.; Kaspi, Y.; Milani, A.; Parisi, M.; Serra, D.; Tortora, P.; Zannoni, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Juno spacecraft is currently orbiting Jupiter in a 52.9-day orbit, collecting crucial gravity and magnetic field data to unveil the interior structure of the gas giant. As of Aug. 1st, 2017, Juno completed seven perijove passes, two of which were devoted to gravity field determination. During PJ3 (11 Dec. 2016) and PJ6 (19 May 2017), Juno established a two-way radio link with the ground antenna DSS-25 of NASA's Deep Space Network, collecting range rate data from two coherent links at Ka and X bands (32.5 and 8.4 GHz). This tracking configuration provides a strong suppression of dispersive noise, mainly induced by the Io plasma torus. An Advanced Media Calibration System available at DSS 25 enables a significant reduction of path delay variations caused by tropospheric water vapor. The resulting RMS end-to-end range rate noise is about 0.015 mm/s at 60 s integration time, therefore enabling a very accurate determination of Jupiter's gravity. Doppler data from PJ3 and PJ6 passes were combined in a multi-arc solution to estimate the harmonic coefficients of the gravity field, the pole position, and the tidal response to the quadrupole field generated by the Galilean moons. Thanks to the high quality data, the gravity solution allows stringent comparisons with theoretical predictions for even and odd harmonics. We also discuss the solution stability and report on upper limits to the tesseral field.

  18. Internal Gravity Waves in the Magnetized Solar Atmosphere. I. Magnetic Field Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigeesh, G.; Steiner, O. [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstrasse 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Jackiewicz, J., E-mail: vigeesh@leibniz-kis.de [New Mexico State University, Department of Astronomy, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Observations of the solar atmosphere show that internal gravity waves are generated by overshooting convection, but are suppressed at locations of magnetic flux, which is thought to be the result of mode conversion into magnetoacoustic waves. Here, we present a study of the acoustic-gravity wave spectrum emerging from a realistic, self-consistent simulation of solar (magneto)convection. A magnetic field free, hydrodynamic simulation and a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with an initial, vertical, homogeneous field of 50 G flux density were carried out and compared with each other to highlight the effect of magnetic fields on the internal gravity wave propagation in the Sun’s atmosphere. We find that the internal gravity waves are absent or partially reflected back into the lower layers in the presence of magnetic fields and argue that the suppression is due to the coupling of internal gravity waves to slow magnetoacoustic waves still within the high- β region of the upper photosphere. The conversion to Alfvén waves is highly unlikely in our model because there is no strongly inclined magnetic field present. We argue that the suppression of internal waves observed within magnetic flux concentrations may also be due to nonlinear breaking of internal waves due to vortex flows that are ubiquitously present in the upper photosphere and the chromosphere.

  19. Anisotropic inflation with a non-minimally coupled electromagnetic field to gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Muzaffer; Akarsu, Özgür; Dereli, Tekin; Sert, Özcan

    2017-11-01

    We consider the non-minimal model of gravity in Y(R) F2-form. We investigate a particular case of the model, for which the higher order derivatives are eliminated but the scalar curvature R is kept to be dynamical via the constraint YRFmnFmn =-2/κ2. The effective fluid obtained can be represented by interacting electromagnetic field and vacuum depending on Y(R), namely, the energy density of the vacuum tracks R while energy density of the conventional electromagnetic field is dynamically scaled with the factor Y(R)/2. We give exact solutions for anisotropic inflation by assuming the volume scale factor of the Universe exhibits a power-law expansion. The directional scale factors do not necessarily exhibit power-law expansion, which would give rise to a constant expansion anisotropy, but expand non-trivially and give rise to a non-monotonically evolving expansion anisotropy that eventually converges to a non-zero constant. Relying on this fact, we discuss the anisotropic e-fold during the inflation by considering observed scale invariance in CMB and demanding the Universe to undergo the same amount of e-folds in all directions. We calculate the residual expansion anisotropy at the end of inflation, though as a result of non-monotonic behaviour of expansion anisotropy all the axes of the Universe undergo the same of amount of e-folds by the end of inflation. We also discuss the generation of the modified electromagnetic field during the first few e-folds of the inflation and its persistence against to the vacuum till end of inflation.

  20. Recent developments in high-resolution global altimetric gravity field modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Berry, P. A .M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, dedicated effort has been made to improve high-resolution global marine gravity fields. One new global field is the Danish National Space Center (DNSC) 1-minute grid called DNSC08GRA, released in 2008. DNSC08GRA was derived from double-retracked satellite altimetry, mainly from t...

  1. GRIM5-C1: Combination solution of the global gravity field to degree and order 120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Thomas; Bode, Albert; Reigber, Christoph; Schwintzer, Peter; Balmino, Georges; Biancale, Richard; Lemoine, Jean-Michel

    2000-12-01

    The new satellite Earth gravity field model GRIM5-S1 was recently prepared in a joint GFZ and GRGS effort. Based on this satellite solution and terrestrial and altimetric gravity anomalies from NIMA, a combined model GRIM5-C1, with full variance-covariance matrix up to degree and order 120, was computed. Surface gravity and altimetric gravity data are corrected for several systematic effects, such as ellipsoidal corrections and aliasing. A weighting scheme for gravity anomalies, according to their given standard deviations was developed. From each data set full normal equations were set up and finally combined with the GRIM5-S1 normals. To take into account good information from the satellite-only model a procedure was developed to identify such coefficients and appropriately weighed them in the final normal equation system. Internal error propagation and comparisons to external data sets show, that the GRIM5-C1 model represents the best state of long wavelength gravity field models.

  2. On the use of airborne gravimetry in gravity field modelling: Experiences from the AGMASCO project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastos, L.; Cunha, S.; Forsberg, René

    2000-01-01

    of the vertical accelerations acting on the airborne platform from the natural gravity signal. With the advances in DGPS techniques new prospects arise for gravity field recovery which are of great importance for geodesy, geophysics oceanography and satellite navigation. Furthermore, airborne gravimetric...... improvement of the whole technique where the quality of both the accelerometers and the gyros is the key sensing element. In the scope of the MAST III Project AGMASCO, an airborne geoid mapping system was successfully implemented in different aeroplanes. The characteristics of the aeroplane and the flight...... and the methods validated. Recovery of the gravity values directly from measurements with the Lacoste & Romberg air/sea gravimeter and from measurements with the inertial sensors was analysed. The potential of these sensors to recover gravity and the experience gained within this project are reported here....

  3. Multipole analysis in the radiation field for linearized f (R ) gravity with irreducible Cartesian tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bofeng; Huang, Chao-Guang

    2018-04-01

    The 1 /r expansion in the distance to the source is applied to the linearized f (R ) gravity, and its multipole expansion in the radiation field with irreducible Cartesian tensors is presented. Then, the energy, momentum, and angular momentum in the gravitational waves are provided for linearized f (R ) gravity. All of these results have two parts, which are associated with the tensor part and the scalar part in the multipole expansion of linearized f (R ) gravity, respectively. The former is the same as that in General Relativity, and the latter, as the correction to the result in General Relativity, is caused by the massive scalar degree of freedom and plays an important role in distinguishing General Relativity and f (R ) gravity.

  4. Quantum field theory II introductions to quantum gravity, supersymmetry and string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Manoukian, Edouard B

    2016-01-01

    This book takes a pedagogical approach to explaining quantum gravity, supersymmetry and string theory in a coherent way. It is aimed at graduate students and researchers in quantum field theory and high-energy physics. The first part of the book introduces quantum gravity, without requiring previous knowledge of general relativity (GR). The necessary geometrical aspects are derived afresh leading to explicit general Lagrangians for gravity, including that of general relativity. The quantum aspect of gravitation, as described by the graviton, is introduced and perturbative quantum GR is discussed. The Schwinger-DeWitt formalism is developed to compute the one-loop contribution to the theory and renormalizability aspects of the perturbative theory are also discussed. This follows by introducing only the very basics of a non-perturbative, background-independent, formulation of quantum gravity, referred to as “loop quantum gravity”, which gives rise to a quantization of space. In the second part the author in...

  5. Concept Design of a Gravity Core Cooling Tank as a Passive Residual Heat Removal System for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwonyeong; Chi, Daeyoung; Kim, Seong Hoon; Seo, Kyoungwoo; Yoon, Juhyeon

    2014-01-01

    A core downward flow is considered to use a plate type fuel because it is benefit to install the fuel in the core. If a flow inversion from a downward to upward flow in the core by a natural circulation is introduced within a high heat flux region of residual heat, the fuel fails instantly due to zero flow. Therefore, the core downward flow should be sufficiently maintained until the residual heat is in a low heat flux region. In a small power research reactor, inertia generated by a flywheel of the PCP can maintain a downward flow shortly and resolve the problem of a flow inversion. However, a high power research reactor more than 10 MW should have an additional method to have a longer downward flow until a low heat flux. Usually, other research reactors have selected an active residual heat removal system as a safety class. But, an active safety system is difficult to design and expensive to construct. A Gravity Core Cooling Tank (GCCT) beside the reactor pool with a Residual Heat Removal Pipe connecting two pools was developed and designed preliminarily as a passive residual heat removal system for an open-pool type research reactor. It is very simple to design and cheap to construct. Additionally, a non-safety, but active residual heat removal system is applied with the GCCT. It is a Pool Water Cooling and Purification System. It can improve the usability of the research reactor by removing the thermal waves, and purify the reactor pool, the Primary Cooling System, and the GCCT. Moreover, it can reduce the pool top radiation level

  6. Deriving the DTU15 Global high resolution marine gravity field from satellite altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    surface height observations, the Cryosat-2 has now completed its fifth cycle of 369 days. This opens for new ways of using “pseudo” repeat Geodetic mission data, by averaging or other means of analysisOne further advantage of the Cryosat-2 is its ability of provide new accurate sea surface height...... information for gravity field determination in the northernmost part of the Arctic Ocean upto 88N where no altimeters have measured before.The first evaluation of the DTU15 global marine gravity field is presented here. The DTU15 is based on five years of retracked altimetry from Cryosat-2 as well as data...

  7. Outlet baffles: Effect on liquid residuals from zero-gravity draining of hemispherically ended cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the relative effectiveness of various outlet baffles in reducing liquid residuals resulting from the draining of hemispherically ended cylindrical tanks in a weightless environment. Three different baffles were employed. The relative effectiveness of each baffle was determined by comparing the results obtained, in the form of liquid residuals, with results for an unbaffled tank. Data indicate that all the baffles tested reduced residuals. Reductions betweem 10 and 60 percent were obtained, depending on baffle geometry and outlfow Weber number.

  8. On the capability of SWARM for estimating time-variable gravity fields and mass variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reubelt, Tilo; Baur, Oliver; Weigelt, Matthias; Sneeuw, Nico

    2013-04-01

    Recently, the implementation of the GRACE Follow-On mission has been approved. However, this successor of GRACE is planned to become operational in 2017 at the earliest. In order to fill the impending gap of 3-4 years between GRACE and GRACE-FO, the capability of the magnetic field mission SWARM as a gap filler for time-variable gravity field determination has to be investigated. Since the three SWARM satellites, where two of them fly on a pendulum formation, are equipped with high-quality GPS receivers and accelerometers, orbit analysis from high-low Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (hl-SST) can be applied for geopotential recovery. As data analysis from CHAMP and GRACE has shown, the detection of annual gravity signals and gravity trends from hl-SST is possible for long-wavelength features corresponding to a Gaussian radius of 1000 km, although the accuracy of a low-low SST mission like GRACE cannot be reached. However, since SWARM is a three-satellite constellation and might provide GPS data of higher quality compared to previous missions, improved gravity field recovery can be expected. We present detailed closed-loop simulation studies for a 5 years period based on time-variable gravity caused by mass changes in the hydrosphere, cryosphere and solid Earth. Models for these variations are used to simulate the SWARM satellite orbits. We recover time-variable gravity from orbit analysis adopting the acceleration approach. Finally, we convert time-variable gravity to mass change in order to compare with the a priori model input.

  9. Liquid Droplet Dynamics in Gravity Compensating High Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarevics, V.; Easter, S.; Pericleous, K.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical models are used to investigate behavior of liquid droplets suspended in high DC magnetic fields of various configurations providing microgravity-like conditions. Using a DC field it is possible to create conditions with laminar viscosity and heat transfer to measure viscosity, surface tension, electrical and thermal conductivities, and heat capacity of a liquid sample. The oscillations in a high DC magnetic field are quite different for an electrically conducting droplet, like liquid silicon or metal. The droplet behavior in a high magnetic field is the subject of investigation in this paper. At the high values of magnetic field some oscillation modes are damped quickly, while others are modified with a considerable shift of the oscillating droplet frequencies and the damping constants from the non-magnetic case.

  10. Accelerating anisotropic cosmologies in Brans-Dicke gravity coupled to a mass-varying vector field

    OpenAIRE

    Akarsu, Ozgur; Dereli, Tekin; Oflaz, Neslihan

    2013-01-01

    The field equations of Brans-Dicke gravity coupled to a mass-varying vector field are derived. Anisotropic cosmological solutions with a locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I metric and time-dependent scalar and electric vector fields are studied. A particular class of exact solutions for which all the variable parameters have a power-law time dependence is given. The universe expands with a constant expansion anisotropy within this class of solutions. We show that the accelerating ex...

  11. Predictive hydrogeochemical modelling of bauxite residue sand in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissmeier, Laurin; Barry, David A; Phillips, Ian R

    2011-07-15

    The suitability of residue sand (the coarse fraction remaining from Bayer's process of bauxite refining) for constructing the surface cover of closed bauxite residue storage areas was investigated. Specifically, its properties as a medium for plant growth are of interest to ensure residue sand can support a sustainable ecosystem following site closure. The geochemical evolution of the residue sand under field conditions, its plant nutrient status and soil moisture retention were studied by integrated modelling of geochemical and hydrological processes. For the parameterization of mineral reactions, amounts and reaction kinetics of the mineral phases natron, calcite, tricalcium aluminate, sodalite, muscovite and analcime were derived from measured acid neutralization curves. The effective exchange capacity for ion adsorption was measured using three independent exchange methods. The geochemical model, which accounts for mineral reactions, cation exchange and activity corrected solution speciation, was formulated in the geochemical modelling framework PHREEQC, and partially validated in a saturated-flow column experiment. For the integration of variably saturated flow with multi-component solute transport in heterogeneous 2D domains, a coupling of PHREEQC with the multi-purpose finite-element solver COMSOL was established. The integrated hydrogeochemical model was applied to predict water availability and quality in a vertical flow lysimeter and a cover design for a storage facility using measured time series of rainfall and evaporation from southwest Western Australia. In both scenarios the sand was fertigated and gypsum-amended. Results show poor long-term retention of fertilizer ions and buffering of the pH around 10 for more than 5 y of leaching. It was concluded that fertigation, gypsum amendment and rainfall leaching alone were insufficient to render the geochemical conditions of residue sand suitable for optimal plant growth within the given timeframe. The

  12. Chameleon fields, wave function collapse and quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanzi, A

    2015-01-01

    Chameleon fields are quantum (usually scalar) fields, with a density-dependent mass. In a high-density environment, the mass of the chameleon is large. On the contrary, in a small-density environment (e.g. on cosmological distances), the chameleon is very light. A model where the collapse of the wave function is induced by chameleon fields is presented. During this analysis, a Chameleonic Equivalence Principle (CEP) will be formulated: in this model, quantum gravitation is equivalent to a conformal anomaly. Further research efforts are necessary to verify whether this proposal is compatible with phenomeno logical constraints. (paper)

  13. Accounting for time- and space-varying changes in the gravity field to improve the network adjustment of relative-gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Ferre, Ty P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The relative gravimeter is the primary terrestrial instrument for measuring spatially and temporally varying gravitational fields. The background noise of the instrument—that is, non-linear drift and random tares—typically requires some form of least-squares network adjustment to integrate data collected during a campaign that may take several days to weeks. Here, we present an approach to remove the change in the observed relative-gravity differences caused by hydrologic or other transient processes during a single campaign, so that the adjusted gravity values can be referenced to a single epoch. The conceptual approach is an example of coupled hydrogeophysical inversion, by which a hydrologic model is used to inform and constrain the geophysical forward model. The hydrologic model simulates the spatial variation of the rate of change of gravity as either a linear function of distance from an infiltration source, or using a 3-D numerical groundwater model. The linear function can be included in and solved for as part of the network adjustment. Alternatively, the groundwater model is used to predict the change of gravity at each station through time, from which the accumulated gravity change is calculated and removed from the data prior to the network adjustment. Data from a field experiment conducted at an artificial-recharge facility are used to verify our approach. Maximum gravity change due to hydrology (observed using a superconducting gravimeter) during the relative-gravity field campaigns was up to 2.6 μGal d−1, each campaign was between 4 and 6 d and one month elapsed between campaigns. The maximum absolute difference in the estimated gravity change between two campaigns, two months apart, using the standard network adjustment method and the new approach, was 5.5 μGal. The maximum gravity change between the same two campaigns was 148 μGal, and spatial variation in gravity change revealed zones of preferential infiltration and areas of relatively

  14. Orbit and Gravity Field Solutions from Swarm GPS Observations - First Result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, A.; Dahle, C.; Arnold, D.; Bock, H.; Flechtner, F.

    2014-12-01

    Although ESA's Earth Explorer Mission Swarm is primarily dedicated to measure the Earth's magnetic field, it may also serve as a gravity field mission. Equipped with GPS receivers, accelerometers, star-tracker assemblies and laser retro-reflectors, the three Swarm satellites are potentially capable to be used as a high-low satellite-to-satellite tracking (hl-SST) observing system, following the missions CHAMP (first single-satellite hl-SST mission), GRACE (twin-satellite mission with additional ultra-precise low-low SST and GOCE (single-satellite mission additionally equipped with a gradiometer). GRACE, dedicated to measure the time-variability of the gravity field, is the only mission still in orbit, but its lifetime will likely end before launch of its follow-on mission GRACE-FO in August 2017 primarily due to aging of the onboard batteries after meanwhile more than 12 years of operation. Swarm is probably a good candidate to provide time-variable gravity field solutions and to close a potential gap between GRACE and GRACE-FO. Consisting of three satellites, Swarm also offers to use inter-satellite GPS-derived baselines as additional observations. However, as of today it is not clear if such information will substantially improve the gravity field solutions. Nevertheless, the properties of the Swarm constellation with two lower satellites flying in a pendulum-like orbit and a slightly differently inclined third satellite at higher altitude still represent a unique observing system raising expectations at least compared to CHAMP derived time-variable gravity field solutions. Whatever processing method will be applied for Swarm gravity field recovery, its success strongly depends on the quality of the Swarm Level 1b data as well as the quality of the derived Swarm orbits. With first Level 1b data sets available since mid of May 2014 (excluding accelerometer data), first results for Swarm orbits and baselines, as well as Swarm gravity field solutions are presented

  15. String theory embeddings of nonrelativistic field theories and their holographic Hořava gravity duals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewski, Stefan; Karch, Andreas

    2013-02-22

    We argue that generic nonrelativistic quantum field theories with a holographic description are dual to Hořava gravity. We construct explicit examples of this duality embedded in string theory by starting with relativistic dual pairs and taking a nonrelativistic scaling limit.

  16. Gravity field models from kinematic orbits of CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE satellites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bezděk, Aleš; Sebera, Josef; Klokočník, Jaroslav; Kostelecký, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2014), s. 412-429 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13071; GA ČR GA13-36843S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : gravity field models * kinematic orbits * generalized least squares Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2014

  17. On the covariant formalism of the effective field theory of gravity and its cosmological implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, Alessandro; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Following our previous work wherein the leading order effective action was computed in the covariant effective field theory of gravity, here we specialize the effective action to the FRW spacetime and obtain the effective Friedmann equations. In particular, we focus our attention on studying...

  18. A GOCE-only global gravity field model by the space-wise approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migliaccio, Federica; Reguzzoni, Mirko; Gatti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The global gravity field model computed by the spacewise approach is one of three official solutions delivered by ESA from the analysis of the GOCE data. The model consists of a set of spherical harmonic coefficients and the corresponding error covariance matrix. The main idea behind this approac...

  19. The DNSC08GRA global marine gravity field from double retracked satellite altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Berry, P.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Satellite radar altimetry has been monitoring the earth's oceans from space for several decades. However, only the GEOSAT and ERS-1 geodetic mission data recorded more than a decade ago provide altimetry with adequate spatial coverage to derive a high-resolution marine gravity field. The original...

  20. CHAMP and GRACE resonances, and the gravity field of the Earth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gooding, R. H.; Wagner, C. A.; Klokočník, Jaroslav; Gruber, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 10 (2007), s. 1604-1611 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003407; GA MŠk(CZ) LC506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : gravity field resonances * lumped coefficients * CHAMP * GRACE Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.774, year: 2007

  1. Simulation of the time-variable gravity field by means of coupled geophysical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, T.; Bamber, J.L.; Bierkens, M.F.P.; Dobslaw, H.; Murböck, M.; Thomas, M.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Dam, T. van; Vermeersen, L.L.A.; Visser, P.

    2011-01-01

    Time variable gravity fields, reflecting variations of mass distribution in the system Earth is one of the key parameters to understand the changing Earth. Mass variations are caused either by redistribution of mass in, on or above the Earth's surface or by geophysical processes in the Earth's

  2. Ground track density considerations on the resolvability of gravity field harmonics in a repeat orbit

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klokočník, Jaroslav; Wagner, C. A.; Kostelecký, J.; Bezděk, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 6 (2015), 1146-1160 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-36843S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : gravity field of the Earth * resonant/repeat orbit missions * ground track density Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.409, year: 2015

  3. Measurement of gravity and gauge fields using quantum mechanical probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anandan, J.

    1986-01-01

    The author considers the question of which quantities are observed when the gravitational and gauge fields are measured by a quantum mechanical probe. The motion of a quantum mechanical particle can be constructed, via Huyghens' principle, by the interference of secondary wavelets. Three types of interference phenomena are considered: interference of two coherent beams separated in space-time during part of their motion; interference of two coherent beams which are in the same region in spacetime but differ in energy or mass; and the Josphson effect and its generalization. The author shows how to determine the gravitational field by means of quantum interference. The corresponding problem for gauge fields is treated and a simple proof of the previously proved theorem for the reconstruction of the connection from the holonomy transformations is presented. A heuristic principle for the gravitational interaction of two quantum mechanical particles is formulated which implies the equivalence of inertial and active gravitational masses

  4. Global Lunar Gravity Field Determination Using Historical and Recent Tracking Data in Preparation for SELENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Namiki, N.; Hanada, H.; Iwata, T.; Tsuruta, S.; Kawano, N.; Sasaki, S.

    2006-12-01

    In the near future, a number of satellite missions are planned to be launched to the Moon. These missions include initiatives by China, India, the USA, as well as the Japanese SELENE mission. These missions will gather a wealth of lunar data which will improve the knowledge of the Moon. One of the main topics to be addressed will be the lunar gravity field. Especially SELENE will contribute to improving the knowledge of the gravity field, by applying 4-way Doppler tracking between the main satellite and a relay satellite, and by applying a separate differential VLBI experiment. These will improve the determination of the global gravity field, especially over the far side and at the lower degrees (mostly for degrees lower than 30), as is shown by extensive simulations of the SELENE mission. This work focuses on the determination of the global lunar gravity field from all available tracking data to this date. In preparation for the SELENE mission, analysis using Lunar Prospector tracking data, as well as Clementine data and historical data from the Apollo and Lunar Orbiter projects is being conducted at NAOJ. Some SMART-1 tracking data are also included. The goal is to combine the good-quality data from the existing lunar missions up to this date with the tracking data from SELENE in order to derive a new lunar gravity field model. The focus therefore currently lies on processing the available data and extracting lunar gravity field information from them. It is shown that the historical tracking data contribute especially to the lower degrees of the global lunar gravity field model. Due to the large gap in tracking data coverage over the far side for the historical data, the higher degrees are almost fully determined by the a priori information in the form of a Kaula rule. The combination with SELENE data is thus expected to improve the estimate for the lower degrees even further, including coverage of the far side. Since historical tracking data are from orbits with

  5. Parallel Vector Fields and Einstein Equations of Gravity | Mahara ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In other words, we prove that the existence of such vector fields in a region implies the vanishing of the Riemann curvature tensor in that region. To prove this statement, we reduce the 4-dimensional problem to a 3-dimensional one. This enables us to use a link existing between the Riemann curvature tensor and the Ricci ...

  6. Marine gravity field for oil and mineral exploration — Improvements in the Arctic from CryoSat-2 SAR altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Jain, Maulik; Knudsen, Per

    2014-01-01

    The availability of Cryosat-2 with its coverage throughout the Arctic Ocean up to 88N is a quantum leap forward for altimetric gravity field modeling and here we have tried to quantify the improvement of Cryosat-2 to global and particularly Arctic altimetric gravity field modeling through a compa...

  7. Gravity field separation and mapping of buried quaternary valleys in Lolland, Denmark using old geophysical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M.J.; Olsen, Henrik; Ploug, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we utilise the old industrial data for planning new surveys. The overall purpose is a detailed mapping of possible aquifers for the island of Lolland, Denmark. This is done through detection and modelling of the buried quaternary valleys, which either can serve as potential aquifers...... or potential aquifer barriers. The present paper deals only with one aspect of a larger study; namely a case story leading to the detection of unknown buried valleys and the first attempts to model them in 3D from gravity and seismics. Also, the emphasis here is not on any theoretical or even methodological...... the results): the construction of depth models from industrial seismic data for known geological units; geological stripping with mass density adjustment; high-pass filtering of the residual gravity signals; vibroseis surveys; microgravity surveys along seismic lines; the first modelling of buried valleys....

  8. Consolidated science and user requirements for a next generation gravity field mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pail, Roland; Bingham, Rory; Braitenberg, Carla; Eicker, Annette; Horwath, Martin; Longuevergne, Laurent; Panet, Isabelle; Rolstad-Denby, Cecile; Wouters, Bert

    2015-04-01

    In an internationally coordinated initiative among the main user communities of gravity field products the science and user requirements for a future gravity field mission constellation (beyond GRACE-FO) have been reviewed and defined. This activity was realized as a joint initiative of the IAG (International Association of Geodesy) Sub-Commissions 2.3 and 2.6, the GGOS (Global Geodetic Observing System) Working Group on Satellite Missions, and the IUGG (International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics). After about one year of preparation, in a user workshop that was held in September 2014 consensus among the user communities of hydrology, ocean, cryosphere, solid Earth and atmosphere on consolidated science requirements could be achieved. The consolidation of the user requirements became necessary, because several future gravity field studies have resulted in quite different performance numbers as a target for a future gravity mission (2025+). Based on limited number of mission scenarios which took also technical feasibility into account, a consolidated view on the science requirements among the international user communities was derived, research fields that could not be tackled by current gravity missions have been identified, and the added value (qualitatively and quantitatively) of these scenarios with respect to science return has been evaluated. The resulting document shall form the basis for further programmatic and technological developments. In this contribution, the main results of this initiative will be presented. An overview of the specific requirements of the individual user groups, the consensus on consolidated requirements as well as the new research fields that have been identified during this process will be discussed.

  9. Heat transfer to liquid sodium in a straight duct in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and a gravity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, A.

    1998-01-01

    Heat transfer to liquid sodium in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and gravity field was analyzed in a square cross section straight duct. The duct had conducting vanadium walls. Magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions and energy equation in three dimensions in cartesian coordinate system were solved. Firstly Nusselt number was calculated with no magnetic field and gravity field. Secondly the Nusselt number was calculated for the case of transverse magnetic field acting on the fluid. Thirdly Nusselt number was calculated for the case of transverse magnetic field and gravity field acting on the fluid. Only one face of the channel was heated. It was found that Nusselt number is not sensitive to application of gravity field and is slightly sensitive to application of transverse magnetic field. The sensitivity of Nusselt number to magnetic field intensity becomes almost negligible after increasing the strength of magnetic field to 0.1 Tesla. (author)

  10. Research Progress of the Gravity Field Application in Earth's Geodynamics and Interior Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Heping

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of deep internal structure and internal dynamics of the earth has always been a hot topic in the field of basic geoscience research.Traditional approach relies mainly on seismic technology. However, in recent decades, the innovation of modern gravity observation technology (especially the successful application of high-precision superconducting gravity technology makes it possible to detect the earth's internal dynamics and physical information. In this paper, we summarize the research progress of Chinese group in detecting the earth's free oscillation, free core nutation, inner core translational oscillation, tidal model and polar tide and the internal structure by using modern high-precision gravity technology in recent years.

  11. Towards consolidated science requirements for a next generation gravity field mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pail, R.; Braitenberg, C. F.; Eicker, A.; Floberghagen, R.; Forsberg, R.; Haagmans, R.; Horwath, M.; Kusche, J.; Labrecque, J. L.; Panet, I.; Rolstad Denby, C.; Schröter, J.; Wouters, B.

    2013-12-01

    As a joint initiative of the IAG (International Association of Geodesy) Sub-Commissions 2.3 and 2.6, the GGOS (Global Geodetic Observing System) Working Group on Satellite Missions, and the IUGG (International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics), we target on the consolidation of science requirements for a next generation gravity field mission (beyond GRACE-FO). Several future gravity field studies have resulted in quite different performance numbers as a target for a future gravity mission (2025+), and a consolidation within the different user groups is required, under the boundary condition of the technical feasibility of the mission concepts and before the background of double- and multi-pair formations. Therefore, this initiative shall concentrate on the consolidation of the science requirements, and should result in a document that can be used as a solid basis for further programmatic and technological developments. Based on limited number of realistic mission scenarios, a consolidated view on the science requirements within the international user communities shall be derived, research fields that could not be tackled by current gravity missions shall be identified, and the added value (qualitatively and quantitatively) of these scenarios with respect to science return shall be evaluated. The final science requirements shall be agreed upon during a workshop which is planned for the second half of 2014. In this contribution, the mission scenarios will be discussed and first results of the consolidation process will be presented.

  12. A new approach to the regularization of regional gravity field solutions in SRBF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Majid; Flury, Jakob

    2016-04-01

    We present a purely data-dependent approach to the choice of the regularization parameter for regional gravity field solutions in spherical radial base functions. The method is based on the space-localization feature of the base functions and needs a prior gravity field solution to solve for the regional gravity field coefficients. However, to be independent of any prior model, we estimate an approximate solution using a realistic first guess for the regularization parameter. The final regularization parameter and therefore the final regional solution are obtained in an iterative procedure. We apply our methodology to real GOCE gravity gradients and assess the performance of the method in several test regions. Results show that our approach outperforms the existing methods such as the L-curve, the GCV and the VCE. In addition, the estimated coefficients represent the shape of the signal (geoid) in the target region and have therefore physical meaning. More details are given and the results are discussed in this contribution.

  13. Field sampling of residual aviation gasoline in sandy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostendorf, D.W.; Hinlein, E.S.; Yuefeng, Xie; Leach, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two complementary field sampling methods for the determination of residual aviation gasoline content in the contaminated capillary fringe of a fine, uniform, sandy soil were investigated. The first method featured field extrusion of core barrels into pint-size Mason jars, while the second consisted of laboratory partitioning of intact stainless steel core sleeves. Soil samples removed from the Mason jars (in the field) and sleeve segments (in the laboratory) were subjected to methylene chloride extraction and gas chromatographic analysis to compare their aviation gasoline content. The barrel extrusion sampling method yielded a vertical profile with 0.10m resolution over an essentially continuous 5.0m interval from the ground surface to the water table. The sleeve segment alternative yielded a more resolved 0.03m vertical profile over a shorter 0.8m interval through the capillary fringe. The two methods delivered precise estimates of the vertically integrated mass of aviation gasoline at a given horizontal location, and a consistent view of the vertical profile as well. In the latter regard, a 0.2m thick lens of maximum contamination was found in the center of the capillary fringe, where moisture filled all voids smaller than the mean pore size. The maximum peak was resolved by the core sleeve data, but was partially obscured by the barrel extrusion observations, so that replicate barrels or a half-pint Mason jar size should be considered for data supporting vertical transport analyses in the absence of sleeve partitions

  14. Noether Gauge Symmetry of Dirac Field in (2 + 1-Dimensional Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganim Gecim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a gravitational theory including a Dirac field that is nonminimally coupled to gravity in 2 + 1 dimensions. Noether gauge symmetry approach can be used to fix the form of coupling function F(Ψ and the potential V(Ψ of the Dirac field and to obtain a constant of motion for the dynamical equations. In the context of (2 + 1-dimensional gravity, we investigate cosmological solutions of the field equations using these forms obtained by the existence of Noether gauge symmetry. In this picture, it is shown that, for the nonminimal coupling case, the cosmological solutions indicate both an early-time inflation and late-time acceleration for the universe.

  15. Aspects of Nonlocality in Quantum Field Theory, Quantum Gravity and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Barvinsky, A O

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a collection of essays on nonlocal phenomena in quantum field theory, gravity and cosmology. Mechanisms of nonlocal contributions to the quantum effective action are discussed within the covariant perturbation expansion in field strengths and spacetime curvatures and the nonperturbative method based on the late time asymptotics of the heat kernel. Euclidean version of the Schwinger-Keldysh technique for quantum expectation values is presented as a special rule of obtaining the nonlocal effective equations of motion for the mean quantum field from the Euclidean effective action. This rule is applied to a new model of ghost free nonlocal cosmology which can generate the de Sitter stage of cosmological evolution at an arbitrary value of $\\varLambda$ -- a model of dark energy with its scale played by the dynamical variable that can be fixed by a kind of a scaling symmetry breaking mechanism. This model is shown to interpolate between the superhorizon phase of gravity theory mediated by a scala...

  16. Tackling non-linearities with the effective field theory of dark energy and modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frusciante, Noemi; Papadomanolakis, Georgios

    2017-12-01

    We present the extension of the effective field theory framework to the mildly non-linear scales. The effective field theory approach has been successfully applied to the late time cosmic acceleration phenomenon and it has been shown to be a powerful method to obtain predictions about cosmological observables on linear scales. However, mildly non-linear scales need to be consistently considered when testing gravity theories because a large part of the data comes from those scales. Thus, non-linear corrections to predictions on observables coming from the linear analysis can help in discriminating among different gravity theories. We proceed firstly by identifying the necessary operators which need to be included in the effective field theory Lagrangian in order to go beyond the linear order in perturbations and then we construct the corresponding non-linear action. Moreover, we present the complete recipe to map any single field dark energy and modified gravity models into the non-linear effective field theory framework by considering a general action in the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner formalism. In order to illustrate this recipe we proceed to map the beyond-Horndeski theory and low-energy Hořava gravity into the effective field theory formalism. As a final step we derived the 4th order action in term of the curvature perturbation. This allowed us to identify the non-linear contributions coming from the linear order perturbations which at the next order act like source terms. Moreover, we confirm that the stability requirements, ensuring the positivity of the kinetic term and the speed of propagation for scalar mode, are automatically satisfied once the viability of the theory is demanded at linear level. The approach we present here will allow to construct, in a model independent way, all the relevant predictions on observables at mildly non-linear scales.

  17. From Discrete Gravity Survey Data to a High-resolution Gravity Field Representation in the Nordic-Baltic Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Märdla, Silja; Ågren, Jonas; Strykowski, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The deduction of a regularly spaced gravity anomaly grid from scattered survey data is studied, addressing mainly two aspects: reduction of gravity to anomalies and subsequent interpolation by various methods. The problem is illustrated in a heterogeneous study area and contrasting test areas inc...

  18. Eccentric binaries of compact objects in strong-field gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, Roman

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis we study the dynamics as well as the resulting gravitational radiation from eccentric binaries of compact objects in the non-linear regime of General Relativity. For this purpose we solve Einstein's field equation numerically in a 3+1 decomposition using the moving-puncture technique. We focus our study on very particular orbits, arising as a purely relativistic phenomenon of the two-body problem in General Relativity, which are associated with unstable circular orbits. They are governed by a fast, nearly circular revolution at a short distance followed by a slow, radial motion on a nearly elliptic trajectory. Due to the unique features of their orbital trajectories they are called zoom-whirl orbits. We analyze how the peculiar dynamics manifests itself in the emitted gravitational radiation and to which extent one can infer the orbital properties from observations of the gravitational waves. In the first part, we consider black hole binaries. We perform a comprehensive parameter study by varying the initial eccentricity, computing and characterizing the resulting gravitational waveforms. We address aspects, which can only be obtained from non-perturbative methods, and which are crucial to the astrophysical relevance of these orbits. In particular, our results imply a fairly low amount of fine-tuning necessary to spot zoom-whirl effects. We find whirl orbits for values of the eccentricities, which fall in disjunct intervals extending to rather low values. Furthermore, we show that whirl effects just before merger cause a signal with significant amplitude. In the second part, we investigate neutron star binaries on eccentric orbits in full General Relativity, which has not been studied so far. We explore their phenomenology and study the consequences for the matter after the neutron stars have merged. In these evolutions the merged neutron stars sooner or later collapse to form a black hole. During the collapse most of the matter is accreted on to the

  19. Eccentric binaries of compact objects in strong-field gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, Roman

    2011-09-27

    In this thesis we study the dynamics as well as the resulting gravitational radiation from eccentric binaries of compact objects in the non-linear regime of General Relativity. For this purpose we solve Einstein's field equation numerically in a 3+1 decomposition using the moving-puncture technique. We focus our study on very particular orbits, arising as a purely relativistic phenomenon of the two-body problem in General Relativity, which are associated with unstable circular orbits. They are governed by a fast, nearly circular revolution at a short distance followed by a slow, radial motion on a nearly elliptic trajectory. Due to the unique features of their orbital trajectories they are called zoom-whirl orbits. We analyze how the peculiar dynamics manifests itself in the emitted gravitational radiation and to which extent one can infer the orbital properties from observations of the gravitational waves. In the first part, we consider black hole binaries. We perform a comprehensive parameter study by varying the initial eccentricity, computing and characterizing the resulting gravitational waveforms. We address aspects, which can only be obtained from non-perturbative methods, and which are crucial to the astrophysical relevance of these orbits. In particular, our results imply a fairly low amount of fine-tuning necessary to spot zoom-whirl effects. We find whirl orbits for values of the eccentricities, which fall in disjunct intervals extending to rather low values. Furthermore, we show that whirl effects just before merger cause a signal with significant amplitude. In the second part, we investigate neutron star binaries on eccentric orbits in full General Relativity, which has not been studied so far. We explore their phenomenology and study the consequences for the matter after the neutron stars have merged. In these evolutions the merged neutron stars sooner or later collapse to form a black hole. During the collapse most of the matter is accreted on

  20. Constraining Saturn's interior density profile from precision gravity field measurement obtained during Grand Finale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, N.; Fortney, J. J.; Helled, R.; Hubbard, W. B.; Mankovich, C.; Thorngren, D.; Wahl, S. M.; Militzer, B.; Durante, D.

    2017-12-01

    The external gravity field of a planetary body is determined by the distribution of mass in its interior. Therefore, a measurement of the external field, properlyinterpreted, tells us about the interior density profile, ρ(r), which in turn can be used to constrain the composition in the interior and thereby learn about theformation mechanism of the planet. Recently, very high precision measurements of the gravity coefficients for Saturn have been made by the radio science instrument on the Cassini spacecraft during its Grand Finale orbits. The resulting coefficients come with an associated uncertainty. The task of matching a given density profile to a given set of gravity coefficients is relatively straightforward, but the question of how to best account for the uncertainty is not. In essentially all prior work on matching models to gravity field data inferences about planetary structure have rested on assumptions regarding the imperfectly known H/He equation of state and the assumption of an adiabatic interior. Here we wish to vastly expand the phase space of such calculations. We present a framework for describing all the possible interior density structures of a Jovian planet constrained by a given set of gravity coefficients and their associated uncertainties. Our approach is statistical. We produce a random sample of ρ(a) curves drawn from the underlying (and unknown) probability distribution of all curves, where ρ is the density on an interior level surface with equatorial radius a. Since the resulting set of density curves is a random sample, that is, curves appear with frequency proportional to the likelihood of their being consistent with the measured gravity, we can compute probability distributions for any quantity that is a function of ρ, such as central pressure, oblateness, core mass and radius, etc. Our approach is also Bayesian, in that it can utilize any prior assumptions about the planet's interior, as necessary, without being overly

  1. Reduction of ocean tide aliasing in the context of a next generation gravity field mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, Markus; Daras, Ilias; Pail, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Ocean tide aliasing is currently one of the main limiting factors for temporal gravity field determination and the derivation of mass transport processes in the Earth system. This will be true even more for future gravity field missions with improved measurement technology, which cannot be fully exploited due to this dominant systematic error source. In several previous studies it has been shown that temporal aliasing, related to tidal and non-tidal sources, can be significantly reduced by double-pair formations, e.g., in a so-called Bender configuration, and its effects can be migrated to higher frequencies by an optimum orbit choice, especially the orbit altitude (Murböck et al. 2013). Improved processing strategies and extended parameter models should be able to further reduce the problem. Concerning non-tidal aliasing, it could be shown that the parameterization of short-period long-wavelength gravity field signals, the so-called Wiese approach, is a powerful method for aliasing reduction (Wiese et al. 2013), but it does not really work for the very short-period signals of ocean tides with mainly semi-diurnal and diurnal periods (Daras 2015). In this contribution, several methods dealing with the reduction of ocean tide aliasing are investigated both from a methodological and a numerical point of view. One of the promising strategies is the co-estimation of selected tidal constituents over long time periods, also considering the basic orbit frequencies of the satellites. These improved estimates for ocean tide signals can then be used in a second step as an enhanced de-aliasing product for the computation of short-period temporal gravity fields. From a number of theoretical considerations and numerical case-studies, recommendations for an optimum orbit selection with respect to reduction of ocean tide aliasing shall be derived for two main mission scenarios. The first one is a classical Bender configuration being composed of a (near-) polar and an inclined in

  2. Magnetic field is the dominant factor to induce the response of Streptomyces avermitilis in altered gravity simulated by diamagnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Gao, Hong; Shang, Peng; Zhou, Xianlong; Ashforth, Elizabeth; Zhuo, Ying; Chen, Difei; Ren, Biao; Liu, Zhiheng; Zhang, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to simulate an altered gravity environment, as in space. In this study, using Streptomyces avermitilis as the test organism, we investigate whether changes in magnetic field and altered gravity induce changes in morphology and secondary metabolism. We find that a strong magnetic field (12T) inhibit the morphological development of S. avermitilis in solid culture, and increase the production of secondary metabolites. S. avermitilis on solid medium was levitated at 0 g*, 1 g* and 2 g* in an altered gravity environment simulated by diamagnetic levitation and under a strong magnetic field, denoted by the asterix. The morphology was obtained by electromicroscopy. The production of the secondary metabolite, avermectin, was determined by OD(245 nm). The results showed that diamagnetic levitation could induce a physiological response in S. avermitilis. The difference between 1 g* and the control group grown without the strong magnetic field (1 g), showed that the magnetic field was a more dominant factor influencing changes in morphology and secondary metabolite production, than altered gravity. We have discovered that magnetic field, rather than altered gravity, is the dominant factor in altered gravity simulated by diamagnetic levitation, therefore care should to be taken in the interpretation of results when using diamagnetic levitation as a technique to simulate altered gravity. Hence, these results are significant, and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena.

  3. Quantum group structure and local fields in the algebraic approach to 2D gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Schnittger, Jens

    1994-01-01

    This review contains a summary of work by J.-L. Gervais and the author on the operator approach to 2d gravity. Special emphasis is placed on the construction of local observables -the Liouville exponentials and the Liouville field itself - and the underlying algebra of chiral vertex operators. The double quantum group structure arising from the presence of two screening charges is discussed and the generalized algebra and field operators are derived. In the last part, we show that our construction gives rise to a natural definition of a quantum tau function, which is a noncommutative version of the classical group-theoretic representation of the Liouville fields by Leznov and Saveliev.

  4. Impact of orbit design choices on the gravity field retrieval of Next Generation Gravity Missions - Insights on the ESA-ADDCON project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daras, Ilias; Visser, Pieter; Sneeuw, Nico; van Dam, Tonie; Pail, Roland; Gruber, Thomas; Tabibi, Sajad; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Wei; Tourian, Mohammad; Engels, Johannes; Saemian, Peyman; Siemes, Christian; Haagmans, Roger

    2017-04-01

    Next Generation Gravity Missions (NGGMs) expected to be launched in the mid-term future have set high anticipations for an enhanced monitoring of mass transport in the Earth system, establishing their products applicable to new scientific fields and serving societal needs. The European Space Agency (ESA) has issued several studies on concepts of NGGMs. Following this tradition, the project "Additional Constellations & Scientific Analysis Studies of the Next Generation Gravity Mission" picks up where the previous study ESA-SC4MGV left off. One of the ESA-ADDCON project objectives is to investigate the impact of different orbit configurations and parameters on the gravity field retrieval. Given a two-pair Bender-type constellation, consisting of a polar and an inclined pair, choices for orbit design such as the altitude profile during mission lifetime, the length of retrieval period, the value of sub-cycles and the choice of a prograde over a retrograde orbit are investigated. Moreover, the problem of aliasing due to ocean tide model inaccuracies, as well as methods for mitigating their effect on gravity field solutions are investigated in the context of NGGMs. The performed simulations make use of the gravity field processing approach where low-resolution gravity field solutions are co-parameterized in short-term periods (e.g. daily) together with the long-term solutions (e.g. 11-day solution). This method proved to be beneficial for NGGMs (ESA-SC4MGV project) since the enhanced spatio-temporal sampling enables a self-de-aliasing of high-frequency atmospheric and oceanic signals, which may now be a part of the retrieved signal. The potential added value of having such signals for the first time in near real-time is assessed within the project. This paper demonstrates the preliminary results of the ESA-ADDCON project focusing on aspects of orbit design choices for NGGMs.

  5. Gravity signal at Ghawar, Saudi Arabia, from the global gravitational field model EGM 2008 and similarities around

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klokočník, Jaroslav; Kostelecký, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2015), s. 3515-3522 ISSN 1866-7511 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : gravity disturbance (anomaly) * Marussi tensor * invariants of the gravity field Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.224, year: 2014

  6. Constraining the interior density profile of a Jovian planet from precision gravity field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, Naor; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Helled, Ravit; Hubbard, William B.; Thorngren, Daniel; Mankovich, Chris; Wahl, Sean; Militzer, Burkhard; Durante, Daniele

    2017-10-01

    The external gravity field of a planetary body is determined by the distribution of mass in its interior. Therefore, a measurement of the external field, properly interpreted, tells us about the interior density profile, ρ(r), which in turn can be used to constrain the composition in the interior and thereby learn about the formation mechanism of the planet. Planetary gravity fields are usually described by the coefficients in an expansion of the gravitational potential. Recently, high precision measurements of these coefficients for Jupiter and Saturn have been made by the radio science instruments on the Juno and Cassini spacecraft, respectively.The resulting coefficients come with an associated uncertainty. And while the task of matching a given density profile with a given set of gravity coefficients is relatively straightforward, the question of how best to account for the uncertainty is not. In essentially all prior work on matching models to gravity field data, inferences about planetary structure have rested on imperfect knowledge of the H/He equation of state and on the assumption of an adiabatic interior. Here we wish to vastly expand the phase space of such calculations. We present a framework for describing all the possible interior density structures of a Jovian planet, constrained only by a given set of gravity coefficients and their associated uncertainties. Our approach is statistical. We produce a random sample of ρ(a) curves drawn from the underlying (and unknown) probability distribution of all curves, where ρ is the density on an interior level surface with equatorial radius a. Since the resulting set of density curves is a random sample, that is, curves appear with frequency proportional to the likelihood of their being consistent with the measured gravity, we can compute probability distributions for any quantity that is a function of ρ, such as central pressure, oblateness, core mass and radius, etc. Our approach is also bayesian, in that

  7. Treatment of ocean tide aliasing in the context of a next generation gravity field mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pail, Roland; Michael, Murböck; Honecker, Johanna; Dobslaw, Henryk

    2014-05-01

    One of the most promising configurations of a future gravity field mission beyond GRACE-FO will be a double-pair formation of two in-line pairs in a so-called Bender configuration. In spite of the fact that it has been shown in several previous studies that temporal aliasing can be significantly reduced by this constellation, also in this case ocean tide aliasing will still be one of the main limiting factors for the gravity field performance. In addition to the optimum orbit choice, which can further significantly reduce temporal aliasing or at least shift the effect to certain bands in the harmonic spectrum (Murböck et al. 2013, J Geod), improved processing strategies and extended parameter models should be able to further reduce the problem. In this contribution, several methods dealing with the reduction of ocean tide aliasing are investigated both from a methodological and a numerical point of view. One of the promising strategies is the co-estimation of selected tidal constituents over long time periods, considering the basic orbit frequencies of the two pairs. These improved estimates for ocean tide signals can then be used in a second step as an enhanced de-aliasing product for the computation of short-period temporal gravity fields. From a number of theoretical considerations and numerical case-studies, recommendations for an optimum orbit selection with respect to reduction of ocean tide aliasing shall be derived. An interesting approach to improve especially non-tidal temporal aliasing is the co-estimation of short-period low-degree gravity fields ("Wiese approach"). As a further aspect of this work, the cross-correlation of the Wiese approach with the co-estimation of tidal parameters is analysed in detail.

  8. Physical Retracking of Jason-1 LRM data for ocean surface height/gravity field determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Maulik; Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Stenseng, Lars; Dall, Jørgen

    2013-04-01

    Jason-1 Low Resolution Mode (LRM) waveforms can be processed to extract accurate heights of the ocean surface. These heights are adjusted taking into account various corrections available. Further the along surface slope/variation of these ocean heights can be used to make an estimation of the gravity field. An important part of this gravity field estimation is dependent on the way the LRM waveform is processed. Thus a physical model based on an error function is used, and the LRM waveforms are fit to this model. A processing system made up of 2 parameter and 3 parameter fitting models are used in order to extract the most reliable ocean surface heights. The quality of the processing system is judged by evaluating the standard deviation of the sea surface anomaly obtained after all corrections and the mean sea surface/geoid are removed. The lower the value of the standard deviation of the sea surface anomaly, the better the quality of processing is. Hence, different processing schemes are considered and evaluated in order to conclude towards the best retracking procedure which would eventually result in high accuracy gravity field estimations.

  9. Estimating the Earth's gravity field using a multi-satellite SLR solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloßfeld, Mathis; Stefka, Vojtech; Müller, Horst; Gerstl, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is the unique technique to determine station coordinates, Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) and Stokes coefficients of the Earth's gravity field in one common adjustment. These parameters form the so called "three pillars" (Plag & Pearlman, 2009) of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). In its function as official analysis center of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), DGFI is developing and maintaining software to process SLR observations called "DGFI Orbit and Geodetic parameter estimation Software" (DOGS). The software is used to analyze SLR observations and to compute multi-satellite solutions. To take benefit of different orbit performances (e.g. inclination and altitude), a solution using ten different spherical satellites (ETALON1/2, LAGEOS1/2, STELLA, STARLETTE, AJISAI, LARETS, LARES, BLITS) covering 12 years of observations is computed. The satellites are relatively weighted using a variance component estimation (VCE). The obtained weights are analyzed w.r.t. the potential of the satellite to monitor changes in the Earths geometry, rotation and gravity field. The estimated parameters (station coordinates and EOP) are validated w.r.t. official time series of the IERS. The obtained Stokes coefficients are compared to recent gravity field solutions and discussed in detail.

  10. Estimating the Earth's geometry, rotation and gravity field using a multi-satellite SLR solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefka, V.; Blossfeld, M.; Mueller, H.; Gerstl, M.; Panafidina, N.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is the unique technique to determine station coordinates, Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) and Stokes coefficients of the Earth's gravity field in one common adjustment. These parameters form the so called "three pillars" (Plag & Pearlman, 2009) of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). In its function as official analysis center of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), DGFI is developing and maintaining software to process SLR observations called "DGFI Orbit and Geodetic parameter estimation Software" (DOGS). The software is used to analyze SLR observations and to compute multi-satellite solutions. To take benefit of different orbit performances (e.g. inclination and altitude), a solution using ten different spherical satellites (ETALON1/2, LAGEOS1/2, STELLA, STARLETTE, AJISAI, LARETS, LARES, BLITS) covering the period of 12 years of observations is computed. The satellites are relatively weighted using a variance component estimation (VCE). The obtained weights are analyzed w.r.t. the potential of the satellite to monitor changes in the Earths geometry, rotation and gravity field. The estimated parameters (station coordinates and EOP) are validated w.r.t. official time series of the IERS. The Stokes coefficients are compared to recent gravity field solutions.

  11. Estimating Jupiter’s Gravity Field Using Juno Measurements, Trajectory Estimation Analysis, and a Flow Model Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Durante, Daniele; Finocchiaro, Stefano; Iess, Luciano, E-mail: eli.galanti@weizmann.ac.il [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2017-07-01

    The upcoming Juno spacecraft measurements have the potential of improving our knowledge of Jupiter’s gravity field. The analysis of the Juno Doppler data will provide a very accurate reconstruction of spatial gravity variations, but these measurements will be very accurate only over a limited latitudinal range. In order to deduce the full gravity field of Jupiter, additional information needs to be incorporated into the analysis, especially regarding the Jovian flow structure and its depth, which can influence the measured gravity field. In this study we propose a new iterative method for the estimation of the Jupiter gravity field, using a simulated Juno trajectory, a trajectory estimation model, and an adjoint-based inverse model for the flow dynamics. We test this method both for zonal harmonics only and with a full gravity field including tesseral harmonics. The results show that this method can fit some of the gravitational harmonics better to the “measured” harmonics, mainly because of the added information from the dynamical model, which includes the flow structure. Thus, it is suggested that the method presented here has the potential of improving the accuracy of the expected gravity harmonics estimated from the Juno and Cassini radio science experiments.

  12. A time-lapse gravity survey of the Coso geothermal field, China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Cronkite-Ratcliff, Collin; Blake, Kelly

    2018-04-19

    We have conducted a gravity survey of the Coso geothermal field to continue the time-lapse gravity study of the area initiated in 1991. In this report, we outline a method of processing the gravity data that minimizes the random errors and instrument bias introduced into the data by the Scintrex CG-5 relative gravimeters that were used. After processing, the standard deviation of the data was estimated to be ±13 microGals. These data reveal that the negative gravity anomaly over the Coso geothermal field, centered on gravity station CER1, is continuing to increase in magnitude over time. Preliminary modeling indicates that water-table drawdown at the location of CER1 is between 65 and 326 meters over the last two decades. We note, however, that several assumptions on which the model results depend, such as constant elevation and free-water level over the study period, still require verification.

  13. Probes and Tests of Strong-Field Gravity with Observations in the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psaltis Dimitrios

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutron stars and black holes are the astrophysical systems with the strongest gravitational fields in the universe. In this article, I review the prospect of using observations of such compact objects to probe some of the most intriguing general relativistic predictions in the strong-field regime: the absence of stable circular orbits near a compact object and the presence of event horizons around black-hole singularities. I discuss the need for a theoretical framework, within which future experiments will provide detailed, quantitative tests of gravity theories. Finally, I summarize the constraints imposed by current observations of neutron stars on potential deviations from general relativity.

  14. Thermal convection in square porous cavity under transverse oscillatory micro gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pradyumna; Ghosh, M. K.

    2007-12-01

    Two-dimensional thermal convection in saturated square porous cavity under transverse sinusoidal micro-gravity field, has been analyzed by solving mass and transient momentum and energy balance equations, using Darcy's law and Boussinesq's approximation. Isothermal boundary conditions are considered at the two vertical walls but at different temperatures and other two horizontal walls are adiabatic. Average Nusselt numbers are presented as a function of Darcy-Rayleigh number (Ramod) and dimensionless time. Thermally convective, transient nature of the flow field has also been presented for different Darcy-Rayleigh number (Ramod).

  15. Determining the Ocean's Role on the Variable Gravity Field on Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Rui M.

    1999-01-01

    A number of ocean models of different complexity have been used to study changes in the oceanic mass field and angular momentum and their relation to the variable Earth rotation and gravity field. Time scales examined range from seasonal to a few days. Results point to the importance of oceanic signals in driving polar motion, in particular the Chandler and annual wobbles. Results also show that oceanic signals have a measurable impact on length-of-day variations. Various circulation features and associated mass signals, including the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the equatorial currents, and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current play a significant role in oceanic angular momentum variability.

  16. GRACE Data-based High Accuracy Global Static Earth's Gravity Field Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Qiujie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To recover the highly accurate static earth's gravity field by using GRACE satellite data is one of the hot topics in geodesy. Since linearization errors of dynamic approach quickly increase when extending satellite arc length, we established a modified dynamic approach for processing GRACE orbit and range-rate measurements in this paper, which treated orbit observations of the twin GRACE satellites as approximate values for linearization. Using the GRACE data spanning the period Jan. 2003 to Dec. 2010, containing satellite attitudes, orbits, range-rate, and non-conservative forces, we developed two global static gravity field models. One is the unconstrained solution called Tongji-Dyn01s complete to degree and order 180; the other one is the Tongji-Dyn01k model computed by using Kaula constraint. The comparisons between our models and those latest GRACE-only models (including the AIUB-GRACE03, the GGM05S, the ITSG-Grace2014k and the Tongji-GRACE01 published by different international groups, and the external validations with marine gravity anomalies from DTU13 product and height anomalies from GPS/levelling data, were performed in this study. The results demonstrate that the Tongji-Dyn01s has the same accuracy level with those of the latest GRACE-only models, while the Tongji-Dyn01k model is closer to the EIGEN6C2 than the other GRACE-only models as a whole.

  17. Repetitive precision gravity studies at the Cerro Prieto and Heber geothermal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannell, R. B.

    1982-09-01

    To study subsidence and mass removal, a precise gravity network was established on 60 permanent monuments in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field in early 1978, and repeated annually through early 1981; the survey was tied to two bedrock sites outside the limits of the current production zone. The looping technique of station occupation was utilized, in which occupation of the base was followed by occupation of several stations, followed by a return to the base. Use of two LaCoste and Romberg gravity meters, and replication of values within loops as well as entire loops, enhanced precision such that the median standard deviations of the base-to-station differences, reduced to observed gravity values, ranged from 7 to 15 microgals for individual surveys. The smaller values were obtained as field and data reduction techniques were improved and experience was gained. A similar survey was initiated in the Heber area just north of the Mexican border in early 1980. It too was established on permanent monuments, was tied to bedrock stations outside the geothermal area, and used multiple repetitions of values with two meters to achieve high precision.

  18. Impact of CryoSat-2 for marine gravity field - globally and in the Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars; Knudsen, Per

    -in) designed to improve the sea surface /ice height mapping in the Polar Regions. We have investigated the use of two years of CryoSat-2 LRM data as well as CryoSat SAR and SAR-in data for deriving a global gravity field as well as a regional marine gravity field in the Arctic. Both conventional ESA Level 2...... GDR data, NOAA LRM data, but also Level1b (LRM, SAR and SAR-in waveforms) data have been analyzed. A suite of eight different empirical retrackers have been developed and investigated for their ability to predict marine gravity in the Arctic Ocean. The impact of the various improvement offered by Cryo...... days repeat offered by CryoSat-2 provides denser coverage than older geodetic mission data set like ERS-1. Thirdly, the 92 degree inclination of CryoSat-2 is designed to map more of the Arctic Ocean than previous altimetric satellites. Finally, CryoSat-2 is able to operate in two new modes (SAR and SAR...

  19. Spectator Higgs, large-scale gauge fields and the non-minimal coupling to gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Even if the Higgs field does not affect the evolution of the background geometry, its massive inhomogeneities induce large-scale gauge fields whose energy density depends on the slow-roll parameters, on the effective scalar mass and, last but not least, on the dimensionless coupling to the space-time curvature. Since the non-Abelian gauge modes are screened, the non-minimal coupling to gravity predominantly affects the evolution of the hypercharge and electromagnetic fields. While in the case of minimal coupling the obtained constraints are immaterial, as soon as the coupling increases beyond one fourth the produced fields become overcritical. We chart the whole parameter space of this qualitatively new set of bounds. Whenever the limits on the curvature coupling are enforced, the magnetic field may still be partially relevant for large-scale magnetogenesis and exceed $10^{-20}$ G for the benchmark scale of the protogalactic collapse.

  20. Projective Invariance and One-Loop Effective Action in Affine-Metric Gravity Interacting with Scalar Field

    OpenAIRE

    Kalmykov, M. Yu.; Pronin, P. I.; Stepanyantz, K. V.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the projective invariance on the renormalization properties of the theory. One-loop counterterms are calculated in the most general case of interaction of gravity with scalar field.

  1. A nonlinear scenario for development of vortex layer instability in gravity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V. P.

    2007-01-01

    A Hamiltonian version of contour dynamics is formulated for models of constant-vorticity plane flows with interfaces. The proposed approach is used as a framework for a nonlinear scenario for instability development. Localized vortex blobs are analyzed as structural elements of a strongly perturbed wall layer of a vorticity-carrying fluid with free boundary in gravity field. Gravity and vorticity effects on the geometry and velocity of vortex structures are examined. It is shown that compactly supported nonlinear solutions (compactons) are candidates for the role of particle-like vortex structures in models of flow breakdown. An analysis of the instability mechanism demonstrates the possibility of a self-similar collapse. It is found that the vortex shape stabilizes at the final stage of the collapse, while the vortex sheet strength on its boundary increases as (t 0 - t) -1 , where t 0 is the collapse time

  2. Time-variable gravity fields and ocean mass change from 37 months of kinematic Swarm orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lück, Christina; Kusche, Jürgen; Rietbroek, Roelof; Löcher, Anno

    2018-03-01

    Measuring the spatiotemporal variation of ocean mass allows for partitioning of volumetric sea level change, sampled by radar altimeters, into mass-driven and steric parts. The latter is related to ocean heat change and the current Earth's energy imbalance. Since 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has provided monthly snapshots of the Earth's time-variable gravity field, from which one can derive ocean mass variability. However, GRACE has reached the end of its lifetime with data degradation and several gaps occurred during the last years, and there will be a prolonged gap until the launch of the follow-on mission GRACE-FO. Therefore, efforts focus on generating a long and consistent ocean mass time series by analyzing kinematic orbits from other low-flying satellites, i.e. extending the GRACE time series. Here we utilize data from the European Space Agency's (ESA) Swarm Earth Explorer satellites to derive and investigate ocean mass variations. For this aim, we use the integral equation approach with short arcs (Mayer-Gürr, 2006) to compute more than 500 time-variable gravity fields with different parameterizations from kinematic orbits. We investigate the potential to bridge the gap between the GRACE and the GRACE-FO mission and to substitute missing monthly solutions with Swarm results of significantly lower resolution. Our monthly Swarm solutions have a root mean square error (RMSE) of 4.0 mm with respect to GRACE, whereas directly estimating constant, trend, annual, and semiannual (CTAS) signal terms leads to an RMSE of only 1.7 mm. Concerning monthly gaps, our CTAS Swarm solution appears better than interpolating existing GRACE data in 13.5 % of all cases, when artificially removing one solution. In the case of an 18-month artificial gap, 80.0 % of all CTAS Swarm solutions were found closer to the observed GRACE data compared to interpolated GRACE data. Furthermore, we show that precise modeling of non-gravitational forces

  3. Physical Retracking of Cryosat-2 Low Resolution Mode data for ocean surface height and gravity field estimation in open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Maulik; Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Dall, Jorgen; Stenseng, Lars

    2014-05-01

    Cryosat-2 Low Resolution Mode (LRM) altimetric data is processed to determine precise ocean surface heights and gravity fields in open ocean. These ocean surface heights are corrected using various geophysical corrections available. The along track variation of the ocean surface height anomaly is used to determine the gravity field. The quality of this gravity field estimation is dependent on the precision in the ocean surface height anomaly. Thus a three/two parameter based physical model based on an error function is used, and the Cryosat-2 LRM waveforms are fit to this model. The fitting routines which employ the Levenberg Marquadt technique generate estimated values of retracked epochs which are used to compute the ocean surface heights. A two step processing system made up of sequential 3 parameter (amplitude, rise time, retracked epoch) and 2 parameter (amplitude, retracked epoch) fitting models are used to determine precise ocean surface heights. The quality of the processing system is judged by evaluating the standard deviation of the ocean surface height anomaly obtained after all corrections and the mean sea surface/geoid are removed. The lower the value of the standard deviation of the ocean surface height anomaly, the better the quality of processing is. Hence, different processing schemes are considered and evaluated in order to conclude towards the best retracking procedure which would eventually result in high accuracy gravity field estimations. Also, the quality on the precision is judged by analyzing the standard deviation in the gravity field anomaly. The gravity field anomaly is obtained by subtracting the retracked gravity field with the marine gravity field available. A lower value of the standard deviation in the gravity field anomaly indicates a more precise retracking algorithm. Using the two retracker performance evaluation strategies, namely the ocean surface height anomaly and the gravity field anomaly, it was concluded that the three

  4. Three-dimensional loop quantum gravity: towards a self-gravitating quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noui, Karim

    2007-01-01

    In a companion paper, we have emphasized the role of the Drinfeld double DSU(2) in the context of three-dimensional Riemannian loop quantum gravity coupled to massive spinless point particles. We make use of this result to propose a model for a self-gravitating quantum field theory (massive spinless non-causal scalar field) in three-dimensional Riemannian space. We start by constructing the Fock space of the free self-gravitating field: the vacuum is the unique DSU(2) invariant state, one-particle states correspond to DSU(2) unitary irreducible simple representations and any multi-particles states are obtained as the symmetrized tensor product between simple representations. The associated quantum field is defined by the usual requirement of covariance under DSU(2). Then, we introduce a DSU(2)-invariant self-interacting potential (the obtained model is a group field theory) and explicitly compute the lowest order terms (in the self-interaction coupling constant λ) of the propagator and of the three-point function. Finally, we compute the lowest order quantum gravity corrections (in the Newton constant G) to the propagator and to the three-point function

  5. Quantum fields in the non-perturbative regime. Yang-Mills theory and gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, Astrid

    2011-09-06

    In this thesis we study candidates for fundamental quantum field theories, namely non-Abelian gauge theories and asymptotically safe quantum gravity. Whereas the first ones have a stronglyinteracting low-energy limit, the second one enters a non-perturbative regime at high energies. Thus, we apply a tool suited to the study of quantum field theories beyond the perturbative regime, namely the Functional Renormalisation Group. In a first part, we concentrate on the physical properties of non-Abelian gauge theories at low energies. Focussing on the vacuum properties of the theory, we present an evaluation of the full effective potential for the field strength invariant F{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}F{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}} from non-perturbative gauge correlation functions and find a non-trivial minimum corresponding to the existence of a dimension four gluon condensate in the vacuum. We also relate the infrared asymptotic form of the {beta} function of the running background-gauge coupling to the asymptotic behavior of Landau-gauge gluon and ghost propagators and derive an upper bound on their scaling exponents. We then consider the theory at finite temperature and study the nature of the confinement phase transition in d = 3+1 dimensions in various non-Abelian gauge theories. For SU(N) with N= 3,..,12 and Sp(2) we find a first-order phase transition in agreement with general expectations. Moreover our study suggests that the phase transition in E(7) Yang-Mills theory also is of first order. Our studies shed light on the question which property of a gauge group determines the order of the phase transition. In a second part we consider asymptotically safe quantum gravity. Here, we focus on the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector of the theory, to study its properties in the context of an interacting UV regime. We investigate several truncations, which all lend support to the conjecture that gravity may be asymptotically safe. In a first truncation, we study the ghost anomalous dimension

  6. Planar AdS black holes in Lovelock gravity with a nonminimal scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Moisés Bravo; Hassaïne, Mokhtar

    2013-11-01

    In arbitrary dimension D, we consider a self-interacting scalar field nonminimally coupled with a gravity theory given by a particular Lovelock action indexed by an integer k. To be more precise, the coefficients appearing in the Lovelock expansion are fixed by requiring the theory to have a unique AdS vacuum with a fixed value of the cosmological constant. This yields to k = 1, 2,⋯, inequivalent possible gravity theories; here the case k = 1 corresponds to the standard Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian. For each par ( D, k), we derive two classes of AdS black hole solutions with planar event horizon topology for particular values of the nonminimal coupling parameter. The first family of solutions depends on a unique constant and is valid only for k ≥ 2. In fact, its GR counterpart k = 1 reduces to the pure AdS metric with a vanishing scalar field. The second family of solutions involves two independent constants and corresponds to a stealth black hole configuration; that is a nontrivial scalar field together with a black hole metric such that both side of the Einstein equations (gravity and matter parts) vanishes identically. In this case, the standard GR case k = 1 reduces to the Schwarzschild-AdS-Tangherlini black hole metric with a trivial scalar field. We show that the two-parametric stealth solution defined in D dimension can be promoted to the uniparametric black hole solution in ( D + 1) dimension by fixing one of the two constants in term of the other and by adding a transversal coordinate. In both cases, the existence of these solutions is strongly inherent of the presence of the higher order curvature terms k ≥ 2 of the Lovelock gravity. We also establish that these solutions emerge from a stealth configuration defined on the pure AdS metric through a Kerr-Schild transformation. Finally, in the last part, we include multiple exact ( D - 1) - forms homogenously distributed and coupled to the scalar field. For a specific coupling, we obtain black hole

  7. Restoration of the covariant gauge α in the initial field of gravity in de Sitter spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Lee Yen; Yan, Chew Xiao [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05

    The gravitational field generated by a mass term and the initial surface through covariant retarded Green's function for linearized gravity in de Sitter spacetime was studied recently [4, 5] with the covariant gauges set to β = 2/3 and α = 5/3. In this paper we extend the work to restore the gauge parameter α in the field coming from the initial data using the method of shifting the parameter. The α terms in the initial field cancels exactly with the one coming from the source term. Consequently, the correct field configuration, with two equal mass points moving in its geodesic, one located at the North pole and another one located at the South pole, is reproduced in the whole manifold of de Sitter spacetime.

  8. Higher-derivative gravity with non-minimally coupled Maxwell field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xing-Hui; Lue, H. [Beijing Normal University, Department of Physics, Center for Advanced Quantum Studies, Beijing (China)

    2016-04-15

    We construct higher-derivative gravities with a non-minimally coupled Maxwell field. The Lagrangian consists of polynomial invariants built from the Riemann tensor and the Maxwell field strength in such a way that the equations of motion are second order for both the metric and the Maxwell potential. We also generalize the construction to involve a generic non-minimally coupled p-form field strength. We then focus on one low-lying example in four dimensions and construct the exact magnetically charged black holes. We also construct exact electrically charged z = 2 Lifshitz black holes. We obtain approximate dyonic black holes for the small coupling constant or small charges. We find that the thermodynamics based on the Wald formalism disagrees with that derived from the Euclidean action procedure, suggesting this may be a general situation in higher-derivative gravities with non-minimally coupled form fields. As an application in the AdS/CFT correspondence, we study the entropy/viscosity ratio for the AdS or Lifshitz planar black holes, and find that the exact ratio can be obtained without having to know the details of the solutions, even for this higher-derivative theory. (orig.)

  9. The Gravity Field, Orientation, and Ephemeris of Mercury from MESSENGER Observations After Three Years in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, Erwan M.; Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Gregory; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed three years of radio tracking data from the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury and determined the gravity field, planetary orientation, and ephemeris of the innermost planet. With improvements in spatial coverage, force modeling, and data weighting, we refined an earlier global gravity field both in quality and resolution, and we present here a spherical harmonic solution to degree and order 50. In this field, termed HgM005, uncertainties in low-degree coefficients are reduced by an order of magnitude relative to the earlier global field, and we obtained a preliminary value of the tidal Love number k(sub 2) of 0.451+/-0.014. We also estimated Mercury's pole position, and we obtained an obliquity value of 2.06 +/- 0.16 arcmin, in good agreement with analysis of Earth-based radar observations. From our updated rotation period (58.646146 +/- 0.000011 days) and Mercury ephemeris, we verified experimentally the planet's 3: 2 spin-orbit resonance to greater accuracy than previously possible. We present a detailed analysis of the HgM005 covariance matrix, and we describe some near-circular frozen orbits around Mercury that could be advantageous for future exploration.

  10. Fusion of Time-Lapse Gravity Survey and Hydraulic Tomography for Estimating Spatially Varying Hydraulic Conductivity and Specific Yield Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jui-Pin; Yeh, Tian-Chyi Jim; Cheng, Ching-Chung; Zha, Yuanyuan; Chang, Liang-Cheng; Hwang, Cheinway; Wang, Yu-Li; Hao, Yonghong

    2017-10-01

    Hydraulic conductivity >(K>) and specific yield (Sy) are important aquifer parameters, pertinent to groundwater resources management and protection. These parameters are commonly estimated through a traditional cross-well pumping test. Employing the traditional approach to obtain detailed spatial distributions of the parameters over a large area is generally formidable. For this reason, this study proposes a stochastic method that integrates hydraulic head and time-lapse gravity based on hydraulic tomography (HT) to efficiently derive the spatial distribution of K and Sy over a large area. This method is demonstrated using several synthetic experiments. Results of these experiments show that the K and Sy fields estimated by joint inversion of the gravity and head data set from sequential injection tests in unconfined aquifers are superior to those from the HT based on head data alone. We attribute this advantage to the mass constraint imposed on HT by gravity measurements. Besides, we find that gravity measurement can detect the change of aquifer's groundwater storage at kilometer scale, as such they can extend HT's effectiveness over greater volumes of the aquifer. Furthermore, we find that the accuracy of the estimated fields is improved as the number of the gravity stations is increased. The gravity station's location, however, has minor effects on the estimates if its effective gravity integration radius covers the well field.

  11. Analysis of the Lunar Gravity Field by Using GL0660B Model and Its Effect on Lunar Satellite Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Kunxue

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The lunar gravity field provides a way to research moon's evolution and probes the interior structure of the moon. It is an important factor influencing the lunar satellite precise orbit determination as well. The new lunar gravity model GL0660B from GRAIL mission dramatically improves the gravity spectrum and spectral ranges. Using the model GL0660B, it can be computed that the corresponding degree-wise RMS and correlation of topography, with which the quality of model GL0660B can be analyzed. Then different characters of the lunar gravity field comparing with other lunar gravity fields are analyzed. Besides, gravity anomaly distribution figures at different height of the models are given, and the character and difference of the lunar gravity models at different height are compared. In addition, lunar satellite orbit revolutionary at different height are modeled by GEODYN. The result shows that the trend of lunar satellite eccentricity changes is a complex and long cycle of change trend. It is different affected by the perturbation of the mascons of different height, which causes different changes of apolune, perilune and eccentricity.

  12. Was Newton right? A search for non-Newtonian behavior of weak-field gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, Paul; Moore, Michael; Newman, Riley; Berg, Eric; Bonicalzi, Ricco; McKenney, Keven

    2014-06-01

    Empirical tests of Einstein's metric theory of gravitation, even in the non-relativistic, weak-field limit, could play an important role in judging theory-driven extensions of the current Standard Model of fundamental interactions. Guided by Galileo's work and his own experiments, Newton formulated a theory of gravity in which the force of attraction between two bodies is independent of composition and proportional to the inertia of each, thereby transparently satisfying Galileo's empirically informed conjecture regarding the Universality of Free Fall. Similarly, Einstein honored the manifest success of Newton's theory by assuring that the linearized equations of GTR matched the Newtonian formalism under "classical" conditions. Each of these steps, however, was explicitly an approximation raised to the status of principle. Perhaps, at some level, Newtonian gravity does not accurately describe the physical interaction between uncharged, unmagnetized, macroscopic bits of ordinary matter. What if Newton were wrong? Detecting any significant deviation from Newtonian behavior, no matter how small, could provide new insights and possibly reveal new physics. In the context of physics as an empirical science, for us this yet unanswered question constitutes sufficient motivation to attempt precision measurements of the kind described here. In this paper we report the current status of a project to search for violation of the Newtonian inverse square law of gravity.

  13. Was Newton right? A search for non-Newtonian behavior of weak-field gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boynton Paul

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Empirical tests of Einstein’s metric theory of gravitation, even in the non-relativistic, weak-field limit, could play an important role in judging theory-driven extensions of the current Standard Model of fundamental interactions. Guided by Galileo's work and his own experiments, Newton formulated a theory of gravity in which the force of attraction between two bodies is independent of composition and proportional to the inertia of each, thereby transparently satisfying Galileo's empirically informed conjecture regarding the Universality of Free Fall. Similarly, Einstein honored the manifest success of Newton’s theory by assuring that the linearized equations of GTR matched the Newtonian formalism under “classical” conditions. Each of these steps, however, was explicitly an approximation raised to the status of principle. Perhaps, at some level, Newtonian gravity does not accurately describe the physical interaction between uncharged, unmagnetized, macroscopic bits of ordinary matter. What if Newton were wrong? Detecting any significant deviation from Newtonian behavior, no matter how small, could provide new insights and possibly reveal new physics. In the context of physics as an empirical science, for us this yet unanswered question constitutes sufficient motivation to attempt precision measurements of the kind described here. In this paper we report the current status of a project to search for violation of the Newtonian inverse square law of gravity.

  14. Impact of sugarcane field residue and mill bagasse on seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research indicates that sugarcane field residue and sugarcane mill bagasse may be allelopathic. Allelopathy is the chemical interaction between plants, which may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. Previous research in Louisiana indicated that sugarcane field residue may inhibi...

  15. Allelopathic impact of HoCP 96-540 field residue on seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research indicates that sugarcane field residue and sugarcane mill bagasse may be allelopathic. Allelopathy is the chemical interaction between plants, which may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. Previous research in Louisiana indicated that sugarcane field residue may inhibi...

  16. e.motion - European Initiatives for a Future Gravity Field Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, T.

    2017-12-01

    Since 2010 a large team of European scientists, with the support of technological and industrial partners, is preparing proposals for new gravity field missions as follow-up to GRACE, GOCE and GRACE-FO. The main goal of the proposed mission concepts is the long term observation of the time variable gravity field with significantly increased spatial and temporal resolution as it can be performed nowadays with GRACE or in the near future with GRACE Follow-On. These observations are crucial for long term monitoring of mass variations in the system Earth in order to improve our knowledge about the global and regional water cycle as well as about processes of the solid Earth. Starting from the existing concepts of single pair mission like GRACE and GRACE-FO, sensitivity, spatial and temporal resolution shall be increased, such that also smaller scale time variable signals can be resolved, which cannot be detected with the current techniques. For such a mission concept new and significantly improved observation techniques are needed. This concerns in particular the measurement of inter-satellite distances, the observation of non-gravitational accelerations, the configuration of the satellite orbit and most important the implementation of constellation of satellite pairs. All in all three proposals have been prepared by the e.motion team specifying in detail the mission design and the performance in terms of science applications. Starting with a single-pair pendulum mission, which was proposed for ESA's Earth Explorer 8 call (EE8), more recently a double-pair Bender-type mission was proposed for the ESA's EE9 call. In between several studies on European (DLR and ESA) and inter-agency level (ESA-NASA) have been performed. The presentation provides a summary about all these initiatives, derives some conclusions which can be drawn from the mission proposals and study results and gives an outlook about future initiatives for gravity field missions in Europe.

  17. Comparing seven candidate mission configurations for temporal gravity field retrieval through full-scale numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Basem; Raimondo, Jean-Claude; Brieden, Phillip; Reubelt, Tilo; Kusche, Jürgen; Flechtner, Frank; Iran Pour, Siavash; Sneeuw, Nico; Müller, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this contribution is to focus on improving the quality of gravity field models in the form of spherical harmonic representation via alternative configuration scenarios applied in future gravimetric satellite missions. We performed full-scale simulations of various mission scenarios within the frame work of the German joint research project "Concepts for future gravity field satellite missions" as part of the Geotechnologies Program, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research and the German Research Foundation. In contrast to most previous simulation studies including our own previous work, we extended the simulated time span from one to three consecutive months to improve the robustness of the assessed performance. New is that we performed simulations for seven dedicated satellite configurations in addition to the GRACE scenario, serving as a reference baseline. These scenarios include a "GRACE Follow-on" mission (with some modifications to the currently implemented GRACE-FO mission), and an in-line "Bender" mission, in addition to five mission scenarios that include additional cross-track and radial information. Our results clearly confirm the benefit of radial and cross-track measurement information compared to the GRACE along-track observable: the gravity fields recovered from the related alternative mission scenarios are superior in terms of error level and error isotropy. In fact, one of our main findings is that although the noise levels achievable with the particular configurations do vary between the simulated months, their order of performance remains the same. Our findings show also that the advanced pendulums provide the best performance of the investigated single formations, however an accuracy reduced by about 2-4 times in the important long-wavelength part of the spectrum (for spherical harmonic degrees ), compared to the Bender mission, can be observed. Concerning state-of-the-art mission constraints, in particular

  18. Three dimensional magnetic solutions in massive gravity with (non)linear field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendi, S. H.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.; Momennia, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Noble Prize in physics 2016 motivates one to study different aspects of topological properties and topological defects as their related objects. Considering the significant role of the topological defects (especially magnetic strings) in cosmology, here, we will investigate three dimensional horizonless magnetic solutions in the presence of two generalizations: massive gravity and nonlinear electromagnetic field. The effects of these two generalizations on properties of the solutions and their geometrical structure are investigated. The differences between de Sitter and anti de Sitter solutions are highlighted and conditions regarding the existence of phase transition in geometrical structure of the solutions are studied.

  19. Global and Local Gravity Field Models of the Moon Using GRAIL Primary and Extended Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Sabaka, Terence J.; Nicholas, Joseph B.; Mazarico, Erwan; Rowlands, David D.; Loomis, Bryant D.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission was designed to map the structure of the lunar interior from crust to core and to advance the understanding of the Moon's thermal evolution by producing a high-quality, high-resolution map of the gravitational field of the Moon. The mission consisted of two spacecraft, which were launched in September 2011 on a Discovery-class NASA mission. Ka-band tracking between the two satellites was the single science instrument, augmented by tracking from Earth using the Deep Space Network (DSN).

  20. Holonomies of gauge fields in twistor space 3: Gravity as a square of N=4 theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Yasuhiro, E-mail: abe@cereja.co.j [Cereja Technology Co., Ltd., 1-13-14 Mukai-Bldg. 3F, Sekiguchi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-0014 (Japan)

    2011-01-21

    In a recent paper, we show that an S-matrix functional for graviton amplitudes can be described by an N=8 supersymmetric gravitational holonomy operator in twistor space. In this paper, we obtain an alternative expression for the gravitational holonomy operator such that it can be interpreted as a square of an N=4 holonomy operator for frame fields, by taking a sum of certain shuffles over ordered indices. The new expression leads to amplitudes of not only spin-2 gravitons but also spin-0 massless particles. We discuss that the squared model is favored as a theory of quantum gravity.

  1. Static, spherically symmetric solutions with a scalar field in Rastall gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Fabris, J. C.; Piattella, O. F.; Santos, E. C.

    2016-12-01

    Rastall's theory belongs to the class of non-conservative theories of gravity. In vacuum, the only non-trivial static, spherically symmetric solution is the Schwarzschild one, except for a very special case. When a canonical scalar field is coupled to the gravity sector in this theory, new exact solutions appear for some values of the Rastall parameter a. Some of these solutions describe the same space-time geometry as the recently found solutions in the k-essence theory with a power function for the kinetic term of the scalar field. There is a large class of solutions (in particular, those describing wormholes and regular black holes) whose geometry coincides with that of solutions of GR coupled to scalar fields with nontrivial self-interaction potentials; the form of these potentials, however, depends on the Rastall parameter a. We also note that all solutions of GR with a zero trace of the energy-momentum tensor, including black-hole and wormhole ones, may be re-interpreted as solutions of Rastall's theory.

  2. Metric-like formalism for matter fields coupled to 3D higher spin gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Ippei; Nakayama, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    The action integral for a matter system composed of 0- and 2-forms, C and B μν , topologically coupled to 3D spin-3 gravity is considered first in the frame-like formalism. The field C satisfies an equation of motion, ∂ μ C+A μ C−C A-bar μ =0, where A μ and A-bar μ are the Chern–Simons gauge fields. With a suitable gauge fixing of a new local symmetry and diffeomorphism, only one component of B μν , say B ϕr , remains non-vanishing and satisfies ∂ μ B ϕr + A-bar μ B ϕr −B ϕr A μ =0. These equations are the same as those for 3D (free) Vasiliev scalars, C and C-tilde . The spin connection is eliminated by solving the equation of motion for the total action, and it is shown that in the resulting metric-like formalism, (BC) 2 interaction terms are induced because of the torsion. The world-volume components of the matter field, C 0 , C μ and C (μν) , are introduced by contracting the local-frame index of C with those of the inverse vielbeins, E a μ and E a (μν) , which were defined by the present authors in (2013 Class. Quantum Grav. 30 035003). 3D higher spin gravity theory contains various metric-like fields. These metric-like fields, as well as the new connections and the generalized curvature tensors, introduced in the above mentioned paper, are explicitly expressed in terms of the metric g μν and the spin-3 field ϕ μνλ by means of the ϕ-expansion. The action integral for the pure spin-3 gravity in the metric-like formalism up to O(ϕ 2 ), obtained before in the literature, is re-derived. Then the matter action is re-expressed in terms of g μν , ϕ μνρ and the covariant derivatives for spin-3 geometry. Spin-3 gauge transformation is extended to the matter fields. It is also found that the action of the matter-coupled theory in the metric-like formalism has larger symmetry than that of the pure spin-3 gravity. The matter-coupled theory in the metric-like formalism is invariant under the ordinary diffeomorphisms, because the

  3. The Effects of Acceleration Noise Performance on the Determination of the Earth's Time-varying Gravity Field for Low-low satellite-to-satellite Tracking missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S. H.; Conklin, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    GRACE provides monthly average gravity field solutions in spherical harmonic coefficients, which gives us information about land and ocean mass variations with a spatial resolution of 1 degree and with an accuracy within 2 cm throughout the entire Earth. GRACE-FO is expected to be launched in 2017 to continue the work of GRACE and to test a new laser ranging interferometer (LRI) which measures the range between the two satellites with higher precision than the K-Band ranging system used in GRACE. Moreover, there have been simulation studies that show that an additional pair of satellites in an inclined orbit increases the sampling frequency and reduces temporal aliasing errors. On the other hand, GOCE used an electrostatic gravity gradiometer and a drag-free control system to compensate for the non-gravitational forces which had better performance than the electrostatic accelerometers of GRACE. Given the fact that future missions will likely continue to use the low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking formation with LRI onboard, it is expected that acceleration noise caused by non-gravitational forces will become a limiting factor for the time-varying gravity field solution. This research evaluates the effects of acceleration noise on the estimation of the time-varying gravity field for a single pair and the optimal double pairs of satellites, assuming that the satellites fly in collinear pairs with LRI. Spherical harmonic coefficients are used to represent the solution and a batch computation Kalman filter is used to estimate the solutions. Various levels of residual noise for existing drag-free systems are applied as acceleration noise to find suitable drag-free performance requirements for upcoming geodesy missions.

  4. Using Magnetic Field Gradients to Simulate Variable Gravity in Fluids and Materials Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2006-01-01

    Fluid flow due to a gravitational field is caused by sedimentation, thermal buoyancy, or solutal buoyancy induced convection. During crystal growth, for example, these flows are undesirable and can lead to crystal imperfections. While crystallization in microgravity can approach diffusion limited growth conditions (no convection), terrestrially strong magnetic fields can be used to control fluid flow and sedimentation effects. In this work, a theory is presented on the stability of solutal convection of a magnetized fluid(weak1y paramagnetic) in the presence of a magnetic field. The requirements for stability are developed and compared to experiments performed within the bore of a superconducting magnet. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experiments. Extension of the technique can also be applied to study artificial gravity requirements for long duration exploration missions. Discussion of this application with preliminary experiments and application of the technique to crystal growth will be provided.

  5. Variational approach to gravity field theories from Newton to Einstein and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Vecchiato, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed and stimulating account of the Lagrangian, or variational, approach to general relativity and beyond. The approach more usually adopted when describing general relativity is to introduce the required concepts of differential geometry and derive the field and geodesic equations from purely geometrical properties. Demonstration of the physical meaning then requires the weak field approximation of these equations to recover their Newtonian counterparts. The potential downside of this approach is that it tends to suit the mathematical mind and requires the physicist to study and work in a completely unfamiliar environment. In contrast, the approach to general relativity described in this book will be especially suited to physics students. After an introduction to field theories and the variational approach, individual sections focus on the variational approach in relation to special relativity, general relativity, and alternative theories of gravity. Throughout the text, solved exercis...

  6. Separation of Non-metallic Inclusions from a Fe-Al-O Melt Using a Super-Gravity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gaoyang; Song, Bo; Guo, Zhancheng; Yang, Yuhou; Song, Mingming

    2018-02-01

    An innovative method for separating non-metallic inclusions from a high temperature melt using super gravity was systematically investigated. To explore the separation behavior of inclusion particles with densities less than that of metal liquid under a super-gravity field, a Fe-Al-O melt containing Al2O3 particles was treated with different gravity coefficients. Al2O3 particles migrated rapidly towards the reverse direction of the super gravity and gathered in the upper region of the sample. It was hard to find any inclusion particles with sizes greater than 2 μm in the middle and bottom areas. Additionally, the oxygen content in the middle region of the sample could be reduced to 0.0022 mass pct and the maximum removal rate of the oxygen content reached 61.4 pct. The convection in the melt along the direction of the super gravity was not generated by the super-gravity field, and the fluid velocity in the molten melt consisted only of the rotating tangential velocity. Moreover, the motion behavior of the Al2O3 particles was approximatively determined by Stokes' law along the direction of super gravity.

  7. Bridging the gap between the deep Earth and lithospheric gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, B. C.; Ebbing, J.; Martinec, Z.; van der Wal, W.

    2017-12-01

    Global gravity field data obtained by dedicated satellite missions can be used to study the density distribution of the lithosphere. The gravitational signal from the deep Earth is usually removed by high-pass filtering of the data. However, this will also remove any long-wavelength signal of the lithosphere. Furthermore, it is still unclear what value for the truncation limit is best suited. An alternative is to forward model the deep situated mass anomalies and subtract the gravitational signal from the observed data. This requires knowledge of the mantle mass anomalies, dynamic topography, and CMB topography. Global tomography provides the VS distribution in the mantle, which is related to the density distribution in the mantle. There are difficulties in constructing a density model from this data. Tomography relies on regularisation which smoothens the mantle anomalies. Also, the VS anomalies need to be converted to density anomalies with uncertain conversion factors. We study the observed reduction in magnitude of the density anomalies due to the regularisation of the global tomography models. The reduced magnitude of the anomalies cannot be recovered by increasing the conversion factor from VS-to-density transformation. The reduction of the tomographic results seems to resemble the effect of a spatial Gaussian filter. By determining the spectral difference between tomographic and gravimetric models a reverse filter can be constructed to reproduce correct density variations in the complete mantle. The long-wavelengths of the global tomography models are less affected by the regularisation and can fix the value of the conversion factor. However, the low degree gravity signals are also dominated by the D" region. Therefore, different approaches are used to determine the effect of this region on the gravity field. The density anomalies in the mantle, as well as the effect of CMB undulations, are forward modelled into their gravitational potential field, such that

  8. New 3D Gravity Model of the Lithosphere and new Approach of the Gravity Field Transformation in the Western Carpathian-Pannonian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielik, M.; Tasarova, Z. A.; Goetze, H.; Mikuska, J.; Pasteka, R.

    2007-12-01

    The 3-D forward modeling was performed for the Western Carpathians and the Pannonian Basin system. The density model includes 31 cross-sections, extends to depth of 220 km. By means of the combined 3-D modeling, new estimates of the density distribution of the crust and upper mantle, as well as depths of the Moho were derived. These data allowed to perform gravity stripping, which in the area of the Pannonian Basin is crucial for the signal analysis of the gravity field. In this region, namely, two pronounced features (i.e. the deep sedimentary basins and shallow Moho) with opposite gravity effects make it impossible to analyze the Bouguer anomaly by field separation or filtering. The results revealed a significantly different nature of the Western Carpathian- Pannonian region (ALACAPA and Tisza-Dacia microplates) from the European Platform lithosphere (i.e. these microplates to be much less dense than the surrounding European Platform lithosphere). The calculation of the transformed gravity maps by means of new method provided the additional information on the lithospheric structure. The use of existing elevation information represents an independent approach to the problem of transformation of gravity maps. Instead of standard separation and transformation methods both in wave-number and spatial domains, this method is based on the estimating of really existing linear trends within the values of complete Bouguer anomalies (CBA), which are understood as a function defined in 3D space. An important assumption that the points with known input values of CBA lie on a horizontal plane is therefore not required. Instead, the points with known CBA and elevation values are treated in their original positions, i.e. on the Earth surface.

  9. Imaging subsurface density structure in Luynnier volcanic field, Saudi Arabia, using 3D gravity inversion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-shrief, Adel; Alqahtani, Faisal; Mogren, Saad

    2017-04-01

    On 19 May, 2009, an earthquake of magnitude (M=5.4) shocked the most volcanically active recent basaltic fields, Luynnier volcanic field, northwestern Saudi Arabia. This event was the largest recorded one since long time ago. Government evacuated the surrounding residents around the epicenter for over 3 months away from any future volcanic activity. The seismic event caused damages to buildings in the village around the epicenter and resulted in surface fissure trending in NNW-SSE direction with about 8 km length. Seismologists from Saudi Geological Survey (SGS) worked out on locating the epicenter and the cause of this earthquake. They collected seismic data from Saudi Geological Surveys Station Network as well as installed broadband seismic stations around the region of the earthquake. They finally concluded that the main cause of the M=5.4 event is dike intrusion at depth of about 5 km (not reached to the surface). In the present work, we carried out detailed ground/airborne gravity survey around the surficial fissure to image the subsurface volcanic structure where about 380 gravity stations were recorded covering the main fissure in an area of 600 km2. Gravity data was analyzed using CET edge detection tools and 3D inversion technique. The results revealed that, there is a magma chamber/body beneath the surface at 5-20 km depth and the main reason for the M=5.4 earthquake is tectonic settings of the Red Sea. Additionally, the area is characterized by set of faults trending in NW direction, parallel to the Red Sea, and most of the volcanic cones were located on faults/contacts implying that, they are structurally controlled. The 8-km surficial crack is extended SE underneath the surface.

  10. Exact solutions for scalar field cosmology in f(R) gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, S. D.; Goswami, R.; Chervon, S. V.; Nikolaev, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    We study scalar field FLRW cosmology in the content of f(R) gravity. Our consideration is restricted to the spatially flat Friedmann universe. We derived the general evolution equations of the model, and showed that the scalar field equation is automatically satisfied for any form of the f(R) function. We also derived representations for kinetic and potential energies, as well as for the acceleration in terms of the Hubble parameter and the form of the f(R) function. Next we found the exact cosmological solutions in modified gravity without specifying the f(R) function. With negligible acceleration of the scalar curvature, we found that the de Sitter inflationary solution is always attained. Also we obtained new solutions with special restrictions on the integration constants. These solutions contain oscillating, accelerating, decelerating and even contracting universes. For further investigation, we selected special cases which can be applied with early or late inflation. We also found exact solutions for the general case for the model with negligible acceleration of the scalar curvature in terms of special Airy functions. Using initial conditions which represent the universe at the present epoch, we determined the constants of integration. This allows for the comparison of the scale factor in the new solutions with that for current stage of the universe evolution in the ΛCDM model.

  11. [The gravity field of the Earth: geophysical factor of gerontology (The Vorobeichikov effect)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalov, S N

    2016-01-01

    The results of investigations of the growth in vitro of Escherichia coli M-17, obtained in the processing of V. M. Vorobeichikov observational data during the movement of the scientific expedition ship «Akademik Fedorov» from St. Petersburg to Antarctica and back, in the period from 13.11.2002 on 26.05.2003 (48th Russian Antarctic expedition). The findings based on the growth in vitro of Escherichia coli from changes in geographical location on a planetary scale, that doesn't eliminate the dependence of other species of microorganisms from the spatial position in the gravity field of the Earth. It is established that the duration of the lag phase of Escherichia coli in the Equatorial zone close to its duration in the high-latitude zone and Antarctic, however, the duration of the lag phase at the equator and the Antarctic corresponds to the time of the lag phase at the time of the Central phase of the lunar Eclipse. The conclusion about high sensitivity in vitro of Escherichia coli to the field of gravity of the Earth, and to syzigium events.

  12. The Gravity Field of Mercury After the Messenger Low-Altitude Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gary A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    The final year of the MESSENGER mission was designed to take advantage of the remaining propellant onboard to provide a series of lowaltitude observation campaigns and acquire novel scientific data about the innermost planet. The lower periapsis altitude greatly enhances the sensitivity to the short-wavelength gravity field, but only when the spacecraft is in view of Earth. After more than 3 years in orbit around Mercury, the MESSENGER spacecraft was tracked for the first time below 200-km altitude on 5 May 2014 by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). Between August and October, periapsis passages down to 25-km altitude were routinely tracked. These periods considerably improved the quality of the data coverage. Before the end of its mission, MESSENGER will fly at very low altitudes for extended periods of time. Given the orbital geometry, however the periapses will not be visible from Earth and so no new tracking data will be available for altitudes lower than 75 km. Nevertheless, the continuous tracking of MESSENGER in the northern hemisphere will help improve the uniformity of the spatial coverage at altitudes lower than 150 km, which will further improve the overall quality of the Mercury gravity field.

  13. AN ADJOINT-BASED METHOD FOR THE INVERSION OF THE JUNO AND CASSINI GRAVITY MEASUREMENTS INTO WIND FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai, E-mail: eli.galanti@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2016-04-01

    During 2016–17, the Juno and Cassini spacecraft will both perform close eccentric orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, respectively, obtaining high-precision gravity measurements for these planets. These data will be used to estimate the depth of the observed surface flows on these planets. All models to date, relating the winds to the gravity field, have been in the forward direction, thus only allowing the calculation of the gravity field from given wind models. However, there is a need to do the inverse problem since the new observations will be of the gravity field. Here, an inverse dynamical model is developed to relate the expected measurable gravity field, to perturbations of the density and wind fields, and therefore to the observed cloud-level winds. In order to invert the gravity field into the 3D circulation, an adjoint model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration. This tool is used for the examination of various scenarios, simulating cases in which the depth of the wind depends on latitude. We show that it is possible to use the gravity measurements to derive the depth of the winds, both on Jupiter and Saturn, also taking into account measurement errors. Calculating the solution uncertainties, we show that the wind depth can be determined more precisely in the low-to-mid-latitudes. In addition, the gravitational moments are found to be particularly sensitive to flows at the equatorial intermediate depths. Therefore, we expect that if deep winds exist on these planets they will have a measurable signature by Juno and Cassini.

  14. The gravity fields of Ganymede, Callisto and Europa: how well can JUICE do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Marzia; Iess, Luciano; Finocchiaro, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    With 20 flybys of Callisto, 2 of Europa and an extended orbital phase around Ganymede, ESA's JUICE mission offers an excellent opportunity to investigate the interiors of the three Galilean satellites. All of these moons can host an internal ocean, but the evidence is compelling only for Europa, where Galileo's measurements of the induced magnetic field are not marred by an intrinsic field as for Ganymede. However, both Europa's and Ganymede's appear to be differentiated (Showman and Malhotra, 1999), and probably hosting a subsurface liquid water ocean underneath the icy surface (Khurana et al., 1998; Kivelson et al., 2002). But even for Callisto, which appears as an undifferentiated body of ice and rock (Showman and Malhotra, 1999), a global or partial subsurface ocean cannot be ruled out (Khurana et al., 1998). The determination of the interior structure of the Galilean satellites, one of the main goal of the JUICE mission, can be accomplished by a combination of gravity, altimetric and magnetic measurements. Gravity measurements are addressed by the 3GM (Geodesy and Geophysics of Jupiter and the Galilean Moons) by means of highly accurate Doppler tracking of the spacecraft from ground antennas. Precise range rate measurements are enabled by a dedicated Ka-band (32-34 GHz) transponder, heritage from the Juno and BepiColombo missions. The expected range rate accuracies are around 0.01 mm/s at 60 s integration time, at nearly all solar elongation angles. A complete cancellation of the interplanetary plasma noise is indeed possible by operating simultaneously the links at X and Ka band. The current mission profile envisages two, low altitude, orbital phases around Ganymede: a circular polar, orbit at an altitude of 500 km for the first 102 days, and circular polar orbit at an altitude of 200 km for the last 30 days. The low altitude will permit the determination of Ganymede's gravity field with a relative accuracy of about 10^-5 for both J2 and C22. The 18 tidal

  15. Small-scale Forearc Structure from Residual Bathymetry and Vertical Gravity Gradients at the Cocos-North America Subduction Zone offshore Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E. S. M.; Ito, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The subduction of topographic relief on the incoming plate at subduction zones causes deformation of the plate interface as well as the overriding plate. Whether the resulting geometric irregularities play any role in inhibiting or inducing seismic rupture is a topic of relevance for megathrust earthquake source studies. A method to discern the small-scale structure at subduction zone forearcs was recently developed by Bassett and Watts (2015). Their technique constructs an ensemble average of the trench-perpendicular topography, and the removal of this regional tectonic signal reveals the short-wavelength residual bathymetric anomalies. Using examples from selected areas at the Tonga, Mariana, and Japan subduction zones, they were able to link residual bathymetric anomalies to the subduction of seamount chains, given the similarities in wavelength and amplitude to the morphology of seamounts that have yet to subduct. We focus here on an analysis of forearc structures found in the Mexico segment of the Middle America subduction zone, and their potential mechanical interaction with areas on the plate interface that have been previously identified as source regions for earthquake ruptures and aseismic events. We identified several prominent residual bathymetric anomalies off the Guerrero and Oaxaca coastlines, mainly in the shallow portion of the plate interface and between 15 and 50 kilometers away from the trench axis. The residual amplitude of these bathymetric anomalies is typically in the hundreds of meters. Some of the residual bathymetric anomalies offshore Oaxaca are found landward of seamount chains on the incoming Cocos Plate, suggesting that these anomalies are associated with the prior subduction of seamounts at the margin. We also separated the residual and regional components of satellite-based vertical gravity gradient data using a directional median filter to isolate the possible gravity signals from the seamount edifices.

  16. Modeling the hydrological effect on local gravity at Moxa, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasan, S.; Troch, P.A.A.; Boll, J.; Kroner, C.

    2006-01-01

    A superconducting gravimeter has observed with high accuracy (to within a few nm s¿2) and high frequency (1 Hz) the temporal variations in the earth¿s gravity field near Moxa, Germany, since 1999. Hourly gravity residuals are obtained by time averaging and correcting for earth tides, polar motion,

  17. String field theory in minimal model backgrounds and non-perturbative two-dimensional gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbimbo, C.; Mukhi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The classical phase space of free closed-string field theory in the background of (p,q) minimal models is studied. It is shown that in the limit q→∞ for fixed p, this becomes the phase space of p-1 massless chiral bosons on a two-dimensional target space, twisted by Z p . It is argued that in the interacting theory, the bosons remain free and massless in the limit, but the non-linear gauge symmetries of string field theory require the imposition of W p -algebra conditions on the Hilbert space, allowing a single physical state. The wave function for this state is the KdV τ-function associated to non-perturbative two-dimensional gravity in the matrix-model approach. (orig.)

  18. Fermionic field perturbations of a three-dimensional Lifshitz black hole in conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, P.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias, Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago (Chile); Vasquez, Yerko; Villalobos, Ruth Noemi [Universidad de La Serena, Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Facultad de Ciencias, La Serena (Chile)

    2017-09-15

    We study the propagation of massless fermionic fields in the background of a three-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, which is a solution of conformal gravity. The black-hole solution is characterized by a vanishing dynamical exponent. Then we compute analytically the quasinormal modes, the area spectrum, and the absorption cross section for fermionic fields. The analysis of the quasinormal modes shows that the fermionic perturbations are stable in this background. The area and entropy spectrum are evenly spaced. In the low frequency limit, it is observed that there is a range of values of the angular momentum of the mode that contributes to the absorption cross section, whereas it vanishes in the high frequency limit. In addition, by a suitable change of variables a gravitational soliton can also be obtained and the stability of the quasinormal modes are studied and ensured. (orig.)

  19. Scalar field cosmology in f(R,T) gravity via Noether symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Nawazish, Iqra

    2018-04-01

    This paper investigates the existence of Noether symmetries of isotropic universe model in f(R,T) gravity admitting minimal coupling of matter and scalar fields. The scalar field incorporates two dark energy models such as quintessence and phantom models. We determine symmetry generators and corresponding conserved quantities for two particular f(R,T) models. We also evaluate exact solutions and investigate their physical behavior via different cosmological parameters. For the first model, the graphical behavior of these parameters indicate consistency with recent observations representing accelerated expansion of the universe. For the second model, these parameters identify a transition form accelerated to decelerated expansion of the universe. The potential function is found to be constant for the first model while it becomes V(φ )≈ φ 2 for the second model. We conclude that the Noether symmetry generators and corresponding conserved quantities appear in all cases.

  20. Spinor matter fields in SL(2,C) gauge theories of gravity: Lagrangian and Hamiltonian approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonowicz, M.; Szczyrba, W.

    1985-01-01

    We consider the SL(2,C)-covariant Lagrangian formulation of gravitational theories with the presence of spinor matter fields. The invariance properties of such theories give rise to the conservation laws (the contracted Bianchi identities) having in the presence of matter fields a more complicated form than those known in the literature previously. A general SL(2,C) gauge theory of gravity is cast into an SL(2,C)-covariant Hamiltonian formulation. Breaking the SL(2,C) symmetry of the system to the SU(2) symmetry, by introducing a spacelike slicing of spacetime, we get an SU(2)-covariant Hamiltonian picture. The qualitative analysis of SL(2,C) gauge theories of gravity in the SU(2)-covariant formulation enables us to define the dynamical symplectic variables and the gauge variables of the theory under consideration as well as to divide the set of field equations into the dynamical equations and the constraints. In the SU(2)-covariant Hamiltonian formulation the primary constraints, which are generic for first-order matter Lagrangians (Dirac, Weyl, Fierz-Pauli), can be reduced. The effective matter symplectic variables are given by SU(2)-spinor-valued half-forms on three-dimensional slices of spacetime. The coupled Einstein-Cartan-Dirac (Weyl, Fierz-Pauli) system is analyzed from the (3+1) point of view. This analysis is complete; the field equations of the Einstein-Cartan-Dirac theory split into 18 gravitational dynamical equations, 8 dynamical Dirac equations, and 7 first-class constraints. The system has 4+8 = 12 independent degrees of freedom in the phase space

  1. Simulation-based evaluation of a cold atom interferometry gradiometer concept for gravity field recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douch, Karim; Wu, Hu; Schubert, Christian; Müller, Jürgen; Pereira dos Santos, Franck

    2018-03-01

    The prospects of future satellite gravimetry missions to sustain a continuous and improved observation of the gravitational field have stimulated studies of new concepts of space inertial sensors with potentially improved precision and stability. This is in particular the case for cold-atom interferometry (CAI) gradiometry which is the object of this paper. The performance of a specific CAI gradiometer design is studied here in terms of quality of the recovered gravity field through a closed-loop numerical simulation of the measurement and processing workflow. First we show that mapping the time-variable field on a monthly basis would require a noise level below 5mE /√{Hz } . The mission scenarios are therefore focused on the static field, like GOCE. Second, the stringent requirement on the angular velocity of a one-arm gradiometer, which must not exceed 10-6 rad/s, leads to two possible modes of operation of the CAI gradiometer: the nadir and the quasi-inertial mode. In the nadir mode, which corresponds to the usual Earth-pointing satellite attitude, only the gradient Vyy , along the cross-track direction, is measured. In the quasi-inertial mode, the satellite attitude is approximately constant in the inertial reference frame and the 3 diagonal gradients Vxx,Vyy and Vzz are measured. Both modes are successively simulated for a 239 km altitude orbit and the error on the recovered gravity models eventually compared to GOCE solutions. We conclude that for the specific CAI gradiometer design assumed in this paper, only the quasi-inertial mode scenario would be able to significantly outperform GOCE results at the cost of technically challenging requirements on the orbit and attitude control.

  2. Spinor matter fields in SL(2,C) gauge theories of gravity: Lagrangian and Hamiltonian approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonowicz, Marek; Szczyrba, Wiktor

    1985-06-01

    We consider the SL(2,C)-covariant Lagrangian formulation of gravitational theories with the presence of spinor matter fields. The invariance properties of such theories give rise to the conservation laws (the contracted Bianchi identities) having in the presence of matter fields a more complicated form than those known in the literature previously. A general SL(2,C) gauge theory of gravity is cast into an SL(2,C)-covariant Hamiltonian formulation. Breaking the SL(2,C) symmetry of the system to the SU(2) symmetry, by introducing a spacelike slicing of spacetime, we get an SU(2)-covariant Hamiltonian picture. The qualitative analysis of SL(2,C) gauge theories of gravity in the SU(2)-covariant formulation enables us to define the dynamical symplectic variables and the gauge variables of the theory under consideration as well as to divide the set of field equations into the dynamical equations and the constraints. In the SU(2)-covariant Hamiltonian formulation the primary constraints, which are generic for first-order matter Lagrangians (Dirac, Weyl, Fierz-Pauli), can be reduced. The effective matter symplectic variables are given by SU(2)-spinor-valued half-forms on three-dimensional slices of spacetime. The coupled Einstein-Cartan-Dirac (Weyl, Fierz-Pauli) system is analyzed from the (3+1) point of view. This analysis is complete; the field equations of the Einstein-Cartan-Dirac theory split into 18 gravitational dynamical equations, 8 dynamical Dirac equations, and 7 first-class constraints. The system has 4+8=12 independent degrees of freedom in the phase space.

  3. The gravity field model IGGT_R1 based on the second invariant of the GOCE gravitational gradient tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Biao; Luo, Zhicai; Zhong, Bo; Zhou, Hao; Flechtner, Frank; Förste, Christoph; Barthelmes, Franz; Zhou, Rui

    2017-11-01

    Based on tensor theory, three invariants of the gravitational gradient tensor (IGGT) are independent of the gradiometer reference frame (GRF). Compared to traditional methods for calculation of gravity field models based on the gravity field and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) data, which are affected by errors in the attitude indicator, using IGGT and least squares method avoids the problem of inaccurate rotation matrices. The IGGT approach as studied in this paper is a quadratic function of the gravity field model's spherical harmonic coefficients. The linearized observation equations for the least squares method are obtained using a Taylor expansion, and the weighting equation is derived using the law of error propagation. We also investigate the linearization errors using existing gravity field models and find that this error can be ignored since the used a-priori model EIGEN-5C is sufficiently accurate. One problem when using this approach is that it needs all six independent gravitational gradients (GGs), but the components V_{xy} and V_{yz} of GOCE are worse due to the non-sensitive axes of the GOCE gradiometer. Therefore, we use synthetic GGs for both inaccurate gravitational gradient components derived from the a-priori gravity field model EIGEN-5C. Another problem is that the GOCE GGs are measured in a band-limited manner. Therefore, a forward and backward finite impulse response band-pass filter is applied to the data, which can also eliminate filter caused phase change. The spherical cap regularization approach (SCRA) and the Kaula rule are then applied to solve the polar gap problem caused by GOCE's inclination of 96.7° . With the techniques described above, a degree/order 240 gravity field model called IGGT_R1 is computed. Since the synthetic components of V_{xy} and V_{yz} are not band-pass filtered, the signals outside the measurement bandwidth are replaced by the a-priori model EIGEN-5C. Therefore, this model is practically a

  4. Levels of pesticide residues in irrigation effluent from tomato fields in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pesticide residues lindane, chlorpyrifos and endosulfan sulphate were detected in water from the spring source, within field and return channel of vegetable farms in Ngarenanyuki, Tanzania. Extraction of the pesticide residues were conducted by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) method. The detection and concentrations of ...

  5. Seasonal changes in the European gravity field from GRACE: A comparison with superconducting gravimeters and hydrology model predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinderer, J.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Lemoine, F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of seasonal changes of the Earth's gravity field from GRACE satellites and the comparison with surface gravity measurements in Europe from the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) sub-network, as well as with recent hydrology models for continental soil......-derived and ground gravity changes due to continental hydrology is studied and we also compute the theoretical ratio of gravity versus radial displacement (in mu Gal/mm) involved in the hydrological loading process. The 'mean' value (averaged in time and in space over Europe) from hydrologic forward modeling...... is found to be close to - 1.0 mu Gal/mm and we show that this value can be explained by a strong low degree (n = 5-6) peak in the hydrology amplitude spectrum. The dominant time-variable signal from GRACE is found to be annual with an amplitude and a phase both of which are in fair agreement...

  6. The Ceres gravity field, spin pole, rotation period and orbit from the Dawn radiometric tracking and optical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopliv, A. S.; Park, R. S.; Vaughan, A. T.; Bills, B. G.; Asmar, S. W.; Ermakov, A. I.; Rambaux, N.; Raymond, C. A.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Russell, C. T.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2018-01-01

    Ceres' gravity field and rotational parameters have been precisely measured using 1.5 years of radiometric Doppler and range data and optical landmark tracking from the Dawn spacecraft in orbit about the dwarf planet. As was the case with Dawn at Vesta, the gravity field, orientation parameters, landmark locations, and Ceres' orbit are jointly estimated in a global solution. Even though Dawn's radio science investigation at Ceres was complicated by additional thrusting for attitude control, the resulting spherical harmonic gravity field has a half-wavelength resolution of up to 82 km (degree 18) near the equator, which is similar harmonic resolution to that of Vesta. The gravity field is consistent with Airy isostatic compensation, and this model assumption limits Ceres' crustal density to be between 1200 and 1600 kg/m3 for two-layer and three-layer models with mean crustal thickness between 27 and 43 km. The compensation depth is determined using admittance between gravity and gravity from topography and is superior to admittance between gravity and topography. The gravitational mass of Ceres is determined to better than 0.002% (GMCeres = 62.62736 ± 0.00040 km3/s2), the spin pole location is improved by 10× over previous results with right ascension (α = 291.427°) and declination (δ = 66.760°) uncertainty less than 0.001°, and the rotation rate is improved by ∼100× over previous determinations from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. Ceres' heliocentric orbit has also been improved, with about 17 months of precision range measurements reducing ephemeris uncertainties to about 10 m during the Dawn timeframe.

  7. Perfect fluid Lagrangian and its cosmological implications in theories of gravity with nonminimally coupled matter fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino, P. P.; Azevedo, R. P. L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we show that the on-shell Lagrangian of a perfect fluid depends on microscopic properties of the fluid, giving specific examples of perfect fluids with different on-shell Lagrangians but with the same energy-momentum tensor. We demonstrate that if the fluid is constituted by localized concentrations of energy with fixed rest mass and structure (solitons) then the average on-shell Lagrangian of a perfect fluid is given by Lm=T , where T is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. We show that our results have profound implications for theories of gravity where the matter Lagrangian appears explicitly in the equations of motion of the gravitational and matter fields, potentially leading to observable deviations from a nearly perfect cosmic microwave background black body spectrum: n -type spectral distortions, affecting the normalization of the spectral energy density. Finally, we put stringent constraints on f (R ,Lm) theories of gravity using the COBE-FIRAS measurement of the spectral radiance of the cosmic microwave background.

  8. The Gravity Field of Mars From MGS, Mars Odyssey, and MRO Radio Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) missions have enabled NASA to conduct reconnaissance and exploration of Mars from orbit for sixteen consecutive years. These radio systems on these spacecraft enabled radio science in orbit around Mars to improve the knowledge of the static structure of the Martian gravitational field. The continuity of the radio tracking data, which cover more than a solar cycle, also provides useful information to characterize the temporal variability of the gravity field, relevant to the planet's internal dynamics and the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere [1]. MGS operated for more than 7 years, between 1999 and 2006, in a frozen sun-synchronous, near-circular, polar orbit with the periapsis at approximately 370 km altitude. ODY and MRO have been orbiting Mars in two separate sun-synchronous orbits at different local times and altitudes. ODY began its mapping phase in 2002 with the periapis at approximately 390 km altitude and 4-5pm Local Solar Time (LST), whereas the MRO science mission started in November 2006 with the periapis at approximately 255 km altitude and 3pm LST. The 16 years of radio tracking data provide useful information on the atmospheric density in the Martian upper atmosphere. We used ODY and MRO radio data to recover the long-term periodicity of the major atmospheric constituents -- CO2, O, and He -- at the orbit altitudes of these two spacecraft [2]. The improved atmospheric model provides a better prediction of the annual and semi-annual variability of the dominant species. Therefore, the inclusion of the recovered model leads to improved orbit determination and an improved gravity field model of Mars with MGS, ODY, and MRO radio tracking data.

  9. Exact radial solution in 2+1 gravity with a real scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Hans-Jürgen, E-mail: hjschmi@rz.uni-potsdam.de [Institut für Mathematik, Universität Potsdam Am Neuen Palais 10, D-14469 Potsdam (Germany); Singleton, Douglas, E-mail: dougs@csufresno.edu [Institut für Mathematik, Universität Potsdam Am Neuen Palais 10, D-14469 Potsdam (Germany); Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Physics Department, CSU Fresno, Fresno, CA 93740-8031 (United States)

    2013-04-25

    In this Letter we give some general considerations about circularly symmetric, static space–times in 2+1 dimensions, focusing first on the surprising (at the time) existence of the BTZ black hole solution. We show that BTZ black holes and Schwarzschild black holes in 3+1 dimensions originate from different definitions of a black hole. There are two by-products of this general discussion: (i) we give a new and simple derivation of (2+1)-dimensional Anti-de Sitter (AdS) space–time; (ii) we present an exact solution to (2+1)-dimensional gravity coupled to a self-interacting real scalar field. The spatial part of the metric of this solution is flat but the temporal part behaves asymptotically like AdS space–time. The scalar field has logarithmic behavior as one would expect for a massless scalar field in flat space–time. The solution can be compared to gravitating scalar field solutions in 3+1 dimensions but with certain oddities connected with the (2+1)-dimensional character of the space–time. The solution is unique to 2+1 dimensions; it does not carry over to 3+1 dimensions.

  10. Exact radial solution in 2 + 1 gravity with a real scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans-Jürgen; Singleton, Douglas

    2013-04-01

    In this Letter we give some general considerations about circularly symmetric, static space-times in 2 + 1 dimensions, focusing first on the surprising (at the time) existence of the BTZ black hole solution. We show that BTZ black holes and Schwarzschild black holes in 3 + 1 dimensions originate from different definitions of a black hole. There are two by-products of this general discussion: (i) we give a new and simple derivation of (2 + 1)-dimensional Anti-de Sitter (AdS) space-time; (ii) we present an exact solution to (2 + 1)-dimensional gravity coupled to a self-interacting real scalar field. The spatial part of the metric of this solution is flat but the temporal part behaves asymptotically like AdS space-time. The scalar field has logarithmic behavior as one would expect for a massless scalar field in flat space-time. The solution can be compared to gravitating scalar field solutions in 3 + 1 dimensions but with certain oddities connected with the (2 + 1)-dimensional character of the space-time. The solution is unique to 2 + 1 dimensions; it does not carry over to 3 + 1 dimensions.

  11. Superconductor-Mediated Modification of Gravity? AC Motor Experiments with Bulk YBCO Disks in Rotating Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David A.; Koczor, Ronald J.; Roberson, Rick

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported results using a high precision gravimeter to probe local gravity changes in the neighborhood of large bulk-processed high-temperature superconductors. Podkietnov, et al (Podkietnov, E. and Nieminen, R. (1992) A Possibility of Gravitational Force Shielding by Bulk YBa2 Cu3 O7-x Superconductor, Physica C, C203:441-444.) have indicated that rotating AC fields play an essential role in their observed distortion of combined gravity and barometric pressure readings. We report experiments on large (15 cm diameter) bulk YBCO ceramic superconductors placed in the core of a three-phase, AC motor stator. The applied rotating field produces up to a 12,000 revolutions per minute magnetic field. The field intensity decays rapidly from the maximum at the outer diameter of the superconducting disk (less than 60 Gauss) to the center (less than 10 Gauss). This configuration was applied with and without a permanent DC magnetic field levitating the superconducting disk, with corresponding gravity readings indicating an apparent increase in observed gravity of less than 1 x 10(exp -6)/sq cm, measured above the superconductor. No effect of the rotating magnetic field or thermal environment on the gravimeter readings or on rotating the superconducting disk was noted within the high precision of the observation. Implications for propulsion initiatives and power storage flywheel technologies for high temperature superconductors will be discussed for various spacecraft and satellite applications.

  12. Innovative Energy Harvester Design Using Bistable Mechanism With Compensational Springs In Gravity Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysotskyi, Bogdan; Parrain, Fabien; Lefeuvre, Elie; Aubry, Denis; Gaucher, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the presented work is to introduce the novel design of electrostatic energy harvester using bistable mechanism with compensational springs in gravity field capable of providing the output of several μW under the excitation of extremely small amplitude (up to 0.2g) and low frequency (10-100Hz). Presented energy harvester uses the bistable hysteresis modification to achieve low-frequency low-amplitude sensibility. It was demonstrated with finite element modelling (FEM) that hysteresis width produced by bistability is changing with a constant linear coefficient as a function of a compensational spring stiffness and thus a device sensitivity could be adjusted to the minimum point for the amplitude of external excitation. Further, highly non-linear bistable double curved beam mechanism assures the high sensitivity in frequencial domain due to the non-defined bandwidth. The equivalent circuit technique is used for simulating the device performance. (paper)

  13. Two preliminary alternative designs for the gravity support of ITER toroidal field magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Binglin; Pan Chuanhong; Li Pengyuan; Zhang Nianman

    2009-01-01

    According to the original reference design, the gravity support pedestal (GSP) of ITER toroidal field magnet will be very difficult to fabricate because of large vacuum electronic welding, and therefore, two conceptual alternative designs, 'split vacuum electronic welding option' and 'bolt clamping option', are put forward. The preliminary buckling analyses with FEM (finite element method) and hand calculation show that there are enough safety margin in two options and both of them are feasible. Even though the 'split vacuum electronic welding option' makes the welding easier (in which GSP is split into two halves and thereby no large vacuum-chamber is needed), there are more advantages in the 'bolt clamping option' (where no welding is needed), such as the GSP fabrication is simple, the reject rate is low, the cost is much lower, and the producing time is shortened. Comparably, the 'bolt clamping option' is strongly recommended. (authors)

  14. Estimating Small-Body Gravity Field from Shape Model and Navigation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ryan S.; Werner, Robert A.; Bhaskaran, Shyam

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method to model the external gravity field and to estimate the internal density variation of a small-body. We first discuss the modeling problem, where we assume the polyhedral shape and internal density distribution are given, and model the body interior using finite elements definitions, such as cubes and spheres. The gravitational attractions computed from these approaches are compared with the true uniform-density polyhedral attraction and the level of accuracies are presented. We then discuss the inverse problem where we assume the body shape, radiometric measurements, and a priori density constraints are given, and estimate the internal density variation by estimating the density of each finite element. The result shows that the accuracy of the estimated density variation can be significantly improved depending on the orbit altitude, finite-element resolution, and measurement accuracy.

  15. The application of Regge calculus to quantum gravity and quantum field theory in a curved background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, N.P.

    1982-01-01

    The application of Regge calculus to quantum gravity and quantum field theory in a curved background is discussed. A discrete form of exterior differential calculus is developed, and this is used to obtain Laplacians for p-forms on the Regge manifold. To assess the accuracy of these approximations, the eigenvalues of the discrete Laplacians were calculated for the regular tesselations of S 2 and S 3 . The results indicate that the methods obtained in this paper may be used in curved space-times with an accuracy comparing with that obtained in lattice gauge theories on a flat background. It also becomes evident that Regge calculus provides particularly suitable lattices for Monte-Carlo techniques. (author)

  16. High-resolution combined global gravity field modelling: Solving large kite systems using distributed computational algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingerle, Philipp; Fecher, Thomas; Pail, Roland; Gruber, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    One of the major obstacles in modern global gravity field modelling is the seamless combination of lower degree inhomogeneous gravity field observations (e.g. data from satellite missions) with (very) high degree homogeneous information (e.g. gridded and reduced gravity anomalies, beyond d/o 1000). Actual approaches mostly combine such data only on the basis of the coefficients, meaning that previously for both observation classes (resp. models) a spherical harmonic analysis is done independently, solving dense normal equations (NEQ) for the inhomogeneous model and block-diagonal NEQs for the homogeneous. Obviously those methods are unable to identify or eliminate effects as spectral leakage due to band limitations of the models and non-orthogonality of the spherical harmonic base functions. To antagonize such problems a combination of both models on NEQ-basis is desirable. Theoretically this can be achieved using NEQ-stacking. Because of the higher maximum degree of the homogeneous model a reordering of the coefficient is needed which leads inevitably to the destruction of the block diagonal structure of the appropriate NEQ-matrix and therefore also to the destruction of simple sparsity. Hence, a special coefficient ordering is needed to create some new favorable sparsity pattern leading to a later efficient computational solving method. Such pattern can be found in the so called kite-structure (Bosch, 1993), achieving when applying the kite-ordering to the stacked NEQ-matrix. In a first step it is shown what is needed to attain the kite-(NEQ)system, how to solve it efficiently and also how to calculate the appropriate variance information from it. Further, because of the massive computational workload when operating on large kite-systems (theoretically possible up to about max. d/o 100.000), the main emphasis is put on to the presentation of special distributed algorithms which may solve those systems parallel on an indeterminate number of processes and are

  17. Hydromagnetic thermosolutal instability of Rivlin-Ericksen rotating fluid permeated with suspended particles and variable gravity field in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana G. C.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The thermosolutal instability of Rivlin-Ericksen elasticoviscous rotating fluid permeated with suspended particles (fine dust and variable gravity field in porous medium in hydromagnetics is considered. By applying normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation has been derived and solved analytically. It is observed that the rotation, magnetic field, gravity field, suspended particles and viscoelasticity introduce oscillatory modes. For stationary convection, the rotation and stable solute gradient has stabilizing effects and suspended particles are found to have destabilizing effect on the system whereas the medium permeability has stabilizing or destabilizing effect on the system under certain conditions. The magnetic field has destabilizing effect in the absence of rotation whereas in the presence of rotation, magnetic field has stabilizing or destabilizing effect under certain conditions. The effect of rotation, suspended particles, magnetic field, stable solute gradient and medium permeability has also been shown graphically.

  18. Source Parameter Inversion for Recent Great Earthquakes from a Decade-long Observation of Global Gravity Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shin-Chan; Riva, Ricccardo; Sauber, Jeanne; Okal, Emile

    2013-01-01

    We quantify gravity changes after great earthquakes present within the 10 year long time series of monthly Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity fields. Using spherical harmonic normal-mode formulation, the respective source parameters of moment tensor and double-couple were estimated. For the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the gravity data indicate a composite moment of 1.2x10(exp 23)Nm with a dip of 10deg, in agreement with the estimate obtained at ultralong seismic periods. For the 2010 Maule earthquake, the GRACE solutions range from 2.0 to 2.7x10(exp 22)Nm for dips of 12deg-24deg and centroid depths within the lower crust. For the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, the estimated scalar moments range from 4.1 to 6.1x10(exp 22)Nm, with dips of 9deg-19deg and centroid depths within the lower crust. For the 2012 Indian Ocean strike-slip earthquakes, the gravity data delineate a composite moment of 1.9x10(exp 22)Nm regardless of the centroid depth, comparing favorably with the total moment of the main ruptures and aftershocks. The smallest event we successfully analyzed with GRACE was the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake with M(sub 0) approx. 5.0x10(exp 21)Nm. We found that the gravity data constrain the focal mechanism with the centroid only within the upper and lower crustal layers for thrust events. Deeper sources (i.e., in the upper mantle) could not reproduce the gravity observation as the larger rigidity and bulk modulus at mantle depths inhibit the interior from changing its volume, thus reducing the negative gravity component. Focal mechanisms and seismic moments obtained in this study represent the behavior of the sources on temporal and spatial scales exceeding the seismic and geodetic spectrum.

  19. Seasonal changes in the European gravity field from GRACE: A comparison with superconducting gravimeters and hydrology model predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinderer, J.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Lemoine, F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of seasonal changes of the Earth's gravity field from GRACE satellites and the comparison with surface gravity measurements in Europe from the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) sub-network, as well as with recent hydrology models for continental soil...... moisture and snow. We used gravity maps in Europe retrieved from the initial GRACE monthly solutions spanning a 21 -month duration from April 2002 to December 2003 for various truncation levels of the initial spherical harmonic decomposition of the field. The transfer function between satellite...... is found to be close to - 1.0 mu Gal/mm and we show that this value can be explained by a strong low degree (n = 5-6) peak in the hydrology amplitude spectrum. The dominant time-variable signal from GRACE is found to be annual with an amplitude and a phase both of which are in fair agreement...

  20. Alaska and Yukon magnetic compilation, residual total magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, W.; Saltus, Richard W.; Hayward, N.; Oneschuk, D.

    2017-01-01

    This map is a compilation of aeromagnetic surveys over Yukon and eastern Alaska. Aeromagnetic surveys measure the total intensity of the earth's magnetic field. The field was measured by a magnetometer aboard an aircraft flown in parallel lines spaced at 200 m to 10000 m across the map area. The magnetic field reflects magnetic properties of bedrock and provides qualitative and quantitative information used in geological mapping. Understanding the geology will help geologists map the area, assist mineral/hydrocarbon exploration activities, and provide useful information necessary for communities, aboriginal associations, and government to make land use decisions. This survey was flown to improve our knowledge of the area. It will support ongoing geological mapping and resource assessment.

  1. Metric-like formalism for matter fields coupled to 3D higher spin gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Ippei; Nakayama, Ryuichi

    2014-12-01

    The action integral for a matter system composed of 0- and 2-forms, C and Bμν, topologically coupled to 3D spin-3 gravity is considered first in the frame-like formalism. The field C satisfies an equation of motion, \\partial _{\\mu } \\, C+A_{\\mu } \\, C-C \\, \\bar{A}_{\\mu }=0, where Aμ and \\bar{A}_{\\mu } are the Chern-Simons gauge fields. With a suitable gauge fixing of a new local symmetry and diffeomorphism, only one component of Bμν, say Bϕr, remains non-vanishing and satisfies \\partial _{\\mu } \\, B_{\\phi r}+\\bar{A}_{\\mu } \\, B_{\\phi r}-B_{\\phi r} \\, A_{\\mu }=0. These equations are the same as those for 3D (free) Vasiliev scalars, C and \\tilde{C}. The spin connection is eliminated by solving the equation of motion for the total action, and it is shown that in the resulting metric-like formalism, (BC)2 interaction terms are induced because of the torsion. The world-volume components of the matter field, C0, Cμ and C(μν), are introduced by contracting the local-frame index of C with those of the inverse vielbeins, E_a^{\\mu } and E_a^{(\\mu \

  2. New features of extended wormhole solutions in the scalar field gravity theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Kamal K [Department of Mathematics, University of North Bengal, Siliguri 734 013 (India); Nigmatzyanov, Ilnur; Izmailov, Ramil; Migranov, Nail G [Joint Research Laboratory, Bashkir State Pedagogical University, Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kamalnandi1952@yahoo.co.in, E-mail: ilnur.nigmat@gmail.com, E-mail: ramil.ejik@gmail.com, E-mail: ufangm@yahoo.co.uk

    2008-08-21

    This paper reports new interesting features characteristic of wormhole solutions in the scalar field gravity theories. To demonstrate these, using a slightly modified form of the Matos-Nunez algorithm, we obtain an extended class of asymptotically flat wormhole solutions belonging to the Einstein minimally coupled scalar field theory. Generally, solutions in these theories do not represent traversable wormholes due to the occurrence of curvature singularities. However, the Ellis I solution of the Einstein minimally coupled theory, when Wick rotated, yields an Ellis class III solution representing a singularity-free traversable wormhole. We see that Ellis I and III are not essentially independent solutions. The Wick-rotated seed solutions, extended by the algorithm, contain two new parameters a and {delta}. The effect of the parameter a on the geodesic motion of test particles reveals some remarkable features. By arguing for Sagnac effect in the extended Wick-rotated solution, we find that the parameter a can indeed be interpreted as a rotation parameter of the wormhole. The analysis reported here has wide applicability, for it can be adopted in other scalar field theories, including string theory.

  3. Determining the Ocean's Role on the Variable Gravity Field and Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Rui M.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A number of ocean models of different complexity have been used to study changes in the oceanic angular momentum (OAM) and mass fields and their relation to the variable Earth rotation and gravity field. Time scales examined range from seasonal to a few days. Results point to the importance of oceanic signals in driving polar motion, in particular the Chandler and annual wobbles. Results also show that oceanic signals have a measurable impact on length-of-day variations. Various circulation features and associated mass signals, including the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the equatorial currents, and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current play a significant role in oceanic angular momentum variability. The impact on OAM values of an optimization procedure that uses available data to constrain ocean model results was also tested for the first time. The optimization procedure yielded substantial changes, in OAM, related to adjustments in both motion and mass fields,as well as in the wind stress torques acting on the ocean. Constrained OAM values were found to yield noticeable improvements in the agreement with the observed Earth rotation parameters, particularly at the seasonal timescale.

  4. Mercury’s gravity field, tidal Love number k2, and spin axis orientation revealed with MESSENGER radio tracking data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2015-11-01

    We are conducting an independent analysis of two-way Doppler and two-way range radio tracking data from the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury from 2011 to 2015. Our goals are to estimate Mercury’s gravity field and to obtain independent estimates of the tidal Love number k2 and spin axis orientation. Our gravity field solution reproduces existing values with high fidelity, and prospects for recovery of the other quantities are excellent.The tidal Love number k2 provides powerful constraints on interior models of Mercury, including the mechanical properties of the mantle and the possibility of a solid FeS layer at the top of the core. Current gravity analyses cannot rule out a wide range of values (k2=43-0.50) and a variety of plausible interior models. We are seeking an independent estimate of tidal Love number k2 with improved errors to further constrain these models.Existing gravity-based solutions for Mercury's spin axis orientation differ from those of Earth-based radar and topography-based solutions. This difference may indicate an error in one of the determinations, or a real difference between the orientations about which the gravity field and the crust rotate, which can exist in a variety of plausible configuration. Securing an independent estimate of the spin axis orientation is vital because this quantity has a profound impact on the determination of the moment of inertia and interior models.We have derived a spherical harmonic solution of the gravity field to degree and order 40 as well as estimates of the tidal Love number k2 and spin axis orientation

  5. Mercury's gravity field, tidal Love number k2, and spin axis orientation revealed with MESSENGER radio tracking data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, A. K.; Margot, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    We are conducting an independent analysis of two-way Doppler and two-way range radio tracking data from the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury from 2011 to 2015. Our goals are to estimate Mercury's gravity field and to obtain independent estimates of the tidal Love number k2 and spin axis orientation. Our gravity field solution reproduces existing values with high fidelity, and prospects for recovery of the other quantities are excellent. The tidal Love number k2 provides powerful constraints on interior models of Mercury, including the mechanical properties of the mantle and the possibility of a solid FeS layer at the top of the core. Current gravity analyses cannot rule out a wide range of values (k2=43-0.50) and a variety of plausible interior models. We are seeking an independent estimate of tidal Love number k2 with improved errors to further constrain these models. Existing gravity-based solutions for Mercury's spin axis orientation differ from those of Earth-based radar and topography-based solutions. This difference may indicate an error in one of the determinations, or a real difference between the orientations about which the gravity field and the crust rotate, which can exist in a variety of plausible configuration. Securing an independent estimate of the spin axis orientation is vital because this quantity has a profound impact on the determination of the moment of inertia and interior models. We have derived a spherical harmonic solution of the gravity field to degree and order 40 as well as estimates of the tidal Love number k2 and spin axis orientation.

  6. The effects of lithographic residues and humidity on graphene field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, unknown-manner changes in charge neutrality point (CNP) positioning were ascribed to humidity at graphene field effect transistors (GFETs). While the exactmeans of humidity interacting with hydrophobicgraphene remains unknown, this work examines pristine and lithographic-process-applied graphene ...

  7. The effects of lithographic residues and humidity on graphene field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CNP positioning is generally observed at the drain-to-source current vs. gate voltage (IDS–Vbg) characteristics, and the humidity is seen as a contributing factor of ..... vertical lines and gate-voltage-generated field indicated by red lines are shown. As can be seen in figure 9c, the contact- metal-coated graphene regions are ...

  8. Tebuconazole and Azoxystrobin Residue Behaviors and Distribution in Field and Cooked Peanut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Fan; Teng, Peipei; Liu, Fengmao; Wang, Wenzhuo

    2017-06-07

    Residue behaviors of tebuconazole and azoxystrobin in field condition and the variation of their residue levels during the boiling process were evaluated. The terminal residues of peanut kernels were determined by using a modified QuEChERS method (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) by means of the optimization of the novel purification procedure with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Fe 3 O 4 -magnetic nanoparticle (Fe 3 O 4 -MNP) in the presence of an external magnetic field, and the terminal residues were all at trace level at harvest time. The residues in shells were detected as well to investigate the distribution in peanuts. Tebuconazole and azoxystrobin residue levels varied before/after boiling in kernels and shells to different degrees due to various factors, such as the modes of action and physicochemical properties of pesticides. The residues have been transferred from peanut into the infusion during boiling with the higher percentage of azoxystrobin as its lower logK ow . The processing factors (PFs) for tebuconazole and azoxystrobin after processing were <1, indicating that home cooking in this study could reduce the residue levels in peanut. Risk assessment showed there was no health risk for consumers.

  9. Chlorpyrifos residual behaviors in field crops and transfers during duck pellet feed processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Wei, Wei; He, Liang; Hao, Lili; Ji, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Qiang

    2014-10-22

    Chlorpyrifos is a widely used organophosphorus pesticide in agricultural crops (including food) and animal feeds in China, resulting in heavy contamination. Many studies have focused on the food-processing effects on chlorpyrifos removal, but sufficient information is not observed for feed-processing steps. Here, chlorpyrifos residual behaviors in field crops and its transfers in duck pellet feed-processing steps were evaluated. In field trials, the highest residues for rice grain, shelled corn, and soybean seed were 12.0, 0.605, and 0.220 mg/kg, respectively. Residues of all rice grain and about half of shelled corn exceeded the maximum residue limits (MRLs) of China, and five soybean seeds exceeded the MRL of China. Chlorpyrifos residue was reduced 38.2% in brown rice after the raw rice grain was hulled. The residue in bran increased 71.2% after milling from brown rice. During the squashing step, the residue reduced 73.8% in soybean meal. The residues reduced significantly (23.7-36.8%) during the process of granulating for rice, maize, and soybean products. Comparatively, the grinding process showed only limited influence on chlorpyrifos removal (residues of duck pellet feeds produced from highly contaminated raw materials of this study were 1.01 mg/kg (maize-soybean feed) and 3.20 mg/kg (rice-soybean feed), which were much higher than the generally accepted value (>0.1 mg/kg) for animal feeding. Chlorpyrifos residues were removed significantly by processing steps of pellet feeds, but the residue of raw materials was the determining factor for the safety of duck feeding.

  10. Non-perturbative aspects of quantum field theory. From the quark-gluon plasma to quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, Nicolai

    2015-07-08

    In this dissertation we investigate several aspects of non-perturbative quantum field theory. Two main parts of the thesis are concerned with non-perturbative renormalization of quantum gravity within the asymptotic safety scenario. This framework is based on a non-Gaussian ultraviolet fixed point and provides a well-defined theory of quantized gravity. We employ functional renormalization group (FRG) techniques that allow for the study of quantum fields even in strongly coupled regimes. We construct a setup for the computation of graviton correlation functions and analyze the ultraviolet completion of quantum gravity in terms of the properties of the two- and three point function of the graviton. Moreover, the coupling of gravity to Yang-Mills theories is discussed. In particular, we study the effects of graviton induced interactions on asymptotic freedom on the one hand, and the role of gluonic fluctuations in the gravity sector on the other hand. The last subject of this thesis is the physics of the quark-gluon plasma. We set-up a general non-perturbative strategy for the computation of transport coefficients in non-Abelian gauge theories. We determine the viscosity over entropy ratio η/s in SU(3) Yang-Mills theory as a function of temperature and estimate its behavior in full quantum chromodynamics (QCD).

  11. Field redefinitions in theories beyond Einstein gravity using the language of differential forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezquiaga, Jose María; García-Bellido, Juan; Zumalacárregui, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    We study the role of field redefinitions in general scalar-tensor theories. In particular, we first focus on the class of field redefinitions linear in the spin-2 field and involving derivatives of the spin-0 mode, generically known as disformal transformations. We start by defining the action of a disformal transformation in the tangent space. Then, we take advantage of the great economy of means of the language of differential forms to compute the full transformation of Horndeski's theory under general disformal transformations. We obtain that Horndeski's action maps onto itself modulo a reduced set of non-Horndeski Lagrangians. These new Lagrangians are found to be invariant under disformal transformation that depend only in the first derivatives of the scalar. Moreover, these combinations of Lagrangians precisely appear when expressing in our basis the constraints of the recently proposed extended scalar-tensor theories. These results allow us to classify the different orbits of scalar-tensor theories invariant under particular disformal transformations, namely, the special disformal, kinetic disformal, and disformal Horndeski orbits. In addition, we consider generalizations of this framework. We find that there are possible well-defined extended disformal transformations that have not been considered in the literature. However, they generically cannot link Horndeski theory with extended scalar-tensor theories. Finally, we study further generalizations in which extra fields with different spin are included. These field redefinitions can be used to connect different gravity theories such as multiscalar-tensor theories, generalized Proca theories, and bigravity. We discuss how the formalism of differential forms could be useful for future developments in these lines.

  12. Novel Applications of Magnetic Fields for Fluid Flow Control and for Simulating Variable Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    . The use of strong magnetic fields for terrestrially simulating variable gravity environments and applications supporting the NASA Exploration Initiative will also be briefly discussed.

  13. Quantifying the interplay between gravity and magnetic field in molecular clouds - a possible multiscale energy equipartition in NGC 6334

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Burkert, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    The interplay between gravity, turbulence and the magnetic field determines the evolution of the molecular interstellar medium (ISM) and the formation of the stars. In spite of growing interests, there remains a lack of understanding of the importance of magnetic field over multiple scales. We derive the magnetic energy spectrum - a measure that constraints the multiscale distribution of the magnetic energy, and compare it with the gravitational energy spectrum derived in Li & Burkert. In our formalism, the gravitational energy spectrum is purely determined by the surface density probability density distribution (PDF), and the magnetic energy spectrum is determined by both the surface density PDF and the magnetic field-density relation. If regions have density PDFs close to P(Σ) ˜ Σ-2 and a universal magnetic field-density relation B ˜ ρ1/2, we expect a multiscale near equipartition between gravity and the magnetic fields. This equipartition is found to be true in NGC 6334, where estimates of magnetic fields over multiple scales (from 0.1 pc to a few parsec) are available. However, the current observations are still limited in sample size. In the future, it is necessary to obtain multiscale measurements of magnetic fields from different clouds with different surface density PDFs and apply our formalism to further study the gravity-magnetic field interplay.

  14. Baroclinic Instability in the Solar Tachocline for Continuous Vertical Profiles of Rotation, Effective Gravity, and Toroidal Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, Peter A., E-mail: gilman@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2017-06-20

    We present results from an MHD model for baroclinic instability in the solar tachocline that includes rotation, effective gravity, and toroidal field that vary continuously with height. We solve the perturbation equations using a shooting method. Without toroidal fields but with an effective gravity declining linearly from a maximum at the bottom to much smaller values at the top, we find instability at all latitudes except at the poles, at the equator, and where the vertical rotation gradient vanishes (32.°3) for longitude wavenumbers m from 1 to >10. High latitudes are much more unstable than low latitudes, but both have e -folding times that are much shorter than a sunspot cycle. The higher the m and the steeper the decline in effective gravity, the closer the unstable mode peak to the top boundary, where the energy available to drive instability is greatest. The effect of the toroidal field is always stabilizing, shrinking the latitude ranges of instability as the toroidal field is increased. The larger the toroidal field, the smaller the longitudinal wavenumber of the most unstable disturbance. All latitudes become stable for a toroidal field exceeding about 4 kG. The results imply that baroclinic instability should occur in the tachocline at latitudes where the toroidal field is weak or is changing sign, but not where the field is strong.

  15. Conserved charge of a gravity theory with p -form gauge fields and its property under Kaluza-Klein reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun-Jin

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the conserved charges of generally diffeomorphism invariant gravity theories with a wide variety of matter fields, particularly of the theories with multiple scalar fields and p -form potentials, in the context of the off-shell generalized Abbott-Deser-Tekin (ADT) formalism. We first construct a new off-shell ADT current that consists of the terms for the variation of a Killing vector and expressions of the field equations as well as the Lie derivative of a surface term with respect to the Killing vector within the framework of generally diffeomorphism invariant gravity theories involving various matter fields. After deriving the off-shell ADT potential corresponding to this current, we propose a formula of conserved charges for these theories. Next, we derive the off-shell ADT potential associated with the generic Lagrangian that describes a large range of gravity theories with a number of scalar fields and p -form potentials. Finally, the properties of the off-shell generalized ADT charges for the theory of Einstein gravity and the gravity theories with a single p -form potential are investigated by performing Kaluza-Klein dimensional reduction along a compactified direction. The results indicate that the charge contributed by all the fields in the lower-dimensional theory is equal to that of the higher-dimensional one at mathematical level with the hypothesis that the higher-dimensional spacetime allows for the existence of the compactified dimension. In order to illustrate our calculations, the mass and angular momentum for the five-dimensional rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes are explicitly evaluated as an example.

  16. Field evidences and theoretical analysis of the gravity-driven wetting front instability of water runoffs on concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntz, M.; Van Mier, J.G.M.

    1997-01-01

    A series of field observations of the evolution of water runoffs over several vertical concrete walls directly exposed to rain falls is reported in this note. In all the cases, the main water flow originated from the top horizontal surface of the walls. The observations show that the gravity-driven

  17. A methodology for least-squares local quasi-geoid modelling using a noisy satellite-only gravity field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klees, R.; Slobbe, D. C.; Farahani, H. H.

    2018-04-01

    The paper is about a methodology to combine a noisy satellite-only global gravity field model (GGM) with other noisy datasets to estimate a local quasi-geoid model using weighted least-squares techniques. In this way, we attempt to improve the quality of the estimated quasi-geoid model and to complement it with a full noise covariance matrix for quality control and further data processing. The methodology goes beyond the classical remove-compute-restore approach, which does not account for the noise in the satellite-only GGM. We suggest and analyse three different approaches of data combination. Two of them are based on a local single-scale spherical radial basis function (SRBF) model of the disturbing potential, and one is based on a two-scale SRBF model. Using numerical experiments, we show that a single-scale SRBF model does not fully exploit the information in the satellite-only GGM. We explain this by a lack of flexibility of a single-scale SRBF model to deal with datasets of significantly different bandwidths. The two-scale SRBF model performs well in this respect, provided that the model coefficients representing the two scales are estimated separately. The corresponding methodology is developed in this paper. Using the statistics of the least-squares residuals and the statistics of the errors in the estimated two-scale quasi-geoid model, we demonstrate that the developed methodology provides a two-scale quasi-geoid model, which exploits the information in all datasets.

  18. A Note on the Inverse Reconstruction of Residual Fields in Surface Peened Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ali Faghidian

    Full Text Available Abstract A modified stress function approach is developed here to reconstruct induced stress, residual stress and eigenstrain fields from limited experimental measurements. The present approach is successfully applied to three experimental measurements set in surface peened plates with shallow shot peening affected zone. The well-rehearsed advantage of the proposed approach is that it not only minimizes the deviation of measurements from its approximations but also will result in an inverse solution satisfying a full range of continuum mechanics requirements. Also, the effect of component thickness as a geometric parameter influencing the residual stress state is comprehensively studied. A key finding of present study is that the plate thickness has no influence on the maximum magnitude of eigenstrain profile and compressive residual stresses within the shot peening affected zone while having a great influence on the magnitude of tensile residual stress and the gradient of linear residual stresses present in deeper regions.

  19. Time-variable Gravity Field Solutions from GRACE: Analysis and De-aliasing of Tides, Atmosphere, and Hydrology Signals and Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S.-C.; Jekeli, C.; Shum, C. K.

    2003-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission will map the Earth gravitational field with considerably high accuracy and resolution. In addition to the Earth’s static gravitational field, the GRACE will be able to monitor its temporal variations for 5 years or longer periods. New models of Earth's static and time-variable gravity fields will be available with a temporal resolution of every month, which is an adequate period considering the accuracy requirement and the data coverage. For a successful recovery of these gravity fields, some temporal effects such as ocean tidal and atmospheric mass redistribution should be corrected from the GRACE measurements based on the available recent model and data. The remaining residual effects due to imperfect model and data may affect the GRACE monthly estimates significantly. Even if they are perfect, the GRACE monthly products may also be considerably contaminated by the time-variable aliasing effects, because the temporal sampling interval of the GRACE products is relatively low comparing periods of temporal mass redistribution signals. In addition, monthly surface water mass recovery may suffer from short period variations of surface water mass, even if we have perfect GRACE measurements. We quantify the effects due to the inherent modeling error and temporal aliasing caused by ocean tides, atmosphere, and ground surface water mass on monthly mean GRACE gravity estimates. We show the simulation results on GRACE range-rate perturbations due to modeling error along the orbit, and analyze their effects and temporal aliasing on the estimated gravitational coefficients by fully inverting monthly GRACE data. For the ocean tide model, some constituents like S2 may cause errors 3 times larger than the measurements noises at degrees less than 15 in monthly mean estimates, while other constituents like K1, O1, and M2 are reduced below the measurement noise level by one month averaging. For the atmosphere

  20. Field investigations on port non-tranquility caused by infra-gravity water waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Najafi-Jilani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Field investigations have been carried out in two 60-day stages on the surf beat low frequency waves in Anzali port, one of the main commercial ports in Iran, located in southwest coast of the Caspian Sea. The characteristics of significant water waves were measured at three metering stations in the sea, one at the entrance of the port and three in the basin. The measured data were inspected to investigate the surf beat negative effects on the tranquility of the port. Using field measurements and complementary numerical modeling, the response of the basin to the infra-gravity long waves was inspected for a range of wave frequencies. It was concluded that the water surface fluctuations in the port is strongly related to the incident wave period. The long waves with periods of about 45s were recognized as the worst cases for water surfaceperturbation in the port. For wave periods higher than the mentioned range, the order of fluctuation was generally low.

  1. The geology and gravity field in the central core of the Vredefort structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepto, D.

    1990-01-01

    low-frequency oval-shaped anomaly with a long axis trending NW-SE has eccentrically positioned on it a plateau extending southwards as a spur. A dyke is responsible for the spur, but the source for the plateau is, from a recent borehole, thought to be largely due to sheared altered harzburgite. Modelling of the low-frequency gravity field component was based on the mapped divisions of the OGG, SF and ILG, and a density contrast of 200 kg/m 3 was determined between the OGG and the SF and ILG lithologies. A purely crustal solution for the excess mass distribution in the basement is conclusively demonstrated.

  2. Metal Residue Deposition from Military Pyrotechnic Devices and Field Sampling Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA. Taylor. S. R. 1964. Abundance of chemical elements in the continental crust . Geochimica et...Development Center Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory Hanover, NH 03755 Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited Metal Residue...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Metal Residue Deposition from Military Pyrotechnic Devices and Field Sampling Guidance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  3. Field kit and method for testing for the presence of gunshot residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodacy, Philip J.; Walker, Pamela K.

    2003-09-02

    A field test kit for gunshot residue comprises a container having at least compartments separated by a barrier. A surface is tested by wiping it with a swab and placing the swab in a first compartment. The barrier is then breached, permitting reagent in the second compartment to flow onto the swab. The first compartment is transparent, and a color change will be observed if the reagent reacts with gunshot residue.

  4. Enhancement of subsurface geologic structure model based on gravity, magnetotelluric, and well log data in Kamojang geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustin Kamah, Muhammad; Armando, Adilla; Larasati Rahmani, Dinda; Paramitha, Shabrina

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical methods such as gravity and magnetotelluric methods commonly used in conventional and unconventional energy exploration, notably for exploring geothermal prospect. They used to identify the subsurface geology structures which is estimated as a path of fluid flow. This study was conducted in Kamojang Geothermal Field with the aim of highlighting the volcanic lineament in West Java, precisely in Guntur-Papandayan chain where there are three geothermal systems. Kendang Fault has predominant direction NE-SW, identified by magnetotelluric techniques and gravity data processing techniques. Gravity techniques such as spectral analysis, derivative solutions, and Euler deconvolution indicate the type and geometry of anomaly. Magnetotelluric techniques such as inverse modeling and polar diagram are required to know subsurface resistivity charactersitics and major orientation. Furthermore, the result from those methods will be compared to geology information and some section of well data, which is sufficiently suitable. This research is very useful to trace out another potential development area.

  5. GOCO05c: A New Combined Gravity Field Model Based on Full Normal Equations and Regionally Varying Weighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecher, T.; Pail, R.; Gruber, T.

    2017-05-01

    GOCO05c is a gravity field model computed as a combined solution of a satellite-only model and a global data set of gravity anomalies. It is resolved up to degree and order 720. It is the first model applying regionally varying weighting. Since this causes strong correlations among all gravity field parameters, the resulting full normal equation system with a size of 2 TB had to be solved rigorously by applying high-performance computing. GOCO05c is the first combined gravity field model independent of EGM2008 that contains GOCE data of the whole mission period. The performance of GOCO05c is externally validated by GNSS-levelling comparisons, orbit tests, and computation of the mean dynamic topography, achieving at least the quality of existing high-resolution models. Results show that the additional GOCE information is highly beneficial in insufficiently observed areas, and that due to the weighting scheme of individual data the spectral and spatial consistency of the model is significantly improved. Due to usage of fill-in data in specific regions, the model cannot be used for physical interpretations in these regions.

  6. Magmatic underplating beneath the Rajmahal Traps: Gravity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    surface correlative basalt in seismic and drilling results is ..... 2-D gravity model, partially constrained by available seismic section, along the DSS profile-II. SP is the DSS ... interpretation. One established procedure is to sep- arate regional and residual fields through convo- lution. Another common procedure is the manual.

  7. Field desorption mass spectrometric analysis of organic compound residues in the environment. I--Organochlorine insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M; Yamato, Y; Koga, M

    1978-09-01

    Field desorption mass spectrometry is applied to the positive identification of organochlorine insecticides and their related compounds residing in field soil environment. Additionally, standard field desorption mass spectra of these compounds are presented. Soil samples were collected in lettuce and spinach fields, and insecticides were extracted, cleaned up, and separated with thin-layer chromatography. Residue levels were measured by injecting the extract into a gas chromatography equipped with an electron capture detector. Residues of p,p'-DDT and dieldrin in field soil samples were clearly identified by field desorption mass spectrometry using the emitter dipping method. Moreover, mixed residues of these insecticides were simultaneously confirmed. However, residues of insecticides and their related compounds other than p,p'-DDT and dieldrin could not be characterized. All spectra of standard showed prominent [M].+, [M(35Cl(n-1), 37Cl)].+ and [M(35Cl(n-2, 37Cl2)].+ ions, and the [M(35Cl(n-1), 37Cl)].+ ion was the base peak in all spectra obtained.

  8. A single dumbbell falling under gravity in a cellular flow field

    CERN Document Server

    Piva, M F

    2003-01-01

    We study the motion of a single polymer chain settling under gravity in an ensemble of periodic, cellular flow fields, which are steady in time. The molecule is an elastic dumbbell composed of two beads connected by a nonbendable Hookean spring. Each bead is subject to a Stokes drag and a Brownian force from the flow. In the absence of particle inertia, the molecule settles out at a rate which depends on three parameters: the particle velocity in a fluid at rest, V sub g , the spring constant, B, and the diffusion coefficient, D. We investigate the dependence of the molecule settling velocity on B, for fixed V sub g and D. It is found that this velocity strongly depends on B and it has a minimum value less than V sub g. We also find that the molecule is temporarily trapped at fixed points for certain values of the parameters. We analyse one fixed point in detail and conclude that its stability is the main factor which contributes to slowing down the settling process.

  9. Spontaneous generation and reversals of mean flows in a convectively-generated internal gravity wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couston, Louis-Alexandre; Lecoanet, Daniel; Favier, Benjamin; Le Bars, Michael

    2017-11-01

    We investigate via direct numerical simulations the spontaneous generation and reversals of mean zonal flows in a stably-stratified fluid layer lying above a turbulent convective fluid. Contrary to the leading idealized theories of mean flow generation by self-interacting internal waves, the emergence of a mean flow in a convectively-generated internal gravity wave field is not always possible because nonlinear interactions of waves of different frequencies can disrupt the mean flow generation mechanism. Strong mean flows thus emerge when the divergence of the Reynolds stress resulting from the nonlinear interactions of internal waves produces a strong enough anti-diffusive acceleration for the mean flow, which, as we will demonstrate, is the case when the Prandtl number is sufficiently low, or when the energy input into the internal wavefield by the convection and density stratification are sufficiently large. Implications for mean zonal flow production as observed in the equatorial stratospheres of the Earth, Saturn and Jupiter, and possibly occurring in other geophysical systems such as planetary and stellar interiors will be briefly discussed. Funding provided by the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program through Grant Agreement No. 681835-FLUDYCO-ERC-2015-CoG.

  10. Comparison of numerical solution strategies for gravity field recovery from GOCE SGG observations implemented on a parallel platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pail

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of a full set of gravity field parameters from satellite gravity gradiometry (SGG is a huge numerical and computational task. In practice, parallel computing has to be applied to estimate the more than 90 000 harmonic coefficients parameterizing the Earth’s gravity field up to a maximum spherical harmonic degree of 300. Three independent solution strategies, i.e. two iterative methods (preconditioned conjugate gradient method, semi-analytic approach and a strict solver (Distributed Non-approximative Adjustment, which are operational on a parallel platform (‘Graz Beowulf Cluster’, are assessed and compared both theoretically and on the basis of a realistic-as-possible numerical simulation, regarding the accuracy of the results, as well as the computational effort. Special concern is given to the correct treatment of the coloured noise characteristics of the gradiometer. The numerical simulations show that there are no significant discrepancies among the solutions of the three methods. The newly proposed Distributed Nonapproximative Adjustment approach, which is the only one of the three methods that solves the inverse problem in a strict sense, also turns out to be a feasible method for practical applications.Key words. Spherical harmonics – satellite gravity gradiometry – GOCE – parallel computing – Beowulf cluster

  11. Decomposition of corn and soybean residues under field conditions and their role as inoculum source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Reis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Necrotrophic parasites of above-ground plant parts survive saprophytically, between growing seasons in host crop residues. In an experiment conducted under field conditions, the time required in months for corn and soybean residues to be completely decomposed was quantified. Residues were laid on the soil surface to simulate no-till farming. Crop debris of the two plant species collected on the harvesting day cut into pieces of 5.0cm-long and a 200g mass was added to nylon mesh bags. At monthly intervals, bags were taken to the laboratory for weighing. Corn residues were decomposed within 37.0 months and those of soybean, within 34.5 months. Hw main necrotrophic fungi diagnosed in the corn residues were Colletotrichum gramicola, Diplodia spp. and Gibberella zeae, and those in soybeans residues were Cercospora kikuchii, Colletotrichum spp, Glomerella sp. and Phomopsis spp. Thus, those periods shoulb be observed in crop rotation aimed at to eliminating contaminated residues and, consequently, the inoculum from the cultivated area.

  12. Effective spacetime understanding emergence in effective field theory and quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Crowther, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the notion that quantum gravity may represent the "breakdown" of spacetime at extremely high energy scales. If spacetime does not exist at the fundamental level, then it has to be considered "emergent", in other words an effective structure, valid at low energy scales. The author develops a conception of emergence appropriate to effective theories in physics, and shows how it applies (or could apply) in various approaches to quantum gravity, including condensed matter approaches, discrete approaches, and loop quantum gravity.

  13. Holographic description of curved-space quantum field theory and gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlemann, Christoph Frank

    2012-12-12

    The celebrated AdS/CFT dualities provide a window to strongly-coupled quantum field theories (QFTs), which are realized in nature at the most fundamental level on the one hand, but are hardly accessible for the standard mathematical tools on the other hand. The prototype examples of AdS/CFT relate classical supergravity theories on (d+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter space (AdS) to strongly-coupled d-dimensional conformal field theories (CFTs). The AdS spacetimes admit a timelike conformal boundary, on which the dual CFT is defined. In that sense the AdS/CFT dualities are holographic, and this new approach has led to remarkable progress in understanding strongly-coupled QFTs defined on Minkowski space and on the Einstein cylinder. On the other hand, the study of QFT on more generic curved spacetimes is of fundamental interest and non-trivial already for free theories. Moreover, understanding the properties of gravity as a quantum theory remains among the hardest problems to solve in physics. Both of these issues can be studied holographically and we investigate here generalizations of AdS/CFT involving on the lower-dimensional side QFTs on curved backgrounds and as a further generalization gravity. In the first part we expand on the holographic description of QFT on fixed curved backgrounds, which involves gravity on an asymptotically-AdS space with that prescribed boundary structure. We discuss geometries with de Sitter and AdS as conformal boundary to holographically describe CFTs on these spacetimes. After setting up the procedure of holographic renormalization we study the reflection of CFT unitarity properties in the dual bulk description. The geometry with AdS on the boundary exhibits a number of interesting features, mainly due to the fact that the boundary itself has a boundary. We study both cases and resolve potential tensions between the unitarity properties of the bulk and boundary theories, which would be incompatible with a duality. The origin of these

  14. The maximum possible stress intensity factor for a crack in an unknown residual stress field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coules, H.E.; Smith, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Residual and thermal stress fields in engineering components can act on cracks and structural flaws, promoting or inhibiting fracture. However, these stresses are limited in magnitude by the ability of materials to sustain them elastically. As a consequence, the stress intensity factor which can be applied to a given defect by a self-equilibrating stress field is also limited. We propose a simple weight function method for determining the maximum stress intensity factor which can occur for a given crack or defect in a one-dimensional self-equilibrating stress field, i.e. an upper bound for the residual stress contribution to K I . This can be used for analysing structures containing defects and subject to residual stress without any information about the actual stress field which exists in the structure being analysed. A number of examples are given, including long radial cracks and fully-circumferential cracks in thick-walled hollow cylinders containing self-equilibrating stresses. - Highlights: • An upper limit to the contribution of residual stress to stress intensity factor. • The maximum K I for self-equilibrating stresses in several geometries is calculated. • A weight function method can determine this maximum for 1-dimensional stress fields. • Simple MATLAB scripts for calculating maximum K I provided as supplementary material.

  15. Bi-Metallic Composite Structures With Designed Internal Residual Stress Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) have a unique ability to recover small amounts of plastic strain through a temperature induced phase change. For these materials, mechanical displacement can be accomplished by heating the structure to induce a phase change, through which some of the plastic strain previously introduced to the structure can be reversed. This paper introduces a concept whereby an SMA phase is incorporated into a conventional alloy matrix in a co-continuous reticulated arrangement forming a bi-metallic composite structure. Through memory activation of the mechanically constrained SMA phase, a controlled residual stress field is developed in the interior of the structure. The presented experimental data show that the memory activation of the SMA composite component significantly changes the residual stress distribution in the overall structure. Designing the structural arrangement of the two phases to produce a controlled residual stress field could be used to create structures that have much improved durability and damage tolerance properties.

  16. Residual magnetism in an MRI suite after field-rampdown: what are the issues and experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammet, Steffen; Koch, Regina Maria; Aguila, Francisco; Knopp, Michael Vinzenz

    2010-05-01

    To investigate residual magnetization at different locations in the MRI suite at several time points prior, during and after field-rampdown with the goal to determine if the MRI suites could be reused in a clinical environment after the field-rampdown of MR scanners of different field strengths. Residual magnetism was measured with two gaussmeters in the MRI suites of an 8 Tesla (T) and a 0.7T whole body magnet at several time points prior, during and after field-rampdown. Residual magnetism, in the MRI suite after controlled rampdown of an 8T superconducting magnet, was not significantly elevated compared with magnetic fields in the environment. Through 40 days, no significant changes in magnetism could be seen compared with initial measurements directly after rampdown, as both gaussmeters consistently measured. Similar findings were also observed after the quenched shutdown of a 0.7T system but a remanence was observed. A controlled rampdown of even an ultrahigh field MR system does not lead to retained magnetic contamination, while forced quenched rampdown of a mid-field system revealed temporary remanence. There is no need to degauss an MRI suite when an appropriate steel composition has been used in the iron shield. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Seasonal changes in the European gravity field from GRACE: A comparison with superconducting gravimeters and hydrology model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, Jacques; Andersen, Ole; Lemoine, Frank; Crossley, David; Boy, Jean-Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of seasonal changes of the Earth's gravity field from GRACE satellites and the comparison with surface gravity measurements in Europe from the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) sub-network, as well as with recent hydrology models for continental soil moisture and snow. We used gravity maps in Europe retrieved from the initial GRACE monthly solutions spanning a 21-month duration from April 2002 to December 2003 for various truncation levels of the initial spherical harmonic decomposition of the field. The transfer function between satellite-derived and ground gravity changes due to continental hydrology is studied and we also compute the theoretical ratio of gravity versus radial displacement (in μGal/mm) involved in the hydrological loading process. The 'mean' value (averaged in time and in space over Europe) from hydrologic forward modeling is found to be close to -1.0 μGal/mm and we show that this value can be explained by a strong low degree ( n = 5-6) peak in the hydrology amplitude spectrum. The dominant time-variable signal from GRACE is found to be annual with an amplitude and a phase both of which are in fair agreement with predictions in Europe from recent hydrology models. Initial results suggest that all three data sets (GRACE, hydrology and GGP) respond to annual changes in near-surface water in Europe of a few μGal (at length scales of ˜1000 km) that show a high value in winter and a summer minimum. Despite the limited time span of our analysis and the uncertainties in separating purely local effects from regional ones in superconducting gravimeter data, the calibration and validation aspects of the GRACE data processing based on the annual hydrology cycle in Europe are in progress.

  18. Covariant w∞ gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Pope, C.N.; Stelle, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the notion of higher-spin covariance in w∞ gravity. We show how a recently proposed covariant w∞ gravity action can be obtained from non-chiral w∞ gravity by making field redefinitions that introduce new gauge-field components with corresponding new gauge transformations.

  19. Sugarcane field residue and bagasse allelopathic impact on vegetable seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical interaction between plants, which is referred to as allelopathy, may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. The objective of this research was to determine the allelopathic impact of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) var. ‘HoCP 96-540’ field residue and sugarcane baga...

  20. Quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The search for a quantum theory of the gravitational field is one of the great open problems in theoretical physics. This book presents a self-contained discussion of the concepts, methods and applications that can be expected in such a theory. The two main approaches to its construction - the direct quantisation of Einstein's general theory of relativity and string theory - are covered. Whereas the first attempts to construct a viable theory for the gravitational field alone, string theory assumes that a quantum theory of gravity will be achieved only through a unification of all the interactions. However, both employ the general method of quantization of constrained systems, which is described together with illustrative examples relevant for quantum gravity. There is a detailed presentation of the main approaches employed in quantum general relativity: path-integral quantization, the background-field method and canonical quantum gravity in the metric, connection and loop formulations. The discussion of stri...

  1. Effects of Humidity and Temperature on Orange Dye-Based Organic Field Effect Transistors Fabricated at Different Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, N.; Ahmed, M. M.; Karimov, Kh. S.

    2017-11-01

    This study reports the fabrication of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) using 3-[ethyl[4-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]phenyl]amino]propanenitrile, usually known as Orange-Dye 25 (OD) and its composite with sugar. The study investigated the heat- and humidity-dependent electrical characteristics of the fabricated devices. Fabrication was carried out from the aqueous solution of the materials using different gravity conditions, i.e., at positive (normal) gravity (+1 g) and at negative gravity (-1 g). A thin layer (10-15 μm) of OD or OD:sugar was deposited by drop-casting on pre-fabricated drain and source silver (Ag) electrodes having 30 μm separation and 2 mm length followed by aluminum (Al) thermal evaporation to achieve a Schottky barrier. Devices fabricated using OD at -1 g were more sensitive in capacitance-temperature and impedance-humidity relationships than those fabricated at +1 g. Moreover, OFETs fabricated at -1 g using OD:sugar offered capacitance-temperature sensitivity much higher than the devices fabricated at +1 g. It has been observed that, in the drop-casting method, the properties of OFETs are dependent upon gravity as well as the solution composition employed for channel definition.

  2. Time-variable aliasing effects of ocean tides, atmosphere, and continental water mass on monthly mean GRACE gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shin-Chan; Jekeli, Christopher; Shum, C. K.

    2004-04-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission will provide new measurements of Earth's static and time-variable gravity fields with monthly resolution. The temporal effects due to ocean tides and atmospheric mass redistribution are assumed known and could be removed using current models. In this study we quantify the aliasing effects on monthly mean GRACE gravity estimates due to errors in models for ocean tides and atmosphere and due to ground surface water mass variation. Our results are based on simulations of GRACE recovery of monthly gravity solution complete to degree and order 120 in the presence of the respective model errors and temporal aliasing effects. For ocean tides we find that a model error in S2 causes errors 3 times larger than the measurement noise at n corrupt recovered coefficients and introduce 30% more error in the global monthly geoid estimates up to maximum degree 120. Assuming daily CDAS-1 data for continental surface water mass redistribution, the analysis indicates that the daily soil moisture and snow depth variations with respect to their monthly mean produce a systematic error as large as the measurement noise over the continental regions.

  3. Estimating the variance and integral scale of the transmissivity field using head residual increments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lingyun; Silliman, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    A modification of previously published solutions regarding the spatial variation of hydraulic heads is discussed whereby the semivariogram of increments of head residuals (termed head residual increments HRIs) are related to the variance and integral scale of the transmissivity field. A first-order solution is developed for the case of a transmissivity field which is isotropic and whose second-order behavior can be characterized by an exponential covariance structure. The estimates of the variance ??(Y)/2 and the integral scale ?? of the log transmissivity field are then obtained via fitting a theoretical semivariogram for the HRI to its sample semivariogram. This approach is applied to head data sampled from a series of two-dimensional, simulated aquifers with isotropic, exponential covariance structures and varying degrees of heterogeneity (??(Y)/2 = 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0). The results show that this method provided reliable estimates for both ?? and ??(Y)/2 in aquifers with the value of ??(Y)/2 up to 2.0, but the errors in those estimates were higher for ??(Y)/2 equal to 5.0. It is also demonstrated through numerical experiments and theoretical arguments that the head residual increments will provide a sample semivariogram with a lower variance than will the use of the head residuals without calculation of increments.

  4. Influence of the Mercury gravity field on the orbit insertion strategy of BepiColombo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Anja; Jehn, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    Ziel des Versuchs BepiColombo is Europe's first mission to Mercury expected to launch on an Ariane 5 rocket in 2015. The European Space Agency (ESA), in cooperation with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), is responsible for the mission design and navigation. The mission has a high scientific interest as there are still many unsolved questions about Mercury, such as origin and evolution of the planet, its physical form, as well as its interior structure. Also instruments to measure the chemical composition, the exosphere and magnetosphere of Mercury will be on board of BepiColombo. The interplanetary journey based on ion propulsion and 7 gravity assists is followed by the challenging gravitational capture at Mercury. This paper describes the manoeuvre sequences of the Mercury Orbit Insertion (MOI). The manoeuvres were optimized such that the two scientific elements - the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) and the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) - can be released to their target orbits with minimum fuel consumption. The MOI consists of fifteen burns: After five burns the MMO will be released to its operational orbit of 600 km x 11624 km; after the fifteenth burn MPO shall arrive at its target orbit of 560 km x 1530 km. The optimum burn sequence was obtained by implementing the optimization package SNOPT into an orbit propagation software that considers orbital perturbations due to the non-sphericity of Mercury and the gravitational pull of the Sun. Since the gravity field of Mercury is still not very well known - even after Messenger being in orbit around Mercury for almost two years - the final MPO orbit is still under discussion. Depending on the final choice of the MPO orbit, different orbit insertion sequences have to be optimised and the most probable ones are presented here. This also includes different argument of periherm values for MPO and MMO. Furthermore, the effect of the solar aspect angle constraints ("no direct Sun on MMO and on the

  5. Effectiveness of a constructed wetland for treating alkaline bauxite residue leachate: a 1-year field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Derek; Curtin, Teresa; Courtney, Ronan

    2017-03-01

    Increasing volumes of bauxite residues and their associated leachates represent a significant environmental challenge to the alumina industry. Constructed wetlands have been proposed as a potential approach for leachate treatment, but there is limited data on field-scale applications. The research presented here provides preliminary evaluation of a purpose-built constructed wetland to buffer leachate from a bauxite residue disposal site in Ireland. Data collected over a 1-year period demonstrated that the pH of bauxite residue leachates could be effectively reduced from ca. pH 10.3 to 8.1 but was influenced by influent variability and temporal changes. The wetland was also effective in decreasing elemental loading, and sequential extractions suggested that the bulk of the sediment-bound metal inventory was in hard-to-leach phases. Elemental analysis of Phragmites australis showed that although vegetation displayed seasonal variation, no trace elements were at concentrations of concern.

  6. A model of the general ocean circulation determined from a joint solution for the Earth's gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerem, R. S.; Tapley, B. D.; Shum, C. K.; Yuan, D. N.

    1989-01-01

    If the geoid and the satellite position are known accurately, satellite altimetry can be used to determine the geostrophic velocity of the surface ocean currents. The purpose of this investigation is to simultaneously estimate the sea surface topography, zeta, the model for the gravity field, and the satellite orbit. Satellite tracking data from fourteen satellites were used; along with Seasat and Geosat altimeter data as well as surface gravity data for the solution. The estimated model of zeta compares well at long wavelengths with the hydrographic model of zeta. Covariance studies show that the geoid is separable from zeta up to degree 9, at which point geoid error becomes comparable to the signal of zeta.

  7. Models for the dynamics of dust-like matter in the self-gravity field: The method of hydrodynamic substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, V. M.

    2017-09-01

    Models for the dynamics of a dust-like medium in the self-gravity field are investigated. Solutions of the corresponding problems are constructed by the method of hydrodynamic substitutions generalizing the Cole-Hopf substitutions. The method is extended to multidimensional ideal and viscous fluid flows with cylindrical and spherical symmetries for which exact solutions are constructed. Solutions for the dynamics of self-gravitating dust with arbitrary initial distributions of both fluid density and velocity are constructed using special coordinate transformations. In particular, the problem of cosmological expansion is considered in terms of Newton's gravity theory. Models of a one-dimensional viscous dust fluid flow and some problems of gas hydrodynamics are considered. Examples of exact solutions and their brief analysis are provided.

  8. Time-variable gravity fields and ocean mass change from 37 months of kinematic Swarm orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lück

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the spatiotemporal variation of ocean mass allows for partitioning of volumetric sea level change, sampled by radar altimeters, into mass-driven and steric parts. The latter is related to ocean heat change and the current Earth's energy imbalance. Since 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE mission has provided monthly snapshots of the Earth's time-variable gravity field, from which one can derive ocean mass variability. However, GRACE has reached the end of its lifetime with data degradation and several gaps occurred during the last years, and there will be a prolonged gap until the launch of the follow-on mission GRACE-FO. Therefore, efforts focus on generating a long and consistent ocean mass time series by analyzing kinematic orbits from other low-flying satellites, i.e. extending the GRACE time series. Here we utilize data from the European Space Agency's (ESA Swarm Earth Explorer satellites to derive and investigate ocean mass variations. For this aim, we use the integral equation approach with short arcs (Mayer-Gürr, 2006 to compute more than 500 time-variable gravity fields with different parameterizations from kinematic orbits. We investigate the potential to bridge the gap between the GRACE and the GRACE-FO mission and to substitute missing monthly solutions with Swarm results of significantly lower resolution. Our monthly Swarm solutions have a root mean square error (RMSE of 4.0 mm with respect to GRACE, whereas directly estimating constant, trend, annual, and semiannual (CTAS signal terms leads to an RMSE of only 1.7 mm. Concerning monthly gaps, our CTAS Swarm solution appears better than interpolating existing GRACE data in 13.5 % of all cases, when artificially removing one solution. In the case of an 18-month artificial gap, 80.0 % of all CTAS Swarm solutions were found closer to the observed GRACE data compared to interpolated GRACE data. Furthermore, we show that precise modeling of non

  9. Regional gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Mineral Mountains and vicinity, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.A.; Cook, K.L.

    1978-04-01

    The results of gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Mineral Mountains and vicinity are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map (about 1450 stations with 1-mgal contour interval) and a total magnetic field intensity residual anomaly map (with contour interval 50 gammas), respectively. Combined interpretation of the gravity and aeromagnetic data was conducted based on comparing and contrasting various processed maps and interpretative geologic cross sections produced from each survey. (MHR)

  10. Dynamics of mature pea residue nitrogen turnover in unplanted soil under field conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamics of N-15-labelled mature, pea (Pisum sativum L.) residue turnover in soil were studied in two 3 yr experiments, using residue sizes of soil in the field. During the initial 10 days of decomposition there was a sharp decline in the amount of N-15 in organic...... in the biomass N, indicating that unlabelled soil N was immobilized in the biomass in the second experiment, despite the high residue N concentration. The total residual organic N-15 and the N-15 in the biomass declined with average decay constants of 0.44 and 0.65 yr-1, respectively, for the 10 d to 1 yr period...... mineralizable after 2 yr of decomposition, indicating that the remaining residue N-15 was present in rather recalcitrant soil organic matter. After 90 days of decomposition N-15 unaccounted for corresponded to 10% of the input, increasing to 20-30% after 2-3 yr of decomposition. The main part of the N...

  11. Time-variable gravity fields derived from GPS tracking of Swarm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bezděk, Aleš; Sebera, Josef; da Encarnacao, J.T.; Klokočník, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 205, č. 3 (2016), s. 1665-1669 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14026; GA ČR GA13-36843S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : satellite geodesy * time variable gravity * global change from geodesy Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.414, year: 2016

  12. On the covariant formalism of the effective field theory of gravity and leading order corrections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, Alessandro; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    as gravity coupled to matter. By means of heat kernel methods we renormalize and compute the leading quantum corrections to quadratic order in a curvature expansion. The final effective action in our covariant formalism is generally non-local and can be readily used to understand the phenomenology...

  13. Strong-field tests of gravity using pulsars and black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, M.; Backer, D.C.; Cordes, J.M.; Lazio, T.J.W.; Stappers, B.W.; Johnston, S.

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of the SKA enables a number of tests of theories of gravity. A Galactic Census of pulsars will discover most of the active pulsars in the Galaxy beamed toward us. In this census will almost certainly be pulsar black hole binaries as well as pulsars orbiting the super-massive black

  14. Determining the COB location along the Iberian margin and Galicia Bank from gravity anomaly inversion, residual depth anomaly and subsidence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Leanne; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge and understanding of the ocean-continent transition (OCT) structure, continent-ocean boundary (COB) location and crustal type are of critical importance in evaluating rifted continental margin formation and evolution. OCT structure, COB location and magmatic type also have important implications for the understanding of the geodynamics of continental breakup and in the evaluation of petroleum systems in deep-water frontier oil and gas exploration at rifted continental margins. Mapping the distribution of thinned continental crust and lithosphere, its distal extent and the start of unequivocal oceanic crust and hence determining the OCT structure and COB location at rifted continental margins is therefore a generic global problem. In order to assist in the determination of the OCT structure and COB location, we present methodologies using gravity anomaly inversion, residual depth anomaly (RDA) analysis and subsidence analysis, which we apply to the west Iberian rifted continental margin. The west Iberian margin has one of the most complete data sets available for deep magma-poor rifted margins, so there is abundant data to which the results can be calibrated. Gravity anomaly inversion has been used to determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness and continental lithosphere thinning; subsidence analysis has been used to determine the distribution of continental lithosphere thinning; and RDAs have been used to investigate the OCT bathymetric anomalies with respect to expected oceanic bathymetries at rifted continental margins. These quantitative analytical techniques have been applied to the west Iberian rifted continental margin along profiles IAM9, Lusigal 12 (with the TGS-extension) and ISE-01. Our predictions of OCT structure, COB location and magmatic type (i.e. the volume of magmatic addition, whether the margin is `normal' magmatic, magma-starved or magma-rich) have been tested and validated using ODP wells (Legs 103, 149 and 173), which provide

  15. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  16. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10-23 Hz-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  17. Field-theory representation of gauge-gravity symmetry-protected topological invariants, group cohomology, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juven C; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2015-01-23

    The challenge of identifying symmetry-protected topological states (SPTs) is due to their lack of symmetry-breaking order parameters and intrinsic topological orders. For this reason, it is impossible to formulate SPTs under Ginzburg-Landau theory or probe SPTs via fractionalized bulk excitations and topology-dependent ground state degeneracy. However, the partition functions from path integrals with various symmetry twists are universal SPT invariants, fully characterizing SPTs. In this work, we use gauge fields to represent those symmetry twists in closed spacetimes of any dimensionality and arbitrary topology. This allows us to express the SPT invariants in terms of continuum field theory. We show that SPT invariants of pure gauge actions describe the SPTs predicted by group cohomology, while the mixed gauge-gravity actions describe the beyond-group-cohomology SPTs. We find new examples of mixed gauge-gravity actions for U(1) SPTs in (4+1)D via the gravitational Chern-Simons term. Field theory representations of SPT invariants not only serve as tools for classifying SPTs, but also guide us in designing physical probes for them. In addition, our field theory representations are independently powerful for studying group cohomology within the mathematical context.

  18. Modelling and experimental characterisation of a residual stress field in a ferritic compact tension specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenman, M.R.; Price, A.J.; Steuwer, A.; Chard-Tuckey, P.R.; Crocombe, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work is to elucidate the influence of plasticity behaviour on the residual stress field in a ferritic reactor pressure vessel steel. To this end, we investigate two compressively pre-loaded compact tension (CT) specimens to generate a mechanical residual stress field. One specimen was subsequently pre-cracked by fatigue before both specimens were measured using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A fine grain size microstructure (∼5-10 μm grain size) allowed a small X-ray beam slit size and therefore gauge volume. The results provide an excellent data set for validation of finite element (FE) modelling predictions against which they have been compared. The results of both mechanical testing and modelling suggest that the use of a combined hardening model is needed to accurately predict the residual stress field present in the specimen after pre-loading. Some discrepancy between the modelled crack tip stress values and those found by X-ray diffraction remain which can be partly explained by volume averaging effects in the presence of very high stress/strain gradients.

  19. Temperature Field Prediction for Determining the Residual Stresses Under Heat Treatment of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Livshits

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to non-stationary temperature field blanks from aluminum alloys during heat treatment. It consists of the introduction and two smaller paragraphs. In the introduction the author concerns the influence of residual stresses arising in the manufacturing process of details, on the strength of the whole aircraft construction and, consequently, on their technical and economic parameters, such as weight, reliability, efficiency, and cost. He also notes that the residual stresses appeared during the production of parts change their location, size and direction under the influence of the elastic deformations that occur during the exploitation of aircraft. Redistributed residual stresses may have a chaotic distribution that may cause overlap of these stresses on the stresses caused by the impact of workload of constructions and destruction or damage of aircraft components.The first paragraph is devoted to the existing methods and techniques for determining the residual stresses. The presented methods and techniques are analyzed to show the advantages and disadvantages of each of them. The conclusion is drawn that the method to determine the residual stresses is necessary, its cost is less than those of existing ones, and an error does not exceed 10%.In the second section, the author divides the problem of determining the residual stresses into two parts, and describes the solution methods of the first one. The first problem is to define the temperature field of the work piece. The author uses a Fourier equation with the definition of initial and boundary conditions to describe a mathematical model of the heat cycle of work piece cooling. He draws special attention here to the fact that it is complicated to determine the heat transfer coefficient, which characterizes the process of cooling the work piece during hardening because of its dependence on a number of factors, such as changing temperature-dependent material properties of

  20. Revised Backbone-Virtual-Bond-Angle Potentials to Treat the l- and d-Amino Acid Residues in the Coarse-Grained United Residue (UNRES) Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieradzan, Adam K; Niadzvedtski, Andrei; Scheraga, Harold A; Liwo, Adam

    2014-05-13

    Continuing our effort to introduce d-amino-acid residues in the united residue (UNRES) force field developed in our laboratory, in this work the C α ··· C α ··· C α backbone-virtual-bond-valence-angle (θ) potentials for systems containing d-amino-acid residues have been developed. The potentials were determined by integrating the combined energy surfaces of all possible triplets of terminally blocked glycine, alanine, and proline obtained with ab initio molecular quantum mechanics at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level to calculate the corresponding potentials of mean force (PMFs). Subsequently, analytical expressions were fitted to the PMFs to give the virtual-bond-valence potentials to be used in UNRES. Alanine represented all types of amino-acid residues except glycine and proline. The blocking groups were either the N -acetyl and N ', N '-dimethyl or N -acetyl and pyrrolidyl group, depending on whether the residue next in sequence was an alanine-type or a proline residue. A total of 126 potentials (63 symmetry-unrelated potentials for each set of terminally blocking groups) were determined. Together with the torsional, double-torsional, and side-chain-rotamer potentials for polypeptide chains containing d-amino-acid residues determined in our earlier work (Sieradzan et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. , 2012 , 8, 4746), the new virtual-bond-angle (θ) potentials now constitute the complete set of physics-based potentials with which to run coarse-grained simulations of systems containing d-amino-acid residues. The ability of the extended UNRES force field to reproduce thermodynamics of polypeptide systems with d-amino-acid residues was tested by comparing the experimentally measured and the calculated free energies of helix formation of model KLALKLALxxLKLALKLA peptides, where x denotes any d- or l- amino-acid residue. The obtained results demonstrate that the UNRES force field with the new potentials reproduce the changes of free energies of helix formation upon d

  1. Quantitative Velocity Field Measurements in Reduced-Gravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    1999-01-01

    Systems have been developed and demonstrated for performing quantitative velocity measurements in reduced gravity combustion science and fluid physics investigations. The unique constraints and operational environments inherent to reduced-gravity experimental facilities pose special challenges to the development of hardware and software systems. Both point and planar velocimetric capabilities are described, with particular attention being given to the development of systems to support the International Space Station laboratory. Emphasis has been placed on optical methods, primarily arising from the sensitivity of the phenomena of interest to intrusive probes. Limitations on available power, volume, data storage, and attendant expertise have motivated the use of solid-state sources and detectors, as well as efficient analysis capabilities emphasizing interactive data display and parameter control.

  2. Finite element modeling of ground deformation and gravity field at Mt. Etna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ganci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An elastic 3-D axi-symmetric model based on Finite Element Method (FEM is proposed to compute ground deformation and gravity changes caused by overpressure sources in volcanic areas. The numerical computations are focused on the modeling of a complex description of Mt Etna in order to evaluate the effect of topography, medium heterogeneities and source geometries. Both ground deformation and gravity changes are investigated by solving a coupled numerical problem considering a simplified ground surface profile and a multi-layered crustal structure inferred from seismic tomography. The role of the source geometry is also explored taking into account spherical and ellipsoidal volumetric sources. The comparison between numerical results and those predicted by analytical solutions disclosed significant discrepancies. These differences constrain the applicability of simple spherical source and homogeneous half-space hypotheses, which are usually implicitly assumed when analytical solutions are applied.

  3. Analogue Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Barceló

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Analogue gravity is a research programme which investigates analogues of general relativistic gravitational fields within other physical systems, typically but not exclusively condensed matter systems, with the aim of gaining new insights into their corresponding problems. Analogue models of (and for gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity.

  4. Numerical Simulation of the Field Velocities and Local Disturbances of a Long Gravity Wave Passing above an Immersed Vertical Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laouar Abdelhamid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is interested in the study of the passage of a long gravity wave above an immersed vertical barrier. The latter is placed at a right angle in the middle of the occupied fluid domain which is limited vertically by both a free surface and an impermeable horizontal bottom. We want to determine the field velocity and the local disturbances in the vicinity of the barrier. For this, we use the generalized theory of shallow water and complex variables method. For illustration, we consider a solitary wave as an emitted long wave.

  5. Correspondence between nonrelativistic anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theory, and aging-gravity duality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, Djordje; Pleimling, Michel

    2008-12-01

    We point out that the recent discussion of nonrelativistic anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theory correspondence has a direct application in nonequilibrium statistical physics, a fact which has not been emphasized in the recent literature on the subject. In particular, we propose a duality between aging in systems far from equilibrium characterized by the dynamical exponent z=2 and gravity in a specific background. The key ingredient in our proposal is the recent geometric realization of the Schrödinger group. We also discuss the relevance of the proposed correspondence for the more general aging phenomena in systems where the value of the dynamical exponent is different from 2.

  6. Proposal for field-based definition of soil bound pesticide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesten, J J T I

    2016-02-15

    The environmental significance of soil bound pesticide residues (SBPR) is potentially large because approximately one third of the applied mass of the pesticides in agriculture ends up as SBPR. At EU level, there is little regulatory guidance available on the environmental risk assessment of SBPR in spite of some 50 years of SBPR research. This lack of guidance is partially caused by the fact that the current definitions of SBPR are founded on non-extractability in soil in the laboratory whereas for the environmental risk assessment not the soil in the laboratory but the soil in the field is the system of interest. Therefore a definition of SBPR is proposed that is based on the field soil: a molecule (further called 'the mother molecule') is soil bound if a relevant part of this molecule has become part of the solid phase in the soil and if this relevant part will never be released again to the liquid phase in soil under relevant field conditions in the form of this mother molecule or in the form of another molecule that may possibly raise environmental or human toxicological concerns. This mother molecule may be the parent substance that is applied to the soil but it may also be a metabolite of this parent substance. A consequence of the definition is that the SBPR terminology becomes more precise because the mother molecule of the soil bound residue has to be specified. A further consequence is that very strong but reversible sorption of molecules such as paraquat is not considered soil-bound residue anymore (as may be demonstrated by a self-exchange extraction procedure). Furthermore, the definition requires that risk managers have to define what they consider as 'relevant field conditions' (e.g. include also changes of agricultural fields into forests?). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of crustal correction for calculation of lithospheric mantle density from gravity data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2016-01-01

    of the crust from the observed satellite gravity field data (GOCE Direct release 3). Thus calculated residual mantle gravity anomalies are caused mainly by a heterogeneous density distribution in the upper mantle. Given a relatively small range of expected compositional density variations in the lithospheric......We investigate how uncertainties in seismic and density structure of the crust propagate to uncertainties in mantle density structure. The analysis is based on interpretation of residual upper-mantle gravity anomalies which are calculated by subtracting (stripping) the gravitational effect...... mantle, knowledge on uncertainties associated with incomplete information on crustal structure is of utmost importance for progress in gravity modelling. Uncertainties in the residual upper-mantle gravity anomalies result chiefly from uncertainties in (i) seismic VP velocity-density conversion...

  8. Density heterogeneity of the North American upper mantle from satellite gravity and a regional crustal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2014-01-01

    and by introducing variations into the crustal structure which corresponds to the uncertainty of its resolution by highquality and low-quality seismic models. We examine the propagation of these uncertainties into determinations of lithospheric mantle density. Given a relatively small range of expected density......We present a regional model for the density structure of the North American upper mantle. The residual mantle gravity anomalies are based on gravity data derived from the GOCE geopotential models with crustal correction to the gravity field being calculated from a regional crustal model. We analyze...... how uncertainties and errors in the crustal model propagate from crustal densities to mantle residual gravity anomalies and the density model of the upper mantle. Uncertainties in the residual upper (lithospheric) mantle gravity anomalies result from several sources: (i) uncertainties in the velocity-density...

  9. On the variation of e/m ratio in the five-dimensional theory of gravity, electromagnetism and scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, Yu.S.; Kislov, V.V.

    1982-01-01

    Basic equations of the united five-dimensional theory of gravity, electromagnetism and scalar field are given. Discussed is one of the given theory consequences - dependence of electric charge ratio to the e/m test, particle mass on fundamental scalar field value in the specified point. The latter is determined by the solution of the Einstein, Maxwell and Klein-Fock equations system. In particular, this field varies in the Sun-Earth system for an observer bound to the Earth owing to orbit ellipticity of the Earth. The formula describing the e/m variation is given. Data on measuring Josephson frequency revealing the tendency of season dependence (Earth-Sun distances) which raises the problem of performing direct experiments for controlling e/m ratio stability are reproduced

  10. Dynamics, Residue and Risk Assessment of Nitenpyram in Rice and Paddy Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUAN Xue-xia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Residues dynamics, final residual levels and dietary intake risk of nitenpyram in rice and paddy field were investigated in three dif-ferent regions of China(Shandong, Henan and Anhui. A method was illustrated to detect nitenpyram residues in paddy, plant, brown rice, paddy water and soil. The residues in paddy and rice were extracted with methanol+phosphate buffer(0.2 mol·L-1, pH=7.0(60+40, adjust pH to 2.5, then cleaned up with solid phase extraction column and 0.22 μm filter membrane, and then analyzed by HPLC with an ul-traviolet detector at 260 nm. When spiked 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 mg·kg-1, the recoveries of nitenpyram in paddy plant and brown rice were 78.4%~94.7% and 84.0%~94.2%, respectively. The residues in paddy water and soil were extracted with phosphate buffer (0.2 mol·L-1, pH=7.0, when spiked 0.01, 0.5, 1.0 mg·kg-1, the recoveries of nitenpyram in paddy water and soil were 84.6%~98.0% and 93.7%~97.1%, respective-ly, which indicated this method match the requirement of the detection. Two years results showed that nitenpyram belongs to easily degraded pesticides, because all half-lives were below 1.4 d in rice plant, as well as below 4.2 d in paddy water. Final residual levels of nitenpyram in rice were all below 0.05 mg·kg-1,which was far below the Japanese maximum residue limit(0.5 mg·kg-1. The risk quotients (RQs were low for different populations in China, which indicated its low risk in rice. Therefore, the rice with nitenpyram applied, according to the recom-mend method, 45 g·hm-2 application once, with 21 days collection interval, was safe.

  11. Probing the earth's gravity field by means of satellite-to-satellite tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1977-01-01

    Two satellite-to-satellite tracking (sst) tests are described in detail: (1) the ATS-6/Geos-3 and (2) the ATS-6/Apollo-Soyuz experiment. The main purpose of these two experiments was to track via ATS-6 the Geos-3, as well as the Apollo-Soyuz and to use these tracking data to determine both of the orbits at the same time, each of the orbits alone, and to test the two sst links to study local gravity anomalies. A second purpose was to test communications, command and data transmission from the ground via ATS-6 to these spacecraft and back again to the ground.

  12. Solar System constraints on massless scalar-tensor gravity with positive coupling constant upon cosmological evolution of the scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-09-01

    Scalar-tensor theories of gravity modify general relativity by introducing a scalar field that couples nonminimally to the metric tensor, while satisfying the weak-equivalence principle. These theories are interesting because they have the potential to simultaneously suppress modifications to Einstein's theory on Solar System scales, while introducing large deviations in the strong field of neutron stars. Scalar-tensor theories can be classified through the choice of conformal factor, a scalar that regulates the coupling between matter and the metric in the Einstein frame. The class defined by a Gaussian conformal factor with a negative exponent has been studied the most because it leads to spontaneous scalarization (i.e. the sudden activation of the scalar field in neutron stars), which consequently leads to large deviations from general relativity in the strong field. This class, however, has recently been shown to be in conflict with Solar System observations when accounting for the cosmological evolution of the scalar field. We here study whether this remains the case when the exponent of the conformal factor is positive, as well as in another class of theories defined by a hyperbolic conformal factor. We find that in both of these scalar-tensor theories, Solar System tests are passed only in a very small subset of coupling parameter space, for a large set of initial conditions compatible with big bang nucleosynthesis. However, while we find that it is possible for neutron stars to scalarize, one must carefully select the coupling parameter to do so, and even then, the scalar charge is typically 2 orders of magnitude smaller than in the negative-exponent case. Our study suggests that future work on scalar-tensor gravity, for example in the context of tests of general relativity with gravitational waves from neutron star binaries, should be carried out within the positive coupling parameter class.

  13. Validation of gravity data from the geopotential field model for subsurface investigation of the Cameroon Volcanic Line (Western Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, Jean; Abate Essi, Jean Marcel; Nouck, Philippe Njandjock; Sanda, Oumarou; Manguelle-Dicoum, Eliézer

    2018-03-01

    Belonging to the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL), the western part of Cameroon is an active volcanic zone with volcanic eruptions and deadly gas emissions. The volcanic flows generally cover areas and bury structural features like faults. Terrestrial gravity surveys can hardly cover entirely this mountainous area due to difficult accessibility. The present work aims to evaluate gravity data derived from the geopotential field model, EGM2008 to investigate the subsurface of the CVL. The methodology involves upward continuation, horizontal gradient, maxima of horizontal gradient-upward continuation combination and Euler deconvolution techniques. The lineaments map inferred from this geopotential field model confirms several known lineaments and reveals new ones covered by lava flows. The known lineaments are interpreted as faults or geological contacts such as the Foumban fault and the Pan-African Belt-Congo craton contact. The lineaments highlighted coupled with the numerous maar lakes identified in this volcanic sector attest of the vulnerability of the CVL where special attention should be given for geohazard prevention.

  14. Forward modelling of global gravity fields with 3D density structures and an application to the high-resolution ( 2 km) gravity fields of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šprlák, M.; Han, S.-C.; Featherstone, W. E.

    2017-12-01

    Rigorous modelling of the spherical gravitational potential spectra from the volumetric density and geometry of an attracting body is discussed. Firstly, we derive mathematical formulas for the spatial analysis of spherical harmonic coefficients. Secondly, we present a numerically efficient algorithm for rigorous forward modelling. We consider the finite-amplitude topographic modelling methods as special cases, with additional postulates on the volumetric density and geometry. Thirdly, we implement our algorithm in the form of computer programs and test their correctness with respect to the finite-amplitude topography routines. For this purpose, synthetic and realistic numerical experiments, applied to the gravitational field and geometry of the Moon, are performed. We also investigate the optimal choice of input parameters for the finite-amplitude modelling methods. Fourth, we exploit the rigorous forward modelling for the determination of the spherical gravitational potential spectra inferred by lunar crustal models with uniform, laterally variable, radially variable, and spatially (3D) variable bulk density. Also, we analyse these four different crustal models in terms of their spectral characteristics and band-limited radial gravitation. We demonstrate applicability of the rigorous forward modelling using currently available computational resources up to degree and order 2519 of the spherical harmonic expansion, which corresponds to a resolution of 2.2 km on the surface of the Moon. Computer codes, a user manual and scripts developed for the purposes of this study are publicly available to potential users.

  15. The Gravity of Dark Vortices: Effective Field Theory for Branes and Strings Carrying Localized Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; Williams, M

    2015-01-01

    A Nielsen-Olesen vortex usually sits in an environment that expels the flux that is confined to the vortex, so flux is not present both inside and outside. We construct vortices for which this is not true, where the flux carried by the vortex also permeates the `bulk' far from the vortex. The idea is to mix the vortex's internal gauge flux with an external flux using off-diagonal kinetic mixing. Such `dark' vortices could play a phenomenological role in models with both cosmic strings and a dark gauge sector. When coupled to gravity they also provide explicit ultra-violet completions for codimension-two brane-localized flux, which arises in extra-dimensional models when the same flux that stabilizes extra-dimensional size is also localized on space-filling branes situated around the extra dimensions. We derive simple formulae for observables such as defect angle, tension, localized flux and on-vortex curvature when coupled to gravity, and show how all of these are insensitive to much of the microscopic detail...

  16. Droplet evaporation on a horizontal substrate under gravity field by mesoscopic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chiyu; Zhang, Jianying; Bertola, Volfango; Wang, Moran

    2016-02-01

    The evaporation of water drop deposited on a horizontal substrate is investigated using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for multiphase flows with a large-density ratio. To account for the variation of evaporation flux distribution along the drop interface, a novel evaporation scheme is introduced into the LBM framework, and validated by comparison with experimental data. We aim at discovering the effect of gravity on the evaporating drop in detail, and various evaporation conditions are considered as well as different wetting properties of the substrates. An effective diameter is introduced as an indicator of the critical drop size under which gravity is negligible. Our results show that such critical diameter is much smaller than the capillary length, which has been widely accepted as the critical size in previous and current works. The critical diameter is found to be almost independent of the evaporation conditions and the surface wettability. A correlation between this critical diameter and the capillary length is also proposed for easy use in applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Field experiment for investigation of very shallow basement structure by micro-gravity survey; Microgravity tansa no gokusenbu kiban chosa eno tekiyo jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshita, K.; Nozaki, K. [OYO Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    This paper illustrates the field experiment results in which micro-gravity survey was applied to investigation of very shallow basement structure between a few m and 10 m. Its applicability was discussed. In principle, the micro-gravity survey was conducted at the measuring points in a grid with 20 m pitch. Measuring points of 174 were used. The gravity system used for the measurements is an automatic gravimeter CG-3M made by the Scintrex. Survey results of P-wave reflection method conducted at the site using a vibrator focus were used as control data of micro-gravity survey. Consequently, change in the thickness of surface layer (earth filling) shallower than the depth of -10 m could be grasped as a plane. It was found that the micro-gravity survey is a useful method for the investigation of very shallow basement structure. Survey results by the reflection method could contribute to the determination of trend face at filtration and construction of density model as well as the geologic interpretation of gravity anomaly. As a result, reliability of micro-gravity survey and reflection method could be enhanced, mutually. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  18. The evaluation of a new technology for gunshot residue (GSR) analysis in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondrogiannis, Ellen; Andersen, Danielle; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2013-05-01

    There continues to be a need for improved technology to be used in theater to quickly and accurately identify the person who shot any weapon during a terrorist attack as well as to link a suspect to the actual weapon fired during a crime. Beyond this, in areas of conflict it would be desirable to have the capability to establish the source country for weaponry and ammunition. Gunshot residue (GSR) analysis is a reasonably well-studied technology area. Recent scientific publications have reported that the residues have a rich composition of both organic and inorganic compounds. For the purposes of identifying the manufacturer or country of origin for the ammunition, the inorganic components of GSR appear to be especially promising since their presence in the propellant and primer formulations are either specific to a given chemical formula, or they represent impurities in the manufacturing process that can be unique to a manufacturer or the source country for the chemicals used for propellants and primers. The Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technology has already demonstrated considerable capability for elemental fingerprinting, especially for inorganic/metallic components. A number of reports have demonstrated LIBS capability in forensics for matching materials such as inks, fabrics, paper, glass, and paint. This work describes the encouraging results of an initial study to assess a new commercial field-portable (battery operated) LIBS system for GSR analysis with gunshot residues having been collected from inside cartridge casings from 3 different ammunition manufacturers.

  19. Residues and Analysis of Degradation of Novel Fungicide Picoxystrobin in Cucumber and Soil Under Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The analytical method for the residues of picoxystrobin in cucumber vegetable and soil matrices was developed and the dissipation of picoxystrobin under field conditions was studied. The limit of detection(LODof picoxystrobin was 3.5×10 -11 g and the limit of quantifica-tion(LOQwas found to be 0.005 mg·kg -1 in cucumber and soil. At three different spiking levels(0.005, 0.05, 0.25 mg·kg -1, mean recoveries and relative standard deviation(RSDfrom fortified samples in five replicated experiments for each matrix were in the range of 68.61%-122.4% and 1.06%-17.2%, respectively. The results showed that the half-lives of picoxystrobin in cucumber and soil from Tianjin City were 5.71 d and 12.9 d, respectively, the half-lives of picoxystrobin in cucumber and soil from Shandong Province were 2.70 d and 10.3 d, respec-tively, and the half-lives of picoxystrobin in cucumber and soil from Jiangsu Province were 9.76 d and 14.9 d, respectively. The maximum residual concentration of picoxystrobin on the 5th day after the last application was 0.014 mg· kg -1, much lower than the Maximum Residue Limits(MRLsfor picoxystrobin in cucumber according to the standards of EU(0.05 mg·kg-1.

  20. The Gravity Field of Saturn and the Mass of the Saturnian Rings at the end of the Cassini Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert A.; Brozovic, Marina; Roth, Duane C.

    2016-05-01

    Following its flyby of Titan on 2016 November 29, Cassini will begin a set 20 high inclination orbits, known as the F-ring orbits, that pass over the ring plane and have periapses near the F-ring. The final Titan flyby on 2017 April 22 will redirect the spacecraft into the proximal orbits, a series 22 orbits with periapses between the innermost D-ring and the upper layer of Saturn’s atmosphere. The proximal orbits will be strongly perturbed the gravitational field of Saturn and slightly perturbed by the gravity of rings. The ring gravity will also affect the F-ring orbits. This paper presents the results of an analysis of simulated radiometric data acquired during the final 42 Cassini orbits. We investigate the sensitivity of the data to the ring mass and gravitational harmonics of the planet. We limit the simulated data quantity to the DSN coverage currently being requested by the Cassini Project augumented by several critical passes expected to be obtained from ESA southern hemisphere stations. We assume a data accuracy consistent with projected effects of solar plasma. In the dynamical model of the spacecraft motion we account for non-gravitational accelerations caused by the planned momentum management to be performed with Reaction Wheel Assembly and thrusters, by the Radioisotope Thermo-electric Generator, and by solar radiation pressure. We use a weighted-least squares procedure to obtain estimates of spacecraft’s state, masses of the rings, the gravity harmonics, and the non-gravitational accelerations. We find that the final orbits of the Cassini mission should yield high accuracy estimates of the gravitational harmonics through J12 and statistically meaningful estimates of the A- and B-ring masses.The research described in this paper was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Adminstration.

  1. The DYNAMO Orbiter Project: High Resolution Mapping of Gravity/Magnetic Fields and In Situ Investigation of Mars Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, S.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Reme, H.; Mazelle, C.; Blelly, P. -L.; Acuna, M.; Connerney, J.; Purucker, M.; Lin, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamo is a small Mars orbiter planned to be launched in 2005 or 2007, in the frame of the NASA/CNES Mars exploration program. It is aimed at improving gravity and magnetic field resolution, in order to better understand the magnetic, geologic and thermal history of Mars, and at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained. These objectives are achieved by using a low periapsis orbit, similar to the one used by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft during its aerobraking phases. The proposed periapsis altitude for Dynamo of 120-130 km, coupled with the global distribution of periapses to be obtained during one Martian year of operation, through about 5000 low passes, will produce a magnetic/gravity field data set with approximately five times the spatial resolution of MGS. Low periapsis provides a unique opportunity to investigate the chemical and dynamical properties of the deep ionosphere, thermosphere, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the solar wind, therefore atmospheric escape, which may have played a crucial role in removing atmosphere, and water, from the planet. There is much room for debate on the importance of current atmosphere escape processes in the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, as early "exotic" processes including hydrodynamic escape and impact erosion are traditionally invoked to explain the apparent sparse inventory of present-day volatiles. Yet, the combination of low surface gravity and the absence of a substantial internally generated magnetic field have undeniable effects on what we observe today. In addition to the current losses in the forms of Jeans and photochemical escape of neutrals, there are solar wind interaction-related erosion mechanisms because the upper atmosphere is directly exposed to the solar wind. The solar wind related loss rates, while now comparable to those of a modest comet, nonetheless occur continuously, with the intriguing possibility of important cumulative and

  2. Combined effect of electric field and residual stress on propagation of indentation cracks in a PZT-5H ferroelectric ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.Y.; Chu, W.Y.; Su, Y.J.; Qiao, L.J.; Gao, K.W.

    2005-01-01

    The combined effect of electric field and residual stress on propagation of unloaded indentation cracks in a PZT-5 ceramic has been studied. The results show that residual stress itself is too small to induce delayed propagation of the indentation cracks in silicon oil. If applied constant electric field is larger than 0.2 kV/cm, the combined effect of electric field and residual stress can cause delayed propagation of the indentation crack after passing an incubation time in silicon oil, but the crack will arrest after propagating for 10-30 μm because of decrease of the resultant stress intensity factor induced by the field and residual stress with increasing the crack length. The threshold electric field for delayed propagation of the indentation crack in silicon oil is E DP = 0.2 kV/cm. If the applied electric field is larger than 5.25 kV/cm, combined effect of the electric field and residual stress can cause instant propagation of the indentation crack, and under sustained electric field, the crack which has propagated instantly can propagate continuously, until arrest at last. The critical electric field for instant propagation of the indentation crack is E P = 5.25 kV/cm. If the applied electric field is larger than 12.6 kV/cm, the microcracks induced by the electric field initiate everywhere, grow and connect in a smooth specimen, resulting in delayed failure, even without residual stress. The threshold electric field for delayed failure of a smooth specimen in silicon oil is E DF = 12.6 kV/cm and the critical electric field for instant failure is E F = 19.1 kV/cm

  3. Revealing infinite derivative gravity's true potential: The weak-field limit around de Sitter backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edholm, James

    2018-03-01

    General Relativity is known to produce singularities in the potential generated by a point source. Our universe can be modeled as a de Sitter (dS) metric and we show that ghost-free infinite derivative gravity (IDG) produces a nonsingular potential around a dS background, while returning to the GR prediction at large distances. We also show that although there are an apparently infinite number of coefficients in the theory, only a finite number actually affect the predictions. By writing the linearized equations of motion in a simplified form, we find that at distances below the Hubble length scale, the difference between the IDG potential around a flat background and around a de Sitter background is negligible.

  4. Probing the earth's gravity field using Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1976-01-01

    Satellite-to-Satellite (SST) tests, namely: (a) the ATS-6/GEOS-3 and (b) the ATS-6/Apollo-Soyuz experiment and some of the results obtained are described. The main purpose of these two experiments was first to track via ATS-6 the GEOS-3 as well as the Apollo-Soyuz and to use these tracking data to determine (a) both orbits, that is, ATS-6, GEOS-3 and/or the Apollo-Soyuz orbits at the same time; (b) each of these orbits alone; and (c) test the ATS-6/GEOS-3 and/or Apollo-Soyuz SST link to study local gravity anomalies; and, second, to test communications, command, and data transmission from the ground via ATS-6 to these spacecraft and back again to the ground. The Apollo-Soyuz Geodynamics Experiment is discussed in some detail.

  5. Mapping residual stress fields from Vickers hardness indents using Raman microprobe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to map the residual stress fields in the vicinity of Vickers hardness indents. Both 514.5 and 488.0 nm, light is used to excite the effect and the resulting shifted and broadened Raman peaks are analyzed using computer deconvolution. Half-wave plates are used to vary the orientation of the incident later light`s polarization state with respect to crystal orientation. The Raman scattered light is then analyzed for polarization dependences which are indicative of the various components of the Raman scattering tensor. Such studies can yield valuable information about the orientation of stress components in a well known stress field. The results can then be applied to the determination of stress components in machined semiconductor materials.

  6. Assessment of Gravity Field and Steady State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) geoid model using GPS levelling over Sabah and Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, A. H.; Omar, K. M.; Din, A. H. M.; Som, Z. A. M.; Yahaya, N. A. Z.; Pa'suya, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    The GOCE satellite mission has significantly contributed to various applications such as solid earth physics, oceanography and geodesy. Some substantial applications of geodesy are to improve the gravity field knowledge and the precise geoid modelling towards realising global height unification. This paper aims to evaluate GOCE geoid model based on the recent GOCE Global Geopotential Model (GGM), as well as EGM2008, using GPS levelling data over East Malaysia, i.e. Sabah and Sarawak. The satellite GGMs selected in this study are the GOCE GGM models which include GOCE04S, TIM_R5 and SPW_R4, and the EGM2008 model. To assess these models, the geoid heights from these GGMs are compared to the local geometric geoid height. The GGM geoid heights was derived using EGMLAB1 software and the geometric geoid height was computed by available GPS levelling information obtained from the Department Survey and Mapping Malaysia. Generally, the GOCE models performed better than EGM2008 over East Malaysia and the best fit GOCE model for this region is the TIM_R5 model. The TIM_R5 GOCE model demonstrated the lowest R.M.S. of ± 16.5 cm over Sarawak, comparatively. For further improvement, this model should be combined with the local gravity data for optimum geoid modelling over East Malaysia.

  7. Temporal variation of gravity field prior to the Ludian Ms6.5 and Kangding Ms6.3 earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Hongtao; Wei, Jin; Hu, Minzhang; Liu, Ziwei; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Using mobile gravity data from the central area of Sichuan and Yunnan Provinces, the relationship between gravity variation and earthquakes was studied based on the Ludian Ms6.5 earthquake that occurred on August 3rd, 2014, and the Kangding Ms6.3 earthquake that occurred on November 22nd, 2014; the mechanism of gravity variation was also explored. The results are as follows: (1) Prior to both earthquakes, gravity variation exhibited similar characteristics as those observed before both the Ta...

  8. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarev, I.; Babcock, E.; Beck, D.; Burghoff, M.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Chupp, T.; Degenkolb, S.; Fan, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Frei, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Kuchler, F.; Lauer, T.; Link, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Schläpfer, U.; Schnabel, A.; Sharma, S.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Trahms, L.; Voigt, J.; Zechlau, T.

    2014-07-01

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

  9. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altarev, I.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Kuchler, F.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B. [Physikdepartment, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Babcock, E. [Jülich Center for Neutron Science, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Beck, D.; Sharma, S. [Physics Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Burghoff, M.; Fan, I. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2014-07-15

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

  10. Estimated residual Magnetic Field acting on the Circulating Beam in the LHC Septum Magnets MSI and MSD - Shielding Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Gyr, Marcel

    2000-01-01

    Computation of the residual field inside the shielded vacuum chambers of the circulating beams that pass through the septum holes of the MSI and MSD magnets is very impractical because of the disproportionate effort involved in obtaining meaningful results. Therefore, a short model has been built to measure the order of magnitude of the residual field inside the LHC vacuum chambers. It is found, that a 0.9 mm thick µ-metal (or Permalloy$^{TM}$) shielding is sufficient to reduce the field, which is experienced by the circulating beam, below the level of the earth's field.

  11. 2.5-min Isostatic Gravity Grid for the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2.5-min isostatic gravity data set was produced by regridding the 4-km residual isostatic gravity grid of the U.S. The isostatic residual gravity grid was...

  12. Earth's Largest Terrestrial Landslide (The Markagunt Gravity Slide of Southwest Utah): Insights from the Catastrophic Collapse of a Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, D. B.; Biek, R. F.; Rowley, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The newly discovered Miocene Markagunt gravity slide (MGS; Utah, USA) represents the largest volcanic landslide structure on Earth. Recent geologic mapping of the MGS indicates that it was a large contiguous volcanic sheet of allochthonous andesitic mudflow breccias and lava flows, volcaniclastic rocks, and intertonguing regional ash-flow tuffs that blanketed an area of at least 5000 km2 with an estimated volume of ~3000 km3. From its breakaway zone in the Tushar and Mineral Mountains to its southern limits, the MGS is over 95 km long and at least 65 km wide. The MGS consists of four distinct structural segments: 1) a high-angle breakaway segment, 2) a bedding-plane segment, ~60 km long and ~65 km wide, typically located within the volcaniclastic Eocene-Oligocene Brian Head Formation, 3) a ramp segment ~1-2 km wide where the slide cuts upsection, and 4) a former land surface segment where the upper-plate moved at least 35 km over the Miocene landscape. The presence of basal and lateral cataclastic breccias, clastic dikes, jigsaw puzzle fracturing, internal shears, pseudotachylytes, and the overall geometry of the MGS show that it represents a single catastrophic emplacement event. The MGS represents gravitationally induced collapse of the southwest sector of the Oligocene to Miocene Marysvale volcanic field. We suggest that continuous growth of the Marysvale volcanic field, loading more volcanic rocks on a structurally weak Brian Head basement, created conditions necessary for gravity sliding. In addition, inflation of the volcanic pile due to multiple magmatic intrusions tilted the strata gently southward, inducing lateral spreading of the sub-volcanic rocks prior to failure. Although similar smaller-scale failures have been recognized from individual volcanoes, the MGS represents a new class of low frequency but high impact hazards associated with catastrophic sector collapse of large volcanic fields containing multiple volcanoes. The relationship of the MGS to

  13. On the Trail of Missing Heat: Forward Gravity Modeling of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, B. N.; Morgan, P.

    2003-12-01

    The San Francisco volcanic field is a Quaternary field in northern Arizona, the age and size of which suggests there is a high possibility for an associated exploitable high temperature geothermal resource. Sunset Crater, the youngest dated feature in the field, erupted less than 1000 years ago. The youngest felsic volcanism in the area, located near Strawberry Crater, has been dated at about 51,000 years b.p. Felsic magmas are viscous, and therefore felsic magmatism is generally associated with upper crustal plutons, whereas mafic magmas commonly form surface flows. Heat from felsic magmatism tends to remain near subsurface ponds of the magma. Felsic magmatic systems can sustain substantial geothermal heat for tens to hundreds of thousands of years after emplacement. Knowledge of the quantity and distribution of felsic magmatism is therefore paramount to understanding the geothermal potential of the field. Surface heat flow in the study area ranges from ˜20 to ˜50 mW/m2, anomalously low for the region. Hydrological characteristics of the San Francisco volcanic field are thought to mask increased surface heat flow from the magmatic system. The deep water table (>300m) and a 2-level hydraulic system prevent characteristic surface manifestations of hydrothermal potential, such as hot springs and elevated surface heat flow. Lack of these thermal features at the surface precludes analysis of the resource based solely on surficial mapping and measurements. Forward modeling of the gravity field of a 50 km x 45 km area covering the eastern San Francisco volcanic field has been completed. Results suggest that a large felsic body ( ˜-0.15 g/cc contrast) trends northeastward under the Sugarloaf Mountain-O'Leary Peak-Strawberry Crater magmatic trend. This trend parallels a regional basement fabric, likely of early- to middle-Proterozoic origin. These results are being correlated with new surface geologic mapping and radiometric dating of young felsic volcanic rocks to

  14. Restricted three-body problem in effective-field-theory models of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Esposito, Giampiero

    2014-04-01

    One of the outstanding problems of classical celestial mechanics was the restricted three-body problem, in which a planetoid of small mass is subject to the Newtonian attraction of two celestial bodies of large mass, as it occurs, for example, in the Sun-Earth-Moon system. On the other hand, over the last decades, a systematic investigation of quantum corrections to the Newtonian potential has been carried out in the literature on quantum gravity. The present paper studies the effect of these tiny quantum corrections on the evaluation of equilibrium points. It is shown that, despite the extreme smallness of the corrections, there exists no choice of sign of these corrections for which all qualitative features of the restricted three-body problem in Newtonian theory remain unaffected. Moreover, first-order stability of equilibrium points is characterized by solving a pair of algebraic equations of fifth degree, where some coefficients depend on the Planck length. The coordinates of stable equilibrium points are slightly changed with respect to Newtonian theory, because the planetoid is no longer at equal distance from the two bodies of large mass. The effect is conceptually interesting but too small to be observed, at least for the restricted three-body problems available in the solar system.

  15. On the spatial pattern of semi-annual signals present in GRACE gravity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, M.; Mueller, J.

    2009-04-01

    GRACE monthly solutions clearly show mass changes and mass redistribution within the earth. Such variability is due to some known and unknown geophysical and geodynamical processes interacting in the earth system. One way to distinguish between these different sources is to analyze the compound gravity signals in the spectral domain to separate phenomena with different temporal resolutions. Since the launch of GRACE satellites, more than seventy monthly solutions have been released by different processing centers. As the time span of the available data increases, the possibility of significantly detecting signals with extended temporal wavelength will increase, too. In this work, a spectral analysis is performed to the GRACE geoids over the globe and the spatial patterns of some relevant periodicities are shown as well as regions with secular changes. Besides some well known temporal variations like secular changes and annual cycles, our study explicitly shows the existence of semi-annual signals with considerable amplitudes in Nepal and northern India as well as in the Polar Regions. The significance of the signals is discussed and probable explanation will be given as well.

  16. Gravity data processing and research in potential evaluation of uranium resource in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hu; Zhao Dan; Ke Dan; Li Bihong; Han Shaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Through data processing, anomaly extraction, geologic structure deduction from gravity in 39 uranium metallogenic zones and 29 prediction areas, the predicting factors such as tectonic units, faults, scope and depth of rocks, scope of basins and strata structure were provided for the evaluation of uranium resources potential. Gravity field features of uranium metallogenic environment were summarized for hydrothermal type uranium deposits (granite, volcanic and carbonate-siliceous-argillaceous type) as regional gravity transition from high to the low field or the region near the low field, and the key metallogenic factors as granite rocks and volcanic basins in the low gravity field. It was found that Large-scale sandstone type uranium mineralization basins are located in the high regional gravity field, provenance areas are in the low field, and the edge and inner uplift areas usually located in the high field of the residual gravity. Faults related to different type uranium mineralization occur as the gradient zones, boundaries, a string of bead anomalies and striped gravity anomalies in the gravity field. (authors)

  17. Kinetics of diuron under aerobic condition and residue analysis in sugarcane under subtropical field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Shishir; Pant, Ravi

    2017-10-10

    The phenylureas group includes persistent herbicides which are major pollutants to soil and water. Dissipation kinetics of diuron in different soils under sugarcane field conditions was investigated. Diuron was extracted with acetone and florisil solid phase extraction clean-up and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography-UV. Diuron persisted for more than 100 days and dissipation followed monophasic first-order kinetics. Persistence was more in sandy loam compared to silty clay loam soil. Half-life of diuron in silty clay loam soil was 22.57 and 32.37 days and in sandy loam was 28.35 and 43.93 days at 2 and 4 kg ha-1applications, respectively. Average recovery in soil, bagasse, leaf-straw and juice ranged from 75.95% to 84.20%, 80.15% to 89.35%, 77.46% to 86.19% and 81.88% to 92.68%, respectively. The quantitation limits for soil, bagasse, leaf-straw and juice were 0.01, 0.03, 0.04 μg g -1 and 0.008 μg mL -1 , respectively. Application of diuron inhibited growth of soil microbes initially but they recovered later. At harvest, diuron residues were below maximum residue limits in all samples. The study revealed that under subtropical conditions, diuron is safe for use in weed management and would not pose any residual/environmental problem and that sugarcane crop could be used safe for human/animal consumption.

  18. Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

  19. Effective gravitational field equations on m-brane embedded in n-dimensional bulk of Einstein and f(R) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta, E-mail: sumanta@iucaa.in [IUCAA, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, 411 007, Pune (India); SenGupta, Soumitra, E-mail: tpssg@iacs.res.in [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 700032, Kolkata (India)

    2015-11-18

    We have derived effective gravitational field equations on a lower dimensional hypersurface (known as a brane), placed in a higher dimensional bulk spacetime for both Einstein and f(R) gravity theories. We have started our analysis on the n-dimensional bulk from which the effective field equations on a (n-1)-dimensional brane have been obtained by imposing Z{sub 2} symmetry. Subsequently, we have arrived at the effective equations in (n-2) dimensions starting from the effective equations for (n-1)-dimensional brane. This analysis has been carried out and is used to obtain the effective field equations for an (n-m)-dimensional brane, embedded in a n-dimensional bulk. Having obtained the effective field equations in Einstein gravity, we have subsequently generalized the effective field equation for an (n-m)-dimensional brane which is embedded in the n-dimensional bulk spacetime endowed with f(R) gravity. We have also presented applications of our results in the context of Einstein and f(R) gravity. In both cases we have discussed static spherically symmetric vacuum solutions as well as solutions in a cosmological context. Implications are also discussed.

  20. Availability of nitrogen in 15N-labelled mature pea residues to subsequent crops in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The availability of N in N-15-labelled mature pea (Pisum sativum L.) residues to subsequent autumn-sown or spring-sown crops was studied in two experiments in field microplots. The residues were incorporated in the soil in August or September. Winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and winter oilseed...... incorporation of the residues. At maturity, the pea residue N constituted soil did not significantly influence the amount of non-labelled soil (+ fertilizer) N accumulated by crops. The recovery of pea residue N in successive autumn-sown crops of barley......, oilseed rape and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was 14, 3 and 2% respectively; spring-sown barley, oilseed rape and wheat recovered only 6, 2 and 2% respectively. Similarly, the amount of non-labelled soil N accumulated was almost twice as high in autumn-sown crops as compared to spring-sown crops...

  1. Effects of a strong magnetic field on internal gravity waves: trapping, phase mixing, reflection and dynamical chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Papaloizou, John C. B.

    2018-04-01

    The spectrum of oscillation modes of a star provides information not only about its material properties (e.g. mean density), but also its symmetries. Spherical symmetry can be broken by rotation and/or magnetic fields. It has been postulated that strong magnetic fields in the cores of some red giants are responsible for their anomalously weak dipole mode amplitudes (the "dipole dichotomy" problem), but a detailed understanding of how gravity waves interact with strong fields is thus far lacking. In this work, we attack the problem through a variety of analytical and numerical techniques, applied to a localised region centred on a null line of a confined axisymmetric magnetic field which is approximated as being cylindrically symmetric. We uncover a rich variety of phenomena that manifest when the field strength exceeds a critical value, beyond which the symmetry is drastically broken by the Lorentz force. When this threshold is reached, the spatial structure of the g-modes becomes heavily altered. The dynamics of wave packet propagation transitions from regular to chaotic, which is expected to fundamentally change the organisation of the mode spectrum. In addition, depending on their frequency and the orientation of field lines with respect to the stratification, waves impinging on different parts of the magnetised region are found to undergo either reflection or trapping. Trapping regions provide an avenue for energy loss through Alfvén wave phase mixing. Our results may find application in various astrophysical contexts, including the dipole dichotomy problem, the solar interior, and compact star oscillations.

  2. Material processing of convection-driven flow field and temperature distribution under oblique gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    A set of mathematical formulation is adopted to study vapor deposition from source materials driven by heat transfer process under normal and oblique directions of gravitational acceleration with extremely low pressure environment of 10(exp -2) mm Hg. A series of time animation of the initiation and development of flow and temperature profiles during the course of vapor deposition has been obtained through the numerical computation. Computations show that the process of vapor deposition has been accomplished by the transfer of vapor through a fairly complicated flow pattern of recirculation under normal direction gravitational acceleration. It is obvious that there is no way to produce a homogeneous thin crystalline films with fine grains under such a complicated flow pattern of recirculation with a non-uniform temperature distribution under normal direction gravitational acceleration. There is no vapor deposition due to a stably stratified medium without convection for reverse normal direction gravitational acceleration. Vapor deposition under oblique direction gravitational acceleration introduces a reduced gravitational acceleration in vertical direction which is favorable to produce a homogeneous thin crystalline films. However, oblique direction gravitational acceleration also induces an unfavorable gravitational acceleration along horizontal direction which is responsible to initiate a complicated flow pattern of recirculation. In other words, it is necessary to carry out vapor deposition under a reduced gravity in the future space shuttle experiments with extremely low pressure environment to process vapor deposition with a homogeneous crystalline films with fine grains. Fluid mechanics simulation can be used as a tool to suggest most optimistic way of experiment with best setup to achieve the goal of processing best nonlinear optical materials.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Gravity Data Used for Hydrological Model Calibration: Field Study of a Recharge Event in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, L.; Binning, P. J.; Andersen, O. B.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrological models are traditionally calibrated using point data from e.g. piezometers, discharge stations and infiltrometers, which characterize water levels and water flows in the modeled system. Changes in total water storage in the ground is often not well constrained by this type of data because it depends on the drainable porosity (specific yield) of the aquifer. Time-lapse micro-gravimetry can detect changes in water mass (volume) in the ground and can thus help constrain the mass balance in a groundwater model, potentially leading to better estimates of e.g. specific yield and hydraulic river bed conductance. Field test have so far been limited, but with the emergence of better gravimeters over the past years, the interest in hydro-gravimetry is growing. The Okavango Delta, Botswana, has an annual flood cycle resulting in large (two meters or more) variations in groundwater table along the peripheral rivers of the wetland. Combined with a generally sandy soil, this provides good conditions for field tests of hydro-gravimetry. During the flooding of a previously dry river bed in July - August 2008, shallow groundwater wells along two transects were monitored and relative micro-gravity data collected with at temporal and spatial distribution using a Scintrex CG-5 relative gravimeter. Changes in gravity of up to 30μGal were observed with uncertainties down to 4μGal. The traditional approach of considering the groundwater as a horizontal slab fails to give consistent values for specific yield. A MODFLOW groundwater model for the site is build and calibrated, using both water level and gravity data. To facilitate this, a forward gravity code has been developed in the HYDROGRAV research group which calculates the gravity response from a modeled change in groundwater level. We see that the inclusion of gravity data significantly decreases parameter uncertainty. Moreover, we assess to what extent gravity data can substitute the more expensive drilling of

  4. European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management - a new Horizon2020 project to serve the international community and improve the accessibility to gravity field products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, Adrian; Weigelt, Matthias; Flechtner, Frank; Guentner, Andreas; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Martinis, Sandro; Bruinsma, Sean; Flury, Jakob; Bourgogne, Stephane

    2015-04-01

    A proposal for a European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management (EGSIEM) has been submitted in response to the Earth Observation Call EO-1-2014 of the Horizon 2020 Framework Programme. EGSIEM shall demonstrate that observations of the redistribution of water and ice mass derived from the current GRACE mission, the future GRACE-FO mission, and additional data provide critical and complementary information to more traditional Earth Observation products and open the door for innovative approaches to flood and drought monitoring and forecasting. The EGSIEM project has recently started in January 2015. We present the three key objectives that EGSIEM shall address: 1) to establish a scientific combination service to deliver the best gravity products for applications in Earth and environmental science research based on the unified knowledge of the European GRACE community, 2) to establish a near real-time and regional service to reduce the latency and increase the temporal resolution of the mass redistribution products, and 3) to establish a hydrological and early warning service to develop gravity-based indicators for extreme hydrological events and to demonstrate their value for flood and drought forecasting and monitoring services. All of these services shall be tailored to the various needs of the respective communities. Significant efforts shall be devoted to transform the service products into user-friendly and easy-to-interpret data sets and the development of visualization tools.

  5. Development of a field testing protocol for identifying Deepwater Horizon oil spill residues trapped near Gulf of Mexico beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuling

    2018-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident, one of the largest oil spills in U.S. history, contaminated several beaches located along the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) shoreline. The residues from the spill still continue to be deposited on some of these beaches. Methods to track and monitor the fate of these residues require approaches that can differentiate the DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues. This is because, historically, the crude oil released from sources such as natural seeps and anthropogenic discharges have also deposited other types of petroleum residues on GOM beaches. Therefore, identifying the origin of these residues is critical for developing effective management strategies for monitoring the long-term environmental impacts of the DWH oil spill. Advanced fingerprinting methods that are currently used for identifying the source of oil spill residues require detailed laboratory studies, which can be cost-prohibitive. Also, most agencies typically use untrained workers or volunteers to conduct shoreline monitoring surveys and these worker will not have access to advanced laboratory facilities. Furthermore, it is impractical to routinely fingerprint large volumes of samples that are collected after a major oil spill event, such as the DWH spill. In this study, we propose a simple field testing protocol that can identify DWH oil spill residues based on their unique physical characteristics. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by testing a variety of oil spill samples, and the results are verified by characterizing the samples using advanced chemical fingerprinting methods. The verification data show that the method yields results that are consistent with the results derived from advanced fingerprinting methods. The proposed protocol is a reliable, cost-effective, practical field approach for differentiating DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues. PMID:29329313

  6. Development of a field testing protocol for identifying Deepwater Horizon oil spill residues trapped near Gulf of Mexico beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuling; Clement, T Prabhakar

    2018-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident, one of the largest oil spills in U.S. history, contaminated several beaches located along the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) shoreline. The residues from the spill still continue to be deposited on some of these beaches. Methods to track and monitor the fate of these residues require approaches that can differentiate the DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues. This is because, historically, the crude oil released from sources such as natural seeps and anthropogenic discharges have also deposited other types of petroleum residues on GOM beaches. Therefore, identifying the origin of these residues is critical for developing effective management strategies for monitoring the long-term environmental impacts of the DWH oil spill. Advanced fingerprinting methods that are currently used for identifying the source of oil spill residues require detailed laboratory studies, which can be cost-prohibitive. Also, most agencies typically use untrained workers or volunteers to conduct shoreline monitoring surveys and these worker will not have access to advanced laboratory facilities. Furthermore, it is impractical to routinely fingerprint large volumes of samples that are collected after a major oil spill event, such as the DWH spill. In this study, we propose a simple field testing protocol that can identify DWH oil spill residues based on their unique physical characteristics. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by testing a variety of oil spill samples, and the results are verified by characterizing the samples using advanced chemical fingerprinting methods. The verification data show that the method yields results that are consistent with the results derived from advanced fingerprinting methods. The proposed protocol is a reliable, cost-effective, practical field approach for differentiating DWH residues from other types of petroleum residues.

  7. Integrated PEMFC Flow Field Design Concept for Gravity Independent Passive Water Removal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ElectroChem proposes a Phase II program to advance its very successful SBIR Phase I PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) program. In Phase I, the unique integrated-flow-field...

  8. Dissipation and residue of clothianidin in granules and pesticide fertilizers used in cabbage and soil under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P W; Wang, S Y; Huang, C L; Fu, J T; Huang, R L; Li, Z H; Zhang, Z X

    2018-01-01

    The single application of 0.5 % clothianidin granules, a novel formulation, was used to control pests in vegetables under a high dose. In this article, residues of clothianidin in cabbage and soil samples under field conditions from Guangzhou, Nanning, and Qianjiang were determined by HPLC. The terminal residues of clothianidin in cabbage were less than the limit of detection (clothianidin residual, clothianidin granules and fertilizers of chicken manure, urea, and organic fertilizer were mixed into different pesticide fertilizers through their normal field using dosage and evaluate residual influence of clothianidin in different formula. After analysis of variance of the effect factors, the effect of different pesticide types on half-life was not significant, but the effect of sample types was significant. Clothianidin granules and pesticide fertilizers could be safely applied in cabbage under a single high-dose administration.

  9. Massive Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia de Rham

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP, cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware–Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alternative and related models of massive gravity such as new massive gravity, Lorentz-violating massive gravity and non-local massive gravity.

  10. Silica phases in sinters and residues from geothermal fields of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, K. A.; Browne, P. R. L.; Buddle, T. F.; Cook, K. L.; Greatrex, R. A.; Hampton, W. A.; Herdianita, N. R.; Holland, G. R.; Lynne, B. Y.; Martin, R.; Newton, Z.; Pastars, D.; Sannazarro, K. L.; Teece, C. I. A.

    2004-06-01

    Five silica phases are major components of silica sinters, deposited from both near-neutral pH alkali-chloride and acid-sulfate thermal waters, and of silica residues formed at the surface of geothermal fields in New Zealand. In all cases, the initial silica is noncrystalline opal-A deposited commonly as microspheres that possess an underlying nanospherical substructure, upon different substrate templets, including microbes living in hot springs. Deposition may also occur monomerically upon earlier deposited silica. Following microsphere growth through Ostwald ripening, silica remains mobile throughout the postdepositional history of the sinter/residue deposits, resulting in a range of textures. These include the continuing growth of microspheres, the development of secondary microspheres and silica coatings, phase transformations, a reduction in sinter porosity, dissolution features, and late-stage deposition of drusy quartz and opal-A. The sinter mass attempts to achieve thermodynamic equilibrium through stepwise phase transformations (maturation): opal-A crystallises to paracrystalline opal-CT±opal-C, which recrystallises to microcrystalline α-quartz+moganite. No intermediate silica phases are produced, but gradual changes occur among different opal-A or opal-CT/-C phases. The phase maturation produces changes in particle densities, silanol water, and in X-ray powder response of the different silica phases, although the rates of change can be perturbed by heating, weathering, and dissolution of the sinter/residue. The properties of opal-A change little in a sinter/residue mass within the first 10,000 years, but reductions occur in the densities, silanol water, and X-ray scattering bandwidth of older sinters where opal-A can persist for up to 100,000 years. Eventually, opal-A transforms to opal-CT when silanol water is reduced sufficiently for enough -Si-O-Si- linkages to produce a crude diffraction-like X-ray response. The transformation is aided by heat, as

  11. ‘DEOS CHAMP-01C 70’ : A model of the Earth’s gravity field computed from accelerations of the CHAMP satellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ditmar, P.G.; Kuznetsov, V.; Van Eck van der Sluis, A.A.; Schrama, E.; Klees, R.

    2005-01-01

    Performance of a recently proposed technique for gravity field modeling has been assessed with data from the CHAMP satellite. The modeling technique is a variant of the acceleration approach. It makes use of the satellite accelerations that are derived from the kinematic orbit with the 3-point

  12. A New Semi-Symmetric Unified Field Theory of the Classical Fields of Gravity and Electromagnetism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhendro I.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We attempt to present a classical theoretical framework in which the gravitational and electromagnetic fields are unified as intrinsic geometric objects in the space-time manifold. For this purpose, we first present the preliminary geometric considerations dealing with the metric differential geometry of Cartan connections. The unified field theory is then developed as an extension of the general theory of relativity based on a semi- symmetric Cartan connection which is meant to be as close as possible structurally to the symmetric connection of the Einstein-Riemann space-time.

  13. On gravity's role in the genesis of rest masses of classical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabados, László B.

    2018-03-01

    It is shown that in the Einstein-conformally coupled Higgs-Maxwell system with Friedman-Robertson-Walker symmetries the energy density of the Higgs field has stable local minimum only if the mean curvature of the t=const hypersurfaces is less than a finite critical value χ _c, while for greater mean curvature the energy density is not bounded from below. Therefore, there are extreme gravitational situations in which even quasi-locally defined instantaneous vacuum states of the Higgs sector cannot exist, and hence one cannot at all define the rest mass of all the classical fields. On hypersurfaces with mean curvature less than χ _c the energy density has the `wine bottle' (rather than the familiar `Mexican hat') shape, and the gauge field can get rest mass via the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism. The spacelike hypersurface with the critical mean curvature represents the moment of `genesis' of rest masses.

  14. Anisotopic inflation with a non-abelian gauge field in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, Sayantani

    2017-01-01

    In presence of Gauss-Bonnet corrections, we study anisotropic inflation aided by a massless SU(2) gauge field where both the gauge field and the Gauss-Bonnet term are non-minimally coupled to the inflaton. In this scenario, under slow-roll approximations, the anisotropic inflation is realized as an attractor solution with quadratic forms of inflaton potential and Gauss-Bonnet coupling function. We show that the degree of anisotropy is proportional to the additive combination of two slow-roll parameters of the theory. The anisotropy may become either positive or negative similar to the non-Gauss-Bonnet framework, a feature of the model for anisotropic inflation supported by a non-abelian gauge field but the effect of Gauss-Bonnet term further enhances or suppresses the generated anisotropy.

  15. Field investigations on port non-tranquility caused by infra-gravity water waves

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi-Jilani, A.; Rahimi-Maleki, D.

    2010-01-01

    Field investigations have been carried out in two 60-day stages on the surf beat low frequency waves in Anzali port, one of the main commercial ports in Iran, located in southwest coast of the Caspian Sea. The characteristics of significant water waves were measured at three metering stations in the sea, one at the entrance of the port and three in the basin. The measured data were inspected to investigate the surf beat negative effects on the tranquility of the port. Using field measurements...

  16. Comparing Dislodgeable 2,4-D Residues across Athletic Field Turfgrass Species and Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Jeffries

    Full Text Available 2,4-dimethylamine salt (2,4-D is an herbicide commonly applied on athletic fields for broadleaf weed control that can dislodge from treated turfgrass. Dislodge potential is affected by numerous factors, including turfgrass canopy conditions. Building on previous research confirming herbicide-turfgrass dynamics can vary widely between species, field research was initiated in 2014 and 2015 in Raleigh, NC, USA to quantify dislodgeable 2,4-D residues from dormant hybrid bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. x C. transvaalensis and hybrid bermudagrass overseeded with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L., which are common athletic field playing surfaces in subtropical climates. Additionally, dislodgeable 2,4-D was compared at AM (7:00 eastern standard time and PM (14:00 sample timings within a day. Samples collected from perennial ryegrass consistently resulted in greater 2,4-D dislodgment immediately after application (9.4 to 9.9% of applied compared to dormant hybrid bermudagrass (2.3 to 2.9%, as well as at all AM compared to PM timings from 1 to 3 d after treatment (DAT; 0.4 to 6.3% compared to 0.1 to 0.8%. Dislodgeable 2,4-D did not differ across turfgrass species at PM sample collections, with ≤ 0.1% of the 2,4-D applied dislodged from 1 to 6 DAT, and 2,4-D detection did not occur at 12 and 24 DAT. In conclusion, dislodgeable 2,4-D from treated turfgrass can vary between species and over short time-scales within a day. This information should be taken into account in human exposure risk assessments, as well as by turfgrass managers and athletic field event coordinators to minimize 2,4-D exposure.

  17. Comparing Dislodgeable 2,4-D Residues across Athletic Field Turfgrass Species and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, James T.; Breeden, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    2,4-dimethylamine salt (2,4-D) is an herbicide commonly applied on athletic fields for broadleaf weed control that can dislodge from treated turfgrass. Dislodge potential is affected by numerous factors, including turfgrass canopy conditions. Building on previous research confirming herbicide-turfgrass dynamics can vary widely between species, field research was initiated in 2014 and 2015 in Raleigh, NC, USA to quantify dislodgeable 2,4-D residues from dormant hybrid bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. x C. transvaalensis) and hybrid bermudagrass overseeded with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), which are common athletic field playing surfaces in subtropical climates. Additionally, dislodgeable 2,4-D was compared at AM (7:00 eastern standard time) and PM (14:00) sample timings within a day. Samples collected from perennial ryegrass consistently resulted in greater 2,4-D dislodgment immediately after application (9.4 to 9.9% of applied) compared to dormant hybrid bermudagrass (2.3 to 2.9%), as well as at all AM compared to PM timings from 1 to 3 d after treatment (DAT; 0.4 to 6.3% compared to 0.1 to 0.8%). Dislodgeable 2,4-D did not differ across turfgrass species at PM sample collections, with ≤ 0.1% of the 2,4-D applied dislodged from 1 to 6 DAT, and 2,4-D detection did not occur at 12 and 24 DAT. In conclusion, dislodgeable 2,4-D from treated turfgrass can vary between species and over short time-scales within a day. This information should be taken into account in human exposure risk assessments, as well as by turfgrass managers and athletic field event coordinators to minimize 2,4-D exposure. PMID:27936174

  18. Quantum Gravity in Everyday Life: General Relativity as an Effective Field Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Cliff P

    2004-01-01

    This article is meant as a summary and introduction to the ideas of effective field theory as applied to gravitational systems, ideas which provide the theoretical foundations for the modern use of general relativity as a theory from which precise predictions are possible.

  19. Quantum Gravity in Everyday Life: General Relativity as an Effective Field Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess Cliff P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is meant as a summary and introduction to the ideas of effective field theory as applied to gravitational systems, ideas which provide the theoretical foundations for the modern use of general relativity as a theory from which precise predictions are possible.

  20. Feasibility to apply the steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) technique in the country's heavy crude-oil fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Edwin; Orjuela, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    The steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) processes are one of the most efficient and profitable technologies for the production of heavy crude oils and oil sands. These processes involve the drilling of a couple of parallel horizontal wells, separated by a vertical distance and located near the oil field base. The upper well is used to continuously inject steam into the zone of interest, while the lower well collects all resulting fluids (oil, condensate and formation water) and takes them to the surface (Butler, 1994). This technology has been successfully implemented in countries such as Canada, Venezuela and United States, reaching recovery factors in excess of 50%. This article provides an overview of the technique's operation mechanism and the process most relevant characteristics, as well as the various categories this technology is divided into, including all its advantages and limitations. Furthermore, the article sets the oil field's minimal conditions under which the SAGD process is efficient, which conditions, as integrated to a series of mathematical models, allow to make forecasts on production, thermal efficiency (ODR) and oil to be recovered, as long as it is feasible (from a technical point of view) to apply this technique to a defined oil field. The information and concepts compiled during this research prompted the development of software, which may be used as an information, analysis and interpretation tool to predict and quantify this technology's performance. Based on the article, preliminary studies were started for the country's heavy crude-oil fields, identifying which provide the minimum conditions for the successful development of a pilot project

  1. Viscous plasma evolution from gravity using anti-de sitter/conformal-field-theory correspondence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Romuald A

    2007-01-12

    We analyze the anti-de Sitter/conformal-field-theory dual geometry of an expanding boost-invariant plasma. We show that the requirement of nonsingularity of the dual geometry for leading and subasymptotic times predicts, without any further assumptions about gauge theory dynamics, hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma with viscosity coefficient exactly matching the one obtained earlier in the static case by Policastro, Son, and Starinets.

  2. Field source characteristic of gravity variation in Hexi region before Menyuan Ms6.4 earthquake based on the Euler deconvolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study adopted the Euler deconvolution method to conduct an inversion and interpretation of the depth and spatial distribution pattern of field source that lead to gravity variation. For this purpose, mobile gravity data from four periods in the Hexi region between 2011 and 2015 were obtained from an observation network. With a newly established theoretical model, we acquired the optimum inversion parameters and conducted calculation and analysis with the actual data. The results indicate that one is the appropriate value of the structure index for the inversion of the mobile gravity data. The inversion results of the actual data showed a comparable spatial distribution of the field source and a consistent structural trend with observations from the Qilian-Haiyuan Fault zone between 2011 and 2015. The distribution was in a blocking state at the epicenter of the Menyuan earthquake in 2016. Our quantitative study of the field source provides new insights into the inversion and interpretation of signals of mobile gravity variation.

  3. EIGEN-6C2 - A new combined global gravity field model including GOCE data up to degree and order 1949 of GFZ Potsdam and GRGS Toulouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förste, Christoph; Bruinsma, Sean; Flechtner, Frank; Marty, Jean-Charles; Dahle, Christoph; Abrykosov, Oleh; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Neumayer, Hans; Barthelmes, Franz; Biancale, Richard; König, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    GFZ Potsdam and GRGS Toulouse have a long-time close cooperation in the field of global gravity field determination at which the present focus is (1) on GOCE gravity field determination and (2) on computation of high resolution combined gravity field models. Such data products play a fundamental role in geodesy and Earth sciences, ranging from practical purposes, like precise orbit determination, to scientific applications, like investigations of the density structure of the Earth's interior. Here we present our combined gravity field model EIGEN-6C2 which is the second release of EIGEN-6C (EIGEN = European Improved Gravity model of the Earth by New techniques). The initial release of EIGEN-6, published in 2011, was the first global combined gravity field model containing GOCE data. It had been computed from a combination of LAGEOS, GRACE and GOCE data, augmented with the DTU10 surface gravity data and is complete to degree and order 1440 (corresponding to 14 km spatial resolution). The combination of the different data types has been done on the basis of full normal equations up to maximum degree/order 370. The spherical harmonic coefficients of the shorter wavelengths were obtained from a block diagonal normal equation from the terrestrial data only. The new release is now complete to degree and order 1949 (corresponding to approx. 10 km spatial resolution). Furthermore this new model comprises extended measurement time spans for the LAGEOS/GRACE data as well as for the GOCE data. Our combination of GRACE and GOCE data allows the construction of an accurate satellite-only contribution to the final combined model up to degree and order 240, where the GOCE gradiometer data contribute only for degrees upwards of 100. This is achieved through filtering of the GOCE observation equations, which is necessary because of the degraded gradiometer performance outside the measurement bandwidth. The surface data normal equations are combined with satellite normal equations at

  4. Modeling magnetic field and TEC signatures of large-amplitude acoustic and gravity waves generated by natural hazard events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.; Inchin, P.; Komjathy, A.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean and solid earth responses during earthquakes are a significant source of large amplitude acoustic and gravity waves (AGWs) that perturb the overlying ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system. IT disturbances are routinely detected following large earthquakes (M > 7.0) via GPS total electron content (TEC) observations, which often show acoustic wave ( 3-4 min periods) and gravity wave ( 10-15 min) signatures with amplitudes of 0.05-2 TECU. In cases of very large earthquakes (M > 8.0) the persisting acoustic waves are estimated to have 100-200 m/s compressional velocities in the conducting ionospheric E and F-regions and should generate significant dynamo currents and magnetic field signatures. Indeed, some recent reports (e.g. Hao et al, 2013, JGR, 118, 6) show evidence for magnetic fluctuations, which appear to be related to AGWs, following recent large earthquakes. However, very little quantitative information is available on: (1) the detailed spatial and temporal dependence of these magnetic fluctuations, which are usually observed at a small number of irregularly arranged stations, and (2) the relation of these signatures to TEC perturbations in terms of relative amplitudes, frequency, and timing for different events. This work investigates space- and time-dependent behavior of both TEC and magnetic fluctuations following recent large earthquakes, with the aim to improve physical understanding of these perturbations via detailed, high-resolution, two- and three-dimensional modeling case studies with a coupled neutral atmospheric and ionospheric model, MAGIC-GEMINI (Zettergren and Snively, 2015, JGR, 120, 9). We focus on cases inspired by the large Chilean earthquakes from the past decade (viz., the M > 8.0 earthquakes from 2010 and 2015) to constrain the sources for the model, i.e. size, frequency, amplitude, and timing, based on available information from ocean buoy and seismometer data. TEC data are used to validate source amplitudes and to constrain

  5. Classical Weyl transverse gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Ichiro [University of the Ryukyus, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge-fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a ''fake'' symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields, i.e. the Weyl-invariant scalar, vector and spinor fields. Fourthly, it is explicitly shown that in the WTDiff gravity the Schwarzschild black hole metric and a charged black hole one are classical solutions to the equations of motion only when they are expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system. Finally, we consider the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology and provide some exact solutions. (orig.)

  6. Energy balance of a corn residue-covered field during snowmelt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, T.J.; Hatfield, J.L.; Prueger, J.H.; Logsdon, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    Transport of agricultural chemicals in runoff and recharge waters from snowmelt and soil thawing may represent a significant event in terms of annual contaminant loadings in temperate regions. Improved understanding of the melt dynamics of shallow snowpacks is necessary to fully assess the implications for water quality. The objective of this study was to measure the energy balance components of a corn (Zea mays L.) stubble field during the melting of its snowcover. Net radiation (Rn), soil (G), sensible (H), and latent (Q) best fluxes were measured in a field near Ames, Iowa, during the winter of 1994-1995. Energy consumed by melting including change in energy storage of the snowpack was determined as the residual of the measured energy balance. There was continuous snowcover at the field site for 71 days (maximum depth = 222 m) followed by an open period of 11 days before additional snowfall and a second melt period. The net radiation and snowmelt/energy storage change (S) terms dominated the energy balance during both measurement intervals. Peak daily sensible and latent best fluxes were below 100 W m(-2) on all days except the last day of the second melt period. There was good agreement between predicted and measured values of H and Q during the melting of an aged snow layer but poorer agreement during the melt of fresh snow. Both snowpacks melted rapidly and coincident changes in soil moisture storage were observed. Improved estimates of Q and H, especially for partially open surfaces, will require better characterization of the surface aerodynamic properties and spatially-representative surface temperature measurements

  7. Temporal variation of gravity field prior to the Ludian Ms6.5 and Kangding Ms6.3 earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Hao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Using mobile gravity data from the central area of Sichuan and Yunnan Provinces, the relationship between gravity variation and earthquakes was studied based on the Ludian Ms6.5 earthquake that occurred on August 3rd, 2014, and the Kangding Ms6.3 earthquake that occurred on November 22nd, 2014; the mechanism of gravity variation was also explored. The results are as follows: (1 Prior to both earthquakes, gravity variation exhibited similar characteristics as those observed before both the Tangshan and Wenchuan earthquakes, in which typical precursor anomalies were positive gravity variation near the epicenter and the occurrence of a high-gravity-gradient zone across the epicenter prior to the earthquake. (2 A relatively accurate prediction of the occurrence locations of the two earthquakes was made by the Gravity Network Center of China (GNCC based on these precursor anomalies. In the gravity study report on the 2014 earthquake trends submitted at the end of 2013, the Daofu-Shimian section at the junction of the Xianshuihe and Longmenshan fault zones was noted as an earthquake-risk region with a predicted magnitude of 6.5, which covered the epicenter of the Kangding Ms6.3 earthquake. In another report on earthquake trends in southwestern China submitted in mid-2014, the Lianfeng, Zhaotong fault zone was also classified as an earthquake-risk region with a magnitude of 6.0, and the central area of this region basically overlapped with the epicenter of the Ludian Ms6.5 earthquake. (3 The gravity variation characteristics are reasonably consistent with crustal movements, and deep material migration is likely the primary cause of gravity variation.

  8. Magnetour: Surfing planetary systems on electromagnetic and multi-body gravity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantoine, Gregory; Russell, Ryan P.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Garrett, Henry B.

    2017-09-01

    A comprehensive tour of the complex outer planet systems is a central goal in space science. However, orbiting multiple moons of the same planet would be extremely prohibitive using traditional propulsion and power technologies. In this paper, a new mission concept, named Magnetour, is presented to facilitate the exploration of outer planet systems and address both power and propulsion challenges. This approach would enable a single spacecraft to orbit and travel between multiple moons of an outer planet, without significant propellant or onboard power source. To achieve this free-lunch 'Grand Tour', Magnetour exploits the unexplored combination of magnetic and multi-body gravitational fields of planetary systems, with a unique focus on using a bare electrodynamic tether for power and propulsion. Preliminary results indicate that the Magnetour concept is sound and is potentially highly promising at Jupiter.

  9. Localization and the interface between quantum mechanics, quantum field theory and quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]|[Freie Univ., Berlin (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik]. E-mail: schroer@cbpf.br

    2007-07-01

    We show that there are significant conceptual differences between QM and QFT which make it difficult to view QFT as just a relativistic extension of the principles of QM. The root of this is a fundamental distinction between Born-localization in QM (which in the relativistic context changes its name to Newton-Wigner localization) and modular localization which is the localization underlying QFT, after one liberates it from its standard presentation in terms of field coordinates. The first comes with a probability notion and projection operators, whereas the latter describes causal propagation in QFT and leads to thermal aspects. Taking these significant differences serious has not only repercussions for the philosophy of science, but also leads to a new structural properties as a consequence of vacuum polarization: the area law for localization entropy near the the causal localization horizon and a more realistic cutoff independent setting for the cosmological vacuum energy density which is compatible with local covariance. (author)

  10. Localization and the interface between quantum mechanics, quantum field theory and quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, Bert; Freie Univ., Berlin

    2007-01-01

    We show that there are significant conceptual differences between QM and QFT which make it difficult to view QFT as just a relativistic extension of the principles of QM. The root of this is a fundamental distinction between Born-localization in QM (which in the relativistic context changes its name to Newton-Wigner localization) and modular localization which is the localization underlying QFT, after one liberates it from its standard presentation in terms of field coordinates. The first comes with a probability notion and projection operators, whereas the latter describes causal propagation in QFT and leads to thermal aspects. Taking these significant differences serious has not only repercussions for the philosophy of science, but also leads to a new structural properties as a consequence of vacuum polarization: the area law for localization entropy near the the causal localization horizon and a more realistic cutoff independent setting for the cosmological vacuum energy density which is compatible with local covariance. (author)

  11. Observing coseismic gravity change from the Japan Tohoku-Oki 2011 earthquake with GOCE gravity gradiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, M.J.; Bouman, J.; Broerse, D.B.T.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Vermeersen, L.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Tohoku-Oki earthquake (9.0 Mw) of 11 March 2011 has left signatures in the Earth's gravity field that are detectable by data of the Gravity field Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Because the European Space Agency's (ESA) satellite gravity mission Gravity field and

  12. The Accuracy Analysis of Multiple Earth Gravity Field Models and Normal Height Determination of GPS Points Based on Combination Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Xingfu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The scale factor ae of Earth gravity field model is discussed for numerically analyzing the effect on model height anomaly,and the coefficient's accuracy of the latest models ITG-GRACE2010S,AIUB-GRACE03S,EIGEN-6C,GOCO02S,DIR_R3,TIM_R3,SPW_R2,gif48 and EGM2008 for different degrees are analyzed based on coefficient's variance information and GPS/leveling data sets.The simply spectral combination method and weighted spectral combination method are given for improving the accuracy of model height anomaly.In test area,the results show that the accuracy of all models up to degree and order 135 is better than the same degree and order of EGM2008 model,and the accuracy of gif48 and EIGEN-6C model is also better than the same degree and order of EGM2008 model,the simply spectral combination method and weighted spectral combination method can also improve the accuracy of regional model height anomaly.

  13. Orbit Determination of the SELENE Satellites Using Multi-Satellite Data Types and Evaluation of SELENE Gravity Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Noda, H.; Araki, H.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.

    2011-01-01

    The SELENE mission, consisting of three separate satellites that use different terrestrial-based tracking systems, presents a unique opportunity to evaluate the contribution of these tracking systems to orbit determination precision. The tracking data consist of four-way Doppler between the main orbiter and one of the two sub-satellites while the former is over the far side, and of same-beam differential VLBI tracking between the two sub-satellites. Laser altimeter data are also used for orbit determination. The contribution to orbit precision of these different data types is investigated through orbit overlap analysis. It is shown that using four-way and VLBI data improves orbit consistency for all satellites involved by reducing peak values in orbit overlap differences that exist when only standard two-way Doppler and range data are used. Including laser altimeter data improves the orbit precision of the SELENE main satellite further, resulting in very smooth total orbit errors at an average level of 18m. The multi-satellite data have also resulted in improved lunar gravity field models, which are assessed through orbit overlap analysis using Lunar Prospector tracking data. Improvements over a pre-SELENE model are shown to be mostly in the along-track and cross-track directions. Orbit overlap differences are at a level between 13 and 21 m with the SELENE models, depending on whether l-day data overlaps or I-day predictions are used.

  14. Gauge/gravity duality, jets in strongly coupled plasma, and far-from-equilibrium dynamics in conformal field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Paul M.

    We study dynamics in conformal field theories with gravitational duals. Attention is focused on heavy and light quark jets as well as far-from-equilibrium dynamics. The stress-energy tensor of a heavy quark moving through a strongly coupled N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma is evaluated using gauge/gravity duality. The accuracy with which the resulting wake, in position space, is reproduced by hydrodynamics is examined. Remarkable agreement is found between hydrodynamics and the complete result down to distances less than 2/ T away from the quark. We also compute the penetration depth of a light quark moving through a N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma using a combination of analytic and numerical techniques. We find that the maximum distance a quark with energy E can travel through a plasma is given by Dxmax E= C/T E/Tl 1/3 with C ≈ 0.5. For the study of dynamics far-from-equilibrium, we consider the creation and evolution of boost invariant anisotropic, strongly coupled conformal plasma. In the dual gravitational description, this corresponds to horizon formation in a geometry driven to be anisotropic by a time-dependent change in boundary conditions.

  15. Quantum Gravity Effects in Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Je-An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the geometrodynamic approach to quantum cosmology, we studied the quantum gravity effects in cosmology. The Gibbons-Hawking temperature is corrected by quantum gravity due to spacetime fluctuations and the power spectrum as well as any probe field will experience the effective temperature, a quantum gravity effect.

  16. Quantum Gravity Effects in Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Je-An; Pyo Kim, Sang; Shen, Che-Min

    2018-01-01

    Within the geometrodynamic approach to quantum cosmology, we studied the quantum gravity effects in cosmology. The Gibbons-Hawking temperature is corrected by quantum gravity due to spacetime fluctuations and the power spectrum as well as any probe field will experience the effective temperature, a quantum gravity effect.

  17. Venus - Ishtar gravity anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Bills, B. G.; Mottinger, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    The gravity anomaly associated with Ishtar Terra on Venus is characterized, comparing line-of-sight acceleration profiles derived by differentiating Pioneer Venus Orbiter Doppler residual profiles with an Airy-compensated topographic model. The results are presented in graphs and maps, confirming the preliminary findings of Phillips et al. (1979). The isostatic compensation depth is found to be 150 + or - 30 km.

  18. Field evaluations of residual pesticide applications and misting system on militarily relevant materials against medically important mosquitoes in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    A key strategy to reduce insect-borne disease is to reduce contact between disease vectors and hosts. In the current study, residual pesticide application and misting system were applied on militarily relevant materials and evaluated against medically important mosquitoes. Field evaluations were car...

  19. Detection of pesticides residues in water samples from organic and conventional paddy fields of Ledang, Johor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Md Pauzi; Othman, Mohamed Rozali; Ishak, Anizan; Nabhan, Khitam Jaber

    2016-11-01

    Pesticides have been used extensively by the farmers in Malaysia during the last few decades. Sixteen water samples, collected from paddy fields both organic and conventional, from Ledang, Johor, were analyzed to determine the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine (OCPs) and organophosphorus (OPPs) pesticide residues. GC-ECD instrument was used to identify and determine the concentrations of these pesticide residues. Pesticide residues were detected in conventional fields in the range about 0.036-0.508 µg/L higher than detected in organic fields about 0.015-0.428 µg/L. However the level of concentration of pesticide residues in water sample from both paddy fields are in the exceed limit for human consumption, according to European Economic Commission (EEC) (Directive 98/83/EC) at 0.1 µg/L for any pesticide or 0.5 µg/L for total pesticides. The results that the organic plot is still contaminated with pesticides although pesticides were not use at all in plot possibly from historical used as well as from airborne contamination.

  20. The delineation and interpretation of the earth's gravity field. Annual progress report, 1 June 1988-31 May 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, B.D.

    1989-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the mechanical interaction of a growing lithosphere containing fracture zones with small and large scale mantle convection, which gives rise to geoid anomalies in oceanic regions, a series of fluid dynamical experiments is in progress to investigate: (1) the influence of lithosphere structure, fluid depth and viscosity field on the onset, scale, and evolution of sublithospheric convection; (2) the role of this convection in determining the rate of growth of lithosphere, especially in light of the flattening of the lithosphere bathymetry and heat flow at late times; and (3) combining the results of both numerical and laboratory experiments to decide the dominate factors in producing geoid anomalies in oceanic regions through the thermo-mechanical interaction of the lithosphere and subjacent mantle. The clear existence of small scale convection associated with a downward propagating solidification front (i.e., the lithosphere) and a larger scale flow associated with a discontinuous upward heat flux (i.e., a fracture zone) has been shown. The flows exist simultaneously and each may have a significant role in deciding the thermal evolution of the lithosphere and in understanding the relation of shallow mantle convection to deep mantle convection. This overall process is reflected in the geoid, gravity, and topographic anomalies in the north-central Pacific. These highly correlated fields of intermediate wavelength (approx. 200 to 2000 km) show isostatic compensation by a thin lithosphere for shorter (less than or equal to approx. 500 km), but not the longer, wavelengths. The ultimate, dynamic origin of this class of anomalies is being investigated

  1. Ion layers, tides, gravity waves, and electric fields in the upper atmosphere, inferred from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, Y.T.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis uses data accumulated during 1980-1989 by the Arecibo incoherent scatter radar to study the behavior and physics of ionization irregularities. Low latitude ionization irregularities, known as sporadic-E and intermediate layers, undergo a regular daily descent, convergence, and dumping of ion layers controlled by the neutral tidal wind. A useful way of studying ion layers and their motion is by ion layer trajectory maps which consist of points representing the altitude and time of ionization layers. Two types of maps were used which assigned either a uniform layer intensity or a gray level/pseudo-color to indicate different layer intensities. Important aspects of layer formation are revealed by map analysis. During January, intermediate layers consistently appeared four times per day instead of the normal twice per day pattern. Simulation of ion trajectories based on the ion momentum equation, which includes both Lorentzian and collisional forces, shows that a combination of diurnal, semidiurnal, and six-hour tides is necessary for such a feature to exist, whereas only diurnal and semidiurnal tides are needed to create the normal pattern. The six-hour period tide has not been previously reported. Extra or irregular layers appear frequently in layer trajectory maps, which can be simulated by the addition of gravity waves to the regular tidal wind system. Electric field effects are normally not a factor in low latitude ion layer formation because they are relatively weak and not commonly observed. Layer configurations during a geomagnetic storm, however, indicate that the electric field played an important role in controlling ion motion

  2. EIGEN-6C4 - The latest combined global gravity field model including GOCE data up to degree and order 1949 of GFZ Potsdam and GRGS Toulouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förste, Christoph; Bruinsma, Sean; Abrikosov, Oleg; Flechtner, Frank; Marty, Jean-Charles; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Dahle, Christoph; Neumayer, Hans; Barthelmes, Franz; König, Rolf; Biancale, Richard

    2014-05-01

    GFZ Potsdam and GRGS Toulouse have a long-time close cooperation in the field of global gravity field determination. Here we focus on (1) GOCE gravity field determination and (2) computation of high resolution combined gravity field models. Such data products play a fundamental role in geodesy and Earth sciences, ranging from practical purposes, like precise orbit determination, to scientific applications, like investigations of the density structure of the Earth's interior. Here we present our combined gravity field model EIGEN-6C4 which is the fourth release of EIGEN-6C (EIGEN = European Improved Gravity model of the Earth by New techniques). The first release of EIGEN-6C, published in 2011, was the first global combined gravity field model containing GOCE data. It was computed from a combination of LAGEOS, GRACE and GOCE data, augmented with DTU10 surface gravity data, and it is complete to degree and order 1440 (corresponding to 14 km spatial resolution). The combination of the different data types has been done on the basis of full normal equations up to maximum degree/order 370. The spherical harmonic coefficients of the shorter wavelengths were obtained from a block diagonal normal equation from the terrestrial data only. The subsequent releases EIGEN-6C2 (2012) and EIGEN-6C3stat (2013) were complete to degree and order 1949 (corresponding to approx. 10 km spatial resolution) and comprise extended measurement time spans for the LAGEOS/GRACE as well as for the GOCE data. Now we present the new release EIGEN-6C4. This time variable combined gravity field model is again developed to degree and order 1949 and comprises the new GRACE Release 03 from GRGS and gradiometer data almost of the entire GOCE mission (Sept. 2009-Sept. 2013). Our combination of GRACE and GOCE data allows the construction of an accurate satellite-only contribution to the final combined model up to degree and order 260, where the GOCE gradiometer data contribute only for degrees upwards of

  3. Field Studies to Evaluate Potential Differences between Bt and non-Bt Corn Residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some reports suggest that the genetically-modified Bt corn residue may have higher lignin content and that the residue may be more resistant to decomposition. If true, then there are implications for both farming practices, e.g., tillage and planting, as well as global carbon budgets. We conducted ...

  4. Streaming gravity mode instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shui.

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of a current sheet with a sheared flow in a gravitational field which is perpendicular to the magnetic field and plasma flow. This mixing mode caused by a combined role of the sheared flow and gravity is named the streaming gravity mode instability. The conditions of this mode instability are discussed for an ideal four-layer model in the incompressible limit. (author). 5 refs

  5. S-wave propagating in an anisotropic inhomogeneous elastic medium under the influence of gravity, initial stress, electric and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakar Rajneesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of gravity, initial stress, non-homogeneity, electric and magnetic field on the propagation of shear waves in an anisotropic incompressible medium. Various graphs are plotted to show the effect of direction of propagation, the anisotropy, magnetic field, electric field, non-homogeneity of the medium and the initial stress on shear waves. The dispersion equations for shear waves are obtained and discussed for different cases. In fact, in the absence of various material parameters, these equations are in agreement with the classical results for isotropic medium.

  6. Study on residues of 14C-fenitrothion in model rice-fish ecosystem and field rice-fish ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongliang; Wang Huaxin; Guo Dazhi; Chen Zhiyu; wu Suqiong

    1994-01-01

    When equal amounts of the pesticide are applied, the extractable residues in brown rice (equivalent to 34.3 +- 1.9 μg/kg fenitrothion) and rice stems and leaves (20.9 +- 1.5 μg/kg) of the model rice-fish ecosystem are 10-15 times higher than those of the field rice-fish ecosystem (4.48 +- 0.13 μg/kg and 1.27 +- 0.34 μg/kg respectively). Residues in upper part of the soil (6.50 +- 0.1-8.10 +- 0.2 μg/kg) and lower part of the soil (1.30 +- 0.1-1.50 +- 0.1 μg/kg)of the model rice-fish ecosystem are 10-40 times higher than those of the field rice-fish ecosystem (0.17 +- 0.01 μg/kg). The extractable residues in paddy water of the model ecosystem (0.30 +- 0.01 μg/kg) are similar to that the the field ecosystem (0.20 +- 0.02 μg/kg). When the fenitrothion is sprayed on the rice plants, residues in brown rice, fish body, soil and paddy water are lower than those when the pesticide is sprayed on the surface of the soil

  7. The problem of gravity field representation in the Amazon region: alternatives evaluation; O problema da representacao do campo de gravidade na regiao amazonica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Nelsi Cogo de [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. Astronomico e Geofisico. Dept. de Geofisica

    1997-07-01

    The Amazonic region is a large segment of South American Plate which contains important geologic and tectonic units, among them, the sedimentary basins: Acre, Parecis-Alto Xingu, Alto Tapajos, Amazonas, Marajo and Boa Vista; and the cratons Rio Branco and Amazonas. Although there are very interesting geophysical investigations in this region, besides its potentialities in oil and mineral prospecting, a very little was done about the regional geophysical survey. Because of the large extension and the geographical peculiarities of this region, the basic geophysical surveys have not been done yet. Today, the aerogeophysical surveys and the geophysical satellite missions are beginning a new phase in collecting data of the gravity and magnetic field of the Earth. The analysis of the existing alternatives for the representation of the gravity field in the Amazonic region, presented in this paper, suggest a combined solution of satellite gradiometry and airborne gravimetry. (author)

  8. Massive Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware–Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alt...

  9. Mass distribution of Earth landforms determined by aspects of the geopotential as computed from the global gravity field model EGM 2008

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalvoda, J.; Klokočník, Jaroslav; Kostelecký, J.; Bezděk, Aleš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 2 (2013), s. 17-25 ISSN 0300-5402 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-36843S Grant - others:GA ČR(EE) GCP209/12/J068; ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. C98056 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Earth landforms * gravity field model * mass distribution Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  10. Phase-field modelling of β(Ti) solidification in Ti-45at.%Al: columnar dendrite growth at various gravity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viardin, A.; Berger, R.; Sturz, L.; Apel, M.; Hecht, U.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of solutal convection on the solidification of γ titanium aluminides, specifically on β(Ti) dendrite growth, is not well known. With the aim of supporting directional solidification experiments under hyper-gravity using a large diameter centrifuge, 2D-phase field simulations of β(Ti) dendrite growth have been performed for the binary alloy Ti-45at.%Al and various gravity scenarios. Both, the direction and magnitude of the gravity vector were varied systematically in order to reveal the subtle interplay between the convective flow pattern and mushy zone characteristics. In this presentation, gravity effects are discussed for early dendrite growth. For selected cases the evolution on longer timescales is also analyse of and oscillatory modes leading to dynamically stable steady state growth are outlined. In a dedicated simulation series forced flow is superimposed, as to mimic thermally driven fluid flow expected to establish on the macroscopic scale (sample size) in the centrifugal experiments. Above a certain threshold this flow turns dominant and precludes solutally driven convective effects.

  11. Residual stress evaluation by Barkhausen signals with a magnetic field sensor for high efficiency electrical motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Yuji; Enokizono, Masato

    2018-04-01

    The iron loss of industrial motors increases by residual stress during manufacturing processes. It is very important to make clear the distribution of the residual stress in the motor cores to reduce the iron loss in the motors. Barkhausen signals which occur on electrical steel sheets can be used for the evaluation of the residual stress because they are very sensitive to the material properties. Generally, a B-sensor is used to measure Barkhausen signals, however, we developed a new H-sensor to measure them and applied it into the stress evaluation. It is supposed that the Barkhausen signals by using a H-sensor can be much effective to the residual stress on the electrical steel sheets by referring our results regarding to the stress evaluations. We evaluated the tensile stress of the electrical steel sheets by measuring Barkhausen signals by using our developed H-sensor for high efficiency electrical motors.

  12. Frozen-wave instability in near-critical hydrogen subjected to horizontal vibration under various gravity fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandikota, G; Chatain, D; Amiroudine, S; Lyubimova, T; Beysens, D

    2014-01-01

    The frozen-wave instability which appears at a liquid-vapor interface when a harmonic vibration is applied in a direction tangential to it has been less studied until now. The present paper reports experiments on hydrogen (H2) in order to study this instability when the temperature is varied near its critical point for various gravity levels. Close to the critical point, a liquid-vapor density difference and surface tension can be continuously varied with temperature in a scaled, universal way. The effect of gravity on the height of the frozen waves at the interface is studied by performing the experiments in a magnetic facility where effective gravity that results from the coupling of the Earth's gravity and magnetic forces can be varied. The stability diagram of the instability is obtained. The experiments show a good agreement with an inviscid model [Fluid Dyn. 21 849 (1987)], irrespective of the gravity level. It is observed in the experiments that the height of the frozen waves varies weakly with temperature and increases with a decrease in the gravity level, according to a power law with an exponent of 0.7. It is concluded that the wave height becomes of the order of the cell size as the gravity level is asymptotically decreased to zero. The interface pattern thus appears as a bandlike pattern of alternate liquid and vapor phases, a puzzling phenomenon that was observed with CO2 and H2 near their critical point in weightlessness [Acta Astron. 61 1002 (2007); Europhys. Lett. 86 16003 (2009)].

  13. EIGEN-6C3 - The latest Combined Global Gravity Field Model including GOCE data up to degree and order 1949 of GFZ Potsdam and GRGS Toulouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerste, C.; Bruinsma, S.; Flechtner, F.; Abrykosov, O.; Dahle, C.; Marty, J.; Lemoine, J.; Biancale, R.; Barthelmes, F.; Neumayer, K.; König, R.

    2013-12-01

    GFZ Potsdam and GRGS Toulouse have a long-time close cooperation in the field of global gravity field determination at which the present focus is (1) on GOCE gravity field determination and (2) on computation of high resolution combined gravity field models. Such data products play a fundamental role in geodesy and Earth sciences, ranging from practical purposes, like precise orbit determination, to scientific applications, like investigations of the density structure of the Earth's interior. Here we present our combined gravity field model EIGEN-6C3 which is the third release of EIGEN-6C (EIGEN = European Improved Gravity model of the Earth by New techniques). The first release of EIGEN-6, published in 2011, was the first global combined gravity field model containing GOCE data. It had been computed from a combination of LAGEOS, GRACE and GOCE data, augmented with the DTU10 surface gravity data and is complete to degree and order 1440 (corresponding to 14 km spatial resolution). The combination of the different data types has been done on the basis of full normal equations up to maximum degree/order 370. The spherical harmonic coefficients of the shorter wavelengths were obtained from a block diagonal normal equation from the terrestrial data only. The new release is complete to degree and order 1949 (corresponding to approx. 10 km spatial resolution) and comprises extended measurement time spans for the LAGEOS/GRACE data, and more than 2 years of reprocessed GOCE data in particular. Our combination of GRACE and GOCE data allows the construction of an accurate satellite-only contribution to the final combined model up to degree and order 260, where the GOCE gradiometer data contribute only for degrees upwards of 100. This is achieved through filtering of the GOCE observation equations, which is necessary because of the degraded gradiometer performance outside the measurement bandwidth. Consequently, surface data normal equations are combined with the satellite

  14. Interannual Variations in Earth's Low-Degree Gravity Field and the Connections With Geophysical/Climatic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Cox, Christopher M.

    2004-01-01

    Long-wavelength time-variable gravity recently derived from satellite laser ranging (SLR) analysis have focused to a large extent on the effects of the recent (since 1998) large anomalous change in J2, or the Earth's oblateness, and the potential causes. However, it is relatively more difficult to determine whether there are corresponding signals in the shorter wavelength zonal harmonics from the existing SLR-derived time variable gravity results, although it appears that geophysical fluid mass transport is being observed. For example, the recovered J3 time series shows remarkable agreement with NCEP-derived estimates of atmospheric gravity variations. Likewise, some of the non-zonal spherical harmonic components have significant interannual signal that appears to be related to mass transport. The non-zonal degree-2 components show reasonable temporal correlation with atmospheric signals, as well as climatic effects such as El Nino Southern Oscillation. We will present recent updates on the J2 evolution, as well as a look at other low-degree components of the interannual variations of gravity, complete through degree 4. We will examine the possible geophysical and climatic causes of these low-degree time-variable gravity related to oceanic and hydrological mass transports, for example some anomalous but prominent signals found in the extratropic Pacific ocean related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

  15. Combined effects of f(R) gravity and conformally invariant Maxwell field on the extended phase space thermodynamics of higher-dimensional black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong; Li, Gu-Qiang; Xu, Xiao-Bao [Lingnan Normal University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Zhanjiang, Guangdong (China)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the thermodynamics of higher-dimensional f(R) black holes in the extended phase space. Both the analytic expressions and the numerical results for the possible critical physical quantities are obtained. It is proved that meaningful critical specific volume only exists when p is odd. This unique phenomenon may be attributed to the combined effect of f(R) gravity and conformally invariant Maxwell field. It is also shown that the ratio P{sub c}v{sub c}/T{sub c} differs from that of higher-dimensional charged AdS black holes in Einstein gravity. However, the ratio for four-dimensional f(R) black holes is the same as that of four-dimensional RN-AdS black holes, implying that f(R) gravity does not influence the ratio. So the ratio may be related to conformally invariant Maxwell field. To probe the phase transition, we derive the explicit expression of the Gibbs free energy with its graph plotted. A phase transition analogous to the van der Waals liquid-gas system takes place between the small black hole and the large black hole. Classical swallow tail behavior, characteristic of first-order phase transitions, can also be observed in the Gibbs free energy graph. Critical exponents are also calculated. It is shown that these exponents are exactly the same as those of other AdS black holes, implying that neither f(R) gravity nor conformally invariant Maxwell field influence the critical exponents. Since the investigated black hole solution depends on the form of the function f(R), we discuss in detail how our results put constraint on the form of the function f(R) and we also present a simple example. (orig.)

  16. On wormholes and black holes solutions of Einstein gravity coupled to a K-massless scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez-Delgado, J [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Morelia, Mich (Mexico); Zannias, T [Ins. de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, A.P. 2-82, 58040 Morelia, Mich (Mexico)

    2007-05-15

    We investigate the nature of black holes and wormholes admitted by a K-essence model involving a massless scalar field {phi}, minimally coupled to gravity. Via Weyl's formalism, we show that any axial wormhole of the theory can be generated by a unique pair of harmonic functions: U({lambda}) = {pi}/2 C + C arctan({lambda}/{lambda}{sub 0}), {phi}({lambda}) = {pi}/2 D + D arctan({lambda}/{lambda}{sub 0}) where {lambda} is one of the oblate coordinate, {lambda}{sub 0} > 0 and (C, D) real parameters. The properties of the wormholes depends crucially upon the values of the parameters (C, D). Whenever (C, D) are chosen so that 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -2 the wormhole is spherical, while for the case where 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -4 or 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -6 the wormhole throat possesses toroidal topology. Those two families of wormholes exhaust all regular static and axisymmetric wormholes admitted by this theory. For completeness we add that whenever (C, D) satisfy 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -2l with l {>=} 3/2 one still generates a spacetime possessing two asymptotically flat but the throat connecting the two ends contains a string like singularity. For the refined case where 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -2l with l = 4,5, ... the resulting spacetime represents a multi-sheeted configuration which even though free of curvature singularities nevertheless the spacetime topology is distinct to so far accepted wormhole topology. Spacetimes generated by the pair (U({lambda}), {phi}({lambda})) and parameters (C, D) subject to 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -2l with l < 3/2 contain naked curvature singularities. For the classes of regular wormholes, the parameters (C, D) determine the ADM masses of the asymptotically flat ends and can be positive, negative or zero. Except for the cases of zero mass wormholes, the two ends possess ADM masses of opposite sign. In contrast to wormhole sector, the black hole sector of the theory is trivial. Any static, asymptotically flat solution of the

  17. Effect of an absorbent overlay on the residual stress field induced by laser shock processing on aluminum samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio-Gonzalez, C. [Centro de Ingenieria y Desarrollo Industrial, Pie de la Cuesta No. 702, Desarrollo San Pablo, Queretaro, Qro. 76130 (Mexico)]. E-mail: crubio@cidesi.mx; Gomez-Rosas, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara. Lagos de Moreno Jal. (Mexico); Ocana, J.L. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada a la Ingenieria Industrial, E.T.S.I.I. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Molpeceres, C. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada a la Ingenieria Industrial, E.T.S.I.I. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Banderas, A. [Centro de Ingenieria y Desarrollo Industrial, Pie de la Cuesta No. 702, Desarrollo San Pablo, Queretaro, Qro. 76130 (Mexico); Porro, J. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada a la Ingenieria Industrial, E.T.S.I.I. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Morales, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada a la Ingenieria Industrial, E.T.S.I.I. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-15

    Laser shock processing (LSP) or laser shock peening is a new technique for strengthening metals. This process induces a compressive residual stress field, which increases fatigue crack initiation life and reduces fatigue crack growth rate. Specimens of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy are used in this investigation. A convergent lens is used to deliver 2.5 J, 8 ns laser pulses by a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser, operating at 10 Hz. The pulses are focused to a diameter of 1.5 mm onto aluminum samples. Density of 2500 pulses/cm{sup 2} with infrared (1064 nm) radiation was used. The effect of an absorbent overlay on the residual stress field using this LSP setup and this energy level is evaluated. Residual stress distribution as a function of depth is assessed by the hole drilling method. It is observed that the overlay makes the compressive residual stress profile move to the surface. This effect is explained on the basis of the vaporization of the coat layer suppressing thermal effects on the metallic substrate. The effect of coating the specimen surface before LSP treatment may have advantages on improving wear and contact fatigue properties of this aluminum alloy.

  18. Statistical estimation of absolute gravity values | Aku | Science World ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gravity measurements at stations in northwestern Nigeria were assumed to be random variables. Gravity data collected was used to illustrate the gravity network adjustment theories. Residuals of the network were inspected to detect gross errors by standardizing the residuals. Computed standard deviation for unit weight ...

  19. Carroll versus Galilei gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergshoeff, Eric [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Gomis, Joaquim [Departament de Física Cuàntica i Astrofísica and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rollier, Blaise [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Rosseel, Jan [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna,Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Veldhuis, Tonnis ter [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-03-30

    We consider two distinct limits of General Relativity that in contrast to the standard non-relativistic limit can be taken at the level of the Einstein-Hilbert action instead of the equations of motion. One is a non-relativistic limit and leads to a so-called Galilei gravity theory, the other is an ultra-relativistic limit yielding a so-called Carroll gravity theory. We present both gravity theories in a first-order formalism and show that in both cases the equations of motion (i) lead to constraints on the geometry and (ii) are not sufficient to solve for all of the components of the connection fields in terms of the other fields. Using a second-order formalism we show that these independent components serve as Lagrange multipliers for the geometric constraints we found earlier. We point out a few noteworthy differences between Carroll and Galilei gravity and give some examples of matter couplings.

  20. Erratum to: Estimating the crop response to fertilizer nitrogen residues in long-continued field experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Mattson, L

    2012-01-01

    to previous N input rates, the experimental design for testing needs to be examined. Experimental designs that suspend the customary N inputs, leaving the test crop unfertilized, ignore any interaction between the rate of N applied in the past and the rate applied in the test year. We estimated...... and N offtake when the residual effect originated from organic applications, but the interaction was not significant when mineral N fertilizer had been used in the past, making the residual effect of N applied in the past additive to the effect of N applied in the test year. The dry matter (DM) grain...

  1. How To Test Nontarget Effects of Veterinary Pharmaceutical Residues in Livestock Dung in the Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochmann, R.; Blanckenhorn, W.U.; Bussière, L.; Eirkson, C.E.; Jensen, J.; Kryger, U.; Lahr, J.; Lumaret, J.P.; Römbke, J.; Wardhaugh, K.G.; Floate, K.D.

    2010-01-01

    To register veterinary medicinal products (VMPs) as parasiticides on pastured animals, legislation in the European Union requires an environmental risk assessment to test the potential nontarget effects of fecal residues on dung-dwelling organisms. Products with adverse effects in single-species

  2. Proposal for field-based definition of soil bound pesticide residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2016-01-01

    The environmental significance of soil bound pesticide residues (SBPR) is potentially large because approximately one third of the applied mass of the pesticides in agriculture ends up as SBPR. At EU level, there is little regulatory guidance available on the environmental risk assessment of SBPR

  3. Residual stress fields in sol-gel-derived thin TiO2 layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, D.H.J.; Haas, M. de; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the induction of residual stresses during the curing process of thin titania layers, which are derived using a sol-gel process. During this process, stresses may build up in the spinning stage, the drying stage, and the consolidation stage. The magnitude and character of these

  4. Simultaneous determination of tebuconazole, trifloxystrobin, and its metabolite trifloxystrobin acid residues in gherkin under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivam, Mariappan; Selvi, Chellamuthu; Deepa, Manthirachalam; Jayaprakash, Samiyannan A; Chandrasekaran, Subramanian

    2015-03-01

    A rapid, simple, and selective analytical method for the simultaneous determination of tebuconazole, trifloxystrobin, and its metabolite trifloxystrobin acid residues in gherkin and soil was developed and validated by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile and cleaned up by dispersive solid-phase extraction with primary secondary amine sorbent. The limit of quantification of the method was 0.05 mg/kg for all three compounds. The method was validated using blank samples spiked at three levels and recoveries ranged from 83.5 to 103.8% with a relative standard deviation of 1.2 to 4.8%. The developed method was validated and applied for the analysis of a degradation study sample. The residues of trifloxystrobin and tebuconazole were found to dissipate following first-order kinetics with half-life ranging between 3.31-3.38 and 3.0-3.04 days, respectively, for two different dosages. Pesticide residues were below the European Union maximum residue level after seven days for trifloxystrobin (0.2 mg/kg) and ten days for tebuconazole (0.05 mg/kg), which suggested the use of this fungicide mixture to be safe to humans. These results can be utilized in formulating the spray schedule and safety evaluation on trifloxystrobin and tebuconazole in gherkin crop. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Grain yield and crop N offtake in response to residual fertilizer N in long-term field experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Mattsson, L.

    2010-01-01

    Organic inputs [e.g. animal manure (AM) and plant residues] contribute directly to the soil organic N pool, whereas mineral N fertilizer contributes indirectly by increasing the return of the crop residues and by microbial immobilization. To evaluate the residual effect of N treatments established...... in four long-term (>35 yr) field experiments, we measured the response of barley (grain yield and N offtake at crop maturity) to six rates (0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 kg N/ha) of mineral fertilizer N (Nnew) applied in subplots replacing the customary long-term plot treatments of fertilizer inputs (Nprev......). Rates of Nprev above 50-100 kg N/ha had no consistent effect on the soil N content, but this was up to 20% greater than that in unfertilized treatments. Long-term unfertilized plots should not be used as control to test the residual value of N in modern agriculture with large production potentials...

  6. Residuation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Blyth, T S; Sneddon, I N; Stark, M

    1972-01-01

    Residuation Theory aims to contribute to literature in the field of ordered algebraic structures, especially on the subject of residual mappings. The book is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on ordered sets; directed sets; semilattices; lattices; and complete lattices. Chapter 2 tackles Baer rings; Baer semigroups; Foulis semigroups; residual mappings; the notion of involution; and Boolean algebras. Chapter 3 covers residuated groupoids and semigroups; group homomorphic and isotone homomorphic Boolean images of ordered semigroups; Dubreil-Jacotin and Brouwer semigroups; and loli

  7. Application of the satellite system of the earth's gravity field measurement (GRACE) for the evaluation of water balance in large Russian river catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, Natalia; Zotov, Leonid; Grigoriev, Vadim; Sazonov, Alexey; Kireeva, Maria; Krylenko, Inna

    2017-04-01

    Space-based Earth observing systems provided a substantially large amount of information to the scientific community in recent decades. Cumulative effects of redistribution of masses in the Earth system can be seen in the changes of the gravity field of the Earth. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, launched 17.03.2002 from Plesetsk, provide a set of monthly Earth's gravity field observations. GRACE data is very useful for hydrological and climatological studies, especially over large territory, not completely covered by the meteorological and hydrological networks, like Russia. Possible application of the satellite gravity survey data obtained under the GRACE for solving various hydrological problems is discussed. The GRACE-based monthly gravity field data are transformed into the maps of water level equivalent and averaged for the catchments of the largest rivers of Russia. The temporal variability of the parameter is analyzed. Possible application of the GRACE data for the evaluation of particular components of water balance within the largest river basins of the European part of Russia is discussed. After averaging over 15 large Russian rivers basins annual component shows amplitude increase since 2009. Trend component grows until 2009 and then reaches a plateau. It is mostly dominated by Siberian rivers. Map for the trend show gravity field increase in Siberia, at Back Sea and decrease over Caspian Sea since 2003. GRACE satellite gravimetry data can be used for estimating terrestrial water storage (TWS) in a river basin scale. Terrestrial water storage (TWS) is the integrated sum of all basin storages (surface water bodies, soil and ground aquifer, snowpack and glaciers) and the ability to estimate TWS dynamics is useful for understanding the basin's water cycle, its interconnection with the local climate, physics of predictability of extreme hydrological events. Despite the importance of the TWS estimates, reliable ground

  8. The ESA project SC4MGV "Assessment of Satellite Constellations for Monitoring the Variations in Earth's Gravity Field" - overview, objectives and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reubelt, Tilo; Sneeuw, Nico; Iran Pour, Siavash; Pail, Roland; Gruber, Thomas; Murböck, Michael; Daras, Ilias; Visser, Pieter; de Texeira de Encarnação, Joao; van Dam, Tonie; Weigelt, Matthias; Cesare, Stefano; Cornara, Stefania

    2014-05-01

    In recent years several studies, publications and projects dealt with future gravity mission studies for time variable gravity field recovery of the successive era of GRACE and GRACE-FO. Besides improved satellite and sensor technology (e.g. laser interferometry and drag-free systems) sophisticated satellite formations and multi-satellite formations indicate a great potential for mitigating aliasing effects and for improving sensitivity and isotropy. Especially pendulum formations and Bender constellations, which consist of two inline satellite pairs - one on a near polar orbit and one on an inclined orbit - showed very promising results. Since pendulum formations are regarded as hardly feasible at the moment due to serious technological problems, e.g. large range rates and high precision active satellite pointing, the Bender constellations which make use of mature inline formations are regarded as an appropriate choice. In autumn 2012 ESA called for a project where the orbit design, gravity recovery approaches and post-processing algorithms should be optimized for Bender constellations. In this contribution, the project, its objectives, the project team as well as first results for the mission requirements and the orbit design are presented.

  9. Perturbative formulation of pure space-like axial gauge QED with infrared divergences regularized by residual gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakawaki, Yuji; McCartor, Gary

    2006-01-01

    We construct a new perturbative formulation of pure space-like axial gauge QED in which the inherent infrared divergences are regularized by residual gauge fields. For this purpose, we carry out our calculations in the coordinates x μ =(x + , x - , x 1 , x 2 ), where x + =x 0 sinθ + x 3 cosθ and x - = x 0 cosθ - x 3 sinθ. Here, A=A 0 cosθ + A 3 sinθ = n·A=0 is taken as the gauge fixing condition. We show in detail that, in perturbation theory, infrared divergences resulting from the residual gauge fields cancel infrared divergences resulting from the physical parts of the gauge field. As a result, we obtain the gauge field propagator proposed by Mandelstam and Leibbrandt. By taking the limit θ→π/4, we are able to construct a light-cone formulation that is free from infrared divergences. With that analysis complete, we next calculate the one-loop electron self-energy, something not previously done in the light-cone quantization and light-cone gauge. (author)

  10. In-situ measurements for assessment of residual radiation field on incore structural components of research reactor Cirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, P.B.; Varughese, A.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Mishra, S.G.; Prasad, S.K.; Vakharwala, K.J.

    2003-01-01

    In-situ radiation field measurements on in-core components of Cirus reactor were carried out during the refurbishing outage of the reactor. The data aided in characterization studies for evaluation of residual activity in the structural components of the reactor after four decades of its operation. The study led to the generation of a database which served as a primary input in decision making for various refurbishing activities related to in-core components of the reactor. The measurements also helped in dose budgeting during the refurbishing activities. The radiation field measurements were repeated in near identical conditions to asses the decay pattern of the residual activity. It was observed that the reduction of 35-40% in radiation field over a period of ∼-1200 days can be correlated to the half-life of radionuclides produced by neutron activation of structural components. This paper describes, in detail, the radiation field measurements carried out and the measurement technique employed for in-situ measurements in generating a reliable database for planning of the future decommissioning activities of the reactor. (author)

  11. Quantum gravity. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, P. G.; de Sabbata, V.; Treder, H.-J.

    The following topics were dealt with: relativistic heat theories; unified field theory; mixed field theories; de Sitter gauges; black hole entropy; null hypersurface canonical formalism; gauge aspects; superluminal behavior; general relativity; twistor theory; quantum geometry and gravity; strings; Poincaré gauge theory and spacetime quantization.

  12. A field study of radiation fog. The chemical composition of interstitial aerosol and droplet residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieray R.; Wieser, P.

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate the discrimination of atmospheric trace components due to cloud or fog formation, the residues resulting from droplet evaporation are compared with particles of the interstitial aerosol. A counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), described e.g. by OGREN et al. (1985) is used to separate the fog droplets from both the gaseous and the particulate aerosol components. The fog droplets sampled evaporate in the airborne state and the residues are either collected on a nucleopore filter or by means of a five-stage cascade impactor on thin films. In addition, both the humidity originating from droplet evaporation and the number concentration of the droplet residues are measured. These data can be used to study the time dependence of the liquid water content, the number density and the volume equivalent diameter of the fog droplets sampled, respectively. Soot particles only appear in the fraction of the interstitial aerosol. They are not involved in the formation of the liquid phase. The average residence time and the transport of soot particles in the atmosphere are influenced by this fact. The relatively low average scavenged fraction of lead, potassium and zinc can be attributed to the observed enrichment of these elements in soot particles remaining in the interstitial aerosol. (orig./BBR) [de

  13. Utilization of ultrasonic tomography for the mapping of residual stress fields in thick metal sections. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, B.P.; Hufferd, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    It is well known that the velocity of sound propagation through a solid is altered when a stress is applied. The velocity change is small, and dependent upon the type of wave being propagated as well as the magnitude of the stress. Sensitivity is greatest to shear wave sound with the polarization vector parallel to the direction of stress. In this case, velocity changes as great as 0.6 percent were measured. Preliminary work is described aimed at evaluating computerized reconstruction of velocity fields from velocity profiles to map residual stress concentrations in thick metal sections. Experimental results with liquid and solid models are described. One could image velocity anomalies of 0.2 percent and estimate that 0.05 percent is technically feasible. It is concluded that this technique has great potential for finding and mapping residual stress in thick metal sections

  14. DenInv3D: a geophysical software for three-dimensional density inversion of gravity field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Ke, Xiaoping; Wang, Yong

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional density inversion software called DenInv3D that operates on gravity and gravity gradient data. The software performs inversion modelling, kernel function calculation, and inversion calculations using the improved preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) algorithm. In the PCG algorithm, due to the uncertainty of empirical parameters, such as the Lagrange multiplier, we use the inflection point of the L-curve as the regularisation parameter. The software can construct unequally spaced grids and perform inversions using such grids, which enables changing the resolution of the inversion results at different depths. Through inversion of airborne gradiometry data on the Australian Kauring test site, we discovered that anomalous blocks of different sizes are present within the study area in addition to the central anomalies. The software of DenInv3D can be downloaded from http://159.226.162.30.

  15. Using the Multiplicative Schwarz Alternating Algorithm (MSAA) for Solving the Large Linear System of Equations Related to Global Gravity Field Recovery up to Degree and Order 120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, A.; Sharifi, M. A.; Amjadiparvar, B.

    2010-05-01

    The GRACE mission has substantiated the low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking (LL-SST) concept. The LL-SST configuration can be combined with the previously realized high-low SST concept in the CHAMP mission to provide a much higher accuracy. The line of sight (LOS) acceleration difference between the GRACE satellite pair is the mostly used observable for mapping the global gravity field of the Earth in terms of spherical harmonic coefficients. In this paper, mathematical formulae for LOS acceleration difference observations have been derived and the corresponding linear system of equations has been set up for spherical harmonic up to degree and order 120. The total number of unknowns is 14641. Such a linear equation system can be solved with iterative solvers or direct solvers. However, the runtime of direct methods or that of iterative solvers without a suitable preconditioner increases tremendously. This is the reason why we need a more sophisticated method to solve the linear system of problems with a large number of unknowns. Multiplicative variant of the Schwarz alternating algorithm is a domain decomposition method, which allows it to split the normal matrix of the system into several smaller overlaped submatrices. In each iteration step the multiplicative variant of the Schwarz alternating algorithm solves linear systems with the matrices obtained from the splitting successively. It reduces both runtime and memory requirements drastically. In this paper we propose the Multiplicative Schwarz Alternating Algorithm (MSAA) for solving the large linear system of gravity field recovery. The proposed algorithm has been tested on the International Association of Geodesy (IAG)-simulated data of the GRACE mission. The achieved results indicate the validity and efficiency of the proposed algorithm in solving the linear system of equations from accuracy and runtime points of view. Keywords: Gravity field recovery, Multiplicative Schwarz Alternating Algorithm, Low

  16. The effects of rape residue mulching on net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity from no-tillage paddy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Cao, Cou-Gui; Guo, Li-Jin; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to provide a complete greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for global warming potential (GWP), net GWP, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from no-tillage (NT) paddy fields with different amounts of oilseed rape residue mulch (0, 3000, 4000, and 6000 kg dry matter (DM) ha(-1)) during a rice-growing season after 3 years of oilseed rape-rice cultivation. Residue mulching treatments showed significantly more organic carbon (C) density for the 0-20 cm soil layer at harvesting than no residue treatment. During a rice-growing season, residue mulching treatments sequestered significantly more organic C from 687 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) to 1654 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) than no residue treatment. Residue mulching significantly increased emissions of CO2 and N2O but decreased CH4 emissions. Residue mulching treatments significantly increased GWP by 9-30% but significantly decreased net GWP by 33-71% and GHGI by 35-72% relative to no residue treatment. These results suggest that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be achieved simultaneously by residue mulching on NT paddy fields in central China.

  17. The Effects of Rape Residue Mulching on Net Global Warming Potential and Greenhouse Gas Intensity from No-Tillage Paddy Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Cao, Cou-Gui; Guo, Li-Jin; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to provide a complete greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for global warming potential (GWP), net GWP, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from no-tillage (NT) paddy fields with different amounts of oilseed rape residue mulch (0, 3000, 4000, and 6000 kg dry matter (DM) ha−1) during a rice-growing season after 3 years of oilseed rape-rice cultivation. Residue mulching treatments showed significantly more organic carbon (C) density for the 0–20 cm soil layer at harvesting than no residue treatment. During a rice-growing season, residue mulching treatments sequestered significantly more organic C from 687 kg C ha−1 season−1 to 1654 kg C ha−1 season−1 than no residue treatment. Residue mulching significantly increased emissions of CO2 and N2O but decreased CH4 emissions. Residue mulching treatments significantly increased GWP by 9–30% but significantly decreased net GWP by 33–71% and GHGI by 35–72% relative to no residue treatment. These results suggest that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be achieved simultaneously by residue mulching on NT paddy fields in central China. PMID:25140329

  18. $P-V$ criticality of a specific black hole in $f(R)$ gravity coupled with Yang-Mills field arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Övgün, Ali

    In this paper, we study the $P-v$ criticality of a specific charged AdS type black hole (SBH) in $f(R)$ gravity coupled with Yang-Mills field. In the extended phase space, we treat the cosmological constant as a thermodynamic pressure. After we study the various thermodynamical quantities, we show that the thermodynamic properties of the SBH behave as a Van der Waals liquid-gas system at the critical points and there is a first order phase transition between small-large SBH.

  19. Nonlocal gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    Relativity theory is based on a postulate of locality, which means that the past history of the observer is not directly taken into account. This book argues that the past history should be taken into account. In this way, nonlocality---in the sense of history dependence---is introduced into relativity theory. The deep connection between inertia and gravitation suggests that gravity could be nonlocal, and in nonlocal gravity the fading gravitational memory of past events must then be taken into account. Along this line of thought, a classical nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation has recently been developed. A significant consequence of this theory is that the nonlocal aspect of gravity appears to simulate dark matter. According to nonlocal gravity theory, what astronomers attribute to dark matter should instead be due to the nonlocality of gravitation. Nonlocality dominates on the scale of galaxies and beyond. Memory fades with time; therefore, the nonlocal aspect of gravity becomes wea...

  20. Induced classical gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novozhilov, Yu.V.; Vassilevich, D.V.

    1991-01-01

    We review the induced-gravity approach according to which the Einstein gravity is a long-wavelength effect induced by underlying fundamental quantum fields due to the dynamical-scale symmetry breaking. It is shown that no ambiguities arise in the definition of the induced Newton and cosmological constants if one works with the path integral for fundamental fields in the low-scale region. The main accent is on a specification of the path integral which enables us to utilize the unitarity condition and thereby avoid ambiguities. Induced Einstein equations appear from the symmetry condition that the path integral of fundamental fields for a slowly varying metric is invariant under the local vertical strokeGL(4, R)-transformations of a tetrad, which contain the local Euclidean Lorentz, O(4)-rotations as a subgroup. The relatinship to induced quantum gravity is briefly outlined. (orig.)

  1. Neonicotinoid insecticide residues in surface water and soil associated with commercial maize (corn) fields in southwestern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Arthur; Limay-Rios, Victor; Baute, Tracey; Smith, Jocelyn; Xue, Yingen

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides have come under scrutiny for their potential unintended effects on non-target organisms, particularly pollinators in agro-ecosystems. As part of a larger study of neonicotinoid residues associated with maize (corn) production, 76 water samples within or around the perimeter of 18 commercial maize fields and neighbouring apiaries were collected in 5 maize-producing counties of southwestern Ontario. Residues of clothianidin (mean = 2.28, max. = 43.60 ng/mL) and thiamethoxam (mean = 1.12, max. = 16.50 ng/mL) were detected in 100 and 98.7% of the water samples tested, respectively. The concentration of total neonicotinoid residues in water within maize fields increased six-fold during the first five weeks after planting, and returned to pre-plant levels seven weeks after planting. However, concentrations in water sampled from outside the fields were similar throughout the sampling period. Soil samples from the top 5 cm of the soil profile were also collected in these fields before and immediately following planting. The mean total neonicotinoid residue was 4.02 (range 0.07 to 20.30) ng/g, for samples taken before planting, and 9.94 (range 0.53 to 38.98) ng/g, for those taken immediately after planting. Two soil samples collected from within an conservation area contained detectable (0.03 and 0.11 ng/g) concentrations of clothianidin. Of three drifted snow samples taken, the drift stratum containing the most wind-scoured soil had 0.16 and 0.20 ng/mL mainly clothianidin in the melted snow. The concentration was at the limit of detection (0.02 ng/mL) taken across the entire vertical profile. With the exception of one sample, water samples tested had concentrations below those reported to have acute, chronic or sublethal effects to honey bees. Our results suggest that neonicotinoids may move off-target by wind erosion of contaminated soil. These results are informative to risk assessment models for other non-target species in maize agro-ecosytems.

  2. Neonicotinoid insecticide residues in surface water and soil associated with commercial maize (corn fields in southwestern Ontario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Schaafsma

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoid insecticides have come under scrutiny for their potential unintended effects on non-target organisms, particularly pollinators in agro-ecosystems. As part of a larger study of neonicotinoid residues associated with maize (corn production, 76 water samples within or around the perimeter of 18 commercial maize fields and neighbouring apiaries were collected in 5 maize-producing counties of southwestern Ontario. Residues of clothianidin (mean = 2.28, max. = 43.60 ng/mL and thiamethoxam (mean = 1.12, max. = 16.50 ng/mL were detected in 100 and 98.7% of the water samples tested, respectively. The concentration of total neonicotinoid residues in water within maize fields increased six-fold during the first five weeks after planting, and returned to pre-plant levels seven weeks after planting. However, concentrations in water sampled from outside the fields were similar throughout the sampling period. Soil samples from the top 5 cm of the soil profile were also collected in these fields before and immediately following planting. The mean total neonicotinoid residue was 4.02 (range 0.07 to 20.30 ng/g, for samples taken before planting, and 9.94 (range 0.53 to 38.98 ng/g, for those taken immediately after planting. Two soil samples collected from within an conservation area contained detectable (0.03 and 0.11 ng/g concentrations of clothianidin. Of three drifted snow samples taken, the drift stratum containing the most wind-scoured soil had 0.16 and 0.20 ng/mL mainly clothianidin in the melted snow. The concentration was at the limit of detection (0.02 ng/mL taken across the entire vertical profile. With the exception of one sample, water samples tested had concentrations below those reported to have acute, chronic or sublethal effects to honey bees. Our results suggest that neonicotinoids may move off-target by wind erosion of contaminated soil. These results are informative to risk assessment models for other non-target species in maize

  3. Neonicotinoid Insecticide Residues in Surface Water and Soil Associated with Commercial Maize (Corn) Fields in Southwestern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Arthur; Limay-Rios, Victor; Baute, Tracey; Smith, Jocelyn; Xue, Yingen

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides have come under scrutiny for their potential unintended effects on non-target organisms, particularly pollinators in agro-ecosystems. As part of a larger study of neonicotinoid residues associated with maize (corn) production, 76 water samples within or around the perimeter of 18 commercial maize fields and neighbouring apiaries were collected in 5 maize-producing counties of southwestern Ontario. Residues of clothianidin (mean = 2.28, max. = 43.60 ng/mL) and thiamethoxam (mean = 1.12, max. = 16.50 ng/mL) were detected in 100 and 98.7% of the water samples tested, respectively. The concentration of total neonicotinoid residues in water within maize fields increased six-fold during the first five weeks after planting, and returned to pre-plant levels seven weeks after planting. However, concentrations in water sampled from outside the fields were similar throughout the sampling period. Soil samples from the top 5 cm of the soil profile were also collected in these fields before and immediately following planting. The mean total neonicotinoid residue was 4.02 (range 0.07 to 20.30) ng/g, for samples taken before planting, and 9.94 (range 0.53 to 38.98) ng/g, for those taken immediately after planting. Two soil samples collected from within an conservation area contained detectable (0.03 and 0.11 ng/g) concentrations of clothianidin. Of three drifted snow samples taken, the drift stratum containing the most wind-scoured soil had 0.16 and 0.20 ng/mL mainly clothianidin in the melted snow. The concentration was at the limit of detection (0.02 ng/mL) taken across the entire vertical profile. With the exception of one sample, water samples tested had concentrations below those reported to have acute, chronic or sublethal effects to honey bees. Our results suggest that neonicotinoids may move off-target by wind erosion of contaminated soil. These results are informative to risk assessment models for other non-target species in maize agro

  4. An Innovative Passive Residual Heat Removal System of an Open-Pool Type Research Reactor with Pump Flywheel and Gravity Core Cooling Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon-Yeong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In an open-pool type research reactor, the primary cooling system can be designed to have a downward flow inside the core during normal operation because of the plate type fuel geometry. There is a flow inversion inside the core from the downward flow by the inertia force of the primary coolant to the upward flow by the natural circulation when the pump is turned off. To delay the flow inversion time, an innovative passive system with pump flywheel and GCCT is developed to remove the residual heat. Before the primary cooling pump starts up, the water level of the GCCT is the same as that of the reactor pool. During the primary cooling pump operation, the water in the GCCT is moved into the reactor pool because of the pump suction head. After the pump stops, the potential head generates a downward flow inside the core by moving the water from the reactor pool to the GCCT and removes the residual heat. When the water levels of the two pools are the same again, the core flow has an inversion of the flow direction, and natural circulation is developed through the flap valves.

  5. Measurement of residual stress fields in FHPP welding: a comparison between DSPI combined with hole-drilling and neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viotti, Matias R.; Albertazzi, Armando; Staron, Peter; Pisa, Marcelo

    2013-04-01

    This paper shows a portable device to measure mainly residual stress fields outside the optical bench. This system combines the traditional hole drilling technique with Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry. The novel feature of this device is the high degree of compaction since only one base supports simultaneously the measurement module and the hole-drilling device. The portable device allows the measurement of non-uniform residual stresses in accordance with the ASTM standard. In oil and gas offshore industries, alternative welding procedures among them, the friction hydro pillar processing (FHPP) is highlighted and nowadays is an important maintenance tool since it has the capability to produce structure repairs without risk of explosions. In this process a hole is drilled and filled with a consumable rod of the same material. The rod, which could be cylindrical or conical, is rotated and pressed against the hole, leading to frictional heating. In order to assess features about the residual stress distribution generated by the weld into the rod as well as into the base material around the rod, welded samples were evaluated by neutron diffraction and by the hole drilling technique having a comparison between them. For the hole drilling technique some layers were removed by using electrical discharge machining (EDM) after diffraction measurements in order to assess the bulk stress distribution. Results have shown a good agreement between techniques.

  6. Factors Influencing Dislodgeable 2, 4-D Plant Residues from Hybrid Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. x C. transvaalensis) Athletic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khalied A.; Breeden, Gregory K.

    2016-01-01

    Research to date has confirmed 2,4-D residues may dislodge from turfgrass; however, experiments have not been conducted on hybrid bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. x C. transvaalensis), the most common athletic field turfgrass in subtropical climates. More specifically, previous research has not investigated the effect of post-application irrigation on dislodgeable 2,4-D residues from hybrid bermudagrass and across turfgrass species, research has been nondescript regarding sample time within a d (TWD) or conducted in the afternoon when the turfgrass canopy is dry, possibly underestimating potential for dislodgement. The effect of irrigation and TWD on 2,4-D dislodgeability was investigated. Dislodgeable 2,4-D amine was reduced > 300% following irrigation. From 2 to 7 d after treatment (DAT), ≤ 0.5% of applied 2,4-D was dislodged from irrigated turfgrass, while ≤ 2.3% of applied 2,4-D was dislodged when not irrigated. 2,4-D dislodgeability decreased as TWD increased. Dislodgeable 2,4-D residues declined to 2,4-D re-suspended on treated turfgrass vegetation overnight. In conclusion, irrigating treated turfgrass reduced dislodgeable 2,4-D. 2,4-D dislodgeability increased as TWD decreased, which was attributed to non-precipitation climatic conditions favoring turfgrass canopy wetness. This research will improve turfgrass management practices and research designed to minimize human 2,4-D exposure. PMID:26863005

  7. Massive gravity from bimetric gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baccetti, Valentina; Martín-Moruno, Prado; Visser, Matt

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the subtle relationship between massive gravity and bimetric gravity, focusing particularly on the manner in which massive gravity may be viewed as a suitable limit of bimetric gravity. The limiting procedure is more delicate than currently appreciated. Specifically, this limiting procedure should not unnecessarily constrain the background metric, which must be externally specified by the theory of massive gravity itself. The fact that in bimetric theories one always has two sets of metric equations of motion continues to have an effect even in the massive gravity limit, leading to additional constraints besides the one set of equations of motion naively expected. Thus, since solutions of bimetric gravity in the limit of vanishing kinetic term are also solutions of massive gravity, but the contrary statement is not necessarily true, there is no complete continuity in the parameter space of the theory. In particular, we study the massive cosmological solutions which are continuous in the parameter space, showing that many interesting cosmologies belong to this class. (paper)

  8. Artificial Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Clément, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term reduced gravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity, which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by short-radius human centrifuge devices within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient

  9. Instantons and gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, N.P.

    1996-01-01

    The problems of application of nonperturbative quantization methods in the theories of the gauge fields and gravity are discussed. Unification of interactions is considered in the framework of the geometrical gauge fields theory. Vacuum conception in the unified theory of interactions and instantons role in the vacuum structure are analyzed. The role of vacuum solutions of Einstein equations in definition of the gauge field vacuum is demonstrated

  10. Variability of pesticide residues in cauliflower units collected from a field trial and market places in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodhan, M D H; Papadakis, Emmanouil-N; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the variability of pesticide residue levels present in cauliflower units, a total of 142 samples were collected from a field trial of a cooperative farmer, and 120 samples were collected from different market places in Thessaloniki, Greece. The collected samples were extracted using the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) extraction technique, and the residues were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The developed method was validated by evaluating the accuracy, precision, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), and limit of quantification (LOQ). The average recoveries for all the analytes, derived from the data of control samples fortified at 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 mg/kg, ranged from 74 to 110% with a relative standard deviation of ≤8%. The correlation coefficient (R(2)) was ≥0.997 for all the analytes using matrix-matched calibration standards. The LOD values ranged from 0.001 to 0.003 mg/kg, and the LOQ was determined at 0.01 mg/kg for all the sought analytes. The matrix effect was found to be at a considerable level, especially for cypermethrin and deltamethrin, amounting to +90% and +145%, respectively. For the field samples, the unit-to-unit variability factors (VFs) calculated for cypermethrin and deltamethrin were 2.38 and 2.32, respectively, while the average VF for the market basket samples was 5.11. In the market basket samples, residues of cypermethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos, and indoxacarb were found at levels ≥LOQ and their respective VFs were 7.12, 5.67, 5.28, and 2.40.

  11. Effects of Rotation and Gravity Field on Surface Waves in Fibre-Reinforced Thermoelastic Media under Four Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abd-Alla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation is done to investigate the gravitational and rotational parameters effects on surface waves in fibre-reinforced thermoelastic media. The theory of generalized surface waves has been firstly developed and then it has been employed to investigate particular cases of waves, namely, Stoneley waves, Rayleigh waves, and Love waves. The analytical expressions for surface waves velocity and attenuation coefficient are obtained in the physical domain by using the harmonic vibrations and four thermoelastic theories. The wave velocity equations have been obtained in different cases. The numerical results are given for equation of coupled thermoelastic theory (C-T, Lord-Shulman theory (L-S, Green-Lindsay theory (G-L, and the linearized (G-N theory of type II. Comparison was made with the results obtained in the presence and absence of gravity, rotation, and parameters for fibre-reinforced of the material media. The results obtained are displayed by graphs to clear the phenomena physical meaning. The results indicate that the effect of gravity, rotation, relaxation times, and parameters of fibre-reinforced of the material medium is very pronounced.

  12. Analogue Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barceló Carlos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Analogue models of (and for gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity.

  13. Gravity brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  14. Returning Winter Cover Crop Residue Influences Soil Aggregation and Humic Substances under Double-cropped Rice Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiming Tang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Residue management in cropping systems may improve soil quality. However, there are few studies on the effects of residue management on soil aggregation and carbon content in the humin (C-HUM, humic acid (C-HAF and fulvic acid (C-FAF fractions in South China. Therefore, the effects on soil aggregation and on the C-HUM, C-HAF, C-FAF from incorporating winter cover crop residues in a double-cropped rice (Oryza sativa L. system in South China fields were studied. The experiment has been conducted since winter 2004. Five winter cropping systems were used: rice-rice-ryegrass (Ry-R-R, rice-rice-Chinese milk vetch (Mv-R-R, rice-rice-potato (Po-R-R, rice-rice-rape (Ra-R-R and rice-rice with winter fallow (Fa-R-R. The results indicated that the organic C content in the paddy soil under the Ry-R-R, Mv-R-R, Po-R-R, and Ra-R-R systems was significantly higher than the content in the Fa-R-R system at the early rice and late rice maturity stages. The different sizes of aggregates under the five treatments showed similar trends. The Po-R-R systems had the highest percentage of soil aggregates in each size class and the Fa-R-R systems had the lowest percentage of soil aggregates in each size class in the 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, and 0.10-0.20 m soil depth at the early rice and late rice maturity stages. The C-HUM, C-HAF, and C-FAF increased through long-term application of winter cover crop residues. Statistical analysis showed that the C-HAF under the Ra-R-R systems was significantly higher than that in the Fa-R-R systems at the early rice and late rice maturity stages. The C-FAF and C-HUM under the Mv-R-R systems was significantly higher than the C-FAF and C-HUM in the Fa-R-R systems at the early rice and late rice maturity stages. As a result, the soil organic C content, the soil aggregates in each size class, and the C-HUM, C-HAF, and C-FAF increased from application of winter cover crop residues in double-cropped rice systems.

  15. Content Of 2,4-D-14C Herbicide Residue In Water And Soil Of Irrigated Rice Field System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chairul, Sofnie M.; Djabir, Elida; Magdalena, Nelly

    2000-01-01

    The investigation of 2,4-D exp.-14C herbicide residue in water and soil of irrigated rice field system was carried out. Rice plant and weeds (Monochoria vaginalis Burn. F. Presl) were planted in 101 buckets using two kinds of soil condition, I.e. normal soil and 30 % above normal compact soil. After one week planting, the plants were sprayed with 1 u Ci of 2,4-D exp.-14C and 0,4 mg non labeled 2,4-D. The herbicide residue content was determined 0, 2, 4, 8 and 10 weeks after spraying with 2,4-D herbicide. The analysis was done using Combustion Biological Oxidizer merk Harvey ox-400, and counted with Liquid Scintillation Counter merk Beckman model LS-1801. The results indicates that the herbicide contents in water and soil decrease from the first spraying with herbicide until harvest herbicide Residue content in water after harvest was 0.87 x 10 exp.-6 ppm for soil normal condition, and 0.59 x 10 exp.-6 pm for the soil 30 % up normal condition, while herbicide content in soil was 1.54 x 10 exp.-6 ppm for soil normal condition and 1.48 x 10 exp.-6 ppm for soil 30 % up normal. 2,4-D herbicide residue content in rice after harvest was 0.27 x 10 exp.-6 ppm for normal soil condition and 0.25 x 10 exp.-6 ppm for the soil 30 % up normal. 2,4-D herbicide residue content in roots and leaves of weeds after harvest were respectively 0.29 x 10 exp.-6 ppm and 0.18 x 10 exp.-6 for normal soil condition, while for 30 % up normal soil were 0.25 x 10 exp.-5 ppm and 0.63 x 10 exp.-7 ppm. This result indicates that there is no effect pollution to surrounding area, because the herbicide content is still bellow the allowed detection limit, 0.05 ppm

  16. A direct recursive residue generation method: application to photoionization of hydrogen in static electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, H.O.; Goscinski, O.

    1994-01-01

    In studies of hydrogenic systems via the recursive residue generation method (RRGM) the major bottleneck is the matrix vector product HC, between the Hamiltonian matrix H and a Lanczos vector C. For highly excited states and/or strong perturbations the size of H grows fast leading to storage problems. By making use of direct methods, i.e. avoidance of explicit construction of large Hamiltonian matrices, such problems can be overcome. Utilizing the underlying analytical properties of the Laguerre basis e -λr L k 2l+2 (2λr) a direct RRGM (D-RRGM) for the unperturbed hydrogenic Hamiltonian is derived, changing the storage needs from scaling as N 2 to 4N where N is the number of radial functions for each factorized H o (l,m) block with the possibility of parallel processing. A further computational simplification is introduced by putting the expression for the photoionization (PI) cross section in the rational form conventionally used in the representation of density of states (DOS). This allows the construction of the PI cross section directly from the tridiagonal Lanczos matrix avoiding the explicit calculation of individual eigen values and eigenvectors. (Author)

  17. Effects of distance from center of a weld to fixed end on residual stress and stress intensity factor of a piping weld. Evaluation of SCC growth under residual stress field. Report 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Katsumasa; Numata, Masanori; Saito, Koichi; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2006-01-01

    The fixed conditions of butt welds between straight pipe and valve or pump in the actual piping system are different from those of straight pipes. However, the effect of fixed condition on the residual stress and the stress intensity factor for evaluation of structural integrity of cracked piping was not clear. In this study, the finite element analyses were conducted by considering the differences in the distance from the center of weld to the fixed end L to clarify the effect of fixed condition on the residual stress and the stress intensity factor. For the 600 A piping, the axial residual stress distribution was not affected by the distance L. Furthermore, the stress intensity factor of circumferential crack under the residual stress field with fixed condition could be estimated by using the existing simplified solution for piping. (author)

  18. Flow of visco-elastic fluid of Rivlin-Ericksen type between two inclined parallel planes in presence of gravity and uniform transverse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, P.R.; Sadat, Khondokar Anowarus; Kundu, Shyamal Kumar

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the flow of Rivlin-Ericksen visco-elastic fluid between two inclined parallel planes in presence of gravity and uniform transverse magnetic field. It has been assumed that the lower plane is at rest and the upper plane is moving with a transient velocity in the first case, while in the second case it is moving longitudinally with a periodic velocity. In both cases the fluid velocity and flux of fluid have been obtained by variable separation technique. These results are then deduced for the case of visco-elastic Maxwell fluid taking the fluid to be electrically conducting and placed in presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field. Further, when the magnetic field is absent the corresponding results are obtained by passing to the limit as uniform magnetic field tending to zero. Moreover, the titled problem has also been solved in case of inviscid fluid in both cases of hydromagnetic flow and flow in absence of magnetic field. Thus the present problem is focused to a wide range of flow problems of different types of fluid models. (author)

  19. Buoyancy Effect of Ionic Vacancy on the Change of the Partial Molar Volume in Ferricyanide-Ferrocyanide Redox Reaction under a Vertical Gravity Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Oshikiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With a gravity electrode (GE in a vertical gravity field, the buoyancy effect of ionic vacancy on the change of the partial molar volume in the redox reaction between ferricyanide (FERRI and ferrocyanide (FERRO ions was examined. The buoyancy force of ionic vacancy takes a positive or negative value, depending on whether the rate-determining step is the production or extinction of the vacancy. Though the upward convection over an upward electrode in the FERRO ion oxidation suggests the contribution of the positive buoyancy force arising from the vacancy production, the partial molar volume of the vacancy was not measured. On the other hand, for the downward convection under a downward electrode in the FERRI ion reduction, it was not completely but partly measured by the contribution of the negative buoyancy force from the vacancy extinction. Since the lifetime of the vacancy is decreased by the collision between ionic vacancies during the convection, the former result was ascribed to the shortened lifetime due to the increasing collision efficiency in the enhanced upward convection over an upward electrode, whereas the latter was thought to arise from the elongated lifetime due to the decreasing collision efficiency by the stagnation under the downward electrode.

  20. Single-Use Sensor Strips for Reliable Field Analysis of Gunshot Residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-13

    determined in a single GSR assay. Wearable textile -based printed electrodes were also examined towards a ’Lab-on-Sleeve’ forensic field analysis. New...Example of the different cyclic square-wave stripping voltammetric signals obtained with “swiping” samples at a bare SPCE electrode . Score plot of the...A) The Forensic Finger exhibiting the three electrode surface screen-printed onto a flexible nitrile finger cot (bottom left inset), as well as a

  1. Brane-World Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartens Roy

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The observable universe could be a 1+3-surface (the "brane" embedded in a 1+3+$d$-dimensional spacetime (the "bulk", with Standard Model particles and fields trapped on the brane while gravity is free to access the bulk. At least one of the $d$ extra spatial dimensions could be very large relative to the Planck scale, which lowers the fundamental gravity scale, possibly even down to the electroweak ($sim$TeV level. This revolutionary picture arises in the framework of recent developments in M theory. The 1+10-dimensional M theory encompasses the known 1+9-dimensional superstring theories, and is widely considered to be a promising potential route to quantum gravity. General relativity cannot describe gravity at high enough energies and must be replaced by a quantum gravity theory, picking up significant corrections as the fundamental energy scale is approached. At low energies, gravity is localized at the brane and general relativity is recovered, but at high energies gravity "leaks" into the bulk, behaving in a truly higher-dimensional way. This introduces significant changes to gravitational dynamics and perturbations, with interesting and potentially testable implications for high-energy astrophysics, black holes and cosmology. Brane-world models offer a phenomenological way to test some of the novel predictions and corrections to general relativity that are implied by M theory. This review discusses the geometry, dynamics and perturbations of simple brane-world models for cosmology and astrophysics, mainly focusing on warped 5-dimensional brane-worlds based on the Randall-Sundrum models.

  2. Some remarks about quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Alfaro, V.; Fubini, S.; Turin Univ.; Furlan, G.; Trieste Univ.

    1982-02-01

    Ideas concerning the normalization of quantum gravity are set forth. The approach is to ascribe the correct dimensionality to the field gsub(μnu), to interpret Newton's constant as a vacuum effect, and to work with inverse operators

  3. Gravity and embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between the developing embryo (both plant and animal) and a gravitational field has long been contemplated. The difficulty in designing critical experiments on the surface of the earth because of its background of 1 g, has been an obstacle to a resolution of the problem. Biological responses to gravity (particularly in plants) are obvious in many cases; however, the influence of gravity as an environmental input to the developing embryo is not as obvious and has proven to be extremely difficult to define. In spite of this, over the years numerous attempts have been made using a variety of embryonic materials to come to grips with the role of gravity in development. Three research tools are available: the centrifuge, the clinostat, and the orbiting spacecraft. Experimental results are now available from all three sources. Some tenuous conclusions are drawn, and an attempt at a unifying theory of gravitational influence on embryonic development is made.

  4. Quantum Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giribet, G E

    2005-01-01

    Claus Kiefer presents his book, Quantum Gravity, with his hope that '[the] book will convince readers of [the] outstanding problem [of unification and quantum gravity] and encourage them to work on its solution'. With this aim, the author presents a clear exposition of the fundamental concepts of gravity and the steps towards the understanding of its quantum aspects. The main part of the text is dedicated to the analysis of standard topics in the formulation of general relativity. An analysis of the Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity and the canonical quantization of gravity is performed in detail. Chapters four, five and eight provide a pedagogical introduction to the basic concepts of gravitational physics. In particular, aspects such as the quantization of constrained systems, the role played by the quadratic constraint, the ADM decomposition, the Wheeler-de Witt equation and the problem of time are treated in an expert and concise way. Moreover, other specific topics, such as the minisuperspace approach and the feasibility of defining extrinsic times for certain models, are discussed as well. The ninth chapter of the book is dedicated to the quantum gravitational aspects of string theory. Here, a minimalistic but clear introduction to string theory is presented, and this is actually done with emphasis on gravity. It is worth mentioning that no hard (nor explicit) computations are presented, even though the exposition covers the main features of the topic. For instance, black hole statistical physics (within the framework of string theory) is developed in a pedagogical and concise way by means of heuristical arguments. As the author asserts in the epilogue, the hope of the book is to give 'some impressions from progress' made in the study of quantum gravity since its beginning, i.e., since the end of 1920s. In my opinion, Kiefer's book does actually achieve this goal and gives an extensive review of the subject. (book review)

  5. Venus gravity - Analysis of Beta Regio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, P. B.; Sjogren, W. L.; Mottinger, N. A.; Bills, B. G.; Abbott, E.

    1982-01-01

    Radio tracking data acquired over Beta Regio were analyzed to obtain a surface mass distribution from which a detailed vertical gravity field was derived. In addition, a corresponding vertical gravity field was evaluated solely from the topography of the Beta region. A comparison of these two maps confirms the strong correlation between gravity and topography which was previously seen in line-of-sight gravity maps. It also demonstrates that the observed gravity is a significant fraction of that predicted from the topography alone. The effective depth of complete isostatic compensation for the Beta region is estimated to be 330 km, which is somewhat deeper than that found for other areas of Venus.

  6. Cosmic string in gravity's rainbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Davood; Upadhyay, Sudhaker; Myrzakulov, Yerlan; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we study the various cylindrical solutions (cosmic strings) in gravity's rainbow scenario. In particular, we calculate the gravitational field equations corresponding to energy-dependent background. Further, we discuss the possible Kasner, quasi-Kasner and non-Kasner exact solutions of the field equations. In this framework, we find that quasi-Kasner solutions cannot be realized in gravity's rainbow. Assuming only time-dependent metric functions, we also analyse the time-dependent vacuum cosmic strings in gravity's rainbow, which are completely different than the other GR solutions.

  7. Residue levels of molinate in rice field soil: their effects on populations of aquatic flora and fauna under recycling and non-recycling practices in the MUDA area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashriyah Mat; Azimahtol Hawariah Lope Pihie

    2002-01-01

    A study to evaluate the effects of Molinate residue levels in rice field soil on populations of weed and aquatic fauna in the recycling and the non-recycling areas of Muda was carried out. Molinate residue levels in soil, Simpson Index of Diversity and Importance Value (IV) of weeds, and Sequential Comparison Index of aquatic fauna were measured. No marked variation between the recycled (B 111) and non-recycled (D 111) area was observed for the population parameters and residue levels measured. (Author)

  8. Constraining Nonperturbative Strong-Field Effects in Scalar-Tensor Gravity by Combining Pulsar Timing and Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijing Shao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsar timing and laser-interferometer gravitational-wave (GW detectors are superb laboratories to study gravity theories in the strong-field regime. Here, we combine these tools to test the mono-scalar-tensor theory of Damour and Esposito-Farèse (DEF, which predicts nonperturbative scalarization phenomena for neutron stars (NSs. First, applying Markov-chain Monte Carlo techniques, we use the absence of dipolar radiation in the pulsar-timing observations of five binary systems composed of a NS and a white dwarf, and eleven equations of state (EOSs for NSs, to derive the most stringent constraints on the two free parameters of the DEF scalar-tensor theory. Since the binary-pulsar bounds depend on the NS mass and the EOS, we find that current pulsar-timing observations leave scalarization windows, i.e., regions of parameter space where scalarization can still be prominent. Then, we investigate if these scalarization windows could be closed and if pulsar-timing constraints could be improved by laser-interferometer GW detectors, when spontaneous (or dynamical scalarization sets in during the early (or late stages of a binary NS (BNS evolution. For the early inspiral of a BNS carrying constant scalar charge, we employ a Fisher-matrix analysis to show that Advanced LIGO can improve pulsar-timing constraints for some EOSs, and next-generation detectors, such as the Cosmic Explorer and Einstein Telescope, will be able to improve those bounds for all eleven EOSs. Using the late inspiral of a BNS, we estimate that for some of the EOSs under consideration, the onset of dynamical scalarization can happen early enough to improve the constraints on the DEF parameters obtained by combining the five binary pulsars. Thus, in the near future, the complementarity of pulsar timing and direct observations of GWs on the ground will be extremely valuable in probing gravity theories in the strong-field regime.

  9. Progress on The GEMS (Gravity Electro-Magnetism-Strong) Theory of Field Unification and Its Application to Space Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    2008-01-01

    Progress on the GEMS (Gravity Electro-Magnetism-Strong), theory is presented as well as its application to space problems. The GEMS theory is now validated through the Standard Model of physics. Derivation of the value of the Gravitation constant based on the observed variation of α with energy: results in the formula G congruent with (ℎ/2π)c/M ηc 2 exp(-1/(1.61α)), where α is the fine structure constant,(ℎ/2π), is Planck's constant, c, is the speed of light, and M ηc is the mass of the η cc Charmonium meson that is shown to be identical to that derived from the GEM postulates. Covariant formulation of the GEM theory is now possible through definition of the spacetime metric tensor as a portion of the EM stress tensor normalized by its own trace: g ab = 4(F c a F cb )/(F ab F ab ), it is found that this results in a massless ground state vacuum and a Newtonian gravitation potential φ = 1/2 E 2 /B 2 . It is also found that a Lorentz or flat-space metric is recovered in the limit of a full spectrum ZPF

  10. Comments on Lambeck and Coleman - 'The earth's shape and gravity field: A report of progress from 1958 to 1982'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, F. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Wagner, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    The accuracy and validation of global gravity models based on satellite data are discussed, responding to the statistical analysis of Lambeck and Coleman (1983) (LC). Included are an evaluation of the LC error spectra, a summary of independent-observation calibrations of the error estimates of the Goddard Earth Models (GEM) 9 and L2 (Lerch et al., 1977, 1979, 1982, 1983, and 1985), a comparison of GEM-L2 with GRIM-3B (Reigber et al., 1983), a comparison of recent models with LAGEOS laser ranging, and a summary of resonant-orbit model tests. It is concluded that the accuracy of GEMs 9, 10, and L2 is much higher than claimed by LC, that the GEMs are in good agreement with independent observations and with GRIM-3B, and that the GEM calibrations were adequate. In a reply by LC, a number of specific questions regarding the error estimates are addressed, and it is pointed out that the intermodel discrepancies of the greatest geophysical interest are those in the higher-order coefficients, not discussed in the present comment. It is argued that the differences among the geoid heights of even the most recent models are large enough to call for considerable improvements.

  11. Solid state properties of oligomers containing dithienothiophene or fluorene residues suitable for field effect transistor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porzio, William; Destri, Silvia; Giovanella, Umberto; Pasini, Mariacecilia; Marin, Luminita; Iosip, Mariana Dana; Campione, Marcello

    2007-01-01

    A series of three thiophene based oligomers has been extensively characterized. The chemical design has been addressed to obtain ionization potential (IP) and electronic affinity (EA) values matching the work function of commonly used electrode materials. Such IP and EA values were tested by cyclovoltammetry. In order to tune electron-donation and drawing strength the sequence of the molecule subunits in the oligomer has been varied. The thermal properties with particular reference to their stability during preparation and operation were checked by using differential scanning calorimetry, polarised light microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis techniques. Prototypes of thin film field effect transistor, based on this series of oligomers have been electrically and structurally characterized. The long axes of the molecules are oriented nearly perpendicular to the gate insulator, in agreement with both highly sensitive X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. From powder diffraction data the structure of oligomer I was solved. A general relation is envisaged between charge mobility and packing closeness in the series. For the most promising molecule a study of mobility/temperature behaviour was performed yielding interesting results

  12. Horizon thermodynamics in fourth-order gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Sen Ma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of horizon thermodynamics, the field equations of Einstein gravity and some other second-order gravities can be rewritten as the thermodynamic identity: dE=TdS−PdV. However, in order to construct the horizon thermodynamics in higher-order gravity, we have to simplify the field equations firstly. In this paper, we study the fourth-order gravity and convert it to second-order gravity via a so-called “Legendre transformation” at the cost of introducing two other fields besides the metric field. With this simplified theory, we implement the conventional procedure in the construction of the horizon thermodynamics in 3 and 4 dimensional spacetime. We find that the field equations in the fourth-order gravity can also be written as the thermodynamic identity. Moreover, we can use this approach to derive the same black hole mass as that by other methods.

  13. Residual effects of metal contamination on the soil quality: a field survey in central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Gerardo, Romeu

    2017-04-01

    Agriculture is an important source of income and employment. But depletion and degradation of land challenge to producing safe food and other agricultural products to sustain livelihoods and meet the needs of urban populations. When developing or expanding an agricultural area, it becomes essential to access the soil quality. Even if the present source of contamination is not observed, it is a worth subject to evaluate whether or not any negative effects of the post contamination still last. For this purpose, a field survey (2 ha) was carried: a zinc and lead mining site that was abandoned about 50 years ago was researched at Sanguinheiro (40°18'N and 8°21'W) in Central Portugal. The area is characterized by very steep slopes that are confining with a small stream. The obtained results show that (i) the Pb content in the site (165 mg/kg) is higher than that in the background (67.7 mg/kg); (ii) the Zn content of local vegetation (Eucalyptus globulus) in the post-mining site is 2.1 times that in the control site, and (iii) dead bare ground is observed in some parts of the site. There is a possibility that great amounts of Zn and Pb accumulate in tissues of local vegetation. Although mining activity ended 50 years ago, the contents of Pb and Zn in the sampled soil were comparatively high in the site with about a 75% slope. It is concluded that not only the present contamination but also the post-environmental stress should be assessed to properly develop an agricultural area in terms of securing agricultural products.

  14. Simulating Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  15. Topological gravity with minimal matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Keke

    1991-01-01

    Topological minimal matter, obtained by twisting the minimal N = 2 supeconformal field theory, is coupled to two-dimensional topological gravity. The free field formulation of the coupled system allows explicit representations of BRST charge, physical operators and their correlation functions. The contact terms of the physical operators may be evaluated by extending the argument used in a recent solution of topological gravity without matter. The consistency of the contact terms in correlation functions implies recursion relations which coincide with the Virasoro constraints derived from the multi-matrix models. Topological gravity with minimal matter thus provides the field theoretic description for the multi-matrix models of two-dimensional quantum gravity. (orig.)

  16. Residual gas analysis of a cryostat vacuum chamber during the cool down of SST - 1 superconducting magnet field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semwal, P.; Joshi, K.S.; Thankey, P.L.; Pathan, F.S.; Raval, D.C.; Patel, R.J.; Pathak, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important feature of Steady state Superconducting Tokamak -1 (SST-l) is the Nb-Ti superconducting magnet field coils. The coils will be kept in a high vacuum chamber (Cryostat) and liquid Helium will be flown through it to cool it down to its critical temperature of 4.5K. The coil along with its hydraulics has four types of joints (1) Stainless Steel (S.S.) to Copper (Cu) weld joints (2) S. S. to S. S. weld joints (3) Cu to Cu brazed joints and (4) G-10 to S. S. joints with Sti-cast as the binding material. The joints were leak tested with a Helium mass spectrometer leak detector in vacuum as well as in sniffer mode. However during the cool-down of the coil, these joints may develop leaks. This would deteriorate the vacuum inside the cryostat and coil cool-down would subsequently become more difficult. To study the effect of cooling on the vacuum condition of the Cryostat, a dummy Cryostat chamber was fabricated and a toroidal Field (TF) magnet was kept inside this chamber and cooled down to 4.5 K.A residual gas analyzer (RGA) was connected to the Cryostat chamber to study the behaviour of major gases inside this chamber with temperature. An analysis of the RGA data acquired during the coo-down has been presented in this chamber. (author)

  17. Failures in sand in reduced gravity environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jason P.; Hurley, Ryan C.; Arthur, Dan; Vlahinic, Ivan; Senatore, Carmine; Iagnemma, Karl; Trease, Brian; Andrade, José E.

    2018-04-01

    The strength of granular materials, specifically sand is important for understanding physical phenomena on other celestial bodies. However, relatively few experiments have been conducted to determine the dependence of strength properties on gravity. In this work, we experimentally investigated relative values of strength (the peak friction angle, the residual friction angle, the angle of repose, and the peak dilatancy angle) in Earth, Martian, Lunar, and near-zero gravity. The various angles were captured in a classical passive Earth pressure experiment conducted on board a reduced gravity flight and analyzed using digital image correlation. The data showed essentially no dependence of the peak friction angle on gravity, a decrease in the residual friction angle between Martian and Lunar gravity, no dependence of the angle of repose on gravity, and an increase in the dilation angle between Martian and Lunar gravity. Additionally, multiple flow surfaces were seen in near-zero gravity. These results highlight the importance of understanding strength and deformation mechanisms of granular materials at different levels of gravity.

  18. Residential proximity to electromagnetic field sources and birth weight: Minimizing residual confounding using multiple imputation and propensity score matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vocht, Frank; Lee, Brian

    2014-08-01

    Studies have suggested that residential exposure to extremely low frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) from high voltage cables, overhead power lines, electricity substations or towers are associated with reduced birth weight and may be associated with adverse birth outcomes or even miscarriages. We previously conducted a study of 140,356 singleton live births between 2004 and 2008 in Northwest England, which suggested that close residential proximity (≤ 50 m) to ELF-EMF sources was associated with reduced average birth weight of 212 g (95%CI: -395 to -29 g) but not with statistically significant increased risks for other adverse perinatal outcomes. However, the cohort was limited by missing data for most potentially confounding variables including maternal smoking during pregnancy, which was only available for a small subgroup, while also residual confounding could not be excluded. This study, using the same cohort, was conducted to minimize the effects of these problems using multiple imputation to address missing data and propensity score matching to minimize residual confounding. Missing data were imputed using multiple imputation using chained equations to generate five datasets. For each dataset 115 exposed women (residing ≤ 50 m from a residential ELF-EMF source) were propensity score matched to 1150 unexposed women. After doubly robust confounder adjustment, close proximity to a residential ELF-EMF source remained associated with a reduction in birth weight of -116 g (95% confidence interval: -224:-7 g). No effect was found for proximity ≤ 100 m compared to women living further away. These results indicate that although the effect size was about half of the effect previously reported, close maternal residential proximity to sources of ELF-EMF remained associated with suboptimal fetal growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Brane-World Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Maartens

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The observable universe could be a 1+3-surface (the “brane” embedded in a 1+3+d-dimensional spacetime (the “bulk”, with Standard Model particles and fields trapped on the brane while gravity is free to access the bulk. At least one of the d extra spatial dimensions could be very large relative to the Planck scale, which lowers the fundamental gravity scale, possibly even down to the electroweak (∼ TeV level. This revolutionary picture arises in the framework of recent developments in M theory. The 1+10-dimensional M theory encompasses the known 1+9-dimensional superstring theories, and is widely considered to be a promising potential route to quantum gravity. At low energies, gravity is localized at the brane and general relativity is recovered, but at high energies gravity “leaks” into the bulk, behaving in a truly higher-dimensional way. This introduces significant changes to gravitational dynamics and perturbations, with interesting and potentially testable implications for high-energy astrophysics, black holes, and cosmology. Brane-world models offer a phenomenological way to test some of the novel predictions and corrections to general relativity that are implied by M theory. This review analyzes the geometry, dynamics and perturbations of simple brane-world models for cosmology and astrophysics, mainly focusing on warped 5-dimensional brane-worlds based on the Randall–Sundrum models. We also cover the simplest brane-world models in which 4-dimensional gravity on the brane is modified at low energies – the 5-dimensional Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati models. Then we discuss co-dimension two branes in 6-dimensional models.

  20. Double unification of particles with fields and electricity with gravity in non-empty space of continuous complex energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulyzhenkov Igor E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-empty space reading of Maxwell equations as local energy identities explains why a Coulomb field is carried rigidly by electrons in experiments. The analytical solution of the Poisson equation defines the sharp radial shape of charged elementary densities which are proportional to continuous densities of electric self-energy. Both Coulomb field and radial charge densities are free from energy divergences. Non-empty space of electrically charged mass-energy can be described by complex analytical densities resulting in real values for volume mass integrals and in imaginary values for volume charge integrals. Imaginary electric charges in the Newton gravitational law comply with real Coulomb forces. Unification of forces through complex charges rids them of radiation self-acceleration. Strong gravitational fields repeal probe bodies that might explainthe accelerated expansion of the dense Metagalaxy. Outward and inward spherical waves form the standing wave process within the radial carrier of complex energy.