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Sample records for residual glass matrix

  1. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Glass matrix armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calkins, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the insides surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material

  3. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  4. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  5. Fracture behaviour of brittle (glass) matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 482, - (2005), s. 115-122 ISSN 0255-5476. [International Conference on Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture /4./. Brno, 23.06.2004-25.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041003; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Ceramic matrix composites * fracture toughness * toughening effects Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2005

  6. Residual, restarting and Richardson iteration for the matrix exponential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochev, Mikhail A.; Grimm, Volker; Hochbruck, Marlis

    2013-01-01

    A well-known problem in computing some matrix functions iteratively is the lack of a clear, commonly accepted residual notion. An important matrix function for which this is the case is the matrix exponential. Suppose the matrix exponential of a given matrix times a given vector has to be computed.

  7. Residual, restarting and Richardson iteration for the matrix exponential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochev, Mikhail A.

    2010-01-01

    A well-known problem in computing some matrix functions iteratively is a lack of a clear, commonly accepted residual notion. An important matrix function for which this is the case is the matrix exponential. Assume, the matrix exponential of a given matrix times a given vector has to be computed. We

  8. Evaluation of the glow curves of a new glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Nathália S.; Souza, Samara P.; Ferreira, Pâmela Z.; Dantas, Noelio O.; Silva, Anielle C.A.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Carrera, Betzabel N.S.; Watanabe, Shigueo

    2017-01-01

    Thermoluminescence is a dosimetric technique with may be used to personal, clinical, environmental and high doses. In this work a new glass matrix, with nominal composition of 20Li 2 CO 3 .10Al 2 O 3 .25BaO.45B 2 O 3 (mol%), was studied by the thermoluminescence technique. The glow curves was be analyzed, after the irradiation of this glass matrix with high doses. The results showed that this new glass matrix has a temperature peak in 260°C, which is ideal for dosimetry applications. (author)

  9. Simulation of Residual Stresses at Holes in Tempered Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a full 3D numerical study of the residual stresses in tempered (toughened) glass near holes using Narayanaswamy’s model for the tempering process. It is the objective of the paper to elucidate the influence on the minimal residual compressive stresses at holes from variations in...

  10. Detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Chang-Zhong [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Tang, Yuanyuan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Lee, Po-Heng [Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Liu, Chengshuai, E-mail: csliu@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550009 (China); Shih, Kaimin, E-mail: kshih@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Li, Fangbai [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. All Cr(VI) species is reduced to Cr(III) and most chromium contents are incorporated into spinel structure where the residual chromium are resided in the glass networks. - Highlights: • COPR was detoxified and immobilized in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. • Cr-rich crystalline phase was determined to be MgCr{sub 1.32}Fe{sub 0.19}Al{sub 0.49}O{sub 4} spinel. • The partitioning ratio of Cr into spinel in the glass-ceramic can be up to 77%. • No Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic. • TCLP results demonstrate the superiority of the final product in immobilizing Cr. - Abstract: A promising strategy for the detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix is reported in this study. In the search for a more chemically durable matrix for COPR, the most critical crystalline phase for Cr immobilization was found to be a spinel solid solution with a chemical composition of MgCr{sub 1.32}Fe{sub 0.19}Al{sub 0.49}O{sub 4}. Using Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, we identified this final product is with the phases of spinel (3.5 wt.%), diopside (5.2 wt.%), and some amorphous contents (91.2 wt.%). The partitioning ratio of Cr reveals that about 77% of the Cr was incorporated into the more chemically durable spinel phase. The results of Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy show that no Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic, which indicates successful detoxification of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic. The leaching performances of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic were compared with a prolonged acid-leaching test, and the results demonstrate the superiority of the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic matrix in the

  11. Detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Chang-Zhong; Tang, Yuanyuan; Lee, Po-Heng; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin; Li, Fangbai

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. All Cr(VI) species is reduced to Cr(III) and most chromium contents are incorporated into spinel structure where the residual chromium are resided in the glass networks. - Highlights: • COPR was detoxified and immobilized in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. • Cr-rich crystalline phase was determined to be MgCr 1.32 Fe 0.19 Al 0.49 O 4 spinel. • The partitioning ratio of Cr into spinel in the glass-ceramic can be up to 77%. • No Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic. • TCLP results demonstrate the superiority of the final product in immobilizing Cr. - Abstract: A promising strategy for the detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix is reported in this study. In the search for a more chemically durable matrix for COPR, the most critical crystalline phase for Cr immobilization was found to be a spinel solid solution with a chemical composition of MgCr 1.32 Fe 0.19 Al 0.49 O 4 . Using Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, we identified this final product is with the phases of spinel (3.5 wt.%), diopside (5.2 wt.%), and some amorphous contents (91.2 wt.%). The partitioning ratio of Cr reveals that about 77% of the Cr was incorporated into the more chemically durable spinel phase. The results of Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy show that no Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic, which indicates successful detoxification of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic. The leaching performances of Cr 2 O 3 and COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic were compared with a prolonged acid-leaching test, and the results demonstrate the superiority of the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic matrix in the immobilization of Cr. The overall results suggest that

  12. Characterizing the residual glass in a MgO/Al2O3/SiO2/ZrO2/Y2O3 glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Sabrina; Patzig, Christian; Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Gawronski, Antje; Hu, Yongfeng; Höche, Thomas; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The non-isochemical crystallization of glasses leads to glass-ceramics in which the chemical composition of the amorphous matrix differs from that of the parent glass. It is challenging to solely analyse the properties of these residual glassy phases because they frequently contain finely dispersed crystals. In this study, the composition of the residual glass matrix after the crystallization of a glass with the mol% composition 50.6 SiO2 · 20.7 MgO · 20.7 Al2O3 · 5.6 ZrO2 · 2.4 Y2O3 is analysed by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) including energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXS). A batch of the residual glass with the determined composition is subsequently melted and selected properties are analysed. Furthermore, the crystallization behaviour of this residual glass is studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy including electron backscatter diffraction and STEM-EDXS analyses. The residual glass shows sole surface crystallization of indialite and multiple yttrium silicates while bulk nucleation does not occur. This is in contrast to the crystallization behaviour of the parent glass, in which a predominant bulk nucleation of spinel and ZrO2 is observed. The crystallization of the residual glass probably leads to different crystalline phases when it is in contact to air, rather than when it is enclosed within the microstructure of the parent glass-ceramics. PMID:27734918

  13. Boron nitride nanosheets reinforced glass matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saggar, Richa; Porwal, H.; Tatarko, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, SEP (2015), S26-S32 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK155 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Boron nitride nanosheets * Borosilicate glass * Mechanical properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2015

  14. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  15. Thin films prepared from tungstate glass matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, B.; Ribeiro, S.J.L.; Messaddeq, Y. [Departamento de Quimica Geral e Inorganica, Instituto de Quimica, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, CP 355, CEP 14800-900, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Li, M.S. [Instituto de Fisica, USP, CP 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Poirier, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, UNIFAL-MG, CEP 37130-000, Alfenas-MG (Brazil)], E-mail: gael@unifal-mg.edu.br

    2008-01-30

    Vitreous samples containing high concentrations of WO{sub 3} (above 40% M) have been used as a target to prepare thin films. Such films were deposited using the electron beam evaporation method onto soda-lime glass substrates. These films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), perfilometry, X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), M-Lines and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. In this work, experimental parameters were established to obtain stable thin films showing a chemical composition close to the glass precursor composition and with a high concentration of WO{sub 3}. These amorphous thin films of about 4 {mu}m in thickness exhibit a deep blue coloration but they can be bleached by thermal treatment near the glass transition temperature. Such bleached films show several guided modes in the visible region and have a high refractive index. Controlled crystallization was realized and thus it was possible to obtain WO{sub 3} microcrystals in the amorphous phase.

  16. Study of a new glass matrix by the thermoluminescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Pamela Z.; Vedovato, Uly P.; Cunha, Diego M. da; Dantas, Noelio O.; Silva, Anielle C.A.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Carrera, Betzabel N.S.; Watanabe, Shigueo

    2015-01-01

    The thermoluminescence technique is widely used for both personal and for high-dose dosimetry. In this work, the thermoluminescence technique was utilized to study a new glass matrix, with nominal composition of 20Li 2 CO 3 .10Al 2 O 3 .20BaO.50B 2 O 3 (mol%), irradiated with different doses in a 60 Co source. The glow curves and the dose-response curve were obtained for radiation doses between 50 Gy and 900 Gy. The results showed that this new glass matrix presents potential use in high-dose dosimetry. (author)

  17. Diffraction measurements of residual stress in titanium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.R.; Bourke, M.A.; Goldstone, J.A.; Lawson, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    Metal matrix composites develop residual strains after consolidation due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the reinforcement fiber and the matrix. X-ray and neutron diffraction measured values for the longitudinal residual stress in the matrix of four titanium MMCs are reported. For thick composites (> 6 plies) the surface stress measured by x-ray diffraction matches that determined by neutron diffraction and therefore represents the stress in the bulk region consisting of the fibers and matrix. For thin sheet composites, the surface values are lower than in the interior and increase as the outer rows of fibers are approached. While a rationale for the behavior in the thin sheet has yet to be developed, accounting for composite thickness is important when using x-ray measured values to validate analytic and finite element calculations of the residual stress state

  18. Numerical analysis of residual stresses reconstruction for axisymmetric glass components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Bo; Xu, Shuang; Yao, Honghui

    2018-01-01

    A non-destructive measurement method for 3D stress state in a glass cylinder using photoelasticity has been analyzed by simulation in this research. Based on simulated stresses in a glass cylinder, intensity of the cylinder in a circular polariscope can be calculated by Jones calculus. Therefore, the isoclinic angle and optical retardation can be obtained by six steps phase shifting technique. Through the isoclinic angle and optical retardation, the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses inside the glass cylinder in cylindrical coordinate system can be reconstructed. Comparing the reconstructed stresses with numerical simulated stresses, the results verify this non-destructive method can be used to reconstruct the 3D stresses. However, there are some mismatches in axial stress, radial stress and circumferential stress.

  19. R7T7-type HLW glass alteration under irradiation. Study of the residual alteration rate regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolland, Severine

    2012-01-01

    In France, fission products and minor actinides remaining after reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are confined in a borosilicate glass matrix, named R7T7, for disposal in a geological repository. However, in these conditions, after several thousand years, water could arrive in contact with glass and be radio-lysed. In this work, we investigated the irradiation influence and especially the influence of the energy deposition on the residual glass alteration rate regime in pure water. Two types of leaching tests have been carried out. The first were performed on radioactive glass and the second on a SON68 glass (nonradioactive surrogate of R7T7 glass) under external irradiation γ. (author) [fr

  20. Residual stresses and critical diameter in vitreous matrix materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastelaro, Valmor R.; Zanotto, Edgar D.

    1995-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to test the validity of existing models for: i) the residual internal stresses which arise due to thermal and elastic mismatch in duplex systems, and ii) the critical particle diameter for spontaneous cracking. Partially crystallized 1,07 Na 2 O-2 Ca O-3 Si O 2 - 6% P 2 O 5 glasses were studied. The experimental residual stress was in excellent agreement with the calculated value, however, the critical particle diameter, estimated by an energy balance approach, was more than ten times smaller than the experimental value. This discrepancy indicates that the energy model is not applicable in this case. (author)

  1. Residual stresses and mechanical properties of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Christer.

    1993-01-01

    The large difference in coefficient of thermal expansion of the matrix and particles in a metal matrix composite will introduce residual stresses during cooling from process temperature. These stresses are locally very high, and are known to influence the mechanical behaviour of the material. Changes in the stress state will occur during heat treatments and when the material is loaded due to different elastic, plastic, and creep properties of the constituents. The change of residual stresses in an Al-SiC particulate composite after different degree of plastic straining has been studied. The effect of plastic straining was modelled by an Eshelby model. The model and the measurements both show that the stress in the loading direction decreases for a tensile plastic strain and increases for a compressive plastic strain. By x-ray diffraction the stress response in the matrix and particles can be measured independently. This has been used to determine the stress state under and after heat treatments and under mechanical loading in two Al 15% SiC metal matrix composites. By analysing the line width from x-ray experiment the changes in the microstrains in the material were studied. A finite element model was used to model the generation of thermal residual stresses, stress relaxation during heat treatments, and load sharing during the first load cycle. Calculated stresses and microstrains were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. The elastic behaviour of the composite can be understood largely in terms of elastic load transfer between matrix and particles. However, at higher loads when the matrix becomes plastic residual stresses also become important. 21 refs

  2. Measurement of edge residual stresses in glass by the phase-shifting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajovalasit, A.; Petrucci, G.; Scafidi, M.

    2011-05-01

    Control and measurement of residual stress in glass is of great importance in the industrial field. Since glass is a birefringent material, the residual stress analysis is based mainly on the photoelastic method. This paper considers two methods of automated analysis of membrane residual stress in glass sheets, based on the phase-shifting concept in monochromatic light. In particular these methods are the automated versions of goniometric compensation methods of Tardy and Sénarmont. The proposed methods can effectively replace manual methods of compensation (goniometric compensation of Tardy and Sénarmont, Babinet and Babinet-Soleil compensators) provided by current standards on the analysis of residual stresses in glasses.

  3. Physical matrix correction for RFA of mass and special glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medicus, G.; Ritter, R.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical matrix correction model with relatively complex mass absorption coefficients is reported, which takes into account the adsorption of the stimulating radiation and the radiation in the specimen to be measured, as well as the geometry of the spectrometer. With the realized concept of an effective primary wave length, good correction results were obtained over large regions of concentrations and elements. The computer program renders possible besides of the usual reference measurement at uniform reference wave length - the reference of several elements in the specimen to one special element of the reference specimen. The correction method was tested with 42 test glasses, which were previously analyzed. (author)

  4. Compressive behavior of wire reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Yub [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Clausen, Bjorn [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Uestuendag, Ersan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Choi-Yim, Haein [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Aydiner, C. Can [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Bourke, Mark A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) possess a unique set of mechanical properties that make them attractive structural materials. However, when loaded without constraint, BMGs fracture catastrophically due to formation of macroscopic shear bands and this behavior reduces their reliability. To address this issue, BMG matrix composites have been developed. In this investigation, neutron diffraction was used during uniaxial compressive loading to measure the internal strains in the second phases of various BMG composites reinforced with Ta, Mo, or stainless steel wires. The diffraction data were then employed to develop a finite element model that deduced the in situ constitutive behavior of each phase. It was found that the reinforcements yielded first and started transferring load to the matrix, which remained elastic during the whole experiment. While the present composites exhibited enhanced ductility, largely due to their ductile reinforcements, they yielded at applied stresses lower than those found in W reinforced composites.

  5. Borosilicate glass as a matrix for the immobilization of Savannah River Plant waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Wicks, G.G.; Bibler, N.E.

    1982-01-01

    The reference waste form for immobilization of Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste is borosilicate glass. In the reference process, waste is mixed with glass-forming chemicals and melted in a Joule-heated ceramic melter at 1150 0 C. Waste glass made with actual or simulated waste on a small scale and glass made with simulated waste on a large scale confirm that the current reference process and glass-former composition are able to accommodate all SRP waste compositions and can produce a glass with: high waste loading; low leach rates; good thermal stability; high resistance to radiation effects; and good impact resistance. Borosilicate glass has been studied as a matrix for the immobilization of SRP waste since 1974. This paper reviews the results of extensive characterization and performance testing of the glass product. These results show that borosilicate glass is a very suitable matrix for the immobilization of SRP waste. 18 references, 3 figures, 10 tables

  6. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  7. Preparation of SnO_2-Glass Composite Containing Cu Particles Reduced from Copper Ions in Glass Matrix : Effect of Glass Particle Size on Microstructure and Electrical Property

    OpenAIRE

    Haruhisa, SHIOMI; Kaori, UMEHARA; Faculty of Engineering and Design, Kyoto Institute of Technology; Faculty of Engineering and Design, Kyoto Institute of Technology

    2000-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve the electrical properties of SnO_2-glass composites by dispersing Cu particles with low resistivity and positive temperature coefficient of resistance(TCR)in the glass matrix. Cu metal particles were precipitated by reducing Cu_2O previously dissolved into the matrix glass by adding LaB_6 as a reducing agent. The effect of the glass particle size, which influences the homogeneity of LaB_6 dispersion in the powder mixture before firing, on the Cu precipitation in...

  8. Phase boundary effects in metal matrix embedded glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiewer, E.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was performed to study reactions at the phase boundaries of glass-lead composites at temperatures up to the softening point of the glass. Some metal was oxidized at the boundary and penetrated into the glass. Solid-state diffusion was rate controlling. In the case of a phosphate glass, fission products were depleted in the boundary area. Molybdenum migrated into the lead, and cesium migrated into the glass core. 2 figures, 3 tables

  9. Chemical durability of glass and glass-ceramic materials, developed in laboratory scale, from industrial oil shale residue. Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Fonseca, M.V. de; Souza Santos, P. de

    1990-01-01

    Industrial developments frequently drive to the natural resources extinction. The recycling era has come out a long time ago and it has been evident that great part of industrial work's problems are related to the pollution and the raw materials extinction. These problems should be solved, with advantages, through industrial residues recycling. This study deals with glass and glass-ceramics materials obtained from oil shale (Irati Formation-Sao Mateus do Sul-Parana State) industrialization residues. The reached results show that a controled devitrification of retorted oil shale glass improves its performance related to chemical attack. The crystallinity caracterization of the oil shales glass-ceramic was made through X-ray diffraction. (author) [pt

  10. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  11. Improving residue-residue contact prediction via low-rank and sparse decomposition of residue correlation matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haicang; Gao, Yujuan; Deng, Minghua; Wang, Chao; Zhu, Jianwei; Li, Shuai Cheng; Zheng, Wei-Mou; Bu, Dongbo

    2016-03-25

    Strategies for correlation analysis in protein contact prediction often encounter two challenges, namely, the indirect coupling among residues, and the background correlations mainly caused by phylogenetic biases. While various studies have been conducted on how to disentangle indirect coupling, the removal of background correlations still remains unresolved. Here, we present an approach for removing background correlations via low-rank and sparse decomposition (LRS) of a residue correlation matrix. The correlation matrix can be constructed using either local inference strategies (e.g., mutual information, or MI) or global inference strategies (e.g., direct coupling analysis, or DCA). In our approach, a correlation matrix was decomposed into two components, i.e., a low-rank component representing background correlations, and a sparse component representing true correlations. Finally the residue contacts were inferred from the sparse component of correlation matrix. We trained our LRS-based method on the PSICOV dataset, and tested it on both GREMLIN and CASP11 datasets. Our experimental results suggested that LRS significantly improves the contact prediction precision. For example, when equipped with the LRS technique, the prediction precision of MI and mfDCA increased from 0.25 to 0.67 and from 0.58 to 0.70, respectively (Top L/10 predicted contacts, sequence separation: 5 AA, dataset: GREMLIN). In addition, our LRS technique also consistently outperforms the popular denoising technique APC (average product correction), on both local (MI_LRS: 0.67 vs MI_APC: 0.34) and global measures (mfDCA_LRS: 0.70 vs mfDCA_APC: 0.67). Interestingly, we found out that when equipped with our LRS technique, local inference strategies performed in a comparable manner to that of global inference strategies, implying that the application of LRS technique narrowed down the performance gap between local and global inference strategies. Overall, our LRS technique greatly facilitates

  12. Conversion of plutonium scrap and residue to boroilicate glass using the GMODS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.; Elam, K.R.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Plutonium scrap and residue represent major national and international concerns because (1) significant environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) problems have been identified with their storage; (2) all plutonium recovered from the black market in Europe has been from this category; (3) storage costs are high; and (4) safeguards are difficult. It is proposed to address these problems by conversion of plutonium scrap and residue to a CRACHIP (CRiticality, Aerosol, and CHemically Inert Plutonium) glass using the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS). CRACHIP refers to a set of requirements for plutonium storage forms that minimize ES ampersand H concerns. The concept is several decades old. Conversion of plutonium from complex chemical mixtures and variable geometries into a certified, qualified, homogeneous CRACHIP glass creates a stable chemical form that minimizes ES ampersand H risks, simplifies safeguards and security, provides an easy-to-store form, decreases storage costs, and allows for future disposition options. GMODS is a new process to directly convert metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidize organics with the residue converted to glass; and convert chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, and other materials to glass. GMODS is an enabling technology that creates new options. Conventional glassmaking processes require conversion of feeds to oxide-like forms before final conversion to glass. Such chemical conversion and separation processes are often complex and expensive

  13. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    based bulk metallic glass (BMG) and its in situ BMG matrix composites with diameter of 3 mm were fabricated by conventional Cu-mould casting method and ... The composites showed lower friction coefficient and wear rate than the pure BMG.

  14. Chemical durability of lead borosilicate glass matrix under simulated geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalmali, Vrunda S.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Wattal, P.K.

    2002-03-01

    The lead borosilicate glass has been developed for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) stored at Trombay. This waste is contains especially high contents of sodium, uranium sulphate and iron. The glasses containing HLW are to be ultimately disposed into deep geological repositories. Long term leach rates under simulated geological conditions need to be evaluated for glass matrix. Studies were taken up to estimate the lead borosilicate glass WTR-62 matrix for chemical durability in presence of synthetic ground water. The leachant selected was based on composition of ground water sample near proposed repository site. In the first phase of these tests, the experiments were conducted for short duration of one and half month. The leaching experiments were conducted in presence of a) distilled water b) synthetic ground water c) synthetic ground water containing granite, bentonite and ferric oxide and d) synthetic ground water containing humic acid at 100 0 C. The leachate samples were analysed by pHmetry , ion chromatography and UV -VIS spectrophotometry. The normalised leach rates for lead borosilicate WTR- 62 glass matrix based on silica, boron and sulphate analyses of leachates were of the order of 10 -3 to 10 -5 gms/cm 2 /day for 45 days test period in presence of synthetic ground water as well as in presence of other materials likely to be present along with synthetic ground water. These rates are comparable to those of sodium borsilicate glass matrices reported in literature. It is known that the leach rates of glass matrix decrease with longer test durations due to formation of leached layer on its surface. The observed leach rates of lead borosilicate WTR- 62 glass matrix for 45 day tests under simulated geological conditions were found to be sufficiently encouraging to take up long term tests for evaluating its performances under repository conditions. (author)

  15. CdS/CdSSe quantum dots in glass matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CdSSe and melted at 1200–1300°C. The glass samples were transparent and pale yellow in colour due to presence of CdS/CdSSe tiny nano crystal (Q-dots). in situ growth of CdS/CdSSe nano crystals imparts the yellow/orange/red colour to ...

  16. Excellent plasticity of a new Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite upon dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R.F. [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Jiao, Z.M. [Institute of Applied Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Y.S.; Wang, Z. [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Z.H.; Ma, S.G. [Institute of Applied Mechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Qiao, J.W., E-mail: qiaojunwei@gmail.com [Laboratory of Applied Physics and Mechanics of Advanced Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-11-20

    Quasi-static and dynamic compressive properties of in-situ Ti{sub 60}Zr{sub 14}V{sub 12}Cu{sub 4}Be{sub 10} bulk metallic glass matrix composites containing ductile dendrites were investigated. Upon quasi-static compressive loading, the composite exhibits a high fracture strength of ~2,600 MPa, combined with a considerable plasticity of ~40% at room temperature. However, upon dynamic loading, an excellent plasticity of ~16% can be obtained due to the abundant dislocations and severe lattice distortions within dendrites and multiplication of shear bands within the glass matrix analyzed by transmission-electron microscopy. A constitutive relationship is obtained by Johnson-Cook plasticity model, which is employed to model the dynamic flow stress behavior. In addition, under dynamic compression, the adiabatic temperature rise increases with increasing strain rates, resulting in that the softening effect within the glass matrix is obviously enhanced during deformation.

  17. High-silica glass matrix process for high-level waste solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, J.H.; Macedo, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    In the search for an optimum glass matrix composition, we have determined that chemical durability and thermal stability are maximized, and that stress development is minimized for glass compositions containing large concentrations of glass-forming oxides, of which silica is the major component (80 mol%). These properties and characteristics were recently demonstrated to belong to very old geological glasses known as tektites (ages of 750,000 to 34 million years.) The barrier to simulating tektite compositions for the waste glasses was the high melting temperature (1600 to 1800 0 C) needed for these glasses. Such temperatures greatly complicate furnace design and maintenance and lead to an intolerable vaporization of many of the radioisotopes into the off-gas system. Research conducted at our laboratory led to the development of a porous high-silica waste glass material with approximately 80% SiO 2 by mole and 30% waste loading by weight. The process can handle a wide variety of compositions, and yields long, elliptical, monolithic samples, which consist of a loaded high-silica core completely enveloped in a high-silica glass tube, which has collapsed upon the core and sealed it from the outside. The outer glass layer is totally free of waste isotopes and provides an integral multibarrier protection system

  18. Development of a glass matrix for vitrification of sulphate bearing high level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Mishra, R.K.; Thorat, Vidya; Ramchandran, M.; Amar Kumar; Ozarde, P.D.; Raj, Kanwar; Das, D.

    2004-07-01

    High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is generated during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In the earlier reprocessing flow sheet ferrous sulphamate has been used for valancy adjustment of Pu from IV to III for effective separation. This has resulted in generation of HLW containing significance amount of sulphate. Internationally borosilicate glass matrix has been adopted for vitrification of HLW. The first Indian vitrification facility at Waste Immobilislition Plant (WIP), Tarapur a five component borosilicate matrix (SiO 2 :B 2 O 3 :Na 2 O : MnO : TiO 2 ) has been used for vitrification of waste. However at Trombay HLW contain significant amount of sulphate which is not compatible with standard borosilicate formulation. Extensive R and D efforts were made to develop a glass formulation which can accommodate sulphate and other constituents of HLW e.g., U, Al, Ca, etc. This report deals with development work of a glass formulations for immobilization of sulphate bearing waste. Different glass formulations were studied to evaluate the compatibility with respect to sulphate and other constituents as mentioned above. This includes sodium, lead and barium borosilicate glass matrices. Problems encountered in different glass matrices for containment of sulphate have also been addressed. A glass formulation based on barium borosilicate was found to be effective and compatible for sulphate bearing high level waste. (author)

  19. Optoelectronic switch matrix as a look-up table for residue arithmetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, R I

    1987-10-01

    The use of optoelectronic matrix switches to perform look-up table functions in residue arithmetic processors is proposed. In this application, switchable detector arrays give the advantage of a greatly reduced requirement for optical sources by comparison with previous optoelectronic residue processors.

  20. Bulk metallic glass matrix composite for good biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjoub, F; Metiri, W; Doghmane, A; Hadjoub, Z

    2012-01-01

    Reinforcement volume fraction effects on acoustical parameters of Zr 41.2 Ti 13.8 Cu 12.5 Ni 10 Be 22.5 matrix composites reinforced by Mg, Ag and Cd metals have been studied via a simulation program based on acoustic microscopy technique. Moreover, acoustical parameters of human bone were compared to those of BMGs in both monolithic and reinforced case. It was found that elastic behavior of BMGs matrix composites in high reinforcement volume fraction is similar of that of human bone. This behavior leads to high biocompatibility and good transfer of stress between composite material and human system.

  1. Effectiveness of high temperature innovative geometry fixed ceramic matrix regenerators used in glass furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wołkowycki Grzegorz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effectiveness of waste heat recovery regenerators equipped with innovative ceramic matrix forming an integral part of a real glass furnace. The paper full description of the regenerators’ matrix structure with its dimensions, thermo-physical properties and operating parameters is included experimentally determined was the effectiveness of the regenerators has been descrbed using the obtained experimental data such as the operating temperature, gas flows as well as the gases generated during the liquid glass manufacturing process. The effectiveness values refer not only to the heating cycle when the regenerator matrix is heated by combustion gases but also to the cooling cycle in which the matrix is cooled as a result of changes in the direction of the flowing gas. On the basis of the determined effectiveness values for both cycles and measurement uncertainties it was possible, to calculate the weighted average efficiency for each of the regenerators.

  2. Properties of sintered glass-ceramics prepared from plasma vitrified air pollution control residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roether, J.A.; Daniel, D.J. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Amutha Rani, D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Deegan, D.E. [Tetronics Ltd., Swindon, Wiltshire SN3 4DE (United Kingdom); Cheeseman, C.R., E-mail: c.cheeseman@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Boccaccini, A.R., E-mail: a.boccaccini@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Air pollution control (APC) residues, obtained from a major UK energy from waste (EfW) plant, processing municipal solid waste, have been blended with silica and alumina and melted using DC plasma arc technology. The glass produced was crushed, milled, uni-axially pressed and sintered at temperatures between 750 and 1150 deg. C, and the glass-ceramics formed were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mechanical properties assessed included Vickers's hardness, flexural strength, Young's modulus and thermal shock resistance. The optimum sintering temperature was found to be 950 deg. C. This produced a glass-ceramic with high density ({approx}2.58 g/cm{sup 3}), minimum water absorption ({approx}2%) and relatively high mechanical strength ({approx}81 {+-} 4 MPa). Thermal shock testing showed that 950 deg. C sintered samples could withstand a 700 deg. C quench in water without micro-cracking. The research demonstrates that glass-ceramics can be readily formed from DC plasma treated APC residues and that these have comparable properties to marble and porcelain. This novel approach represents a technically and commercially viable treatment option for APC residues that allow the beneficial reuse of this problematic waste.

  3. Properties of sintered glass-ceramics prepared from plasma vitrified air pollution control residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roether, J.A.; Daniel, D.J.; Amutha Rani, D.; Deegan, D.E.; Cheeseman, C.R.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues, obtained from a major UK energy from waste (EfW) plant, processing municipal solid waste, have been blended with silica and alumina and melted using DC plasma arc technology. The glass produced was crushed, milled, uni-axially pressed and sintered at temperatures between 750 and 1150 deg. C, and the glass-ceramics formed were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mechanical properties assessed included Vickers's hardness, flexural strength, Young's modulus and thermal shock resistance. The optimum sintering temperature was found to be 950 deg. C. This produced a glass-ceramic with high density (∼2.58 g/cm 3 ), minimum water absorption (∼2%) and relatively high mechanical strength (∼81 ± 4 MPa). Thermal shock testing showed that 950 deg. C sintered samples could withstand a 700 deg. C quench in water without micro-cracking. The research demonstrates that glass-ceramics can be readily formed from DC plasma treated APC residues and that these have comparable properties to marble and porcelain. This novel approach represents a technically and commercially viable treatment option for APC residues that allow the beneficial reuse of this problematic waste.

  4. Matrix-Matching as an Improvement Strategy for the Detection of Pesticide Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacinti, Géraldine; Raynaud, Christine; Capblancq, Sophie; Simon, Valérie

    2016-05-01

    More than 90% of the pesticides residues in apples are located in the peel. We developed a gas chromatography/ion trap tandem mass spectrometry method for investigating all detectable residues in the peel of 3 apple varieties. Sample preparation is based on the use of the Quick Easy Cheap Effective Rugged and Safe method on the whole fruit, the flesh, and the peel. Pesticide residues were quantified with solvent-matched and matrix-matched standards, by spiking apple sample extracts. Matrix effects dependent on the type of extract (fruit, flesh, or peel) and the apple variety were detected. The best data processing methods involved normalizing matrix effect rates by matrix-matched internal/external calibration. Boscalid, captan, chlorpyrifos, fludioxonil, and pyraclostrobin were the most frequently detected pesticides. However, their concentrations in the whole fruit were below European maximum residue levels. Despite negative matrix effects, the residues in peel were detected at concentrations up to 10 times higher than those in whole fruits. Consequently, other pesticide residues present at concentrations below the limit of quantification in the whole fruit were detected in the peel. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Powder addition assessment of manganese residue ceramic matrix coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, A.C.R. da; Santos, O.C.; Leao, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of recycled materials in the composition of new products follows the production's worldwide trending, meeting new technological requirements and environmental concerns. This work aims to utilize the residue of manganese dust on ceramic mass for the production of ceramic coating. The raw materials were characterized by both x-ray fluorescence and diffraction. The powder residue added to clay in the percentage of 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% (measured in weight) was compressed by a uniaxial pressing of 30MPa and the sintering temperatures were 900°, 1000° and 1100°. The samples were analysed in relation to flexural strength, bulk density, water absorption and linear shrinkage. The microstructural variation was also analysed by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The results showed that there is a viability for the production of porcelain ceramic coating (A3 and A4 formulations) and stoneware (A2 formulation) according to the specification of technical standards. author)

  6. Effect of static pre-loading on fracture toughness of Nicalon fibre glass matrix composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Chawla, K. K.; Kulkarmi, R.; Koopman, M.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    č. 367 (2004), s. 17-23 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003; GA MŠk ME 491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Nicalon fibre * glass matrix composite * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  7. Metal particles constraint in glass matrix composites and its impact on fracture toughness enhancement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotoul, M.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    387-389 (2004), s. 404-408 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/02/0683 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : brittle matrix composites * crack bridging * crack trapping Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  8. Effect of magnesium aluminum silicate glass on the thermal shock resistance of BN matrix composite ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Delong; Jia, Dechang; Yang, Zhihua; Zhu, Qishuai; Ocelik, Vaclav; Vainchtein, Ilia D.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.; Zhou, Yu

    The effects of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) glass on the thermal shock resistance and the oxidation behavior of h-BN matrix composites were systematically investigated at temperature differences from 600 degrees C up to 1400 degrees C. The retained strength rate of the composites rose with the

  9. Shielding of electromagnetic fields by metallic glasses with Fe and Co matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowosielski, R.; Griner, S.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of chemical composition and magnetic and electric properties for shielding of electromagnetic fields with frequency 10-1000 kHz, by metallic glasses has been analysed. For investigation were selected two groups of metallic glasses with matrix of Fe and Co. Particularly, in there were selected metallic glasses as follows; Fe 78 Si 9 B 13 , Co 68 Fe 4 Mo 1.5 Si 13.5 B 13 , Co 69 Mo 2 Fe 4 Si 14 B 11 , Co 70.5 Fe 2.5 Mn 4 Mo 1 Si 9 B 15 . The experiments were realised for casting metallic glasses by the CMBS method in the form of strips with width 10 mm. Obtained results of shielding indicate clear for very good shielding effectiveness of one layer shields both electric and magnetic components of electromagnetic fields, although shielding of magnetic component is smaller than electric. (author). 17 refs, 5 figs, 9 tabs

  10. Determination of residual boron in thermally treated controlled-porosity glasses, by colorimetry, spectrography and isotachophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawidowicz, A.L.; Matusewicz, J.; Wysocka-Lisek, J.

    1989-01-01

    Controlled-porosity glasses (CPGs) are often applied as sorbents in chromatography. Besides having high thermal, chemical and mechanical resistance they are characterized by a very narrow pore-size distribution and the choice of mean pore diameter and porosity covers a wide range. In spite of these advantages, their range of use in chromatography is restricted because of their strong adsorption properties, which are connected with the presence of residual boron atoms in the porous CPG skeleton. The boron concentration on the CPG surface can be increased by proper thermal treatment. When CPGs are heated in the range 400-800 0 the residual boron atoms in the network diffuse from the bulk to the surface. The paper discusses the boron content in porous glasses of different mean pore diameters and the determination of the enrichment of boron on the GPG surface, by three independent methods: colorimetry, spectrography and isotachophoresis. (author)

  11. Prediction of residue-residue contact matrix for protein-protein interaction with Fisher score features and deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tianchuan; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H; Sun, Bilin

    2016-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions play essential roles in many biological processes. Acquiring knowledge of the residue-residue contact information of two interacting proteins is not only helpful in annotating functions for proteins, but also critical for structure-based drug design. The prediction of the protein residue-residue contact matrix of the interfacial regions is challenging. In this work, we introduced deep learning techniques (specifically, stacked autoencoders) to build deep neural network models to tackled the residue-residue contact prediction problem. In tandem with interaction profile Hidden Markov Models, which was used first to extract Fisher score features from protein sequences, stacked autoencoders were deployed to extract and learn hidden abstract features. The deep learning model showed significant improvement over the traditional machine learning model, Support Vector Machines (SVM), with the overall accuracy increased by 15% from 65.40% to 80.82%. We showed that the stacked autoencoders could extract novel features, which can be utilized by deep neural networks and other classifiers to enhance learning, out of the Fisher score features. It is further shown that deep neural networks have significant advantages over SVM in making use of the newly extracted features. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Uranium and Plutonium Residues Wastes - 13164

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Martin W.A.; Moricca, Sam A.; Zhang, Yingjie; Day, R. Arthur; Begg, Bruce D.; Scales, Charlie R.; Maddrell, Ewan R.; Hobbs, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    A program of work has been undertaken to treat plutonium-residues wastes at Sellafield. These have arisen from past fuel development work and are highly variable in both physical and chemical composition. The principal radiological elements present are U and Pu, with small amounts of Th. The waste packages contain Pu in amounts that are too low to be economically recycled as fuel and too high to be disposed of as lower level Pu contaminated material. NNL and ANSTO have developed full-ceramic and glass-ceramic waste forms in which hot-isostatic pressing is used as the consolidation step to safely immobilize the waste into a form suitable for long-term disposition. We discuss development work on the glass-ceramic developed for impure waste streams, in particular the effect of variations in the waste feed chemistry glass-ceramic. The waste chemistry was categorized into actinides, impurity cations, glass formers and anions. Variations of the relative amounts of these on the properties and chemistry of the waste form were investigated and the waste form was found to be largely unaffected by these changes. This work mainly discusses the initial trials with Th and U. Later trials with larger variations and work with Pu-doped samples further confirmed the flexibility of the glass-ceramic. (authors)

  13. Effect of fiber content on the properties of glass fiber-phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, M.Y.; Shahid, M.R.; Subhani, T.; Sharif, M.N.

    2003-01-01

    Glass fiber-Phenolic matrix composite is used for the manufacturing of parts /components related to electronic and aerospace industry due to its high strength, dimensional stability and excellent electrical insulation properties. The evaluation of this composite material is necessary prior to make parts/components of new designs. In the present research, thermosetting phenolic plastic was reinforced with E-glass fiber in different fiber-to-resin ratios to produce composites of different compositions. Mechanical and electrical properties of these composite materials were evaluated with reference to the effect of fiber content variation in phenolic resin. (author)

  14. Iron phosphate glass: a promising matrix for the immobilization of Cs and Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemadevi, V.; Joseph, Kitheri

    2015-01-01

    Presently, borosilicate glass (BSG) is the acceptable vitrification matrix for the immobilization of high level waste. The solubility of Mo in BSG is limited in the presence of Cs. As per the literature, solubility of Mo in BSG is about 2.5 wt. % in the presence of Cs. Hence it is difficult to immobilize nuclear waste rich in Cs and Mo in borosilicate glass. It is observed that the composition of Cs and Mo expressed as oxides are 10.4 and 14.7 wt. % respectively in simulated fast reactor waste. Iron phosphate glass containing 20 wt. % simulated fast reactor waste (referred as IP20FRW) was synthesized and characterized. IP20FRW contains ~ 3 wt. % of molybdenum oxide along with 2 wt. % cesium oxide. IPG is a suitable matrix for the immobilization of Cs and Mo separately. Hence it is essential to understand the glass characteristics of IPG containing both Cs and Mo. This paper explores systematic loading of both Cs and Mo such that the final composition corresponds to 10.5 wt. % Cs 2 O-15 wt. % MoO 3 -31.9 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -42.6 wt. % P 2 O 5 . In addition to synthesis, the present study also includes understanding the change in glass characteristics of IPG containing both Cs and Mo. The possibility of higher percent loading of both Cs and Mo in IPG demonstrates the better glass forming characteristics of IPG. The synthesis and characterization of Cs-Mo loaded glasses will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  15. Effect of the glass transition temperature on alpha-amylase activity in a starch matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Vinita; Panyoyai, Naksit; Small, Darryl M; Shanks, Robert A; Kasapis, Stefan

    2017-02-10

    This study optimises a protocol for the estimation of α-amylase activity in a condensed starch matrix in the vicinity of the glass transition region. Enzymatic activity on the vitrified starch system was compared with that of a reference substrate, maltodextrin. The activity was assayed as the rate of release of reducing sugar using a dinitrosalicylic acid procedure. The condensed carbohydrate matrices served the dual purpose of acting as a substrate as well as producing a pronounced effect on the ability to enzymatic hydrolysis. Activation energies were estimated throughout the glass transition region of condensed carbohydrate preparations based on the concept of the spectroscopic shift factor. Results were used to demonstrate a considerable moderation by the mechanical glass transition temperature, beyond the expected linear effect of the temperature dependence, on the reaction rate of starch hydrolysis by α-amylase in comparison with the low-molecular weight chain of maltodextrin. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Study of a new glass matrix by thermoluminescent technique for high-dose dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Pamela Z.; Carvalho, Gabriel S. Marchiori de; Cunha, Diego M. da; Dantas, Noelio O.; Silva, Anielle C.A.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P., E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Linda, V.E. Caldas [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carrera, Betzabel N.S.; Watanabe, Shigueo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-07-01

    The thermoluminescence technique is widely used for both personal and for high-dose dosimetry. In this work, the thermoluminescence technique was utilized to study a new glass matrix, with nominal composition of 20Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.30BaO.40B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol%), irradiated with different doses in a {sup 60}Co source. The glow curves and the dose-response curve were obtained for radiation doses of 10, 50, 100, 200 e 700 Gy. The results showed that this new glass matrix has potential use in high-dose dosimetry. (author)

  17. Effects of glass composition on the residual rate of alteration and modelling parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleury, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with the long-term behavior of the French nuclear glasses R7T7. An experiment plan (based on 27 glass compositions) is developed for studying the effect of glass composition on the residual rate of alteration. The impact of Mg-phase precipitation on glass alteration is also studied and several modelling exercises are performed. There is one order of magnitude between the different measurements (rate or pH...) associated with the different glass compositions. The statistical treatment of these measurements results in predictive equations and several observable trends are valid for all materials with a composition complying with the experiment plan conditions. The effect of Si, Na, B and Al on alteration (.i.e, gel and secondary phase's formation, pH) is confirmed, the influence of Zn, Zr and Ni-Co is evidenced. The role of Cr has to be clarified. Experiments show that glass alteration rate in underground water, which contains high level of Ca and Mg, is one order of magnitude higher than in the case of pure water. The glass composition plays the same role for the alteration in the two types of solution. During alteration, the late addition of Mg introduces a time lag in the resumption response because silicon is first provided from partial dissolution of the previously-formed alteration gel. The nucleation process does not limit Mg-silicate precipitation whereas a pH above 8-8.5 is necessary for Mg-silicate precipitation. The glass alteration rate can be a limiting factor if the quantity of Mg supplied to the reaction is enough. The Mg silicate phase seems to have systematically a molar ratio Mg/Si between 0.2 and 0.4. It is also shown that the air tightness of the reactor influences the rate of dissolution of CO 2 in the solution leading to a decrease of pH. Finally, modelling exercises with GRAAL show promising results. Such modelling is required in order to extend the prediction of the long-term alteration behavior to different glass

  18. Composite properties for S-2 glass in a room-temperature-curable epoxy matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, L. L.; Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The authors have measured thermal and mechanical properties of several composites of S-2 glass fiber in a room-temperature-curable epoxy matrix. The filament-wound composites ranged from 50 to 70 vol% fiber. The composites had generally good to excellent mechanical properties, particularly in view of the moderate cost of the material. However, the composites showed rapid increases in transverse thermal expansion above 50 C, and this property must be carefully considered if any use above that temperature is contemplated.

  19. Influence of phosphate glass recrystallization on the stability of a waste matrix to leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudintsev, S. V.; Pervukhina, A. M.; Mokhov, A. V.; Malkovsky, V. I.; Stefanovsky, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    In Russia, highly radioactive liquid wastes from recycling of spent fuel of nuclear reactors are solidified into Na-Al-P glass for underground storage. The properties of the matrix including the radionuclide fixation will change with time due to crystallization. This is supported by the results of study of the interaction between glassy matrices, products of their crystallization, and water. The concentration of Cs in a solution at the contact of a recrystallized sample increased by three orders of magnitude in comparison with an experiment with glass. This difference is nearly one order of magnitude for Sr, Ce, and Nd (simulators of actinides) and U due to their incorporation into phases with low solubility in water. Based on data on the compositional change of solutions after passing through filters of various diameters, it is concluded that Cs occurs in the dissolved state in runs with a glass and recrystallized matrix. At the same time, Sr, lanthanides, and U occur in the dissolved state and in the composition of colloids in runs with glass, and mostly in colloid particles after contact with the recrystallized sample. These results should be regarded for substantiation of safety for geological waste storage.

  20. Effects of thermal residual stresses and fiber packing on deformation of metal-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, T.; Suresh, S.

    1993-01-01

    The combined effects of thermal residual stresses and fiber spatial distribution on the deformation of a 6061 aluminum alloy containing a fixed concentration unidirectional boron fibers have been analyzed using detailed finite element models. The geometrical structure includes perfectly periodic, uniformly space fiber arrangements in square and hexagonal cells, as well as different cells in which either 30 or 60 fibers are randomly placed in the ductile matrix. The model involves an elastic-plastic matrix, elastic fibers, and mechanically bonded interfaces. The results indicate that both fiber packing and thermal residual stresses can have a significant effect on the stress-strain characteristics of the composite. The thermal residual stresses cause pronounced matrix yielding which also influences the apparent overall stiffness of the composite during the initial stages of subsequent far-field loading along the axial and transverse direction. Furthermore, the thermal residual stresses apparently elevate the flow stress of the composite during transverse tension. Such effects can be traced back to the level of constraint imposed on the matrix by local fiber spacing. The implications of the present results to the processing of the composites are also briefly addressed

  1. Thermomechanically induced residual strains in Al/SiCp metal-matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T.; Clarke, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Residual lattice strains in the aluminium and SiC phases of F3S.20S extruded A359 20% SiC metal-matrix composite were measured by using neutron diffi action at room and elevated temperatures to monitor the effects of in situ uniaxial plastic deformations. The results are interpreted with referenc...

  2. Porous glass matrix method for encapsulating high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, P.B.; Tran, D.C.; Simmons, J.H.; Saleh, M.; Barkatt, A.; Simmons, C.J.; Lagakos, N.; DeWitt, E.

    1979-01-01

    A novel process which uses solidified porous high-silica glass powder to fixate radioactive high-level wastes is described. The process yields cylinders consisting of a core of high-silica glass containing the waste elements in its structure and a protective layer also of high-silica glass completely free of waste elements. The process can be applied to waste streams containing 0 to 100% solids. The core region exhibits a higher coefficient of thermal expansion and a lower glass transition temperature than the outer protective layer. This leads to mechanical strengthening of the glass and good resistance to stress corrosion by the development of a high residual compressive stress on the surface of the sample. Both the core and the protective layer exhibit extremely high chemical durability and offer an effective fixation of the radioactive waste elements, including 239 Pu and 99 Tc which have long half-lives, for calculated periods of more than 1 million years, when temperatures are not allowed to rise above 100 0 C

  3. Influence of cold rolling and fatigue on the residual stress state of a metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanus, E.; Ericsson, T.; Lu, J.; Decomps, F.

    1993-01-01

    The large difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the matrix alloy and the particle in a metal matrix composite gives rise to residual stresses in the material. In the present work the effect of cold rolling and four-point bending fatigue on the residual stress state of a silicon carbide particle reinforced aluminium alloy (AA 2014) has been investigated. The three dimensional stress state measured in both phases: matrix and reinforcement, has been determined by using an X-ray diffraction technique. It was found that cold rolling induces surface compressive macrostresses of about -250 MPa, with a penetration depth around 2 mm. The absolute values of the pseudomacrostresses in both phases are significantly reduced due to the single track rolling. Stress relaxation occurs during four-point bending fatigue. (orig.)

  4. Molecular dynamics study of a nuclear waste glass matrix with plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meis, C.; Delaye, J.M.; Ghaleb, D.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation techniques were applied to model the incorporation of plutonium in the French nuclear waste glass matrix. Born-Mayer-Huggins analytical potentials were established to characterize short-range interactions between Pu-O and Pu-Pu pairs; the potentials were fitted to the structural properties of plutonium dioxide in the light of a recent experimental study showing that plutonium is found as Pu(IV) in the glass. The transferability of the established potentials to the glass structure is discussed, and the potential parameters are further refined by molecular dynamics simulations in an aluminoborosilicate glass to obtain mean Pu-O interatomic distances and first-neighbor coordination numbers matching the experimental values as closely as possible. Previously published Born-Mayer-Huggins potentials supplemented by Stillinger-Weber three-body terms were used for oxygen-cation and cation-cation interactions. The difficulties encountered in establishing a Pu-O potential that provides satisfactory results in both oxides and glasses are also discussed

  5. The effect of heat treatment on the magnitude and composition of residual gas in sealed silica glass ampoules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The residual gas pressure and composition in sealed silica glass ampoules as a function of different treatment procedures has been investigated. The dependence of the residual gas on the outgassing and annealing parameters has been determined. The effects of the fused silica brand, of the ampoule fabrication, and of post-outgassing procedures have been evaluated.

  6. Recovery of plutonium from insulation, scrap glass, and sand-slag residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.; Garnett, J.E.; Fraser, J.K.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate methods for removing plutonium from insulation, glass leach heel, and sand and slag heel. The methods evaluated included hydrochloric acid leaching, nitric acid leaching, and a treatment consisting of a fusion step followed by acid leaching. Results indicate that a nitric acid leach is effective in lowering the plutonium concentration of these solid wastes to the desired limit, if multiple contacts are used. A hydrochloric acid leach was found to be superior to a nitric acid leach for removing plutonium from the residues

  7. Borosilicate glass as a matrix for immobilization of SRP high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 22 million gallons of high-level radioactive defense waste are currently being stored in large underground tanks located on the Savannah River Plant (SRP) site in Aiken, South Carolina. One option now being considered for long-term management of this waste involves removing the waste from the tanks, chemically processing the waste, and immobilizing the potentially harmful radionuclides in the waste into a borosilicate glass matrix. The technology for producing waste glass forms is well developed and has been demonstrated on various scales using simulated as well as radioactive SRP waste. Recently, full-scale prototypical equipment has been made operational at SRP. This includes both a joule-heated ceramic melter and an in-can melter. These melters are a part of an integrated vitrification system which is under evaluation and includes a spray calciner, direct liquid feed apparatus, and various elements of an off-gas system. Two of the most important properties of the waste glass are mechanical integrity and leachability. Programs are in progress at SRL aimed at minimizing thermally induced cracking by carefully controlling cooling cycles and using ceramic liners or coatings. The leachability of SRP waste glass has been studied under many different conditions and consistently found to be low. For example, the leachability of actual SRP waste glass was found to be 10 -6 to 10 -5 g/(cm 2 )(day) initially and decreasing to 10 -9 to 10 -8 g/(cm 2 )(day) after 100 days. Waste glass is also being studied under anticipated storage conditions. In brine at 90 0 C, the leachability is about 5 x 10 -8 g/(cm 2 )(day) after 60 days. The effects of other geological media including granite, basalt, shale, and tuff are also being studied as part of the multibarrier isolation system

  8. Matrix Characterization of Plutonium Residues by Alpha-Particle Self-Interrogation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Foster, L.A.; Staples, P.

    1998-01-01

    Legacy plutonium residues often have inadequate item descriptions. Nondestructive characterization can help segregate these items for reprocessing or provide information needed for disposal or storage. Alpha particle-induced gamma-ray spectra contain a wealth of information that can be used for matrix characterization. We demonstrate how this information can be used for item identification. Gamma-ray spectra were recorded at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility from a variety of legacy, plutonium-processing residues and product materials. The comparison and analysis of these spectra are presented

  9. arXiv On Matrix Factorizations, Residue Pairings and Homological Mirror Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Lerche, Wolfgang

    We argue how boundary B-type Landau-Ginzburg models based on matrix factorizations can be used to compute exact superpotentials for intersecting D-brane configurations on compact Calabi-Yau spaces. In this paper, we consider the dependence of open-string, boundary changing correlators on bulk moduli. This determines, via mirror symmetry, non-trivial disk instanton corrections in the A-model. As crucial ingredient we propose a differential equation that involves matrix analogs of Saito's higher residue pairings. As example, we compute from this for the elliptic curve certain quantum products m_2 and m_3, which reproduce genuine boundary changing, open Gromov-Witten invariants.

  10. Residual strain evolution during the deformation of single fiber metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanan, J.C.; Uestuendag, E.; Clausen, B. [Dept. of Materials Science, California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Sivasambu, M.; Beyerlein, I.J. [Theoretical Div., Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, D.W.; Bourke, M.A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Div., Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Successful application of metal matrix composites often requires strength and lifetime predictions that account for the deformation of each phase. Yet, the deformation of individual phases in composites usually differs significantly from their respective monolithic behaviors. An approach is presented that quantifies the deformation parameters of each phase using neutron diffraction measurements before, during, and after failure under tensile loading in model composites consisting of a single alumina fiber embedded in an aluminum matrix. The evolution of residual strains after loading was examined including the effects of fiber failure. (orig.)

  11. Augite-anorthite glass-ceramics from residues of basalt quarry and ceramic wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal A. Khater

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dark brown glasses were prepared from residues of basalt quarries and wastes of ceramic factories. Addition of CaF2, Cr2O3 and their mixture CaF2-Cr2O3 were used as nucleation catalysts. Generally, structures with augite and anorthite as major phases and small amount of magnetite and olivine phases were developed through the crystallization process. In the samples heat treated at 900 °C the dominant phase is augite, whereas the content of anorthite usually overcomes the augite at higher temperature (1100 °C. Fine to medium homogenous microstructures were detected in the prepared glass-ceramic samples. The coefficient of thermal expansion and microhardness measurements of the glass-ceramic samples were from 6.16×10-6 to 8.96×10-6 °C-1 (in the 20–500 °C and 5.58 to 7.16 GP, respectively.

  12. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  13. Characterization of residues of effluent treatment plant from lapping process of soda-lime glass and its application in the production of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio, Aline Pignaton; Calmon, Joao Luiz; Tristao, Fernando Avancini

    2012-01-01

    This study enunciates the physical, chemical and mineralogical composition of the residue from the process of ETE cutting of soda-lime glasses and its application in concrete as a replacement to the weight of CPV ARI RS cement, at levels of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%. Tests were performed on fresh and hardened (ages 3, 7, 28 and 300 days). The results were compared and statistically analyzed. In the fresh state, reductions in the amount of exuding water and consistency were observed. The results of compressive strength were statistically different, while the results for the tensile strength by diametrical compression and modulus of elasticity results were belonging to homogeneous groups. Beneficial effects the levels of residue on the cementitious matrix and the transition zone of concrete were identified by SEM, particularly concrete in S15

  14. Ultrafine Ceramic Grains Embedded in Metallic Glass Matrix: Achieving Superior Wear Resistance via Increase in Both Hardness and Toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Wen, Mao; Dai, Xuan; Cheng, Gang; Zhang, Kan

    2018-05-09

    As structural materials, crystalline or metallic glass materials have attracted scientific and practical interests. However, some mechanisms involving critical size and shear bands have adverse effects on their mechanical properties. Here, we counter these two effects by introducing a special structure with ultrafine ceramic grains (with a diameter of ∼2.0 nm) embedded into a metallic glass matrix, wherein the grains are mainly composed of a Ta-W-N solid solution structure in nature, surrounded by a W-based amorphous matrix that contains Ta and N atoms. Such a structure is in situ formed during preparation, which combines the merits of both phases to achieve simultaneous increase in hardness and toughness relative to references (pure TaN and W) and thus superior wear resistance. Even more remarkable, a favorable variation of increased hardness but reduced elasticity modulus can be induced by this structure. Intrinsically, ultrafine ceramic grains (free of dislocations), embedded in the metallic glass matrix, could prevent shear band propagation within the glass matrix and further improve the hardness of the matrix material. In return, such glass matrix allows for stiffness neutralization and structural relaxation to reduce the elasticity modulus of ceramic grains. This study will offer a new guidance to fabricate ultrahigh-performance metal-based composites.

  15. Coating extracellular matrix proteins on a (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated glass substrate for improved cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiro-taka; Ishihara, Seiichiro; Harada, Ichiro; Mizutani, Takeomi; Ishikawa, Masayori; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that a (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated glass surface is superior to an untreated glass surface for coating with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins when used as a cell culture substrate to observe cell physiology and behavior. We found that MDCK cells cultured on untreated glass coated with ECM removed the coated ECM protein and secreted different ECM proteins. In contrast, the cells did not remove the coated ECM protein when seeded on (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated (i.e., silanized) glass coated with ECM. Furthermore, the morphology and motility of cells grown on silanized glass differed from those grown on non-treated glass, even when both types of glass were initially coated with laminin. We also found that cells on silanized glass coated with laminin had higher motility than those on silanized glass coated with fibronectin. Based on our results, we suggest that silanized glass is a more suitable cell culture substrate than conventional non-treated glass when coated by ECM for observations of ECM effects on cell physiology.

  16. Barium borosilicate glass - a potential matrix for immobilization of sulfate bearing high-level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Mishra, R.K.; Sengupta, P.; Kumar, Amar; Das, D.; Kale, G.B.; Raj, Kanwar

    2006-01-01

    Borosilicate glass formulations adopted worldwide for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is not suitable for sulphate bearing HLW, because of its low solubility in such glass. A suitable glass matrix based on barium borosilicate has been developed for immobilization of sulphate bearing HLW. Various compositions based on different glass formulations were made to examine compatibility with waste oxide with around 10 wt% sulfate content. The vitrified waste product obtained from barium borosilicate glass matrix was extensively evaluated for its characteristic properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, glass transition temperature, thermal conductivity, impact strength, etc. using appropriate techniques. Process parameters like melt viscosity and pour temperature were also determined. It is found that SB-44 glass composition (SiO 2 : 30.5 wt%, B 2 O 3 : 20.0 wt%, Na 2 O: 9.5 wt% and BaO: 19.0 wt%) can be safely loaded with 21 wt% waste oxide without any phase separation. The other product qualities of SB-44 waste glass are also found to be on a par with internationally adopted waste glass matrices. This formulation has been successfully implemented in plant scale

  17. Residual stresses in a bulk metallic glass-stainless steel composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydiner, C.C. [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Uestuendag, E. [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Clausen, B. [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hanan, J.C. [Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Winholtz, R.A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Research Reactor Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Peker, A. [Liquidmetal Technologies, Lake Forest, CA 92630 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are new structural materials with impressive mechanical properties. They can now be cast into large dimensions, which can lead to significant residual stress generation due to thermal tempering. In this process, a surface compression develops balanced with tension in the interior. To evaluate this phenomenon non-destructively, a model cylindrical stainless steel (SS)-BMG composite was prepared and studied using neutron diffraction and finite element (FE) modeling. The residual strain data from the SS obtained by diffraction were used in modeling calculations to show that significant tempering could be achieved in the composite (about -200 MPa surface compression in the SS). The strong bond between the SS and BMG allowed efficient load transfer and facilitated stress generation. The final values of the residual stresses were seen to be relatively insensitive to the high temperature constitutive behavior of the SS due to the physics of the thermal tempering in BMGs. The approach presented here constitutes an effective means to study non-destructively thermal tempering in BMGs.

  18. Residual stresses in a bulk metallic glass-stainless steel composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydiner, C.C.; Uestuendag, E.; Clausen, B.; Hanan, J.C.; Winholtz, R.A.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Peker, A.

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are new structural materials with impressive mechanical properties. They can now be cast into large dimensions, which can lead to significant residual stress generation due to thermal tempering. In this process, a surface compression develops balanced with tension in the interior. To evaluate this phenomenon non-destructively, a model cylindrical stainless steel (SS)-BMG composite was prepared and studied using neutron diffraction and finite element (FE) modeling. The residual strain data from the SS obtained by diffraction were used in modeling calculations to show that significant tempering could be achieved in the composite (about -200 MPa surface compression in the SS). The strong bond between the SS and BMG allowed efficient load transfer and facilitated stress generation. The final values of the residual stresses were seen to be relatively insensitive to the high temperature constitutive behavior of the SS due to the physics of the thermal tempering in BMGs. The approach presented here constitutes an effective means to study non-destructively thermal tempering in BMGs

  19. Characterisation of glass matrix composites reinforced with lead zirconate titanate particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannillo, Valeria; Manfredini, Tiziano; Montorsi, Monia; Tavoni, Francesca; Minay, Emma J.; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2005-01-01

    A new type of glass matrix composite reinforced with ferroelectric particulate secondary phase was investigated. Samples containing lead zirconate titanate (PZT) particles in a silicate lead glass were fabricated. Various sintering strategies were tested in order to optimise the processing route. The densest samples were obtained by hot-pressing. The composites were characterized by means of SEM observations, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and Vickers indentations. In order to get a deeper insight into the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the material, a FEM based numerical model was prepared and applied. In particular, the crack-particle interaction was assessed and thus possible toughening mechanisms were investigated. By means of the numerical modelling supported by SEM observations, traditional toughening mechanisms (e.g. crack deflection, particle debonding) were ruled out. Since the experimentally measured indentation fracture toughness of the composite is significantly higher than that of the unreinforced glass, the findings suggest that a new toughening mechanism may be active, based on the piezoelectric effect

  20. Quantitative micro-Raman analysis of volcanic glasses: influence and correction of matrix effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muro, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy, even though a very promising micro-analytical technique, is still not used to routinely quantify volatile elements dissolved in glasses. Following an original idea of Galeener and Mikkelsen (1981) for the quantification of hydroxyl (OH) in silica glass, several quantitative procedures have been recently proposed for the analysis of water, sulphur and carbon in natural glasses (obsidians, pumices, melt inclusions). The quantification of a single analyte requires the calibration of the correlation between the intensity I (height or area) of the related Raman band, normalized or not to a reference band RB, and the analyte concentration. For the analysis of alumino-silicate glasses, RB corresponds to one of the two main envelopes (LF and HF) related to the vibration of the glass network. Calibrations are linear, provided the increase in the analyte concentration does not dramatically affect RB intensity. Much attention has been paid to identify the most appropriate spectral treatment (spectra reduction; baseline subtraction; etc) to achieve accurate measurement of band intensities. I here show that the accuracy of Raman procedures for volatile quantification critically depends on the capability in predicting and in taking into account the influence of multiple matrix effects, which are often correlated with the average polymerization degree of the glass network. A general model has been developed to predict matrix effects affecting micro-Raman analysis of natural glasses. The specific and critical influence of iron redox state and pressure are discussed. The approach has been extensively validated for the study of melt inclusions and matrices spanning a broad range of compositions and dissolved volatile contents. References Analytical procedures Mercier, M, Di Muro, A., Métrich, N., Giordano, D., Belhadj, O., Mandeville, C.W. (2010) Spectroscopic analysis (FTIR, Raman) of water in mafic and intermediate glasses and glass inclusions

  1. Residual strain dependence on the matrix structure in RHQ-Nb3Al wires by neutron diffraction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Xinzhe; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Tsuchiya, Kiyosumi; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Ito, Takayoshi; Harjo, Stefanus; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Takeuchi, Takao; Hemmi, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    We prepared three types of non-Cu RHQ-Nb 3 Al wire sample with different matrix structures: an all-Ta matrix, a composite matrix of Nb and Ta with a Ta inter-filament, and an all-Nb matrix. Neutron diffraction patterns of the wire samples were measured at room temperature in the J-PARC ‘TAKUMI’. To obtain the residual strains of the materials, we estimated the lattice constant a by multi-peak analysis in the wires. A powder sample of each wire was measured, where the powder was considered to be strain free. The grain size of all the powder samples was below 0.02 mm. For the wire sample with the all-Nb matrix, we also obtained the lattice spacing d by a single-peak analysis. The residual strains of the Nb 3 Al filament were estimated from the two analysis results and were compared. The resulting residual strains obtained from the multi-peak analysis showed a good accuracy with small standard deviation. The multi-peak analysis results for the residual strains of the Nb 3 Al filaments in the three samples (without Cu plating) were all tensile residual strain in the axial direction, of 0.12%, 0.12%, and 0.05% for the all-Ta matrix, the composite matrix, and the all-Nb matrix, respectively. The difference in the residual strain of the Nb 3 Al filament between the composite and all-Nb matrix samples indicates that the type of inter-filament material shows a great effect on the residual strain. In this paper, we report the method of measurement, method of analysis, and results for the residual strain in the three types of non-Cu RHQ-Nb 3 Al wires. (paper)

  2. The Effect of Stochastically Varying Creep Parameters on Residual Stresses in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Mital, Subodh K.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Constituent properties, along with volume fraction, have a first order effect on the microscale fields within a composite material and influence the macroscopic response. Therefore, there is a need to assess the significance of stochastic variation in the constituent properties of composites at the higher scales. The effect of variability in the parameters controlling the time-dependent behavior, in a unidirectional SCS-6 SiC fiber-reinforced RBSN matrix composite lamina, on the residual stresses induced during processing is investigated numerically. The generalized method of cells micromechanics theory is utilized to model the ceramic matrix composite lamina using a repeating unit cell. The primary creep phases of the constituents are approximated using a Norton-Bailey, steady state, power law creep model. The effect of residual stresses on the proportional limit stress and strain to failure of the composite is demonstrated. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using a normal distribution for the power law parameters and the resulting residual stress distributions were predicted.

  3. Determining the fracture resistance of fibre-reinforced glass matrix composites by means of the chevron-notch flexural technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Kern, H.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 308, 1/2 (2001), s. 111-117 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV101/96/K264 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : glass matrix composites * fracture toughness * chevron notch test Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.978, year: 2001

  4. Transient and residual stresses in a pressable glass-ceramic before and after resin-cement coating determined using profilometry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The effect of heat-pressing and subsequent pre-cementation (acid-etching) and resin-cementation operative techniques on the development of transient and residual stresses in different thicknesses of a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were characterised using profilometry prior to biaxial flexure strength (BFS) determination.

  5. Studies on the accelerated chemical durability test and its impact on structural changes in borosilicate glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorat, Vidya S.; Kadam, P.S.; Mishra, R.K.; Kumar, Amar; Kaushik, C.P.; Sudarsan, V.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium borosilicate glass used for the immobilisation of high level nuclear waste with tentative compositions (SiO 2 ) 0.477 (B 2 O 3 ) 0.239 (Na 2 O) 0.170 (TiO 2 ) 0.02 )3 (CaO) 0.068 (Al 2 O 3 ) 0.023 was evaluated for its long term stability in the repository conditions where it may be exposed to high temperature and pressure. 29 Si MAS NMR studies have confirmed that, upon leaching, sodium borosilicate glass undergoes congruent crystallization leading to the formation of an aluminosilicate phase, Na 6 Al 6 Si 10 O 32 . Further the residual glass structure in the composite sample is identical with that of the un-leached glass. Boron structural units are unaffected in the glass compositions upon leaching

  6. Assessment of thermal shock induced damage in silicon carbide fibre reinforced glass matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boccaccini, A. R.

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of microstructural damage in silicon carbide fibre (Nicalon™ reinforced glass matrix composite samples subjected to thermal shock was investigated by using a nondestructive forced resonance technique and fibre push out indentation tests. Thermal shock testing involved quenching samples in a water bath maintained at room temperature from a high temperature (650ºC. Changes in the Young's modulus and internal friction of the samples with increasing number of shocks were measured accurately by the forced resonance technique. Fibre push-out tests showed no significant changes in the properties of the fibre-matrix interface, indicating that damage in the composite was concentrated mainly in the development of matrix microcracking. It was also shown that the internal friction is a very sensitive parameter by which to detect the onset and development of such microcracking. A simple semi-empirical model is proposed to correlate the internal friction level with the microcracking density in the glass matrix. Finally, the relevance of detecting nondestructively the existence of microcracks in the glass matrix, before any significant interfacial degradation occurs, is emphasized, in conextion with the possibility of inducing a crack healing process by a thermal treatment (annealing, taking advantage of the viscous flow properties of the glass.

    El desarrollo de daño microestructural en materiales compuestos de matriz de vidrio reforzados con fibras de carburo de silicio (Nicalon™ sometidos a choque térmico fue investigado mediante la técnica no-destructiva de resonancia forzada y por mediciones de indentación "push-out" de fibras. Los ensayos de choque térmico involucraron el enfriamiento brusco en un baño de agua a temperatura ambiente de las piezas previamente calentadas a una temperatura elevada (650ºC. La técnica de resonancia forzada permitió medir cambios en el módulo de Young de elasticidad y en la fricci

  7. Investigating the use of coupling agents to improve the interfacial properties between a resorbable phosphate glass and polylactic acid matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Muhammad Sami; Ahmed, Ifty; Parsons, Andrew J; Rudd, Chris D; Walker, Gavin S; Scotchford, Colin A

    2013-09-01

    Eight different chemicals were investigated as potential candidate coupling agents for phosphate glass fibre reinforced polylactic acid composites. Evidence of reaction of the coupling agents with phosphate glass and their effect on surface wettability and glass degradation were studied along with their principle role of improving the interface between glass reinforcement and polymer matrix. It was found that, with an optimal amount of coupling agent on the surface of the glass/polymer, interfacial shear strength improved by a factor of 5. Evidence of covalent bonding between agent and glass was found for three of the coupling agents investigated, namely: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane; etidronic acid and hexamethylene diisocyanate. These three coupling agents also improved the interfacial shear strength and increased the hydrophobicity of the glass surface. It is expected that this would provide an improvement in the macroscopic properties of full-scale composites fabricated from the same materials which may also help to retain these properties for the desired length of time by retarding the breakdown of the fibre/matrix interface within these composites.

  8. Reduction of Residual Stresses in Sapphire Cover Glass Induced by Mechanical Polishing and Laser Chamfering Through Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Jeh Wu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sapphire is a hard and anti-scratch material commonly used as cover glass of mobile devices such as watches and mobile phones. A mechanical polishing using diamond slurry is usually necessary to create mirror surface. Additional chamfering at the edge is sometimes needed by mechanical grinding. These processes induce residual stresses and the mechanical strength of the sapphire work piece is impaired. In this study wet etching by phosphate acid process is applied to relief the induced stress in a 1” diameter sapphire cover glass. The sapphire is polished before the edge is chamfered by a picosecond laser. Residual stresses are measured by laser curvature method at different stages of machining. The results show that the wet etching process effectively relief the stress and the laser machining does not incur serious residual stress.

  9. Numerical simulation of residual stresses at holes near edges and corners in tempered glass: A parametric study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourmoghaddam, Navid; Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Schneider, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This work presents 3D results of the thermal tempering simulation by the Finite Element Method in order to calculate the residual stresses in the area of the holes near edges and corners of a tem-pered glass plate. A viscoelastic material behavior of the glass is considered for the tempering...... process. The structural relaxation is taken into account using Narayanaswamy’s model. The motiva-tion for this work is to study the effect of the reduction of the hole and edge minimum distances, which are defined according to EN 12150-1. It is the objective of the paper to demonstrate and elucidate...... the influence of the hole and edge distances on the minimal residual compressive stress-es at holes after the tempering process. The residual stresses in the area of the holes are calculat-ed varying the following parameters: the hole diameter, the plate thickness and the interaction between holes and edges...

  10. Mechanical characterization of SiC particulate & E-glass fiber reinforced Al 3003 hybrid metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, K. S. Lakshmi; Shivanand, H. K.

    2018-04-01

    Metal matrix composites constitute a class of low cost high quality materials which offer high performance for various industrial applications. The orientation of this research is towards the study of mechanical properties of as cast silicon carbide (SiC) particulates and Short E-Glass fibers reinforced Aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). The Hybrid metal matrix composite is developed by reinforcing SiC particulates of 100 microns and short E-Glass fibers of 2-3 mm length with Al 3003 in different compositions. The vortex method of stir casting was employed, in which the reinforcements were introduced into the vortex created by the molten metal by means of mechanical stirrer. The mechanical properties of the prepared metal matrix composites were analyzed. From the studies it was noticed that an improvement in mechanical properties of the reinforced alloys compared to unreinforced alloys.

  11. Interfacial bonding and friction in silicon carbide (filament)-reinforced ceramic- and glass-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, J.D.; Shetty, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports interfacial shear strength and interfacial sliding friction stress assessed in unidirectional SiC-filament-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and borosilicate glass composites and 0/90 cross-ply reinforced borosilicate glass composite using a fiber pushout test technique. The interface debonding load and the maximum sliding friction load were measured for varying lengths of the embedded fibers by continuously monitoring the load during debonding and pushout of single fibers in finite-thickness specimens. The dependences of the debonding load and the maximum sliding friction load on the initial embedded lengths of the fibers were in agreement with nonlinear shear-lag models. An iterative regression procedure was used to evaluate the interfacial properties, shear debond strength (τ d ), and sliding friction stress (τ f ), from the embedded fiber length dependences of the debonding load and the maximum frictional sliding load, respectively. The shear-lag model and the analysis of sliding friction permit explicit evaluation of a coefficient of sliding friction (μ) and a residual compressive stress on the interface (σ 0 ). The cross-ply composite showed a significantly higher coefficient of interfacial friction as compared to the unidirectional composites

  12. Investigation of the microcrack evolution in a Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and evolution behavior of the shear-bands and microcracks in a Ti-based metallic-glass–matrix composite (MGMC were investigated by using an in-situ tensile test under transmission electron microscopy (TEM. It was found that the plastic deformation of the Ti-based MGMC related with the generation of the plastic deformation zone in crystalline and shear deformation zone in glass phase near the crack tip. The dendrites can suppress the propagation of the shear band effectively. Before the rapid propagation of cracks, the extending of plastic deformation zone and shear deformation zone ahead of crack tip is the main pattern in the composite.

  13. Interferometric investigation and simulation of refractive index in glass matrixes containing nanoparticles of varying sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feeney, Michael Gerard; Ince, Rabia; Yukselici, Mehmet Hikmet; Allahverdi, Cagdas

    2011-07-01

    The relationship between refractive index and nanoparticle radii of cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles embedded within glass matrixes was investigated experimentally and by simulations. A homemade automated Michelson interferometer arrangement employing a rotating table and a He-Ne laser source at a wavelength of 632.8 nm determined the refractive index versus nanoparticle radii of embedded cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles. The refractive index was found to decrease linearly with nanoparticle radius increase. However, one sample showed a step increase in refractive index; on spectroscopic analysis, it was found that its resonant wavelength matched that of the He-Ne source wavelength. The simulations showed that two conditions caused the step increase in refractive index: low plasma frequency and matched sample and source resonances. This simple interferometer setup defines a new method of determining the radii of nanoparticles embedded in substrates and enables refractive index tailoring by modification of exact annealing conditions.

  14. Micromechanical modeling of tungsten-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hao [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Li Ke [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, TAMU 3123, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)]. E-mail: keli@tamu.edu; Subhash, Ghatu [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Kecskes, Laszlo J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Dowding, Robert J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Micromechanics models are developed for tungsten (W)-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) matrix composites employing the Voronoi tessellation technique and the finite element (FE) method. The simulation results indicate that the computed elastic moduli are close to those measured in the experiments. The predicted stress-strain curves agree well with their experimentally obtained counterparts in the early stage of the plastic deformation. An increase in the W volume fraction leads to a decrease in the yield stress and an increase in the Young's modulus of the composite. In addition, contours of equivalent plastic strain for increasing applied strains provide an explanation why shear bands were observed in the glassy phase, along the W/BMG interface, and in the W phase of failed W/BMG composite specimens.

  15. Shock Wave Response of Iron-based In Situ Metallic Glass Matrix Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanolkar, Gauri R; Rauls, Michael B; Kelly, James P; Graeve, Olivia A; Hodge, Andrea M; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-03-02

    The response of amorphous steels to shock wave compression has been explored for the first time. Further, the effect of partial devitrification on the shock response of bulk metallic glasses is examined by conducting experiments on two iron-based in situ metallic glass matrix composites, containing varying amounts of crystalline precipitates, both with initial composition Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4. The samples, designated SAM2X5-600 and SAM2X5-630, are X-ray amorphous and partially crystalline, respectively, due to differences in sintering parameters during sample preparation. Shock response is determined by making velocity measurements using interferometry techniques at the rear free surface of the samples, which have been subjected to impact from a high-velocity projectile launched from a powder gun. Experiments have yielded results indicating a Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) to be 8.58 ± 0.53 GPa for SAM2X5-600 and 11.76 ± 1.26 GPa for SAM2X5-630. The latter HEL result is higher than elastic limits for any BMG reported in the literature thus far. SAM2X5-600 catastrophically loses post-yield strength whereas SAM2X5-630, while showing some strain-softening, retains strength beyond the HEL. The presence of crystallinity within the amorphous matrix is thus seen to significantly aid in strengthening the material as well as preserving material strength beyond yielding.

  16. Antimicrobial thin films based on ayurvedic plants extracts embedded in a bioactive glass matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floroian, L.; Ristoscu, C.; Candiani, G.; Pastori, N.; Moscatelli, M.; Mihailescu, N.; Negut, I.; Badea, M.; Gilca, M.; Chiesa, R.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2017-09-01

    Ayurvedic medicine is one of the oldest medical systems. It is an example of a coherent traditional system which has a time-tested and precise algorithm for medicinal plant selection, based on several ethnopharmacophore descriptors which knowledge endows the user to adequately choose the optimal plant for the treatment of certain pathology. This work aims for linking traditional knowledge with biomedical science by using traditional ayurvedic plants extracts with antimicrobial effect in form of thin films for implant protection. We report on the transfer of novel composites from bioactive glass mixed with antimicrobial plants extracts and polymer by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation into uniform thin layers onto stainless steel implant-like surfaces. The comprehensive characterization of the deposited films was performed by complementary analyses: Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy and antimicrobial tests. The results emphasize upon the multifunctionality of these coatings which allow to halt the leakage of metal and metal oxides into the biological fluids and eventually to inner organs (by polymer use), to speed up the osseointegration (due to the bioactive glass use), to exert antimicrobial effects (by ayurvedic plants extracts use) and to decrease the implant price (by cheaper stainless steel use).

  17. Mechanical Characterization of Thermomechanical Matrix Residual Stresses Incurred During MMC Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, much effort has been spent examining the residual stress-strain states of advanced composites. Such examinations are motivated by a number of significant concerns that affect composite development, processing, and analysis. The room-temperature residual stress states incurred in many advanced composite systems are often quite large and can introduce damage even prior to the first external mechanical loading of the material. These stresses, which are induced during the cooldown following high-temperature consolidation, result from the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the fiber and matrix. Experimental techniques commonly used to evaluate composite internal residual stress states are non-mechanical in nature and generally include forms of x-ray and neutron diffraction. Such approaches are usually complex, involving a number of assumptions and limitations associated with a wide range of issues, including the depth of penetration, the volume of material being assessed, and erroneous effects associated with oriented grains. Furthermore, and more important to the present research, these techniques can assess only "single time" stress in the composite. That is, little, if any, information is obtained that addresses the time-dependent point at which internal stresses begin to accumulate, the manner in which the accumulation occurs, and the presiding relationships between thermoelastic, thermoplastic, and thermoviscous behaviors. To address these critical issues, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center developed and implemented an innovative mechanical test technique to examine in real time, the time-dependent thermomechanical stress behavior of a matrix alloy as it went through a consolidation cycle.

  18. Influence of thermal residual stress on behaviour of metal matrix composites reinforced with particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, R. E.; Hernández Arroyo, E.

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a metallic matrix composites materials (MMC's) reinforced with particles can be affected by different events occurring within the material in a manufacturing process. The existence of residual stresses resulting from the manufacturing process of these materials (MMC's) can markedly differentiate the curves obtained in tensile tests obtained from compression tests. One of the themes developed in this work is the influence of residual stresses on the mechanical behaviour of these materials. The objective of this research work presented is numerically estimate the thermal residual stresses using a unit cell model for the Mg ZC71 alloy reinforced with SiC particles with volume fraction of 12% (hot-forging technology). The MMC's microstructure is represented as a three dimensional prismatic cube-shaped with a cylindrical reinforcing particle located in the centre of the prism. These cell models are widely used in predicting stress/strain behaviour of MMC's materials, in this analysis the uniaxial stress/strain response of the composite can be obtained through the calculation using the commercial finite-element code.

  19. A Laboratory Investigation on Shear Strength Behavior of Sandy Soil: Effect of Glass Fiber and Clinker Residue Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouaricha Leyla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to investigate the shear strength parameters of treated sands reinforced with randomly distributed glass fibers by carrying out direct shear test after seven days curing periods. Firstly, we studied the fiber content and fiber length effect on the peak shear strength on samples. The second part gives a parametric analysis on the effect of glass fiber and clinker residue content on the shear strength parameters for two types of uniform Algerian sands having different particle sizes (Chlef sand and Rass sand with an average relative density Dr = 50%. Finally, the test results show that the combination of glass fiber and clinker residue content can effectively improve the shear strength parameters of soil in comparison with unreinforced soil. For instance, there is a significant gain for the cohesion and friction angle of reinforced sand of Chlef. Compared to unreinforced sand, the cohesion for sand reinforced with different ratios of clinker residue increased by 4.36 to 43.08 kPa for Chlef sand and by 3.1 to 28.64 kPa for Rass sand. The feature friction angles increased from 38.73° to 43.01° (+4.28°, and after the treatment, clinker residue content of soil evaluated to 5% (WRC = 5%.

  20. A Laboratory Investigation on Shear Strength Behavior of Sandy Soil: Effect of Glass Fiber and Clinker Residue Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaricha, Leyla; Henni, Ahmed Djafar; Lancelot, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the shear strength parameters of treated sands reinforced with randomly distributed glass fibers by carrying out direct shear test after seven days curing periods. Firstly, we studied the fiber content and fiber length effect on the peak shear strength on samples. The second part gives a parametric analysis on the effect of glass fiber and clinker residue content on the shear strength parameters for two types of uniform Algerian sands having different particle sizes (Chlef sand and Rass sand) with an average relative density Dr = 50%. Finally, the test results show that the combination of glass fiber and clinker residue content can effectively improve the shear strength parameters of soil in comparison with unreinforced soil. For instance, there is a significant gain for the cohesion and friction angle of reinforced sand of Chlef. Compared to unreinforced sand, the cohesion for sand reinforced with different ratios of clinker residue increased by 4.36 to 43.08 kPa for Chlef sand and by 3.1 to 28.64 kPa for Rass sand. The feature friction angles increased from 38.73° to 43.01° (+4.28°), and after the treatment, clinker residue content of soil evaluated to 5% (WRC = 5%).

  1. Effects of β-irradiation in multicomponent glasses simulating the matrix of the French nuclear waste glass (R7T7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boizot, B.; Ghaleb, D.; Petite, G.

    2001-01-01

    4-, 5- and 6-oxide components alumino-borosilicate glasses, with compositions closed to the matrix of the french nuclear glass 'R7T7' have been irradiated with electrons (β) at 2.5 MeV with a Van de Graff accelerator. These glasses have been studied after irradiation with different spectroscopic methods: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance for the study of defects, Raman Micro-spectroscopy for the study of amorphous network evolution under irradiation, and by 11 B MAS NMR. The results of these studies are presented here. It shows in particular a great sensibility to the irradiation conditions like dose rate and irradiation temperature, who are therefore important parameters for the representativeness of such experiments. (authors)

  2. Direct conversion of plutonium metal, scrap, residue, and transuranic waste to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Malling, J.F.; Rudolph, J.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the direct conversion of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids to borosilicate glass has been invented. The process is called the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS). Traditional glass-making processes can convert only oxide materials to glass. However, many wastes contain complex mixtures of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids. Conversion of such mixtures to oxides followed by their conversion to glass is often impractical. GMODS may create a practical method to convert such mixtures to glass. Plutonium-containing materials (PCMS) exist in many forms, including metals, ceramics, organics, amorphous solids, and mixtures thereof. These PCMs vary from plutonium metal to filters made of metal, organic binders, and glass fibers. For storage and/or disposal of PCMS, it is desirable to convert PCMs to borosilicate glass. Borosilicate glass is the preferred repository waste form for high-level waste (HLW) because of its properties. PCMs converted to a transuranic borosilicate homogeneous glass would easily pass all waste acceptance and storage criteria. Conversion of PCMs to a glass would also simplify safeguards by conversion of heterogeneous PCMs to homogeneous glass. Thermodynamic calculations and proof-of-principle experiments on the GMODS process with cerium (plutonium surrogate), uranium, stainless steel, aluminum, Zircaloy-2, and carbon were successfully conducted. Initial analysis has identified potential flowsheets and equipment. Major unknowns remain, but the preliminary data suggests that GMODS may be a major new treatment option for PCMs

  3. A relationship between leach rate of nuclear waste glass and residual amount of sodium on the glass surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamizono, Hiroshi; Banba, Tsunetaka

    1984-12-01

    Leach tests of simulated high-level waste glass were carried out in order to examine the quantitative relationship between the amount of elements on the sample surface and that in the leachate. An experimental equation was obtained expressing the relationship between the amount of Na on the sample surface and that in the leachate. This shows that it is possible in some cases to estimate the amount of Na in the leachate by measuring the amount of Na on the sample surface. One example of such an estimation was observed with the simulated high-level waste glass leached at 100 0 C in the presence of a backfill material. (author)

  4. PALS investigations of matrix Vycor glass doped with molecules of luminescent dye and silver nanoparticles. Discrepancies from the ETE model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgol Marek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A thermal stability of three materials: undoped reference Vycor glass, glass filled with ROT-305 red dye, and silver nanoparticles was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS in a broad temperature range (from 93 to 473 K. The attempt of pore size calculations from the ortho-positronium lifetime data was performed using the extended Tao-Eldrup (ETE model. Below room temperature, a significant decrease in lifetime values of the longest-lived component was found for all the samples. This effect could not be explained by thermal shrinkage of the material and is probably caused by interaction of o-Ps with a Vycor glass matrix. The greatest discrepancy from the ETE model predictions was observed for the reference glass. Doping the base material with dye molecules and silver nanoparticles resulted in similar small decrease in this discrepancy. After reheating the samples to the room temperature, the PALS components returned to the initial values. In the temperature range of 293–473 K, quite good agreement between PALS results and the ETE model predictions was observed for the reference glass and the glass incorporated with dye molecules. The observed small discrepancy in this range could possibly be partly explained by thermal expansion of the material. For the glass doped with silver nanoparticles, a significant change in PALS parameters was observed in the temperature range from 403 to 473 K.

  5. Development of Fe-B Based Bulk Metallic Glasses: Morphology of Residual Phases in Fe50Ni16Mo6B18Zr10 Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiburce A. Aboki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron-boron based bulk metallic glasses (BMG development has been initiated using Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 as precursor. Addition of zirconium up to 10 atomic % along with the reduction of Ni proportion improves the glass forming ability (GFA, which is optimum when Ni is suppressed in the alloy. However melting instability occurred during the materials fabrication resulting in the formation of residual crystalline phases closely related to the amorphous phase. Microstructure study shows an evolution from amorphous structure to peculiar acicular structure, particularly for Fe50Ni16Mo6B18Zr10, suggesting the amorphous structure as interconnected atomic sheets like “atomic mille feuilles” whose growth affects the alloys’ GFA.

  6. Singlet and doublet states UV-vis spectrum and electronic properties of 3-methylchrysene and 4-methylchrysene in glass matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Mudassir M; Tandon, H C; Varadwaj, Pradeep R

    2008-03-01

    The ultraviolet-visual spectrum of 3-methylchrysene, 4-methylchrysene and their radical cations formed by ultraviolet radiations, were measured in glass matrix at the room temperature. In the measured singlet state spectrum we were able to identify the alpha, p, beta, beta' (Clar's) or (1)L(b), (1)L(a)(1)B(b), (1)B(a) (Platt's notation) bands. The presence of alpha, beta or (1)L(b), (1)B(b) was confirmed by calculating their wavelength ratio lambda(alpha)/lambda(beta). Since matrix induces perturbation in the measured spectrum; it becomes necessary to take into account the perturbation while computing the spectrum. An effort has been made in this work to simulate the electronic spectrum in the same environment as is measured. This study presents the first calculated spectrum of these systems and their cations in glass matrix by semi empirical methods. To observe the magnitude of perturbation and hence to see the spectral shift in glass matrix, the spectrum was calculated in the free state as well. Spectral properties such as frontier orbitals gap, dipole moment, mean polarizabilities and its tensors were also computed both in glass matrix and free state using semiemperical method. The measured bands of 3-methylchrysene cation at wavelength 416.50 and 473.85 nm closely match with the available diffuse intersteallar bands (DIBs) at 417.55 and 472.64 nm, respectively. Also the observed 474.85 nm band of 4-methylchrysene cation matches the DIB at 476.00 nm.

  7. Glass as a matrix for SRP high-level defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.; Bibler, N.E.; Dukes, M.D.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Work done at Savannah River Laboratory and elsewhere that has led to development of glass as a candidate for solidifying Savannah River Plant waste is summarized. Areas of development described are glass formulation and fabrication, and leaching and radiation effects

  8. Characteristic of improved fatigue performance for Zr-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, J.W.; Huang, E.W.; Wang, G.Y.; Yang, H.J.; Liang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Liaw, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Zr 58.5 Ti 14.3 Nb 5.2 Cu 6.1 Ni 4.9 Be 11.0 bulk metallic glass matrix composites exhibit improved four-point-bending fatigue endurance with a fatigue limit of 567 MPa, compared to that under the tension–tension fatigue, due to the high-volume-fractioned dendrites, which can effectively blunt the fatigue-induced cracks. Illuminated by high-energy synchrotron X-ray at 200 and 100 K, the corresponding diffraction peaks, such as (110), (200), and (211) shift rightward to small lattice spacings, compared to those at 298 K. However, the peak widths at 100 K and 200 K are almost identical to that of room temperature. Since an identical fatigue specimen was measured under room temperature, 200 K, and 100 K, the invariant of the peak widths reveal the fact of the irreversible microstructure developments induced by fatigue. Even if the fatigue fracture stress is distinguishingly lower than the yielding strength, the deformation of dendrites locally prevails, evidenced by the occurrence of dislocations

  9. Residual Stress Induced Mechanical Property Enhancement in Steel Encapsulated Light Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudger, Sean James

    Macro hybridized systems consisting of steel encapsulated light metal matrix composites (MMCs) were produced with the goal of creating a low cost/light weight composite system with enhanced mechanical properties. MMCs are frequently incorporated into advanced material systems due to their tailorable material properties. However, they often have insufficient ductility for many structural applications. The macro hybridized systems take advantage of the high strength, modulus, and damage tolerance of steels and high specific stiffness and low density of MMCs while mitigating the high density of steels and the poor ductility of MMCs. Furthermore, a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch induced residual compressive stress method is utilized as a means of improving the ductility of the MMCs and overall efficiency of the macro hybridized systems. Systems consisting of an A36, 304 stainless steel, or NitronicRTM 50 stainless steel shell filled with an Al-SiC, Al-Al2O3, or Mg-B4C MMC are evaluated in this work. Upon cooling from processing temperatures, residual strains are generated due to a CTE mismatch between each of the phases. The resulting systems offer higher specific properties and a more structurally efficient system can be attained. Mechanical testing was performed and improvements in yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and ductility were observed. However, the combination of these dissimilar materials often results in the formation of intermetallic compounds. In certain loading situations, these typically brittle intermetallic layers can result in degraded performance. X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), and Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) are utilized to characterize the intermetallic layer formation at the interface between the steel and MMC. As the residual stress condition in each phase has a large impact on the mechanical property improvement, accurate quantification of these strains/stresses is

  10. Micromechanics of deformation of metallic-glass-matrix composites from in situ synchrotron strain measurements and finite element modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, R.T.; Sansoz, F.; Molinari, J.F.; Almer, J.; Ramesh, K.T.; Hufunagel, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    In situ X-ray scattering and finite element modeling (FEM) were used to examine the micromechanics of deformation of in situ formed metallic-glass-matrix composites consisting of Ta-rich particles dispersed in an amorphous matrix. The strain measurements show that under uniaxial compression the second-phase particles yield at an applied stress of approx. 325 MPa. After yielding, the particles do not strain harden significantly; we show that this is due to an increasingly hydrostatic stress state arising from the lateral constraint on deformation of the particles imposed by the elastic matrix. Shear band initiation in the matrix is not due to the difference in elastic properties between the matrix and the particles. Rather, the development of a plastic misfit strain causes stress concentrations around the particles, resulting in localized yielding of the matrix by shear band formation at an applied stress of approx. 1450 MPa, considerably lower than the macroscopic yield stress of the composite (approx. 1725 MPa). Shear bands do not propagate at the lower stress because the yield criterion of the matrix is only satisfied in the region immediately around the particles. At the higher stresses, the yield criterion is satisfied in large regions of the matrix, allowing extensive shear band propagation and significant macroscopic plastic deformation. However, the presence of the particles makes the stress state highly inhomogeneous, which may partially explain why fracture is suppressed in the composite, allowing the development of large plastic strains

  11. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  12. Study of a new glass matrix by the thermoluminescence technique; Estudo de uma nova matriz vitrea pela tecnica de termoluminescencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Pamela Z.; Vedovato, Uly P.; Cunha, Diego M. da; Dantas, Noelio O.; Silva, Anielle C.A.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P., E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (INFIS/UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carrera, Betzabel N.S.; Watanabe, Shigueo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    The thermoluminescence technique is widely used for both personal and for high-dose dosimetry. In this work, the thermoluminescence technique was utilized to study a new glass matrix, with nominal composition of 20Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.20BaO.50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol%), irradiated with different doses in a {sup 60}Co source. The glow curves and the dose-response curve were obtained for radiation doses between 50 Gy and 900 Gy. The results showed that this new glass matrix presents potential use in high-dose dosimetry. (author)

  13. In vivo xenogeneic scaffold fate is determined by residual antigenicity and extracellular matrix preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Maelene L; Wong, Janelle L; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Griffiths, Leigh G

    2016-06-01

    The immunological potential of animal-derived tissues and organs is the critical hurdle to increasing their clinical implementation. Glutaraldehyde-fixation cross-links proteins in xenogeneic tissues (e.g., bovine pericardium) to delay immune rejection, but also compromises the regenerative potential of the resultant biomaterial. Unfixed xenogeneic biomaterials in which xenoantigenicity has been ameliorated and native extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture has been maintained have the potential to overcome limitations of current clinically utilized glutaraldehyde-fixed biomaterials. The objective of this work was to determine how residual antigenicity and ECM architecture preservation modulate recipient immune and regenerative responses towards unfixed bovine pericardium (BP) ECM scaffolds. Disruption of ECM architecture during scaffold generation, with either SDS-decellularization or glutaraldehyde-fixation, stimulated recipient foreign body response and resultant fibrotic encapsulation following leporine subpannicular implantation. Conversely, BP scaffolds subjected to stepwise removal of hydrophilic and lipophilic antigens using amidosulfobetaine-14 (ASB-14) maintained native ECM architecture and thereby avoided fibrotic encapsulation. Removal of hydrophilic and lipophilic antigens significantly decreased local and systemic graft-specific, adaptive immune responses and subsequent calcification of BP scaffolds compared to scaffolds undergoing hydrophile removal only. Critically, removal of antigenic components and preservation of ECM architecture with ASB-14 promoted full-thickness recipient non-immune cellular repopulation of the BP scaffold. Further, unlike clinically utilized fixed BP, ASB-14-treated scaffolds fostered rapid intimal and medial vessel wall regeneration in a porcine carotid patch angioplasty model. This work highlights the importance of residual antigenicity and ECM architecture preservation in modulating recipient immune and regenerative

  14. Evaluation of two fast and easy methods for pesticide residue analysis in fatty food matrixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehotay, Steven J; Mastovská, Katerina; Yun, Seon Jong

    2005-01-01

    Two rapid methods of sample preparation and analysis of fatty foods (e.g., milk, eggs, and avocado) were evaluated and compared for 32 pesticide residues representing a wide range of physicochemical properties. One method, dubbed the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) method for pesticide residue analysis, entailed extraction of 15 g sample with 15 mL acetonitrile (MeCN) containing 1% acetic acid followed by addition of 6 g anhydrous magnesium sulfate and 1.5 g sodium acetate. After centrifugation, 1 mL of the buffered MeCN extract underwent a cleanup step (in a technique known as dispersive solid-phase extraction) using 50 mg each of C18 and primary secondary amine sorbents plus 150 mg MgSO4. The second method incorporated a form of matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD), in which 0.5 g sample plus 2 g C18 and 2 g anhydrous sodium sulfate was mixed in a mortar and pestle and added above a 2 g Florisil column on a vacuum manifold. Then, 5 x 2 mL MeCN was used to elute the pesticide analytes from the sample into a collection tube, and the extract was concentrated to 0.5 mL by evaporation. Extracts in both methods were analyzed concurrently by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The recoveries of semi-polar and polar pesticides were typically 100% in both methods (except that basic pesticides, such as thiabendazole and imazalil, were not recovered in the MSPD method), but recovery of nonpolar pesticides decreased as fat content of the sample increased. This trend was more pronounced in the QuEChERS method, in which case the most lipophilic analyte tested, hexachlorobenzene, gave 27 +/- 1% recovery (n=6) in avocado (15% fat) with a<10 ng/g limit of quantitation.

  15. Implementation of a fast digital optical matrix-vector multiplier using a holographic look-up table and residue arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiby, Sarry F.; Collins, Stuart A., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The design and implementation of a digital (numerical) optical matrix-vector multiplier are presented. A Hughes liquid crystal light valve, the residue arithmetic representation, and a holographic optical memory are used to construct position coded optical look-up tables. All operations are performed in effectively one light valve response time with a potential for a high information density.

  16. On the thermally-induced residual stresses in thick fiber-thermoplastic matrix (PEEK) cross-ply laminated plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shoufeng; Nairn, John A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical method for calculating thermally-induced residual stresses in laminated plates is applied to cross-ply PEEK laminates. We considered three cooling procedures: slow cooling (uniform temperature distribution); convective and radiative cooling; and rapid cooling by quenching (constant surface temperature). Some of the calculated stresses are of sufficient magnitude to effect failure properties such as matrix microcracking.

  17. Preparation and characterization of an improved borosilicate glass matrix for the incorporation of high level radioactive waste (HAW). Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guber, W.; Hussain, M.; Kahl, L.; Ondracek, G.; Saidl, J.; Dippel, T.

    1979-08-01

    On the basis of laboratory and technical experience with the preparation and the characterization of borosilicate glasses as solidification matrix for high level radioactive waste solution (HAW), a borosilicate glass composition with optimum properties has been developed. Keeping in view the technical and final storage requirements, a number of glass compositions with varying proportions of influential components as Al, Mg, Na were prepared and thoroughly investigated for certain parameters as specific gravity, thermal conductivity, impact resistance, thermal expansion, viscosity, characteristic temperature points, specific heat, evaporation losses from the melt, electrical conductivity, leach resistance, tendency toward recrystallization and second phase formation. All the compositions (some with different amounts of Gd 2 O 3 , an expected neutron poision) contained 15 wt. % simulated HAW oxides. Samples for investigation were fabricated very close to the actual process conditions of vitrification. Two glass products GP12 and GP26 (3.7% Gd 2 O 3 ) have been selected out of 25 glasses as the optimised products for further thorough investigations. Leach resistance, viscosity at 1420 K, tendency towards recrystallization and second phase formation were the most important deciding factors. (orig.) [de

  18. An investigation into the effects of residual water on the glass transition temperature of polylactide microspheres using modulated temperature DSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passerini, N; Craig, D Q

    2001-05-18

    The objective of the study was to ascertain residual water levels in polylactide and polylactide-co-glycolide microspheres prepared using the solvent evaporation technique and to investigate the effects of that water on the glass transitional behaviour of the microspheres. Microspheres were prepared from polylactic acid (PLA) and polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) 50:50 and 75:25 using a standard solvent evaporation technique. The glass transition was measured as a function of drying conditions using modulated temperature DSC. The microspheres were found to contain very low levels of dichloromethane, while residual water levels of up to circa 3% w/w were noted after freeze or oven drying, these levels being higher for microspheres containing higher glycolic acid levels. The residual water was found to lower the T(g) following the Gordon-Taylor relationship. The data indicate that the microparticles may retain significant water levels following standard preparation and drying protocols and that this drying may markedly lower the T(g) of the spheres.

  19. Influence of residual composition on the structure and properties of extracellular matrix derived hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio-Rizo, Jesús A; Rangel-Argote, Magdalena; Castellano, Laura E; Delgado, Jorge; Mata-Mata, José L; Mendoza-Novelo, Birzabith

    2017-10-01

    In this work, hydrolysates of extracellular matrix (hECM) were obtained from rat tail tendon (TR), bovine Achilles tendon (TAB), porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and bovine pericardium (PB), and they were polymerized to generate ECM hydrogels. The composition of hECM was evaluated by quantifying the content of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), fibronectin and laminin. The polymerization process, structure, physicochemical properties, in vitro degradation and biocompatibility were studied and related to their composition. The results indicated that the hECM derived from SIS and PB were significantly richer in sGAG, fibronectin and laminin, than those derived from TAB and TR. These differences in hECM composition influenced the polymerization and the structural characteristics of the fibrillar gel network. Consequently, the swelling, mechanics and degradation of the hydrogels showed a direct relationship with the remaining composition. Moreover, the cytocompatibility and the secretion of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) by macrophages were enhanced in hydrogels with the highest residual content of ECM biomolecules. The results of this work evidenced the role of the ECM molecules remaining after both decellularization and hydrolysis steps to produce tissue derived hydrogels with structure and properties tailored to enhance their performance in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. AN ALTERNATIVE HOST MATRIX BASED ON IRON PHOSPHATE GLASSES FOR THE VITRIFICATION OF SPECIALIZED WASTE FORMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Delbert D.

    2000-01-01

    As mentioned above, the overall goal of this research project was to collect the scientific information essential to develop iron phosphate glass based nuclear wasteforms. The specific objectives of the project were: (1) Investigate the structure of binary iron phosphate glasses and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Understand atomic arrangements and nature of the bonding. Establish structure-property relationships. Determine the compositions and melting conditions which optimize the critical properties of the base glass. (2) Understand the structure of iron phosphate wasteforms and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Investigate how the waste elements are bonded and coordinated within the glass structure. Establish structure-property relationships for the waste glasses. Determine the compositions and melting atmosphere for which the critical properties of the waste forms would be optimum. (3) Determine the role(s) played by the valence states of iron ions and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Understand the different roles of iron(II) and iron(III) ions in determining the critical properties of the base glass and the waste forms. Investigate how the iron valence and its significance depend on the composition and melting atmosphere. (4) Investigate glass forming and crystallization processes of the iron phosphate glasses and their waste forms: Understand the dependence of the glass forming and crystallization characteristics on overall glass composition and valence states of iron ions. Identify the products of devitrification and investigate the critical properties of these crystalline compounds which may adversely affect the chemical and physical properties of the waste forms

  1. Influence of friction on the residual morphology, the penetration load and the residual stress distribution of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, friction between the Cube-Corner indenter and the sample surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG was analyzed and discussed by the experimental method, the theoretical method and the finite element simulation. Linear residua are observed on the surface of the indenter for the first time, which gives the direct evidence that strong interaction processes exist between the indenter surface and the sample surface because of strong friction and local high contact press. A simplified model was developed to correct the penetration load with the consideration of friction. Effects of friction on the penetration load-depth curves, plastic flow, surface deformation and residual stress distribution of the sample with different friction coefficients were investigated by the finite element simulation.

  2. Sulfur Solubility Testing and Characterization of LAW Phase 1 Matrix Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-02-24

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides chemical analysis results for a series of simulated low-activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. These data will be used in the development of improved sulfur solubility models for LAW glass. A procedure developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for producing sulfur saturated melts (SSMs) was carried out at both SRNL and PNNL to fabricate the glasses characterized in this report. This method includes triplicate melting steps with excess sodium sulfate, followed by grinding and washing to remove unincorporated sulfur salts. The wash solutions were also analyzed as part of this study.

  3. Sulfur Solubility Testing and Characterization of Hanford LAW Phase 2, Inner Layer Matrix Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Caldwell, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-27

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for a series of simulated low activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. A procedure developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for producing sulfur saturated melts (SSMs) was carried out at both SRNL and PNNL to fabricate the glasses characterized in this report. This method includes triplicate melting steps with excess sodium sulfate, followed by grinding and washing to remove unincorporated sulfur salts. The wash solutions were also analyzed as part of this study. These data will be used in the development of improved sulfur solubility models for LAW glass.

  4. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    based bulk metallic glasses; in situ composites; ductile phase; wear behaviours. 1. Introduction ... crystalline alloys [2], which led to an abnormal phenomenon that the wear ... of BMGs does not follow the empirical Archard's wear equa- tion which ...

  5. The role of residual cracks on alkali silica reactivity of recycled glass aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraghechi, Hamed; Shafaatian, Seyed-Mohammad-Hadi; Fischer, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Despite its environmental and economical advantages, crushed recycled glass has limited application as concrete aggregates due to its deleterious alkali-silica reaction. To offer feasible mitigation strategies, the mechanism of ASR should be well understood. Recent research showed that unlike some...

  6. Application of the atomic absorption technical to available the concentration of silver ions incorporated in glass matrix by ionic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, E.; Silva, K.F.; Teixeira, A.; Silva, L.; Paula, M.M.S.; Angioletto, E.; Riella, H.G.; Fiori, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Ion specimens can be incorporated in glasses or natural clays by ionic exchange process with different concentrations dependent of matrix's type and of the ionic exchange parameters. In particular, the incorporation of silver ions presents high interest by its biocidal properties. A compound contending ion silver specimens presents bactericidal and fungicidal properties with effect proportional to ion concentration. This work presents results about application of the atomic absorption technical to determine the silver ion concentration incorporated in a glass matrix by ionic exchange process. The ionic exchange experiments were realized with different AgNO 3 concentration and constant temperature. After ionic exchange process, the glass samples were submitted to characterization by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy and Atomic Absorption Techniques. The comparative results between different techniques showed that atomic absorption technical is adequate to determine ion silver concentration incorporated in the glass matrix after ionic exchange process. (author)

  7. A study on thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber of a misoriented short fiber composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Bong Jin; Lee, Joon Hyun

    1994-01-01

    An elastic model is developed to predict the average thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber of a misoriented short fiber composite. The thermal residual stresses are induced by the mismatch in the coefficient of the thermal expansion of the matrix and fiber when the composite is subjected to a uniform temperature change. The model considers two special cases of fiber misorientation; two-dimensional in-plane and three-dimensional axisymmetric. The analytical formulation of the model is based on Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and is unique in that it is able to account for interactions among fibers. The model is more general than past models and it is able to treat prior analyses of the simpler composite systems as extream cases. The present model is to investigate the effects of fiber volume fraction, distribution type, distribution cut-off angle, and aspect ratio on thermal residual stress for both in-plane and axisymmetric fiber misorientation. Fiber volume fraction, aspect ratio, and disturbution cut-off angle are shown to have more significant effects on the magnitude of the thermal residual stresses than fiber distrubution type for both in-plane and axisymmetric misorientation.

  8. Residual stresses and critical diameter in vitreous matrix materials; Tensoes residuais e diametro critico em materiais com matrizes vitreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastelaro, Valmor R.; Zanotto, Edgar D. [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    1995-12-31

    The present study was undertaken to test the validity of existing models for: i) the residual internal stresses which arise due to thermal and elastic mismatch in duplex systems, and ii) the critical particle diameter for spontaneous cracking. Partially crystallized 1,07 Na{sub 2} O-2 Ca O-3 Si O{sub 2} - 6% P{sub 2} O{sub 5} glasses were studied. The experimental residual stress was in excellent agreement with the calculated value, however, the critical particle diameter, estimated by an energy balance approach, was more than ten times smaller than the experimental value. This discrepancy indicates that the energy model is not applicable in this case. (author) 1 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Effect of elasticity on stress distribution in CAD/CAM dental crowns: Glass ceramic vs. polymer-matrix composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuanyuan; Griggs, Jason A

    2015-06-01

    Further investigations are required to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of newly developed polymer-matrix composite (PMC) blocks for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of elasticity on the stress distribution in dental crowns made of glass-ceramic and PMC materials using finite element (FE) analysis. Elastic constants of two materials were determined by ultrasonic pulse velocity using an acoustic thickness gauge. Three-dimensional solid models of a full-coverage dental crown on a first mandibular molar were generated based on X-ray micro-CT scanning images. A variety of load case-material property combinations were simulated and conducted using FE analysis. The first principal stress distribution in the crown and luting agent was plotted and analyzed. The glass-ceramic crown had stress concentrations on the occlusal surface surrounding the area of loading and the cemented surface underneath the area of loading, while the PMC crown had only stress concentration on the occlusal surface. The PMC crown had lower maximum stress than the glass-ceramic crown in all load cases, but this difference was not substantial when the loading had a lateral component. Eccentric loading did not substantially increase the maximum stress in the prosthesis. Both materials are resistant to fracture with physiological occlusal load. The PMC crown had lower maximum stress than the glass-ceramic crown, but the effect of a lateral loading component was more pronounced for a PMC crown than for a glass-ceramic crown. Knowledge of the stress distribution in dental crowns with low modulus of elasticity will aid clinicians in planning treatments that include such restorations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Confocal detection of Rayleigh scattering for residual stress measurement in chemically tempered glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hödemann, S., E-mail: siim.hodemann@ut.ee; Möls, P.; Kiisk, V.; Saar, R.; Kikas, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Wilhelm Ostwald st., Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Murata, T. [Nippon Electric Glass Co., 7-1 Seiran 2-chome, Otsu-shi, Shiga 520-8639 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    A new optical method is presented for evaluation of the stress profile in chemically tempered (chemically strengthened) glass based on confocal detection of scattered laser beam. Theoretically, a lateral resolution of 0.2 μm and a depth resolution of 0.6 μm could be achieved by using a confocal microscope with high-NA immersion objective. The stress profile in the 250 μm thick surface layer of chemically tempered lithium aluminosilicate glass was measured with a high spatial resolution to illustrate the capability of the method. The confocal method is validated using transmission photoelastic and Na{sup +} ion concentration profile measurement. Compositional influence on the stress-optic coefficient is calculated and discussed. Our method opens up new possibilities for three-dimensional scattered light tomography of mechanical imaging in birefringent materials.

  11. Analysis of soda-lime glasses using non-negative matrix factor deconvolution of Raman spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Woelffel , William; Claireaux , Corinne; Toplis , Michael J.; Burov , Ekaterina; Barthel , Etienne; Shukla , Abhay; Biscaras , Johan; Chopinet , Marie-Hélène; Gouillart , Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Novel statistical analysis and machine learning algorithms are proposed for the deconvolution and interpretation of Raman spectra of silicate glasses in the Na 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 system. Raman spectra are acquired along diffusion profiles of three pairs of glasses centered around an average composition of 69. 9 wt. % SiO 2 , 12. 7 wt. % CaO , 16. 8 wt. % Na 2 O. The shape changes of the Raman spectra across the compositional domain are analyzed using a combination of princi...

  12. Fixation by ion exchange of toxic materials in a glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litovitz, T.A.; Simmons, C.J.; Simmons, J.H.; Macedo, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    A process for disposing of toxic materials such as radioactive waste comprises reacting a porous silicate glass or silica gel, having interconnected pores and alkali metal cations. Group 1b metal cations and/or ammonium cation bonded to silicon through divalent oxygen linkages on the internal surfaces of said pores, with a toxic material containing toxic cations as well as non-cationic portions. The toxic cations are capable of displacing the alkali metal cations, Group 1b metal cations and/or ammonium cations to provide a distribution of internal silicon-bonded toxic cation oxide groups within the pores of the glass or silica gel. (author)

  13. Influence of the Processing Parameters on the Fiber-Matrix-Interphase in Short Glass Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Katharina Sambale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interphase in short fiber thermoplastic composites is defined as a three-dimensional, several hundred nanometers-wide boundary region at the interface of fibers and the polymer matrix, exhibiting altered mechanical properties. This region is of key importance in the context of fiber-matrix adhesion and the associated mechanical strength of the composite material. An interphase formation is caused by morphological, as well as thermomechanical processes during cooling of the plastic melt close to the glass fibers. In this study, significant injection molding processing parameters are varied in order to investigate the influence on the formation of an interphase and the resulting mechanical properties of the composite. The geometry of the interphase is determined using nano-tribological techniques. In addition, the influence of the glass fiber sizing on the geometry of the interphase is examined. Tensile tests are used in order to determine the resulting mechanical properties of the produced short fiber composites. It is shown that the interphase width depends on the processing conditions and can be linked to the mechanical properties of the short fiber composite.

  14. Effect of phosphate-based glass fibre surface properties on thermally produced poly(lactic acid) matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Maziar Shah; Ahmed, Ifty; Muja, Naser; Rudd, Christopher D; Bureau, Martin N; Nazhat, Showan N

    2011-12-01

    Incorporation of soluble bioactive glass fibres into biodegradable polymers is an interesting approach for bone repair and regeneration. However, the glass composition and its surface properties significantly affect the nature of the fibre-matrix interface and composite properties. Herein, the effect of Si and Fe on the surface properties of calcium containing phosphate based glasses (PGs) in the system (50P(2)O(5)-40CaO-(10-x)SiO(2)-xFe(2)O(3), where x = 0, 5 and 10 mol.%) were investigated. Contact angle measurements revealed a higher surface energy, and surface polarity as well as increased hydrophilicity for Si doped PG which may account for the presence of surface hydroxyl groups. Two PG formulations, 50P(2)O(5)-40CaO-10Fe(2)O(3) (Fe10) and 50P(2)O(5)-40CaO-5Fe(2)O(3)-5SiO(2) (Fe5Si5), were melt drawn into fibres and randomly incorporated into poly(lactic acid) (PLA) produced by melt processing. The ageing in deionised water (DW), mechanical property changes in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and cytocompatibility properties of these composites were investigated. In contrast to Fe10 and as a consequence of the higher surface energy and polarity of Fe5Si5, its incorporation into PLA led to increased inorganic/organic interaction indicated by a reduction in the carbonyl group of the matrix. PLA chain scission was confirmed by a greater reduction in its molecular weight in PLA-Fe5Si5 composites. In DW, the dissolution rate of PLA-Fe5Si5 was significantly higher than that of PLA-Fe10. Dissolution of the glass fibres resulted in the formation of channels within the matrix. Initial flexural strength was significantly increased through PGF incorporation. After PBS ageing, the reduction in mechanical properties was greater for PLA-Fe5Si5 compared to PLA-Fe10. MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts seeded onto PG discs, PLA and PLA-PGF composites were evaluated for up to 7 days indicating that the materials were generally cytocompatible. In addition, cell alignment along the PGF

  15. Light scattering in glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendy, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Glass-ceramic materials with microstructures comprised of dispersed nanocrystallites in a residual glass matrix show promise for many new technological applications. In particular, transparent glass-ceramics offer low thermal expansion and stability, in addition to the prospect of novel non-linear optical properties that can arise from the nanocrystallites. Good transparency requires low optical scattering and low atomic absorption. Light scattering in the glass-ceramic arises primarily from the glass-crystallite interface. The attenuation due to scattering (turbidity) will depend upon the difference in refractive index of the two phases and the size and distribution of nanocrystallites in the glass. Here we consider models of glass-ceramic structure formation and look at scattering in these model structures to increase our understanding of the transparency of glass-ceramics

  16. Implementation of a digital optical matrix-vector multiplier using a holographic look-up table and residue arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiby, Sarry F.

    1987-01-01

    The design and implementation of a digital (numerical) optical matrix-vector multiplier are presented. The objective is to demonstrate the operation of an optical processor designed to minimize computation time in performing a practical computing application. This is done by using the large array of processing elements in a Hughes liquid crystal light valve, and relying on the residue arithmetic representation, a holographic optical memory, and position coded optical look-up tables. In the design, all operations are performed in effectively one light valve response time regardless of matrix size. The features of the design allowing fast computation include the residue arithmetic representation, the mapping approach to computation, and the holographic memory. In addition, other features of the work include a practical light valve configuration for efficient polarization control, a model for recording multiple exposures in silver halides with equal reconstruction efficiency, and using light from an optical fiber for a reference beam source in constructing the hologram. The design can be extended to implement larger matrix arrays without increasing computation time.

  17. Neutron detector based on Particles of {sup 6}Li glass scintillator dispersed in organic lightguide matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianakiev, K.D., E-mail: ianakiev@lanl.gov; Hehlen, M.P.; Swinhoe, M.T.; Favalli, A.; Iliev, M.L.; Lin, T.C.; Bennett, B.L.; Barker, M.T.

    2015-06-01

    Most {sup 3}He replacement neutron detector technologies today have overlapping neutron–gamma pulse-height distributions, which limits their usefulness and performance. Different techniques are used to mitigate this shortcoming, including Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) or threshold settings that suppress all gammas as well as much of the neutrons. As a result, count rates are limited and dead times are high when PSD is used, and the detection efficiency for neutron events is reduced due to the high threshold. This is a problem in most applications where the neutron–gamma separation of {sup 3}He detectors had been essential. This challenge is especially severe for neutron coincidence and multiplicity measurements that have numerous conflicting requirements such as high detection efficiency, short die-away time, short dead time, and high stability. {sup 6}Li-glass scintillators have excellent light output and a single peak distribution, but they are difficult to implement because of their gamma sensitivity. The idea of reducing the gamma sensitivity of {sup 6}Li-glass scintillators by embedding small glass particles in an organic light-guide medium was first presented by L.M. Bollinger in the early 60s but, to the best of our knowledge, has never been reduced to practice. We present a proof of principle detector design and experimental data that develop this concept to a large-area neutron detector. This is achieved by using a multi-component optical medium ({sup 6}Li glass particles attached to a glass supporting structure and a mineral oil light guide) which matches the indices of refraction and minimizes the absorption of the 395 nm scintillator light. The detector design comprises a 10 in. long tube with dual end readout with about 3% volume density of {sup 6}Li glass particles installed. The presented experimental data with various neutron and gamma sources show the desired wide gap between the neutron and gamma pulse height distributions, resulting in a

  18. Laboratory-scale study of possible use of residual sludge from glass sand beneficiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikryl, Richard; Weishauptova, Zuzana; Zach, Jaroslav; Kozlovcev, Petr

    2016-04-01

    Beneficiation of quartz sand from sedimentary deposits for glass sands results in significant amounts of under-size fraction, a sludge rich in clay minerals. This sludge is considered as a waste and is returned in mined-out spaces for a simple rehabilitation, which is also the case of one of the largest glass sand production areas in the Czech Republic. The amount of produced waste sludge in the studied area (glass sand works in Provodín area, Bohemian Cretaceous Basin) is about 20 kt per year. In the recent study, we have focused on possible employment of this waste material for three applications: (1) a clay component in a raw material mixture for making of hydraulic lime, (2) a kaolinite absorbent, and (3) a geotechnical material. The sampled sludge was primarily analysed for mineralogical and chemical composition, mechanical and physical properties, the specific surface area, and parameters of pore space. X-ray analysis proved the presence of kaolinite, illite (both WCI and PCI), quartz, and accessory microcline. According to silicate analysis, the material is composed of SiO2 (80.52 wt. %), Al2O3 (11.36 wt. %), and K2O (2.14 wt. %). For its potential use as an artificial admixture for hydraulic lime production, the studied material was mixed with pure limestone in ratio of 10, 15, 20, and/or 25 wt. %. The experimental mixtures were burnt in the temperature range from 850 to 1,200°C. XRD was employed for the detection of newly formed phases showing formation of hydraulic phase such as C2S, C3A, C4AF starting from the 1050°C burning temperature. Peak burning temperature significantly influenced amount of individual phases in the burnt product. Second possible mode of use of the investigated waste material focused on its application as a sorbent. Pore space and specific surface area characteristics (SBET 7.4 sq. m/g) range this material to the group of low grade kaolinite-dominated adsorbents. Thermal treatment (burning of raw waste material at temperatures of

  19. Fixation by ion exchange of toxic materials in a glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, C.J.; Simmons, J.H.; Macedo, P.B.; Litovitz, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    A process is reported for reacting a porous silicate or borosilicate glass or silica gel with alkali metal cations, Group lb cations and/or ammonium cations bonded to the silicon through divalent oxygen linkages on the internal surfaces of the pores. Ion exchange of the cations with toxic or radioactive cations was possible resulting in a distribution of internal silicon-bonded toxic cation oxide groups within the pores of the glass or silica gel. The ion exchange reaction may be done successfully with acidic, neutral or alkaline pH solutions. The aim of the immobilization is for permanent storage of hazardous materials such as Hg 2+ , Hg + , Cd 2+ , Tl + , Pb 2+ and radioactive cations

  20. Changes in Fracture Micromechanism with Increasing Reinforcement Volume Fraction in Glass Matrix Composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 567-568, - (2008), s. 369-372 ISSN 0255-5476. [MSMF /5./. Brno, 27.06.2007-29.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD106/05/H008; GA ČR GP106/05/P119 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : glass -ceramics * fracture mechanics * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  1. The Effect of Various Silicate-glass Matrixes on Gold-nanoparticle Formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švecová, B.; Vindová, P.; Staněk, S.; Vytykačová, S.; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Mikšová, Romana; Janeček, M.; Pešička, J.; Špirková, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2017), s. 52-58 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G; GA ČR GA15-01602S; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : glasses * nanoparticles * transmission electron microscopy * ion implantation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nano-materials (production and properties) Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2016

  2. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar+ laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A.; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar + laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10 4 W/cm 2 ) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  3. Characterization and excitation behaviour studies of radionuclide (scandium) in glass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehana, Ishrat; Shahid, K.A.; Husain, S.; Muhammad, Din

    1999-01-01

    Directional movements of bed load in marine sediments are studied using a radioactive tracer, scandium, similar to the natural sediment in the area. Scandium glass prepared for this purpose was analyzed by atomic emission spectrography for quality assurance purposes. A buffer composed of graphite with 5% germanium oxide was used for accurate and reproducible analyses. The role of this buffer in the excitation behavior of scandium and variations in spectral line intensity with respect to various influencing parameters are reported. Volatilization of scandium was observed using the moving plate technique, with a dc-arc as the excitation source

  4. In vivo xenogeneic scaffold fate is determined by residual antigenicity and extracellular matrix preservation

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Maelene L.; Wong, Janelle L.; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Griffiths, Leigh G.

    2016-01-01

    The immunological potential of animal-derived tissues and organs is the critical hurdle to increasing their clinical implementation. Glutaraldehyde-fixation cross-links proteins in xenogeneic tissues (e.g., bovine pericardium) to delay immune rejection, but also compromises the regenerative potential of the resultant biomaterial. Unfixed xenogeneic biomaterials in which xenoantigenicity has been ameliorated and native extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture has been maintained have the potent...

  5. GRC: Composite material from an inorganic matrix reinforced with AR glass fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comino Almenara, P. I.

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the historical background of Cem-FIL. Alkali Resistant Glass Fibre, as well as the composite characteristics of the element they generate: GRC. The most important advantages and properties of this type of Composite Material are also detailed.

    En este artículo se detallan cuáles son las bases históricas de las Fibras de Vidrio Álcali-Resistentes Cem-FIL así como las características del elemento compuesto que ellas generan: GRC. En este documento también se pueden encontrar indicaciones sobre las principales ventajas y propiedades de este tipo de Material Compuesto.

  6. Doxycycline-containing glass ionomer cement for arresting residual caries: an in vitro study and a pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Cristiane; Kreling, Paula Fernanda; Pereira, Jesse Augusto; de Paula, Andreia Bolzan; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In a previous study, we demonstrated that the incorporation of doxycycline hyclate (DOX) into resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) inhibited important cariogenic microorganisms, without modifying its biological and mechanical characteristics. In this study, we keep focused on the effect of that experimental material as a potential therapy for arresting residual caries by analyzing other in vitro properties and conducting a pilot clinical trial assessing the in vivo effect of DOX-containing RMGIC on residual mutans streptococci after partial carious removal in primary molars. Specimens of the groups RMGIC (control); RMGIC + 1.5% DOX; RMGIC + 3% DOX; and RMGIC + 4.5% DOX were made to evaluate the effect of DOX incorporation on surface microhardness and fluoride release of RMGIC and against biofilm of Streptococcus mutans. Clinical intervention consisted of partial caries removal comparing RMGIC and RMGIC + 4.5% DOX as lining materials. After 3 months, clinical and microbiologic evaluations were performed. Data were submitted to ANOVA/Tukey or Wilcoxon/Mann-Whitney set as α=0.05. Fluoride release and surface microhardness was not influenced by the incorporation of DOX (p>0.05). There was a significant reduction of S. mutans biofilm over the material surface with the increase of DOX concentration. After clinical trial, the remaining dentin was hard and dry. Additionally, mutans streptococci were completely eliminated after 3 months of treatment with RMGIC + 4.5% DOX. The incorporation of DOX provided better antibiofilm effect, without jeopardizing fluoride release and surface microhardness of RMGIC. This combination also improved the in vivo shortterm microbiological effect of RMGIC after partial caries removal. PMID:29742263

  7. Doxycycline-containing glass ionomer cement for arresting residual caries: an in vitro study and a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Aline Rogéria Freire de; Duque, Cristiane; Kreling, Paula Fernanda; Pereira, Jesse Augusto; Paula, Andreia Bolzan de; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2018-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that the incorporation of doxycycline hyclate (DOX) into resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) inhibited important cariogenic microorganisms, without modifying its biological and mechanical characteristics. In this study, we keep focused on the effect of that experimental material as a potential therapy for arresting residual caries by analyzing other in vitro properties and conducting a pilot clinical trial assessing the in vivo effect of DOX-containing RMGIC on residual mutans streptococci after partial carious removal in primary molars. Specimens of the groups RMGIC (control); RMGIC + 1.5% DOX; RMGIC + 3% DOX; and RMGIC + 4.5% DOX were made to evaluate the effect of DOX incorporation on surface microhardness and fluoride release of RMGIC and against biofilm of Streptococcus mutans. Clinical intervention consisted of partial caries removal comparing RMGIC and RMGIC + 4.5% DOX as lining materials. After 3 months, clinical and microbiologic evaluations were performed. Data were submitted to ANOVA/Tukey or Wilcoxon/Mann-Whitney set as α=0.05. Fluoride release and surface microhardness was not influenced by the incorporation of DOX (p>0.05). There was a significant reduction of S. mutans biofilm over the material surface with the increase of DOX concentration. After clinical trial, the remaining dentin was hard and dry. Additionally, mutans streptococci were completely eliminated after 3 months of treatment with RMGIC + 4.5% DOX. The incorporation of DOX provided better antibiofilm effect, without jeopardizing fluoride release and surface microhardness of RMGIC. This combination also improved the in vivo shortterm microbiological effect of RMGIC after partial caries removal.

  8. Evaluation of bioactive glass incorporated poly(caprolactone)-poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix and the effect of BMP-2 modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keothongkham, Khamsone [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom 73170 (Thailand); Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Tang, I-Ming [Department of Materials Science Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Pon-On, Weeraphat, E-mail: fsciwpp@ku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2017-05-01

    Composite materials having mechanical and biological properties similar to those of human bones are needed for bone regeneration and repair. In the present study, composites were made by incorporating bioactive glass (BG) into polycaprolactone (PCL)-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (PCLPVA) matrix. Composites with different BG contents of 10, 25 and 50 wt% were fabricated by an in-situ blending method. Physicochemical properties measurements found that the composite with 50 wt% BG in the PCLPVA organic matrix exhibited the best mechanical properties (compressive strength and compressive young's modulus up to 32.26 MPa and 530.91 MPa, respectively). We investigated the effects of the BG content on cell adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic activity of UMR-106 cells grown on the scaffolds using in vitro cell culture assay. The composite scaffolds having 25 wt% BG showed a significant increase in their cell adhesion capability and a faster cell proliferation. They also exhibited cell adhesion and spreading morphology after only 5 days of culturing. For these reasons, we chose to attach the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 to this composite. The resulting composite (labeled BMP-2-loaded PCLPVABG25) showed significant improvement in the UMR-106 cells adhesion, in the enhancement in osteogenic differentiation and osteoinductivity of this composite. - Highlights: • Preparation of PCLPVABGx composite scaffolds and their physical properties. • Mechanical properties could be adjusted by controlling BG contents in PCLPVA matrix. • In vitro cell availability tests confirmed the osteoblast grow on the PCLPVABGx composite scaffolds surface. • Upon the BMP-2-loaded PCLPVABG25 scaffolds can enhance cell attachment and significantly improved osteogenicity.

  9. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Aggelis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium osumilite (BMAS ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism.

  10. 3D in situ observations of glass fibre/matrix interfacial debonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martyniuk, Karolina; Sørensen, Bent F.; Modregger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    X-ray microtomography was used for 3D in situ observations of the evolution of fibre/matrix interfacial debonding. A specimen with a single fibre oriented perpendicular to the tensile direction was tested at a synchrotron facility using a special loading rig which allowed for applying a load...... transverse to the fibre. Three distinguishable damage stages were observed: (i) interfacial debond initiation at the free surface, (ii) debond propagation from the surface into the specimen and (iii) unstable debonding along the full length of the scanned volume. The high resolution microtomography provides...

  11. Stimulated Light Emission in Dense Fog Confined inside a Porous Glass Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, E.; Kovalev, D.; Künzner, N.; Diener, J.; Koch, F.; Fujii, M.

    2002-12-01

    We report on light amplification through stimulated emission in a dielectrically disordered medium. Liquid fragments confined in the solid matrix of porous quartz layers result in a random fluctuation of the dielectric function, and dye molecules embedded in the voids yield optical gain. The level of opacity is tunable by the ambient vapor pressure of the dielectric substance. In the multiple scattering regime, a strong intensity enhancement of the dye emission accompanied by significant spectral narrowing is observed above the threshold for a layer being in the opalescence state.

  12. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models. Results for the third set of high alumina outer layer matrix glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for 14 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 96.9 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Several of the glasses exhibited increases in normalized concentrations (NCi) after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Five of the glasses, after the CCC heat treatment, had NCB values that exceeded that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass. These results can be combined with additional characterization, including X-ray diffraction, to determine the cause of the higher release rates.

  13. Analysis of residual transverse stresses in a thick UD glass/polyester pultruded profile using hole drilling with strain gage and digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Onur; Baran, Ismet; Ersoy, Nuri; Akkerman, Remko

    2018-05-01

    Process induced stresses inherently exist in fiber reinforced polymer composites particularly in thick parts due to the presence of non-uniform cure, shrinkage and thermal expansion/contraction during manufacturing. In order to increase the reliability and the performance of the composite materials, process models are developed to predict the residual stress formation. The accuracy of the process models is dependent on the geometrical (micro to macro), material and process parameters as well as the numerical implementation. Therefore, in order to have reliable process modelling framework, there is a need for validation and if necessary calibration of the developed models. This study focuses on measurement of the transverse residual stresses in a relatively thick pultruded profile (20×20 mm) made of glass/polyester. Process-induced residual stresses in the middle of the profile are examined with different techniques which have never been applied for transverse residual stresses in thick unidirectional composites. Hole drilling method with strain gage and digital image correlation are employed. Strain values measured from measurements are used in a finite element model (FEM) to simulate the hole drilling process and predict the residual stress level. The measured released strain is found to be approximately 180 μm/m from the strain gage. The tensile residual stress at the core of the profile is estimated approximately as 7-10 MPa. Proposed methods and measured values in this study will enable validation and calibration of the process models based on the residual stresses.

  14. A Theoretical Study on Quantitative Prediction and Evaluation of Thermal Residual Stresses in Metal Matrix Composite (Case 1 : Two-Dimensional In-Plane Fiber Distribution)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Son, Bong Jin

    1997-01-01

    Although discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composite(MMC) is one of the most promising materials for applications of aerospace, automotive industries, the thermal residual stresses developed in the MMC due to the mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion between the matrix and the fiber under a temperature change has been pointed out as one of the serious problem in practical applications. There are very limited nondestructive techniques to measure the residual stress of composite materials. However, many difficulties have been reported in their applications. Therefore it is important to establish analytical model to evaluate the thermal residual stress of MMC for practical engineering application. In this study, an elastic model is developed to predict the average thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber of a misoriented short fiber composite. The thermal residual stresses are induced by the mismatch in the coefficient of the thermal expansion of the matrix and fiber when the composite is subjected to a uniform temperature change. The model considers two-dimensional in-plane fiber misorientation. The analytical formulation of the model is based on Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and is unique in that it is able to account for interactions among fibers. This model is more general than past models to investigate the effect of parameters which might influence thermal residual stress in composites. The present model is to investigate the effects of fiber volume fraction, distribution type, distribution cut-off angle, and aspect ratio on thermal residual stress for in-plane fiber misorientation. Fiber volume fraction, aspect ratio, and distribution cut-off angle are shown to have more significant effects on the magnitude of the thermal residual stresses than fiber distribution type for in-plane misorientation

  15. DATA SUMMARY REPORT SMALL SCALE MELTER TESTING OF HLW ALGORITHM GLASSES MATRIX1 TESTS VSL-07S1220-1 REV 0 7/25/07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    Eight tests using different HLW feeds were conducted on the DM100-BL to determine the effect of variations in glass properties and feed composition on processing rates and melter conditions (off-gas characteristics, glass processing, foaming, cold cap, etc.) at constant bubbling rate. In over seven hundred hours of testing, the property extremes of glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, and T{sub 1%}, as well as minimum and maximum concentrations of several major and minor glass components were evaluated using glass compositions that have been tested previously at the crucible scale. Other parameters evaluated with respect to glass processing properties were +/-15% batching errors in the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs) to the feed, and variation in the sources of boron and sodium used in the GFCs. Tests evaluating batching errors and GFC source employed variations on the HLW98-86 formulation (a glass composition formulated for HLW C-106/AY-102 waste and processed in several previous melter tests) in order to best isolate the effect of each test variable. These tests are outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to the Test Specification for this work. The present report provides summary level data for all of the tests in the first test matrix (Matrix 1) in the Test Plan. Summary results from the remaining tests, investigating minimum and maximum concentrations of major and minor glass components employing variations on the HLW98-86 formulation and glasses generated by the HLW glass formulation algorithm, will be reported separately after those tests are completed. The test data summarized herein include glass production rates, the type and amount of feed used, a variety of measured melter parameters including temperatures and electrode power, feed sample analysis, measured glass properties, and gaseous emissions rates. More detailed information and analysis from the melter tests with complete emission chemistry, glass durability, and

  16. Development of basic data for modelling the residual alteration rate in aqueous media of AVM nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thien, B.

    2010-01-01

    During their aqueous alteration, AVM French nuclear glasses exhibit a large range of behaviour, in spite of a small range of composition. AVM glasses alteration rates are controlled by two phenomena: (i) precipitation of secondary phases, mostly aluminous hectorites, and (ii) diffusion of water across a more or less protective gel. The magnesium contained in these glasses increases the precipitation of these secondary phases, leading to a partial or total dissolution of the gel layer. This dissolution increases the glass alteration rates. On the other hand, Mg also incorporates in the gel, increasing his passivation properties. The predominance of one of these two phenomena depends on the initial composition of the glass, the pH of the solution, and the alteration conditions. In presence of Bure geological disposal site water (Mg and Ca rich), AVM glasses undergo less alteration than in initially pure water, in spite of larger amounts of secondary phase precipitates. This results from incorporation of calcium in the gel instead of sodium and magnesium, improving its passivating properties. We have adapted the geochemical GRAAL model for AVM glasses. In spite of its limitations, this model allows us to describe the differences of behaviour between these glasses, in function of their composition. Moreover, GRAAL can be proposed as a basis of a future operational model for predicting the alteration of AVM glasses. (author) [fr

  17. Evaluation of matrix effect in isotope dilution mass spectrometry based on quantitative analysis of chloramphenicol residues in milk powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiu Qin; Yang, Zong; Zhang, Qing He; Li, Hong Mei

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We develop a strategy to evaluate matrix effect and its impact on the IDMS results. •Matrix effect and IDMS correction factor from different conditions are evaluated. •Ion suppression effect is observed in LLE and HLB pre-treated sample solutions. •Ion enhancement effect is found in MCX pre-treated sample solution. •IDMS correction factor in HLB and MCX solutions in three instruments is close to 1 -- Abstract: In the present study, we developed a comprehensive strategy to evaluate matrix effect (ME) and its impact on the results of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) in analysis of chloramphenicol (CAP) residues in milk powder. Stable isotope-labeled internal standards do not always compensate ME, which brings the variation of the ratio (the peak area of analyte/the peak area of isotope). In our investigation, impact factors of this variation were studied in the extraction solution of milk powder using three mass spectrometers coupled with different ion source designs, and deuterium-labeled chloramphenicol (D5-CAP) was used as the internal standard. ME from mobile phases, sample solvents, pre-treatment methods, sample origins and instruments was evaluated, and its impact on the results of IDMS was assessed using the IDMS correction factor (θ). Our data showed that the impact of ME of mobile phase on the correction factor was significantly greater than that of sample solvent. Significant ion suppression and enhancement effects were observed in different pre-treated sample solutions. The IDMS correction factor in liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) and molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) extract with different instruments was greater or less 1.0, and the IDMS correction factor in hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) and mix-mode cation exchange (MCX) extract with different instruments was all close to 1.0. To the instrument coupled with different ion source design, the impact of ME on IDMS quantitative results was

  18. Evaluation of the glow curves of a new glass matrix; Avaliação das curvas de emissão termoluminescente de uma nova matriz vítrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Nathália S.; Souza, Samara P.; Ferreira, Pâmela Z.; Dantas, Noelio O.; Silva, Anielle C.A.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P., E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (INFIS/UFU), Uberlândia, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Física; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carrera, Betzabel N.S.; Watanabe, Shigueo [Universidade de São Paulo (IF/USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Física

    2017-07-01

    Thermoluminescence is a dosimetric technique with may be used to personal, clinical, environmental and high doses. In this work a new glass matrix, with nominal composition of 20Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.25BaO.45B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol%), was studied by the thermoluminescence technique. The glow curves was be analyzed, after the irradiation of this glass matrix with high doses. The results showed that this new glass matrix has a temperature peak in 260°C, which is ideal for dosimetry applications. (author)

  19. Insight on agglomerates of gold nanoparticles in glass based on surface plasmon resonance spectrum: study by multi-spheres T-matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avakyan, L. A.; Heinz, M.; Skidanenko, A. V.; Yablunovski, K. A.; Ihlemann, J.; Meinertz, J.; Patzig, C.; Dubiel, M.; Bugaev, L. A.

    2018-01-01

    The formation of a localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrum of randomly distributed gold nanoparticles in the surface layer of silicate float glass, generated and implanted by UV ArF-excimer laser irradiation of a thin gold layer sputter-coated on the glass surface, was studied by the T-matrix method, which enables particle agglomeration to be taken into account. The experimental technique used is promising for the production of submicron patterns of plasmonic nanoparticles (given by laser masks or gratings) without damage to the glass surface. Analysis of the applicability of the multi-spheres T-matrix (MSTM) method to the studied material was performed through calculations of SPR characteristics for differently arranged and structured gold nanoparticles (gold nanoparticles in solution, particles pairs, and core-shell silver-gold nanoparticles) for which either experimental data or results of the modeling by other methods are available. For the studied gold nanoparticles in glass, it was revealed that the theoretical description of their SPR spectrum requires consideration of the plasmon coupling between particles, which can be done effectively by MSTM calculations. The obtained statistical distributions over particle sizes and over interparticle distances demonstrated the saturation behavior with respect to the number of particles under consideration, which enabled us to determine the effective aggregate of particles, sufficient to form the SPR spectrum. The suggested technique for the fitting of an experimental SPR spectrum of gold nanoparticles in glass by varying the geometrical parameters of the particles aggregate in the recurring calculations of spectrum by MSTM method enabled us to determine statistical characteristics of the aggregate: the average distance between particles, average size, and size distribution of the particles. The fitting strategy of the SPR spectrum presented here can be applied to nanoparticles of any nature and in various

  20. Effects of crystal size on the mechanical properties of a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Guo, J.W.; Wang, X.S; Zhang, S.F. [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, 145 West Changle Road, Xi’an 710032 (China); He, L., E-mail: helin@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Crystal size of lithium disilicate (LD) phase in a LD glass-ceramic was changed by thermally controlled crystallization of a precursory LD glass at different temperatures. Effects of the crystal size on the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic were investigated. It was found that the flexural strength presented a hump-like variation trend with increasing the crystal size, the hardness monotonously decreased at the same time. It was further confirmed that micro residual compressive stresses existed inside the LD crystals due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the glass matrix and the crystalline phase. The levels of the residual stresses increased with increasing the crystal size. The crystal size performed dual effects on the flexural strength of the glass-ceramic: an “interlocking effect” caused by larger-sized LD crystals and a “micro residual stress effect” related to the balancing tensile stresses in the glass matrix. Higher residual tensile stresses in the glass matrix induced by larger-sized LD crystals would counteract the “interlocking effect” of the crystals, causing the strength degradation. The hardness of the glass-ceramic was mainly controlled by the “micro residual stress effect”.

  1. Variability of matrix effects in liquid and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis of pesticide residues after QuEChERS sample preparation of different food crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas and liquid chromatography (GC and LC) coupled to sophisticated mass spectrometry (MS) instruments are among the most powerful analytical tools currently available to monitor pesticide residues in food, among other applications. However, both GC-MS and LC-MS are susceptible to matrix effects whi...

  2. Matrix effect in analysis of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables by high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andoralov A.M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For modern food safety control are using techniques that allow to determinate a large number of components. So for determination of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables commonly used methods of gas and liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass-spectrometric detection. This system allows to carry out quantitative determination several hundreds of pesticides and their identification by the characteristic fragments of the mass spectrum. The main problem when using mass spectrometric detection is a matrix effect, which is caused by the influence of matrix components extracted with pesticides from the sample. In this work, attempts have been made to reduce the influence of the matrix in the analysis of pesticide residues by high performance liquid chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometry (HPLC / TOFMS.

  3. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization for Glass-Fiber Epoxy-Matrix Composite 5 MW Horizontal-Axis Wind-Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, G.; Pandurangan, B.; Sellappan, V.; Vallejo, A.; Ozen, M.

    2010-11-01

    A multi-disciplinary design-optimization procedure has been introduced and used for the development of cost-effective glass-fiber reinforced epoxy-matrix composite 5 MW horizontal-axis wind-turbine (HAWT) blades. The turbine-blade cost-effectiveness has been defined using the cost of energy (CoE), i.e., a ratio of the three-blade HAWT rotor development/fabrication cost and the associated annual energy production. To assess the annual energy production as a function of the blade design and operating conditions, an aerodynamics-based computational analysis had to be employed. As far as the turbine blade cost is concerned, it is assessed for a given aerodynamic design by separately computing the blade mass and the associated blade-mass/size-dependent production cost. For each aerodynamic design analyzed, a structural finite element-based and a post-processing life-cycle assessment analyses were employed in order to determine a minimal blade mass which ensures that the functional requirements pertaining to the quasi-static strength of the blade, fatigue-controlled blade durability and blade stiffness are satisfied. To determine the turbine-blade production cost (for the currently prevailing fabrication process, the wet lay-up) available data regarding the industry manufacturing experience were combined with the attendant blade mass, surface area, and the duration of the assumed production run. The work clearly revealed the challenges associated with simultaneously satisfying the strength, durability and stiffness requirements while maintaining a high level of wind-energy capture efficiency and a lower production cost.

  4. Investigation of matrix effects in 193 nm laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis using reference glasses of different transparencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czas, J.; Jochum, K.P.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Yang, Q.-C.; Jacob, D.E.; Andreae, M.O.

    2012-01-01

    The degree of transparency of glasses, which depends on the Fe content, may influence the ablation behavior during laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis. To test possible matrix effects when using a 193 nm Nd:YAG laser, we have analyzed transparent and opaque NIST, BAM and USGS reference glasses. These reference materials are ideal for such investigations, because they are well characterized, most elements are homogeneously distributed at the micrometer scale, and their Fe content varies over a very large range, from 16 to 130,000 μg g −1 . Our measurements show that the fractionation factors of refractory and volatile lithophile elements, such as Sr, Ba, and Rb, are 1.00 ± 0.03 and independent of the degree of transparency. However, for volatile chalcophile/siderophile elements (e.g., Zn and Pb) the fractionation factors vary significantly between 0.7 and 1, depending on the spot sizes and the transparency of the material. Mass-load-induced matrix effects may also influence the accuracy of LA-ICP-MS analysis. They are less than 2% for the lithophile and up to 10% for volatile chalcophile/siderophile elements when the mass load varies by a factor 2.4. Relative sensitivity factors used for calibration of lithophile elements agree within uncertainty limits for transparent and opaque glasses when using a 193 nm laser. Even for volatile/chalcophile elements they differ only by 5–10%. The reliability of the LA-ICP-MS analyses is demonstrated by presenting concentration data of 27 trace elements in the NIST, BAM and USGS reference glasses using NIST SRM 612 for calibration, where highly accurate reference values are available. For trace element concentrations in the range between 1 and 500 μg g −1 , the reproducibility and the uncertainties at the 95% confidence level of the measurements vary between 1–4%, and 7–10%, respectively. - Highlights: ► Matrix effects are low for lithophile elements using a 193 nm laser

  5. Alteration of French waste glass matrix of R7T7 type in deep geological disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combarieu, G. de

    2007-02-01

    The Geological disposal is a possible option for safe and long term management of long lived and highly radioactive wastes. In order to predict the release of radionuclides in the environment, the comprehensive knowledge of glass dissolution rates as well as the properties of near- and far-field in which migration will occur is necessary. This thesis is aimed to describe the alteration of SON68 glass, inactive analog of French R7T7 glass, in contact with disposal materials: metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian argilite. Therefore, original experiments have been carried out on a laboratory scaled system involving 'glass-iron-argilite' interactions. The transformations of chemistry and crystal-chemistry are investigated with multi-scale probing tools: SEM, TEM, XRD, XRF, EXAFS and Raman spectroscopies. In the same time, the glass alteration is modeled to obtain a source term in good agreement with the major phenomena observed in common experiments. As an end, geochemical models of iron and argilite transformations are also developed and set together in the transport-chemistry code HYTEC to simulate chemical reactions (iron corrosion, argilite evolution, and glass alteration). Simulations and comparison with experiments have improved the overall knowledge of the glass-iron-clay system. (author)

  6. A statistically designed matrix to evaluate solubility, impurity tolerance, and thermal stability of plutonium-bearing glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D.K.; Meaker, T.F.; Edwards, T.B.; McIntyre, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    In support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Material Disposition (OFDM) Program, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is evaluating a unique lanthanide borosilicate glass to immobilize excess plutonium and other heavy metals. The lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass system met all FY96 programmatic planning objectives. Those objectives were focused on (1) demonstrating 10 wt% Pu solubility, and (2) meeting preliminary product performance criteria. Although 10 wt% Pu solubility was demonstrated with product performance exceeding high level waste glasses based on PCT results, the LaBS system was not optimized

  7. Optimization of heat-liberating batches for ash residue stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlina, O.K.; Varlackova, G.A.; Ojovan, M.I.; Tivansky, V.M.; Dmitriev, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    The ash residue obtained after incineration of solid radioactive waste is a dusting poly-dispersed powder like material that contains radioactive nuclides ( 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239 Pu, hor ( ellipsis)). Specific radioactivity of the ash can be about 10 5 --10 7 Bq/kg. In order to dispose of the ash, residue shall be stabilized by producing a monolith material. The ash residue can be either vitrified or stabilized into a ceramic matrix. For this purpose the ash residue is mixed with fluxing agents followed by melting of obtained composition in the different type melters. As a rule this requires both significant energy consumption and complex melting equipment. A stabilization technology of ash residue was proposed recently by using heat liberating batches-compositions with redox properties. The ash residue is melted due to exothermic chemical reactions in the mixture with heat-liberating batch that occur with considerable release of heat. Stabilization method has three stages: (1) preparation of a mixture of heating batch and ash residue with or without glass forming batch (frit); (2) ignition and combustion of mixed composition; (3) cooling (quenching) of obtained vitreous material. Combustion of mixed composition occurs in the form of propagation of reacting wave. The heat released during exothermic chemical reactions provides melting of ash residue components and production of glass-like phase. The final product consists of a glass like matrix with embedded crystalline inclusions of infusible ash residue components

  8. Uncovering the local inelastic interactions during manufacture of ductile cast iron: How the substructure of the graphite particles can induce residual stress concentrations in the matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Hellström, Kristina; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    2018-01-01

    Recent X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements have revealed that plastic deformation and a residual elastic strain field can be present around the graphite particles in ductile cast iron after manufacturing, probably due to some local mismatch in thermal contraction. However, as only one component...... of the elastic strain tensor could be obtained from the XRD data, the shape and magnitude of the associated residual stress field have remained unknown. To compensate for this and to provide theoretical insight into this unexplored topic, a combined experimental-numerical approach is presented in this paper...... the graphite particles and the matrix during manufacturing of the industrial part considered in the XRD study. The model indicates that, besides the vis- coplastic deformation of the matrix, the effect of the inelastic deformation of the graphite has to be considered to explain the magnitude of the XRD strain...

  9. Corrosion behavior and pitting susceptibility of in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composites in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, K. K.; Lan, A. D.; Yang, H. J.; Han, P. D.; Qiao, J. W.

    2017-11-01

    The Ti62Zr12V13Cu4Be9, Ti58Zr16V10Cu4Be12, Ti46Zr20V12Cu5Be17, and Ti40Zr24V12Cu5Be19 metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) were prepared by copper mould casting. The corrosion resistance and the pitting susceptibility of Ti-based MGMCs were tested on their cross-sectional areas in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solutions by potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The composites with lower Ti contents (Ti40Zr24V12Cu5Be19 and Ti46Zr20V12Cu5Be17) exhibit a low resistance to the chloride induced pitting and local corrosion. The preferential dissolution of amorphous matrix is explained by the high chemical reactivity of beryllium element compared to that of stable dendrites and by the detected lower Ti and V contents. However, fairly good passivity was found in the composite with higher Ti contents (Ti62Zr12V13Cu4Be9). XPS measurements revealed that protective Ti-enriched oxide film was formed on the composite surface, additionally, lower content of beryllium element in amorphous matrix hinder the selective corrosion of amorphous matrix. The assessment of experimental observation leads to a proposed corrosion mechanism involving selective dissolution of amorphous matrix and chloride induced pitting process.

  10. Flexible xxx-asp/asn and gly-xxx residues of equine cytochrome C in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    The backbone flexibility of a protein has been studied from the standpoint of the susceptibility of amino acid residues to in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Residues more susceptible to MALDI-ISD, namely Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx, were identified from the discontinuous intense peak of c'-ions originating from specific cleavage at N-Cα bonds of the backbone of equine cytochrome c. The identity of the residues susceptible to ISD was consistent with the known flexible backbone amides as estimated by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. The identity of these flexible amino acid residues (Asp, Asn, and Gly) is consistent with the fact that these residues are preferred in flexible secondary structure free from intramolecular hydrogen-bonded structures such as α-helix and β-sheet. The MALDI-ISD spectrum of equine cytochrome c gave not only intense N-terminal side c'-ions originating from N-Cα bond cleavage at Xxx-Asp/Asn and Gly-Xxx residues, but also C-terminal side complement z'-ions originating from the same cleavage sites. The present study implies that MALDI-ISD can give information about backbone flexibility of proteins, comparable with the protection factors estimated by HDX.

  11. Flexible Xxx–Asp/Asn and Gly–Xxx Residues of Equine Cytochrome c in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization In-Source Decay Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    The backbone flexibility of a protein has been studied from the standpoint of the susceptibility of amino acid residues to in-source decay (ISD) in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). Residues more susceptible to MALDI-ISD, namely Xxx–Asp/Asn and Gly–Xxx, were identified from the discontinuous intense peak of c′-ions originating from specific cleavage at N–Cα bonds of the backbone of equine cytochrome c. The identity of the residues susceptible to ISD was consistent with the known flexible backbone amides as estimated by hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. The identity of these flexible amino acid residues (Asp, Asn, and Gly) is consistent with the fact that these residues are preferred in flexible secondary structure free from intramolecular hydrogen-bonded structures such as α-helix and β-sheet. The MALDI-ISD spectrum of equine cytochrome c gave not only intense N-terminal side c′-ions originating from N–Cα bond cleavage at Xxx–Asp/Asn and Gly–Xxx residues, but also C-terminal side complement z′-ions originating from the same cleavage sites. The present study implies that MALDI-ISD can give information about backbone flexibility of proteins, comparable with the protection factors estimated by HDX. PMID:24349908

  12. Synthesis of diluted magnetic semiconductor Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals in a host glass matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.S. [Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Naturais e Educação (ICENE), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, 38025-180 Uberaba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Mikhail, H.D., E-mail: ricardosilva@fisica.uftm.edu.br [Instituto de Ciências Tecnológicas e Exatas (ICTE), Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, 38064-200 Uberaba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Pavani, R. [Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Naturais e Educação (ICENE), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, 38025-180 Uberaba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Cano, N.F. [Departamento de Ciências do Mar, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, 11030-400 Santos, São Paulo (Brazil); Silva, A.C.A.; Dantas, N.O. [Instituto de Física, Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38400-902 Uberlândia, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-11-05

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors of manganese doped in bismuth-telluride nanocrystals (Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} NCs) were grown in a glass matrix and investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy/Magnetic Force Microscopy, and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. TEM images showed that the nanocrystals formed within the glass matrix were nearly spherical, with average sizes between 4 and 5 nm, and d{sub 015}-spacing of approximately 0.322 nm, which corresponds to the (015) interplanar distance in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} bulk. The diffraction patterns showed that the diffraction peak associated with the (015) plane of the Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals shifts to larger diffraction angles as manganese (Mn) concentration increases, suggesting that the Mn{sup 2+} ions are substitutional defects occupying Bi sites (Mn{sub Bi}). AFM and MFM measurements showed magnetic phase contrast patterns, providing further evidence of Mn{sup 2+} ion incorporation in the nanocrystal structure. EPR signal of manganese ion incorporation and valence states in the crystalline structure of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals confirmed the presence of the Mn{sup 2+} state. - Highlights: • Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} NCs were synthesized in a glass matrix by fusion method. • Transmission Electronic Microscopy shows the formation of Bi{sub 2−x}Mn{sub x}Te{sub 3} NCs. • The sp-d exchange interaction in DMS NCs can be evidenced by X Ray-Diffraction and Magnetic Force Microscopy. • Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectra confirmed that Mn{sup 2+} ions are located in two distinct Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} NCs sites.

  13. Characterization of residues of effluent treatment plant from lapping process of soda-lime glass and its application in the production of concrete; Caracterizacao de residuo de estacao de tratamento de efluentes de processo de lapidacao de vidro sodo-calcico e sua aplicacao na producao de concreto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, Aline Pignaton; Calmon, Joao Luiz; Tristao, Fernando Avancini, E-mail: apignaton@hotmail.com, E-mail: calmonbarcelona@gmail.com, E-mail: fernandoavancini@ct.ufes.br [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Civil

    2012-07-01

    This study enunciates the physical, chemical and mineralogical composition of the residue from the process of ETE cutting of soda-lime glasses and its application in concrete as a replacement to the weight of CPV ARI RS cement, at levels of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%. Tests were performed on fresh and hardened (ages 3, 7, 28 and 300 days). The results were compared and statistically analyzed. In the fresh state, reductions in the amount of exuding water and consistency were observed. The results of compressive strength were statistically different, while the results for the tensile strength by diametrical compression and modulus of elasticity results were belonging to homogeneous groups. Beneficial effects the levels of residue on the cementitious matrix and the transition zone of concrete were identified by SEM, particularly concrete in S15.

  14. The role of residual (undegassed) and environmental waters in pyroclastic volcanic glass in nature and experiments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, I. N.; Seligman, A. N.; Nolan, G. S.; Lundstrom, C.; Martin, E.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Palandri, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The advent and calibration of the Thermal Combustion Element Analyzer (TCEA) continuous flow system coupled with the large-radius mass spectrometer, at the University of Oregon, permits precise (×0.02 wt.% H2O, ×1-3‰ D/H) measurements in 1-10 mg of volcanic glass (0.1 wt.% H2O requires ~10 mg glass). This is a 10-100 time reduction in sample size over previous methods, which permits the targeting of small amounts of the freshest concentrate. In combination with the FTIR, we use the TCEA to research problems involving the mechanisms and timescales of volcanic ash hydration on both natural and laboratory timescales using isotopically-labeled water, D/H-H2O pathways of volcanic degassing, water content and D/H in recently erupted volcanic ash, and the mechanisms of tephra-hydration by isotopically-distinct rain and glacial meltwaters. The talk will review new results: 1) Water content determined by FTIR (OH and H2O) and TCEA give excellent correspondence for basaltic and rhyolitic glasses, including FTIR measurements for irregular ash particles mixed in equal proportion with KBr and molded into pellets. 2) Nominally-anhydrous (hydrated ash (4 wt.% water) leads to neglegeable δD exchange, signifying nearly zero-fractionation upon loss of predominantly H2Omol water. 5) Glacial vs. intergacial water can be recognized in hydrated glasses. 6) Subaqueous perlites from Yellowstone have an onion-skin distribution of water with water-poor cores, as determined by the scanning FTIR technique. 7) Thermal diffusion experiments achieve up to a 144‰ range in δD across a 300-600°C temperature change; this has implications for explaining natural variations in δD in high temperature environments due to high diffusivity of hydrogen. 8) We report results of δ18O in extracted water in glass and discuss isotopic offsets due to incomplete oxygen extraction from OH groups. 9) We apply these methods to submarine glasses, and degassing tephra products of the same eruption.

  15. Tracking the Depleted Mantle Signature in Melt Inclusions and Residual Glass of Basaltic Martian Shergottites using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Timothy J.; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.; Usui, Tomohiro; Economos, Rita C.; Schmitt, Axel K.; McKeegan, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Trace element abundances of depleted shergottite magmas recorded by olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and interstitial mesostasis glass were measured using the Cameca ims-1270 ion microprobe. Two meteorites: Tissint, an olivine-­phyric basaltic shergottite which fell over Morocco July 18th 2001; and the Antarctic meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y98), an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite with abundant glassy mesostasis have been studied. Chondrite-­normalized REE patterns for MI in Tissint and Y98 are characteristically LREE depleted and, within analytical uncertainty, parallel those of their respective whole rock composition; supporting each meteorite to represent a melt composition that has experienced closed-­system crystallization. REE profiles for mesostasis glass in Y98 lie about an order of magnitude higher than those from the MI; with REE profiles for Tissint MI falling in between. Y98 MI have the highest average Sm/Nd and Y/Ce ratios, reflecting their LREE depletion and further supporting Y98 as one of our best samples to probe the depleted shergotitte mantle. In general, Zr/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 and Tissint MI, Ce/Nb ratios overlap between Y98 MI and mesostasis glass, and Sm/Nd ratios overlap between Y98 mesostasis glass and Tissint MI. These features support similar sources for both, but with subtle geochemical differences that may reflect different melting conditions or fractionation paths during ascent from the mantle. Interestingly, the REE patterns for both Y98 bulk and MI analyses display a flattening of the LREE that suggests a crustal contribution to the Y98 parent melt. This observation has important implications for the origins of depleted and enriched shergottites.

  16. Porous glasses as a matrix for incorporation of photonic materials. Pore determination by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisfeld, Pore determination by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy R.; Saraidarov, T.; Jasinska, B.

    2004-07-01

    Porous glasses prepared by the sol-gel technique have a variety of applications when incorporated by photonic materials: tunable lasers, sensors, luminescence solar concentrators, semiconductor quantum dots, biological markers. The known methods of pore size determinations, the nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry allow to determine the sizes of open pores. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) allows to determine pore sizes also of closed pores. As an example we have performed measurements of non-doped zirconia-silica-polyurethane (ZSUR) ormocer glasses and the same glasses doped with lead sulfide quantum dots. The pore radii range between 0.25-0.38 nm, total surface area 15.5-23.8 m 2/g.

  17. Mechanical and fracture properties of R-glass reinforced composites with pyrolysed polysiloxane resin as a matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Martin; Bednářová, D.; Glogar, Petr; Dusza, J.; Rudnayová, E.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 290, - (2005), s. 344-347 ISSN 1013-9826. [International conference on fractography of advanced ceramics /2./. Stará Lesná, 03.10.2005-06.10.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK2067107; GA ČR GA106/02/0177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : unidirectional composite * glass fiber reinforcement * pyrolysed polysiloxane resins Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.224, year: 2005

  18. Uncovering the local inelastic interactions during manufacture of ductile cast iron: How the substructure of the graphite particles can induce residual stress concentrations in the matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriollo, Tito; Hellström, Kristina; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Thorborg, Jesper; Tiedje, Niels; Hattel, Jesper

    2018-02-01

    Recent X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements have revealed that plastic deformation and a residual elastic strain field can be present around the graphite particles in ductile cast iron after manufacturing, probably due to some local mismatch in thermal contraction. However, as only one component of the elastic strain tensor could be obtained from the XRD data, the shape and magnitude of the associated residual stress field have remained unknown. To compensate for this and to provide theoretical insight into this unexplored topic, a combined experimental-numerical approach is presented in this paper. First, a material equivalent to the ductile cast iron matrix is manufactured and subjected to dilatometric and high-temperature tensile tests. Subsequently, a two-scale hierarchical top-down model is devised, calibrated on the basis of the collected data and used to simulate the interaction between the graphite particles and the matrix during manufacturing of the industrial part considered in the XRD study. The model indicates that, besides the viscoplastic deformation of the matrix, the effect of the inelastic deformation of the graphite has to be considered to explain the magnitude of the XRD strain. Moreover, the model shows that the large elastic strain perturbations recorded with XRD close to the graphite-matrix interface are not artifacts due to e.g. sharp gradients in chemical composition, but correspond to residual stress concentrations induced by the conical sectors forming the internal structure of the graphite particles. In contrast to common belief, these results thus suggest that ductile cast iron parts cannot be considered, in general, as stress-free at the microstructural scale.

  19. N-terminal aliphatic residues dictate the structure, stability, assembly, and small molecule binding of the coiled-coil region of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekar, Susheel K; Asnani, Mukta; Limbad, Chandani; Haghpanah, Jennifer S; Hom, Wendy; Barra, Hanna; Nanda, Soumya; Lu, Min; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2009-09-15

    The coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMPcc) assembles into a homopentamer that naturally recognizes the small molecule 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (vit D). To identify the residues critical for the structure, stability, oligomerization, and binding to vit D as well as two other small molecules, all-trans-retinol (ATR) and curcumin (CCM), here we perform an alanine scanning mutagenesis study. Ten residues lining the hydrophobic pocket of COMPcc were mutated into alanine; of the mutated residues, the N-terminal aliphatic residues L37, L44, V47, and L51 are responsible for maintaining the structure and function. Furthermore, two polar residues, T40 and Q54, within the N-terminal region when converted into alanine improve the alpha-helical structure, stability, and self-assembly behavior. Helical stability, oligomerization, and binding appear to be linked in a manner in which mutations that abolish helical structure and assembly bind poorly to vit D, ATR, and CCM. These results provide not only insight into COMPcc and its functional role but also useful guidelines for the design of stable, pentameric coiled-coils capable of selectively storing and delivering various small molecules.

  20. Studies on mechanical properties of aluminium 6061 reinforced with titanium and E glass fibre metal matrix hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B. N. Ravi; Vidyasagar, H. N.; Shivanand, H. K.

    2018-04-01

    2Development of the mmc with fibers and filler materials as a replacement material for some engineering purpose such as automobiles, aerospace are indispensable. Therefore, the studies related to hybrid mmc's of Al6061 were noted in this paper. In this work, Al6061 reinforced with E glass fibers and micro Titanium particles. Hybrid composites was prepared by very feasible and commercially used technique Stir casting and by varying composition of Al6061, Titanium and E-glass fibre. Experiments were done by varying weight fraction of Titanium (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%) and E glass fibre (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%). Wire EDM were used to prepare the specimens required for tensile and hardness according to standards and tests conducted. The proportion of elements which are present the mmc's are identified by EDAX. Optical microscopy were conducted by SU3500 machine Scanning Electron Microscope and Microstructure shows the distribution of reinforced Ti particles and E glass fibres. The characterization of Al6061 hybrid mmc's is having significant impact on the mechanical properties.

  1. Influence of matrix ductility and fibre architecture on the repeated impact response of glass-fibre-reinforced laminated composites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwen, B.A.G.; Peijs, A.A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the results of falling weight impact tests on glass-fibre-reinforced laminates. The test program consisted of (i) falling weight impact tests for the determination of the penetration energy and the influence of laminate construction on damage development and (ii) repeated

  2. Chemical durability and resistance to irradiation of LnYSiAlO (Ln=La or Ce) glasses, potential immobilization matrix of minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavarini, St.

    2002-11-01

    Rare earth aluminosilicate glasses are known for their interesting mechanical and optical properties. Recent studies have shown that their chemical durability was very good too, such they have the potential to be used in the nuclear industry for the specific immobilization of trivalent actinides. Initial dissolution rates of LaYSiAlO and CeYSiAlO were determined using a Soxhlet device (dynamic leaching). The differences linked to the nature of the rare earth element were studied by synthesizing analogous glasses that only differed in their rare earth element composition (%at.): Y-5%, La-5 %, Si-15%, Al-10% O-65%. The influence of pH on the dissolution mechanisms and kinetics was also studied by static leaching tests performed in dilute solutions of NaOH or HNO 3 . Electronic defects and collision cascades, induced by a-disintegration of radioelements confined in storage matrix, can cause important modifications in the glass structure and, thus, influence its chemical durability. To simulate these effects, glass samples were irradiated with β particles and heavy ions accelerated to 2,5 MeV and 200 keV, respectively. Monoliths were then leached in static bi-distilled water (pH≥≥ 5.5) for one month in an autoclave heated to 90 degrees C. Initially, the structural changes caused by irradiation were determined using Raman, NMR and EPR spectroscopies. Ion μ-beams, SEM-EDS and XPS analysis were also performed to evaluate the potential modifications of the superficial composition. Finally, the leaching behavior was studied, for both irradiated and unirradiated samples, through solution and solid elementary characterization. (author)

  3. Fabrication and characterization of high impact hybrid matrix composites from thermoset resin and dyneema-glass fabric reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Pansuriya, T.; Malgani, E. V.; Sevkani, V.

    2018-05-01

    Hybrid composites have been fabricated by hand lay-up technique with epoxy resin and diethylene tri amine as a hardener for high impact energy absorption with sandwich stacking of different reinforcements of dyneema and glass fabric. High impact grade composites are nowadays gaining a lot of importance in the field of high mechanical load bearing applications, ballistics and bulletproofing. The present work emphases on the fabrication and mechanical properties of the hybrid composites of cut resistant dyneema fabric along with glass fabric reinforced in the thermosetting resin. i.e. epoxy. The prime importance while fabricating such materials have been given to the processing along with selection of the raw materials. High impact resistive materials with low density and henceforth low weight have been manufactured and characterized by IZOD impact tester, UTM, Archimedes density meter and SEM. Throughout the work, satisfactory results have been obtained. Impact resistance was observed to be boosted three times as that of the reference sample of glass fabric and epoxy. The density of the hybrid composite is observed to be 25% as that of the reference sample.

  4. Criterion for matrix cracking in glass fiber reinforced cross-ply laminates. GFRP chokko sekisoban ni okeru matrix kiretsu no hattatsu kijun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motoki, S.; Fukuda, T. (Osaka City Univ., Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Tanaka, M. (Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe (Japan))

    1992-05-15

    In this research, with regard to GFRP cross-ply laminates, which were the most basic lamination composition, the factors governing the progress of matrix cracks at the 90{degree} layer were studied, in particular the criterion for not depending on the thickness of the 90{degree} layer was examined. For the experiment concerning the above, GFRP prepreg was laminated and three kinds of cross-ply laminates were made for use. A quasistatic tensile load was applied to these specimens and a load-displacement curve was measured, and at the same time, the matrix crack numbers generated in the 90{degree} layer were counted. As a result, it was found that the maximum value of the vertical stress in the loading direction of 90{degree} layer did not depend on the lamination composition, hence could become the criterion for the crack progress. Also it was found that in case when this stress surpassed a certain threshold value, cracks were formed, but in case when it was smaller than the threshold value, no crack was formed. 12 refs., 14 figs.

  5. Characterization of the matrix glass transition in carbon-epoxy laminates using the CSD test geometry. [centro-symmetric deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternstein, S. S.; Yang, P.

    1983-01-01

    A new test geometry, referred to as centro-symmetric deformation (CSD), is proposed for characterizing the viscoelastic behavior of the matrix of carbon-epoxy laminates. The sample consists of a thin disk, typically 6-14 plies thick, having a nominal diameter of 30 mm. The disk is freely supported on a circular anvil; the load is applied to the center of the disk using an 8-mm-diameter ball bearing nosepiece. The CSD test geometry provides viscoelastic dispersion data which are independent of the angular orientation of the sample. The test geometry is sufficiently sensitive to matrix changes to allow its use for postcuring, humidity, crosslink density, and other matrix change studies. Test results are presented for a carbon-epoxy laminate.

  6. Biological and bactericidal properties of Ag-doped bioactive glass in a natural extracellular matrix hydrogel with potential application in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y-Y; Chatzistavrou, X; Faulk, D; Badylak, S; Zheng, L; Papagerakis, S; Ge, L; Liu, H; Papagerakis, P

    2015-06-20

    The aim of this study was the fabrication and evaluation of a novel bioactive and bactericidal material, which could have applications in dentistry by supporting tissue regeneration and killing oral bacteria. Our hypothesis was that a new scaffold for pulp-dentin tissue engineering with enhanced antibacterial activity could be obtained by associating extracellular matrix derived from porcine bladder with an antibacterial bioactive glass. Our study combines in vitro approaches and ectopic implantation in scid mice. The novel material was fabricated by incorporating a sol-gel derived silver (Ag)-doped bioactive glass (BG) in a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel in ratio 1:1 in weight % (Ag-BG/ECM). The biological properties of the Ag-BG/ECM were evaluated in culture with dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). In particular, cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, stem cells markers profile, and cell differentiation potential were studied. Furthermore, the antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei was measured. Moreover, the capability of the material to enhance pulp/dentin regeneration in vivo was also evaluated. Our data show that Ag-BG/ECM significantly enhances DPSCs' proliferation, it does not affect cell morphology and stem cells markers profile, protects cells from apoptosis, and enhances in vitro cell differentiation and mineralisation potential as well as in vivo dentin formation. Furthermore, Ag-BG/ECM strongly inhibits S. mutans and L. casei growth suggesting that the new material has also anti-bacterial properties. This study provides foundation for future clinical applications in dentistry. It could potentially advance the currently available options of dental regenerative materials.

  7. Bioactive glass-ceramic bone repair associated or not with autogenous bone: a study of organic bone matrix organization in a rabbit critical-sized calvarial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Cavalla, Franco; Tim, Carla Roberta; Saraiva, Patrícia Pinto; Orcini, Wilson; De Andrade Holgado, Leandro; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz; Matsumoto, Mariza Akemi

    2018-04-26

    The aim of the study was to analyze bone matrix (BMX) organization after bone grafting and repair using a new bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate ® ) associated or not with particulate autogenous bone graft. Thirty rabbits underwent surgical bilateral parietal defects and divided into groups according to the materials used: (C) control-blood clot, (BG) particulate autogenous bone, (BS) bioactive glass-ceramic, and BG + BS. After 7, 14, and 30 days post-surgery, a fragment of each specimen was fixed in - 80 °C liquid nitrogen for zymographic evaluation, while the remaining was fixed in 10% formalin for histological birefringence analysis. The results of this study demonstrated that matrix organization in experimental groups was significantly improved compared to C considering collagenous organization. Zymographic analysis revealed pro-MMP-2, pro-MMP-9, and active (a)-MMP-2 in all groups, showing gradual decrease of total gelatinolytic activity during the periods. At day 7, BG presented more prominent gelatinolytic activity for pro-MMP-2 and 9 and a-MMP-2, when compared to the other groups. In addition, at day 7, a 53% activation ratio (active form/[active form + latent form]) was evident in C group, 33% in BS group, and 31% in BG group. In general, BS allowed the production of a BMX similar to BG, with organized collagen deposition and MMP-2 and MMP-9 disponibility, permitting satisfactory bone remodeling at the late period. The evaluation of new bone substitute, with favorable biological properties, opens the possibility for its use as a viable and efficient alternative to autologous bone graft.

  8. Structural study of thin films prepared from tungstate glass matrix by Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanari, Bianca; Barbosa, Anne J.; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L.; Messaddeq, Younes [Departamento de Quimica Geral e Inorganica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP, CP 355, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Poirier, Gael [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, UNIFAL-MG, CEP 37130-000 Alfenas, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: gael@unifal-mg.edu.br; Li, Maximo S. [Instituto de Fisica, USP, CP 369, CEP 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-06-30

    Thin films were prepared using glass precursors obtained in the ternary system NaPO{sub 3}-BaF{sub 2}-WO{sub 3} and the binary system NaPO{sub 3}-WO{sub 3} with high concentrations of WO{sub 3} (above 40% molar). Vitreous samples have been used as a target to prepare thin films. Such films were deposited using the electron beam evaporation method onto soda-lime glass substrates. Several structural characterizations were performed by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) at the tungsten L{sub I} and L{sub III} absorption edges. XANES investigations showed that tungsten atoms are only sixfold coordinated (octahedral WO{sub 6}) and that these films are free of tungstate tetrahedral units (WO{sub 4}). In addition, Raman spectroscopy allowed identifying a break in the linear phosphate chains as the amount of WO{sub 3} increases and the formation of P-O-W bonds in the films network indicating the intermediary behavior of WO{sub 6} octahedra in the film network. Based on XANES data, we suggested a new attribution of several Raman absorption bands which allowed identifying the presence of W-O{sup -} and W=O terminal bonds and a progressive apparition of W-O-W bridging bonds for the most WO{sub 3} concentrated samples (above 40% molar) attributed to the formation of WO{sub 6} clusters.

  9. Multi-class multi-residue analysis of veterinary drugs in meat using enhanced matrix removal lipid cleanup and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Limian; Lucas, Derick; Long, David; Richter, Bruce; Stevens, Joan

    2018-05-11

    This study presents the development and validation of a quantitation method for the analysis of multi-class, multi-residue veterinary drugs using lipid removal cleanup cartridges, enhanced matrix removal lipid (EMR-Lipid), for different meat matrices by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection. Meat samples were extracted using a two-step solid-liquid extraction followed by pass-through sample cleanup. The method was optimized based on the buffer and solvent composition, solvent additive additions, and EMR-Lipid cartridge cleanup. The developed method was then validated in five meat matrices, porcine muscle, bovine muscle, bovine liver, bovine kidney and chicken liver to evaluate the method performance characteristics, such as absolute recoveries and precision at three spiking levels, calibration curve linearity, limit of quantitation (LOQ) and matrix effect. The results showed that >90% of veterinary drug analytes achieved satisfactory recovery results of 60-120%. Over 97% analytes achieved excellent reproducibility results (relative standard deviation (RSD) meat matrices. The matrix co-extractive removal efficiency by weight provided by EMR-lipid cartridge cleanup was 42-58% in samples. The post column infusion study showed that the matrix ion suppression was reduced for samples with the EMR-Lipid cartridge cleanup. The reduced matrix ion suppression effect was also confirmed with 30%) for all tested veterinary drugs in all of meat matrices. The results showed that the two-step solid-liquid extraction provides efficient extraction for the entire spectrum of veterinary drugs, including the difficult classes such as tetracyclines, beta-lactams etc. EMR-Lipid cartridges after extraction provided efficient sample cleanup with easy streamlined protocol and minimal impacts on analytes recovery, improving method reliability and consistency. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-matrix corrected organic sulfur determination by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy for western Kentucky coals and residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, C.P.; Freeman, G.B.; Hower, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A method for non-matrix corrected organic sulfur analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has been developed using petroleum coke standards. Typically, electron beam microanalysis is a rapid, nondestructive analytical technique to quantitatively measure organic sulfur in coal. The results show good correlation to ASTM values for numerous well characterized coals with a wide range in total and pyritic sulfur content. This direct analysis is capable of reducing error commonly associated with the present ASTM method which relies on an indirect measure of organic sulfur by difference. The precision of the organic sulfur values determined in the present study is comparable to that obtained by ZAF matrix corrected microanalysis. The energy dispersive microanalysis is capable of measuring micro as well as bulk organic sulfur levels

  11. Lipase from Aspergillus niger obtained from mangaba residue fermentation: biochemical characterization of free and immobilized enzymes on a sol-gel matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Augusta Leite dos Santos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, mangaba residue (seeds was used as a substrate for Aspergillus niger lipase production by solid-state fermentation. The partially purified enzyme was efficiently immobilized in a sol-gel matrix by covalent bonding with an immobilization yield of 91.2%. The immobilized biocatalyst and free lipase had an optimum pH of 2.0 and 5.0, respectively. However, greater stability was obtained at pH 4.0 and 7.0, respectively. The biocatalysts showed stability at the optimum temperature of 55°C, where the residual activity was above 87% after 240 min., of incubation. The lower deactivation constant (kd and higher half-life of the immobilized biocatalyst indicated greater thermal stability than those obtained with the free enzyme. The Michaelis Constant (Km (77 and 115 mM for free and immobilized lipase, respectively and maximum reaction rate (Vmax (1250 and 714 U mg-1 for free and immobilized lipase, respectively indicated that the immobilization process reduced enzyme-substrate affinity. Regarding the operational stability, the biocatalyst showed relative activity above 50% until seven cycles of reuse in olive oil hydrolysis. This novel biocatalyst obtained from a tropical fruit residue showed biochemical characteristics that support its application in future biocatalysis studies.

  12. Glass transition behavior and crystallization kinetics of Cu0.3(SSe20)0.7 chalcogenide glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    The glass transition behavior and crystallization kinetics of Cu 0.3 (SSe 20 ) 0.7 chalcogenide glass were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD). Two crystalline phases (SSe 20 and Cu 2 Se) were identified after annealing the glass at 773 K for 24 h. The activation energy of the glass transition (E g ), the activation energy of crystallization (E c ), the Avrami exponent (n) and the dimensionality of growth (m) were determined. Results indicate that this glass crystallizes by a two-stage bulk crystallization process upon heating. The first transformation, in which SSe 20 precipitates from the amorphous matrix with a three-dimensional crystal growth. The second transformation, in which the residual amorphous phase transforms into Cu 2 Se compound with a two-dimensional crystal growth

  13. First Industrial Tests of a Drum Monitor Matrix Correction for the Fissile Mass Measurement in Large Volume Historic Metallic Residues with the Differential Die-away Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoni, R.; Passard, C.; Perot, B.; Batifol, M.; Vandamme, J.C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Grassi, G. [AREVA NC, 1 place Jean-Millier, 92084 Paris-La-Defense cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    The fissile mass in radioactive waste drums filled with compacted metallic residues (spent fuel hulls and nozzles) produced at AREVA La Hague reprocessing plant is measured by neutron interrogation with the Differential Die-away measurement Technique (DDT. In the next years, old hulls and nozzles mixed with Ion-Exchange Resins will be measured. The ion-exchange resins increase neutron moderation in the matrix, compared to the waste measured in the current process. In this context, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache has studied a matrix effect correction method, based on a drum monitor ({sup 3}He proportional counter inside the measurement cavity). A previous study performed with the NML R and D measurement cell PROMETHEE 6 has shown the feasibility of method, and the capability of MCNP simulations to correctly reproduce experimental data and to assess the performances of the proposed correction. A next step of the study has focused on the performance assessment of the method on the industrial station using numerical simulation. A correlation between the prompt calibration coefficient of the {sup 239}Pu signal and the drum monitor signal was established using the MCNPX computer code and a fractional factorial experimental design composed of matrix parameters representative of the variation range of historical waste. Calculations have showed that the method allows the assay of the fissile mass with an uncertainty within a factor of 2, while the matrix effect without correction ranges on 2 decades. In this paper, we present and discuss the first experimental tests on the industrial ACC measurement system. A calculation vs. experiment benchmark has been achieved by performing dedicated calibration measurement with a representative drum and {sup 235}U samples. The preliminary comparison between calculation and experiment shows a satisfactory agreement for the drum monitor. The final objective of this work is to confirm the reliability of the

  14. First Industrial Tests of a Drum Monitor Matrix Correction for the Fissile Mass Measurement in Large Volume Historic Metallic Residues with the Differential Die-away Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoni, R.; Passard, C.; Perot, B.; Batifol, M.; Vandamme, J.C.; Grassi, G.

    2015-01-01

    The fissile mass in radioactive waste drums filled with compacted metallic residues (spent fuel hulls and nozzles) produced at AREVA La Hague reprocessing plant is measured by neutron interrogation with the Differential Die-away measurement Technique (DDT. In the next years, old hulls and nozzles mixed with Ion-Exchange Resins will be measured. The ion-exchange resins increase neutron moderation in the matrix, compared to the waste measured in the current process. In this context, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache has studied a matrix effect correction method, based on a drum monitor ( 3 He proportional counter inside the measurement cavity). A previous study performed with the NML R and D measurement cell PROMETHEE 6 has shown the feasibility of method, and the capability of MCNP simulations to correctly reproduce experimental data and to assess the performances of the proposed correction. A next step of the study has focused on the performance assessment of the method on the industrial station using numerical simulation. A correlation between the prompt calibration coefficient of the 239 Pu signal and the drum monitor signal was established using the MCNPX computer code and a fractional factorial experimental design composed of matrix parameters representative of the variation range of historical waste. Calculations have showed that the method allows the assay of the fissile mass with an uncertainty within a factor of 2, while the matrix effect without correction ranges on 2 decades. In this paper, we present and discuss the first experimental tests on the industrial ACC measurement system. A calculation vs. experiment benchmark has been achieved by performing dedicated calibration measurement with a representative drum and 235 U samples. The preliminary comparison between calculation and experiment shows a satisfactory agreement for the drum monitor. The final objective of this work is to confirm the reliability of the modeling approach

  15. Effect of nanoparticles and nanofibers on Mode I fracture toughness of fiber glass reinforced polymeric matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Ajit D.; Mohan, Ram; Bolick, Ronnie; Shendokar, Sachin

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Use of alumina nanoparticles and TEOS electrospun nanofibers at the interfaces of glass fiber plies to develop delamination resistant epoxy polymeric composites and compare their Mode I fracture toughness characteristics. - Abstract: In the recent past, the research involving the fabrication and processing of reinforced polymer nanocomposites has increased significantly. These new materials are enabling in the discovery, development and incorporation of improved nanocomposite materials with effective manufacturing methodologies for several defense and industrial applications. These materials eventually will allow the full utilization of nanocomposites in not only reinforcing applications but also in multifunctional applications where sensing and the unique optical, thermal, electrical and magnetic properties of nanoparticles can be combined with mechanical reinforcement to offer the greatest opportunities for significant advances in material design and function. This paper presents two methods and material systems for processing and integration of the nanomaterial constituents, namely: (a) dispersing alumina nanoparticles using high energy mixing (using ultrasonication, high shear mixing and pulverization) and (b) electrospinning technique to manufacture nanofibers. These reinforced polymer nanocomposites and the processing methodologies are likely to provide effective means of improving the interlaminar properties of woven fiber glass composites compared to the traditional methods such as stitching and Z-pinning. The electrospinning technology relies on the creation of nanofibers with improved molecular orientation with reduced concentration of fiber imperfections and crystal defects. Electrospinning process utilizes surface tension effects created by electrostatic forces acting on liquid droplets, creating numerous nanofibers. These nanofibers thus have potential to serve as through-the-thickness reinforcing agents in woven composites. While

  16. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass studied by in situ scratch testing inside the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on material removal mechanism is meaningful for precision and ultra-precision manufacturing. In this paper, a novel scratch device was proposed by integrating the parasitic motion principle linear actuator. The device has a compact structure and it can be installed on the stage of the scanning electron microscope (SEM to carry out in situ scratch testing. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass (BMG was studied by in situ scratch testing inside the SEM. The whole removal process of the BMG during the scratch was captured in real time. Formation and growth of lamellar chips on the rake face of the Cube-Corner indenter were observed dynamically. Experimental results indicate that when lots of chips are accumulated on the rake face of the indenter and obstruct forward flow of materials, materials will flow laterally and downward to find new location and direction for formation of new chips. Due to similar material removal processes, in situ scratch testing is potential to be a powerful research tool for studying material removal mechanism of single point diamond turning, single grit grinding, mechanical polishing and grating fabrication.

  17. Measurement of glass transition temperature, residual heat of reaction and mixing ratio of epoxy resins using near infrared spectroscopy: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmøller, Lars Plejdrup; Laursen, Peter Clemen

    2003-01-01

    As a measure of the degree of curing of epoxy resins, the glass transition temperature, Tg, and the residual heat of reaction, DeltaHr, are often used. In this study, near infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration (partial least squares regression (PLSR)) have been used to monitor the two...... variables, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the reference method. The epoxy under study was a commercial system consisting of the resin, trimethylolpropanetriglycidylether, and the hardener, 3-aminomethyl-3,5,5,-trimethylcyclohexylamine. Using samples cured under different conditions......, calibrations resulted in root mean square errors of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 18 J/g for DeltaHr (range for Hr: 6.1-231.3 J/g) and 7.2ºC for Tg (range for Tg: 41.5-98.8ºC). Also, a PLSR model for mixing ratio of hardener and resin was obtained, resulting in a RMSECV of 0.0040 (range for mixing ratio: 0.180-0.380)...

  18. Characterization and Morphological Properties of Glass Fiber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    used as the matrix for the glass fibre-epoxy resin formation. E- Glass fibre ... reinforcement of composites, coatings of materials, and other ..... composite for the manufacture of glass-ceramic materials ... reinforced epoxy composites with carbon.

  19. Multi-layered metal nanocrystals in a sol-gel spin-on-glass matrix for flash memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Meiyu Stella [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); Globalfoundries Singapore Pte Ltd, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, 738406 (Singapore); Suresh, Vignesh [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*Star, Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), #08-03, 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, 138634 (Singapore); Chan, Mei Yin [School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Ma, Yu Wei [Globalfoundries Singapore Pte Ltd, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, 738406 (Singapore); Lee, Pooi See [School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar [Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*Star, Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), #08-03, 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, 138634 (Singapore); Science et Analyse des Materiaux Unit (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, 41, rue du Brill, Belvaux, 4422 (Luxembourg); Srinivasan, M.P., E-mail: srinivasan.madapusi@rmit.edu.au [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); School of Engineering, RMIT University, Building 10, Level 11, Room 14, 376-392 Swanston Street, Melbourne, Victoria, 3001 (Australia)

    2017-01-15

    A simple and low-cost process of embedding metal nanocrystals as charge storage centers within a dielectric is demonstrated to address leakage issues associated with the scaling of the tunnelling oxide in flash memories. Metal nanocrystals with high work functions (nickel, platinum and palladium) were prepared as embedded species in methyl siloxane spin-on-glass (SOG) films on silicon substrates. Sub-10 nm-sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed, multi-layered nanocrystals with high particle densities (10{sup 11}–10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}) were formed in the films by thermal curing of the spin-coated SOG films containing the metal precursors. Capacitance-Voltage measurements performed on metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors with the SOG films show that the presence of metal nanocrystals enhanced the memory window of the films to 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. These SOG films demonstrated the ability to store both holes and electrons. Capacitance-time measurements show good charge retention of more than 75% after 10{sup 4} s of discharging. This work demonstrates the applicability of the low-cost in-situ sol-gel preparation in contrast to conventional methods that involve multiple and expensive processing steps. - Highlights: • Sub-10 nm sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed nanoparticle based charge trap memories. • Preparation of multi-layer high work function metal nanocrystals at low cost. • Large memory window of 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. • Good charge retention of more than 90% and 75% after 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} s of discharging respectively. • Use of a 3 nm thick tunnelling oxide in compliance with ITRS specifications.

  20. Multi-layered metal nanocrystals in a sol-gel spin-on-glass matrix for flash memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Meiyu Stella; Suresh, Vignesh; Chan, Mei Yin; Ma, Yu Wei; Lee, Pooi See; Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    A simple and low-cost process of embedding metal nanocrystals as charge storage centers within a dielectric is demonstrated to address leakage issues associated with the scaling of the tunnelling oxide in flash memories. Metal nanocrystals with high work functions (nickel, platinum and palladium) were prepared as embedded species in methyl siloxane spin-on-glass (SOG) films on silicon substrates. Sub-10 nm-sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed, multi-layered nanocrystals with high particle densities (10"1"1–10"1"2 cm"−"2) were formed in the films by thermal curing of the spin-coated SOG films containing the metal precursors. Capacitance-Voltage measurements performed on metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors with the SOG films show that the presence of metal nanocrystals enhanced the memory window of the films to 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. These SOG films demonstrated the ability to store both holes and electrons. Capacitance-time measurements show good charge retention of more than 75% after 10"4 s of discharging. This work demonstrates the applicability of the low-cost in-situ sol-gel preparation in contrast to conventional methods that involve multiple and expensive processing steps. - Highlights: • Sub-10 nm sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed nanoparticle based charge trap memories. • Preparation of multi-layer high work function metal nanocrystals at low cost. • Large memory window of 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. • Good charge retention of more than 90% and 75% after 10"3 and 10"4 s of discharging respectively. • Use of a 3 nm thick tunnelling oxide in compliance with ITRS specifications.

  1. Strong work-hardening behavior induced by the solid solution strengthening of dendrites in TiZr-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, D.Q. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Jiao, W.T. [College of Education, Hebei Normal University of Science and Technology, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang, Y.F. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Hebei Vocational and Technical College of Building Materials, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, B.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, X.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Ma, M.Z., E-mail: mz550509@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Liu, R.P. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2015-03-05

    Highlights: • Hardness of dendrite of TiZr-based BMGMCs increases. • Strong work-hardening behavior is obtained after solid solution strengthening. • Lattice distortions of dendrite suffering from rapid cooling are detected. - Abstract: A series of TiZr-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) with distinguished mechanical properties are successfully fabricated by adding different volume fractions of Ta (Ti{sub 38.8}Zr{sub 28.8}Cu{sub 6.2}Be{sub 16.2}Nb{sub 10} as the basic composition, denoted as Ta{sub 0.0}–Ta{sub 8.0}). Along with the growth of precipitated phase, typical dendritic morphology is fully developed in the TiZr-based BMGMCs of Ta{sub 8.0}. Energy-dispersive spectrometry analysis of the dendrites and glass matrix indicates that the metallic elements of Nb and Ta should preferentially form solid solution into dendrites. The chaotic structure of high-temperature precipitate phase is trapped down by the rapid cooling of the copper-mould. The detected lattice distortions in the dendrites are attributed to the strong solid solution strengthening of the metallic elements of Ti, Zr, Nb, and Ta. These lattice distortions increase the resistance of the dislocation motion and pin the dislocations, thus the strength and hardness of dendrite increase. Dendrites create a strong barrier for the shear band propagation and generate multiple shear bands after solid solution strengthening, thereby providing the TiZr-based BMGMCs with greatly improved capacity to sustain plastic deformation and resistance to brittle fracture. Thus, the TiZr-based BMGMCs possess distinguished work-hardening capability. Among these TiZr-based BMGMCs, the sample Ta{sub 0.5} possesses the largest plastic strain (ε{sub p}) at 20.3% and ultimate strength (σ{sub max}) of 2613 MPa during compressive loading. In addition, the sample of Ta{sub 0.5} exhibits work-hardening up to an ultrahigh tensile strength of 1680 MPa during the tensile process, and then progressively

  2. Rapid Determination of Ractopamine Residues in Edible Animal Products by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: Development and Investigation of Matrix Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine ractopamine residues in animal food products (chicken muscle, pettitoes, pig muscle, and pig liver, we established a rapid direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using a polyclonal antibody generated from ractopamine-linker-BSA. The antibody showed high sensitivity and specificity in phosphate buffer, with an IC50 of 0.6 ng/mL, and the limit of detection was 0.04 ng/mL. The matrix effect of the samples was easily eliminated by one-step extraction with PBS, without any organic solution or clean-up procedure such as SPE or liquid-liquid extraction, making it a much more simple and rapid method than previously reported ones. The detection limit in blank samples was 0.2 μg/kg. To validate this new RAC (ractopamine hydrochloride ELISA, a RAC-free pig liver sample spiked at three different concentrations was prepared and analyzed by HPLC and ELISA. The results showed a good correlation between the data of ELISA and HPLC (R2>0.95, which proves that the established ELISA is accurate enough to quantify the residue of RAC in the animal derived foods.

  3. Rapid determination of ractopamine residues in edible animal products by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: development and investigation of matrix effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fengxia; Fang, Li; Wang, Shuo; Fang, Guozhen

    2009-01-01

    To determine ractopamine residues in animal food products (chicken muscle, pettitoes, pig muscle, and pig liver), we established a rapid direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a polyclonal antibody generated from ractopamine-linker-BSA. The antibody showed high sensitivity and specificity in phosphate buffer, with an IC(50) of 0.6 ng/mL, and the limit of detection was 0.04 ng/mL. The matrix effect of the samples was easily eliminated by one-step extraction with PBS, without any organic solution or clean-up procedure such as SPE or liquid-liquid extraction, making it a much more simple and rapid method than previously reported ones. The detection limit in blank samples was 0.2 mug/kg. To validate this new RAC (ractopamine hydrochloride) ELISA, a RAC-free pig liver sample spiked at three different concentrations was prepared and analyzed by HPLC and ELISA. The results showed a good correlation between the data of ELISA and HPLC (R(2) > 0.95), which proves that the established ELISA is accurate enough to quantify the residue of RAC in the animal derived foods.

  4. Characterization of glass and glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.; Borchardt, J.; De, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solidified nuclear waste forms, glass and glass ceramic compositions and the properties (composition, thermal stability, crystallization, phase behavior, chemical stability, mechanical stability, and radiation effects) of glasses and glass ceramics are discussed. The preparation of glass ceramics may be an optional step for proposed vitrification plants if tailored glasses are used. Glass ceramics exhibit some improved properties with respect to glasses. The overall leach resistance is similar to that of glasses. An increased leach resistance may become effective for single radionuclides being hosted in highly insoluble crystal phases mainly when higher melting temperatures are applicable in order to get more leach resistant residual glass phases. The development of glass ceramic is going on. The technological feasibility is still to be demonstrated. The potential gain of stability when using glass ceramics qualifies the material as an alternative nuclear waste form

  5. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for seven sulfonamide residues and investigation of matrix effects from different food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yan; Fang, Guozhen; Zheng, Wenjie; Wang, Shuo

    2007-03-21

    Direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were developed to detect a broad range of sulfonamides in various matrices. Screening for this class of antibiotics in pig muscle, chicken muscle, fish, and egg extracts was accomplished by simple, rapid extraction methods carried out with only phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer. Twenty milliliters of extract solution was added to 4 g of sample to extract the sulfonamide residues, and sample extracts diluted with assay buffer were directly analyzed by ELISA; matrix effects could be avoided with 1:5 dilution of pig muscle, chicken muscle, and egg extracts with PBS and 1:5 dilution of fish extract with 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA)-PBS. For liver sample, the extraction method was a little more complicated; 2 g of sample was added to 20 mL of ethanol, mixed, and then centrifuged. The solvent of 10 mL of the upper liquid was removed, and the residues were dissolved in 10 mL of PBS and then filtered; the filtrate was diluted two-fold with 0.5% BSA-PBS for ELISA. These common methods were able to detect seven sulfonamide residues such as sulfisozole, sulfathiazole, sufameter, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfapyridine, sulfamethizole, and sulfachlorpyridazine in pig muscle, liver, chicken muscle, egg, and fish. The assay's detection limits for these compounds were less than 100 microg kg-1. Various extraction methods were tested, and the average recovery (n=3) of 100 microg kg-1 for the matrices was found to range from 77.3 to 123.7%.

  6. Two-dimensional coordination polymer matrix for solid-phase extraction of pesticide residues from plant Cordia salicifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Pedro Henrique Viana; Barreto, Alysson Santos; Rodrigues, Marcelo O; Prata, Vanessa de Menezes; Alves, Péricles Barreto; de Mesquita, Maria Eliane; Alves, Severino; Navickiene, Sandro

    2009-06-01

    The 2D coordination polymer (infinity[Gd(DPA)(HDPA)]) was tested for extraction of acephate, chlorpropham, pirimicarb, bifenthrin, tetradifon, and phosalone from the medicinal plant Cordia salicifolia, whose extracts are commercialized in Brazil as diuretic, appetite suppressant, and weight loss products, using GC/MS, SIM. Considering that there are no Brazilian regulations concerning maximum permissible pesticide residue concentrations in medicinal herbs, recovery experiments were carried out (seven replicates), at two arbitrary fortification levels (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg), resulting in recoveries in range of 20 to 107.7% and SDRSDs were between 5.6 and 29.1% for infinity[Gd(DPA)(HDPA)] sorbent. Detection and quantification limits for herb ranged from 0.10 to 0.15 mg/kg and from 0.15 to 0.25 mg/kg, respectively, for the different pesticides studied. The developed method is linear over the range assayed, 0.5-10.0 microg/mL, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9975 to 0.9986 for all pesticides. Comparison between infinity[Gd(DPA)(HDPA)] sorbent and conventional sorbent (neutral alumina) showed similar performance of infinity[Gd(DPA)(HDPA)] polymeric sorbent for three (bifenthrin, tetradifon, and phosalone) out of six pesticides tested.

  7. Control of luminescence emitted by Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}S nanocrystals in a glass matrix: x concentration and thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas Neto, Ernesto S; Dantas, Noelio O [Laboratorio de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, CP 593, CEP 38400-902, Uberlandia, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Barbosa Neto, Newton M [Grupo de Espectroscopia de Materiais (GEM), Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, CP 593, CEP 38400-902, Uberlandia, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Guedes, Ilde [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, CEP 60455-760, Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Chen, Felipe, E-mail: ernestosfn@yahoo.com.br [Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, CEP 09210-170, Santo Andre, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-03-11

    Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}S nanocrystals (NCs) were successfully grown in a glass matrix and investigated by photoluminescence (PL), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We verified that the luminescent properties of these NCs can be controlled both by changing the x concentration and by thermal annealing of the samples. The EPR and PL data showed that the characteristic emission of Mn{sup 2+} ions ({sup 4}T{sub 1}-{sup 6}A{sub 1}) is only observed when this magnetic impurity is substitutionally incorporated in the Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}S NC core (site S{sub I}). Besides, it was observed that the emission ({sup 4}T{sub 1}-{sup 6}A{sub 1}) suppression, caused by the Mn{sup 2+} ion presence near the surface (site S{sub II}) of the Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}S NCs, is independent of the host material. The MFM images also confirmed the high quality of the Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}S NC samples, showing a uniform distribution of total magnetic moments in the nanoparticles.

  8. Waste Material Based "Terrazzo" Tiles: The Effect Of Curing Time And Extreme Environmental Conditions Over Glass Aggregate/Cement Matrix Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, E.; Radica, F.; Stabile, P.; Ansaloni, F.; Giuli, G.; Carroll, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Currently, more than half of all materials extracted globally (over three billion tonnes/year in the EU only) are transformed for use in construction. Before year 2020, the EU aims to reduce the environmental impact of the construction sector by recycling or re-using large amounts of these materials, thus reducing the consumption of raw materials and helping promote the sector's economic stability. With this challenge in mind an aesthetically pleasant and fully recycled (up to 78%) pre-cast cement based tile (Terrazzo tiles) was designed by replacing raw materials with Glass Waste (GW) and Construction/Demolition Waste (CDW). Several recent studies explored the effect of the addition of GW in the manufacture of urban pavements, concluding that the use of GW can improve various phases of pavement life and structure by enhancing the structural performance, durability, environmental friendliness, and aesthetic features. In this study we extend this knowledge also to interior cement-based tiles by evaluating the technical performances of this this novel designed tile, in particular by focusing on the interface between the GW aggregates and different Portland cement based matrix at extreme environmental conditions. For this work three representative waste material based "terrazzo" tiles were selected and characterized by means of XRD and SEM imaging in order to study the boundary effect between GW aggregate and different binding materials: limestone powder, quartz powder and fine ground WG powder. A fourth additional mixture of Portland cement and CDW material was characterized. Fragments of a Limestone matrix tile were also thermally threated at -18°C and at 60°C for one week to witness the possible formation of new harmful phases at the grain-matrix boundary. Preliminary results on X-ray diffraction patterns show that 1 year after manufacture and/or thermal treatment there is no new formation of harmful phases other than the starting ones. High magnification SEM

  9. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  10. Mechanical properties of molybdenum-sealing glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swearengen, J.C.; Eagan, R.J.

    1975-07-01

    Elastic constants, thermal expansion, strength, and fracture toughness were determined for a molybdenum-sealing glass-ceramic containing approximately 31 volume percent Zn 2 SiO 4 crystals in a glass matrix. The microstructure was studied for two different crystallization treatments and moderate changes in composition. Mechanical properties of the composite were compared with the properties of the constituent phases through application of mixture theory and by fractographic observations. The reinforcing effects of the crystal phase at room temperature are evident in comparison with the properties of the residual glass but not necessarily in comparison with the parent glass. Fracture toughness of the composite depends primarily upon additive properties of the separate phases instead of by interactive effects such as microcracks. (U.S.)

  11. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility. PMID:24961911

  12. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-06-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility.

  13. Crystallization behavior of Zr62Al8Ni13Cu17 Metallic Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Mi Sun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization behavior has been studied in Zr62Al8Ni13Cu17 metallic glass alloy. The Zr62Al8Ni13Cu17 metallic glass crystallized through two steps. The fcc Zr2Ni phase transformed from the amorphous matrix during first crystallization and then the Zr2Ni and residual amorphous matrix transformed into a mixture of tetragonal Zr2Cu and hexagonal Zr6Al2Ni phases. Johnson-Mehl-Avrami analysis of isothermal transformation data suggested that the formation of crystalline phase is primary crystallization by diffusion-controlled growth.

  14. The effects of crystallization and residual glass on the chemical durability of iron phosphate waste forms containing 40 wt% of a high MoO3 Collins-CLT waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jen-Hsien; Bai, Jincheng; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Brow, Richard K.; Szabo, Joe; Zervos, Adam

    2018-03-01

    The effects of cooling rate on the chemical durability of iron phosphate waste forms containing up to 40 wt% of a high MoO3 Collins-CLT waste simulant were determined at 90 °C using the product consistency test (PCT). The waste form, designated 40wt%-5, meets appropriate Department of Energy (DOE) standards when rapidly quenched from the melt (as-cast) and after slow cooling following the CCC (canister centerline cooling)-protocol, although the quenched glass is more durable. The analysis of samples from the vapor hydration test (VHT) and the aqueous corrosion test (differential recession test) reveals that rare earth orthophosphate (monazite) and Zr-pyrophosphate crystals that form on cooling are more durable than the residual glass in the 40wt%-5 waste form. The residual glass in the CCC-treated samples has a greater average phosphate chain length and a lower Fe/P ratio, and those contribute to its faster corrosion kinetics.

  15. Mixture design and Doehlert matrix for the optimization of the extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Spondias mombin L Apple Bagasse Agro-industrial Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Felix, Antonio C.; Novaes, Cleber G.; Pires Rocha, Maísla; Barreto, George E.; do Nascimento, Baraquizio B.; Giraldez Alvarez, Lisandro D.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we have determined, using RSM (mixture design and Doehlert matrix), the optimum values of the independent variables to achieve the maximum response for the extraction of total phenolic compounds from Spondias mombin L bagasse agroindustrial residues, preserving its antioxidant activity. The assessment with reference to the extraction of phenolic compounds, as well as their capacity to scavenge ABTS and the antioxidant capacity, determined by the modified DPPH method were investigated based on distinct combinations of time, temperature, velocity of rotation and solvents concentration. It was investigated that the optimum condition for the highest antioxidant yield was obtained using water (60.84%), acetone (30.31%) and ethanol (8.85%) at 30 ºC during 20 min at 50 rpm. We have found that the maximum yield of total phenolics was 355.63 ± 9.77 (mg GAE/100 g), showing an EC50 of 3962.24 ± 41.20 (g fruit/g of DPPH) and 8.36 ± 0.30 (µM trolox/g fruit), which were measured using DPPH and ABTS assays. These results suggest that RSM was successfully applied for optimizing the extraction of phenolics compounds preserving its antioxidant activity. This method does not require expensive reagents or high quantities of organic solvents.

  16. Copper oxide content dependence of crystallization behavior, glass forming ability, glass stability and fragility of lithium borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, A.A.; Kashif, I.

    2010-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been employed to investigate the copper oxide content dependence of the glass transition temperatures data, activation energy for the glass transition E t , glass stability GS, fragility index Fi, the glass-forming ability (GFA) and crystallization behavior of {(100-x) mol% Li 2 B 4 O 7 -x mol% CuO} glass samples, where x=0-40 mol% CuO. From the dependence of the glass transition temperature T g on the heating rate β, the fragility, F i , and the activation energy, E t , have been calculated. It is seen that F i and E t are attained their minimum values at 0 x -T g , SCL region and the GS. The GFA has been investigated on the basis of Hruby parameter K H , which is a strong indicator of GFA, and the relaxation time. Results of GFA are in good agreement with the fragility index, F i , calculations indicating that {90Li 2 B 4 O 7 .10CuO} is the best glass former. The stronger glass forming ability has decreasing the fragility index. XRD result indicates that no fully amorphous samples but a mixture of crystalline and amorphous phases are formed in the samples containing x>25 mol% CuO and below it composed of glassy phase. Increasing the CuO content above 25 mol% helps the crystallization process, and thus promotes a distinct SCL region. XRD suggests the presence of micro-crystallites of remaining residual amorphous matrix by increasing the CuO content.

  17. Immobilization of acid digestion residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.; Allen, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Acid digestion treatment of nuclear waste is similar to incineration processes and results in the bulk of the waste being reduced in volume and weight to some residual solids termed residue. The residue is composed of various dispersible solid materials and typically contains the resultant radioactivity from the waste. This report describes the immobilization of the residue in portland cement, borosilicate glass, and some other waste forms. Diagrams showing the cement and glass virtification parameters are included in the report as well as process steps and candidate waste product forms. Cement immobilization is simplest and probably least expensive; glass vitrification exhibits the best overall volume reduction ratio

  18. Ion exchange for glass strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gy, Rene

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a short overview of silicate glass strengthening by exchange of alkali ions in a molten salt, below the glass transition temperature (chemical tempering). The physics of alkali inter-diffusion is briefly explained and the main parameters of the process, which control the glass reinforcement, are reviewed. Methods for characterizing the obtained residual stress state and the strengthening are described, along with the simplified modelling of the stress build-up. The fragmentation of chemically tempered glass is discussed. The concept of engineered stress profile glass is presented, and finally, the effect of glass and salt compositions is overviewed

  19. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.

    1995-01-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing

  20. An alternative host matrix based on iron phosphate glasses for the vitrification of specialized nuclear waste forms. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, D.E.; Marasinghe, K.; Ray, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    'Objectives of this project are to: (1) investigate the glass composition and processing conditions that yield optimum properties for iron phosphate glasses for vitrifying radioactive waste, (2) determine the atomic structure of iron phosphate glasses and the structure-property relationships, (3) determine how the physical and structural properties of iron phosphate glasses are affected by the addition of simulated high level nuclear waste components, and (4) investigate the process and products of devitrification of iron phosphate waste forms. The glass forming ability of about 125 iron phosphate melts has been investigated in different oxidizing to reducing atmospheres using various iron oxide raw materials such as Fe 2 O 3 , FeO, Fe 3 O 4 , and FeC 2 O 4 2H 2 O. The chemical durability, redox equilibria between Fe(II) and Fe(III), crystallization behavior and structural features for these glasses and their crystalline forms have been investigated using a variety of techniques including Mossbauer spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (DTA/TGA), and X-ray and neutron diffraction.'

  1. Phosphate glasses, containing nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyna, E.A.; Khalilev, V.D.; Koryavin, A.A.; Goncharova, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of nitrogen-containing glass synthesis by the introduction into the charge of ammonium salts, as well as aluminium nitride, are studied. Zinc alumoyttrium phosphate glass (mol. %) Zn(PO 3 ) 2 - 4O, Al(PO 3 ) 3 - 3O, Y(PO 3 ) 3 -3O is suggested as a matrix. It is shown that the effect of amide and imide groups on the properties of the glass is less noticeable than the effect of nitride groups. Direct introduction of nitride constituent was realized using AlN, but aluminium introduction was taken into account so that the oxide was subtracted. The attempt to introduce more than 2.5 mass % of nitrogen into initial matrix by aluminium nitride has failed due to repeated restoration of glass with amorphous phosphorus isolation

  2. Effect of irradiation on the evolution of alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougnaud, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) remaining after spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is immobilized within a glass matrix, eventually destined for geological disposal. Water intrusion into the repository is expected after several thousand years. The alteration of a non-radioactive surrogate for nuclear glass has been extensively studied and it has been determined that successive leaching mechanisms lead to the formation of a 'passivating' alteration layer and to the establishment of a residual rate regime in the long term. However, glass packages are submitted to the radioactivity of confined radioelements. This work focuses on the influence of irradiation on the alteration layer formed during the residual rate regime, in a structural and mechanistic point of view. Three focal areas have been selected. Non-radioactive simple glasses have been leached and externally irradiated in order to determine modifications induced by electronic effects (irradiations with electrons and alpha particles). The same type of glass samples have been previously irradiated with heavy ions and their leaching behavior have been studied in order to assess the impact of ballistic dose cumulated by the glass before water intrusion. Leaching behavior of a complex radioactive glass, doped with an alpha-emitter, has been studied to consider a more realistic situation. (author) [fr

  3. Electrical properties of phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogus-Milankovic, A; Santic, A; Reis, S T; Day, D E

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the electrical properties of phosphate glasses where transition metal oxide such as iron oxide is the network former and network modifier is presented. Phosphate glasses containing iron are electronically conducting glasses where the polaronic conduction is due to the electron hopping from low to high iron valence state. The identification of structural defects caused by ion/polaron migration, the analysis of dipolar states and electrical conductivity in iron phosphate glasses containing various alkali and mixed alkali ions was performed on the basis of the impedance spectroscopy (IS). The changes in electrical conductivity from as-quenched phosphate glass to fully crystallized glass (glass-ceramics) by IS are analyzed. A change in the characteristic features of IS follows the changes in glass and crystallized glass network. Using IS, the contribution of glass matrix, crystallized grains and grain boundary to the total electrical conductivity for iron phosphate glasses was analyzed. It was shown that decrease in conductivity is caused by discontinuities in the conduction pathways as a result of the disruption of crystalline network where two or more crystalline phases are formed. Also, phosphate-based glasses offer a unique range of biomaterials, as they form direct chemical bonding with hard/soft tissue. The surface charges of bioactive glasses are recognized to be the most important factors in determining biological responses. The improved bioactivity of the bioactive glasses as a result of the effects of the surface charges generated by electrical polarization is discussed.

  4. Properties and performance of polysiloxane-derived ceramic matrix in heat resistant composites reinforced with R-glass or fine ceramic fibres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Martin; Glogar, Petr; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Machovič, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2005), s. 145-152 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/02/0177; GA ČR(CZ) GP106/02/P025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : polysiloxane resin * fibre-reinforced composite * mechanical properties Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.463, year: 2005

  5. THE BEST SOLUTION FOR INEQUALITIES OF A O CROSS X LOWER THAN X FROM B O DOT X USING HIGH MATRIX RESIDUATION OF IDEMPOTENT SEMIRING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Susilowati

    2017-01-01

      A complete idempotent semiring has a structure which is called a complete lattice. Because of the same structure as the complete lattice then inequality of the complete idempotent semiring can be solved a solution by using residuation theory. One of the inequality which is explained is  where matrices A,X,B with entries in the complete idempotent semiring S. Furthermore, introduced dual product , i.e. binary operation endowed in a complete idempotent semirings S and not included in the standard definition of complete idempotent semirings. A solution of inequality  can be solved by using residuation theory. Because of the guarantee that for each isotone mapping in complete lattice always has a fixed point, then is also exist in a complete idempotent semirings. This of the characteristics is used in order to obtain the greatest solution of inequality .   Keywords: complete lattice, complete idempotent semiring, dual Kleene Star, dual product, residuation theory

  6. Evaluation of a recent product to remove lipids and other matrix co-extractives in the analysis of pesticide residues and environmental contaminants in foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study demonstrates the application of a novel lipid removal product to the residue analysis of 65 pesticides and 52 environmental contaminants in kale, pork, salmon, and avocado by fast, low pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LPGC-MS/MS). Sample preparation involves QuEChE...

  7. Combined Life Cycle Assessment and Life Cycle Costing in the Eco-Care-Matrix: A case study on the performance of a modernized manufacturing system for glass containers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auer, Johannes; Bey, Niki; Schäfer, Johannes-Marius

    2017-01-01

    Cycle Assessment, as well as Life Cycle Costing (LCC). The results were then to be displayed in an Eco-Care-Matrix (ECM) in order to quantitatively visualize the improvements when comparing the updated manufacturing system to the previous one and they were to be discussed in terms of (i) ecodesign...

  8. The matrix-elements of two-particle residual interaction in the shell-model formalism with the M.S.D.I. approximation. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasielska, A.; Wiktor, S.

    1977-01-01

    The table of two-particle matrix elements calculated according to the formalism of MSDI approximation for the orbits 1fsub(7/2), 2psub(3/2), 2psub(1/2) and 1fsub(5/2) and published previously is now supplemented by inclusion of the 1gsub(9/2) orbit. (author)

  9. Neodymium partitioning in zirconolite-based glass-ceramics designed for minor actinides immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loiseau, P.; Caurant, D.; Baffier, N.; Fillet, C.

    2000-01-01

    This study deals with glass-ceramic matrices designed for the conditioning of minor actinides, in which zirconolite crystals (CaZrTi 2 O 7 ) are homogeneously dispersed in a residual glassy matrix. Good immobilization performances require a high enrichment of actinides in the crystalline phase (double containment principle). Glass-ceramics are obtained by controlled devitrification of an aluminosilicate parent glass containing large amounts of TiO 2 and ZrO 2 . Neodymium was selected to simulate the trivalent minor actinides. Crystallization was performed at 1200 deg. C for various Nd 2 O 3 contents (0 - 10 wt. %). In all cases, zirconolite crystallization is obtained in the bulk of glass-ceramics. The evolution of Nd 3+ location between the crystals and the residual glass was followed by electron spin resonance and optical absorption. Both techniques demonstrate that neodymium is partly incorporated in zirconolite crystals. Moreover, total Nd 2 O 3 content in parent glass has a strong effect on Nd 3+ ions distribution. (authors)

  10. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  11. Quantifying Silica Reactivity in Subsurface Environments: Reaction Affinity and Solute Matrix Controls on Quartz and SiO2 Glass Dissolution Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, Patricia M.

    1999-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of amorphous silica, SiO2(am), dissolution kinetics in aqueous solutions. A knowledge of fundamental controls on the reactivity of simple Si-O bonded phases is the baseline of behavior for understanding highly complex silica phases. In the Earth, silicate minerals comprise >70% of the crust and dominate virtually every subsurface system. More importantly for the objectives of this EMSP project, the silicates are important because compositionally complex glasses will become the front line of defense in containing radioactive wastes in the nation's long term and interim storage strategies. To date, the behavior of SiO2(am) is largely inferred from studies of the better known crystalline polymorphs (e.g. alpha-quartz). In the first step towards constructing a general model for amorphous silica reactivity in the complex fluid compositions of natural waters, we are determining the dissolution behavior as a function of temperature, solution pH and cation concentration. With these data we are determining relationships between SiO2 glass structure and dissolution rates in aqueous solutions, as described below

  12. Quantifying silica reactivity in subsurface environments: Reaction affinity and solute matrix controls on quartz and SiO2 glass. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    'The author reports the preliminary results of the experiments on the dissolution behavior of vitreous silica (v-SiO 2 ) into aqueous solutions of variable pH and ionic strength. The experiments are being conducted in mixed flow reactors with a high circulation rate that simulates constant-stirred conditions, the efficacy of which the authors discuss below. The preliminary results indicate that v-SiO 2 dissolves into aqueous solutions approximately two orders of magnitude more quickly than crystalline silica (e.g., quartz). With additional experiments, they will utilize the dissolution rate data as a framework for understanding the behavior of waste glass compositions in the subsurface. In other work related to the studies of glass reactivity, the author has written one book chapter that will be published as part of a proceedings for the CEA/VALRHO international nuclear waste disposal conference held in Mejannes le Clap, France. In separate work, she is presently writing a second book chapter for the volume entitled Adsorption on Silica Surfaces.'

  13. Electrochromic Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-31

    this glass and that dipole-dipole correlations contribute to the "ferroelectric-like" character of this amorphous system. The TeO2 -W03 glasses can only...shows the dielectric constant and Fig. I(b) glass from pure TeO2 ot pure WO. In addition, glass the tan 8 of the WO glass as a function of temperature... glasses containing WO, in various glass forming nitworks of LifO-B1O0, Na:O-BzO,, and TeO2 were prepared from reagent grade oxides at 800 C - 9SO C in

  14. Powder addition assessment of manganese residue ceramic matrix coating; Avaliacao da adicao do po de residuo de manganes em matriz ceramica para revestimento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceicao, A.C.R. da; Santos, O.C.; Leao, M.A., E-mail: arangel-ma@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), BA (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The use of recycled materials in the composition of new products follows the production's worldwide trending, meeting new technological requirements and environmental concerns. This work aims to utilize the residue of manganese dust on ceramic mass for the production of ceramic coating. The raw materials were characterized by both x-ray fluorescence and diffraction. The powder residue added to clay in the percentage of 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% (measured in weight) was compressed by a uniaxial pressing of 30MPa and the sintering temperatures were 900°, 1000° and 1100°. The samples were analysed in relation to flexural strength, bulk density, water absorption and linear shrinkage. The microstructural variation was also analysed by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The results showed that there is a viability for the production of porcelain ceramic coating (A3 and A4 formulations) and stoneware (A2 formulation) according to the specification of technical standards. author)

  15. Effects of thermal processing on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detection of milk residues in a model food matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Melanie L; Taylor, Steve L

    2010-09-22

    Food products and ingredients are frequently tested for the presence of undeclared allergenic food residues (including milk) using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). However, little is understood about the efficacy of these kits with thermally processed foods. This study evaluated the performance of three milk ELISA kits with a model food processed by several methods. A model food (pastry dough squares) was spiked with nonfat dry milk at several concentrations. The pastry squares were processed by boiling (100 °C for 2 min), baking (190 °C for 30 min), frying (190 °C for 2 min), and retorting (121 °C for 20 min with 17 psi overpressure). Samples were analyzed with three commercial ELISA kits: Neogen Veratox Total Milk, ELISA Systems β-lactoglobulin, and ELISA Systems casein. The detection of milk residues depended upon the type of processing applied to the food and the specific milk analyte targeted by the ELISA kit. Poor recoveries were obtained in all processed samples (2-10% of expected values) using the β-lactoglobulin kit. Better recoveries were obtained in boiled samples (44 and 59%, respectively) using the total milk and casein kits. However, these kits performed poorly with baked (9 and 21%) and fried (7 and 18%) samples. Moderate recoveries were observed in retorted samples (23 and 28%). The decreased detection in processed samples is likely due to protein modifications, including aggregation and Maillard reactions, which affect the solubility and immunoreactivity of the antigens detected by the ELISA methods. The observed decreases in ELISA detection of milk are dramatic enough to affect risk-assessment decisions. However, a lower detection of milk residues does not necessarily indicate decreased allergenicity. These ELISA kits are not acceptable for all applications, and users should understand the strengths and limitations of each method.

  16. Phase transitions and glass transition in a hyperquenched silica–alumina glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.F.; Zhao, D.H.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate phase transitions, glass transition, and dynamic behavior in the hyperquenched 69SiO2–31Al2O3 (mol%) glass (SA glass). Upon reheating, the SA glass exhibits a series of thermal responses. Subsequent to the sub-Tg enthalpy release, the glass undergoes a large jump in isobaric heat...... capacity (ΔCp) during glass transition, implying the fragile nature of the SA glass. The mullite starts to form before the end of glass transition, indicating that the SA glass is extremely unstable against crystallization. After the mullite formation, the remaining glass phase exhibits an increased Tg...... and a suppressed ΔCp. The formation of cristobalite at 1553 K indicates the dominance of silica in the remaining glass matrix. The cristobalite gradually re-melts as the isothermal heat-treatment temperature is raised from 1823 to 1853 K, which is well below the melting point of cristobalite, while the amount...

  17. Fluorescence imaging of sample zone narrowing and dispersion in a glass microchip: the effects of organic solvent (acetonitrile)-salt mixtures in the sample matrix and surfactant micelles in the running buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhijian; Lee, Yi-kuen; Fang, Qun; Huie, Carmen W

    2006-03-01

    A mismatch in the EOF velocities between the sample zone and running buffer region is known to generate pressure-driven, parabolic flow profile of the sample plug in electrokinetic separation systems. In the present study, video fluorescence microscopy was employed to capture real-time dynamics of the sample plug (containing fluorescein as the probe molecule) in a discontinuous conductivity system within a glass microchip, in which the sample matrix consisted of a mixture of ACN and salt (NaCl), and the running buffer contained sodium cholate (SC) micelles as the pseudo-stationary phase (i.e., performing "ACN stacking" in the mode of MEKC). Upon application of the separation voltage, the video images revealed that zone narrowing and broadening of the probe molecules occurred as the sample plug headed toward the cathode during the initial time period, probably resulting in part from the stacking/sweeping, and destacking of the SC micelles at the boundaries between the sample zone and running buffer. Interestingly, a second sample zone narrowing event can be observed as the sample plug moved further toward the cathode, which could be attributed to the sweeping of the slower moving probe molecules by the faster moving SC micelles that originated from the anode. This phenomenon was studied as a function of pH, sample plug length, as well as the concentration of organic solvent and salt in the sample matrix. The data suggested that the presence of large amounts of an organic solvent (such as ACN or methanol) and salts in the sample matrix not only induces sample dispersion due to the formation of a pressure-driven (hydrodynamic) flow, but may also lead to the formation of a double sample zone narrowing phenomenon by altering the local EOF dynamics within the separation system.

  18. Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te ultrasmall quantum dots growth in a silicate glass matrix by the fusion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Lima Fernandes, Guilherme de; Almeida Silva, Anielle Christine [Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38408-100 Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo; Gómez, Jorge Antônio [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, 14040-901 Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-29

    In this study, we synthesized Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te ultrasmall quantum dots (USQDs) in SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass system using the fusion method. Growth of these Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te USQDs was confirmed by optical absorption, atomic force microscopy (AFM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. The blueshift of absorption transition with increasing manganese concentration gives evidence of incorporation of manganese ions (Mn{sup 2+}) in CdTe USQDs. AFM, TEM, and MFM confirmed, respectively, the formation of high quality Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te USQDs with uniformly distributed size and magnetic phases. Furthermore, EPR spectra showed six lines associated to the S = 5/2 spin half-filled d-state, characteristic of Mn{sup 2+}, and confirmed that Mn{sup 2+} are located in the sites core and surface of the CdTe USQD. Therefore, synthesis of high quality Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te USQDs may allow the control of optical and magnetic properties.

  19. Behaviour of E-glass fibre reinforced vinylester resin composites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India. Abstract. ... Impact fatigue; static fatigue; residual stress; E-glass fibre; vinylester resin. 1. ... The present work ..... American Society for Testing and Materials) 497 p. 311.

  20. Analysis of glass fibre sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer composites are widely used for industrial and engineering applications which include construction, aerospace, automotive and wind energy industry. During the manufacturing glass fibres, they are surface-treated with an aqueous solution. This process and the treated...... surfaces are called sizing. The sizing influences the properties of the interface between fibres and a matrix, and subsequently affects mechanical properties of composites. In this work the sizing of commercially available glass fibres was analysed so as to study the composition and chemical structures....... Soxhlet extraction was used to extract components of the sizing from the glass fibres. The glass fibres, their extracts and coated glass plates were analysed by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis combined with a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS), and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR...

  1. Glass consistency and glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Glass produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will have to consistently be more durable than a benchmark glass (evaluated using a short-term leach test), with high confidence. The DWPF has developed a Glass Product Control Program to comply with this specification. However, it is not clear what relevance product consistency has on long-term glass performance. In this report, the authors show that DWPF glass, produced in compliance with this specification, can be expected to effectively limit the release of soluble radionuclides to natural environments. However, the release of insoluble radionuclides to the environment will be limited by their solubility, and not glass durability

  2. Quantifying Silica Reactivity in Subsurface Environments: Reaction Affinity and Solute Matrix Controls on Quartz and SiO2 Glass Dissolution Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, Patricia M.

    2000-01-01

    During the three years of this project, Professor Dove's laboratory made tremendous progress in understanding controls on amorphous silica dissolution kinetics in aqueous solutions. Our findings have already received considerable attention. In hydrothermal and low temperature studies, the work focused on determining quantitative and mechanistic controls on the most abundant silica polymorphs in Earth environments--quartz and amorphous silica. Our studies achieved goals set forth in the original proposal to establish a new quantitative understanding of amorphous silica dissolution. This support has resulted in 10 journal, 12 abstracts and 2 thesis publications. The PI and students were also recognized with 6 awards during this period. The 1998 EMSP conference in Chicago was an important meeting for our project. The symposium, enabled P.I. Dove to establish valuable contacts with ''users'' having specific needs for the findings of our EMSP project related to the urgency of problems in the Tanks Focus Area (TFA). Since that time, our working relations developed as Dove interacted with TFA scientists and engineers on the problems of waste glass properties. These interactions refined our experimental objectives to better meet their needs. Dove presented the results of EMSP research findings to a TFA subgroup at a Product Acceptance Workshop held in Salt Lake City during December 1998. The travel costs to attend this unanticipated opportunity were paid from EMSP project funds. In January 2000, Dove also attended a similar meeting in Atlanta with PNNL, SRL and BNF scientists/engineers to discuss new issues and make another level of decisions on the Product Acceptance goals. Our EMSP-funded research interfaced very well with the ongoing studies of Dr. Pete McGrail and colleagues in the Applied Geochemistry Group at PNNL. The value of our work to ''users'' was further demonstrated when Dove's EMSP-funded Postdoc, Dr. Jonathan Icenhower was hired by the same PNNL group. With

  3. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  4. Conditioning of high activity solid waste: fuel claddings and dissolution residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reports on experimental studies of embedding into matrix material, the melting and conversion of zircaloy, and waste properties and characterization. Methods are developed for embedding the waste scrap into a solid and resistant matrix material in order to confine the radioactivity and to prevent it from dispersion. The matrix materials investigated are lead alloys, ceramics and compacted graphite or aluminium powder. The treatment of fuel hulls by melting or chemical conversion is described. Cemented hulls are characterized and the pyrophoricity of zircaloy fines is investigated. Topics considered include the embedding of hulls into graphite and aluminium, the embedding of hulls and dissolution residues into alumino-ceramics, the solidification of alpha-bearing wastes into a ceramic matrix, and the conditioning of cladding waste by eutectoidic melting and by embedding in glass

  5. Matrix Effect Evaluation and Method Validation of Azoxystrobin and Difenoconazole Residues in Red Flesh Dragon Fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) Matrices Using QuEChERS Sample Preparation Methods Followed by LC-MS/MS Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noegrohati, Sri; Hernadi, Elan; Asviastuti, Syanti

    2018-03-30

    Production of red flesh dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) was hampered by Colletotrichum sp. Pre-harvest application of azoxystrobin and difenoconazole mixture is recommended, therefore, a selective and sensitive multi residues analytical method is required in monitoring and evaluating the commodity's safety. LC-MS/MS is a well-established analytical technique for qualitative and quantitative determination in complex matrices. However, this method is hurdled by co-eluted coextractives interferences. This work evaluated the pH effect of acetate buffered and citrate buffered QuEChERS sample preparation in their effectiveness of matrix effect reduction. Citrate buffered QuEChERS proved to produce clean final extract with relative matrix effect 0.4%-0.7%. Method validation of the selected sample preparation followed by LC-MS/MS for whole dragon fruit, flesh and peel matrices fortified at 0.005, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 g/g showed recoveries 75%-119%, intermediate repeatability 2%-14%. The expanded uncertainties were 7%-48%. Based on the international acceptance criteria, this method is valid.

  6. Production of three-dimensional quantum dot lattice of Ge/Si core-shell quantum dots and Si/Ge layers in an alumina glass matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljan, M; Radić, N; Sancho-Paramon, J; Janicki, V; Grenzer, J; Bogdanović-Radović, I; Siketić, Z; Ivanda, M; Utrobičić, A; Hübner, R; Weidauer, R; Valeš, V; Endres, J; Car, T; Jerčinović, M; Roško, J; Bernstorff, S; Holy, V

    2015-02-13

    We report on the formation of Ge/Si quantum dots with core/shell structure that are arranged in a three-dimensional body centered tetragonal quantum dot lattice in an amorphous alumina matrix. The material is prepared by magnetron sputtering deposition of Al2O3/Ge/Si multilayer. The inversion of Ge and Si in the deposition sequence results in the formation of thin Si/Ge layers instead of the dots. Both materials show an atomically sharp interface between the Ge and Si parts of the dots and layers. They have an amorphous internal structure that can be crystallized by an annealing treatment. The light absorption properties of these complex materials are significantly different compared to films that form quantum dot lattices of the pure Ge, Si or a solid solution of GeSi. They show a strong narrow absorption peak that characterizes a type II confinement in accordance with theoretical predictions. The prepared materials are promising for application in quantum dot solar cells.

  7. Clean-up of aqueous acetone vegetable extracts by solid-matrix partition for pyrethroid residue determination by gas chromatography-electron-capture detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muccio, A; Barbini, D A; Generali, T; Pelosi, P; Ausili, A; Vergori, F; Camoni, I

    1997-03-21

    Disposable, ready-to-use cartridges filled with macroporous diatomaceous material are used to carry out a partition clean-up that, in a single step, is capable of transferring pesticide residues from aqueous acetone extracts into light petroleum-dichloromethane (75:25, v/v). This procedure takes the place of some functions (such as separatory-funnel partition, drying over anhydrous sodium sulphate and partial adsorption clean-up) usually performed by separate steps in classical schemes. Fourteen pyrethroid pesticides, including tefluthrin, tetramethrin, cyphenothrin, cyfluthrin, flucythrinate, tau-fluvalinate, deltamethrin, bioallethrin, fenpropathrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, permethrin, alpha-cypermethrin, esfenvalerate and tralomethrin were determined using the described procedure with satisfactory recoveries for most of them, at spiking levels ranging from 0.08 to 0.82 mg/kg for the different compounds. Crops subjected to the described procedure included strawberry, apple, and orange gave extracts containing a mass of co-extractives that was between 5 and 30 mg. Compared with classical schemes, the described procedure is simple, less labour intensive, allows parallel handling of several extracts and does not require the preparation and maintenance of equipment. Troublesome emulsions such as those frequently observed in separation funnel partitioning do not occur.

  8. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  9. Glasses obtained from industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Oliveira Fillho, J.; Uggioni, E.; Bernardin, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the vitrification mechanism as an inertization method for industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals. Ashes from coal (thermoelectric), wastes from mining (fluorite and feldspar) and plating residue were used to compose vitreous systems planed by mixture design. The chemical composition of the wastes was determined by XRF and the formulations were melted at 1450 deg C for 2h using 10%wt of CaCO 3 (fluxing agent). The glasses were poured into a mold and annealed (600 deg C). The characteristic temperatures were determined by thermal analysis (DTA, air, 20 deg C/min) and the mechanical behavior by Vickers microhardness. As a result, the melting temperature is strongly dependent on silica content of each glass, and the fluorite residue, being composed mainly by silica, strongly affects Tm. The microhardness of all glasses is mainly affected by the plating residue due to the high iron and zinc content of this waste. (author)

  10. Wear rate optimization of Al/SiCnp/e-glass fibre hybrid metal matrix composites using Taguchi method and genetic algorithm and development of wear model using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongale, Arunkumar M.; Kumar, Satish; Sachit, T. S.; Jadhav, Priya

    2018-03-01

    Studies on wear properties of Aluminium based hybrid nano composite materials, processed through powder metallurgy technique, are reported in the present study. Silicon Carbide nano particles and E-glass fibre are reinforced in pure aluminium matrix to fabricate hybrid nano composite material samples. Pin-on-Disc wear testing equipment is used to evaluate dry sliding wear properties of the composite samples. The tests were conducted following the Taguchi’s Design of Experiments method. Signal-to-Noise ratio analysis and Analysis of Variance are carried out on the test data to find out the influence of test parameters on the wear rate. Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis and Energy Dispersive x-ray analysis are conducted on the worn surfaces to find out the wear mechanisms responsible for wear of the composites. Multiple linear regression analysis and Genetic Algorithm techniques are employed for optimization of wear test parameters to yield minimum wear of the composite samples. Finally, a wear model is built by the application of Artificial Neural Networks to predict the wear rate of the composite material, under different testing conditions. The predicted values of wear rate are found to be very close to the experimental values with a deviation in the range of 0.15% to 8.09%.

  11. Modelling glass alteration in an altered argillaceous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bildstein, O.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Jullien, M.

    2007-01-01

    The long term behaviour of materials such as glass, steel and clay has been investigated in the context of deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes. The interactions between vitrified wastes, canister corrosion products (CPs) and clay are studied using a modified version of the reaction-transport code Crunch, especially looking at pH changes and possible cementation at the interface with the clayey materials. These perturbations may indeed affect the lifetime of glass matrix in deep repositories, e.g., high pH enhances the rate of glass alteration. This work focuses on the argillite of Bure. The calculations were performed at 323 K with a glass alteration rate switching from a high initial rate to a residual rate according to the sorption capacity of CPs. The time at which this sorption capacity is saturated is crucial to the system in terms of wastes package lifetime. The results show that the glass alteration imposes a high pH value at the interface with CPs and clay: up to a value of 9.2, compared to 7.3 which is the initial pH value in the argillite. Experimental data show that the rate of glass alteration is much higher in such pH conditions. For a R7T7-type glass, the rate is about five times higher at pH 9 than at pH 7. This pH perturbation migrates through the clayey domain as a result of the migration of mobile elements such as boron and sodium, and despite the existence of strong pH buffers in the argillite. The cementation of porosity at the interface between glass and clay is predicted by the model due to the massive precipitation of iron corrosion products and glass alteration products. At this point of the evolution of the system, the pH starts to decrease and the alteration rate of the glass could be significantly reduced. This porosity clogging effect is difficult to confirm by experiments especially since existing data on short term experiments tend to show a pervasive precipitation of silica in the domain instead of a localized precipitation

  12. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  13. Helium behaviour in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fares, T.

    2011-01-01

    The present thesis focuses on the study of helium behavior in R7T7 nuclear waste glass. Helium is generated by the minor actinides alpha decays incorporated in the glass matrix. Therefore, four types of materials were used in this work. These are non radioactive R7T7 glasses saturated with helium under pressure, glasses implanted with 3 He + ions, glasses doped with curium and glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor. The study of helium solubility in saturated R7T7 glass has shown that helium atoms are inserted in the glass free volume. The results yielded a solubility of about 10 16 at. cm -3 atm. -1 . The incorporation limit of helium in this type of glass has been determined; its value amounted to about 2*10 21 at. cm -3 , corresponding to 2.5 at.%. Diffusion studies have shown that the helium migration is controlled by the single population dissolved in the glass free volume. An ideal diffusion model was used to simulate the helium release data which allowed to determine diffusion coefficients obeying to the following Arrhenius law: D = D 0 exp(-E a /kBT), where D 0 = 2.2*10 -2 and 5.4*10 -3 cm 2 s -1 and E a = 0.61 eV for the helium saturated and the curium doped glass respectively. These results reflect a thermally activated diffusion mechanism which seems to be not influenced by the glass radiation damage and helium concentrations studied in the present work (up to 8*10 19 at. g -1 , corresponding to 0.1 at.%). Characterizations of the macroscopic, structural and microstructural properties of glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor did not reveal any impact associated with the presence of helium at high concentrations. The observed modifications i.e. a swelling of 0.7 %, a decrease in hardness by 38 %, an increase between 8 and 34 % of the fracture toughness and a stabilization of the glass structure under irradiation, were attributed to the glass nuclear damage induced by the irradiation in reactor. Characterizations by SEM and TEM of R7T7 glasses implanted

  14. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  15. Feasibility Study for Preparation and Use of Glass Grains as an Alternative to Glass Nodules for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonavane, M S; Mishra, P.K., E-mail: maheshss@barc.gov.in [Nuclear Recycle Board, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mandal, S; Barik, S; Roy Chowdhury, A; Sen, R [Central Glass and Ceramic Institute, Kolkata (India)

    2012-10-15

    High level nuclear liquid waste (HLW) is immobilized using borosilicate glass matrix. Presently joule heated ceramic melter is being employed for vitrification of HLW in India. Preformed nodules of base glass are fed to melter along with liquid waste in predetermined ratio. In order to reduce the cost incurred for production of glass nodules of base glass, an alternative option of using glass grains was evaluated for its preparation and its suitability for the melter operation. (author)

  16. Feasibility Study for Preparation and Use of Glass Grains as an Alternative to Glass Nodules for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonavane, M.S.; Mishra, P.K.; Mandal, S.; Barik, S.; Roy Chowdhury, A.; Sen, R.

    2012-01-01

    High level nuclear liquid waste (HLW) is immobilized using borosilicate glass matrix. Presently joule heated ceramic melter is being employed for vitrification of HLW in India. Preformed nodules of base glass are fed to melter along with liquid waste in predetermined ratio. In order to reduce the cost incurred for production of glass nodules of base glass, an alternative option of using glass grains was evaluated for its preparation and its suitability for the melter operation. (author)

  17. Ceramics and glasses for radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, G.

    1984-06-01

    Borosilicate glasses are mainly choosen for the confinement of fission products; industrial plants are either in operation (AVM) or in construction. Studies of ceramics as a matrix haven't received real application [fr

  18. Oxidation behaviour of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Bin

    2011-01-01

    The Zr-based bulk metallic glasses, developed since the late 1980's, have very interesting mechanical properties, which can be considered for many applications including working under oxidizing atmosphere conditions at high temperatures. It is therefore interesting to study their oxidation resistance and to characterize the oxide scale formed on alloys surface. The fundamental objective of this thesis is to enhance the understanding of the role of various thermodynamic and chemistry parameters on the oxidation behaviour of the Zr-based bulk metallic glasses at high temperature under dry air, to determine the residual stresses in the oxide layer, in comparison with their crystalline alloys with the same chemical composition after an annealing treatment. The oxidation kinetics of these glasses and the crystalline structure of oxide scale ZrO 2 depend on the temperature and the oxidation duration: for short periods of oxidation or at a temperature below Tg, the kinetics follows a parabolic law, whereas, if the sample is oxidized at T ≥ Tg, the kinetics can be divided into two parts. The crystalline counterparts are oxidized by a parabolic rule whatever the temperature; for long oxidation duration at a temperature close to Tg, the kinetics becomes more complex because of the crystallisation of the glasses during the oxidation tests. Also the crystalline structure of the oxide layers depends on the oxidation temperature: the oxide layer consists only in tetragonal Zirconia at T ≤ Tg, while monoclinic Zirconia was formed at higher temperature. The mechanism of the formation of the oxide scale is due to both the interior diffusion of Oxygen ions and the external diffusion of Zirconium ions. However the diffusion of Zirconium ions slows gradually during the crystallisation process of the glass matrix. When the crystallisation is completed, the formation of Zirconia is controlled by only the internal diffusion of oxygen ions. The corresponding residual stresses

  19. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  20. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  1. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  2. Immobilization of radioactive waste in glass matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    A promising process for long-term management of high-level radioactive waste is to immobilize the waste in a borosilicate glass matrix. Among the most important criteria characterizing the integrity of the large-scale glass-waste forms are that they possess good chemical stability (including low leachability), thermal stability, mechanical integrity, and high radiation stability. Fulfillment of these criteria ensures the maximum margin of safety of glass-waste products, following solidification, handling, transportation, and long-term storage

  3. Crack tip fracture toughness of base glasses for dental restoration glass-ceramics using crack opening displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deubener, J; Höland, M; Höland, W; Janakiraman, N; Rheinberger, V M

    2011-10-01

    The critical stress intensity factor, also known as the crack tip toughness K(tip), was determined for three base glasses, which are used in the manufacture of glass-ceramics. The glasses included the base glass for a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, the base glass for a fluoroapatite glass-ceramic and the base glass for a leucite glass-ceramic. These glass-ceramic are extensively used in the form of biomaterials in restorative dental medicine. The crack tip toughness was established by using crack opening displacement profiles under experimental conditions. The crack was produced by Vickers indentation. The crack tip toughness parameters determined for the three glass-ceramics differed quite significantly. The crack tip parameters of the lithium disilicate base glass and the leucite base glass were higher than that of the fluoroapatite base glass. This last material showed glass-in-glass phase separation. The discussion of the results clearly shows that the droplet glass phase is softer than the glass matrix. Therefore, the authors conclude that a direct relationship exists between the chemical nature of the glasses and the crack tip parameter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Caracterização da matriz orgânica de resíduos de origens diversificadas Characterization of the organic matrix of residues from different origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leônidas Carrijo Azevedo Melo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Vários fatores controlam a velocidade de decomposição e a liberação de nutrientes por resíduos orgânicos. Dentre esses fatores, destacam-se o grau de humificação e a natureza química dos resíduos. Com este trabalho, objetivou-se caracterizar a matriz orgânica de amostras de lodo de esgoto, estercos de galinha, suíno, codorna e bovino, além de composto, substrato orgânico e material húmico comerciais. Analisaram-se o pH, condutividade elétrica (CE, capacidade de troca de cátions (CTC, capacidade de retenção de água (CRA, teores de N total e N-mineral, matéria orgânica, carbono orgânico total (COT e as frações de COT: C-fração ácido húmico (C-FAH, C-fração ácido fúlvico (C-FAF, C solúvel em água (CSA, C lábil e teor e diversidade de ácidos orgânicos de baixa massa molar (AOBMM. Quanto maior o teor de C-fração ácido húmico, mais elevada é a capacidade de adsorver cátions dos resíduos orgânicos. Considerando-se o índice de humificação (IH, a razão de humificação (RH e a CTC, e seus respectivos valores críticos (19 %, 28 % e 67 cmol c kg-1 para separar materiais decompostos daqueles suscetíveis à decomposição, os estercos de suíno, bovino, galinha e codorna, a amostra de composto e o lodo de esgoto 1 podem ser classificados como resíduos ainda não completamente humificados. O C lábil não foi adequado para predizer a biodisponibilidade dos resíduos avaliados. Os estercos de galinha e de codorna foram os materiais mais ricos em ácidos orgânicos de baixa massa molar.The humification degree and the chemical nature of organic residues are essential factors controlling their degradation and nutrient release. To characterize the organic matrix, samples of sewage sludge, poultry, pig, cattle and quail manure, besides commercial compost, organic substrate and humic material were analyzed for: pH, electric conductivity, cation exchange capacity (CEC, water retention capacity, concentration of

  5. Review of glass ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Glass ceramics are being considered for the immobilization of nuclear wastes to obtain a waste form with improved properties relative to glasses. Improved impact resistance, decreased thermal expansion, and increased leach resistance are possible. In addition to improved properties, the spontaneous devitrification exhibited in some waste-containing glasses can be avoided by the controlled crystallization after melting in the glass-ceramic process. The majority of the glass-ceramic development for nuclear wastes has been conducted at the Hahn-Meitner Institute (HMI) in Germany. Two of their products, a celsian-based (BaAl 3 Si 2 O 8 ) and a fresnoite-based (Ba 2 TiSi 2 O 8 ) glass ceramic, have been studied at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A basalt-based glass ceramic primarily containing diopsidic augite (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ) has been developed at PNL. This glass ceramic is of interest since it would be in near equilibrium with a basalt repository. Studies at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in Japan have favored a glass-ceramic product based upon diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ). Compositions, processing conditions, and product characterization of typical commercial and nuclear waste glass ceramics are discussed. In general, glass-ceramic waste forms can offer improved strength and decreased thermal expansion. Due to typcially large residual glass phases of up to 50%, there may be little improvement in leach resistance

  6. Thermoset composite recycling: Properties of recovered glass fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beauson, Justine; Fraisse, Anthony; Toncelli, C.

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of glass fiber thermoset polymer composite is a challenging topic and a process able to recover the glass fibers original properties in a limited cost is still under investigation. This paper focuses on the recycling technique separating the glass fiber from the matrix material. Four...

  7. The influence of glass composition on crystalline phase stability in glass-ceramic wasteforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddrell, Ewan; Thornber, Stephanie; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Crystalline phase formation shown to depend on glass matrix composition. • Zirconolite forms as the sole crystalline phase only for most aluminous glasses. • Thermodynamics indicate that low silica activity glasses stabilise zirconolite. - Abstract: Zirconolite glass-ceramic wasteforms were prepared using a suite of Na 2 O–Al 2 O 3 –B 2 O 3 –SiO 2 glass matrices with variable Al:B ratios. Zirconolite was the dominant crystalline phase only for the most alumina rich glass compositions. As the Al:B ratio decreased zirconolite was replaced by sphene, zircon and rutile. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate a silica activity in the glass melt below which zirconolite is the favoured crystalline phase. The concept of the crystalline reference state of glass melts is then utilised to provide a physical basis for why silica activity varies with the Al:B ratio

  8. GLASS BOX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curtis, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this effort were to develop Glass Box capabilities to allow for the capturing of analyst activities and the associated data resources, track and log the results of automated processing...

  9. A generic approach for expanding homolog-targeted residue screening of sulfonamides using a fast matrix separation and class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Chunlin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Guo Bin, E-mail: binnguo@126.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Wang Xiaoying [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Li Jie [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy and Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Zhu Weitao; Chen Bo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Ouyang Shan [Food Inspection and Quarantine Center, Shenzhen Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau of the People' s Republic of China, Shenzhen 518067 (China); Yao Shouzhuo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education of China), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2012-08-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generic homolog-targeted screening approach for multi-residual sulfonamide analogs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup for direct injection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Class-specific fragmentation for expanding coverage of N{sup 4}-acetyl and N-OH metabolites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PreS-IDA-EPI in LC-QqLIT for simultaneous screening and confirmation of real samples. - Abstract: A generic and efficient homolog-targeted approach was used to expand screening and detection of target class of sulfonamides and structural analogs, based on a fast single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup (SEP/MAC) for class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a liquid chromatography-hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LC-QqLIT). By combining the two-stage process conducted in a single tube as one-pot protocol, the straightforward SEP/MAC procedure was optimized to offer clean extracts with reasonable recovery (71-109% with RSDs < 20%) and decreased matrix interferences (-9 to 19%) of multiresidual sulfonamide extraction from different tissue samples. The novel use of neutral loss scan of 66 Da (NLS) or precursor ion scanning of m/z 108 (PreS) in positive ion mode was found to achieve more comprehensive coverage of protonated molecular ions of a wide array of sulfonamides including N{sup 4}-acetyl and hydroxylamine metabolites plus their possible dimers. Moreover, the PreS-triggered automatically enhanced product ion spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous screening, profiling and confirmation of an unlimited number of analytes belonging to the sulfonamide class within a single analysis. The validation and application results of the generic SEP/MAC-based LC-QqLIT strategy consistently demonstrated favorable performances with acceptable accuracy (67-116%), precision (RSDs < 25%), and sensitivity (LOQs {<=} 7.5 ng

  10. A generic approach for expanding homolog-targeted residue screening of sulfonamides using a fast matrix separation and class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chunlin; Guo Bin; Wang Xiaoying; Li Jie; Zhu Weitao; Chen Bo; Ouyang Shan; Yao Shouzhuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Generic homolog-targeted screening approach for multi-residual sulfonamide analogs. ► Single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup for direct injection. ► Class-specific fragmentation for expanding coverage of N 4 -acetyl and N-OH metabolites. ► PreS–IDA–EPI in LC–QqLIT for simultaneous screening and confirmation of real samples. - Abstract: A generic and efficient homolog-targeted approach was used to expand screening and detection of target class of sulfonamides and structural analogs, based on a fast single-tube extraction/partitioning-multifunction adsorption cleanup (SEP/MAC) for class-specific fragmentation-dependent acquisition with a liquid chromatography–hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LC–QqLIT). By combining the two-stage process conducted in a single tube as one-pot protocol, the straightforward SEP/MAC procedure was optimized to offer clean extracts with reasonable recovery (71–109% with RSDs 4 -acetyl and hydroxylamine metabolites plus their possible dimers. Moreover, the PreS-triggered automatically enhanced product ion spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous screening, profiling and confirmation of an unlimited number of analytes belonging to the sulfonamide class within a single analysis. The validation and application results of the generic SEP/MAC-based LC–QqLIT strategy consistently demonstrated favorable performances with acceptable accuracy (67–116%), precision (RSDs −1 ) to meet the acceptance criteria for all the sulfonamide–tissue combinations. Thus, the integration of the matrix-independent SEP/MAC procedure and the multiparameter matching algorithm with the unit-resolution LC–QqLIT instrument can serve as a valuable semi-targeted discovery strategy for rapid screening and reliable quantitative/confirmatory analysis of real samples.

  11. Nanoporous Glasses for Nuclear Waste Containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Woignier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research is in progress to incorporate nuclear waste in new matrices with high structural stability, resistance to thermal shock, and high chemical durability. Interactions with water are important for materials used as a containment matrix for the radio nuclides. It is indispensable to improve their chemical durability to limit the possible release of radioactive chemical species, if the glass structure is attacked by corrosion. By associating high structural stability and high chemical durability, silica glass optimizes the properties of a suitable host matrix. According to an easy sintering stage, nanoporous glasses such as xerogels, aerogels, and composite gels are alternative ways to synthesize silica glass at relatively low temperatures (≈1,000–1,200°C. Nuclear wastes exist as aqueous salt solutions and we propose using the open pore structure of the nanoporous glass to enable migration of the solution throughout the solid volume. The loaded material is then sintered, thereby trapping the radioactive chemical species. The structure of the sintered materials (glass ceramics is that of nanocomposites: actinide phases (~100 nm embedded in a vitreous silica matrix. Our results showed a large improvement in the chemical durability of glass ceramic over conventional nuclear glass.

  12. Basaltic glass alteration in confined media: analogy with nuclear glass in geological disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parruzot, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation concerns basaltic glass alteration mechanisms and rates. Through a better understanding of the processes controlling the basaltic glass durability, this thesis attempts to establish a link between laboratory studies and volcanic glass alteration in natural environment. The methodology used here is similar to the one used for nuclear glasses. Thus, we measured for the first time the residual alteration rate of basaltic glasses. Protective effect of the alteration film is clearly established. Moreover, synthetic glass representativeness is evaluated through a study focused on the effect of iron oxidation degree on the glass structure and leaching properties. A minor effect of Fe II on the forward rate and a negligible effect on the residual rate are shown. The residual rate is extrapolated at 5 C and compared to the mean alteration rate of natural samples of ages ranging from 1900 to 10 7 years. Non-zeolitized natural glasses follow this linear tendency, suggesting a control of the long-term rate by clayey secondary phase precipitation. Natural environments are open environments: a parametric study was performed in order to quantify the water flow rate effect on chemical composition of the alteration layer. When applied to two natural samples, the obtained laws provide coherent results. It seems possible to unify the descriptive approach from the study of natural environments to the mechanistic approach developed at the laboratory. The next step will consist in developing a model to transpose these results to nuclear glasses. (author) [fr

  13. Radiation-induced transmission spectral variations of Ce3+-doped heavy germanate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yunxia; Baccaro, S.; Cecilia, A.; Rao Jinhua; Zhang Junbiao; Xia Fang; Chen Guorong

    2005-01-01

    Radiation-induced transmission spectral variations of Ce 3+ -doped heavy germanate glasses used as scintillating materials are presented. Glass matrix contains mainly GeO 2 , BaO and Gd 2 O 3 with a density higher than 5 g/cm 3 . Glasses are melted in the different atmosphere. The transmission spectra of glasses before and after radiation treatments are measured and compared. Unlike exhibiting the monotonous deterioration effect on the glass matrix, radiation plays the radiation protection role, even making enhanced transmission of Ce 3+ -doped glasses, depending upon glass melting atmosphere and radiation dose. Radiation-induced reducing and oxidizing mechanism is proposed to explain phenomena

  14. Effect of alumina on the dissolution rate of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palavit, G.; Montagne, L.

    1997-01-01

    Small alumina addition to silicate glasses improves their chemical durability, but a large amount of alumina can also be beneficial to obtain a high dissolution rate. This paper describes the effect of Al 3+ on the early stage of glass alteration, in relation with its coordination in the glass and also with the reactions involved (hydrolysis and ionic exchange). We describe briefly nuclear magnetic resonance tools available to characterize the aluminum environments in the glasses. The rote of alumina on the dissolution rate of phosphate glasses is also discussed in order to show that the effect of Al 3+ is dependant upon the nature of the glass matrix. (author)

  15. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahotra, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The principal effect of unloading a material strained into the plastic range is to create a permanent set (plastic deformation), which if restricted somehow, gives rise to a system of self-balancing within the same member or reaction balanced by other members of the structure., known as residual stresses. These stresses stay there as locked-in stresses, in the body or a part of it in the absence of any external loading. Residual stresses are induced during hot-rolling and welding differential cooling, cold-forming and extruding: cold straightening and spot heating, fabrication and forced fitting of components constraining the structure to a particular geometry. The areas which cool more quickly develop residual compressive stresses, while the slower cooling areas develop residual tensile stresses, and a self-balancing or reaction balanced system of residual stresses is formed. The phenomenon of residual stresses is the most challenging in its application in surface modification techniques determining endurance mechanism against fracture and fatigue failures. This paper discusses the mechanism of residual stresses, that how the residual stresses are fanned and what their behavior is under the action of external forces. Such as in the case of a circular bar under limit torque, rectangular beam under limt moment, reclaiming of shafts welds and peening etc. (author)

  16. Glass compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, P W

    1985-05-30

    A fluoride glass for use in the production of optical fibres has an enhanced D/H ratio, preferably such that OD:OH is at least 9:1. In the example, such a glass is prepared by treating with D/sub 2/O a melt comprising 51.53 mole per cent ZrF/sub 4/, 20.47 mole per cent BaF/sub 2/, 5.27 mole per cent LaF/sub 3/, 3.24 mole per cent AlF/sub 3/, and 19.49 mole per cent LiF.

  17. Thermal recycling and re-manufacturing of glass fibre thermosetting composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fraisse, Anthony; Beauson, Justine; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    The impact of using thermally recycled glass fibre in re-manufactured composites was investigated. A unidirectional glass fibre thermosetting composite laminate was manufactured. The matrix in one part of the laminate was burnt off to recover the glass fibres. These recycled glass fibres were used...

  18. Acoustic study of nano-crystal embedded PbO–P2O5 glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. Glasses; acoustical properties; nanostructured materials; glass ceramic. 1. Introduction. During the last two decades, studies of different physical properties of nano-crystal embedded glass matrix have attracted attention of technologists as well as scientists for fabrication of glass ceramic through controlled crysta-.

  19. INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF ALUMINUM IMPACTS ON CRYSTALLIZATION IN U.S. HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, K; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P; James Marra, J

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this task was to develop glass formulations for (Department of Energy) DOE waste streams with high aluminum concentrations to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints. Liquidus temperatures and crystallization behavior were carefully characterized to support model development for higher waste loading glasses. The experimental work, characterization, and data interpretation necessary to meet these objectives were performed among three partnering laboratories: the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Projected glass compositional regions that bound anticipated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Hanford high level waste (HLW) glass regions of interest were developed and used to generate glass compositions of interest for meeting the objectives of this study. A thorough statistical analysis was employed to allow for a wide range of waste glass compositions to be examined while minimizing the number of glasses that had to be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. The glass compositions were divided into two sets, with 45 in the test matrix investigated by the U.S. laboratories and 30 in the test matrix investigated by KRI. Fabrication and characterization of the US and KRI-series glasses were generally handled separately. This report focuses mainly on the US-series glasses. Glasses were fabricated and characterized by SRNL and PNNL. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses and were generally iron oxides and spinels, which are not expected to impact durability of the glass. Nepheline was detected in five of the glasses after the CCC heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements for each of the glasses were conducted

  20. INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF ALUMINUM IMPACTS ON CRYSTALLIZATION IN U.S. HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P; James Marra, J

    2008-09-23

    The objective of this task was to develop glass formulations for (Department of Energy) DOE waste streams with high aluminum concentrations to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints. Liquidus temperatures and crystallization behavior were carefully characterized to support model development for higher waste loading glasses. The experimental work, characterization, and data interpretation necessary to meet these objectives were performed among three partnering laboratories: the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Projected glass compositional regions that bound anticipated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Hanford high level waste (HLW) glass regions of interest were developed and used to generate glass compositions of interest for meeting the objectives of this study. A thorough statistical analysis was employed to allow for a wide range of waste glass compositions to be examined while minimizing the number of glasses that had to be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. The glass compositions were divided into two sets, with 45 in the test matrix investigated by the U.S. laboratories and 30 in the test matrix investigated by KRI. Fabrication and characterization of the US and KRI-series glasses were generally handled separately. This report focuses mainly on the US-series glasses. Glasses were fabricated and characterized by SRNL and PNNL. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses and were generally iron oxides and spinels, which are not expected to impact durability of the glass. Nepheline was detected in five of the glasses after the CCC heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements for each of the glasses were conducted

  1. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.

    1978-01-01

    Residual stresses are stresses which exist in a material without the influence of external powers and moments. They come into existence when the volume of a material constantly changes its form as a consequence of mechanical, thermal, and/or chemical processes and is hindered by neighbouring volumes. Bodies with residual stress are in mechanical balance. These residual stresses can be manifested by means of all mechanical interventions disturbing this balance. Acoustical, optical, radiological, and magnetical methods involving material changes caused by residual stress can also serve for determining residual stress. Residual stresses have an ambivalent character. In technical practice, they are feared and liked at the same time. They cause trouble because they can be the cause for unexpected behaviour of construction elements. They are feared since they can cause failure, in the worst case with catastrophical consequences. They are appreciated, on the other hand, because, in many cases, they can contribute to improvements of the material behaviour under certain circumstances. But they are especially liked for their giving convenient and (this is most important) mostly uncontrollable explanations. For only in very few cases we have enough knowledge and possibilities for the objective evaluation of residual stresses. (orig.) [de

  2. Matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel N

    2003-01-01

    Mathematically rigorous introduction covers vector and matrix norms, the condition-number of a matrix, positive and irreducible matrices, much more. Only elementary algebra and calculus required. Includes problem-solving exercises. 1968 edition.

  3. Diffusion in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarak, A S

    1991-12-31

    Rutherford backscattering spectromertry technique (RBS) was used to characterize and investigate the depth distribution profiles of Ca-impurities of Ca-doped soda-time glass. The purposely added Ca-impurities were introduced inti the glass matrix by a normal ion exchange diffusion process. The measurements and analysis were performed using 2 MeV {sup 2}He{sup +} ions supplied from the University of Jordan Van de Graff acceierator (JOVAG). The normalized concetration versus depth profile distributions for the Ca-imourities were determined, both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical treatment was carried out by setting up and soiving the diffusion equation under the conditions of the experiment. The resulting profiles are characterized by a compiementary error function. the theoretical treeatment was extended to include the various methods of enhancing the diffusion process, e.g. using an electric field. The diffusion coefficient, assumed constant, of the Ca-impurities exchanged in the soda-lime glass was determined to be 1.23 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup 2}/s. A comparison between theoretically and experimentally determined profiles is made and commented at, where several conclusions are drawn and suggestions for future work are mentioned. (author). 38 refs., 21 figs., 10 Tabs.

  4. Visualization of residual organic liquid trapped in aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, S.H.; Wilson, J.L.; Mason, W.R.; Peplinski, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    Organic liquids that are essentially immiscible with water migrate through the subsurface under the influence of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. These liquids originate from the improper disposal of hazardous wastes, and the spills and leaks of petroleum hydrocarbons and solvents. The flow visualization experiments described in this study examined the migration of organic liquids through the saturated zone of aquifers, with a primary focus on the behavior of the residual organic liquid saturation, referring to that portion of the organic liquid that is trapped by capillary forces. Etched glass micromodels were used to visually observe dynamic multiphase displacement processes in pore networks. The resulting fluid distributions were photographed. Pore and blob casts were produced by a technique in which an organic liquid was solidified in place within a sand column at the conclusion of a displacement. The columns were sectioned and examined under optical and scanning electron microscopes. Photomicrographs of these sections show the morphology of the organic phase and its location within the sand matrix. The photographs from both experimental techniques reveal that in the saturated zone large amounts of residual organic liquid are trapped as isolated blobs of microscopic size. The size, shape, and spatial distribution of these blobs of residual organic liquid affect the dissolution of organic liquid into the water phase and the biotransformation of organic components. These processes are of concern for the prediction of pollution migration and the design of aquifer remediation schemes

  5. R7T7 glass alteration mechanism in an aqueous closed system: understanding and modelling the long term alteration kinetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chave, T.

    2007-10-01

    The long term alteration rate of the French R7T7 nuclear glass has been investigated since many years because it will define the overall resistance of the radionuclide containment matrix. Recent studies have shown that the final rate remains constant or is slightly decreasing with time. It never reaches zero. Though this residual rate is very low, only 5 nm per year at 50 C, it would be the dominant alteration phenomenon in a geological repository. Two mechanisms are suggested for explaining such behaviour: diffusion in solution of elements from glass through an amorphous altered layer and precipitation of neo-formed phases. The diffusion processes are in agreement with a solid state diffusion mechanism and can lead to secondary phase precipitation due to solution concentration increases. Observed phases are mainly phyllosilicates and zeolites, in specific conditions. Phyllosilicates are expected to maintain the residual kinetic rate whereas alteration resumption could be observed in presence of zeolites at very high pH or temperature (10.5 at 90 C or temperature above 150 C). Both diffusion and neo-formed phase precipitation have been investigated in order to better understand their impact on the residual alteration rate and have then been modelled by a calculation code, coupling chemistry and transport, in order to be able to better anticipate the long term behaviour of the glass R7T7 in an aqueous closed system. (author)

  6. Investigations on vanadium doped glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhusudana Rao, P.

    2013-01-01

    The glass samples studied in the present work have been prepared by melt quenching technique. They were prepared by mixing and grinding together by appropriate amounts of Li 2 O - Na 2 O - B 2 O 3 doped with V 2 O 5 in an agate motor before transferring into crucible. The mixtures were heated in an electric furnace at 1225K for 20 mm. The melt was then quenched to room temperature by pouring it on plane brass plate and pressing it with another brass plate. White and yellow coloured glasses have been obtained with good optical quality and high transparency. Finally the vitreous sample were annealed for 3 hrs at 423K to relieve residual internal stress and slowly cooled to room temperature. The polished glasses have been used for XRD, FTIR analysis and for DSC report. The DSC thermo grams for all the glasses were recorded on in the temperature range 50-550℃ with a heating rate of 10℃/min. Electron spin resonance and optical absorption of 20Li 2 O - 10 Na 2 O - (70-X)B 2 O 3 doped with XV 2 O 5 glass system are studied. ESR spectra of V 4+ ions doped in the glass exhibit peak at g =1.98. Spin Hamiltonian parameters are calculated. It was found that these parameters are dependent upon alkali ion concentration in the glass and the VO +2 ion in an octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression. The physical parameters of all glasses were also evaluated with respect to the composition

  7. Glass: Rotary Electric Glass Furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recca, L.

    1999-01-29

    Compared to conventional gas-fired furnaces, the new rotary electric furnace will increase energy efficiency while significantly reducing air emissions, product turnaround time, and labor costs. As this informative new fact sheet explains, the thousand different types of glass optical blanks produced for the photonics industry are used for lasers, telescopes, cameras, lights, and many other products.

  8. Heterogeneities in nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladirat, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    The industrial vitrification of high level radioactive wastes is a 2 stage process. During the first stage, the concentrated solution is heated in a spinning resistance oven at the temperature of 400 Celsius degrees till evaporation and calcination. The second stage begins when the dry residue falls into a melting pot that is maintained at a temperature of 1100-1150 Celsius degrees. Glass fretting is added and the glass is elaborated through the fusion of the different elements present in the melting pot. Heterogeneities in the glass may be associated to: - the presence in the solution to vitrify of insoluble elements from the dissolution of the fuel (RuO 2 , Rh, Pd), - the presence of minuscule metal scraps (Zr) that have been produced during the cutting of the fuel element, - the failures to conform to the technical specifications of the vitrification process, for instance, temperatures or flow rates when introducing the different elements in the melting pot. (A.C.)

  9. Glass as a gamma ray dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutrisno Puspodikoro.

    1978-01-01

    The advantages of glass as a γ-rays dosemeter are studied. Experiments have shown that ordinary microscope object glass can be used as a dosemeter, which dose range for linear response extends from about 10 4 -10 6 rads. Heat treatment of the irradiated samples accelerates the initial fading of coloration and stabilizes the residual optical density. On the other side cooling of them retards the initial fading. (author)

  10. Nitrate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  11. Preparation of fullerene/glass composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; McBranch, Duncan W.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; Love, Steven P.

    1995-01-01

    Synthesis of fullerene/glass composites. A direct method for preparing solid solutions of C.sub.60 in silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2) glass matrices by means of sol-gel chemistry is described. In order to produce highly concentrated fullerene-sol-gel-composites it is necessary to increase the solubility of these "guests" in a delivery solvent which is compatible with the starter sol (receiving solvent). Sonication results in aggregate disruption by treatment with high frequency sound waves, thereby accelerating the rate of hydrolysis of the alkoxide precursor, and the solution process for the C.sub.60. Depending upon the preparative procedure, C.sub.60 dispersed within the glass matrix as microcrystalline domains, or dispersed as true molecular solutions of C.sub.60 in a solid glass matrix, is generated by the present method.

  12. Physical and thermal behaviour of Sr-La-Al-B-Si based SOFC glass sealants as function of SrO content and B2O3/SiO2 ratio in the matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Prasanta Kumar; Rath, S. K.; Chongdar, T. K.; Gokhale, N. M.; Kulkarni, A. R.

    2011-05-01

    A series of SOFC glass sealants with composition SrO (x), La2O3 (15), Al2O3 (15), B2O3 (40 - x), and SiO2 (30) [x = 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30] (wt.%) [SLABS] are investigated for their structure property correlations at different compositions. Quantitative Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows structural rigidity with increasing SrO content, as demonstrate by an increase in the Si-O-Si/O-Si-O bending and B-O-B stretching frequencies. The role of SrO as a modifier dominates the control of the structure and behaviour of glasses compared with the effect of network formers, i.e., the B2O3/SiO2 ratio. Consequent to the structural changes, increasing substitution of B2O3 by SrO the glasses causes increases in the density, glass transition temperature and dilatometric softening point. On the other hand, the crystallization temperatures show a decreasing trend and the coefficient of thermal expansion increases with increase in substitution.

  13. Solidification process for sludge residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report investigates the solidification process used at 100-N Basin to solidify the N Basin sediment and assesses the N Basin process for application to the K Basin sludge residue material. This report also includes a discussion of a solidification process for stabilizing filters. The solidified matrix must be compatible with the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility acceptance criteria

  14. Impact of crystallization on the structure and chemical durability of borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoleau, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    This work describes a new approach to help understand the chemical durability of partially crystallized nuclear waste conditioning matrices. Among the studies carried out on nuclear waste deep geological disposal, long term behavior studies have so far been conducted on homogeneous glassy matrices. However, as the crystalline phases may generate modifications in the chemical composition and properties of such matrices, the description and a better understanding of their effects on the chemical durability of waste packages are of primary importance. A protocol to study the durability of heterogeneous model matrices of nuclear interest containing different types of crystalline phases was developed. It is based on a detailed description of the morphology, microstructure and structure of the glassy matrix and crystalline phases, and on the study of various alteration regimes. Three crystal phases that may form when higher concentrations of waste are immobilized in Uranium Oxide type conditioning glasses were studied: alkali and alkaline earth molybdates, rare earth silicates and ruthenium oxide. The results highlight the roles of the composition and the structure of the surrounding glassy matrix as the parameters piloting the alteration kinetics of the partially crystallized glassy matrices. This behavior is identical whatever the nature of the crystalline phases, as long as these phases do not lead to a composition gradient and do not percolate within the glassy matrix. Given these results, a methodology to study partially crystallized matrices with no composition gradient is then suggested. Its key development lies firstly in the evaluation of the behavior of partially crystallized matrices through the experimental study of the residual glassy matrix in various alteration regimes. This methodology may be adapted to the case of new glass formulations with more complex compositions (e.g. highly waste-loaded glass), which may contain crystals formed during cooling

  15. Expected behavior of HLW glass in storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    Glass produced by solidification of high-level radioactive liquid waste is studied. Conditions to which the waste form will be exposed in a typical handling sequence representative of current U. S. planning are tabulated. The reference matrix for waste form characterization is discussed, and some of the properties of high-level waste glass are described: physical properties, leachability, fracturing, vaporization, and containment in canister. 12 fig, 5 tables

  16. Solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, E.; Duin, P.J. van; Grootenboer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A summary is presented of the many investigations that have been done on solid residues of atmospheric fluid bed combustion (AFBC). These residues are bed ash, cyclone ash and bag filter ash. Physical and chemical properties are discussed and then the various uses of residues (in fillers, bricks, gravel, and for recovery of aluminium) are summarised. Toxicological properties of fly ash and stack ash are discussed as are risks of pneumoconiosis for workers handling fly ash, and contamination of water by ashes. On the basis of present information it is concluded that risks to public health from exposure to emissions of coal fly ash from AFBC appear small or negligible as are health risk to workers in the coal fly ash processing industry. 35 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs

  17. Glass microspheres for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzone, Samuel David

    Radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres have been developed as biodegradable radiation delivery vehicles for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Once injected into a diseased joint, the microspheres deliver a potent dose of radiation to the diseased tissue, while a non-uniform chemical reaction converts the glass into an amorphous, porous, hydrated dysprosium phosphate reaction product. The non-radioactive, lithium-borate component is dissolved from the glass (up to 94% weight loss), while the radioactive 165Dy reacts with phosphate anions in the body fluids, and becomes "chemically" trapped in a solid, dysprosium phosphate reaction product that has the same size as the un-reacted glass microsphere. Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA) chelation therapy can be used to dissolve the dysprosium phosphate reaction product after the radiation delivery has subsided. The dysprosium phosphate reaction product, which formed in vivo in the joint of a Sprague-Dawley rat, was dissolved by EDTA chelation therapy in 100 Gy) of localized beta radiation to a treatment site within the body, followed by complete biodegradability. The non-uniform reaction process is a desirable characteristic for a biodegradable radiation delivery vehicle, but it is also a novel material synthesis technique that can convert a glass to a highly porous materials with widely varying chemical composition by simple, low-temperature, glass/solution reaction. The reaction product formed by nonuniform reaction occupies the same volume as the un-reacted glass, and after drying for 1 h at 300°C, has a specific surface area of ≈200 m2/g, a pore size of ≈30 nm, and a nominal crushing strength of ≈10 MPa. Finally, rhenium glass microspheres, composed of micron-sized, metallic rhenium particles dispersed within a magnesium alumino borate glass matrix were produced by sintering ReO2 powder and glass frit at 1050°C. A 50 mg injection of radioactive rhenium glass

  18. Chemical reactivity of precursor materials during synthesis of glasses used for conditioning high-level radioactive waste: Experiments and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, A.

    2012-01-01

    The glass used to store high-level radioactive waste is produced by reaction of a solid waste residue and a glassy precursor (glass frit). The waste residue is first dried and calcined (to lose water and nitrogen respectively), then mixed with the glass frit to enable vitrification at high temperature. In order to obtain a good quality glass of constant composition upon cooling, the chemical reactions between the solid precursors must be complete while in the liquid state, to enable incorporation of the radioactive elements into the glassy matrix. The physical and chemical conditions during glass synthesis (e.g. temperature, relative proportions of frit and calcine, amount of radioactive charge) are typically empirically adjusted to obtain a satisfactory final product. The aim of this work is to provide new insights into the chemical and physical interactions that take place during vitrification and to provide data for a mathematical model that has been developed to simulate the chemical reactions. The consequences of the different chemical reactions that involve solid, liquid and gaseous phases are described (thermal effects, changes in crystal morphology and composition, variations in melt properties and structure). In a first series of experiments, a simplified analogue of the calcine (NaNO 3 -Al 2 O 3 ± MoO 3 /Nd 2 O 3 ) has been studied. In a second series of experiments, the simplified calcines have been reacted with a simplified glass frit (SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 ) at high temperature. The results show that crystallization of the calcine may take place before interaction with the glass frit, but that the reactivity with the glass at high temperature is a function of the nature and stoichiometry of the crystalline phases which form at low temperature. The results also highlight how the mixing of the starting materials, the physical properties of the frit (viscosity, glass transition temperature) and the Na 2 O/Al 2 O 3 of the calcine but also its

  19. Chemical durability and resistance to irradiation of LnYSiAlO (Ln=La or Ce) glasses, potential immobilization matrix of minor actinides; Durabilite chimique et comportement a l'irradiation des verres quaternaires LnYSiAlO (Ln = La ou Ce), matrice potentielle d'immobilisation d'actinides mineurs trivalents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavarini, St

    2002-11-01

    Rare earth aluminosilicate glasses are known for their interesting mechanical and optical properties. Recent studies have shown that their chemical durability was very good too, such they have the potential to be used in the nuclear industry for the specific immobilization of trivalent actinides. Initial dissolution rates of LaYSiAlO and CeYSiAlO were determined using a Soxhlet device (dynamic leaching). The differences linked to the nature of the rare earth element were studied by synthesizing analogous glasses that only differed in their rare earth element composition (%at.): Y-5%, La-5 %, Si-15%, Al-10% O-65%. The influence of pH on the dissolution mechanisms and kinetics was also studied by static leaching tests performed in dilute solutions of NaOH or HNO{sub 3}. Electronic defects and collision cascades, induced by a-disintegration of radioelements confined in storage matrix, can cause important modifications in the glass structure and, thus, influence its chemical durability. To simulate these effects, glass samples were irradiated with {beta} particles and heavy ions accelerated to 2,5 MeV and 200 keV, respectively. Monoliths were then leached in static bi-distilled water (pH{>=}{>=} 5.5) for one month in an autoclave heated to 90 degrees C. Initially, the structural changes caused by irradiation were determined using Raman, NMR and EPR spectroscopies. Ion {mu}-beams, SEM-EDS and XPS analysis were also performed to evaluate the potential modifications of the superficial composition. Finally, the leaching behavior was studied, for both irradiated and unirradiated samples, through solution and solid elementary characterization. (author)

  20. Development and characterization of basalt-glass ceramics for the immobilization of transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.; Chick, L.A.; Thomas, L.E.

    1982-09-01

    Basalt-based waste forms were developed for the immobilization of transuranic (TRU) contaminated wastes. The specific waste studied is a 3:1 blend of process sludge and incinerator ash. Various amounts of TRU blended waste were melted with Pomona basalt powder. The vitreous products were subjected to a variety of heat treatment conditions to form glass ceramics. The total crystallinity of the glass ceramic, ranging from 20 to 45 wt %, was moderately dependent on composition and heat treatment conditions. Three parent glasses and four glass ceramics with varied composition and heat treatment were produced for detailed phase characterization and leaching. Both parent glasses and glass ceramics were mainly composed of a continuous, glassy matrix phase. This glass matrix entered into solution during leaching in both types of materials. The Fe-Ti rich dispersed glass phase was not significantly degraded by leaching. The glass ceramics, however, exhibited four to ten times less elemental releases during leaching than the parent glasses. The glass ceramic matrix probably contains higher Fe and Na and lower Ca and Mg relative to the parent glass matrix. The crystallization of augite in the glass ceramics is believed to contribute to the improved leach rates. Leach rates of the basalt glass ceramic are compared to those of other TRU nuclear waste forms containing 239 Pu

  1. Glass transition, crystallization kinetics and pressure effect on crystallization of ZrNbCuNiBe bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, P.F.; Zhuang, Yanxin; Wang, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    The glass transition behavior and crystallization kinetics of Zr48Nb8Cu14Ni12Be18 bulk metallic glass have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The activation energies of both glass transition and crystallization events have been obtained using...... the Kissinger method. Results indicate that this glass crystallizes by a three-stage reaction: (1) phase separation and primary crystallization of glass, (2) formation of intermetallic compounds, and (3) decomposition of intermetallic compounds and crystallization of residual amorphous phase. The pressure...

  2. Preliminary characterization of glass fiber sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2013-01-01

    Glass fiber surfaces are treated with sizing during manufacturing. Sizing consists of several components, including a film former and a silane coupling agent that is important for adhesion between glass fibers and a matrix. Although the sizing highly affects the composite interface and thus...... the strength of the composites, little is known about the structure and chemistry of the sizing. A part of sizing was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The fibers were subsequently burned and some fibers were merely burned for analysis of glass fiber and sizing. The results showed that the analyzed fibers had...

  3. Glass Transition, Crystallization of Glass-Forming Melts, and Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürn W. P. Schmelzer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A critical analysis of possible (including some newly proposed definitions of the vitreous state and the glass transition is performed and an overview of kinetic criteria of vitrification is presented. On the basis of these results, recent controversial discussions on the possible values of the residual entropy of glasses are reviewed. Our conclusion is that the treatment of vitrification as a process of continuously breaking ergodicity with entropy loss and a residual entropy tending to zero in the limit of zero absolute temperature is in disagreement with the absolute majority of experimental and theoretical investigations of this process and the nature of the vitreous state. This conclusion is illustrated by model computations. In addition to the main conclusion derived from these computations, they are employed as a test for several suggestions concerning the behavior of thermodynamic coefficients in the glass transition range. Further, a brief review is given on possible ways of resolving the Kauzmann paradox and its implications with respect to the validity of the third law of thermodynamics. It is shown that neither in its primary formulations nor in its consequences does the Kauzmann paradox result in contradictions with any basic laws of nature. Such contradictions are excluded by either crystallization (not associated with a pseudospinodal as suggested by Kauzmann or a conventional (and not an ideal glass transition. Some further so far widely unexplored directions of research on the interplay between crystallization and glass transition are anticipated, in which entropy may play—beyond the topics widely discussed and reviewed here—a major role.

  4. Thermal stress effects in intermetallic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, P. K.; Sensmeier, M. D.; Kupperman, D. S.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    1993-01-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites develop residual stresses from the large thermal expansion mismatch (delta-alpha) between the fibers and matrix. This work was undertaken to: establish improved techniques to measure these thermal stresses in IMC's; determine residual stresses in a variety of IMC systems by experiments and modeling; and, determine the effect of residual stresses on selected mechanical properties of an IMC. X ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction (ND), synchrotron XRD (SXRD), and ultrasonics (US) techniques for measuring thermal stresses in IMC were examined and ND was selected as the most promising technique. ND was demonstrated on a variety of IMC systems encompassing Ti- and Ni-base matrices, SiC, W, and Al2O3 fibers, and different fiber fractions (Vf). Experimental results on these systems agreed with predictions of a concentric cylinder model. In SiC/Ti-base systems, little yielding was found and stresses were controlled primarily by delta-alpha and Vf. In Ni-base matrix systems, yield strength of the matrix and Vf controlled stress levels. The longitudinal residual stresses in SCS-6/Ti-24Al-llNb composite were modified by thermomechanical processing. Increasing residual stress decreased ultimate tensile strength in agreement with model predictions. Fiber pushout strength showed an unexpected inverse correlation with residual stress. In-plane shear yield strength showed no dependence on residual stress. Higher levels of residual tension led to higher fatigue crack growth rates, as suggested by matrix mean stress effects.

  5. Effect of Ba in the glass characteristics of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Asuvathraman, R.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive 137 Cs extracted from high level nuclear waste, when immobilized in a suitable matrix can be used as a γsource in medical industry. Iron phosphate glass (IPG) is one of a suitable matrix for the immobilization of 137 Cs prior to the immobilization of 137 Cs in IPG, it is essential to optimize the immobilization conditions using natural (inactive) cesium. Glass characteristics of inactive Cs loaded iron phosphate glasses were already explored in our earlier studies. However, the change in glass characteristics of 137 Cs loaded iron phosphate glass to 137 Ba loaded iron phosphate glass need to be studied before the immobilization of 137 Cs in iron phosphate glass as 137 Cs transforms to 137 Ba due to nuclear transmutation ( 137 Cs(β,γ) 137 Ba). This paper reports the studies on such a behaviour by incorporating inactive Ba in cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses. Cs and Ba loaded iron phosphate glasses were prepared by melt quench technique in air using appropriate amounts of Fe 2 O 3 , NH 4 H 2 PO 4 , Ba(OH) 2.8 H 2 O and Cs 2 CO 3 . The chemicals were added such that the glass formed possesses the batch composition of (a) 21.4 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -45 wt. % Cs 2 O-5 wt % BaO-P 2 O 5 (henceforth referred as IP50Cs45Ba5); (b) 21.4 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -25 wt. % Cs 2 O-25 wt % BaO-P 2 O5 (henceforth referred as IP50Cs25Ba25). The thermal expansion measurements were also carried out using a home-built quartz push-rod dilatometer. The data related to change in thermal expansion behaviour, glass forming ability, glass stability and structural changes in phosphate network due to the partial replacement of Cs with Ba will also be discussed. (author)

  6. P-matrix description of charged particles interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babenko, V.A.; Petrov, N.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper deals with formalism of the P-matrix description of two charged particles interaction. Separation in the explicit form of the background part corresponding to the purely Coulomb interaction in the P-matrix is proposed. Expressions for the purely Coulomb P-matrix, its poles, residues and purely Coulomb P-matrix approach eigenfunctions are obtained. (author). 12 refs

  7. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  8. Matrix calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Bodewig, E

    1959-01-01

    Matrix Calculus, Second Revised and Enlarged Edition focuses on systematic calculation with the building blocks of a matrix and rows and columns, shunning the use of individual elements. The publication first offers information on vectors, matrices, further applications, measures of the magnitude of a matrix, and forms. The text then examines eigenvalues and exact solutions, including the characteristic equation, eigenrows, extremum properties of the eigenvalues, bounds for the eigenvalues, elementary divisors, and bounds for the determinant. The text ponders on approximate solutions, as well

  9. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O'Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination

  10. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  11. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  12. A study of the local structure around Eu3+ ions in oxide glasses using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todoroki, S.; Hirao, K.; Soga, N.

    1993-01-01

    The local structure around Eu 3+ ions in several oxide glasses (silicate, germanate and borophosphate glasses) was investigated by using 151 Eu Moessbauer spectroscopy. It was found that the isomer shift (IS) of silicate and borophosphate glasses was independent of the sodium content, but that of germanate glasses was not. This means the first coordination sphere around Eu 3+ ions in silicate glasses is insensitive to the composition of the glass matrix. It is assumed that, regardless of the sodium content, Eu 3+ ions in silicate glasses attract a certain amount of nonbridging oxygen (NBO, Si-O direct difference ) when incorporated stably into silicate glass matrix, because NBO is the only species donating negative charge. For germanate glasses, the behavior of IS is considered to be related to the resence of GeO 6/2 octahedra. On the basis of experimental results, the coordination models of Eu 3+ in these systems are proposed. (orig.)

  13. ION EXCHANGE IN GLASS-CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Halsey Beall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years ion-exchange in glasses has found a renewed interest with a lot of new development and research in industrial and academic labs and the commercialization of materials with outstanding mechanical properties. These glasses are now widely used in many electronic devices including hand-held displays and tablets. The exchange is generally conducted in a bath of molten salt below the transition temperature of the glass. The exchange at the surface of an alkali ion by a bigger one brings compressive stress at the surface. The mechanical properties are dependent on the stress level at the surface and the depth of penetration of the bigger ion. As compared to glasses, glass-ceramics have the interest to display a wide range of aspects (transparent to opaque and different mechanical properties (especially higher modulus and toughness. There has been little research on ion-exchange in glass-ceramics. In these materials the mechanisms are much more complex than in glasses because of their polyphasic nature: ion-exchange generally takes place mostly in one phase (crystalline phase or residual glass. The mechanism can be similar to what is observed in glasses with the replacement of an ion by another in the structure. But in some cases this ion-exchange leads to microstructural modifications (for example amorphisation or phase change.This article reviews these ion-exchange mechanisms using several transparent and opaque alumino-silicate glass-ceramics as examples. The effect of the ion exchange in the various glass-ceramics will be described, with particular emphasis on flexural strength.

  14. Surface layer effects on waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.

    1993-01-01

    Water contact subjects waste glass to chemical attack that results in the formation of surface alteration layers. Two principal hypotheses have been advanced concerning the effect of surface alteration layers on continued glass corrosion: (1) they act as a mass transport barrier and (2) they influence the chemical affinity of the glass reaction. In general, transport barrier effects have been found to be less important than affinity effects in the corrosion of most high-level nuclear waste glasses. However, they can be important under some circumstances, for example, in a very alkaline solution, in leachants containing Mg ions, or under conditions where the matrix dissolution rate is very low. The latter suggests that physical barrier effect may affect the long-term glass dissolution rate. Surface layers influence glass reaction affinity through the effects of the altered glass and secondary phases on the solution chemistry. The reaction affinity may be controlled by various precipitates and crystalline phases, amorphous silica phases, gel layer, or all the components of the glass. The surface alteration layers influence radionuclide release mainly through colloid formation, crystalline phase incorporation, and gel layer retention. This paper reviews current understanding and uncertainties

  15. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  16. Leaching TC-99 from DWPF glass in simulated geologic repository groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose was to determine if DWPF glass in geologic groundwaters would immobilize Tc-99 as well as it does other elements. A previous study (using a borosilicate glass of a very different composition from DWPF glass) indicated that Tc-99 leached rapidly from the glass suggesting that glass may not be a good matrix for immobilizing Tc-99. It was suggested that the Tc-99 had migrated to vesicles in the glass while the glass was still molten. To determine if borosilicate glass was a good immobilizing matrix for Tc-99, this study was performed using DWPF glass. The leaching of Tc-99 was compared to other elements in the glass. It was shown that rapid leaching will not occur with SRP glass. The leach rate for Tc-99 was nearly identical to that for B, a matrix element in the glass. Another objective was to compare the release of Tc-99 under oxidizing and reducing conditions with other elements in the glass. In the tests described here, even though the glass was dissolving more under reducing conditions as a result of abnormally high pH values, less Tc-99 appeared in solution

  17. Development of new radiopaque glass fiber posts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the radiopacity and filler content of three experimental glass fiber posts (EGFP) in comparison with other glass/carbon fibers and metal posts from the dental market. Three EGFP were obtained by pultrusion of glass fibers in a polymer matrix based on 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)-phenyl]propane (bis-GMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Using intraoral sensor disks 27 posts, as well as mesiodistal sections of human molar and aluminum step wedges were radiographed for evaluation of radiopacity. The percentage compositions of fillers by weight and volume were investigated by combustion analysis. Two EGFP showed radiopacity higher than enamel. The commercial endodontic posts showed radiopacity as follows: higher than enamel, between enamel and dentin, and lower than dentin. The results showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) when evaluated with one-way ANOVA statistical analysis. According to combustion analyses, the filler content of the tested posts ranges between 58.84 wt.% and 86.02 wt.%. The filler content of the tested EGFP ranged between 68.91 wt.% and 79.04 wt.%. EGFP could be an alternative to commercial glass fiber posts. Future glass fiber posts are recommended to present higher radiopacity than dentin and perhaps ideally similar to or higher than that of enamel, for improved clinical detection. The posts with a lower radiopacity than dentin should be considered insufficiently radiopaque. The radiopacity of some glass fiber posts is not greatly influenced by the amount of filler. - Highlights: • AR glass fibers for dental applications • AR glass fibers have a great potential for obtaining radiopaque glass fiber posts. • Experimental AR glass fiber posts could be an alternative to commercial glass fiber posts for clinical application.

  18. Development of new radiopaque glass fiber posts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtos, Gabriel, E-mail: gfurtos@yahoo.co.uk [Raluca Ripan Institute of Research in Chemistry, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Baldea, Bogdan [Dep. of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Timisoara (Romania); Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Laura [Raluca Ripan Institute of Research in Chemistry, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the radiopacity and filler content of three experimental glass fiber posts (EGFP) in comparison with other glass/carbon fibers and metal posts from the dental market. Three EGFP were obtained by pultrusion of glass fibers in a polymer matrix based on 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)-phenyl]propane (bis-GMA) and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Using intraoral sensor disks 27 posts, as well as mesiodistal sections of human molar and aluminum step wedges were radiographed for evaluation of radiopacity. The percentage compositions of fillers by weight and volume were investigated by combustion analysis. Two EGFP showed radiopacity higher than enamel. The commercial endodontic posts showed radiopacity as follows: higher than enamel, between enamel and dentin, and lower than dentin. The results showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) when evaluated with one-way ANOVA statistical analysis. According to combustion analyses, the filler content of the tested posts ranges between 58.84 wt.% and 86.02 wt.%. The filler content of the tested EGFP ranged between 68.91 wt.% and 79.04 wt.%. EGFP could be an alternative to commercial glass fiber posts. Future glass fiber posts are recommended to present higher radiopacity than dentin and perhaps ideally similar to or higher than that of enamel, for improved clinical detection. The posts with a lower radiopacity than dentin should be considered insufficiently radiopaque. The radiopacity of some glass fiber posts is not greatly influenced by the amount of filler. - Highlights: • AR glass fibers for dental applications • AR glass fibers have a great potential for obtaining radiopaque glass fiber posts. • Experimental AR glass fiber posts could be an alternative to commercial glass fiber posts for clinical application.

  19. Utilization of recycled glass derived from cathode ray tube glass as fine aggregate in cement mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → A recycling/treatment process to remove lead on funnel glass surface is described. → Utilizing recycled funnel glass in mortar can reduce hazardous CRT glass wastes. → Effects of CRT glass content on the properties of cement mortar are studied. → Fly ash can effectively mitigate ASR expansion of mortar even at 100% glass content. → Alkaline medium in cement matrix successfully prevented the leaching of lead. - Abstract: Rapid advances in the electronic industry led to an excessive amount of early disposal of older electronic devices such as computer monitors and old televisions (TV) before the end of their useful life. The management of cathode ray tubes (CRT), which have been a key component in computer monitors and TV sets, has become a major environmental problem worldwide. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop sustainable alternative methods to manage hazardous CRT glass waste. This study assesses the feasibility of utilizing CRT glass as a substitute for natural aggregates in cement mortar. The CRT glass investigated was an acid-washed funnel glass of dismantled CRT from computer monitors and old TV sets. The mechanical properties of mortar mixes containing 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of CRT glass were investigated. The potential of the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and leachability of lead were also evaluated. The results confirmed that the properties of the mortar mixes prepared with CRT glass was similar to that of the control mortar using sand as fine aggregate, and displayed innocuous behaviour in the ASR expansion test. Incorporating CRT glass in cement mortar successfully prevented the leaching of lead. We conclude that it is feasible to utilize CRT glass in cement mortar production.

  20. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  1. Bulk glass formation and crystallization in zirconium based bulk metallic glass forming alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savalia, R.T.; Neogy, S.; Dey, G.K.; Banerjee, S.

    2002-01-01

    The microstructures of Zr based metallic glasses produced in bulk form have been described in the as-cast condition and after crystallization. Various microscopic techniques have been used to characterize the microstructures. The microstructure in the as-cast condition was found to contain isolated crystals and crystalline aggregates embedded in the amorphous matrix. Quenched-in nuclei of crystalline phases were found to be present in fully amorphous regions. These glasses after crystallization gave rise to nanocrystalline solids. (author)

  2. The mechanism of deceleration of nucleation and crystal growth by the small addition of transition metals to lithium disilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Katrin; Avramov, Isak; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of niobium or tantalum oxide to lithium disilicate glass provokes a drastic decrease of the steady-state nucleation rates and the crystal growth velocities. The viscosity of the residual glassy matrix is considered as a function of the crystallization degree in the course of a non-isothermal crystallization. For simplification, a homogeneous distribution of the added oxides in the glass matrix is assumed. While the viscosity initially decreases, it significantly increases again for higher crystallization degrees hindering crystal growth. However, it was shown that the additives are enriched at the crystal interface. Several possible reasons for the inhibition of nucleation and growth kinetics such as viscosity, interfacial energy crystal/glassy phase, thermodynamic driving force or impingement rate are discussed. Since the crystallization front is blocked by the additives the impingement rate is decreased with increasing additive concentration. Since small concentrations of Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 have a drastic effect on the nucleation, these components should be enriched at the interface crystal/glass. This will only take place, if it leads to a decrease in the interfacial energy. Since this effect alone should result in an increase of the nucleation rate, it must be overcompensated by kinetic effects. PMID:27150844

  3. From glass structure to its chemical durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, F.

    2009-01-01

    The author gives an overview of his research activities. He more precisely reports studies related to glass structure based on nuclei observed by NMR and present in glasses of interest for nuclear activities. He discusses the influence of chemical composition on structure, and discusses information which can be extracted from network formers (Al, B) and modifiers (Na, Ca), and from oxygen present in the network linkages of oxide glasses. He discusses the different experimental and modelling approaches which enable structural and morphological information to be obtained at a mesoscopic scale. The last part deals with the investigation of the long term behaviour of confinement matrices (glassy matrix for medium-activity wastes, ceramic matrix)

  4. Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials

  5. Optical spectroscopy of rare earth-doped oxyfluoro-tellurite glasses ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-16

    Aug 16, 2017 ... glass matrix with different RE ions for optical properties is of importance. ... Figure 1. XRD pattern of the tellurite glasses studied. Table 1. Composition and glass transition ... convoluted using Gaussian line shape. Parameters like .... On the other hand, in Er3+ ion, the ground state 4I15/2 itself has manifold.

  6. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mookerjee, Abhijit

    1976-01-01

    ''Spin glasses'', are entire class of magnetic alloys of moderate dilution, in which the magnetic atoms are far enough apart to be unlike the pure metal, but close enough so that the indirect exchange energy between them (mediated by the s-d interaction between local moments and conduction electrons) dominates all other energies. Characteristic critical phenomena displayed such as freezing of spin orientation at 'Tsub(c)' and spreading of magnetic ordering, are pointed out. Anomalous behaviour, associated with these critical phenomena, as reflected in : (i) Moessbauer spectroscopy giving hyperfine splitting at Tsub(c), (ii) maxima in susceptibility and remanent magnetism, (iii) thermopower maxima and change in slope, (iv) Characteristic cusp in susceptibility and its removal by very small magnetic fields, and (v) conductivity-resistivity measurements, are discussed. Theoretical developments aimed at explaining these phenomena, in particular, the ideas from percolation and localisation theories, and the approach based on the gellations of polymers, are discussed. Finally, a new approach based on renormalisation group in disordered systems is also briefly mentioned. (K.B.)

  7. The Effects of Cooling Rate on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ti{sub 4}0Zr{sub 1}0Cu{sub 3}6Pd{sub 1}4 Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seon Yong; Lim, Ka Ram; Na, Young Sang; Kim, Seong Eon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Youn Suk [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the microstructure and mechanical properties in the Ti{sub 4}0Zr{sub 1}0Cu{sub 3}6Pd{sub 1}4 alloy can be tailored by controlling the cooling rate during solidification. A lower cooling rate increases the volume fraction of crystalline phase such as B2 but decreases the free volume of the glassy matrix. The increase of the B2 volume fraction can dramatically enhance the toughness of the composites, since the B2 phase is relatively ductile compared to the glassy matrix and seems to have good interface stability with the matrix. From the experimental results, it was found that there is a transition point in the plasticity of the composites depending on the cooling rate. Here, we explain how the toughness of the composites varies in accordance with the cooling rate in the Ti{sub 4}0Zr{sub 1}0Cu{sub 3}6Pd{sub 1}4 alloy system.

  8. Investigation of hydrophobic substrates for solution residue analysis utilizing an ambient desorption liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge microplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paing, Htoo W; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2018-03-12

    A practical method for preparation of solution residue samples for analysis utilizing the ambient desorption liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (AD-LS-APGD-OES) microplasma is described. Initial efforts involving placement of solution aliquots in wells drilled into copper substrates, proved unsuccessful. A design-of-experiment (DOE) approach was carried out to determine influential factors during sample deposition including solution volume, solute concentration, number of droplets deposited, and the solution matrix. These various aspects are manifested in the mass of analyte deposited as well as the size/shape of the product residue. Statistical analysis demonstrated that only those initial attributes were significant factors towards the emission response of the analyte. Various approaches were investigated to better control the location/uniformity of the deposited sample. Three alternative substrates, a glass slide, a poly(tetrafluoro)ethylene (PTFE) sheet, and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated glass slide, were evaluated towards the microplasma analytical performance. Co-deposition with simple organic dyes provided an accurate means of determining the location of the analyte with only minor influence on emission responses. The PDMS-coated glass provided the best performance by virtue of its providing a uniform spatial distribution of the residue material. This uniformity yielded an improved limits of detection by approximately 22× for 20 μL and 4 x for 2 μL over the other two substrates. While they operate by fundamentally different processes, this choice of substrate is not restricted to the LS-APGD, but may also be applicable to other AD methods such as DESI, DART, or LIBS. Further developments will be directed towards a field-deployable ambient desorption OES source for quantitative analysis of microvolume solution residues of nuclear forensics importance.

  9. Matrix thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  10. Matrix thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  11. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  12. Towards Luminescence Dating Of Mosaic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, A.; Martini, M.; Sibila, E.; Villa, I.

    The possibility of dating archaeological glass by means of luminescent techniques has been investigated in recent years, despite the difficulties of this application, mainly linked to the amorphous structure of the material. We focused in particular on mosaic glass, after the encouraging results obtained on byzantine and medieval samples. Further studies were devoted to the comprehension of the luminescent mechanisms in silica glasses, and to the investigation of the relationships between luminescence, colouring or opacifier ions and crystalline phase of the vitreous matrix. The results of a study on the dosimetric characteristics of thermoluminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) of a few medieval blue-green mosaic glasses from the San Lorenzo church (Milan) are presented, and the experimental protocols established to identify their suitability for dating are discussed.

  13. Liquidus Temperature Data for DWPF Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, G.F.; Vienna, J.D.; Crum, J.V.; Mika, M.; Hrma, P.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides new liquidus temperature (T L ) versus composition data that can be used to reduce uncertainty in T L calculation for DWPF glass. According to the test plan and test matrix design PNNL has measured T L for 53 glasses within and just outside of the current DWPF processing composition window. The T L database generated under this task will directly support developing and enhancing the current T L process-control model. Preliminary calculations have shown a high probability of increasing HLW loading in glass produced at the SRS and Hanford. This increase in waste loading will decrease the life-cycle tank cleanup costs by decreasing process time and the volume of waste glass produced

  14. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rice, Jarret A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  15. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L.; Rice, Jarret A.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2017-01-01

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  16. Development of soda-lime glasses from ornamental rock wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babisk, Michelle Pereira

    2009-01-01

    During the ornamental rocks production, among other steps, one saw the rock blocks in order to transform them into semi-finished plates. In this step, expressive amounts of residues are generated, which are not properly discharged in nature, without any programmed utilization. The residues of silicide rocks present, in their compositions, oxides which are raw materials employed to fabricate soda-lime type glasses (containing SiO_2, Al_2O_3, CaO, Na_2O and K_2O). On the other hand the residues of carbonatic rocks are constituted of glass net modifier oxides, like CaO and MgO. In this work it was developed four types of soda-lime glasses using ornamental rock residues, where the glasses compositions were adjusted by adding sand, as silica source, as well as sodium and calcium carbonates as sources of Na_2O and CaO, respectively. The obtained glasses were characterized by means of Archimed's method for densities measurements, microstructure by using optical and electronic microscopy, phases by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness by Vickers indentation, spectroscopy (UV/VIS), and hydrolytic resistance according to ISO 719. The XRD analyses confirmed the compositions total vitrification, where the greened aspect of the samples was due to the presence of the iron oxides. The produced glasses properties were compared with those of commercial glasses aiming their industrial employment. The main difference between the produced glasses and those commercials varied primarily regarding the amount of carbonates incorporated. The results showed that the ornamental rocks residues may be used as raw materials for glasses fabrication, and they found a useful economic destination rather than discharge which promotes undesirable environmental impact. (author)

  17. Crystal growth in zinc borosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg, Ana T. G.; Lopes, Andreia A. S.; Veiga, João P. B.; Monteiro, Regina C. C.

    2017-01-01

    Glass samples with a molar composition (64+x)ZnO-(16-x)B2O3-20SiO2, where x=0 or 1, were successfully synthesized using a melt-quenching technique. Based on differential thermal analysis data, the produced glass samples were submitted to controlled heat-treatments at selected temperatures (610, 615 and 620 °C) during various times ranging from 8 to 30 h. The crystallization of willemite (Zn2SiO4) within the glass matrix was confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Under specific heat-treatment conditions, transparent nanocomposite glass-ceramics were obtained, as confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy. The influence of temperature, holding time and glass composition on crystal growth was investigated. The mean crystallite size was determined by image analysis on SEM micrographs. The results indicated an increase on the crystallite size and density with time and temperature. The change of crystallite size with time for the heat-treatments at 615 and 620 °C depended on the glass composition. Under fixed heat-treatment conditions, the crystallite density was comparatively higher for the glass composition with higher ZnO content.

  18. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M

    2003-07-15

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix.

  19. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix

  20. Physical, thermal, infrared and optical properties of Nd3+ doped lithium–lead-germanate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veeranna Gowda, V.C.

    2015-01-01

    The structure–property relationships of neodymium doped lithium–lead-germanate glasses were investigated. The density was found to increase with the increase of Nd 2 O 3 concentration and its variation is explained in terms of its molecular mass, structural transformation and packing density. Addition of modifier oxide to lead-germanate glass suggests a decreased free space within the glass matrix, resulting in the formation of stiff network. The increase in glass transition temperature specifies strengthening of glass by forming bridging oxygens. The optical properties of glass were measured employing UV–visible spectroscopy. The refractive index values varied nonlinearly with Nd 2 O 3 concentration and were speculated to depend on the electronic polarizability of oxide glasses. The frequencies of the infrared absorption bands were affected marginally and the absorption peaks revealed that the glass matrix consists of [GeO 4/2 ], [GeO 6/2 ] and [PbO 4/2 ] structural units

  1. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  2. Strategies to eradicate minimal residual disease in small cell lung cancer: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, L M; Grant, S C; Miller, V A; Ng, K K; Kris, M G

    1999-10-01

    In the last 25 years, treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has improved with advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Standard chemotherapy regimens can yield 80% to 90% response rates and some cures when combined with thoracic irradiation in limited-stage patients. Nonetheless, small cell lung cancer has a high relapse rate due to drug resistance; this has resulted in poor survival for most patients. Attacking this problem requires a unique approach to eliminate resistant disease remaining after induction therapy. This review will focus on three potential strategies: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

  3. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  4. Alpha self irradiation effects in nuclear borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peuget, S.; Roudil, D.; Deschanels, X.; Jegou, C.; Broudic, V.; Bart, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of actinide glasses are studied in the context of high-level waste management programs. Reprocessing high burnup fuels in particular will increase the minor actinide content in the glass package, resulting in higher cumulative alpha decay doses in the glass, and raising the question of the glass matrix behavior and especially its containment properties. The effect of alpha self-irradiation on the glass behavior is evaluated by doping the glass with a short-lived actinide ( 244 Cm) to reach in several years the alpha dose received by the future glass packages over several thousand years. 'R7T7' borosilicate glasses were doped with 3 different curium contents (0.04, 0.4 and 1.2 wt% 244 CmO 2 ). The density and mechanical properties of the curium-doped glasses were characterized up to 2. 10 18 α/g, revealing only a slight evolution of the macroscopic behavior of R7T7 glass in this range. The leaching behavior of curium-doped glass was also studied by Soxhlet tests. The results do not show any significant evolution of the initial alteration rate with the alpha dose. (authors)

  5. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  6. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  7. Glass-ceramics as building materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rincón, J. María

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics are materials composed as any ceramic material by several crystalline phases embedded in an amorphous or vitreous matrix, but their manufacture process implies the controlled devitrification or nucleation and growth of phases from an original glass. The original shape of the original glass molded by conventional methods is carried out by using pressing and sintering followed by crystallization steps. By both processing routes are obtained transparent and/or opaque materials, with or without colours, which after adequate control and design of composition and microstructure have numerous domestic and architectonic applications. They can be used as pavements or wall coatings and in various decorative elements. In fact, their use is very extensive in east-European, American and Asian (Japan countries in constructions for covering large surfaces. The greater advantage of the glass-ceramic process is that due to the own process of vitrification allows the incorporation in their structure of a wide range of compositions from mining and industrial residues, such as red muds, ashes, fangos, scraps... which they can in this way not only be inertizated, but furthermore it be converted without risk for the environment into products useful in construction applications, offering to the architect and to the decorator a new range of "eco-materials" with multiple complementary possibilities of the already existing architectural materials in the market.

    Los productos o materiales vitrocerámicos se componen, como cualquier material de tipo cerámico, de una o varias fases cristalinas embebidas en una matriz amorfa o vítrea, pero cuyo proceso de fabricación implica la desvitrificación o nucleación y cristalización controlada de un vidrio original o de partida. En el proceso de obtención de estos materiales se puede conservar la forma original conferida al vidrio de partida por los métodos convencionales de moldeado de vidrios

  8. Chain chemical reactions during matrix devitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkalov, I.M.

    1980-01-01

    Investigation results of chain reaction mechanisms, proceeding at devitrification of glass-like matrices under the effect of γ-irradiation are summarized. Peculiarities of kinetics and mechanism of chain reactions proceeding at devitrification are considered: hydrocarbon chlorination, polymerization of vinyl monomers, copolymerization and graft polymerization. Possible application aspects of the chain reaction conducting during matrix devitrification are also considered

  9. Processing glass-pyrochlore composites for nuclear waste encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, S.; Cannillo, V.; Wu, J.; Boccaccini, D.N.; Seglem, S.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Glass matrix composites have been developed as alternative materials to immobilize nuclear solid waste, in particular actinides. These composites are made of soda borosilicate glass matrix, into which particles of lanthanum zirconate pyrochlore are encapsulated in concentrations of 30 vol.%. The fabrication process involves powder mixing followed by hot-pressing. At the relatively low processing temperature used (620 deg. C), the pyrochlore crystalline structure of the zirconate, which is relevant for containment of radioactive nuclei, remains unaltered. The microstructure of the composites exhibits a homogeneous distribution of isolated pyrochlore particles in the glass matrix and strong bonding at the matrix-particle interfaces. Hot-pressing was found to lead to high densification (95% th.d.) of the composite. The materials are characterized by relatively high elastic modulus, flexural strength, hardness and fracture toughness. A numerical approach using a microstructure-based finite element solver was used in order to investigate the mechanical properties of the composites

  10. Matrix inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Xingzhi

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this monograph is to report on recent developments in the field of matrix inequalities, with emphasis on useful techniques and ingenious ideas. Among other results this book contains the affirmative solutions of eight conjectures. Many theorems unify or sharpen previous inequalities. The author's aim is to streamline the ideas in the literature. The book can be read by research workers, graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

  11. Combined use of lightweight magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-coated hollow glass spheres and electrically conductive reduced graphene oxide in an epoxy matrix for microwave absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junpeng; Wang, Jun, E-mail: wgdfrp@whut.edu.cn; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Yu; Chen, Wei; Wang, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Epoxy resin based lightweight composites comprising Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-coated hollow glass spheres (HGS@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) were prepared. Impedance matching condition and electromagnetic wave attenuation characteristic are used for analysis of the reflection loss (RL) performance of the composites. Compared with pure HGS@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and RGO composite, the −10 dB absorption bandwidth and the minimum RL of the hybrid composites are enhanced. RL values less than −10 dB are obtained in a wide frequency range and the corresponding bandwidth can reach up to 3.6 GHz when an appropriate absorber thickness is chosen. The density of the hybrid composite is in the range of 0.57–0.72 g/cm{sup 3}, which is attractive candidate for a new type of lightweight microwave absorber. - Highlights: • Lightweight composites comprising HGS@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and RGO were prepared. • The RL less than −10 dB can reach up to 3.6 GHz with layer thickness of 2.5 mm. • The density of the composites is in the range of 0.57−0.72 g/cm{sup 3}.

  12. Chemistry and kinetics of waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Under repository disposal conditions, the reaction of glass with water comprises the source term for release of radionuclides to the near-field environment. An understanding of glass reaction and the manner by which radionuclides are released is needed to design the waste package and to evaluate the total performance of the repository. The ASTM Standard C-1174-91 provides a general methodology for obtaining information related to the behavior of glass. This paper reviews the application of this standard to glass reaction. In the first step in the ASTM approach, the researcher identifies the materials and the conditions under which the long-term behavior is to be determined. Glass compositions have undergone a genesis over the past 15 years in response to concerns about feed streams, processing, and durability. A range of borosilicate compositions has been identified, but as new applications for vitrification occur, for example, immobilization of weapons plutonium and residue from plutonium processing, different compositions must be evaluated. The repository environment depends on the spatial emplacement of waste containers (glass and spent fuel), and both open-quotes hotclose quotes and open-quotes coldclose quotes scenarios have been proposed for the Yucca Mountain site. Regardless of the exact configuration, the near-field hydrology is expected to be unsaturated: that is, the waste packages are contacted initially by water vapor, and ultimately by small amounts of dripping or standing water. The behavior of glass can be studied as a function of composition within the constraints the environmental conditions place on the physical parameters that affect glass reaction (temperature, radiation field, groundwater composition, etc.). In the second step, the researcher reviews the literature and proposes a reaction pathway by which glass reacts in an unsaturated environment

  13. Effect of fatigue testing on the properties of Glass-Epoxy composites using the acoustic tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menail Younès

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the experimental results of the influence of mechanical fatigue on composite material. The plates of Glass fiber with SR 1500 epoxy resin with SD 2505 composite were realized by vacuum molding. Experimental tests were carried out on a standard hydraulic machine INSTRON 8516. The machine is interfaced with a dedicated computer for controlling and data acquisition. The fatigue tests were performed using sinusoidal type of waveform at a displacement control with frequency of 10 Hz. The evolution of Young’s modulus and strain based on fatigue gives us an idea about the resistance of the material. Degradation of mechanical properties was observed, and the results have showed that the Young’s modulus of plates undergo only minor changes. In fact, the residual stiffness and residual strength decrease when the cycle number of fatigue increase (100 to 50000 cycles, indicating that the studied composites have experienced some forms of mechanical damage.The mechanical tests were backed by Acoustic Emission Monitoring (AEM during the load cycle, in order to understand the nature of the failure process in the composites such as fiber breakage, matrix crazing, matrix debonding and delamination etc.

  14. PVC/carbon nanotubes nanocomposites: evaluation of electrical resistivity and the residual solvent effect over the thermal properties of nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Rogerio Gomes; Pires, Alfredo T.N.

    2013-01-01

    The procedure for obtaining nanocomposite by dispersing the nanoparticles in matrix polymer in solution with subsequent elimination of the solvent has been widely used, considering better efficiency in obtaining homogeneity of the final product. However, the presence of residual solvent may affect the nanocomposites in micro-and macroscopic properties of the product. The aim of this study was to evaluate the thermal properties of nanocomposites of poly(vinylchloride)/multi-walled carbon nanotube obtained from the polymer solution and dispersion of carbon nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran (THF), as well as the electrical resistivity of nanocomposites and the influence of residual solvent. The presence of residual tetrahydrofuran reduces the glass transition temperature (Tg) up to 26 °C, being independent of the amount of carbon nanotubes. The total elimination of the solvent is an important factor that does not induce changes in the properties of the polymeric matrix. The graft-COOH groups in the structure of the nanotubes leads to a considerable reduction of the electrical resistivity in ten orders of magnitude, from 0.4 %wt of nanotubes in the nanocomposite composition. (author)

  15. Effect of the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey fraction on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debure, M.; Frugier, P.; GIN, S.; De Windt, L.; Michau, N.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In France, high-level nuclear waste (HLW) is confined in a glass matrix packaged into stainless steel canister and carbon steel overpack. The HLW should be buried in a geological clay formation like, potentially, the Callovian-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone located in the north-eastern Parisian basin. The COx clay-stone contains minerals that can feed the near-field with soluble Mg. Such minerals are carbonates (ankerite, dolomite) as well as clay minerals (chlorite, illite, interstratified illite/smectite). Previous laboratory experiments have proved that aqueous solutions of Mg salts could significantly increase the alteration rate of nuclear glass (Jollivet et al., 2012). This motivated to go a step further by studying the alteration of nuclear glass put in contact with Mg minerals. A first set of experiments have revealed that the rate of glass dissolution was increased with hydro-magnesite (4MgCO 3 .Mg(OH) 2 .4H 2 O, a chemically simple model mineral) and dolomite. In both cases, Mg coming from carbonate dissolution reacts with Si, provided by the glass, in order to form Mg silicates (Debure et al., 2012). In that case, Si consumption sustains glass alteration. Mg silicate precipitation also consumes protons; therefore the interdiffusion of alkali within the glass alteration layer eventually becomes a driving force that sustains Mg silicate precipitation. The second set of experiments, presented here, aimed at better characterizing the role of the COx clayey fraction. The separation of the clayey phases of the COx clay-stone has been made in collaboration with the LEM lab (Nancy, France) by a sequence of sieving, acidic dissolution of carbonates, NaCl washing and sedimentation (Rivard, 2011). According to XRD and infrared analyses, the clayey fraction was mainly composed of kaolinite, illite, interstratified illite/smectite and chlorite (plus a little residual amount of quartz). This first step aimed to remove

  16. Density of mixed alkali borate glasses: A structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doweidar, H.; El-Damrawi, G.M.; Moustafa, Y.M.; Ramadan, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Density of mixed alkali borate glasses has been correlated with the glass structure. It is assumed that in such glasses each alkali oxide associates with a proportional quantity of B 2 O 3 . The number of BO 3 and BO 4 units related to each type of alkali oxide depends on the total concentration of alkali oxide. It is concluded that in mixed alkali borate glasses the volumes of structural units related to an alkali ion are the same as in the corresponding binary alkali borate glass. This reveals that each type of alkali oxide forms its own borate matrix and behaves as if not affected with the presence of the other alkali oxide. Similar conclusions are valid for borate glasses with three types of alkali oxide

  17. Structure and properties of calcium iron phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Bin [School of Science, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Liang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xfliangswust@gmail.com [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Wang, Cuiling; Yang, Shiyuan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2013-11-15

    The structural properties of xCaO–(100 − x) (0.4Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–0.6P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) (x = 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 mol%) glasses have been investigated by XRD, DTA, IR and Raman spectroscopy. XRD analysis has confirmed that the majority of samples are X-ray amorphous, and EDS analysis indicates that the glass matrix can accommodate ≈30 mol% CaO. IR and Raman spectra show that the glass structure consists predominantly of pyrophosphate (Q{sup 1}) units. IR spectra indicate that the phosphate network is depolymerized with the addition of CaO content. The density and glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) increase with increasing CaO content for the glasses. This behavior indicates that the addition of CaO improves the strength of the cross-links between the phosphate chains of the glass.

  18. Climate accounting for waste management, Phase I and II. Summary: Phase 1: Glass Packaging, Metal packaging, paper, cardboard, plastic and wet organic waste. Phase 2: Wood waste and residual waste from households; Klimaregnskap for avfallshaandtering, Fase I og II. Sammendrag: Fase 1: Glassemballasje, metallemballasje, papir, papp, plastemballasje og vaatorganisk avfall. Fase 2: Treavfall og restavfall fra husholdninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raadal, Hanne Lerche; Modahl, Ingunn Saur; Lyng, Kari-Anne

    2009-09-15

    Background. On the basis of an increased focus on emissions of greenhouse gases in general, Waste Norway wanted to prepare a climate accounting for waste management in Norway. Oestfoldforskning was engaged to undertake the project. The aim of the project has been to develop a model for the calculation of net greenhouse gas emissions from different waste types of waste glass containers, metal containers, paper, cardboard, plastic, wet organic waste, wood waste and residual waste. The model is based on life cycle methodology and is used to calculate the net greenhouse gas emissions per kg of waste for the various waste management options and waste types, as well as to calculate the net greenhouse gas emissions for waste management for including waste types and quantities of 2006. There is an emphasis on developing a model so that municipalities / waste companies or regions can develop their own climate accounting for waste management in their region, based on site-specific conditions associated with types and amounts of waste, transport distances, type of treatment, exploitation and use of waste generated energy etc. The model can also be used as the basis for the preparation of useful documentation as the basis for information about waste systems utility in general, and as a basis for strategic reviews for Waste Norway and the waste sector in particular. Conclusions: The main conclusions from the project can be summarized as follows: 1. The results of the study clearly shows that to consider only one environmental indicator is too narrow approach to form the basis for decision making for selection of waste management solutions. 2. Net greenhouse gas emissions for waste management varies greatly, both between the different types of waste and treatment methods which are reviewed. The main results of the ranking of management methods in relation to the net greenhouse effect associated with the waste types and treatment methods are as follows: Recycling of materials

  19. Rational decisions, random matrices and spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluccio, Stefano; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Potters, Marc

    We consider the problem of rational decision making in the presence of nonlinear constraints. By using tools borrowed from spin glass and random matrix theory, we focus on the portfolio optimisation problem. We show that the number of optimal solutions is generally exponentially large, and each of them is fragile: rationality is in this case of limited use. In addition, this problem is related to spin glasses with Lévy-like (long-ranged) couplings, for which we show that the ground state is not exponentially degenerate.

  20. Waste glass/metal interactions in brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shade, J.W.; Pederson, L.R.; McVay, G.L.

    1983-05-01

    Leaching studies of MCC 76-68 glass in synthetic brines high in NaCl were performed from 50 to 150 0 C and included interactive testing with ductile iron and titanium. Hydrolysis of the glass matrix was generally slower in saturated brines than in deionized water, due to a lower solubility of silica in the brines. Inclusion of ductile iron in the tests resulted in accelerated leach rates because irion-silica reactions occurred which reduced the silica saturation fraction. At 150 0 C, iron also accelerated the rate of crystalline reaction product formation which were primarily Fe-bearing sepiolite and talc. 16 references

  1. Glass and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  2. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  3. Risk matrix model for rotating equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassan Rano Khan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Different industries have various residual risk levels for their rotating equipment. Accordingly the occurrence rate of the failures and associated failure consequences categories are different. Thus, a generalized risk matrix model is developed in this study which can fit various available risk matrix standards. This generalized risk matrix will be helpful to develop new risk matrix, to fit the required risk assessment scenario for rotating equipment. Power generation system was taken as case study. It was observed that eight subsystems were under risk. Only vibration monitor system was under high risk category, while remaining seven subsystems were under serious and medium risk categories.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Mital, Subodh K.; Pineda, Evan J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of multiscale modeling simulations of the nonlinear response of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites are reported, wherein the microstructure of the ceramic matrix is captured. This micro scale architecture, which contains free Si material as well as the SiC ceramic, is responsible for residual stresses that play an important role in the subsequent thermo-mechanical behavior of the SiC/SiC composite. Using the novel Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells recursive micromechanics theory, the microstructure of the matrix, as well as the microstructure of the composite (fiber and matrix) can be captured.

  5. Optical residual stress measurement in TFT-LCD panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chung; Sung, Po-Chi

    2017-06-01

    The residual stress of the glass substrate might be one of causes to produce the non-uniform light distribution defect, i.e. Mura, in thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) panels. Glass is a birefringent material with very low birefringence. Furthermore, the thinner and thinner thickness request from the market makes the traditional photoelasticity almost impossible to measure the residual stresses produced in thin glass plates. Recently, a low-level stress measurement method called transmissivity extremities theory of photoelasticity (TEToP) was successfully developed to measure the residual stress in glass plate. Besides, to measure the stress of the glass plate in the TFT-LCD panel whose rear surface may has different kinds of coatings, an advanced reflection photoelasticity was also developed. In this paper, three commercially available glass plates with 0.33mm nominal thickness and three glass circular disks with different coatings were inspected to verify the feasibility of the TEToP and the advanced reflection photoelasticity, respectively.

  6. Physical and chemical characterization of borosilicate glasses containing Hanford high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, M.J.; Palmer, R.A.

    1980-10-01

    Scouting studies are being performed to develop and evaluate silicate glass forms for immobilization of Hanford high-level wastes. Detailed knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of these glasses is required to assess their suitability for long-term storage or disposal. Some key properties to be considered in selecting a glass waste form include leach resistance, resistance to radiation, microstructure (includes devitrification behavior or crystallinity), homogeneity, viscosity, electrical resistivity, mechanical ruggedness, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, density, softening point, annealing point, strain point, glass transformation temperature, and refractive index. Other properties that are important during processing of the glass include volatilization of glass and waste components, and corrosivity of the glass on melter components. Experimental procedures used to characterize silicate waste glass forms and typical properties of selected glass compositions containing simulated Hanford sludge and residual liquid wastes are presented. A discussion of the significance and use of each measured property is also presented

  7. Measurement of optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)

  8. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  9. Glass: a candidate engineered material for management of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, R.K.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    While the commercial importance of glass is generally recognized, a few people are aware of extremely wide range of glass formulations that can be made and of the versatility of this engineered material. Some of the recent developments in the field of glass leading to various technological applications include glass fiber reinforcement of cement to give new building materials, substrates for microelectronics circuitry in form of semiconducting glasses, nuclear waste immobilization and specific medical applications. The present paper covers fundamental understanding of glass structure and its application for immobilization of high level radioactive liquid waste. High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) arising during reprocessing of spent fuel are immobilized in sodium borosilicate glass matrix developed indigenously. Glass compositions are modified according to the composition of HLW to meet the criteria of desirable properties in terms. These glass matrices have been characterized for different properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, thermal stability and radiation stability. (author)

  10. Matrix analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    1997-01-01

    A good part of matrix theory is functional analytic in spirit. This statement can be turned around. There are many problems in operator theory, where most of the complexities and subtleties are present in the finite-dimensional case. My purpose in writing this book is to present a systematic treatment of methods that are useful in the study of such problems. This book is intended for use as a text for upper division and gradu­ ate courses. Courses based on parts of the material have been given by me at the Indian Statistical Institute and at the University of Toronto (in collaboration with Chandler Davis). The book should also be useful as a reference for research workers in linear algebra, operator theory, mathe­ matical physics and numerical analysis. A possible subtitle of this book could be Matrix Inequalities. A reader who works through the book should expect to become proficient in the art of deriving such inequalities. Other authors have compared this art to that of cutting diamonds. One first has to...

  11. Assessment of Savannah River borosilicate glass in the repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Wicks, G.G.; Bibler, N.E.

    1982-04-01

    Since 1973, borosilicate glass has been studied as a matrix for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste generated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). In 1977, efforts began to develop and test the large-scale equipment necessary to convert the alkaline waste slurries at SRP into a durable borosilicate glass. A process has now been developed for the proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) which will annually produce approximately 500 canisters of SRP waste glass which will be stored on an interim basis on the Savannah River site. Current national policy calls for the permanent disposal of high-level waste in deep geologic repositories. In the repository environment, SRP waste glass will eventually be exposed to such stresses as lithostatic or hydrostatic pressures, radiation fields, and self-heating due to radioactive decay. In addition, producing and handling each canister of glass will also expose the glass to thermal and mechanical stresses. An important objective of the extensive glass characterization and testing programs of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has been to determine how these stresses affect the performance of SRP waste glass. The results of these programs indicate that: these stresses will not significantly affect the performance of borosilicate glass containing SRP waste; and SRP waste glass will effectively immobilize hazardous radionuclides in the repository environment

  12. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  13. Multiple Glass Ceilings

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Giovanni; Hassink, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Both vertical (between job levels) and horizontal (within job levels) mobility can be sources of wage growth. We find that the glass ceiling operates at both margins. The unexplained part of the wage gap grows across job levels (glass ceiling at the vertical margin) and across the deciles of the intra-job-level wage distribution (glass ceiling at the horizontal margin). This implies that women face many glass ceilings, one for each job level above the second, and that the glass ceiling is a p...

  14. Homogeneity of Inorganic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Zhang, L.; Keding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneity of glasses is a key factor determining their physical and chemical properties and overall quality. However, quantification of the homogeneity of a variety of glasses is still a challenge for glass scientists and technologists. Here, we show a simple approach by which the homogeneity...... of different glass products can be quantified and ranked. This approach is based on determination of both the optical intensity and dimension of the striations in glasses. These two characteristic values areobtained using the image processing method established recently. The logarithmic ratio between...

  15. Fission products in glasses. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, A.K.; Luckscheiter, B.; Malow, G.; Schiewer, E.

    1977-09-01

    Glass ceramics of different composition with high leach and impact resistance can be produced for fission product solidification. In contrast to commercial glass products, they consist of a number of crystalline phases and a residual glass phase. The major crystalline phase allows a classification into celsian, diopside, encryptite, and perovskite ceramics. They all are of special importance as host phases for long-lived fission products. The paper reports on relations between product composition and melting properties, viscosity, crystallization properties, and fixation capability for fission products. Further investigations deal with dimensional stability, impact resistance, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity. The properties of the ceramics are compared with those of the basic products. The problems still to be solved with regard to further improvement and application of these products are discussed. (RB) [de

  16. Leaching of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hench, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding surface compositional profiles of glasses over a range of 0-2000 A with a variety of analytical instruments shows that five general types of glass surfaces exist. The surface character of a glass article depends upon bulk composition and environmental history during which surface dealkalization, film formation, and network dissolution can occur. Environmental-surface interactions generally result in complex compositional profiles of all the constituents in a glass. Durable glasses almost always develop a stable surface film which has a higher concentration of network formers than the bulk composition. Compositional effects that are used to improve glass durability usually improve the stability of the surface films. Durability tests or service conditions that lead to film destruction are especially severe for the most silicate glasses. 43 references

  17. Measurement of the volatility and glass transition temperatures of glasses produced during the DWPF startup test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.C.; Harbour, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize high-level radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the Savannah River Site by incorporating the waste into a glass matrix. The molten waste glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters which will be welded shut to produce the final waste form. One specification requires that any volatiles produced as a result of accidentally heating the waste glass to the glass transition temperature be identified. Glass samples from five melter campaigns, run as part of the DWPF Startup Test Program, were analyzed to determine glass transition temperatures and to examine the volatilization (by weight loss). Glass transition temperatures (T g ) for the glasses, determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), ranged between 445 C and 474 C. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) scans showed that no overall weight loss occurred in any of the glass samples when heated to 500 C. Therefore, no volatility will occur in the final glass product when heated up to 500 C

  18. Matrix pentagons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The Operator Product Expansion for null polygonal Wilson loop in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory runs systematically in terms of multi-particle pentagon transitions which encode the physics of excitations propagating on the color flux tube ending on the sides of the four-dimensional contour. Their dynamics was unraveled in the past several years and culminated in a complete description of pentagons as an exact function of the 't Hooft coupling. In this paper we provide a solution for the last building block in this program, the SU(4) matrix structure arising from internal symmetry indices of scalars and fermions. This is achieved by a recursive solution of the Mirror and Watson equations obeyed by the so-called singlet pentagons and fixing the form of the twisted component in their tensor decomposition. The non-singlet, or charged, pentagons are deduced from these by a limiting procedure.

  19. Matrix pentagons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Belitsky

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Operator Product Expansion for null polygonal Wilson loop in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory runs systematically in terms of multi-particle pentagon transitions which encode the physics of excitations propagating on the color flux tube ending on the sides of the four-dimensional contour. Their dynamics was unraveled in the past several years and culminated in a complete description of pentagons as an exact function of the 't Hooft coupling. In this paper we provide a solution for the last building block in this program, the SU(4 matrix structure arising from internal symmetry indices of scalars and fermions. This is achieved by a recursive solution of the Mirror and Watson equations obeyed by the so-called singlet pentagons and fixing the form of the twisted component in their tensor decomposition. The non-singlet, or charged, pentagons are deduced from these by a limiting procedure.

  20. Glass interface effect on high-strain-rate tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The glass interface effect on dynamic tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material has been investigated by subjecting a glass-polymer system of this polymer material matrix embedded a single 3 mm-diameter glass particle to impact loading in a split Hopkinson tension bar

  1. Preliminary characterization of glass fiber sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noergaard Petersen, H.; Almdal, K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nanotech, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Kusano, Y.; Broendsted, P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Wind Energy, Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2013-09-01

    Glass fiber surfaces are treated with sizing during manufacturing. Sizing consists of several components, including a film former and a silane coupling agent that is important for adhesion between glass fibers and a matrix. Although the sizing highly affects the composite interface and thus the strength of the composites, little is known about the structure and chemistry of the sizing. A part of sizing was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The fibers were subsequently burned and some fibers were merely burned for analysis of glass fiber and sizing. The results showed that the analyzed fibers had amounts of bonded and physisorbed sizing similar to what has been presented in literature. An estimated sizing thickness was found to be approximately 100 nm. It is indicated that an epoxy-resin containing film former and a polyethylene oxide lubricant are present, yet no silanes or other sizing components were identified in the extractant. (Author)

  2. Radiation effects on lead silicate glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.W.; Zhang, L.P.; Borgen, N.; Pannell, K.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in the microstructure of lead silicate glass were investigated in situ under Mg K α irradiation in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lead-oxygen bond breaking resulting in the formation of pure lead was observed. The segregation, growth kinetics and the structural relaxation of the lead, with corresponding changes in the oxygen and silicon on the glass surfaces were studied by measuring the time-dependent changes in concentration, binding energy shifts, and the full width at half maximum. A bimodal distribution of the oxygen XPS signal, caused by bridging and non-bridging oxygens, was found during the relaxation process. All experimental data indicate a reduction of the oxygen concentration, a phase separation of the lead from the glass matrix, and the metallization of the lead occurred during and after the X-ray irradiation. (author)

  3. Fatigue mechanisms in unidirectional glass-fibre-reinforced polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamstedt, E.K.; Berglund, L.A.; Peijs, T.

    1999-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) and polypropylene modified with maleic anhydride (MA-PP) reinforced by continuous longitudinal glass fibres have been investigated. The most prominent effect of the modification with maleic anhydride in the composite is a stronger fibre/matrix interface. The effects of interfac......Polypropylene (PP) and polypropylene modified with maleic anhydride (MA-PP) reinforced by continuous longitudinal glass fibres have been investigated. The most prominent effect of the modification with maleic anhydride in the composite is a stronger fibre/matrix interface. The effects...... of interfacial strength on fatigue performance and on the underlying micromechanisms have been studied for these composite systems. Tension-tension fatigue tests (R = 0.1) were carried out on 0 degrees glass-fibre/PP and glass-fibre/ MA-PP coupons. The macroscopic fatigue behaviour was characterized in terms...

  4. Nanoporous Glasses for Nuclear Waste Containment

    OpenAIRE

    Woignier, Thierry; Primera, Juan; Reynes, Jerôme

    2016-01-01

    Research is in progress to incorporate nuclear waste in new matrices with high structural stability, resistance to thermal shock, and high chemical durability. Interactions with water are important for materials used as a containment matrix for the radio nuclides. It is indispensable to improve their chemical durability to limit the possible release of radioactive chemical species, if the glass structure is attacked by corrosion. By associating high structural stability and high chemical dura...

  5. Micropatterning on glass with deep UV

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Nicolas CARPI, Matthieu PIEL, Ammar Azioune & Jenny Fink ### Abstract This protocol describes a method to print micropatterns on glass with extra-cellular matrix proteins to promote cell adhesion. The non-adhesive part is made with polylysine grafted polyethyleneglycol (PLL-g-PEG). This technique is reproducible, cheap, fast and can achieve high resolution (~1 µm). ### Introduction This protocol explains how to make high resolution adhesive micropattens of protein...

  6. Influence of nuclear glasses composition on their liability to deterioration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovena, I.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to the study of the nuclear glasses composition influence on their liability to deterioration. The methodology of the experimental research used has lead to define between the thirty oxides which form the reference glass light water, six oxides of interest. For each of these oxides, a composition variation area has been defined. A matrix of twenty glass compositions has then been defined. The preparation of materials of these compositions has sometimes lead to materials weakly heterogeneous which have been characterized before deterioration. This study has been completed by those of three glasses in a composition variation area narrower of the light water nuclear glass : the R7T7 and two glasses at limits having respectively an initial dissolution velocity at 100 degrees Celsius theoretically maximum and minimum. Some deterioration parameters in pure water have been experimentally measured on the twenty three glasses : 1) an initial dissolution velocity at 100 degrees (Vo 1 00) Celsius and another one at 90 degrees Celsius (Vo 9 0) 2) a dissolution velocity in conditions near the saturation at 90 degrees Celsius 3) an apparent solubility of glass based on the ortho silicic acid activity 4) the evolution of the dissolution kinetics at 90 degrees Celsius in sub-saturated medium towards saturated medium 5) the alteration films nature developed at the glasses surface during these last alteration tests. Some thermodynamic and structural models have been studied in order to predict Vo 9 0 and Vo 1 00. The dissolution kinetic law developed from reference glass dissolution results has been studied with the calculation code LIXIVER. It has not been able to be used for most of the glasses compositions studied. As a consequence, the glasses dissolution control by a surface reaction which are itself controlled by the only dissolved silica is an hypothesis which is not verified for the greater part of the glasses. (O.L.). refs., figs

  7. The Cauchy method of residues

    CERN Document Server

    Mitrinović, Dragoslav S

    1993-01-01

    Volume 1, i. e. the monograph The Cauchy Method of Residues - Theory and Applications published by D. Reidel Publishing Company in 1984 is the only book that covers all known applications of the calculus of residues. They range from the theory of equations, theory of numbers, matrix analysis, evaluation of real definite integrals, summation of finite and infinite series, expansions of functions into infinite series and products, ordinary and partial differential equations, mathematical and theoretical physics, to the calculus of finite differences and difference equations. The appearance of Volume 1 was acknowledged by the mathematical community. Favourable reviews and many private communications encouraged the authors to continue their work, the result being the present book, Volume 2, a sequel to Volume 1. We mention that Volume 1 is a revised, extended and updated translation of the book Cauchyjev raeun ostataka sa primenama published in Serbian by Nau~na knjiga, Belgrade in 1978, whereas the greater part ...

  8. Comparison of the layer structure of vapor phase and leached SRL glass by use of AEM [analytical electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biwer, B.M.; Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Bradley, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Test samples of 131 type glass that have been reacted for extended time periods in water vapor atmospheres of different relative humidities and in static leaching solution have been examined to characterize the reaction products. Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) was used to characterize the leached samples, and a complicated layer structure was revealed, consisting of phases that precipitate from solution and also form within the residual glass layer. The precipitated phases include birnes-site, saponite, and an iron species, while the intralayer phases include the U-Ti containing phase brannerite distributed within a matrix consisting of bands of an Fe rich montmorillonite clay. Comparison is made between samples leached at 40 degrees C for 4 years with those leached at 90 degrees C for 3-1/2 years. The samples reacted in water vapor were examined with scanning electron microscopy and show increasing reaction as both the relative humidity and time of reaction increases. These samples also contain a layered structure with reaction products on the glass surface. 15 refs., 5 figs

  9. Radiation modification of glass fiber - reinforced plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allayarov, S.R.; Smirnov, Yu.N.; Lesnichaya, V.A.; Ol'khov, Yu.A.; Belov, G.P.; Dixon, D.A.; Kispert, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    Modification of glass fiber - reinforced plastics (GFRPs) by gamma-irradiation has been researched to receipt of polymeric composite materials. They were produced by the film - technology method and the cheapest thermoplastics (polythene, polyamide were used as polymeric matrixes for their manufacture. GFRPs were irradiated with Co 60 gamma-rays from a Gammatok-100 source in air and in vacuum. The strength properties of GFRPs and initial polymeric matrixes were investigated before and after radiolysis. Molecular - topological structure of the polymeric matrixes were tested by the method of thermomechanical spectroscopy. The strength properties of GFRPs depend on a parity of speeds of structural (physical) and chemical modification of the polymeric matrixes. These two processes proceed simultaneously. The structural modification includes physical transformation of polymers at preservation of their chemical structure. Covalent bonds between various macromolecules or between macromolecules and surface of fiberglasses are formed at the chemical modification of polymeric matrixes induced by radiation. Action of ionizing radiation on the used polymeric matrix results to its structurization (polythene) or to destruction (polyamide). Increasing of durability of GFRPs containing polythene is caused by formation of the optimum molecular topological structure of the polymeric matrix. (authors)

  10. Fractography of glass

    CERN Document Server

    Tressler, Richard

    1994-01-01

    As the first major reference on glass fractography, contributors to this volume offer a comprehensive account of the fracture of glass as well as various fracture surface topography Contributors discuss optical fibers, glass containers, and flatglass fractography In addition, papers explore fracture origins; the growth of the original flaws of defects; and macroscopic fracture patterns from which fracture patterns evolve This volume is complete with photographs and schematics

  11. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  12. Glass to contain wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, M.; Jacquet-Francillon, M.

    1994-01-01

    Here are the tables and figures presented during the conference on the glass to confine high level radioactive wastes: definition, fabrication, storage and disposal. The composition of glasses are detailed, their properties and the vitrification proceeding. The behaviour of these glasses in front of water, irradiation and heat are shown. The characteristics of parcels are given according to the radiation protection rule, ALARA principle, the concept of multi-barriers and the geological stability

  13. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Miguel O.; Prastalo, Simon; Blaumann, Herman; Longhino, Juan M.; Repetto Llamazares, A.H.V.

    2007-01-01

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author) [es

  14. Iron Phosphate Glasses: An Alternative for Vitrifying Certain Nuclear Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Delbert E.; Ray, Chandra S.; Cheol-Woon Kim

    2004-01-01

    Vitrification of nuclear waste in a glass is currently the preferred process for waste disposal. DOE currently approves only borosilicate (BS) type glasses for such purposes. However, many nuclear wastes, presently awaiting disposal, have complex and diverse chemical compositions, and often contain components that are poorly soluble or chemically incompatible in BS glasses. Such problematic wastes can be pre-processed and/or diluted to compensate for their incompatibility with a BS glass matrix, but both of these solutions increases the wasteform volume and the overall cost for vitrification. Direct vitrification using alternative glasses that utilize the major components already present in the waste is preferable, since it avoids pre-treating or diluting the waste, and, thus, minimizes the wasteform volume and overall cost

  15. Iron Phosphate Glasses: An Alternative for Vitrifying Certain Nuclear Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbert E. Day; Chandra S. Ray; Cheol-Woon Kim

    2004-12-28

    Vitrification of nuclear waste in a glass is currently the preferred process for waste disposal. DOE currently approves only borosilicate (BS) type glasses for such purposes. However, many nuclear wastes, presently awaiting disposal, have complex and diverse chemical compositions, and often contain components that are poorly soluble or chemically incompatible in BS glasses. Such problematic wastes can be pre-processed and/or diluted to compensate for their incompatibility with a BS glass matrix, but both of these solutions increases the wasteform volume and the overall cost for vitrification. Direct vitrification using alternative glasses that utilize the major components already present in the waste is preferable, since it avoids pre-treating or diluting the waste, and, thus, minimizes the wasteform volume and overall cost.

  16. Introduction to the crystallization phenomenon in nuclear glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet Francillon, N.

    1997-01-01

    Crystallization is a subject for concern because of its potentially detrimental effects on the technological feasibility of high-temperature melting, and on the chemical durability of the material at intermediate and low temperatures during interim storage or after disposal. The tendency of glass to crystallize depends to a large extent on the composition of the frit and/or of the waste to be solidified. It depends too of the thermal history of the glass generally, the knowledge is mainly upon determination of the time-temperature-transition (TTT) curves, crystal identification and quantification techniques, and their effects on the durability of the glass matrix. French experience is presented. Only a few authors addressed the long-term development of crystalline phases, notably at temperatures below the vitreous transition temperature Tg. Some recommendations for glass crystallization studies are made but glass crystallization after disposal is acceptable provided some conditions are met. (author)

  17. Quartz crystal reinforced quartz glass by spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikai, D.; Barazani, B.; Ono, E.; Santos, M.F.M.; Suzuki, C.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Spark Plasma Sintering presents fast processing time when compared to conventional sintering techniques. This allows to control the grain growth during sintering as well as the diffusion rate of a multi-material compounds, and make possible obtainment of functionally graded materials and nanostructured compounds. Powders of high purity silica glass and crystalline silica were sintered in a SPS equipment at temperatures around 1350° C, i.e., above the softening temperature of silica glass and below the melting temperature of quartz crystal. As a result, glass ceramics with pure silica glass matrix reinforced with crystalline alpha-quartz grains were fabricated at almost any desired range of composition, as well as controlled size of the crystalline reinforcement. X-ray diffraction and density measurements showed the possibility to manufacture a well controlled density and crystallinity glass-ceramic materials. (author)

  18. Thermal shock behaviour of SiC-fibre-reinforced glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, T.; Reichert, J.; Brueckner, R.

    1992-01-01

    The preparation of two SiC-fibre-reinforced glasses with very different thermal expansion coefficients and glass transition temperatures is described and the influence of long-time temperature and thermal shock behaviour of these composites on the mechanical properties is investigated by means of bending test experiments before and after thermal treatments. It will be shown from experiments and calculations on stresses due to thermal expansion mismatch between fibre and glass matrix that not only best mechanical properties but also best thermal shock behaviour are connected with low tensile intrinsic stresses produced by thermal expansion mismatch during preparation. The thermal shock resistance of the best composite (SiC fibre/DURAN glass) does not show a significant decrease of flexural strength even after 60 shocks from 550 to 25deg C in water, while the bulk glass sample of the same dimension was destroyed by one thermal shock from 350deg C. (orig.) [de

  19. Optical absorption and photoluminescence properties of chromium in different host glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachheb, R., E-mail: raouialach66@gmail.com [LaboratoireGéoressources, Matériaux, Environnement et Changements Globaux, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax, Sfax University, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Herrmann, A. [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstraße 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Damak, K. [LaboratoireGéoressources, Matériaux, Environnement et Changements Globaux, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax, Sfax University, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Rüssel, C. [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstraße 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Maâlej, R. [LaboratoireGéoressources, Matériaux, Environnement et Changements Globaux, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax, Sfax University, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2017-06-15

    The optical absorption, excitation and fluorescence spectra, and emission lifetimes of chromium (III) were investigated in a wide variety of oxide glasses (aluminosilicate, aluminate and phosphate). For all glasses, weak crystal field strengths were deduced from the absorption spectra. The effect of the glass matrix and the Cr{sup 3+} concentration on the fluorescence properties of Cr{sup 3+} ions were investigated. An increased fluorescence intensity of Cr{sup 3+}was found for glasses of low optical basicity, the spectral position of the Cr{sup 3+} absorption and emission, however, was hardly influenced by the glass composition. The optical absorption spectra of the chromium doped aluminosilicate and aluminate glasses showed the presence of Cr{sup VI}, while in phosphate glasses most chromium occurred as Cr{sup 3+} ions. Furthermore, for the glass with the lowest basicity, the Cr{sup 3+}concentration was optimized in order to achieve maximum fluorescence emission intensity.

  20. Silicate glasses. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e. borosilicate glass. A historical overview of waste form development programs in nine countries is followed by a summary of the design criteria for borosilicate glass compositions glass compositions. In the sections on glass properties the waste form is characterized in terms of potential alterations under the influence of heat, thermal gradients, radiation, aqueous solutions and combinations thereof. The topics are phase transformations, mechanical properties, radiation effects and chemical durability. The results from studies of volcanic glasses, as natural analogues for borosilicate nuclear waste glasses in order to verify predictions obtained from short-term tests in the laboratory, have been compiled in a special section on natural analogues. A special section on advanced vitrification techniques summarizes the various actual and potential processing schemes and describes the facilities. The literature has been considered until 1985. (author). 430 refs.; 68 figs.; 29 tabs

  1. Glass and vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.L.; Vacher, R.; Moncouyoux, J.P.; Vernaz, E.

    1997-01-01

    Most glasses used as materials are oxides glasses that are produced by a quick quench of a liquid. Glasses are characterized by the absence of periodicity in the atomic arrangements, they do not have symmetries and do not present order over a long distance. This series of 4 short articles present: 1) the properties of glass and its industrial story, 2) the glass structure, 3) a forty years long story of glass as dies used to confine wastes and 4) the methodology used to study the behaviour of glass over very long periods of time. This methodology is based on 5 steps: 1) define and specify the material to study (the prediction of long term alteration of a material is nonsense unless you know well its initial properties), 2) identify all the alteration processes that are likely to happen, determine their kinetics and the influence of environmental parameters, 3) develop mathematical models in order to simulate long-term behaviour of glasses, 4) determine the release rates of the radionuclides confined in the glass, and 5) validate data and models, it is not possible to expect a complete validation of a model that will be extrapolated over tens of thousands of years, nevertheless some ways of validation can lead to a satisfactory level of confidence taking into account reasonable uncertainties. (A.C.)

  2. Heavy atom induced room temperature fluorescence quenching of PAH from a glucose glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlow, Matt, E-mail: matthew.marlow@nicholls.edu

    2017-06-15

    Sugar glasses are a relatively new matrix for solid-matrix luminescence. Molecular interactions within the sugar glass are not well understood. Fluorescence quenching was used to investigate molecular interactions within the sugar glass matrix. The room temperature fluorescence quenching of pyrene and naphthalene was observed from a glucose glass. The heavy atom salt NaI was the quencher. Two solvent compositions 50/50 and 60/40 MeOH/water, used for glass preparation, were examined for their effect on glass rigidity and molecular interactions. A complex static mechanism was observed for glasses prepared with 50/50 MeOH/water. This data was fit to the sphere of action model and associations constants determined. A Stern-Volmer static mechanism of quenching was observed for glasses prepared with 60/40 MeOH/water. This data fit the Stern-Volmer equation and association constants were determined. A larger association constant was observed for pyrene compared to naphthalene for both solvent systems used. Pyrene had a larger association constant with a sugar glass prepared with 60/40 MeOH/water compared to 50/50 MeOH/water implying a greater association between pyrene and iodide. The greater association is a reflection of a more rigid internal environment for the sugar glass prepared with 60/40 MeOH/water.

  3. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2–Al2O3–Y2O3–SrO–Na2O–K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O–P2O5–F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F – pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  4. Radiopaque Strontium Fluoroapatite Glass-Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2-Al2O3-Y2O3-SrO-Na2O-K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O-P2O5-F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: (a) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, (b) Sr5(PO4)3F - leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, (c) Sr5(PO4)3F - pollucite, CsAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4, and (d) Sr5(PO4)3F - Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4. The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needle-like morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needle-like Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of leucite, pollucite, and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite - pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). These

  5. Defining the Glass Composition Limits for SRS Contaminated Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero, C.A.; Bickford, D.F.; Crews, W.O.

    1995-01-01

    Contaminated soil resulting from the excavation, repair, and decommissioning of facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently being disposed of by shallow land burial or is being stored when considered only hazardous. Vitrification of this waste is being investigated, since it will bind the hazardous and radioactive species in a stable and durable glass matrix, which will reduce the risk of ground water contamination. However, the composition limits for producing durable glass have to be determined before the technology can be applied. Glass compositions, consisting of SRS soil and glass forming additives, were tested on a crucible-scale in three ternary phase systems. Nine different glass compositions were produced, with waste loadings ranging from 43 to 58 weight percent. These were characterized using varoius chemical methods and tested for durability in both alkaline and acidic environments. All nine performed well in alkaline environments, but only three met the strictest criteria for the acidic environment tests. Although the glasses did not meet all of the limits for the acidic tests, the test was performed on very conservative size samples, so the results were also conservative. Therefore, enough evidence was found to provide proof that SRS soil can be vitrified in a durable glass matrix

  6. Applications of bauxite residue: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay S; Suri, Narendra M; Kant, Suman

    2017-10-01

    Bauxite residue is the waste generated during alumina production by Bayer's process. The amount of bauxite residue (40-50 wt%) generated depends on the quality of bauxite ore used for the processing. High alkalinity and high caustic content in bauxite residue causes environmental risk for fertile soil and ground water contamination. The caustic (NaOH) content in bauxite residue leads to human health risks, like dermal problems and irritation to eyes. Moreover, disposal of bauxite residue requires a large area; such problems can only be minimised by utilising bauxite residue effectively. For two decades, bauxite residue has been used as a binder in cement industries and filler/reinforcement for composite materials in the automobile industry. Valuable metals and oxides, like alumina (Al 2 O 3 ), titanium oxide (TiO 2 ) and iron oxide Fe 2 O 3 , were extracted from bauxite residue to reduce waste. Bauxite residue was utilised in construction and structure industries to make geopolymers. It was also used in the making of glass-ceramics and a coating material. Recently bauxite residue has been utilised to extract rare earth elements like scandium (Sc), yttrium (Y), lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy). In this review article, the mineralogical characteristics of bauxite residue are summarised and current progresses on utilisation of bauxite residue in different fields of science and engineering are presented in detail.

  7. Mechanical characterization of glass fiber (woven roving/chopped strand mat E-glass fiber) reinforced polyester composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, V. Vijaya; Srinivas, Kolla

    2017-07-01

    Polymer reinforced composites have been replacing most of the engineering material and their applications become more and more day by day. Polymer composites have been analyzing from past thirty five years for their betterment for adapting more applications. This paper aims at the mechanical properties of polyester reinforced with glass fiber composites. The glass fiber is reinforced with polyester in two forms viz Woven Rovings (WRG) and Chopped Strand Mat (CSMG) E-glass fibers. The composites are fabricated by hand lay-up technique and the composites are cut as per ASTM Standard sizes for corresponding tests like flexural, compression and impact tests, so that flexural strength, compression strength, impact strength and inter laminar shear stress(ILSS) of polymer matrix composites are analyzed. From the tests and further calculations, the polyester composites reinforced with Chopped Strand Mat glass fiber have shown better performance against flexural load, compression load and impact load than that of Woven Roving glass fiber.

  8. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  9. Formulation and Characterization of Waste Glasses with Varying Processing Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, M. J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lepry, William C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Johnson, Fabienne; Marra, James C.; Peeler, David K.

    2011-10-17

    This report documents the preliminary results of glass formulation and characterization accomplished within the finished scope of the EM-31 technology development tasks for WP-4 and WP-5, including WP-4.1.2: Glass Formulation for Next Generation Melter, WP-5.1.2.3: Systematic Glass Studies, and WP-5.1.2.4: Glass Formulation for Specific Wastes. This report also presents the suggested studies for eventual restart of these tasks. The initial glass formulation efforts for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM), operating at {approx}1200 C, with selected HLW (AZ-101) and LAW (AN-105) successfully developed glasses with significant increase of waste loading compared to that is likely to be achieved based on expected reference WTP formulations. Three glasses formulated for AZ-101HLW and one glass for AN-105 LAW were selected for the initial CCIM demonstration melter tests. Melter tests were not performed within the finished scope of the WP-4.1.2 task. Glass formulations for CCIM were expanded to cover additional HLWs that have high potential to successfully demonstrate the unique advantages of the CCIM technologies based on projected composition of Hanford wastes. However, only the preliminary scoping tests were completed with selected wastes within the finished scope. Advanced glass formulations for the reference WTP melter, operating at {approx}1200 C, were initiated with selected specific wastes to determine the estimated maximum waste loading. The incomplete results from these initial formulation efforts are summarized. For systematic glass studies, a test matrix of 32 high-aluminum glasses was completed based on a new method developed in this study.

  10. Formulation and Characterization of Waste Glasses with Varying Processing Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, M.J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lepry, William C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Johnson, Fabienne; Marra, James C.; Peeler, David K.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the preliminary results of glass formulation and characterization accomplished within the finished scope of the EM-31 technology development tasks for WP-4 and WP-5, including WP-4.1.2: Glass Formulation for Next Generation Melter, WP-5.1.2.3: Systematic Glass Studies, and WP-5.1.2.4: Glass Formulation for Specific Wastes. This report also presents the suggested studies for eventual restart of these tasks. The initial glass formulation efforts for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM), operating at ∼1200 C, with selected HLW (AZ-101) and LAW (AN-105) successfully developed glasses with significant increase of waste loading compared to that is likely to be achieved based on expected reference WTP formulations. Three glasses formulated for AZ-101HLW and one glass for AN-105 LAW were selected for the initial CCIM demonstration melter tests. Melter tests were not performed within the finished scope of the WP-4.1.2 task. Glass formulations for CCIM were expanded to cover additional HLWs that have high potential to successfully demonstrate the unique advantages of the CCIM technologies based on projected composition of Hanford wastes. However, only the preliminary scoping tests were completed with selected wastes within the finished scope. Advanced glass formulations for the reference WTP melter, operating at ∼1200 C, were initiated with selected specific wastes to determine the estimated maximum waste loading. The incomplete results from these initial formulation efforts are summarized. For systematic glass studies, a test matrix of 32 high-aluminum glasses was completed based on a new method developed in this study.

  11. Simulation of an Aspheric Glass Lens Forming Behavior in Progressive GMP Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sung Ho; Lee, Young Min; Kang, Jeong Jin; Hong, Seok Kwan; Shin, Gwang Ho; Heo, Young Moo; Jung, Tae Sung

    2007-01-01

    Recently, GMP(Glass Molding Press) process is mainly used to produce aspheric glass lenses. Because glass lens is heated at high temperature above Tg (Transformation Temperature) for forming the glass, the quality of aspheric glass lens is deteriorated by residual stresses which are generated in a aspheric glass lens after forming. In this study, as a fundamental study to develop the mold for progressive GMP process, we conducted a aspheric glass lens forming simulation. Prior to a aspheric glass lens forming simulation, compression and thermal conductivity tests were carried out to obtain mechanical and thermal properties of K-PBK40 which is newly developed material for precision molding, and flow characteristics of K-PBK40 were obtained at high temperature. Then, using the flow characteristics obtained, compression simulation was carried out and compared with the experimental result for the purpose of verifying the obtained flow characteristics. Finally, a glass lens press simulation in progressive GMP process was carried out and we could forecast the shape of deformed glass lenses and residual stresses contribution in the structure of deformed glass lenses after forming

  12. Relaxations in spin glasses: Similarities and differences from ordinary glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai, K.L.; Rajagopal, A.K.; Huang, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Relaxation phenomena have become a major concern in the physics of spin glasses. There are certain resemblances of these relaxation properties to those of ordinary glasses. In this work, we compare the relaxation properties of spin glasses near the freezing temperature with those of glasses near the glass transition temperature. There are similarities between the two types of glasses. Moreover, the relaxation properties of many glasses and spin glasses are in conformity with two coupled ''universality'' relations predicted by a recent model of relaxations in condensed matter

  13. Improvement of the piezoelectric properties of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites by poling treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S M; Hwang, H Y

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a new non-destructive method has been proposed for damage monitoring of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials using the piezoelectric characteristics of a polymeric matrix. Several studies of the piezoelectric properties of unidirectional glass fiber epoxy composites and damage monitoring of double-cantilever beams have supported the claim that the piezoelectric method is feasible and powerful enough to monitor the damage of glass fiber epoxy composites. Generally, conventional piezoelectric materials have higher piezoelectric characteristics through poling treatment. In this work, we investigated the change of the piezoelectric properties of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites before and after poling treatment. The piezoelectric constants (d 33 ) of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites increased by more than 400%. Also, x-ray diffraction tests revealed that poling treatment changed the degree of crystallinity of the epoxy matrix, and this led to the improvement of the piezoelectric characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. (paper)

  14. Waste glass as partial mineral precursor in alkali-activated slag/fly ash system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, S.; Keulen, A.; Arbi, K.; Ye, G.

    2017-01-01

    The feasibility of a waste glass powder residue (GP) from glass recycling as partial mineral precursor to produce alkali-activated materials is investigated. GP served as powder coal fly ash (PCFA) replacement within a reference system composed of 50% PCFA and 50% ground granulated blast furnace

  15. Stress Mapping in Glass-to-Metal Seals using Indentation Crack Lengths.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strong, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Diebold, Thomas Wayne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newton, Clay S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bencoe, Denise N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Predicting the residual stress which develops during fabrication of a glass-to-metal compression seal requires material models that can accurately predict the effects of processing on the sealing glass. Validation of the predictions requires measurements on representative test geometries to accurately capture the interaction between the seal materials during a processing cycle required to form the seal, which consists of a temperature excursion through the glass transition temperature of the sealing glass. To this end, a concentric seal test geometry, referred to as a short cylinder seal, consisting of a stainless steel shell enveloping a commercial sealing glass disk has been designed, fabricated, and characterized as a model validation test geometry. To obtain data to test/validate finite element (FE) stress model predictions of this geometry, spatially-resolved residual stress was calculated from the measured lengths of the cracks emanating from radially positioned Vickers indents in the glass disk portion of the seal. The indentation crack length method is described, and the spatially-resolved residual stress determined experimentally are compared to FE stress predictions made using a nonlinear viscoelastic material model adapted to inorganic sealing glasses and an updated rate dependent material model for 304L stainless steel. The measurement method is a first to achieve a degree of success for measuring spatially resolved residual stress in a glass-bearing geometry and a favorable comparison between measurements and simulation was observed.

  16. Stress Mapping in Glass-to-Metal Seals using Indentation Crack Lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Component & Systems Analysis; Strong, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Material Mechanics and Tribology; Newton, Clay S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Material Mechanics and Tribology; Diebold, Thomas Wayne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Material Mechanics and Tribology; Bencoe, Denise N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electronic, Optical and Nano; Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Science; Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation System Analysis

    2017-08-01

    Predicting the residual stress which develops during fabrication of a glass-to-metal compression seal requires material models that can accurately predict the effects of processing on the sealing glass. Validation of the predictions requires measurements on representative test geometries to accurately capture the interaction between the seal materials during a processing cycle required to form the seal, which consists of a temperature excursion through the glass transition temperature of the sealing glass. To this end, a concentric seal test geometry, referred to as a short cylinder seal, consisting of a stainless steel shell enveloping a commercial sealing glass disk has been designed, fabricated, and characterized as a model validation test geometry. To obtain data to test/validate finite element (FE) stress model predictions of this geometry, spatially-resolved residual stress was calculated from the measured lengths of the cracks emanating from radially positioned Vickers indents in the glass disk portion of the seal. The indentation crack length method is described, and the spatially-resolved residual stress determined experimentally are compared to FE stress predictions made using a nonlinear viscoelastic material model adapted to inorganic sealing glasses and an updated rate dependent material model for 304L stainless steel. The measurement method is a first to achieve a degree of success for measuring spatially resolved residual stress in a glass-bearing geometry and a favorable comparison between measurements and simulation was observed.

  17. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  18. Dynamic mechanical and dielectric behavior of banana–glass hybrid fiber reinforced polyester composites.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pothan, LA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites of glass and banana fiber (obtained from the pseudo stem of Musa sapientum) in polyester matrix, are subjected to dynamic mechanical analysis over a range of temperature and three different frequencies. The effect of temperature...

  19. Electric glass capturing markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, K.; Wikstroem, T.

    1996-11-01

    Electric glass has found its place on the construction market. In public buildings, electrically heatable windows are becoming the leading option for large glass walls. Studies on detached houses, both new and renovated, show that floor heating combined with electrically heatable windowpanes is the best choice with respect to resident`s comfort. (orig.)

  20. Radioresistance of inorganic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, A.A.; Zavadovskaya, E.K.; Fedorov, B.V.; Starodubtsev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Regularities are considered in the variation of properties of glass due to irradiations. On the basis of previous theoretical statements and experimental investigations, it is inferred that the irradiation resistance of glasses of the same type, synthesis conditions, content of impurities and amount of imperfections, is a function of the ''element-oxygen'' bond energy. The irradiation resistance depends on the number and the nature of glass structure imperfections. The averaged level of bonding forces is indicative of the glass formation temperature; the imperfections in glasses are formed in structure elements whose amount predominates as compared to the others. Electric charges which accumulate on the crack surface tend to increase its size, thus lessening even further the electric strength of the dielectric. The greater the irradiation time, the greater the number of irradiation imperfections causing a drop in the electric strength of glass. When choosing a glass for service in a radiation field, it is necessary to select those of a highest temperature of glass formation and with a least amount of imperfections

  1. Nucleation in ZBLAN glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leede, G.L.A.; Waal, de H.

    1989-01-01

    Nucleation rates were detd. in a ZrF4-BaF2-NaF-LaF3-AlF3 glass (ZBLAN) using an optical method. The results were compared with a similar glass having a slightly different compn. The difference in the nucleation rate is explained by classical nucleation theory using calcd. free-energy differences

  2. Physical and optical properties of lithium borosilicate glasses doped with Dy3+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramteke, D. D.; Gedam, R. S.; Swart, H. C.

    2018-04-01

    The borosilicate glasses with Dy3+ ions were prepared by the melt quench technique with varying concentration of Dy2O3. The glasses were characterized by the density calculation, absorbance and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy measurements. Density and molar volume of the glasses increases with increase in Dy3+ ions in the glass matrix. This behavior is correlated with the higher molecular weight and larger ionic radius of Dy3+ ion compared to the other constituents of glass matrix. Emission of Dy3+ doped glasses showed three bands at 482, 573 and at 665 nm which correspond to 6H15/2 (blue), 6H13/2 (yellow) and 6H11/2 (red) transitions. The emission spectra of glasses with different concentration of Dy3+ ions shows that, glasses with 0.5 mol% of Dy2O3 shows highest emission and decreases with further doping. CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram showed that the emission of these glasses was in the white region. Photographs of these glasses under 349 nm Light emitting diode excitation also confirmed the white light emission from these glasses.

  3. Modelling of the Residual Stress State in a new Type of Residual Stress Specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Johnny; Andreasen, Jens Henrik

    2014-01-01

    forms the experimental case which is analysed. A FE model of the specimen is used for analysing the curing history and the residual stress build up. The model is validated against experimental strain data which are recorded by a Fibre Brag Grating sensor and good agreement has been achieved.......The paper presents a study on a new type residual stress specimen which is proposed as a simple way to conduct experimental validation for model predictions. A specimen comprising of a steel plate with circular hole embedded into a stack of CSM glass fibre and further infused with an epoxy resin...

  4. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  5. Polymorphism in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landa, L.M.; Nikolaeva, I.N.

    1979-01-01

    To defect phase interfaces and spasmodic properties change, the inhomogeneity and the second radiation effects in quartz glass, metamict phase and intermediate states have been investigated. When irradiating with fast neutrons the transformation of quartz glass - metamict phase occurs completely. The transformation is completed at 2x10 20 part./cm 2 dose. Thermal treatment not only increases the number of inhomogeneities but also results in increasing quartz glass density. Annealing transforms the metamict phase into common quartz glass at 1400 K. The fact, that thermal treatment results in the complete transformation of metamict phase into quartz glass, and the inverse transformation occurs only partially, is quite regular, as the metamict phase has a lesser entropy and is a more ordered state. It is shown that different amorphous phases of a chemical composition have different structures and properties, that there are interfaces between them, and the transformation from one state to another in microvolumes is realized spasmodically and requires expenditure of energy

  6. Validation Assessment of a Glass-to-Metal Seal Finite-Element Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Emery, John M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Vicente J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newton, Clay S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Arthur [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Sealing glasses are ubiquitous in high pressure and temperature engineering applications, such as hermetic feed-through electrical connectors. A common connector technology are glass-to-metal seals where a metal shell compresses a sealing glass to create a hermetic seal. Though finite-element analysis has been used to understand and design glass-to-metal seals for many years, there has been little validation of these models. An indentation technique was employed to measure the residual stress on the surface of a simple glass-to-metal seal. Recently developed rate- dependent material models of both Schott 8061 and 304L VAR stainless steel have been applied to a finite-element model of the simple glass-to-metal seal. Model predictions of residual stress based on the evolution of material models are shown. These model predictions are compared to measured data. Validity of the finite- element predictions is discussed. It will be shown that the finite-element model of the glass-to-metal seal accurately predicts the mean residual stress in the glass near the glass-to-metal interface and is valid for this quantity of interest.

  7. Glass leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  8. Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the durability of nuclear waste glass is paramount if reliable models are to be constructed so that the glass dissolution rate in a given geological repository can be calculated. Presently, it is agreed that (boro)silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4) with higher [H4SiO4] leading to lower dissolution rates. Once the reaction has slowed as a result of the buildup of H4SiO4, another increase in the rate has been observed that corresponds to the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products. However, it has also been observed that the concentration of silica-bearing solution species does not significantly decrease, indicating saturation, while other glass tracer elements concentrations continue to increase, indicating that the glass is still dissolving. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a representative zeolitic silica-bearing alteration product, analcime [Na(AlSi2O6)∙H2O]. To simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix for amorphous silica was substituted for the glass pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix because it has been shown that silicate glasses act as a silica-only solid with respect to kinetic considerations. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. From the simulations we conclude, firstly, that the rate of glass dissolution is dependent on the kinetics of

  9. Role of MnO in manganese–borate binary glass systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structural and thermal properties of x MnO−( 100 − x )B 2 O 3 (where x = 40 , 50 and 60 mol%) glass samples have been investigated with the employment of various techniques. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results revealed the influence of MnO on glass matrix. Decrease of B–O bond-related band intensities has ...

  10. Lead and copper removal from aqueous solutions by porous glass derived calcium hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Wen; Zhan Lei; Piao Longhua; Ruessel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: . Adsorption of Pb 2+ increases with the increase in NaCl volume percentage (1:0%, 2:30%, 3:40%, 4:40%) of the Glass Derived Hydroxyapatite and reaches equilibrium after 24 h. Highlights: → Novel porous glass derived hydroxyapatite matrix is prepared. → Glass derived hydroxyapatite matrix adsorbs lead and copper ions in solutions effectively. → Two adsorption mechanisms including ion exchange theory and the dissolution and precipitation theory are involved in removal of the heavy metal ions from the solutions. - Abstract: A porous glass was prepared by sintering Na 2 O-CaO-B 2 O 3 glass powder with powdered sodium chloride. Subsequently, the sodium chloride was dissolved in water resulting in a highly porous material. A sample was prepared consisting of 60 vol% glass and 40 vol% salt which both had particle sizes 2 HPO 4 solutions at room temperature for 1 day. The porous glass derived hydroxyapatite matrix was then processed for removing lead and copper ions from aqueous solutions. The results showed that the glass derived calcium hydroxyapatite matrix effectively immobilizes lead and copper ions in solution. The adsorption mechanism was investigated by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy including Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDX).

  11. Tribo-mechanical behaviour of SiC filled glass-epoxy composites at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While glass fibers enhance the toughness of the matrix, silicon carbide shows high hardness, thermal stability and low chemical reactivity, leading to superior friction properties. In this work an attempt was made to evaluate the mechanical properties and tribological behaviour of glass fabric reinforced- epoxy (G-E) ...

  12. Matrix metalloproteinases outside vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino-Puertas, Laura; Goulas, Theodoros; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2017-11-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family belongs to the metzincin clan of zinc-dependent metallopeptidases. Due to their enormous implications in physiology and disease, MMPs have mainly been studied in vertebrates. They are engaged in extracellular protein processing and degradation, and present extensive paralogy, with 23 forms in humans. One characteristic of MMPs is a ~165-residue catalytic domain (CD), which has been structurally studied for 14 MMPs from human, mouse, rat, pig and the oral-microbiome bacterium Tannerella forsythia. These studies revealed close overall coincidence and characteristic structural features, which distinguish MMPs from other metzincins and give rise to a sequence pattern for their identification. Here, we reviewed the literature available on MMPs outside vertebrates and performed database searches for potential MMP CDs in invertebrates, plants, fungi, viruses, protists, archaea and bacteria. These and previous results revealed that MMPs are widely present in several copies in Eumetazoa and higher plants (Tracheophyta), but have just token presence in eukaryotic algae. A few dozen sequences were found in Ascomycota (within fungi) and in double-stranded DNA viruses infecting invertebrates (within viruses). In contrast, a few hundred sequences were found in archaea and >1000 in bacteria, with several copies for some species. Most of the archaeal and bacterial phyla containing potential MMPs are present in human oral and gut microbiomes. Overall, MMP-like sequences are present across all kingdoms of life, but their asymmetric distribution contradicts the vertical descent model from a eubacterial or archaeal ancestor. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Matrix Metalloproteinases edited by Rafael Fridman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Disposition of actinides released from high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A series of static leach tests was conducted using glasses developed for vitrifying tank wastes at the Savannah River Site to monitor the disposition of actinide elements upon corrosion of the glasses. In these tests, glasses produced from SRL 131 and SRL 202 frits were corroded at 90 degrees C in a tuff groundwater. Tests were conducted using crushed glass at different glass surface area-to-solution volume (S/V) ratios to assess the effect of the S/V on the solution chemistry, the corrosion of the glass, and the disposition of actinide elements. Observations regarding the effects of the S/V on the solution chemistry and the corrosion of the glass matrix have been reported previously. This paper highlights the solution analyses performed to assess how the S/V used in a static leach test affects the disposition of actinide elements between fractions that are suspended or dissolved in the solution, and retained by the altered glass or other materials

  14. Thermomechanical analyses of phenolic foam reinforced with glass fiber mat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jintang; Yao, Zhengjun; Chen, Yongxin; Wei, Dongbo; Wu, Yibing

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Over 10% glass fiber was used to reinforce phenolic foam in the shape of glass fiber mat. • Nucleating agents were used together with glass fiber mat and improved tensile strength of phenolic foam by 215.6%. • Nucleating agents lead to a smaller bubble size of phenolic foam. • The glass transition temperature of phenolic foam remained unchanged during the reinforcement. - Abstract: In this paper, thermomechanical analysis (TMA) and dynamic mechanical analysis were employed to study the properties of phenolic foam reinforced with glass fiber mat. Unreinforced phenolic foam was taken as the control sample. Mechanical tests and scanning electron microscopy were performed to confirm the results of TMA. The results show that glass fiber mat reinforcement improves the mechanical performance of phenolic foam, and nucleating agents improve it further. Phenolic foam reinforced with glass fiber mat has a smaller thermal expansion coefficient compared with unreinforced foam. The storage modulus of the reinforced phenolic foam is also higher than that in unreinforced foam, whereas the loss modulus of the former is lower than that of the latter. The glass transition temperature of the phenolic foam matrix remains unchanged during the reinforcement

  15. Conversion of plutonium-containing materials into borosilicate glass using the glass material oxidation and dissolution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    The end of the cold war has resulted in excess plutonium-containing materials (PCMs) in multiple chemical forms. Major problems are associated with the long-term management of these materials: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns; waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by conversion of the PCMs to glass: however, conventional glass processes require oxide-like feed materials. Conversion of PCMs to oxide-like materials followed by vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) to allow direct conversion of PCMs to glass. GMODS directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. Equipment options have been identified for processing rates between 1 and 100,000 t/y. Significant work, including a pilot plant, is required to develop GMODS for applications at an industrial scale

  16. The Fracture Process of Tempered Soda-Lime-Silica Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Stang, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    This work presents experimental observations of the characteristic fracture process of tempered glass. Square specimens with a side length of 300 mm, various thicknesses and a residual stress state characterized by photoelastic measurements were used. Fracture was initiated using a 2.5 mm diamond...

  17. Utilization of borosilicate glass for transuranic waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledford, J.A.; Williams, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    Incinerated transuranic waste and other low-level residues have been successfully vitrified by mixing with boric acid and sodium carbonate and heating to 1050 0 C in a bench-scale continuous melter. The resulting borosilicate glass demonstrates excellent mechanical durability and chemical stability

  18. Immobilization of hazardous and radioactive waste into glass structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-01

    As a result of more than three decades of international research, glass has emerged as the material of choice for immobilization of a wide range of potentially hazardous radioactive and non-radioactive materials. The ability of glass structures to incorporate and then immobilize many different elements into durable, high integrity, waste glass products is a direct function of the unique random network structure of the glassy state. Every major country involved with long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has either selected or is considering glass as the matrix of choice for immobilizing and ultimately, disposing of the potentially hazardous, high-level radioactive material. There are many reasons why glass is preferred. Among the most important considerations are the ability of glass structures to accommodate and immobilize the many different types of radionuclides present in HLW, and to produce a product that not only has excellent technical properties, but also possesses good processing features. Good processability allows the glass to be fabricated with relative ease even under difficult remote-handling conditions necessary for vitrification of highly radioactive material. The single most important property of the waste glass produced is its ability to retain hazardous species within the glass structure and this is reflected by its excellent chemical durability and corrosion resistance to a wide range of environmental conditions. In addition to immobilization of HLW glass matrices are also being considered for isolation of many other types of hazardous materials, both radioactive as well as nonradioactive. This includes vitrification of various actinides resulting from clean-up operations and the legacy of the cold war, as well as possible immobilization of weapons grade plutonium resulting from disarmament activities. Other types of wastes being considered for immobilization into glasses include transuranic wastes, mixed wastes, contaminated

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  20. A Ba-free sealing glass with a high CTE and excellent interface stability optimized for SOFC/SOEC stack applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritucci, Ilaria; Agersted, Karsten; Zielke, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    -mechanical properties and compositional variations are reviewed and discussed by thermal analyses and in situ XRD, in order to design and optimize the sealing profile and reduce the residual porosity. The glass after heat treatment partially devitrifies into augite and nepheline with residual glass phase of around 64...

  1. Anorthite glass: a potential host matrix for 90Sr pencil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Pranesh; Dey, G.K.; Fanara, Sara; Chakraborty, Sumit; Mishra, R.K.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    With rising global concerns over health hazards, environmental pollution and possible malicious applications of radioactive materials, there is an increasing consciousness among public and Governmental agencies for its better control, accounting and security. Investigations carried out by International Atomic Energy Agency and other monitoring bodies reveal that among various radioactive materials, the easily dispersible ones are high activity sealed sources (generally called radioactive pencils) used for various peaceful applications. Ideally, these sealed sources should be safely secured within specialized facilities, but in practice, it is not always done. Hence, there is a need to take an extra precautionary measure to ensure that the matrices currently used for hosting the radionuclides within sealed sources are durable enough under harsh service conditions and situations arising due to possible mishaps (accidents, misplaced, stolen etc). Among the variety of useful radionuclides, 90 Sr is one which is regularly used to (i) combat bone cancer, (ii) destroy unwanted tissue on the surface of eye/skin, (iii) light up/provide energy to remotely accessible areas etc. However, due to its (i) toxicity, (ii) mobility, (iii) easy incorporation within human body, (iv) considerable half-life (∼ 29 years), (v) emission of beta (β - ) particles along with high energy gamma ( γ)-rays, and (vi) retention of significant toxicity within sources even after service life, release of 90 Sr poses a serious threat to the biosphere. Hence, there is a need to ensure that existing 90 Sr host matrices are capable of withstanding all sorts of adversity that may arise during service and under storage/disposal

  2. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verné, Enrica; Bruno, Matteo; Miola, Marta; Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia

    2015-08-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-FeO-Fe2O3 and contains magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite - HAp - layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Drilling in tempered glass – modelling and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    The present paper reports experimentally and numerically obtained results for the process of drilling in tempered glass. The experimental results are drilling depths on the edge in 19mm tempered glass with a known residual stress state measured by a scattered light polariscope. The experiments have...... been modelled using a state-of-the-art model and compared with satisfying result to the performed experiments. The numerical model has been used for a parametric study, investigating the redistribution of residual stresses during the process of drilling. This is done for investigating the possibility...... of applying forces in such holes and thereby being able to mechanically assemble tempered glass without the need of drilling holes before the tempering process. The paper is the result of currently ongoing research and the results should be treated as so....

  4. Connectivity of glass structure. Oxygen number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, E. F.; Min'ko, N. I.

    2018-03-01

    With reference to mathematics, crystal chemistry and chemical technology of synthesis of glass structures in the solution (sol-gel technology), the paper is devoted to the study of the degree of connectivity of a silicon-oxygen backbone (fSi) and the oxygen number (R) [1]. It reveals logical contradictions and uncertainty of mathematical expressions of parameters, since fSi is not similar to the oxygen number. The connectivity of any structure is a result of various types of bonds: ion-covalent, donor-acceptor, hydrogen bonds, etc. Besides, alongside with SiO2, many glass compositions contain other glass-forming elements due to tetrahedral sites thus formed. The connectivity function of a glassy network with any set of glass-forming elements is roughly ensured by connectivity factor Y [2], which has monovalent elements loosening a glassy network. The paper considers the existence of various structural motives in hydrogen-impermeable glasses containing B2O3, Al2O3, PbO, Na2O, K2O and rare-earth elements. Hence, it also describes gradual nucleation, change of crystal forms, and structure consolidation in the process of substance intake from a matrix solution according to sol-gel technology. The crystal form varied from two-dimensional plates to three-dimensional and dendritical ones [3]. Alternative parameters, such as the oxygen number (O) and the structure connectivity factor (Y), were suggested. Functional dependence of Y=f(O) to forecast the generated structures was obtained for two- and multicomponent glass compositions.

  5. Glass Dissolution Parameters: Update for Entsorgungsnachweis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curti, E.

    2003-11-01

    This document provides updated long-term corrosion rates for borosilicate glasses used in Switzerland as a matrix for high-level radioactive waste. The new rates are based on long-term leaching experiments conducted at PSI and are corroborated by recent investigations. The asymptotic rates have been determined through weighted linear regressions of the normalised mass losses, directly calculated from B and Li concentrations in the leaching solutions. Special attention was given to the determination of the analytical uncertainty of the mass losses. The sensitivity of the corrosion rates to analytical uncertainties and to other criteria (e.g. the choice of data points for the regressions) was also studied. A major finding was that the uncertainty of the corrosion rate mainly depends on the uncertainty of the specific glass surface area. The reference rates proposed for safety assessment calculations are 1.5 mg m -2 d -1 for BNFL glasses and 0.2 mg m -2 d -1 for Cogema glasses. The relevance of the proposed corrosion rates for repository conditions is shown based on the analysis of processes and parameters currently known to affect the long-term kinetics of silicate glasses. Specifically, recent studies indicate that potentially detrimental effects, notably the removal of silica from solution through adsorption on clay minerals, are transitory and will not affect the long-term corrosion rate of the Swiss reference glasses. Iron corrosion products are also known to bind silica, but present data are not sufficient to quantify their influence on the long-term rate. (author)

  6. High-temperature vitrification of Hanford residual-liquid waste in a continuous melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.M.

    1980-04-01

    Over 270 kg of high-temperature borosilicate glass have been produced in a series of three short-term tests in the High-Temperature Ceramic Melter vitrification system at PNL. The glass produced was formulated to vitrify simulated Hanford residual-liquid waste. The tests were designed to (1) demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing high-temperature, continuous-vitrification technology for the immobilization of the residual-liquid waste, (2) test the airlift draining technique utilized by the high-temperature melter, (3) compare glass produced in this process to residual-liquid glass produced under laboratory conditions, (4) investigate cesium volatility from the melter during waste processing, and (5) determine the maximum residual-liquid glass production rate in the high-temperature melter. The three tests with the residual-liquid composition confirmed the viability of the continuous-melting vitrification technique for the immobilization of this waste. The airlift draining technique was demonstrated in these tests and the glass produced from the melter was shown to be less porous than the laboratory-produced glass. The final glass produced from the second test was compared to a glass of the same composition produced under laboratory conditions. The comparative tests found the glasses to be indistinguishable, as the small differences in the test results fell within the precision range of the characterization testing equipment. The cesium volatility was examined in the final test. This examination showed that 0.44 wt % of the cesium (assumed to be cesium oxide) was volatilized, which translates to a volatilization rate of 115 mg/cm 2 -h

  7. Cerium, uranium, and plutonium behavior in glass-bonded sodalite, a ceramic nuclear waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Lexa, D.; Morss, L. R.; Richmann, M. K.

    1999-01-01

    Glass-bonded sodalite is being developed as a ceramic waste form (CWF) to immobilize radioactive fission products, actinides, and salt residues from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear reactor fuel. The CWF consists of about 75 mass % sodalite, 25 mass % glass, and small amounts of other phases. This paper presents some results and interpretation of physical measurements to characterize the CWF structure, and dissolution tests to measure the release of matrix components and radionuclides from the waste form. Tests have been carried out with specimens of the CWF that contain rare earths at concentrations similar to those expected in the waste form. Parallel tests have been carried out on specimens that have uranium or plutonium as well as the rare earths at concentrations similar to those expected in the waste forms; in these specimens UCl 3 forms UO 2 and PuCl 3 forms PuO 2 . The normalized releases of rare earths in dissolution tests were found to be much lower than those of matrix elements (B, Si, Al, Na). When there is no uranium in the CWF, the release of cerium is two to ten times lower than the release of the other rare earths. The low release of cerium may be due to its tetravalent state in uranium-free CWF. However, when there is uranium in the CWF, the release of cerium is similar to that of the other rare earths. This trivalent behavior of cerium is attributed to charge transfer or covalent interactions among cerium, uranium, and oxygen in (U,Ce)O 2

  8. Rigidity percolation in dispersions with a structured viscoelastic matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbrink, M.W.L.; Michels, M.A.J.; Vellinga, W.P.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with rigidity percolation in composite materials consisting of a dispersion of mineral particles in a microstructured viscoelastic matrix. The viscoelastic matrix in this specific case is a hydrocarbon refinery residue. In a set of model random composites the mean interparticle

  9. Remaining stress-state and strain-energy in tempered glass fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2016-01-01

    to the fragmentation process and some authors e.g. Barsom (J Am Ceram Soc 51(2):75, 1968), Gulati (Glass processing days, Tamglass Engineering Oy, Tampere, 1997), Warren (Fractography of glasses and ceramics IV, Alfred University, Alfred, 2001) and Tandon and Glass (Fracture mechanics of ceramics—active materials......When tempered glass breaks, it shatters into relatively small pieces depending on the residual stress state in the glass. This has been known for centuries and is currently used in standards for classifying whether a piece of glass is tempered or not. However, the process of fragmentation...... is complex and only a few, relatively simple, models have been suggested for predicting the fragment size. The full theoretical explanation is still to be found and this work aims at providing another brick to the puzzle. The strain-energy present in tempered glass is obviously contributing...

  10. Classification of Feedwater Heater Performance Degradation Using Residual Sign Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Gayeon; Heo, Gyunyoung; Song, Seok Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Since a performance of Feedwater Heater (FWH) is directly related to the thermodynamic efficiency of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), performance degradation of FWH results in loss of thermal power and ultimately business benefit. Nevertheless, it is difficult to diagnose its degradation of performance during normal operation due to its minor changes in process parameters, for instance, pressure, temperature, and flowrate. In this paper, six degradation modes have been analyzed and the performance indices for FWH such as Terminal Temperature Difference (TTD) and Drain Cooling Approach (DCA) have been used to diagnose degradation modes. PEPSE (Performance Evaluation of Power System Efficiencies) simulation, which is a plant simulation software simulating plant static characteristic and building energy balance model, has been used to generate the data of performance indices of FWH and actual measurements of FWH from NPPs was used to validate the classification model. In this paper, six degradation modes have been analyzed and the performance indices for FWH have been used to diagnose what degradation mode occurs. The RSM was proposed as a trend identifier of variables. Using RSM, it is possible to obtain appropriate information of the variables in noise environment since noise can be compressed while the original information is being converted to a trend. The SVC has been performed to classify the degradation mode of FWH, and then actual measurements of FWH from NPPs was used to validate the classification model. Performance indices under various leakage conditions show different patterns. In further study, tube leakage simulations for the various cases will be needed

  11. Classification of Feedwater Heater Performance Degradation Using Residual Sign Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Gayeon; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Seok Yoon [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Since a performance of Feedwater Heater (FWH) is directly related to the thermodynamic efficiency of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), performance degradation of FWH results in loss of thermal power and ultimately business benefit. Nevertheless, it is difficult to diagnose its degradation of performance during normal operation due to its minor changes in process parameters, for instance, pressure, temperature, and flowrate. In this paper, six degradation modes have been analyzed and the performance indices for FWH such as Terminal Temperature Difference (TTD) and Drain Cooling Approach (DCA) have been used to diagnose degradation modes. PEPSE (Performance Evaluation of Power System Efficiencies) simulation, which is a plant simulation software simulating plant static characteristic and building energy balance model, has been used to generate the data of performance indices of FWH and actual measurements of FWH from NPPs was used to validate the classification model. In this paper, six degradation modes have been analyzed and the performance indices for FWH have been used to diagnose what degradation mode occurs. The RSM was proposed as a trend identifier of variables. Using RSM, it is possible to obtain appropriate information of the variables in noise environment since noise can be compressed while the original information is being converted to a trend. The SVC has been performed to classify the degradation mode of FWH, and then actual measurements of FWH from NPPs was used to validate the classification model. Performance indices under various leakage conditions show different patterns. In further study, tube leakage simulations for the various cases will be needed.

  12. R7T7 glass alteration mechanism in an aqueous closed system: understanding and modelling the long term alteration kinetic; Etude des mecanismes d'alteration par l'eau du verre R7T7 en milieu confine: comprehension et modelisation de la cinetique residuelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chave, T

    2007-10-15

    The long term alteration rate of the French R7T7 nuclear glass has been investigated since many years because it will define the overall resistance of the radionuclide containment matrix. Recent studies have shown that the final rate remains constant or is slightly decreasing with time. It never reaches zero. Though this residual rate is very low, only 5 nm per year at 50 C, it would be the dominant alteration phenomenon in a geological repository. Two mechanisms are suggested for explaining such behaviour: diffusion in solution of elements from glass through an amorphous altered layer and precipitation of neo-formed phases. The diffusion processes are in agreement with a solid state diffusion mechanism and can lead to secondary phase precipitation due to solution concentration increases. Observed phases are mainly phyllosilicates and zeolites, in specific conditions. Phyllosilicates are expected to maintain the residual kinetic rate whereas alteration resumption could be observed in presence of zeolites at very high pH or temperature (10.5 at 90 C or temperature above 150 C). Both diffusion and neo-formed phase precipitation have been investigated in order to better understand their impact on the residual alteration rate and have then been modelled by a calculation code, coupling chemistry and transport, in order to be able to better anticipate the long term behaviour of the glass R7T7 in an aqueous closed system. (author)

  13. A Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilization of Rare Earth Oxides from the Pyroprocessing Waste salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung-Gil; Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, Hwan-Young; Kim, In-Tae

    2008-01-01

    The fission product of rare earth (RE) oxide wastes are generates during the pyroprocess . Borosilicate glass or some ceramic materials such as monazite, apatite or sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) have been a prospective host matrix through lots of experimental results. Silicate glasses have long been the preferred waste form for the immobilization of HLW. In immobilization of the RE oxides, the developed process on an industrial scale involves their incorporation into a glass matrix, by melting under 1200 ∼ 1300 .deg. C. Instead of the melting process, glass powder sintering is lower temperature (∼ 900 .deg. C) required for the process which implies less demanding conditions for the equipment and a less evaporation of volatile radionuclides. This study reports the behaviors, direct vitrification of RE oxides with glass frit, glass powder sintering of REceramic with glass frit, formation of RE-apatite (or REmonazite) ceramic according to reaction temperature, and the leach resistance of the solidified waste forms

  14. Oxynitride glasses: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.R.; Clausell, C.; Barba, A.

    2016-07-01

    Oxynitride glasses are special types of silicates or silicoaluminates which have been the object of many studies over the last forty years. They can be prepared by means of various complex methods, leading to variable levels of nitrogen incorporation, though in all cases giving limited transparency in the visible range. More recently, a new family of oxynitride glasses incorporating fluorine has been investigated. This paper outlines the effect of composition, in particular nitrogen and fluorine content, on properties such as glass transition temperature, hardness, Young's modulus, compactness and molar volume. (Author)

  15. Orbital glass in HTSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-10-01

    The physical reasons why the orbital glass may exist in granular high-temperature superconductors and the existing experimental data appeared recently are discussed. The orbital glass is characterized by the coexistence of the orbital paramagnetic state with the superconducting state and occurs at small magnetic fields H c0 c1 . The transition in orbital glass arises at the critical field H c0 which is inversely proportional to the surface cross-area S of an average grain. In connection with theoretical predictions the possible experiments are proposed. (author). 10 refs

  16. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960´s, a great interest in the use of bioceramic materials for biomedical applications has been developed. In a previous paper, the authors reviewed crystalline bioceramic materials “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials, constituted for non-metallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidates by thermal treatment of powders at high temperature. In the present review, the authors deal with those called bioactive glasses and glassceramics. Although all of them are also obtained by thermal treatment at high temperature, the first are amorphous and the second are obtained by devitrification of a glass, although the vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases. After an introduction to the concept of bioactive materials, a short historical review of the bioactive glasses development is made. Its preparation, reactivity in physiological media, mechanism of bonding to living tissues and mechanical strength of the bone-implant interface is also reported. Next, the concept of glass-ceramic and the way of its preparation are exposed. The composition, physicochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramic materials: Bioglass®, Ceravital®, Cerabone®, Ilmaplant® and Bioverit® are also reviewed. Finally, a short review on the bioactive-glass coatings and bioactive-composites and most common uses of bioactive-glasses and glass-ceramics are carried out too.

    Desde finales de los años sesenta, se ha despertado un gran interés por el uso de los materiales biocerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. En un trabajo previo, los autores hicieron una revisión de los denominados materiales biocerámicos cristalinos en sentido estricto, es decir, de aquellos materiales, constituidos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados mediante tratamientos térmicos a altas temperaturas. En el presente trabajo, los autores

  17. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements of the ...... an overview of the structure of the research and a summary of current status archived so far.......Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...... of the residual stress state before failure and high-speed camera recordings of the failure are being performed in order to verify the numerical model. The primary goal of this research is to follow the overall fracture of a structural element – e.g. beam – loaded inplane. Present paper would like to give...

  18. Role of residual water hydrogen bonding in sugar/water/biomolecule systems: a possible explanation for trehalose peculiarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordone, L; Cottone, G; Giuffrida, S [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo and CNISM (Italy)

    2007-05-23

    We report on the set of experimental and simulative evidences which enabled us to suggest how biological structures embedded in a non-liquid water-saccharide solvent are anchored to the surrounding matrix via a hydrogen bond network. Such a network, whose rigidity increases by decreasing the sample water content, couples the degrees of freedom of the biostructure to those of the matrix and gives place to protein-saccharide-water structures (protein-solvent conformational substates). In particular, the whole set of data evidences that, while the protein-sugar interaction is well described in terms of a water entrapment hypothesis, the water replacement hypothesis better describes the sugar-membrane interaction; furthermore, it gives a hint towards the understanding of the origin of the trehalose peculiarity since the biomolecule-matrix coupling, specific to each particular sugar, always results in being the tightest for trehalose. In line with the heterogeneous dynamics in supercooled fluids and in carbohydrate glasses of different residual water contents, recent results confirm, at the single molecule level, the existence of protein-solvent conformational substates, spatially heterogeneous and interconverting, whose rigidity increases by lowering the sample hydration.

  19. Simulation of alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses by ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dube, Charu L., E-mail: dubecharu@gmail.com; Stennett, Martin C.; Gandy, Amy S.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate glasses is simulated by employing ion irradiation technique. • FTIR and Raman spectroscopic measurements confirm modification of glass network. • The depolymerisation of glass network after irradiation is attributed to synergetic effect of nuclear and electronic losses. - Abstract: A surrogate approach of ion beam irradiation is employed to simulate alpha decay of actinides in iron phosphate nuclear waste glasses. Bismuth and helium ions of different energies have been selected for simulating glass matrix modification owing to radiolysis and ballistic damage due to recoil atoms. Structural modification and change in coordination number of network former were probed by employing Reflectance Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies as a consequence of ion irradiation. Depolymerisation is observed in glass sample irradiated at intermediate energy of 2 MeV. Helium blisters of micron size are seen in glass sample irradiated at low helium ion energy of 30 keV.

  20. Electrical characterization of strontium titanate borosilicate glass ceramics system with bismuth oxide addition using impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, O.P.; Kumar, Devendra; Parkash, Om; Pandey, Lakshman

    2003-01-01

    The ac electrical data, measured in the frequency range 0.1 kHz-1 MHz, were used to study the electrical response of strontium titanate borosilicate glass ceramic system with bismuth oxide addition. Complex plane plots from these electrical data for various glass ceramic samples reveal contributions from simultaneously operating polarization mechanisms to overall dielectric behavior. The complex modulus (M * ) representation of electrical data for various glass ceramic samples were found to be more informative. Equivalent circuit models, which represent the electrical behavior of glass ceramic samples, were determined using complex non-linear least square (CNLS) fitting. An attempt has been made to understand the dielectric behavior of various glass ceramics in terms of contributions arising from different polarization processes occurring at glassy matrix, crystalline phases, glass to crystal interface region and blocking electrodes. Glass ceramics containing SrTiO 3 and TiO 2 (rutile) phases show thermally stable dielectric behavior

  1. Utilization of waste glass in ECO-cement: Strength properties and microstructural observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, Konstantin; Tuerker, Pelin; Soboleva, Svetlana; Iscioglu, Gunsel

    2007-01-01

    Waste glass creates a serious environmental problem, mainly because of the inconsistency of the waste glass streams. The use of waste glass as a finely ground mineral additive (FGMA) in cement is a promising direction for recycling. Based on the method of mechano-chemical activation, a new group of ECO-cements was developed. In ECO-cement, relatively large amounts (up to 70%) of portland cement clinker can be replaced with waste glass. This report examines the effect of waste glass on the microstructure and strength of ECO-cement based materials. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations were used to observe the changes in the cement hydrates and interface between the cement matrix and waste glass particles. According to the research results, the developed ECO-cement with 50% of waste glass possessed compressive strength properties at a level similar to normal portland cement

  2. Size-dependent penetrant diffusion in polymer glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dong; Zhang, Kai; Kumar, Sanat K

    2018-05-18

    Molecular Dynamics simulations are used to understand the underpinning basis of the transport of gas-like solutes in deeply quenched polymeric glasses. As found in previous work, small solutes, with sizes smaller than 0.15 times the chain monomer size, move as might be expected in a medium with large pores. In contrast, the motion of larger solutes is activated and is strongly facilitated by matrix motion. In particular, solute motion is coupled to the local elastic fluctuations of the matrix as characterized by the Debye-Waller factor. While similar ideas have been previously proposed for the viscosity of supercooled liquids above their glass transition, to our knowledge, this is the first illustration of this concept in the context of solute mass transport in deeply quenched polymer glasses.

  3. Fun with Singing Wine Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency…

  4. Waste glass weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass

  5. Super ionic conductive glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  6. Rare earth ion controlled crystallization of mica glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garai, Mrinmoy; Karmakar, Basudeb, E-mail: basudebk@cgcri.res.in

    2016-09-05

    In understanding the effects of rare earth ions to control the crystallization and microstructure of alkaline boroaluminosilicate system, the CeO{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped K{sub 2}O−MgO−B{sub 2}O{sub 3}−Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}−SiO{sub 2}−F glasses were synthesized by melt-quenching at 1550 °C. Higher density (2.82–3.06 g cm{sup −3}) and thermal stability (glass phase) is experiential on addition of rare earth content, which also affects in increasing the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) and crystallization temperature (T{sub c}). Decrease of thermal expansion in glasses with rare earth ion content is maintained by the stabilization of glass matrix owing to their large cationic field strength. A significant change in the non-isothermal DSC thermogram observed at 750–1050 °C is attributed to fluorophlogopite crystallization. Opaque glass-ceramics were prepared from such glasses by single step heat-treatment at 1050 °C; and the predominant crystalline phases are identified as fluorophlogopite mica, KMg{sub 3}(AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 10})F{sub 2} by XRD and EDX analysis. The compact glass-ceramic microstructure by the agglomeration of fluorophlogopite mica crystallites (crystal size ∼ 100–500 nm, FESEM) is achieved in attendance of rare earth ion; and such microstructure controlled the variation of density, thermal expansion and microhardness value. Higher thermal expansion (11.11–14.08 × 10{sup −6}/K at 50–800 °C and 50–900 °C) of such glass-ceramics approve that these rare earth containing glasses can be useful for high temperature vacuum sealing application with metal or solid electrolyte. The increase of Vickers microhardness (5.27–5.61 GPa) in attendance of rare earth ions is attributed to the compact crystallinity of fluorophlogopite mica glass-ceramic microstructure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of rare earth oxide doped alkaline boroaluminosilicate glasses. • Development of opaque

  7. Rare earth ion controlled crystallization of mica glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garai, Mrinmoy; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2016-01-01

    In understanding the effects of rare earth ions to control the crystallization and microstructure of alkaline boroaluminosilicate system, the CeO_2, Nd_2O_3, Sm_2O_3 and Gd_2O_3 doped K_2O−MgO−B_2O_3−Al_2O_3−SiO_2−F glasses were synthesized by melt-quenching at 1550 °C. Higher density (2.82–3.06 g cm"−"3) and thermal stability (glass phase) is experiential on addition of rare earth content, which also affects in increasing the glass transition temperature (T_g) and crystallization temperature (T_c). Decrease of thermal expansion in glasses with rare earth ion content is maintained by the stabilization of glass matrix owing to their large cationic field strength. A significant change in the non-isothermal DSC thermogram observed at 750–1050 °C is attributed to fluorophlogopite crystallization. Opaque glass-ceramics were prepared from such glasses by single step heat-treatment at 1050 °C; and the predominant crystalline phases are identified as fluorophlogopite mica, KMg_3(AlSi_3O_1_0)F_2 by XRD and EDX analysis. The compact glass-ceramic microstructure by the agglomeration of fluorophlogopite mica crystallites (crystal size ∼ 100–500 nm, FESEM) is achieved in attendance of rare earth ion; and such microstructure controlled the variation of density, thermal expansion and microhardness value. Higher thermal expansion (11.11–14.08 × 10"−"6/K at 50–800 °C and 50–900 °C) of such glass-ceramics approve that these rare earth containing glasses can be useful for high temperature vacuum sealing application with metal or solid electrolyte. The increase of Vickers microhardness (5.27–5.61 GPa) in attendance of rare earth ions is attributed to the compact crystallinity of fluorophlogopite mica glass-ceramic microstructure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of rare earth oxide doped alkaline boroaluminosilicate glasses. • Development of opaque fluorophlogopite mica glass-ceramics by single-step heat treatment. • Nanocrystalline glass

  8. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements

  9. Thermo-mechanical behaviour during encapsulation of glass in a steel vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhodchi, S.; Smith, D.J.; Thomas, B.G.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative numerical simulations and qualitative evaluations are conducted to elucidate thermo-mechanical behaviour during pouring and solidification of molten glass into a stainless-steel cylindrical container. Residual stress and structural integrity in this casting/vitrification process is important because it can be used for long-term storage of high-level nuclear wastes. The predicted temperature and stress distributions in the glass and container agree well with previous measurements of the temperature histories and residual stresses. Three different thermal-stress models are developed using the finite-element method and compared. Two simple slice models were developed based on the generalized plane strain assumption as well as a detailed two-dimensional axi-symmetric model that adds elements according to the stages of pouring glass into the stainless steel container. The results reveal that mechanical interaction between the glass and the wall of the stainless steel container generates residual tensile stresses that approach the yield strength of the steel. Together, these results reveal important insights into the mechanism of stress generation in the process, the structural integrity of the product, and accuracy of the modelling-tool predictions. - Highlights: • Source of residual stresses in glass and stainless steel containers (canisters) is discussed. • Final residual stresses in both glass and container is quantified. • Simple models presented for simulation of complicated casting process. • Comparison between detailed and simple FE modeling.

  10. Parametric testing of a DWPF glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazan, F.; Rego, J.

    1985-03-01

    A series of tests has been performed to characterize the chemical stability of a DWPF borosilicate glass sample as part of the Waste Package Task of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. This material was prepared at the Savannah River Laboratory for the purpose of testing the 165-frit matrix doped with a simulated nonradioactive waste. All tests were conducted at 90 0 C using deionized water and J-13 water (a tuffaceous formation ground water). In the deionized water tests, both monoliths and crushed glass were tested at various ratios of surface area of the sample to volume of water in order to compare leach rates for different sample geometries or leaching times. Effects on the leach rates as a result of the presence of crushed tuff and stainless steel material were also investigated in the tests with J-13 water. 3 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs

  11. New compositions of fluoroindate glasses with higher chemical resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Costa

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, glasses in the systems In-Ba-Mg and In-Ba-Zn-Sr-Mg were water leachead at 80ºC showing surface degradation after 72 hours of leaching. The extent of such degradation is determined by the solubility and the concentration of the elemental fluorides that constitute the glasses. The formation of a layer of crystallized phases on the surface of the samples was observed. Small weight losses were registered and the absence of water on the glass matrix after the attack suggested that the use of MgF2 in the systems studied can lead to better results against moisture corrosion when compared to other fluoride glasses such as the fluorozirconates.

  12. Calorimetric signature of structural heterogeneity in a ternary silicate glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Yang, G.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the structural heterogeneity in a silicate glass by hyperquenching–annealing–calorimetry approach. The results show a striking phenomenon: two separated sub-Tg relaxation peaks appear on the calorimetric curve of the hyperquenched CaO–MgO–SiO2 glass, implying the existence of two...... distinct structural domains of higher and lower potential energies, respectively. The higher energy domains in nanoscale are so unstable that they become ordered during hyperquenching. This is verified by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image exhibiting nanoordered domains in the glass...... matrix. The higher energy domains relax similar to a strong glass phase, whereas the lower energy domains do similar to a fragile one....

  13. Synthesis and characterization of barium fluoride substituted zinc tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishwarya, K.; Vinitha, G.; Varma, G. Sreevidya; Asokan, S.; Manikandan, N.

    2017-12-01

    Glasses in the TeO2-ZnO-BaF2 system were prepared by standard melt quenching technique and were characterized for their thermal, optical and structural properties. Samples were found to show good thermal stability with values ranging above 100 °C for all the compositions. Optical bandgap and refractive index values were calculated from linear optical measurements using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Infrared spectra showed the presence of hydroxyl groups in the glasses indicating that the effect of fluorine was negligible in removing the hydroxyl impurities for the experimental conditions and compositions used. Raman measurements showed the modification occurring in the glass network due to addition of barium fluoride in terms of increase in the formation of non-bridging oxygen atoms compared to strong Te-O-Te linkages in the glass matrix.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of novel polymer-matrix nanocomposites and their constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Rui

    Two main issues for the wide application of polymer-matrix nanocomposites need to be addressed: cost-effective processing of high-performance nanomaterials, and fundamental understanding of the nanofiller-polymer interaction related to property changes of nanocomposites. To fabricate inexpensive and robust carbon nanofibers (CNFs) by the electrospinning technique, an organosolv lignin for replacing polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor was investigated in this work. Modification of lignin to its butyl ester alters the electrospinnability and the thermal mobility of the lignin/PAN blend precursor fibers, which further affect the thermostabilization and carbonization processes of CNFs. The micromorphology, carbon structure, and mechanical properties of resultant CNFs were evaluated in detail. Lignin butyration reveals a new approach to controlling inter-fiber bonding of CNFs which efficiently increases the tensile strength and modulus of nonwoven mats. A commercial vapor-grown CNF reinforcing of room-temperature-vulcanized (RTV) polysiloxane foam has potential impact on the residual tin catalyst in composites and consequently the aging and the long-term performance of the materials. Elemental spectra and mapping were employed to analyze the distribution and the composition of tin catalyst residues in the CNF/polysiloxane composites. Thermal analysis revealed a significant increase of thermal stability for CNF-filled composites. Further, the glass transition properties of polysiloxane are not evidently influenced by the physical interaction between CNF filler and polysiloxane matrix. Nanocomposites consisting of anthracene, a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compound, and a thermosetting epoxy was matrix was studied to interpret the reinforcing effect on the glass transition temperature ( Tg) by different routes: physical dispersion and/or covalent modification. The molecular dynamics of the relaxation processes were analyzed by broadband dielectric

  15. Study of the influence of chemical composition on the pozzolanicity of soda-lime glass microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, R.B.C.; Mohallem, N.D.S.; Aguilar, M.T.P.

    2014-01-01

    The use of residues presents interesting possibilities for obtaining eco-efficient concretes. Research has investigated the use of glass residue in Portland cement composite, whether as an aggregate or a supplementary material. However, there is still no consensus on the influence of the chemical composition of glass on the behaviour of the composites in which it is used. This paper aims to analyse the influence of this composition on the performance of cement composites produced with microparticles of colourless and amber glass. Pozzolanicity was assessed by means of direct tests (modified Chapelle and electrical conductivity) and indirect tests (chemical characterization, X-ray diffraction, thermo analysis and pozzolanic activity index). Most of the results show that microparticles of both types of glass display pozzolanic activity, with no significant differences between them. This indicates the potential for the use of glass microparticles as a supplementary material in cement composites. (author)

  16. Long-term behavior of glass-ceramic zirconolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    This work is a part of the investigation of new containment matrices considered for specific conditioning of radionuclides after separation. The aim was to demonstrate the long-term aqueous corrosion resistance of the glass-ceramic zirconolite considered for the conditioning of plutonium and the minor actinides. This material is composed of crystals of zirconolite (CaZrTi 2 O 7 ) dispersed in a residual vitreous phase. It appears that glass-ceramic zirconolite presents a better kinetic behavior than the nuclear glass R 7T7. This is mainly due to a more important rate decrease that occurs more rapidly, that induces a quantity of glass altered at least 10 times as small as for R 7T7 glass. This high slowdown of the alteration rate is attributed to the formation of an alteration film that has been the subject of a specific study. We have demonstrated that the rate decrease was controlled as for the R7T7 glass by the amorphous phase of the alteration film forming a diffusion barrier for reactive species. It seems that the porosity is not the single parameter that explains the protective effect of the gel. The main differences compared with R7T7 glass are that silicon does not control the alteration of the material and that the gel is composed of two distinct phases. We have in particular identified a dense phase enriched in titanium and neodymium that probably influences deeply the kinetics. (author)

  17. Immobilization of Uranium Silicide in Sintered Iron-Phosphate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, Patricia; Russo, Diego; Rodriguez, Diego; Heredia, A; Sanfilippo, M.; Sterba, Mario

    2003-01-01

    This work is a continuation of a previous one performed in vitrification of uranium silicide in borosilicate and iron-silicate glasses, by sintering.We present the results obtained with an iron-phosphate glass developed at our laboratory and we compare this results with those obtained with the above mentioned glasses. The main objective was to develop a method as simple as possible, so as to get a monolithic glass block with the appropriate properties to be disposed in a deep geological repository.The thermal transformation of the uranium silicide was characterized by DTA/TG analysis and X-ray diffraction.We determined the evolution of the crystalline phases and the change in weight.Calcined uranium silicide was mixed with natural U 3 O 8 , the amount of U 3 O 8 was calculated to simulate an isotopic dilution of 4%.This material was mixed with powdered iron-phosphate glass (in wt.%: 64,9 P 2 O 5 ; 22,7 Fe 2 O 3 ; 8,1 Al 2 O 3 ; 4,3 Na 2 O) in different proportions (in wt%): 7%, 10% y 15%.The powders were pressed and sintered at temperatures between 585 y 670 °C. Samples of the sintered pellet were prepared for the lixiviation tests (MCC-1P: monolithic samples; deionised water; 90° C; 7, 14 and 28 days).The samples showed a quite good durability (0,6 g.m -2 .day -1 ), similar to borosilicate glasses.The microstructure of the glass samples showed that the uranium particles are much better integrated to the glass matrix in the iron-phosphate glasses than in the borosilicate or iron-silicate glasses.We can conclude that the sintered product obtained could be a good alternative for the immobilization of nuclear wastes with high content of uranium, as the ones arising from the conditioning of research reactors spent fuels

  18. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  19. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2008-11-24

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  20. Optimized Synthesis of Foam Glass from Recycled CRT Panel Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming...... additives. In this work we recycle the CRT panel glass to synthesize the foam glass as a crucial component of building and insulating materials. The synthesis conditions such as foaming temperature, duration, glass particle size, type and concentrations of foaming agents, and so on are optimized...... by performing systematic experiments. In particular, the concentration of foaming agents is an important parameter that influences the size of bubbles and the distribution of bubbles throughout the sample. The foam glasses are characterised regarding density and open/closed porosity. Differential scanning...

  1. DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D.; Pickenheim, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point

  2. Simultaneous multielement analysis of zirconium alloys by chlorination separation of matrix/ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kaneharu

    1990-01-01

    An analytical method combined chlorination separation of matrix with ICP-AES has been developed for reactor grade Zr alloys (Zircaloy-2). A sample (1 g) is taken into a Pt boat and chlorinated with HCl gas of 100 ml/min in a glass reaction tube at ca. 330degC. Matrix Zr of the sample is volatilized and separated as ZrCl 4 . The analytic elements remaining quantitatively as chlorination residue are dissolved in a mixture of mineral acids (6 M HCl 3 ml+conc. HNO 3 0.5 ml+conc. H 2 SO 4 0.2 ml) and diluted to 20 ml with distilled water after filtration. ICP-AES was used for simultaneous multielement determination using a calibration curve method. The present method has the following advantages: simple sample preparation procedure; applicability to any form of samples to determine multielements; simple ICP-AES calibration procedure. This method was successfully applied to the determination of Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, Mn and Pb in the Zr alloys of JAERI CRM's and NBS SRM's. (author)

  3. Efficiency criterion for teleportation via channel matrix, measurement matrix and collapsed matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Wei Zha

    Full Text Available In this paper, three kinds of coefficient matrixes (channel matrix, measurement matrix, collapsed matrix associated with the pure state for teleportation are presented, the general relation among channel matrix, measurement matrix and collapsed matrix is obtained. In addition, a criterion for judging whether a state can be teleported successfully is given, depending on the relation between the number of parameter of an unknown state and the rank of the collapsed matrix. Keywords: Channel matrix, Measurement matrix, Collapsed matrix, Teleportation

  4. Glass precursor approach to high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    The available studies on the synthesis of high T sub c superconductors (HTS) via the glass precursor approach were reviewed. Melts of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system as well as those doped with oxides of some other elements (Pb, Al, V, Te, Nb, etc.) could be quenched into glasses which, on further heat treatments under appropriate conditions, crystallized into the superconducting phase(s). The nature of the HTS phase(s) formed depends on the annealing temperature, time, atmosphere, and the cooling rate and also on the glass composition. Long term annealing was needed to obtain a large fraction of the 110 K phase. The high T sub c phase did not crystallize out directly from the glass matrix, but was preceded by the precipitation of other phases. The 110 K HTS was produced at high temperatures by reaction between the phases formed at lower temperatures resulting in multiphase material. The presence of a glass former such as B2O3 was necessary for the Y-Ba-Cu-O melt to form a glass on fast cooling. A discontinuous YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) HTS phase crystallized out on heat treatment of this glass. Attempts to prepare Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O system in the glassy state were not successful.

  5. Residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, I.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the residual gas composition in vacuum systems by a special mass spectrometric method was presented. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its application in thin film technology was discussed. Results, partial pressure versus time curves as well as the line spectra of the residual gases in case of the vaporization of a Ti-Pd-Au alloy were demonstrated together with the possible construction schemes of QMS residual gas analysers. (Sz.J.)

  6. Extended biorthogonal matrix polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Shehata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials for commutative matrices were first introduced by Varma and Tasdelen in [22]. The main aim of this paper is to extend the properties of the pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials of Varma and Tasdelen and certain generating matrix functions, finite series, some matrix recurrence relations, several important properties of matrix differential recurrence relations, biorthogonality relations and matrix differential equation for the pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials J(A,B n (x, k and K(A,B n (x, k are discussed. For the matrix polynomials J(A,B n (x, k, various families of bilinear and bilateral generating matrix functions are constructed in the sequel.

  7. Matrix completion by deep matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jicong; Cheng, Jieyu

    2018-02-01

    Conventional methods of matrix completion are linear methods that are not effective in handling data of nonlinear structures. Recently a few researchers attempted to incorporate nonlinear techniques into matrix completion but there still exists considerable limitations. In this paper, a novel method called deep matrix factorization (DMF) is proposed for nonlinear matrix completion. Different from conventional matrix completion methods that are based on linear latent variable models, DMF is on the basis of a nonlinear latent variable model. DMF is formulated as a deep-structure neural network, in which the inputs are the low-dimensional unknown latent variables and the outputs are the partially observed variables. In DMF, the inputs and the parameters of the multilayer neural network are simultaneously optimized to minimize the reconstruction errors for the observed entries. Then the missing entries can be readily recovered by propagating the latent variables to the output layer. DMF is compared with state-of-the-art methods of linear and nonlinear matrix completion in the tasks of toy matrix completion, image inpainting and collaborative filtering. The experimental results verify that DMF is able to provide higher matrix completion accuracy than existing methods do and DMF is applicable to large matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glass Furnace Project, October 1982-March 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, K.M.; Klingler, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the Glass Furnace Project currently under way at Mound, a treatment technology for low-level radioactive waste is being evaluated that will combine volume reduction and immobilization in one step. Initial work focused on demonstrating the ability of the furnace to efficiently incinerate nonradioactive, simulated power-plant waste and on determining the adequacy of immobilization in a soda-lime silica matrix. Further evaluation of the system will involve a demonstration of the combustion and containment of radioactive waste. In preparation for this next phase of the program, preliminary investigation and design work were conducted during the past six months. 5 figures, 1 table

  9. Conversion of ion-exchange resins, catalysts and sludges to glass with optional noble metal recovery using the GMODS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical processing and cleanup of waste streams (air and water) typically result in products, clean air, clean water, and concentrated hazardous residues (ion exchange resins, catalysts, sludges, etc.). Typically, these streams contain significant quantities of complex organics. For disposal, it is desirable to destroy the organics and immobilize any heavy metals or radioactive components into stable waste forms. If there are noble metals in the residues, it is desirable to recover these for reuse. The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) is a new process that directly converts radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes to borosilicate glass. GMODS oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; converts halides (eg chlorides) to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium halide stream; and recovers noble metals. GMODS has been demonstrated on a small laboratory scale (hundreds of grams), and the equipment needed for larger masses has been identified

  10. Effect of the type of radiation on the degradation behavior of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egusa, Shigenori

    1992-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer matrix composites (filler: E-glass or carbon fiber cloth; matrix; epoxy or polyimide resin) were irradiated with neutrons and 60 Co γ-rays at room temperature or at 5 K. Three-point bend tests were then carried out at 77 K. Comparison of the neutron and γ-ray irradiation effects shows that the radiation sensitivity of the glass/epoxy and glass/polyimide composites is 1.8-2.6 times higher to neutrons than to γ-rays, indicating a higher sensitivity of the epoxy and polyimide matrix resins to recoil protons than to γ-rays. Absorbed dose calculations, on the other hand, show that the spatial distribution of the microscopic energy deposition in polymer matrix composites is inhomogeneous for neutrons, although almost homogeneous for γ-rays. In addition, the neutron irradiation of boron-containing E-glass fiber composites produces additional radiation damage due to a 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction in the glass fibers, thus significantly enhancing a decrease in the composite strength. These facts indicate that as far as polymer matrix composites are concerned, the irradiation effects of neutrons will be rather difficult to simulate with different types of radiation such as protons and carbon ions from an ion accelerator. Thus, it may be prudent that such simulation irradiation be carried out mainly for pure resins to be used as matrix in polymer matrix composites. (author)

  11. Cross-craft interactions between metal and glass working: slag additions to early Anglo-Saxon red glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, James R. N.; Freestone, Ian C.

    Opaque red glass has been extensively studied over the years, but its compositional complexity and variability means that the way in which it was manufactured is still not fully understood. Previous studies have suggested the use of metallurgical by-products in its manufacture, but until now the evidence has been limited. SEM-EDS analysis of glass beads from the early Anglo-Saxon cemetery complex at Eriswell, southeast England, has provided further insights into the production and technology of opaque red glass, which could only have been possible through invasive sampling. The matrix of the red glasses contains angular particles of slag, the main phases of which typically correspond to either fayalite (Fe2SiO4) or kirschsteinite (CaFeSiO4), orthosilicate (olivine-type) minerals characteristic of some copper- and iron-smelting slags. This material appears to have been added in part as a reducing agent, to promote the precipitation of sub-micrometer particles of the colorant phase, copper metal. Its use represents a sophisticated, if empirical, understanding of materials and can only have resulted through deliberate experimentation with metallurgical by-products by early glass workers. Slag also seems to have been added as a source of iron to colour `black' glass. The compositions of the opaque red glasses appear to be strongly paralleled by Merovingian beads from northern Europe and Anglo-Saxon beads from elsewhere in England, suggesting that this technology is likely to have been quite widespread.

  12. Nuclear waste glass corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Dissolution of nuclear waste glass occurs by corrosion mechanisms similar to those of other solids, e.g., metallurgical and mineralogic systems. Metallurgical phenomena such as active corrosion, passivation and immunity have been observed to be a function of the glass composition and the solution pH. Hydration thermodynamics was used to quantify the role of glass composition and its effect on the solution pH during dissolution. A wide compositional range of natural, lunar, medieval, and nuclear waste glasses, as well as some glass-ceramics were investigated. The factors observed to affect dissolution in deionized water are pertinent to the dissolution of glass in natural environments such as the groundwaters anticipated to interact with nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository. The effects of imposed pH and oxidation potential (Eh) conditions existing in natural environments on glass dissolution is described in the context of Pourbaix diagrams, pH potential diagrams, for glass

  13. Theory of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivier, N.

    1985-01-01

    The physical properties of glass are direct consequences of its non-crystalline structure. The structure is described from a topological point of view, since topology is the only geometry surviving non-crystallinity, i.e. absence of metric and trivial space group. This fact has two main consequences: the overall homogeneity of glass is a gauge symmetry, and the only extended, structurally stable constituents are odd lines (or 2π-disclinations in the elastic continuum limit). A gauge theory of glass, based on odd lines as sources of frozen-in strain, can explain those properties of glasses which are both specific to, and universal in amorphous solids: low-temperature excitations, and relaxation at high temperatures. The methods of statistical mechanics can be applied to give a minimal description of amorphous structures in statistical equilibrium. Criteria for statistical equilibrium of the structure and detailed balance are given, together with structural equations of state, which turn out to be well-known empirically among botanists and metallurgists. This review is based on lectures given in 1984 in Niteroi. It contains five parts: I - Structure, from a topological viewpoint; II - gauge invariance; III - Tunneling modes; IV - Supercooled liquid and the glass transitions; V - Statistical crystallography. (Author) [pt

  14. Tyrosine residues modification studied by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santrucek, Jiri; Strohalm, Martin; Kadlcik, Vojtech; Hynek, Radovan; Kodicek, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid residue-specific reactivity in proteins is of great current interest in structural biology as it provides information about solvent accessibility and reactivity of the residue and, consequently, about protein structure and possible interactions. In the work presented tyrosine residues of three model proteins with known spatial structure are modified with two tyrosine-specific reagents: tetranitromethane and iodine. Modified proteins were specifically digested by proteases and the mass of resulting peptide fragments was determined using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results show that there are only small differences in the extent of tyrosine residues modification by tetranitromethane and iodine. However, data dealing with accessibility of reactive residues obtained by chemical modifications are not completely identical with those obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. These interesting discrepancies can be caused by local molecular dynamics and/or by specific chemical structure of the residues surrounding

  15. Antibacterial glass and glass-biodegradable matrix composites for bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, João Pedro Silva

    2017-01-01

    Multiple joint and bone diseases affect millions of people worldwide. In fact the Bone and Joint Decade’s association predicted that the percentage of people over 50 years of age affected by bone diseases will double by 2020. Bone diseases commonly require the need for surgical intervention, often involving partial or total bone substitution. Therefore biodegradable biomaterials designed as bone tissue engineered (BTE) devices to be implanted into the human body, function as a ...

  16. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani, E-mail: mfsyazwani86@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790784 Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, The National University of Malaysia, 43650 Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hrma, Pavel [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790784 Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Pyroprocessing is are processing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl–KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the glass matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (T{sub L}): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability. - Highlights: • We investigated crystallization in borosilicate glasses containing rare earth oxides. • New crystallinity and durability data are shown for glasses proposed in the literature. • Both liquidus temperature and chemical durability increased as the waste loading increased.

  17. Investigation of Thermal Expansion of a Glass Ceramic Material with an Extra-Low Thermal Linear Expansion Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompan, T. A.; Korenev, A. S.; Lukin, A. Ya.

    2008-10-01

    The artificial material sitall CO-115M was developed purposely as a material with an extra-low thermal expansion. The controlled crystallization of an aluminosilicate glass melt leads to the formation of a mixture of β-spodumen, β-eucryptite, and β-silica anisotropic microcrystals in a matrix of residual glass. Due to the small size of the microcrystals, the material is homogeneous and transparent. Specific lattice anharmonism of these microcrystal materials results in close to zero average thermal linear expansion coefficient (TLEC) of the sitall material. The thermal expansion coefficient of this material was measured using an interferometric method in line with the classical approach of Fizeau. To obtain the highest accuracy, the registration of light intensity of the total interference field was used. Then, the parameters of the interference pattern were calculated. Due to the large amount of information in the interference pattern, the error of the calculated fringe position was less than the size of a pixel of the optical registration system. The thermal expansion coefficient of the sitall CO-115M and its temperature dependence were measured. The TLEC value of about 3 × 10-8 K-1 to 5 × 10-8 K-1 in the temperature interval from -20 °C to +60 °C was obtained. A special investigation was carried out to show the homogeneity of the material.

  18. Perspectives on spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Contucci, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Presenting and developing the theory of spin glasses as a prototype for complex systems, this book is a rigorous and up-to-date introduction to their properties. The book combines a mathematical description with a physical insight of spin glass models. Topics covered include the physical origins of those models and their treatment with replica theory; mathematical properties like correlation inequalities and their use in the thermodynamic limit theory; main exact solutions of the mean field models and their probabilistic structures; and the theory of the structural properties of the spin glass phase such as stochastic stability and the overlap identities. Finally, a detailed account is given of the recent numerical simulation results and properties, including overlap equivalence, ultrametricity and decay of correlations. The book is ideal for mathematical physicists and probabilists working in disordered systems.

  19. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1994-01-01

    Three simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentru Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. The behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied. 2 refs., 8 tabs

  20. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C--1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied