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Sample records for residual gas molecules

  1. Residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, I.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the residual gas composition in vacuum systems by a special mass spectrometric method was presented. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its application in thin film technology was discussed. Results, partial pressure versus time curves as well as the line spectra of the residual gases in case of the vaporization of a Ti-Pd-Au alloy were demonstrated together with the possible construction schemes of QMS residual gas analysers. (Sz.J.)

  2. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. linked by α-(1- 4) glycosidic bonds into chains and chains. branch via α-(1- 6) linkage. Branching points are about every fourth residue – allows. glucose ...

  3. Profile Monitors Based on Residual Gas Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Forck, P; Giacomini, T; Peters, A

    2005-01-01

    The precise determination of transverse beam profiles at high current hadron accelerators has to be performed non-interceptingly. Two methods will be discussed based on the excitation of the residual gas molecules by the beam particles: Firstly, by beam induced fluorescence (BIF) light is emitted from the residual gas molecules and is observed with an image intensified CCD camera. At most laboratories N2 gas is inserted, which has a large cross section for emission in the blue wave length region. Secondly, a larger signal strength is achieved by detecting the ionization products in an Ionization Profile Monitor (IPM). By applying an electric field all ionization products are accelerated toward a spatial resolving Micro-Channel Plate. The signal read-out can either be performed by observing the light from a phosphor screen behind the MCP or electronically by a wire array. Methods to achieve a high spatial resolution and a fast turn-by-turn readout capability are discussed. Even though various approaches at dif...

  4. Graphic Three-Axes Presentation of Residual Gas Analyser Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Levi, Alejandro G.

    1996-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers (RGA) are commonly used to measure the composition of residual gases in thermal-vacuum test chambers. Measurements from RGAs are often used to identify and quantify outgassing contaminants from a test article during thermal-vacuum testing. RGA data is typically displayed as snapshots in time, showing instantaneous concentrations of ions from ionized residual gas molecules at different atomic masses. A method was devised by the authors to present RGA data in a three-axis format, plotting atomic mass unit (AMU), ion concentration as a function of AMU, and time, to provide a clear graphic visualization ot trends in gas concentration changes and to initiate a valuable analytical tool to interpret test article outgassing rates during thermal-vacuum testing.

  5. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: GAS DISTRIBUTION STAGE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Gas Distribution Stage 1 souce category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Gas Distribution Stage 1 source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  6. Graphic Three-Axes Presentation of Residual Gas Analyzer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Levi, Alejandro G.

    1997-01-01

    Residual gas analyzers (RGA) are commonly used to measure the composition of residual gases in thermal-vacuum test chambers. Measurements from RGA's are often used to identify and quantify outgassing contaminants from a test article during thermal-vacuum testing. RGA data is typically displayed as snapshots in time, showing instantaneous concentrations of ions from ionized residual gas molecules at different atomic masses. This ion concentration information can be interpreted to be representative of the composition of the residual gas in the chamber at the instant of analysis. Typically, test personnel are most interested in tracking the time history of changes in the composition of chamber residual gas to determine the relative cleanliness and the clean-up rate of the test article under vacuum. However, displays of instantaneous RGA data cannot provide test personnel with the preferred time history information. In order to gain an understanding of gas composition trends, a series of plots of individual data snapshots must be analyzed. This analysis is cumbersome and still does not provide a very satisfactory view of residual gas composition trends. A method was devised by the authors to present RCA data in a three-axis format, plotting Atomic Mass Unit (AMU), the Ionization Signal Response (ISR) as amps/torr as a function of AMU, and Time, to provide a clear graphic visualization of trends of changes in ISR with respect to time and AMU (representative of residual gas composition). This graphic visualization method provides a valuable analytical tool to interpret test article outgassing rates during thermal vacuum tests. Raw RGA data was extracted from a series of delimited ASCII files and then converted to a data array in a spreadsheet. Consequently, using the 3-D plotting functionality provided by the spreadsheet program, 3-D plots were produced. After devising the data format conversion process, the authors began developing a program to provide real-time 3-D

  7. Residual Gas Fluorescence for Profile Measurements at the GSI UNILAC

    CERN Document Server

    Forck, P

    2002-01-01

    The high beam currents, delivered at the LINAC at GSI (UNILAC) can destroy intercepting diagnostics within one macro-pulse. As an alternative for a non-destructive profile measurement the methode for residual-gas-fluorescence is investigated. The fluorescence light is emitted by the N2 molecules of the residual gas at the blue wavelength range and can be monitored with a modern CCD-camera. The images are transferred via digital bus (IEEE 1394 'FireWire') and the profiles are generated by analysis of the images with a modern software tool (National Instruments 'LabView'). Due to the short beam pulses (about 0.2 ms) the light intensities emitted by the residual gas are low and require a high amplification (gain >106) which is realized with an image intensifier with double MCP (multi channel plate), connected with a fiber taper to the CCD-chip. The design parameters of the optics and electronics are discussed as well as the advantages of the digital data transmission. Measurements with heavy ion beams of several...

  8. Origins of the residual pulse height deficit in propane-filled gas ionization detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weijers-Dall, T.D.M.; Timmers, H.; Elliman, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    This work investigates the origins of the residual pulse height deficit in gas ionization detectors. It is motivated by the recent observation that the species dependence of gas detector response cannot be accounted for solely by considering the energy loss of the ions in the detector window and non-ionizing energy loss processes in the detector gas. It was found that the residual pulse height deficit is approximately proportional to the square of the ionization density. However, only a weak dependence of the residual deficit on gas pressure (in the range 70-120mbar) was observed. It is hypothesized that the residual pulse height deficit in gas ionization detectors results from the effect of multiple ionization of individual gas molecules at high ionization densities on the energy required to create an electron-ion pair

  9. Study of residual gas adsorption on GaN nanowire arrays photocathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Sihao; Liu, Lei, E-mail: liu1133_cn@sina.com.cn; Diao, Yu; Kong, Yike

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • H{sub 2}O is more easily to absorb on the nanowire surface. • The work function increase after residual gas adsorption. • Bandgaps of the nanowire increase slightly. • Absorption coefficient is reduced and moves to higher energy side. - Abstract: In order to find out the influences of residual gas on GaN nanowire arrays photocathode, the optoelectronic properties of adsorption system are calculated on the basis of first principles. Results suggest that the residual gas adsorption will increase the work function and introduce a dipole moment with a direction from the nanowire to the adsorbates. The surface structures are changed and electrons transfer from nanowire to gas molecule. The bandgaps are enhanced after adsorption. Besides, the peak of absorption coefficients is reduced and moves to higher energy side. It is discovered that residual gas will drastically degrade the characteristics and lifetime of GaN nanowire arrays photocathode.

  10. The new method for the residual gas density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Anashin, V V; Krasnov, A A; Malyshev, O B; Nas'mov, V P; Pyata, E I; Shaftan, T V

    2001-01-01

    A new method of measurement for residual gas density in the vacuum chambers in presence of synchrotron radiation (SR) is described. The method is based on using a photomultiplier tube for the detection of the SR-stimulated residual gas luminescence, which is proportional to the residual gas density and SR intensity. The design of the experimental setup and results of the measurements of densities of residual gases (H sub 2 , CO sub 2 , CO, N sub 2 , Ar and O sub 2) are submitted.

  11. Novel Applications of Buffer-gas Cooling to Cold Atoms, Diatomic Molecules, and Large Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayna, Garrett Korda

    Cold gases of atoms and molecules provide a system for the exploration of a diverse set of physical phenomena. For example, cold gasses of magnetically and electrically polar atoms and molecules are ideal systems for quantum simulation and quantum computation experiments, and cold gasses of large polar molecules allow for novel spectroscopic techniques. Buffer-gas cooling is a robust and widely applicable method for cooling atoms and molecules to temperatures of approximately 1 Kelvin. In this thesis, I present novel applications of buffer-gas cooling to obtaining gases of trapped, ultracold atoms and diatomic molecules, as well as the study of the cooling of large organic molecules. In the first experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam source of atoms is used to directly load a magneto-optical trap. Due to the versatility of the buffer-gas beam source, we obtain trapped, sub-milliKelvin gases of four different lanthanide species using the same experimental apparatus. In the second experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam is used as the initial stage of an experiment to directly laser cool and magneto-optically trap the diatomic molecule CaF. In the third experiment of this thesis, buffer-gas cooling is used to study the cooling of the conformational state of large organic molecules. We directly observe conformational relaxation of gas-phase 1,2-propanediol due to cold collisions with helium gas. Lastly, I present preliminary results on a variety of novel applications of buffer-gas cooling, such as mixture analysis, separation of chiral mixtures, the measurement of parity-violation in chiral molecules, and the cooling and spectroscopy of highly unstable reaction intermediates.

  12. Adsorption of small gas molecules on B36 nanocluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary Information. Journal of Chemical Sciences. Adsorption of small gas molecules on B36 nanocluster. YOUNES VALADBEIGI. *. , HOSSEIN FARROKHPOUR and MAHMOUD TABRIZCHI. Department of chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111, Iran. *. Corresponding Author: Younes ...

  13. An Ideal Gas Law Simulator for Atmospheric Gas Molecules ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... design and develop the ideal gas law simulator in a 3 dimensional space using Microsoft Visual Studio, Microsoft Paint and 3D Game studio for pedagogic purposes. The gas law variables due to changes in atmospheric conditions were simulated and the parameters considered in the developed software which visually ...

  14. A modeled experiment of gas behavior in aquifer and residual gas formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K.; Yamada, Y.; Murata, S.; Nakano, M.; Matsuoka, T.

    2007-12-01

    National and international concern is rising about the possible effects of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the climate. Several methods are proposed to reduce the gas in the atmosphere and underground sequestration is recently expected as an effective concept. Especially, residual gas can be the most effective method to store the gas in reservoir. Underground sequestration requires the gas injected into a reservoir. When the gas is injected into a water- saturated aquifer, it pushes water out of the pore space. As the gas bubbles go upward, the gas space is filled with water again, but small gas bubbles are trapped in the pore space by surface force and capillary pressure of water. This is the residual gas formation. Once the residual gas is formed, it seldom moves again from the pore space. Residual gas formation needs neither cap-rock nor structural trap, thus has a potential to be applied to broader regions. The purpose of this study is to examine the fundamental mechanism of residual gas formation and gas migration underground by injecting the gas into a modeled and visualized aquifer. We designed and constructed an experimental apparatus to measure the distribution and the saturation of the residual gas. We used glass beads of 1 or 2mm diameters as porous media to construct some reservoir models that have various porosity, permeability, and wettability. The glass beads packed in our apparatus which has 30cm width, 33.5cm height, and 1cm thickness. It has 1§¤volume in amount. The pore space was filled with viscous liquid, then air was injected from the bottom. Some conditions in the injection time and rate were tested. We observed air behavior and measured the volume of the distribution area of residual gas from its digital photographs, and the volume of residual gas from the amount of water that was pushed out from the apparatus. The experimental results showed that differences of reservoir properties made changes in the gas behavior and residual gas volume. It

  15. Small Molecule Catalysts for Harvesting Methane Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ceron-Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oakdale, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lau, E. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-06

    As the average temperature of the earth increases the impact of these changes are becoming apparent. One of the most dramatic changes to the environment is the melting of arctic permafrost. The disappearance of the permafrost has resulted in release of streams of methane that was trapped in remote areas as gas hydrates in ice. Additionally, the use of fracking has also increased emission of methane. Currently, the methane is either lost to the atmosphere or flared. If these streams of methane could be brought to market, this would be an abundant source of revenue. A cheap conversion of gaseous methane to a more convenient form for transport would be necessary to economical. Conversion of methane is a difficult reaction since the C-H bond is very stable (104 kcal/mole). At the industrial scale, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction can be used to convert gaseous methane to liquid methanol but is this method is impractical for these streams that have low pressures and are located in remote areas. Additionally, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction results in over oxidation of the methane leading to many products that would need to be separated.

  16. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide gas residues on selected food produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinetta, Valentina; Vaidya, Nirupama; Linton, Richard; Morgan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables has greatly increased, and so has its association with contamination of several foodborne pathogens (Listeria, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli). Hence, there is a need to investigate effective sanitizer systems for produce decontamination. Chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)), a strong oxidizing gas with broad spectrum and sanitizing properties, has previously been studied for use on selected fruits and vegetables. ClO(2) gas treatments show great potential for surface pathogen reduction; however its use from a residue safety standpoint has yet to be assessed. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate residues of ClO(2), chlorite, chlorate, and chloride on selected fresh produce surfaces after treatment with ClO(2) gas. A rinse procedure was used and water samples were analyzed by N, N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine and ion chromatography method (300.0). Seven different foods--tomatoes, oranges, apples, strawberries, lettuce, alfalfa sprouts, and cantaloupe--were analyzed after ClO(2) treatment for surface residues. Very low residues were detectable for all the food products except lettuce and alfalfa sprouts, where the measured concentrations were significantly higher. Chlorine dioxide technology leaves minimal to no detectable chemical residues in several food products, thus result in no significant risks to consumers. Practical Application: Potential for chlorine dioxide gas treatments as an effective pathogen inactivation technology to produce with minimal risk for consumers.

  17. Residue management in the Bolivia-Brazil gas pipeline construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Eduardo Lopes; Henrique, Paulo Roberto Pereira; Cantarino, Anderson Americo Alves

    2000-01-01

    The construction of the gas pipeline is a process sequential of assembly phases, where each one of those phases generates residues of the most varied types and amounts, being necessary the forecast of your generation in agreement with the activity that is being executed. During the accomplishment of the works they are generated a lot of times situations where are observed the inadequate disposition of the residues. Those practices, besides the environmental impact that they cause, it can cart in the future, the need of additional investments be proceeded in the recovery of the areas and removal of the residues. This work presents the Program of administration of Residues instituted during the construction of the pipeline Bolivia - Brazil, seeking, on a side to reduce to the minimum the generation of residues and of the other, moths handling guidelines and disposition, in way to minimize the environmental impacts caused by the same ones. (author)

  18. Oriented xenon hydride molecules in the gas phase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buck, U.; Fárník, Michal

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 4 (2006), s. 583-612 ISSN 0144-235X Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB 357 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : photofragment translational spectroscopy * charge transfer molecules * low temperature matrices * neutral rare-gas Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.036, year: 2006

  19. Efficient Monte Carlo Simulations of Gas Molecules Inside Porous Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihan; Smit, Berend

    2012-07-10

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are commonly used to obtain adsorption properties of gas molecules inside porous materials. In this work, we discuss various optimization strategies that lead to faster MC simulations with CO2 gas molecules inside host zeolite structures used as a test system. The reciprocal space contribution of the gas-gas Ewald summation and both the direct and the reciprocal gas-host potential energy interactions are stored inside energy grids to reduce the wall time in the MC simulations. Additional speedup can be obtained by selectively calling the routine that computes the gas-gas Ewald summation, which does not impact the accuracy of the zeolite's adsorption characteristics. We utilize two-level density-biased sampling technique in the grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) algorithm to restrict CO2 insertion moves into low-energy regions within the zeolite materials to accelerate convergence. Finally, we make use of the graphics processing units (GPUs) hardware to conduct multiple MC simulations in parallel via judiciously mapping the GPU threads to available workload. As a result, we can obtain a CO2 adsorption isotherm curve with 14 pressure values (up to 10 atm) for a zeolite structure within a minute of total compute wall time.

  20. CO2 storage in depleted gas reservoirs: A study on the effect of residual gas saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Raza

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Depleted gas reservoirs are recognized as the most promising candidate for carbon dioxide storage. Primary gas production followed by injection of carbon dioxide after depletion is the strategy adopted for secondary gas recovery and storage practices. This strategy, however, depends on the injection strategy, reservoir characteristics and operational parameters. There have been many studies to-date discussing critical factors influencing the storage performance in depleted gas reservoirs while little attention was given to the effect of residual gas. In this paper, an attempt was made to highlight the importance of residual gas on the capacity, injectivity, reservoir pressurization, and trapping mechanisms of storage sites through the use of numerical simulation. The results obtained indicated that the storage performance is proportionally linked to the amount of residual gas in the medium and reservoirs with low residual fluids are a better choice for storage purposes. Therefore, it would be wise to perform the secondary recovery before storage in order to have the least amount of residual gas in the medium. Although the results of this study are useful to screen depleted gas reservoirs for the storage purpose, more studies are required to confirm the finding presented in this paper.

  1. Fuel gas production from animal residue. Dynatech report No. 1551

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashare, E.; Wise, D.L.; Wentworth, R.L.

    1977-01-14

    A comprehensive mathematical model description of anaerobic digestion of animal residues was developed, taking into account material and energy balances, kinetics, and economics of the process. The model has the flexibility to be applicable to residues from any size or type of animal husbandry operation. A computer program was written for this model and includes a routine for optimization to minimum unit gas cost, with the optimization variables being digester temperature, retention time, and influent volatile solids concentration. The computer program was used to determine the optimum base-line process conditions and economics for fuel gas production via anaerobic digestion of residues from a 10,000 head environmental beef feedlot. This feedlot at the conditions for minimum unit gas cost will produce 300 MCF/day of methane at a cost of $5.17/MCF (CH/sub 4/), with a total capital requirement of $1,165,000, a total capital investment of $694,000, and an annual average net operating cost of $370,000. The major contributions to this unit gas cost are due to labor (37 percent), raw manure (11 percent), power for gas compression (10 percent), and digester cost (13 percent). A conceptual design of an anaerobic digestion process for the baseline conditions is presented. A sensitivity analysis of the unit gas cost to changes in the major contributions to unit gas cost was performed, and the results of this analysis indicate areas in the anaerobic digestion system design where reasonable improvements could be expected so as to produce gas at an economically feasible cost. This sensitivity analysis includes the effects on unit gas cost of feedlot size and type, digester type, digester operating conditions, and economic input data.

  2. Fuel gas production from animal and agricultural residues and biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, D. L; Wentworth, R. L

    1978-05-30

    Progress was reported by all contractors. Topics presented include: solid waste to methane gas; pipeline fuel gas from an environmental cattle feed lot; heat treatment of organics for increasing anaerobic biodegradability; promoting faster anaerobic digestion; permselective membrane control of algae and wood digesters for increased production and chemicals recovery; anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residues; pilot plant demonstration of an anaerobic, fixed-film bioreactor for wastewater treatment; enhancement of methane production in the anaerobic diegestion of sewage; evaluation of agitation concepts for biogasification of sewage sludge; operation of a 50,000 gallon anaerobic digester; biological conversion of biomass to methane; dirt feedlot residue experiments; anaerobic fermentation of livestock and crop residues; current research on methanogenesis in Europe; and summary of EPA programs in digestion technology. (DC)

  3. Chloroxyanion Residue Quantification in Cantaloupes Treated with Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simran; Smith, David J; Morgan, Mark T

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/liter for 10 min results in a significant reduction (P chlorine dioxide ((36)ClO2) gas was used to describe the identity and distribution of chloroxyanion residues in or on cantaloupe subsequent to fumigation with ClO2 gas at a mean concentration of 5.1 ± 0.7 mg/liter for 10 min. Each treated cantaloupe was separated into rind, flesh, and mixed (rind and flesh) sections, which were blended and centrifuged to give the corresponding sera fractions. Radioactivity detected, ratio of radioactivity to mass of chlorite in initial ClO2 gas generation reaction, and distribution of chloroxyanions in serum samples were used to calculate residue concentrations in flesh, rind, and mixed samples. Anions detected on the cantaloupe were Cl(-) (∼ 90%) and ClO3(-) (∼ 10%), located primarily in the rind (19.3 ± 8.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of rind and 4.8 ± 2.3 μg of ClO3(-)/g of rind, n = 6). Cantaloupe flesh (∼ 200 g) directly exposed to(36)ClO2 gas treatment showed the presence of only Cl(-) residues (8.1 ± 1.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of flesh, n = 3). Results indicate chloroxyanion residues Cl(-) and ClO3(-) are only present on the rind of whole cantaloupes treated with ClO2 gas. However during cutting, residues may be transferred to the fruit flesh. Because Cl(-) is not toxic, only ClO3(-) would be a toxicity concern, but the levels transferred from rind to flesh are very low. In the case of fruit flesh directly exposed to ClO2 gas, only nontoxic Cl(-) was detected. This indicates that ClO2 gas that comes into contact with edible flesh would not pose a health concern.

  4. Minimizing Residual Pressure within a Windowless Gas Target System - JENSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Orlando; Browne, Justin; Kontos, Antonios; Montes, Fernando; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear reactions between light gases and radioactive isotope beams are essential to address open questions in nuclear structure and astrophysics. Pure light gas targets are critical for the measurements of proton- and alpha-induced reactions. J _ et E _ xperiments in N _ uclear S _ tructure and A _ strophysics (JENSA) is the world's most dense (~ 1019 atoms/cm2) windowless gas target system. Most of the gas flow is localized; however, escaping gas creates a pressure gradient which degrades experimental measurements and contaminates the beam line. JENSA contains a differential pumping system to maintain a vacuum. The previous design configuration was not optimized for experiments (pressure measurements 70 cm downstream from the jet were ~ 10-3 torr; optimal is less than 10-4 torr). We have altered the current differential pumping system to minimize the residual pressure profile. Several configurations of two gas-receiving catchers were tested, and the most efficient ones identified using Enhanced Pirani and Cold Cathode gauges. We have determined the 30 mm outer and 20 mm inner gas-receiving cones minimize JENSA central chamber pressure to 200 millitorr at 16,000 torr of discharge pressure. Altering the tubing configuration has additionally lowered the pressure 70 cm downstream to 10-5 torr. The new residual pressure allows operation of JENSA with planned expansion of a recoil mass separator SECAR.

  5. Detection of individual gas molecules adsorbed on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedin, F; Geim, A K; Morozov, S V; Hill, E W; Blake, P; Katsnelson, M I; Novoselov, K S

    2007-09-01

    The ultimate aim of any detection method is to achieve such a level of sensitivity that individual quanta of a measured entity can be resolved. In the case of chemical sensors, the quantum is one atom or molecule. Such resolution has so far been beyond the reach of any detection technique, including solid-state gas sensors hailed for their exceptional sensitivity. The fundamental reason limiting the resolution of such sensors is fluctuations due to thermal motion of charges and defects, which lead to intrinsic noise exceeding the sought-after signal from individual molecules, usually by many orders of magnitude. Here, we show that micrometre-size sensors made from graphene are capable of detecting individual events when a gas molecule attaches to or detaches from graphene's surface. The adsorbed molecules change the local carrier concentration in graphene one by one electron, which leads to step-like changes in resistance. The achieved sensitivity is due to the fact that graphene is an exceptionally low-noise material electronically, which makes it a promising candidate not only for chemical detectors but also for other applications where local probes sensitive to external charge, magnetic field or mechanical strain are required.

  6. Residual stresses evaluation in a gas-pipeline crossing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Maria Cindra [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Manoel Messias [COMPAGAS, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Rebello, Joao Marcos Alcoforado [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Souza Filho, Byron Goncalves de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The X-rays diffraction technique is a well established and effectiveness method in the determination of the residual and applied stresses in fine grained crystalline materials. It allows to characterize and to quantify the magnitude and direction of the existing surface stresses in the studied point of the material. The objective of this work is the evaluation of the surface stresses in a 10 in diameter Natural Gas Distribution Pipeline manufactured from API 5 L Gr B steel of COMPAGAS company, in a crossing with a Natural Gas Transportation Pipeline, in Araucaria-PR. This kind of evaluation is important to establish weather you have to perform a repositioning of one of the pipeline or not. The measurements had been made in two transversal sections of the pipe, the one upstream (170 mm of the external wall of the pipeline) and another one downstream (840 mm of the external wall of the pipeline). Each transversal section measurements where carried out in 3 points: 9 hours, 12 hours and 3 hours. In each measured point of the pipe surface, the longitudinal and transversal stresses had been measured. The magnitude of the surface residual stresses in the pipe varied of +180 MPa at the -210 MPa. The residual stress state on the surface of the points 12 hours region is characterized by tensile stresses and by compressive stresses in the points of 3 and 9 hours region. The surface residual stresses in gas-pipeline have been measured using X-ray diffraction method, by double exposure technique, using a portable apparatus, with Cr-K-alpha radiation. (author)

  7. Prediction of residual valvular lesions in rheumatic heart disease: role of adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mona; Yahia, Sohier; Eldars, Waleed; Eldegla, Heba; Matter, Mohamed; Attia, Gehan; Hawas, Samia

    2013-03-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic condition characterized by fibrosis and scarring of the cardiac valves and damage to the heart muscle, leading to congestive heart failure and death. This prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the possible relation between the levels of serum adhesion molecules and acute rheumatic fever (ARF) carditis, valvular insult severity, and residual valvular lesion after improvement of rheumatic activity. Serum levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin were assayed by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) for 50 children with ARF carditis during activity and after improvement and for 50 healthy children as control subjects. After the acute attack, patients were followed up regularly to detect residual valvular lesion. The serum levels of these adhesion molecules were significantly higher in the patients than in the control group (p valvular lesion (ICAM-1, >1,032.3 μg/ml; VCAM-1, >3,662.3 μg/ml; E-selectin, >104.8 μg/ml). Finally, by combining the three adhesion molecules in a single prediction model, the highest area under the curve (AUC) ± standard error (SE) was obtained (0.869 ± 0.052), and the positive likelihood ratio for having a residual valvular lesion was increased (17.33). Levels of serum adhesion molecules could predict residual valvular lesions in RHD patients. The authors recommend that the serum level of adhesion molecules be measured in all cases of ARF carditis.

  8. Enhanced measurement of residual chemical shift anisotropy for small molecule structure elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhou; Cohen, Ryan D; Gustafson, Kirk R; Martin, Gary E; Williamson, R Thomas

    2018-03-05

    A method is introduced to measure residual chemical shift anisotropies conveniently and accurately in the mesophase of poly-γ-(benzyl-l-glutamate). The alignment amplitude is substantially enhanced over common methods which greatly benefits measurements particularly on sp 3 carbons. The approach offers significant improvements in data accuracy and utility for small molecule structure determination.

  9. Intramolecular cyclization of aspartic acid residues assisted by three water molecules: a density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    Aspartic acid (Asp) residues in peptides and proteins (l-Asp) are known to undergo spontaneous nonenzymatic reactions to form l-β-Asp, d-Asp, and d-β-Asp residues. The formation of these abnormal Asp residues in proteins may affect their three-dimensional structures and hence their properties and functions. Indeed, the reactions have been thought to contribute to aging and pathologies. Most of the above reactions of the l-Asp residues proceed via a cyclic succinimide intermediate. In this paper, a novel three-water-assisted mechanism is proposed for cyclization of an Asp residue (forming a gem-diol precursor of the succinimide) by the B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) density functional theory calculations carried out for an Asp-containing model compound (Ace-Asp-Nme, where Ace = acetyl and Nme = NHCH3). The three water molecules act as catalysts by mediating ‘long-range’ proton transfers. In the proposed mechanism, the amide group on the C-terminal side of the Asp residue is first converted to the tautomeric iminol form (iminolization). Then, reorientation of a water molecule and a conformational change occur successively, followed by the nucleophilic attack of the iminol nitrogen on the carboxyl carbon of the Asp side chain to form the gem-diol species. A satisfactory agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental energetics.

  10. Determination of gas residues in uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riella, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    The measurement of low amounts of residual gases, excluding water, in ceramic grade uranium dioxide pellets, using high temperature vacuum extraction technique, is dealt with. The high temperature extraction gas analysis apparatus was designed and assembled for sequential analysis of up to eight uranium dioxide pellets by run. The system consists of three major units, namely outgassing unit, transfer unit and analytical unit. The whole system is evacuated to a final pressure of less then 10 -5 torr. A weighed pellet is transfered into the outgassing unit for subsequent dropping into a Platinum-Rhodium crucible which is heated inductively up to 1600 0 C during 30 minutes. The released gases are imediately transfered from the outgassing to analytical unit passing through a cold trap at -95 0 C to remove water vapor. The gases are transfered to previously calibrated volumetric bulb where the total pressure and temperature are determined. An estimate of the gas content in the pellets at STP condition is obtained from the measured volume, pressure and temperature of the gas mixture by applying ideal gases equation. Analysis to two lots (fourteen samples) of uranium dioxide pellets by the method described here indicated a mean gas content of 0,060cm 3 /g UO 2 . The lower limit of this technique is 0,03cm 3 /g UO 2 (STP). The time required for the analysis of eight pellets is about 9 hours [pt

  11. Gas-phase spectra of MgO molecules: a possible connection from gas-phase molecules to planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloska, Katherine A.; Fortenberry, Ryan C.

    2018-02-01

    A more fine-tuned method for probing planet-forming regions, such as protoplanetary discs, could be rovibrational molecular spectroscopy observation of particular premineral molecules instead of more common but ultimately less related volatile organic compounds. Planets are created when grains aggregate, but how molecules form grains is an ongoing topic of discussion in astrophysics and planetary science. Using the spectroscopic data of molecules specifically involved in mineral formation could help to map regions where planet formation is believed to be occurring in order to examine the interplay between gas and dust. Four atoms are frequently associated with planetary formation: Fe, Si, Mg and O. Magnesium, in particular, has been shown to be in higher relative abundance in planet-hosting stars. Magnesium oxide crystals comprise the mineral periclase making it the chemically simplest magnesium-bearing mineral and a natural choice for analysis. The monomer, dimer and trimer forms of (MgO)n with n = 1-3 are analysed in this work using high-level quantum chemical computations known to produce accurate results. Strong vibrational transitions at 12.5, 15.0 and 16.5 μm are indicative of magnesium oxide monomer, dimer and trimer making these wavelengths of particular interest for the observation of protoplanetary discs and even potentially planet-forming regions around stars. If such transitions are observed in emission from the accretion discs or absorptions from stellar spectra, the beginning stages of mineral and, subsequently, rocky body formation could be indicated.

  12. Study of Residual Gas Analyser (RGA) Response towards Known Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathan, Firozkhan S; Khan, Ziauddin; Semwal, Pratibha; George, Siju; Raval, Dilip C; Thankey, Prashant L; Manthena, Himabindu; Yuvakiran, Paravastu; Dhanani, Kalpesh R

    2012-01-01

    Helium leak testing is the most versatile form of weld qualification test for any vacuum application. Almost every ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system utilizes this technique for insuring leak tightness for the weld joints as well as demountable joints. During UHV system under operational condition with many other integrated components, in-situ developed leaks identification becomes one of the prime aspect for maintaining the health of such system and for continuing the experiments onwards. Since online utilization of leak detector (LD) has many practical limitations, residual gas analyser (RGA) can be used as a potential instrument for online leak detection. For this purpose, a co-relation for a given leak rate between Leak Detector and RGA is experimentally established. This paper describes the experimental aspect and the relationship between leak detector and RGA.

  13. RESIDUAL-GAS-IONIZATION BEAM PROFILE MONITORS IN RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONNOLLY, R.; MICHNOFF, R.; TEPIKIAN, S.

    2005-05-16

    Four ionization profile monitors (IPMs) in RHIC measure vertical and horizontal beam profiles in the two rings by measuring the distribution of electrons produced by beam ionization of residual gas. During the last three years both the collection accuracy and signal/noise ratio have been improved. An electron source is mounted across the beam pipe from the collector to monitor microchannel plate (MCP) aging and the signal electrons are gated to reduce MCP aging and to allow charge replenishment between single-turn measurements. Software changes permit simultaneous measurements of any number of individual bunches in the ring. This has been used to measure emittance growth rates on six bunches of varying intensities in a single store. Also the software supports FFT analysis of turn-by-turn profiles of a single bunch at injection to detect dipole and quadrupole oscillations.

  14. The emission of fluorine gas during incineration of fluoroborate residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yuheng, E-mail: fengyh@tongji.edu.cn [Thermal & Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Jiang, Xuguang [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen, Dezhen [Thermal & Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Gaseous fluorine products were identified when combusting fluoroborate residue. • BF{sub 3} and SiF{sub 4} tend to be hydrolyzed into HF with the increase of temperature. • The emission of BF{sub 3} and SiF{sub 4} from the chamber could be negligible at 1100 °C. - Abstract: The emission behaviors of wastes from fluorine chemical industry during incineration have raised concerns because multiple fluorine products might danger human health. In this study, fluorine emission from a two-stage incineration system during the combustion of fluoroborate residue was examined. In a TG-FTIR analysis BF{sub 3}, SiF{sub 4} and HF were identified as the initial fluorine forms to be released, while fluorine gases of greenhouse effect such as CF{sub 4} and SF{sub 6} were not found. Below 700 °C, NaBF{sub 4} in the sample decomposed to generate BF{sub 3}. Then part of BF{sub 3} reacted with SiO{sub 2} in the system to form SiF{sub 4} or hydrolyzed to HF. At higher temperatures, the NaF left in the sample was gradually hydrolyzed to form HF. A lab-scale two-stage tube furnace is established to simulate the typical two-stage combustion chamber in China. Experimental tests proved that HF was the only fluorine gas in the flue gas, and emissions of BF{sub 3} and SiF{sub 4} can be negligible. Thermodynamic equilibrium model predicted that all SiF{sub 4} would be hydrolyzed at 1100 °C in the secondary-chamber, which agreed well with the experimental results.

  15. Method of monitoring photoactive organic molecules in-situ during gas-phase deposition of the photoactive organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Vartanian, Garen; Rolin, Cedric

    2015-06-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring of gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in real time while depositing a film of the photoactive organic molecules on a substrate in a processing chamber for depositing the film includes irradiating the gas-phase photoactive organic molecules in the processing chamber with a radiation from a radiation source in-situ while depositing the film of the one or more organic materials and measuring the intensity of the resulting photoluminescence emission from the organic material. One or more processing parameters associated with the deposition process can be determined from the photoluminescence intensity data in real time providing useful feedback on the deposition process.

  16. Chloroxyanion residues in cantaloupe and tomatoes after chlorine dioxide gas sanitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorine dioxide gas is effective at cleansing fruits and vegetables of bacterial pathogens and(or) rot organisms, but few data are available on chemical residues remaining subsequent to chlorine gas treatment. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify chlorate and perchlorate residues after tom...

  17. Adsorption of small gas molecules on pure and Al-doped graphene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction of small gas molecules (CCl 4 , CH 4 , NH 3 , CO 2 , N 2 , CO, NO 2 CCl 2 F 2 , SO 2 , CF 4 , H 2 ) on pure and aluminium-doped graphene were investigated by using the density functional theory to explore their potential applications as sensors. It has been found that all gas molecules show much stronger ...

  18. Collision cross section calculations for polyatomic ions considering rotating diatomic/linear gas molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Structural characterization of ions in the gas phase is facilitated by measurement of ion collision cross sections (CCS) using techniques such as ion mobility spectrometry. Further information is gained from CCS measurement when comparison is made between measurements and accurately predicted CCSs for model ion structures and the gas in which measurements are made. While diatomic gases, namely molecular nitrogen and air, are being used in CCS measurement with increasingly prevalency, the majority of studies in which measurements are compared to predictions use models in which gas molecules are spherical or non-rotating, which is not necessarily appropriate for diatomic gases. Here, we adapt a momentum transfer based CCS calculation approach to consider rotating, diatomic gas molecule collisions with polyatomic ions, and compare CCS predictions with a diatomic gas molecule to those made with a spherical gas molecular for model spherical ions, tetra-alkylammonium ions, and multiply charged polyethylene glycol ions. CCS calculations are performed using both specular-elastic and diffuse-inelastic collisions rules, which mimic negligible internal energy exchange and complete thermal accommodation, respectively, between gas molecule and ion. The influence of the long range ion-induced dipole potential on calculations is also examined with both gas molecule models. In large part we find that CCSs calculated with specular-elastic collision rules decrease, while they increase with diffuse-inelastic collision rules when using diatomic gas molecules. Results clearly show the structural model of both the ion and gas molecule, the potential energy field between ion and gas molecule, and finally the modeled degree of kinetic energy exchange between ion and gas molecule internal energy are coupled to one another in CCS calculations, and must be considered carefully to obtain results which agree with measurements

  19. Injection, flow, and mixing of CO2 in porous media with residual gas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Doughty, C.A.

    2010-09-01

    Geologic structures associated with depleted natural gas reservoirs are desirable targets for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) as evidenced by numerous pilot and industrial-scale GCS projects in these environments world-wide. One feature of these GCS targets that may affect injection is the presence of residual CH{sub 4}. It is well known that CH{sub 4} drastically alters supercritical CO{sub 2} density and viscosity. Furthermore, residual gas of any kind affects the relative permeability of the liquid and gas phases, with relative permeability of the gas phase strongly dependent on the time-history of imbibition or drainage, i.e., dependent on hysteretic relative permeability. In this study, the effects of residual CH{sub 4} on supercritical CO{sub 2} injection were investigated by numerical simulation in an idealized one-dimensional system under three scenarios: (1) with no residual gas; (2) with residual supercritical CO{sub 2}; and (3) with residual CH{sub 4}. We further compare results of simulations that use non-hysteretic and hysteretic relative permeability functions. The primary effect of residual gas is to decrease injectivity by decreasing liquid-phase relative permeability. Secondary effects arise from injected gas effectively incorporating residual gas and thereby extending the mobile gas plume relative to cases with no residual gas. Third-order effects arise from gas mixing and associated compositional effects on density that effectively create a larger plume per unit mass. Non-hysteretic models of relative permeability can be used to approximate some parts of the behavior of the system, but fully hysteretic formulations are needed to accurately model the entire system.

  20. Detection of trans-isomers of hydrocarbon residues of lipid molecules by IR absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhalovsky, I. S.; Samoylov, M. V.; Wileishikova, N. P.

    2009-01-01

    IR spectroscopy is used for a comparative analysis of the trans-isomerization of double bonds in hydrocarbon residuals of lactic and hydrogenated lipids. The maximum of the absorption band of the trans-isomers for all the lipid samples is found to lie at 965 cm-1. An absorption band at 970 cm-1 is discovered in the spectra of the lactic lipids near the analytic band of the trans-isomers at 965 cm-1. Based on a gaussian approximation for their absorption spectral bands, the trans-isomer content in the lactic lipid samples is 10-11%. The absorption by lipid molecules at 970 cm-1 has to be taken into account when determining the trans-isomer content of fat and oil products.

  1. Magnetic trapping and thermal isolation of nitrogen hydride molecules using the buffer gas techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikata, Edem

    Thermal isolation of trapped NH molecules is accomplished. We cool NH molecules to 500 mK using helium vapor buffer gas and magnetically trap them in the 4 Tesla field of an anti-Helmholtz superconducting magnet. The helium is introduced using a fast-acting cryogenic valve, allowing us to abruptly switch off the flow. The buffer gas rapidly exits the trapping region through a large diameter orifice. We trap 105 molecules with lifetimes exceeding 20 s. The prospect of extending the loading and trapping techniques to observe atom-molecule collisions is investigated.

  2. A Mathematical Model of Membrane Gas Separation with Energy Transfer by Molecules of Gas Flowing in a Channel to Molecules Penetrating this Channel from the Adjacent Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szwast Maciej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the mathematical modelling of selected isothermal separation processes of gaseous mixtures, taking place in plants using membranes, in particular nonporous polymer membranes. The modelling concerns membrane modules consisting of two channels - the feeding and the permeate channels. Different shapes of the channels cross-section were taken into account. Consideration was given to co-current and counter-current flows, for feeding and permeate streams, respectively, flowing together with the inert gas receiving permeate. In the proposed mathematical model it was considered that pressure of gas changes along the length of flow channels was the result of both - the drop of pressure connected with flow resistance, and energy transfer by molecules of gas flowing in a given channel to molecules which penetrate this channel from the adjacent channel. The literature on membrane technology takes into account only the drop of pressure connected with flow resistance. Consideration given to energy transfer by molecules of gas flowing in a given channel to molecules which penetrate this channel from the adjacent channel constitute the essential novelty in the current study. The paper also presents results of calculations obtained by means of a computer program which used equations of the derived model. Physicochemical data concerning separation of the CO2/CH4 mixture with He as the sweep gas and data concerning properties of the membrane made of PDMS were assumed for calculations.

  3. Gas composition of sludge residue profiles in a sludge treatment reed bed between loadings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Julie Dam; Nielsen, Steen M; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of sludge in sludge treatment reed bed systems includes dewatering and mineralization. The mineralization process, which is driven by microorganisms, produces different gas species as by-products. The pore space composition of the gas species provides useful information on the biological...... processes occurring in the sludge residue. In this study, we measured the change in composition of gas species in the pore space at different depth levels in vertical sludge residue profiles during a resting period of 32 days. The gas composition of the pore space in the sludge residue changed during...... the resting period. As the resting period proceeded, atmospheric air re-entered the pore space at all depth levels. The methane (CH4) concentration was at its highest during the first part of the resting period, and then declined as the sludge residue became more dewatered and thereby aerated. In the pore...

  4. Gas phase ion/molecule reactions as studied by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, S.I.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is gas phase ion/molecule reactions as studied by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (chapter 2 contains a short description of this method). Three chapters are mainly concerned with mechanistic aspects of gas phase ion/molecule reactions. An equally important aspect of the thesis is the stability and reactivity of α-thio carbanions, dipole stabilized carbanions and homoenolate anions, dealt with in the other four chapters. (Auth.)

  5. Adsorption of small gas molecules on pure and Al-doped graphene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-10-03

    Oct 3, 2017 ... Abstract. The interaction of small gas molecules (CCl4, CH4, NH3, CO2, N2, CO, NO2, CCl2F2, SO2, CF4, H2) on pure and aluminium-doped graphene were investigated by using the density functional theory to explore their potential applications as sensors. It has been found that all gas molecules show ...

  6. Radio observations of molecules in the interstellar gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaddeus, P.

    1981-01-01

    Most interstellar molecules are familiar stable compounds but nearly one-fifth are ions, radicals and acetylenic carbon chains so reactive in the laboratory that before being detected in space they had rarely been observed or were entirely unknown. The heavy atom backbone of the known interstellar molecules is a linear chain of C,N,O or S; rings and branched chains are missing. The most readily observed spectral lines of most interstellar molecules are rotational transitions at millimetre wavelengths. These are generally excited by H2 collisions. Maser line emission from OH, H2O, SiO and CH3OH-extremely intense, small sources, often polarized and sometimes time-dependent - are examples of nonequilibrium excitation. A number of rare isotopic species, particularly those of C,N and O are observed in interstellar molecules. Isotopic ratios differing from those on Earth by two- or threefold apparently exist, and in all but one case can be attributed to stellar nucleosynthesis since the formation of the Solar System. Molecular clouds are important in star formation and galactic structure: it is possible that all stars form in molecular clouds, and as these are largely restricted to the spiral arms, they provide a new and highly specific tracer of the large-scale structure of the galactic system. (author)

  7. Atom-molecule equilibration in a degenerate Fermi gas with resonant interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, J. E.; Nikuni, T.; Nygaard, Nicolai

    2004-01-01

    We present a nonequilibrium kinetic theory describing atom-molecule population dynamics in a two-component Fermi gas with a Feshbach resonance. Key collision integrals emerge that govern the relaxation of the atom-molecule mixture to chemical and thermal equilibrium. Our focus is on the pseudogap...

  8. Molecules, magic and forgetful fruit flies: the supernatural science of medical gas research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mychaskiw, George

    2011-09-06

    Medical gas research often involves the study of molecules under extraphysiologic conditions, that is, conditions that do not exist in nature. This "supernatural" nature of medical gas research sometimes produces results that appear to be almost "magic" to those schooled in traditional physiology"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic".-Arthur C. Clarke.

  9. Studies of gas phase ion/molecule reactions by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleingeld, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    An important field in which Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance has useful applications is that of gas phase ion chemistry, the subject of this thesis. First, the general picture of ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase is discussed. Next, some positive ion-molecule reactions are described, whereas the remaining chapters deal with negative ion-molecule reactions. Most of these studies have been performed using the FT-ICR method. Reactions involving H 3 O - and NH 4 - ions are described whereas the other chapters deal with larger organic complexes. (Auth.)

  10. Dependence of energy per molecule on sputtering yields with reactive gas cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2010-01-01

    Gas cluster ions show dense energy deposition on a target surface, which result in the enhancement of chemical reactions. In reactive sputtering with gas cluster ions, the energy per atom or molecule plays an important role. In this study, the average cluster size (N, the number of atoms or molecules in a cluster ion) was controlled; thereby the dependences of the energy per molecule on the sputtering yields of carbon by CO 2 cluster ions and that of Si by SF 6 /Ar mixed gas cluster ions were investigated. Large CO 2 cluster ions with energy per molecule of 1 eV showed high reactive sputtering yield of an amorphous carbon film. However, these ions did not cause the formation of large craters on a graphite surface. It is possible to achieve very low damage etching by controlling the energy per molecule of reactive cluster ions. Further, in the case of SF 6 /Ar mixed cluster ions, it was found that reactive sputtering was enhanced when a small amount of SF 6 gas (∼10%) was mixed with Ar. The reactive sputtering yield of Si by one SF 6 molecule linearly increased with the energy per molecule.

  11. Chloroxyanion Residues in Cantaloupe and Tomatoes after Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sanitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D J; Ernst, W; Herges, G R

    2015-11-04

    Chlorine dioxide gas is effective at cleansing fruits and vegetables of bacterial pathogens and(or) rot organisms, but little data are available on chemical residues remaining subsequent to chlorine gas treatment. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify chlorate and perchlorate residues after tomato and cantaloupe treatment with chlorine dioxide gas. Treatments delivered 50 mg of chlorine dioxide gas per kg of tomato (2-h treatment) and 100 mg of gas per kg of cantaloupe (6-h treatment) in sealed, darkened containers. Chlorate residues in tomato and cantaloupe edible flesh homogenates were less than the LC-MS/MS limit of quantitation (60 and 30 ng/g respectively), but were 1319 ± 247 ng/g in rind + edible flesh of cantaloupe. Perchlorate residues in all fractions of chlorine dioxide-treated tomatoes and cantaloupe were not different (P > 0.05) than perchlorate residues in similar fractions of untreated tomatoes and cantaloupe. Data from this study suggest that chlorine dioxide sanitation of edible vegetables and melons can be conducted without the formation of unwanted residues in edible fractions.

  12. Nucleobases and Prebiotic Molecules in Organic Residues Produced from the Ultraviolet Photo-Irradiation of Pyrimidine in NH3 and H2O+NH3 Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuevo, Michel; Milam, Stefanie N.; Sandford, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Although not yet identified in the interstellar medium (ISM), N-heterocycles including nucleobases the information subunits of DNA and RNA are present in carbonaceous chondrites, which indicates that molecules of biological interest can be formed in non-terrestrial environments via abiotic pathways. Recent laboratory experiments and ab-initio calculations have already shown that the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices leads to the formation of a suite of oxidized pyrimidine derivatives, including the nucleobase uracil. In the present work, NH3:pyrimidine and H2O:NH3:pyrimidine ice mixtures with different relative proportions were irradiated with UV photons under astrophysically relevant conditions. Liquid- and gas-chromatography analysis of the resulting organic residues has led to the detection of the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as other species of prebiotic interest such as urea and small amino acids. The presence of these molecules in organic residues formed under abiotic conditions supports scenarios in which extraterrestrial organics that formed in space and were subsequently delivered to telluric planets via comets and meteorites could have contributed to the inventory of molecules that triggered the first biological reactions on their surfaces.

  13. Determination of organophosphorus pesticide residues in tomatoes by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souissi, Sihem

    2010-01-01

    Chloropyriphos and malathion are two organophosphorus pesticides from many others pesticides widely used by famers in agriculture .Because of their bad effect on human health, officials standards are set by the international organisations and communities to ensure safer food for consumer .In the same way, scientists over the world are working hard to develop new detection techniques responding to the international requirements. In this study, an ' IAEA-ethylacetate method ', an adaptation of the popular QuEChERS multi residue method, was optimized to analyse chloropyriphos and Malathion residues in tomatoes .Ethyl-Acetate was used as an extraction solvent the PSA was kept for the clean up procedure. GC-NPD is used for samples analysis .The method optimized is specifique, selective with a recovery averaged more than 70 pour cent. A complete validation of the method is necessary to be used for routine analysis.

  14. Polyatomic Trilobite Rydberg Molecules in a Dense Random Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukko, Perttu J J; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2017-11-17

    Trilobites are exotic giant dimers with enormous dipole moments. They consist of a Rydberg atom and a distant ground-state atom bound together by short-range electron-neutral attraction. We show that highly polar, polyatomic trilobite states unexpectedly persist and thrive in a dense ultracold gas of randomly positioned atoms. This is caused by perturbation-induced quantum scarring and the localization of electron density on randomly occurring atom clusters. At certain densities these states also mix with an s state, overcoming selection rules that hinder the photoassociation of ordinary trilobites.

  15. Ultraviolet gas-discharge lamp on iodine molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Minya, A. I.; Gomoki, Z. T.; Kalyuzhnaya, A. G.; Shchedrin, A. I.

    2010-08-01

    The emission characteristics of a pulsed-periodic UV radiation source are reported. The source excited by a pulsed-periodic capacitive discharge initiated in helium-iodine vapor, neon-iodine vapor, or krypton-iodine vapor mixtures radiates in the spectral range 200-450 nm. It is shown that most of the plasma radiation power concentrates in the integral line of the iodine atom (206.2 nm) and in the D'- A' band of the iodine molecule with a maximum at 342 nm. The radiation intensity of the lamp is optimized in accordance with the partial pressure of the inert gases. The discharge plasma parameters that are of interest for simulating the process kinetics and the output characteristics of an UV source based on molecular iodine, atomic iodine, and xenon iodide are calculated in helium-iodine vapor and xenon-iodine vapor mixtures.

  16. Residual lifetime assessment of uPVC gas pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, HA

    2010-01-01

    The Dutch gas distribution network consists of about 20% (22,500 km) of unplasticised poly(vinyl chloride) (uPVC) pipes, most of which have been installed from the mid-sixties up to the mid-seventies of the previous century and have been in service ever since. Replacing the uPVC gas pipes exactly after the specified service lifetime of 50 years will lead to a costly and extremely labour intensive project in the next decade. Postponing the replacement is only an option when it can be done with...

  17. Detection of gas molecules on single Mn adatom adsorbed graphyne: a DFT-D study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhansheng; Lv, Peng; Ma, Dongwei; Yang, Xinwei; Li, Shuo; Yang, Zongxian

    2018-02-01

    As one of the prominent applications in intelligent systems, gas sensing technology has attracted great interest in both industry and academia. In the current study, the pristine graphyne (GY) without and with a single Mn atom is investigated to detect the gas molecules (CO, CH4, CO2, NH3, NO and O2). The pristine GY is promising to detect O2 molecules because of its chemical adsorption on GY with large electron transfer. The great stability of the Mn/GY is found, and the Mn atom prefers to anchor at the alkyne ring as a single atom. Upon single Mn atom anchoring, the sensitivity and selectivity of GY based gas sensors is significantly improved for various molecules, except CH4. The recovery time of the Mn/GY after detecting the gas molecules may help to appraise the detection efficiency for the Mn/GY. The current study will help to understand the mechanism of detecting the gas molecules, and extend the potentially fascinating applications of GY-based materials.

  18. Molecule-based kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of hydrotreating processes applied to Light Cycle Oil gas oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Max; Pereira de Oliveira, Luis; Verstraete, Jan

    2013-03-01

    A novel kinetic modeling strategy for refining processes for heavy petroleum fractions is proposed. The approach allows to overcome the notorious lack of molecular details in describing the petroleum fractions. The simulation of the reactions process consists of a two-step procedure. In the first step, a mixture of molecules representing the feedstock of the process is generated via two sucessive molecular reconstruction algorithms. The first algorithm, termed stochastic reconstruction, generates an equimolar set of molecules with the appropriate analytical properties via a Monte Carlo method. The second algorithm, called reconstruction by entropy maximization, adjusts the molar fractions of the generated molecules in order to further improve the properties of the mixture. In the second step, a kinetic Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the effect of the refining reactions on the previously generated set of molecules. The full two-step methodology has been applied to the hydrotreating of LCO gas oils and to the hydrocracking of vacuum residues from different origins (e.g. Athabasca).

  19. Dynamics and adsorption of gas molecules using proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. Y.; Lee, M. S. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    MgO powders and Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were irradiated by proton beams with high energy (10-35 MeV) for various exposure times, and Ar gas adsorption experiments were carried. A careful investigation measured by TEM studies revealed significant differences in morphological evolution before and after irradiating the proton beams. After irradiating the proton beams, adsorption properties of Ar measured below 80K on MgO powders having only (100) surface exposure exhibited an additional isotherm steps suggesting the creation of the local surface defects presumably due to the bombardments of the protons. Interestingly, CNTs that were radiated by proton beams with energy 35 MeV at the Bragg peak position contain much less Fe, Ni catalysts compare to the ones that were not irradiated by the proton beams. This experiment was re-performed at the same condition to confirm the reproducibility of the result, and the same outcomes were produced.

  20. Phase diagrams for an ideal gas mixture of fermionic atoms and bosonic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, J. E.; Nygaard, Nicolai; Clark, C. W.

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the phase diagrams for a harmonically trapped ideal gas mixture of fermionic atoms and bosonic molecules in chemical and thermal equilibrium, where the internal energy of the molecules can be adjusted relative to that of the atoms by use of a tunable Feshbach resonance. We plot...... diagrams obtained in recent experiments on the Bose-Einstein condensation to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer crossover, in which the condensate fraction is plotted as a function of the initial temperature of the Fermi gas measured before a sweep of the magnetic field through the resonance region....

  1. Characteristics of gas and residues produced from electric arc pyrolysis of waste lubricating oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Geum-Ju; Seo, Yong-Chil; Pudasainee, Deepak; Kim, In-Tae

    2010-07-01

    An attempt has been made to recover high-calorific fuel gas and useful carbonaceous residue by the electric arc pyrolysis of waste lubricating oil. The characteristics of gas and residues produced from electric arc pyrolysis of waste lubricating oil were investigated in this study. The produced gas was mainly composed of hydrogen (35-40%), acetylene (13-20%), ethylene (3-4%) and other hydrocarbons, whereas the concentration of CO was very low. Calorific values of gas ranged from 11,000 to 13,000 kcal kg(-1) and the concentrations of toxic gases, such as NO(x), HCl and HF, were below the regulatory emissions limit. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of liquid-phase residues showed that high molecular-weight hydrocarbons in waste lubricating oil were pyrolyzed into low molecular-weight hydrocarbons and hydrogen. Dehydrogenation was found to be the main pyrolysis mechanism due to the high reaction temperature induced by electric arc. The average particle size of soot as carbonaceous residue was about 10 microm. The carbon content and heavy metals in soot were above 60% and below 0.01 ppm, respectively. The utilization of soot as industrial material resources such as carbon black seems to be feasible after refining and grinding. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging Molecular Structure through Femtosecond Photoelectron Diffraction on Aligned and Oriented Gas-Phase Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzee, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular...

  3. Gas chromatographic determination of pesticide residues in white mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słowik-Borowiec, Magdalena; Szpyrka, Ewa; Walorczyk, Stanisław

    2015-04-15

    A new analytical method employing gas chromatography coupled to electron capture and nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-ECD/NPD) has been developed and validated for the screening and quantification of 51 pesticides in a matrix of high chlorophyll content - white mustard (Sinapis alba L.). For preparation of the sample extract, the citrate buffered QuEChERS procedure was followed. However certain changes were made to adapt the method to our needs and available laboratory resources. The sample size was reduced to 5 g, 10 mL water was added and exchange of solvent before GC analysis was done. The samples spiked with the target pesticides at the concentration level 0.01 mg/kg and a higher level (depending on the compound) yielded average recoveries in the range of 70-120% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) 0-19% except for HCB, S-metolachlor and teflubenzuron, and displayed very good linearity (R(2)>0.99) for nearly all the analytes. Limit of quantification was 0.01 mg/kg for the majority of the analytes. The expanded measurement uncertainties were estimated employing a "top-down" empirical model as being between 6% and 32% and yielding an average value of 18% (coverage factor k=2, confidence level 95%). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Validation of a methodology multi-residue for the determination of pesticides residuals in strawberry (fragraria spp.) by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montano Garces, Mauricio; Guerrero Dallos, Jairo Arturo

    2001-01-01

    This study describes the validation of multi-residue analytical methodology for the simultaneous determination of 19 organ chlorine, organophosphorus and organ nitrogen pesticides in strawberry. Pesticides residues were extracted from strawberry samples with ethyl acetate, the extracts were cleaned-up by GPC, the quantitative analysis was carried out by high resolution gas chromatography (GC) with a pulsed splitless injection mode and simultaneous detection by m-ECD and NPD coupled in parallel. The methodology is specific, selective, and accurate and robust the calibration curves in matrix matched analytical standards show linearity over the concentration range of 0.04-5.00 mg/kg with limits of detection and quantitation between 0.007-0.5 mg/kg and 0.01-1.00 mg/kg respectively. The recovery experiments yielding averages between 80-110% for most of the pesticides. The distribution of analyze in the laboratory sample was evaluated and it was found its homogeneity. The methodology was applied in field samples and was mainly found Captan residues below MRL

  5. Effect of flue gas desulfurization residue on plant establishment and soil and leachate quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punshon, T.; Adriano, D.C.; Weber, J.T. [University of Georgia, Savannah, GA (USA). Savannah River Ecology Lab.

    2001-06-01

    Effects on soil quality and crop establishment after incorporation of flue gas desulfurization by-product (FGD) into soil as an amendment was assessed in a mesocosm study. Mesocosm units received applications equivalent to 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10% FGD residue. Germination, biomass production, and elemental composition of corn, radish and cotton were determined. The quality of leachates and soil were also determined periodically. Flue gas desulfurization residue did not affect germination and all application rates stimulated aboveground biomass. Plants grown in FGD-amended soil contained significantly elevated tissue concentrations of As, B, Se, and Mo. The FGD residue elevated surface soil pH from 5.5 to 8.1. Leachate pH was unaffected by FGD, but salinity rose sharply with increasing application rates of FGD. Leachates contained higher concentrations of B, with small increases in Se and As. Flue gas desulfurization residue application caused an increase in total B, As, Mo, Se and extractable Ca in the soil, but decreased Mn and Zn. Using FGD residues could have beneficial effects on crop establishment without detrimental effects on soil or leachate quality, at an optimum rate of approximately 2.5%. This material could alleviate surface acidity, and B and Mo deficiencies in plants. 27 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Interactions of gas molecules with monolayer MoSe{sub 2}: A first principle study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Munish, E-mail: munishsharmahpu@live.com; Jamdagni, Pooja; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Department. of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, H. P., 171005 (India); Kumar, Ashok [Centre for Physical Sciences, School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda, 151001(India)

    2016-05-23

    We present a first principle study of interaction of toxic gas molecules (NO, NO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}) with monolayer MoSe{sub 2}. The predicted order of sensitivity of gas molecule is NO{sub 2} > SO{sub 2} > NO. Adsorbed molecules strongly influence the electronic behaviour of monolayer MoSe{sub 2} by inducing impurity levels in the vicinity of Fermi energy. NO and SO{sub 2} is found to induce p-type doping effect while semiconductor to metallic transitions occur on NO{sub 2} adsorption. Our findings may guide the experimentalist for fabricating sensor devices based on MoSe{sub 2} monolayer.

  7. Ground state of a hydrogen ion molecule immersed in an inhomogeneous electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Valdes, J.; Gutierrez, F.A.; Matamala, A.R.; Denton, C.D.; Vargas, P.; Valdes, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we have calculated the ground state energy of the hydrogen molecule, H 2 + , immersed in the highly inhomogeneous electron gas around a metallic surface within the local density approximation. The molecule is perturbed by the electron density of a crystalline surface of Au with the internuclear axis parallel to the surface. The surface spatial electron density is calculated through a linearized band structure method (LMTO-DFT). The ground state of the molecule-ion was calculated using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for a fixed-ion while the screening effects of the inhomogeneous electron gas are depicted by a Thomas-Fermi like electrostatic potential. We found that within our model the molecular ion dissociates at the critical distance of 2.35a.u. from the first atomic layer of the solid

  8. Femtosecond time-resolved studies of coherent vibrational Raman scattering in large gas-phase molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, C.C.; Chandler, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from femtosecond time-resolved coherent Raman experiments in which we excite and monitor vibrational coherence in gas-phase samples of benzene and 1,3,5-hexatriene. Different physical mechanisms for coherence decay are seen in these two molecules. In benzene, where the Raman polarizability is largely isotropic, the Q branch of the vibrational Raman spectrum is the primary feature excited. Molecules in different rotational states have different Q-branch transition frequencies due to vibration--rotation interaction. Thus, the macroscopic polarization that is observed in these experiments decays because it has many frequency components from molecules in different rotational states, and these frequency components go out of phase with each other. In 1,3,5-hexatriene, the Raman excitation produces molecules in a coherent superposition of rotational states, through (O, P, R, and S branch) transitions that are strong due to the large anisotropy of the Raman polarizability. The coherent superposition of rotational states corresponds to initially spatially oriented, vibrationally excited, molecules that are freely rotating. The rotation of molecules away from the initial orientation is primarily responsible for the coherence decay in this case. These experiments produce large (∼10% efficiency) Raman shifted signals with modest excitation pulse energies (10 μJ) demonstrating the feasibility of this approach for a variety of gas phase studies. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  9. Synchrotron and small bio-molecules in gas phase and liquid environment: new opportunities in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naves de Brito, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Two techniques are critically related to the photoelectric law, namely: photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy. Both are strongly used now a day within synchrotron laboratories. Our group is employing both to investigate fragmentation of bio-molecules in gas phase such as amino acids and DNA basis using V UV and soft x-ray photons. In the near future lager scale instruments developed in Brazil will allow unique opportunities to apply these two spectroscopic methods to molecules immersed in liquids such as water. We will present details from this advanced x-ray source and experimental stations with capabilities not present in other places in the world. Experiments connected to the molecular origin of live will be shown. Among them an experiment where we mimic the atmosphere at Titan moon producing bio- molecules will discussed. Another experiment will be presented where we test the Panspermia viability using special bacteria. We will also present experiments where frozen simple molecules connected to pre-biotic mate- rial are bombardment by UV photons and energetic particles showing interesting trends. Spectroscopic studies of gas phase photo-fragmentation of bio-molecules may be critical to understand in the future these molecules immersed in liquids. We plan to spend some time showing our recent results in this area. (author)

  10. Analysis of residual swirl in tangentially-fired natural gas-boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasril Hasini; Muhammad Azlan Muad; Mohd Zamri Yusoff; Norshah Hafeez Shuaib

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the investigation on residual swirl flow in a 120 MW natural gas, full-scale, tangential-fired boiler. Emphasis is given towards the understanding of the behavior of the combustion gas flow pattern and temperature distribution as a result of the tangential firing system of the boiler. The analysis was carried out based on three-dimensional computational modeling on full scale boiler with validation from key design parameter as well as practical observation. Actual operating parameters of the actual boiler are taken as the boundary conditions for this modeling. The prediction of total heat flux was found to be in agreement with the key design parameter while the residual swirl predicted at the upper furnace agrees qualitatively with the practical observation. Based on this comparison, detail analysis was carried out for comprehensive understanding on the generation and destruction of the residual swirl behavior in boiler especially those with high capacity. (author)

  11. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  12. Comparison of thin layer chromatographic and gas chromatographic determination of propoxur residues in a cocoa ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeboah, P.O.; Lowor, S.; Akpabli, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    The fate of propoxur in a cocoa ecosystem has been studied using thin layer chromatographic (TLC) and gas chromatographic (GC) methods. Residues of propoxur as determined by both TLC and GC were not significantly different. TLC analysis of propoxur residues in soil, cocoa leaves and pods did not require any rigorous cleanup since residues measured from cleaned extracts and without cleanup were not significantly different. The residue levels of propoxur in the soil were found to decrease rapidly and, by the 21st day, none was detected in the topsoil (0-15 cm). Evidence of leaching of propoxur residues in the soil has also been demonstrated. The amount left in the top soil after the first seven days were 27%, 23% and 24% of the initial one as determined by the TLC without cleanup, TLC with cleanup and GLC, respectively. No propoxur residue was detected in topsoil 21 days after spraying. About 38% of pesticides detected on the cocoa pod on the day of treatment remained on the pod seven days after treatment. The residue detected on the leaves on the day of treatment was higher than that in or on the soil. This decreased rapidly to 1.7% in 21 days compared to 16% for the soil and 23% for the pod. (author)

  13. A first-principles study of gas molecule adsorption on borophene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Borophene, a new two-dimensional material, was recently synthesized. The unique anisotropic structure and excellent properties of borophene have attracted considerable research interest. This paper presents a first-principles study of the adsorption of gas molecules (CO, CO2, NH3, NO, NO2 and CH4 on borophene. The adsorption configurations, adsorption energies and electronic properties of the gas molecules absorpted on borophene are determined, and the mechanisms of the interactions between the gas molecules and borophene are evaluated. We find that CO, CO2, NH3, NO and NO2 are chemisorbed on borophene, while CH4 is physisorbed on borophene. Furthermore, our calculation also indicate that CO and CO2 are chemisorbed on borophene with moderate adsorption energy and NO, NO2 and NH3 are chemisorbed on borophene via strong covalent bonds. Moreover, CO is found as an electron donor, while CO2 an electron acceptor. The chemisorption of CO and CO2 on borophene increases the electrical conductivity, so It seems that borophene has the potential to be used in high-sensitivity CO and CO2 gas sensors.

  14. Controlling residual hydrogen gas in mass spectra during pulsed laser atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, R Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Residual hydrogen (H 2 ) gas in the analysis chamber of an atom probe instrument limits the ability to measure H concentration in metals and alloys. Measuring H concentration would permit quantification of important physical phenomena, such as hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, hydrogen trapping, and grain boundary segregation. Increased insight into the behavior of residual H 2 gas on the specimen tip surface in atom probe instruments could help reduce these limitations. The influence of user-selected experimental parameters on the field adsorption and desorption of residual H 2 gas on nominally pure copper (Cu) was studied during ultraviolet pulsed laser atom probe tomography. The results indicate that the total residual hydrogen concentration, H TOT , in the mass spectra exhibits a generally decreasing trend with increasing laser pulse energy and increasing laser pulse frequency. Second-order interaction effects are also important. The pulse energy has the greatest influence on the quantity H TOT , which is consistently less than 0.1 at.% at a value of 80 pJ.

  15. Quantum mechanical computations and spectroscopy: from small rigid molecules in the gas phase to large flexible molecules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Improta, Roberto; Rega, Nadia

    2008-05-01

    Interpretation of structural properties and dynamic behavior of molecules in solution is of fundamental importance to understand their stability, chemical reactivity, and catalytic action. While information can be gained, in principle, by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, the interpretation of the rich indirect information that can be inferred from the analysis of experimental spectra is seldom straightforward because of the subtle interplay of several different effects, whose specific role is not easy to separate and evaluate. In such a complex scenario, theoretical studies can be very helpful at two different levels: (i) supporting and complementing experimental results to determine the structure of the target molecule starting from its spectral properties; (ii) dissecting and evaluating the role of different effects in determining the observed spectroscopic properties. This is the reason why computational spectroscopy is rapidly evolving from a highly specialized research field into a versatile and widespread tool for the assignment of experimental spectra and their interpretation in terms of chemical physical effects. In such a situation, it becomes important that both computationally and experimentally oriented chemists are aware that new methodological advances and integrated computational strategies are available, providing reliable estimates of fundamental spectral parameters not only for relatively small molecules in the gas phase but also for large and flexible molecules in condensed phases. In this Account, we review the most significant methodological contributions from our research group in this field, and by exploiting some recent results of their application to the computation of IR, UV-vis, NMR, and EPR spectral parameters, we discuss the microscopic mechanisms underlying solvent and vibrational effects on the spectral parameters. After reporting some recent achievements for the study of excited states by first principle quantum mechanical

  16. Genome-wide mapping of methylated adenine residues in pathogenic Escherichia coli using single-molecule real-time sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Gang; Munera, Diana; Friedman, David I; Mandlik, Anjali; Chao, Michael C; Banerjee, Onureena; Feng, Zhixing; Losic, Bojan; Mahajan, Milind C; Jabado, Omar J; Deikus, Gintaras; Clark, Tyson A; Luong, Khai; Murray, Iain A; Davis, Brigid M; Keren-Paz, Alona; Chess, Andrew; Roberts, Richard J; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Steve W; Kumar, Vipin; Waldor, Matthew K; Schadt, Eric E

    2012-12-01

    Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) DNA sequencing allows the systematic detection of chemical modifications such as methylation but has not previously been applied on a genome-wide scale. We used this approach to detect 49,311 putative 6-methyladenine (m6A) residues and 1,407 putative 5-methylcytosine (m5C) residues in the genome of a pathogenic Escherichia coli strain. We obtained strand-specific information for methylation sites and a quantitative assessment of the frequency of methylation at each modified position. We deduced the sequence motifs recognized by the methyltransferase enzymes present in this strain without prior knowledge of their specificity. Furthermore, we found that deletion of a phage-encoded methyltransferase-endonuclease (restriction-modification; RM) system induced global transcriptional changes and led to gene amplification, suggesting that the role of RM systems extends beyond protecting host genomes from foreign DNA.

  17. Flexibility of amino acid residues at position four of nonapeptides enhances their binding to human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; di Modugno, F; Rosano, L

    2000-01-01

    The binding affinity of synthetic nonapeptides to human leucocyte antigens (HLA) molecules of the A0201 allotype, the most common in Caucasian, is enhanced or reduced by suitable amino acid substitutions at position 4, as a result of increased or decreased chain flexibility. A higher flexibility of the bond at this position correlates with an easier accommodation of the fragment into the HLA groove, while rigidity of the peptide chain appears to interfere. These data are based on two lines of evidence: a) most natural high affinity ligands for HLA-A0201 possess, at position 4, flexible residues b) substitutions of such residues by rigid amino acids results in a decrease of binding affinity.

  18. H-bonding networks of the distal residues and water molecules in the active site of Thermobifida fusca hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Francesco P; Droghetti, Enrica; Howes, Barry D; Bustamante, Juan P; Bonamore, Alessandra; Sciamanna, Natascia; Estrin, Darío A; Feis, Alessandro; Boffi, Alberto; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2013-09-01

    The ferric form of truncated hemoglobin II from Thermobifida fusca (Tf-trHb) and its triple mutant WG8F-YB10F-YCD1F at neutral and alkaline pH, and in the presence of CN(-) have been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Tf-trHb contains three polar residues in the distal site, namely TrpG8, TyrCD1 and TyrB10. Whereas TrpG8 can act as a potential hydrogen-bond donor, the tyrosines can act as donors or acceptors. Ligand binding in heme-containing proteins is determined by a number of factors, including the nature and conformation of the distal residues and their capability to stabilize the heme-bound ligand via hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions. Since both the RR Fe-OH(-) and Fe-CN(-) frequencies are very sensitive to the distal environment, detailed information on structural variations has been obtained. The hydroxyl ligand binds only the WT protein giving rise to two different conformers. In form 1 the anion is stabilized by H-bonds with TrpG8, TyrCD1 and a water molecule, in turn H-bonded to TyrB10. In form 2, H-bonding with TyrCD1 is mediated by a water molecule. Unlike the OH(-) ligand, CN(-) binds both WT and the triple mutant giving rise to two forms with similar spectroscopic characteristics. The overall results clearly indicate that H-bonding interactions both with distal residues and water molecules are important structural determinants in the active site of Tf-trHb. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of Profenofos Pesticidal Residue in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. by Gas Chromatographic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Alen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The determination of profenofos pesticidal residue in the lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. by using gas chromatography using flame photometric detector (FPD had been investigated. The lettuce was collected from Padang Luar area, Agam distric, West Sumatera. Sample for determination of profenofos residue divided into three groups: unwashed (A, washed with water (B, and washed with detergent (C. Maceration with sonication was used for the extraction using ethylacetateas a solvent. The results showed that profenofos pesticide residue in sample A, B and C were 0.204, 0.080 and 0.061 ppm, respectively. These profenofos pesticidal residue are over than the Maximum Residue Limits (MRL that established by The Japan Food Chemical Research Foundation (0.05 ppm even though World Health Organization (WHO has not established Maximum Residue Limits (MRL profenofos on lettuce. Based on the statistical analysis one-way method (Anova using SPSS 20.0 showed that there was a significant concentrations difference between lettuce A from lettuce B and lettuce C with p < 0.05.

  20. Generation and orientation of organoxenon molecule H-Xe-CCH in the gas phase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poterya, Viktoriya; Votava, Ondřej; Fárník, Michal; Ončák, M.; Slavíček, P.; Buck, U.; Friedrich, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 10 (2008), s. 104313 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1290; GA AV ČR KAN400400651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : oriented HXEI molecules * rare-gas * basis-sets Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.149, year: 2008

  1. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis.......We present a model suggesting high chemical activity of electronically-excited molecules colliding with an isolator surface. Initial photochemical event is accounted for as the result of molecular evolution on the electronically-excited potential energy surface (PES), where acceleration...

  2. Influence of excited molecules on electron swarm transport coefficients and gas discharge kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Z.L.; Jovanovic, J.V.; Raspopovic, Z.M.; Bzenic, S.A.; Vrhovac, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we study different effects of excited molecules on swarm parameters, electron energy distribution functions and gas discharge modeling. First we discuss a possible experiment in parahydrogen to resolve the discrepancy in hydrogen vibrational excitation cross section data. Negative differential conductivity (NDC) is a kinetic phenomenon which manifests itself in a particular dependence of the drift velocity on E=N and it is affected by superelastic collisions with excited states. A complete kinetic scheme for argon required to model excited state densities in gas discharges is also described. These results are used to explain experiments in capacitively and inductively coupled RF plasmas used for processing. The paper illustrates the application of atomic and molecular collision data, swarm data and the theoretical techniques in modeling of gas discharges with large abundances of excited molecules. It is pointed out that swarm experiments with excited molecules are lacking and that there is a shortage of reliable data, while the numerical procedures are sufficiently developed to include all the important effects. (authors). 59 refs., 12 figs

  3. Monitoring volatilization products using Residual Gas Analyzers during MeV ion beam irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetteland, C. J.; Kriewaldt, K.; Taylor, L. A.; McSween, H. Y.; Sickafus, K. E.

    2018-03-01

    The use of Residual Gas Analyzers (RGAs) during irradiation experiments can provide valuable information when incorporated into experimental end-stations. The instruments can track the volatilization products of beam-sensitive materials, which may ultimately aid researchers in selecting appropriate flux values for conducting experiments. Furthermore, the type of gaseous species released during an irradiation can be monitored directly, which may lead to new insights into the radiolysis and/or heating mechanisms responsible for gas evolution. A survey of several classes of materials exposed to extremes in particle flux is presented to show how RGA instrumentation can be incorporated to qualitatively assess ion-solid interactions in a variety of fields.

  4. Assessment of pesticide residues in some fruits using gas chromatography coupled with micro electron capture detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, Y.; Sherazi, S.T.H.; Bhanger, M.I.

    2011-01-01

    A very sensitive analytical method for the determination of 26 pesticides in some fruits based on solid phase extraction (SPE) cleanup was developed using gas chromatography (GC) coupled with micro electron capture detector (mu ECD). The identity of the pesticides was confirmed by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) using selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Ethyl acetate was used as a solvent for the extraction of pesticide residues with assistance of sonication. For cleanup an octadecyl, C18 SPE column was used. A linear response of mu ECD was observed for all pesticides with good correlation coefficients (>0.9992). Proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of pesticide residues in the orange, apple, and grape fruits. Average recoveries achieved for all of the pesticides at fortification levels of 0.05, 1.0 and 2.0 mu g g/sup -1/ in analyzed fruits were above 90% with relative standard deviations (RSD) less than 6%. (author)

  5. Residual entropy and waterlike anomalies in the repulsive one dimensional lattice gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Fernando Barbosa V. da [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília-DF (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Brasília, Campus São Sebastião, São Sebastião-DF (Brazil); Oliveira, Fernando Albuquerque, E-mail: fao@fis.unb.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília-DF (Brazil); Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A., E-mail: aureliobarbosa@gmail.com [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência de Materiais, Faculdade UnB Planaltina, Universidade de Brasília, Planaltina-DF (Brazil)

    2015-04-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the one dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interaction are investigated using transfer matrix technique and Monte Carlo simulations. This simple model is shown to exhibit waterlike anomalies in density, thermal expansion coefficient, and self-diffusion. An unified description for the thermodynamic anomalies in this model is achieved based on the ground state residual entropy which appears in the model due to mixing entropy in a ground state phase transition.

  6. Residual Gas and Dust around Transition Objects and Weak T Tauri Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doppmann, Greg W. [W. M. Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Hwy., Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Carr, John S., E-mail: gdoppmann@keck.hawaii.edu, E-mail: najita@noao.edu, E-mail: carr@nrl.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2017-02-20

    Residual gas in disks around young stars can spin down stars, circularize the orbits of terrestrial planets, and whisk away the dusty debris that is expected to serve as a signpost of terrestrial planet formation. We have carried out a sensitive search for residual gas and dust in the terrestrial planet region surrounding young stars ranging in age from a few to ∼10 Myr. Using high-resolution 4.7 μ m spectra of transition objects (TOs) and weak T Tauri stars, we searched for weak continuum excesses and CO fundamental emission, after making a careful correction for the stellar contribution to the observed spectrum. We find that the CO emission from TOs is weaker and located farther from the star than CO emission from nontransition T Tauri stars with similar stellar accretion rates. The difference is possibly the result of chemical and/or dynamical effects (i.e., a low CO abundance or close-in low-mass planets). The weak T Tauri stars show no CO fundamental emission down to low flux levels (5 × 10{sup −20} to 10{sup −18} W m{sup −2}). We illustrate how our results can be used to constrain the residual disk gas content in these systems and discuss their potential implications for star and planet formation.

  7. Effect of Residual Gas Composition on Epitaxial Growth of Graphene on SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, J.; Rejhon, M.; Belas, E.; Dědič, V.; Moravec, P.; Franc, J.

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, graphene growth optimization has been one of the key routes towards large-scale, high-quality graphene production. We measure in situ residual gas content during epitaxial-graphene growth on silicon carbide (SiC) to find detrimental factors of epitaxial-graphene growth. The growth conditions in high vacuum, in argon, purified argon, and the flow of argon are compared. The grown epitaxial graphene is studied by Raman-scattering mapping. We determine mechanical strain, number of graphene layers and the graphene quality. The surface topography is measured by atomic force microscopy. Charge density and carrier mobility are studied by Hall-effect measurements in van der Pauw configuration. We identify the major role of the chemical reaction of carbon and residual water. The rate of the reaction is lowered when purified argon is used. We also show that, according to time-varying gas content, it is preferable to grow graphene at higher temperatures and shorter times. Other sources of growth environment contamination are also discussed. The reaction of residual gas and SiC is discussed as one of the factors decreasing the lateral size of SiC atomically flat terraces and leading to their irregular shape. The importance of purified argon and its sufficient flow rate is concluded to be important for high-quality graphene growth as it reduces the rate of undesired chemical reactions and provides a more stable and defined growth ambient.

  8. Prediction of Collision Cross-Section Values for Small Molecules: Application to Pesticide Residue Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Lubertus; Bade, Richard; Celma, Alberto; Mullin, Lauren; Cleland, Gareth; Stead, Sara; Hernandez, Felix; Sancho, Juan V

    2017-06-20

    The use of collision cross-section (CCS) values obtained by ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry has added a third dimension (alongside retention time and exact mass) to aid in the identification of compounds. However, its utility is limited by the number of experimental CCS values currently available. This work demonstrates the potential of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the prediction of CCS values of pesticides. The predictor, based on eight software-chosen molecular descriptors, was optimized using CCS values of 205 small molecules and validated using a set of 131 pesticides. The relative error was within 6% for 95% of all CCS values for protonated molecules, resulting in a median relative error less than 2%. In order to demonstrate the potential of CCS prediction, the strategy was applied to spinach samples. It notably improved the confidence in the tentative identification of suspect and nontarget pesticides.

  9. Dense Molecular Gas Around Protostars and in Galactic Nuclei European Workshop on Astronomical Molecules 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Baan, W A; Langevelde, H J

    2004-01-01

    The phenomena observed in young stellar objects (YSO), circumstellar regions and extra-galactic nuclei show some similarity in their morphology, dynamical and physical processes, though they may differ in scale and energy. The European Workshop on Astronomical Molecules 2004 gave astronomers a unique opportunity to discuss the links among the observational results and to generate common interpretations of the phenomena in stars and galaxies, using the available diagnostic tools such as masers and dense molecular gas. Their theoretical understanding involves physics, numerical simulations and chemistry. Including a dozen introductory reviews, topics of papers in this book also cover: maser and dense gas diagnostics and related phenomena, evolution of circumstellar regions around protostars, evolution of circumnuclear regions of active galaxies, diagnostics of the circumnuclear gas in stars and galactic nuclei. This book summarizes our present knowledge in these topics, highlights major problems to be addressed...

  10. Analysis of micro vibration in gas film of aerostatic guide way based on molecule collision theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Shao Hua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro vibration of the aerostatic guide way has a significant impact on its dynamic characteristics and stability, which limits the development of pneumatic component. High pressure gas molecules have been collided with the supporting surface and the internal surface of the throttle during the flow process. Variable impulse of the surfaces aside for the gas film are affected by the changes of impulse which formed irregular impact force in horizontal and vertical direction. Micro-vibration takes place based on the natural frequency of the system and its frequency doubling. In this paper, the vibration model was established to describe the dynamic characteristics of the gas film, and the formation mechanism of micro vibration in the film is defined. Through the simulation analysis and experimental comparison, formation mechanism of the micro vibration in the gas film is confirmed. It was proposed that the micro vibration of gas film can be produced no matter whether there is a gas chamber or not in the throttle. Under the same conditions, the micro vibration of the guide way with air chamber is greater than that without any chamber. The frequency points of the vibration peaks are almost the same, as well as the vibration pattern in the frequency domain.

  11. [Simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus by headspace gas chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shuyao; Wu, Dike; Sun, Jinhong; Ye, Ruhan; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2014-05-01

    A headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents (petroleum ether (60-90 degrees C), acetone, ethyl acetate, methanol, methylene chloride, ethanol and butyl acetate) in bovis calculus artifactus. The DB-WAX capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) were used for the separation and detection of the residual solvents, and the internal standard method was used for the quantification. The chromatographic conditions, such as equilibrium temperature and equilibrium time, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, all of the seven residual solvents showed good linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (not less than 0.999 3) in the prescribed concentration range. At three spiked levels, the recoveries for the seven residual solvents were 94.7%-105.2% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 3.5%. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method were 0.43-5.23 mg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 1.25-16.67 mg/L. The method is simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate, and is suitable for the simultaneous determination of the seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus.

  12. Analysis of residual toluene in food packaging via headspace extraction method using gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Ying Chin; Mohd Marsin Sanagi

    2008-01-01

    Polymeric materials are used in many food contact applications as packaging material. The presence of residual toluene in this food packaging material can migrate into food and thus affect the quality of food. In this study, a manual headspace analysis was successfully designed and developed. The determination of residual toluene was carried out with standard addition method and multiple headspace extraction, MHE) method using gas chromatography-flame ionization detector, GC-FID). Identification of toluene was performed by comparison of its retention time with standard toluene and GC-MS. It was found that the suitable heating temperature was 180 degree Celsius with an optimum heating time of 10 minutes. The study also found that the concentration of residual toluene in multicolored sample was higher compared to mono colored sample whereas residual toluene in sample analyzed using standard addition method was higher compared to MHE method. However, comparison with the results obtained from De Paris laboratory, France found that MHE method gave higher accuracy for sample with low analyte concentration. On the other hand, lower accuracy was obtained for sample with high concentration of residual toluene due to systematic errors. Comparison between determination methods showed that MHE method is more precise compared to standard addition method. (author)

  13. Evaluation of residue management practices effects on corn productivity, soil quality, and greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Jose German

    The removal of crop residues left after harvest is being considered as a potential feedstock source for bioethanol production which can contribute to the reduction of fossil fuel use and net greenhouse gas (GHG). The objectives of this study were to: (i) examine how tillage, N fertilization rates, residue removal, and their interactions affect crop productivity, (ii) SOC and soil physical properties, and (iii) GHG emissions, and (iv) calculated a soil C budget to determine how much crop residue can be sustainably be removed in Central and Southwest Iowa. After three years of residue removal under different management practices, the findings of this study suggest that a portion of the corn residue that is left on the soil surface after harvest can be removed, with no negative impacts in the short term continuous corn yield in sites at Central and Southwest Iowa. However, significant decreases in SOC sequestration rates, microbial biomass-C, bulk density, soil penetration resistance, wet aggregate stability, and infiltration rates were observed, but varied with soil type and management practices. Additionally, soil surface CO2 and N2O emissions were responsive to management practices; primarily by altering soil temperature, soil water content, soil mineral N, and crop growth. Results from soil C budget show that in 2010 when corn growth was not water stressed (lack of moisture), approximately 35 and 30% of the residue could be sustainably removed in the Central and Southwest sites, respectively. In 2011, drier soil conditions resulted in approximately 2 and 49% of the residue could be sustainably removed in the Central and Southwest sites, respectively.

  14. Adsorption of gas molecules on Cu impurities embedded monolayer MoS{sub 2}: A first- principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, B.; Li, C.Y. [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, L.L. [Key Lab for Special Functional Materials of Ministry of Eduaction, Henan Province, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhou, B.; Zhang, Q.K. [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Z.Q., E-mail: chenzq@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Tang, Z., E-mail: ztang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education of China, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Embedded Cu atom is strongly constrained on the sulfur vacancy of monolayer MoS{sub 2}. • Transition-metal Cu atom can break the chemical inactivation of MoS{sub 2} surface. • MoS{sub 2}-Cu system is a promising for future application in gas molecules sensing. - Abstract: Adsorption of small gas molecules (O{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}) on transition-metal Cu atom embedded monolayer MoS{sub 2} was investigated by first-principles calculations based on the density-functional theory (DFT). The embedded Cu atom is strongly constrained on the sulfur vacancy of monolayer MoS{sub 2} with a high diffusion barrier. The stable adsorption geometry, charge transfer and electronic structures of these gas molecules on monolayer MoS{sub 2} embedded with transition-metal Cu atom are discussed in detail. It is found that the monolayer MoS{sub 2} with embedded Cu atom can effectively capture these gas molecules with high adsorption energy. The NH{sub 3} molecule acts as electron donor after adsorption, which is different from the other gas molecules (O{sub 2}, NO, and NO{sub 2}). The results suggest that MoS{sub 2}-Cu system may be promising for future applications in gas molecules sensing and catalysis, which is similar to those of the transition-metal embedded graphene.

  15. Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions and high-pressure mass spectrometer, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Kenzo

    1977-01-01

    The reasons for the fact that the research in gas-phase ion-molecule reactions, to which wide interest is shown, have greatly contributed to the physical and chemical fields are that, first it is essential in understanding general phenomena concerning ions, second, it can furnish many unique informations in the dynamics of chemical reactions, and third, usefulness of '' chemical ionization'' methods has been established as its application to chemical analysis. In this review, the history and trend of studies and equipments in gas-phase ion-molecule reactions are surveyed. The survey includes the chemical ionization mass spectrometer for simultaneously measuring the positive and negative ions utilizing a quadrupole mass spectrometer presented by Hunt and others, flowing afterglow method derived from the flowing method which traces neutral chemical species mainly optically, ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, trapped ion mass spectrometer and others. Number of reports referred to ion-molecule reactions issued during the last one year well exceeds the total number of reports concerning mass spectrometers presented before 1955. This truly shows how active the research and development are in this field. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. New quantum chemical computations of formamide deuteration support gas-phase formation of this prebiotic molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouteris, D.; Vazart, F.; Ceccarelli, C.; Balucani, N.; Puzzarini, C.; Barone, V.

    2017-06-01

    Based on recent work, formamide might be a potentially very important molecule in the emergence of terrestrial life. Although detected in the interstellar medium for decades, its formation route is still debated, whether in the gas phase or on the dust grain surfaces. Molecular deuteration has proven to be, in other cases, an efficient way to identify how a molecule is synthesized. For formamide, new published observations towards the IRAS16293-2422 B hot corino show that its three deuterated forms have all the same deuteration ratio, 2-5 per cent and that this is a factor of 3-8 smaller than that measured for H2CO towards the IRAS16293-2422 protostar. Following a previous work on the gas-phase formamide formation via the reaction NH2 + H2CO → HCONH2 + H, we present here new calculations of the rate coefficients for the production of monodeuterated formamide through the same reaction, starting from monodeuterated NH2 or H2CO. Some misconceptions regarding our previous treatment of the reaction are also cleared up. The results of the new computations show that, at the 100 K temperature of the hot corino, the rate of deuteration of the three forms is the same, within 20 per cent. On the contrary, the reaction between non-deuterated species proceeds three times faster than that with deuterated ones. These results confirm that a gas-phase route for the formation of formamide is perfectly in agreement with the available observations.

  17. High Selective Gas Detection for small molecules based on Germanium selenide monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lian; Yang, Qun; Wang, Zeping; Ye, Huaiyu; Chen, Xianping; Fan, Xuejun; Zhang, Guoqi

    2018-03-01

    Predictive calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) are used here to study the electronic and optical properties of GeSe monolayer after adsorbing gas molecules (O2, NH3, SO2, H2, CO2, H2S, NO2, CH4, H2O, NO, CO). Our results reveal that for all the gas molecules considered, only NH3 is adsorbed on GeSe monolayer by physisorption. Whereas SO2 and NO2 are chemisorbed on GeSe monolayer with strong adsorption energies. In addition, the adsorption of O2, NO and NO2 distinctly enhances the optical absorbance and broaden the absorbance range of GeSe monolayer in visible light region. Also, it is found that the adsorption of H2S, NO and NH3 can reduce the work function of the GeSe monolayer. The results indicate that GeSe monolayer is not only a promising candidate for the sensing, capture, and storage of NH3, but also an anticipated disposable gas sensor or metal-free catalyst for detecting and catalyzing SO2 and NO2. Furthermore, it has excellent potential to be applied to optical sensors, solar cells, nanoelectronics or optoelectronics devices.

  18. Determination of insecticides malathion and lambda-cyhalothrin residues in zucchini by gas chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayam M. Lofty

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive gas chromatographic method has been developed for the determination of malathion and lambda-cyhalothrin (λ-cyhalothrin insecticide residues in zucchini. The developed method consists of extraction with acetone, purification and partitioning with methylene chloride, column chromatographic clean-up, and finally capillary gas chromatographic determination of the insecticides. The recoveries of method were greater than 90% and limit of determination was 0.001 ppm for both insecticides. The method was applied to determine residues and the rate of disappearance of malathion and λ-cyhalothrin from fruits of zucchini (open field treatment, 50 cc of Malason/Cormandel 57% EC (emulsifiable concentrate for 100 L of water, 20 cc of LAMBDA SUPER FOG 5% liquid for 100 L of water. The insecticide incorporated into the plants decreased rapidly with a half-life time around 0.77 day (18.5h for malathion and 4 days for λ-cyhalothrin. It is not recommended to use zucchini before 12 h of malathion application. For λ-cyhalothrin, the preharvest interval is 5 days. Four market samples were chosen from different regions from A.R.E. and all of them showed no residues of malathion or λ-cyhalothrin.

  19. Alternative Gas Mixtures in Arc Spraying: A Chance to Improve Coating Properties and Residual Stress States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Michél; Henkel, Knuth Michael; Krebs, Sebastian; Kroemmer, Werner

    2018-01-01

    The highly cavitation erosion-resistant propeller alloys CuAl9Ni5Fe4Mn (Ni-Al-Bronze) and CuMn13Al8Fe3Ni2 (Mn-Al-Bronze) were arc-sprayed using a mixture of nitrogen and 2% of hydrogen as atomizing gas and different traverse speeds. The objective was to identify the influences of the different spraying conditions, such as temperature regime and melting loss, on the resulting residual stress states and coating properties. Residual stresses were measured by the incremental hole-drilling method using ESPI. Temperature measurements were carried out by thermographic imaging. Microstructural, chemical and mechanical analyses were realized to examine adhesive and cohesive properties. Additionally, the cavitation erosion behavior was investigated to analyze cohesive coating properties. The spraying process itself was improved, which was apparent by mainly enhanced deposition efficiency and reduced surface temperatures. The amount of oxides and pores as well as the melting loss of alloying elements were reduced. Moreover, an increased cavitation erosion resistance and thus coating cohesion as well as less residual stresses were identified. The change in atomizing gas diminished the impact of the quenching stresses on the coating properties. In contrast, the adhesive strength, Young's moduli and partially the hardness were slightly reduced. With regard to materials, Ni-Al-Bronze revealed superior coating properties in comparison with Mn-Al-Bronze.

  20. Technical assessment of synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from agriculture residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guohui; Feng, Fei; Xiao, Jun; Shen, Laihong

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents thermodynamic evaluations of the agriculture residual-to-SNG process by thermochemical conversion, which mainly consists of the interconnected fluidized beds, hot gas cleaning, fluidized bed methanation reactor and Selexol absorption unit. The process was modeled using Aspen Plus software. The process performances, i.e., CH4 content in SNG, higher heating value and yield of SNG, exergy efficiencies with and without heat recovery, unit power consumption, were evaluated firstly. The results indicate that when the other parameters remain unchanged, the steam-to-biomass ratio at carbon boundary point is the optimal value for the process. Improving the preheating temperatures of air and gasifying agent is beneficial for the SNG yield and exergy efficiencies. Due to the effects of CO2 removal efficiency, there are two optimization objectives for the SNG production process: (I) to maximize CH4 content in SNG, or (II) to maximize SNG yield. Further, the comparison among different feedstocks indicates that the decreasing order of SNG yield is: corn stalk > wheat straw > rice straw. The evaluation on the potential of agriculture-based SNG shows that the potential annual production of agriculture residual-based SNG could be between 555×108 ˜ 611×108 m3 with utilization of 100% of the available unexplored resources. The agriculture residual-based SNG could play a significant role on solving the big shortfall of China's natural gas supply in future.

  1. Free molecule flow analysis of the interaction of skimming hardware components and background gas with free jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghuraman, P.; Bossel, U.

    1974-01-01

    Under conditions typical for the extraction of nozzle beams from free jets the rarefied flow pattern in the expansion chamber containing skimming hardware components and background gas is studied using a free molecule solution to the Boltzmann equation

  2. Influence of vibrations of gas molecules on neutron reaction cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C. D.; Schrack, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The change in molecular vibrational energy upon absorption of a neutron by a nucleus bound in a free molecule can influence resonance shape and other aspects of neutron reaction cross sections. A formalism is developed for centrosymmetric molecules such as UF6 and applied to the shape of the 6.67 eV resonance in 238U. The ratio of the resonance shape for 238UF6 gas and for solid 238U3O8 has been measured and compared with the calculation. Reasonable agreement is obtained indicating the validity of the calculation and the necessity to include vibration effects to avoid large errors in measurements and calculations on gascontaining systems. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 238U(n,γ) measured at 6.67 eV resonance; Effect of molecular vibrations studied experimentally and theoretically.

  3. The structures of tellurium(IV) halides in the gas phase and as solvated molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlykov, Sergey A; Giricheva, Nina I; Titov, Anton V; Szwak, Małgorzata; Lentz, Dieter; Girichev, Georgiy V

    2010-04-07

    The structures of molecular tellurium tetrafluoride and tellurium tetrachloride were determined by a combination of gas-phase electron diffraction, mass spectrometry and quantum chemical calculations. The combined GED/MS experiments showed no evidence of decomposition of TeF(4) and TeCl(4). No ions of oligomeric (dimeric, trimeric, etc.) or any other composition were found in the mass spectra. The monomeric molecules possess a pseudo trigonal bipyramidal structure (C(2v) symmetry) with the equatorial Te-X distances being shorter than the axial ones. The fluorine atoms are bent away from the lone pair resulting in X(eq)-Te-X(eq) and X(eq)-Te-X(ax) bond angles smaller than 120 and 90 degrees, respectively. The structure of solvates TeF(4) (THF)(2), TeF(4) (dioxane) TeF(4) (DME)(2), TeF(4)(Et(2)O) TeF(4)(toluene), TeCl(4)(CH(3)CN)(2), TeCl(4)(DME)(2) and TeCl(4)(dioxane) were determined by X-ray diffraction. The structures of tellurium tetrafluoride solvates are strongly influenced by the choice of the solvent molecules. Monomeric TeF(4) units were obtained with THF, DME and dioxane whereas fluoride bridged coordination polymers were formed using diethyl ether or toluene. All tellurium tetrachloride solvates studied contain monomeric TeCl(4) units with coordinated solvent molecules. Coordination numbers range from four in the gas phase to eight in the TeF(4) dimethoxyethane solvate. Geometric parameters of the TeX(4) molecules in the crystal, solvates and gas phase were compared. DFT, MP2, CCSD, CCSD(T) methods were applied for calculation of geometric and vibrational characteristics of free TeX(4) molecules (X = F, Cl). The pseudorotation barriers were estimated and an NBO analysis was performed. It was shown that both, GED and theoretical, quantitative results are in agreement with the qualitative results of the VSEPR model.

  4. Intermediate energy proton stopping power for hydrogen molecules and monoatomic helium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Stopping power in the intermediate energy region (100 keV to 1 MeV) was investigated, based on the work of Lindhard and Winther, and on the local plasma model. The theory is applied to calculate stopping power of hydrogen molecules and helium gas for protons of energy ranging from 100 keV to 2.5 MeV. Agreement with the experimental data is found to be within 10 percent. Previously announced in STAR as N84-16955

  5. Prebiotic molecules formation through the gas-phase reaction between HNO and CH2CHOH2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Pilar; Martínez, Henar; Largo, Antonio; Barrientos, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    Context. Knowing how the molecules that are present in the ISM can evolve to more complex ones is an interesting topic in interstellar chemistry. The study of possible reactions between detected species can help to understand the evolution in complexity of the interstellar matter and also allows knowing the formation of new molecules which could be candidates to be detected. We focus our attention on two molecules detected in space, vinyl alcohol (CH2CHOH) and azanone (HNO). Aims: We aim to carry out a theoretical study of the ion-molecule reaction between protonated vinyl alcohol and azanone. The viability of formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) from these reactants is expected to provide some insight into the formation of prebiotic species through gas phase reactions. Methods: The reaction of protonated vinyl alcohol with azanone has been theoretically studied by using ab initio methods. Stationary points on the potential energy surface (PES) were characterized at the second-order Moller-Plesset level in conjunction with the aug-cc-pVTZ (correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-zeta) basis set. In addition, the electronic energies were refined by means of single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level (coupled cluster single and double excitation model augmented with a non-iterative treatment of triple excitations) with the same basis set. Results: From a thermodynamic point of view, twelve products, composed of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen which could be precursors in the formation of more complex biological molecules, can be obtained from this reaction. Among these, we focus especially on ionized glycine and two of its isomers. The analysis of the PES shows that only formation of cis- and trans-O-protonated imine acetaldehyde, CH2NHCOH+ and, CHNHCHOH+, are viable under interstellar conditions. Conclusions: The reaction of protonated vinyl alcohol with azanone can evolve in the interstellar medium to more complex organic molecules of

  6. Comparison of Postoperative Pain and Residual Gas Between Restrictive and Liberal Fluid Therapy in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lei; Wang, Yulan; Du, Boxiang; Song, Jie; Ji, Fuhai

    2017-10-01

    Different fluid regimens are used in the clinical management of perioperative fluid therapy, but there still is the argument about which fluid regimen is better for patients. This study was mainly designed to compare different fluid regimens on postoperative pain and residual gas in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A total of 100 patients were equally randomized to receive restrictive fluid infusion (n=50) with lactated Ringer (LR) solution 5 mL/kg/h or liberal fluid infusion (n=50), with 30 mL/kg/h lactated Ringer solution. Postoperative pain was evaluated at 1, 6, and 24 hours after surgery using a visual analog scale (VAS). Postoperative subdiaphragmatic residual gas was monitored by x-ray at 24 hours after surgery. Patients in the restrictive group had significantly higher VAS pain scores at 6 hours after surgery than those in the liberal group (P=0.009). The incidence of subdiaphragmatic residual gas in the restrictive group was higher than in the liberal group (P=0.045). Patients who had residual gas had higher VAS pain scores than those with no residual gas in the restrictive group at 6 hours after surgery (P=0.02). Patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy with restrictive fluid therapy may suffer more severe postoperative pain than those receiving liberal fluid therapy. It suggests that the higher incidence of subdiaphragmatic residual gas may have occurred with restrictive fluid therapy.

  7. Redox-active tyrosine residue in the microcin J25 molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalon, Miriam C. [Departamento de Bioquimica de la Nutricion, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas-Universidad Nacional de Tucuman) and Instituto de Quimica Biologica ' Dr Bernabe Bloj' , Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina); Wilke, Natalia [CIQUIBIC, Dpto. de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Pabellon Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA, Cordoba (Argentina); Pedersen, Jens; Rufini, Stefano [Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata 00133, Rome (Italy); Morero, Roberto D.; Cortez, Leonardo; Chehin, Rosana N.; Farias, Ricardo N. [Departamento de Bioquimica de la Nutricion, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas-Universidad Nacional de Tucuman) and Instituto de Quimica Biologica ' Dr Bernabe Bloj' , Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina); Vincent, Paula A., E-mail: pvincent@fbqf.unt.edu.ar [Departamento de Bioquimica de la Nutricion, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas-Universidad Nacional de Tucuman) and Instituto de Quimica Biologica ' Dr Bernabe Bloj' , Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of MccJ25 and MccJ25 (Y9F). {yields} Infrared spectroscopy studies showed that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation. {yields} Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was demonstrated. {yields} Tyr9 but not Tyr20 can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical. -- Abstract: Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a 21 amino acid lasso-peptide antibiotic produced by Escherichia coli and composed of an 8-residues ring and a terminal 'tail' passing through the ring. We have previously reported two cellular targets for this antibiotic, bacterial RNA polymerase and the membrane respiratory chain, and shown that Tyr9 is essential for the effect on the membrane respiratory chain which leads to superoxide overproduction. In the present paper we investigated the redox behavior of MccJ25 and the mutant MccJ25 (Y9F). Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of both Tyr9 and Tyr20 in MccJ25, but infrared spectroscopy studies demonstrated that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation in solution. Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was demonstrated by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; this radical was not detected when the reaction was carried out with the MccJ25 (Y9F) mutant. These results show that the essential Tyr9, but not Tyr20, can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical.

  8. Redox-active tyrosine residue in the microcin J25 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalon, Miriam C.; Wilke, Natalia; Pedersen, Jens; Rufini, Stefano; Morero, Roberto D.; Cortez, Leonardo; Chehin, Rosana N.; Farias, Ricardo N.; Vincent, Paula A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of MccJ25 and MccJ25 (Y9F). → Infrared spectroscopy studies showed that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation. → Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H 2 O 2 was demonstrated. → Tyr9 but not Tyr20 can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical. -- Abstract: Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a 21 amino acid lasso-peptide antibiotic produced by Escherichia coli and composed of an 8-residues ring and a terminal 'tail' passing through the ring. We have previously reported two cellular targets for this antibiotic, bacterial RNA polymerase and the membrane respiratory chain, and shown that Tyr9 is essential for the effect on the membrane respiratory chain which leads to superoxide overproduction. In the present paper we investigated the redox behavior of MccJ25 and the mutant MccJ25 (Y9F). Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of both Tyr9 and Tyr20 in MccJ25, but infrared spectroscopy studies demonstrated that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation in solution. Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H 2 O 2 was demonstrated by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; this radical was not detected when the reaction was carried out with the MccJ25 (Y9F) mutant. These results show that the essential Tyr9, but not Tyr20, can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical.

  9. A Simple and Rapid Extraction for Gas Chromatographic Determination of Thiabendazole and Imazalil Residues in Lemons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navickiene Sandro

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and efficient method is described for the determination of thiabendazole and imazalil residues in lemons (peel and pulp. The procedure is based on the extraction with an hexane:ethyl acetate mixture (1:1, v/v and gas chromatographic analysis using thermionic specific detection (TSD. The possibility of matrix effect was also studied. Mean recoveries from 8 replicates of fortified samples ranged from 79% to 109%, with relative standard deviation values between 2.4% to 12.8%. The detection and quantification limits of the method were 0.2 mg kg-1 and 0.5 mg kg-1, respectively.

  10. Analysis of Petroleum Products in Fire Debris Residues by Gas Chromatography: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurvinder Singh Bumbrah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This review gives a brief overview of developments in the analysis of petroleum products (PP in fire debris residues (FDR by gas chromatography (GC. The review covers different aspects of analysis such as the substrates involved, isolation procedures, column and mobile phase used, and subsequent detection in tabular form. This paper covers detection of PP such as petrol, kerosene, and diesel in various types’ of samples of interest to fire debris analysts. Solid phase microextraction is most frequently used along with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS for the extraction and identification of PP from FDR. Chemometric tools should be used to improve the significance and reliability of results obtained from the analysis of FDR. However, the potential utility of portable GC-MS in fire debris analysis cannot be ignored, and its proper development and validation is required before using it for this purpose.

  11. Plasma-neutral gas interaction in a tokamak divertor: effects of hydrogen molecules and plasma recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pigarov, A.Yu.; Soboleva, T.K.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the influence of hydrogen molecules on plasma recombination using a collisional-radiative model for multispecies hydrogen plasmas and tokamak detached divertor parameters. The rate constant found for molecular activated recombination of a plasma can be as high as 2 x 10 -10 cm 3 /s, confirming our pervious estimates. We investigate the effects of hydrogen molecules and plasma recombination on self-consistent plasma-neutral gas interactions in the recycling region of a tokamak divertor. We treat the plasma flow in a fluid approximation retaining the effects of plasma recombination and employing a Knudsen neutral transport model for a 'gas box' divertor geometry. For the model of plasma-neutral interactions we employ we find: (a) molecular activated recombination is a dominant channel of divertor plasma recombination; and (b) plasma recombination is a key element leading to a decrease in the plasma flux onto the target and substantial plasma pressure drop which are the main features of detached divertor regimes. (orig.)

  12. Photochemical reactions of triplet benzophenone and anthraquinone molecules with amines in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalesskaya, G.A.; Sambor, E.G.; Belyi, N.N.

    2004-01-01

    The intermolecular photoinduced reactions between triplet ketone molecules and aliphatic amines and pyridine are studied by the quenching of delayed fluorescence of anthraquinone and benzophenone vapors by diethylamine, dibutylamine, cyclohexylamine, triethylamine, and pyridine. In the temperature range 423-573 K, the delayed fluorescence quenching rate constants k q are estimated from changes in the decay rate constant and the intensity of delayed fluorescence upon increasing pressure of bath gases. It is ascertained that, in the gas phase, the mixtures under study exhibit both a negative and a positive dependence of k q on temperature, which indicates that some photoinduced reactions do not have activation barriers. The rate constant k q is shown to increase with decreasing ionization potential of the electron donors. This points to the importance of interactions with charge transfer in the photoreaction of triplet ketone molecules with aliphatic amines and pyridine in the gas phase. The relationship between k q and the change in the free energy ΔG upon the photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer, which is the primary stage of the photochemical reaction, is studied. It is shown that the dependence k q (ΔG) for the donor-acceptor pairs under study is described well by the Marcus equation, in which the average vibrational energies of the donor and acceptor are taken into account for the estimate of ΔG

  13. Adsorption of gas molecules on Cu impurities embedded monolayer MoS2: A first- principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, B.; Li, C. Y.; Liu, L. L.; Zhou, B.; Zhang, Q. K.; Chen, Z. Q.; Tang, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Adsorption of small gas molecules (O2, NO, NO2 and NH3) on transition-metal Cu atom embedded monolayer MoS2 was investigated by first-principles calculations based on the density-functional theory (DFT). The embedded Cu atom is strongly constrained on the sulfur vacancy of monolayer MoS2 with a high diffusion barrier. The stable adsorption geometry, charge transfer and electronic structures of these gas molecules on monolayer MoS2 embedded with transition-metal Cu atom are discussed in detail. It is found that the monolayer MoS2 with embedded Cu atom can effectively capture these gas molecules with high adsorption energy. The NH3 molecule acts as electron donor after adsorption, which is different from the other gas molecules (O2, NO, and NO2). The results suggest that MoS2-Cu system may be promising for future applications in gas molecules sensing and catalysis, which is similar to those of the transition-metal embedded graphene.

  14. Laboratory-based validation of the baseline sensors of the ITER diagnostic residual gas analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biewer, Theodore M. [ORNL; Marcus, Chris [ORNL; Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL; Andrew, Philip [ITER Organization, Cadarache, France; Gardner, W. L. [United States ITER Project Office; Graves, Van B. [ORNL; Hughes, Shaun [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France

    2017-10-01

    The divertor-specific ITER Diagnostic Residual Gas Analyzer (DRGA) will provide essential information relating to DT fusion plasma performance. This includes pulse-resolving measurements of the fuel isotopic mix reaching the pumping ducts, as well as the concentration of the helium generated as the ash of the fusion reaction. In the present baseline design, the cluster of sensors attached to this diagnostic's differentially pumped analysis chamber assembly includes a radiation compatible version of a commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer, as well as an optical gas analyzer using a plasma-based light excitation source. This paper reports on a laboratory study intended to validate the performance of this sensor cluster, with emphasis on the detection limit of the isotopic measurement. This validation study was carried out in a laboratory set-up that closely prototyped the analysis chamber assembly configuration of the baseline design. This includes an ITER-specific placement of the optical gas measurement downstream from the first turbine of the chamber's turbo-molecular pump to provide sufficient light emission while preserving the gas dynamics conditions that allow for \\textasciitilde 1 s response time from the sensor cluster [1].

  15. Laboratory-based validation of the baseline sensors of the ITER diagnostic residual gas analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, C. C.; Biewer, T. M.; Marcus, C.; Andrew, P.; Gardner, W. L.; Graves, V. B.; Hughes, S.

    2017-10-01

    The divertor-specific ITER Diagnostic Residual Gas Analyzer (DRGA) will provide essential information relating to DT fusion plasma performance. This includes pulse-resolving measurements of the fuel isotopic mix reaching the pumping ducts, as well as the concentration of the helium generated as the ash of the fusion reaction. In the present baseline design, the cluster of sensors attached to this diagnostic's differentially pumped analysis chamber assembly includes a radiation compatible version of a commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer, as well as an optical gas analyzer using a plasma-based light excitation source. This paper reports on a laboratory study intended to validate the performance of this sensor cluster, with emphasis on the detection limit of the isotopic measurement. This validation study was carried out in a laboratory set-up that closely prototyped the analysis chamber assembly configuration of the baseline design. This includes an ITER-specific placement of the optical gas measurement downstream from the first turbine of the chamber's turbo-molecular pump to provide sufficient light emission while preserving the gas dynamics conditions that allow for \\textasciitilde 1 s response time from the sensor cluster [1].

  16. [Determination of residual toluene diisocyanate in sponge bra by gas chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aixia; Ye, Ping; Huang, Nan; Chen, Yan; Li, Xinggen

    2017-06-08

    A gas chromatography (GC) with internal standard method was developed for the determination of residual toluene diisocyanate (TDI) in sponge bra. The samples were extracted with ethyl acetate dehydrated, and cleaned up with 0.22 μm microfiltration membrane. The residual toluene diisocyanate was separated on a DB-624 capillary column using temperature programming. The flame ionization detector (FID) was used at 250 ℃. The inlet temperature was 180 ℃ with nitrogen as carrier gas. The linear range was 10-200 mg/L ( R 2 =0.9989) for TDI. The average recovery ranged from 80.5% to 91.6% with RSD not more than 7.9%( n =6). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 10 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg, respectively. The developed method was then utilized to analyse the 100 batches of sponge bra samples from the manufacturing enterprises, the entity shops and electric business platforms. The method is simple, time-saving and environment friendly with high sensitivity and good reproducibility, and has practical application value due to its low-cost and short-circle.

  17. Assessment of Pesticide Residues in Some Fruits Using Gas Chromatography Coupled with Micro Electron Capture Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Bhanger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A very sensitive analytical method for the determination of 26 pesticides in some fruits based on solid phase extraction (SPE cleanup was developed using gas chromatography (GC coupled with micro electron capture detector (μECD. The identity of the pesticides was confirmed by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS using selected ion monitoring (SIM mode. Ethyl acetate was used as a solvent for the extraction of pesticide residues with assistance of sonication. For cleanup an octadecyl, C18 SPE column was used. A linear response of μECD was observed for all pesticides with good correlation coefficients (>0.9992. Proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of pesticide residues in the orange, apple, and grape fruits. Average recoveries achieved for all of the pesticides at fortification levels of 0.05, 1.0 and 2.0 μg g-1 in analyzed fruits were above 90% with relative standard deviations (RSD less than 6

  18. On residual gas analysis during high temperature baking of graphite tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, A A; Chaudhuri, P; Khirwadkar, S; Reddy, D Chenna; Saxena, Y C; Chauhan, N; Raole, P M

    2008-01-01

    Steady-state Super-conducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) is a medium size tokamak with major radius of 1.1 m and minor radius of 0.20 m. It is designed for plasma discharge duration of 1000 seconds to obtain fully steady-state plasma operation. Plasma Facing Components (PFC), consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and poloidal limiters are also designed to be UHV compatible for steady state operation. All PFC are made up of graphite tiles mechanically attached to the copper alloy substrate. Graphite is one of the preferred first wall armour material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number of carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. High temperature vacuum baking of graphite tiles is the standard process to remove the impurities. Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used for qualitative and quantitative measurements of released gases from graphite tiles during baking. Surface Analysis of graphite tiles has also been done before and after baking. This paper describes the residual gas analysis during baking and surface analysis of graphite tiles

  19. On residual gas analysis during high temperature baking of graphite tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A. A.; Chaudhuri, P.; Khirwadkar, S.; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.; Reddy, D. Chenna; Saxena, Y. C.

    2008-05-01

    Steady-state Super-conducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) is a medium size tokamak with major radius of 1.1 m and minor radius of 0.20 m. It is designed for plasma discharge duration of 1000 seconds to obtain fully steady-state plasma operation. Plasma Facing Components (PFC), consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and poloidal limiters are also designed to be UHV compatible for steady state operation. All PFC are made up of graphite tiles mechanically attached to the copper alloy substrate. Graphite is one of the preferred first wall armour material in present day tokamaks. High thermal shock resistance and low atomic number of carbon are the most important properties of graphite for this application. High temperature vacuum baking of graphite tiles is the standard process to remove the impurities. Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) has been used for qualitative and quantitative measurements of released gases from graphite tiles during baking. Surface Analysis of graphite tiles has also been done before and after baking. This paper describes the residual gas analysis during baking and surface analysis of graphite tiles.

  20. Determination of residual dimethylsulphoxide in drug loaded gelatin using thermal desorber - gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaw, Adissu Alemayehu; Wolfs, Kris; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2018-05-10

    Traditional headspace - gas chromatography (HS-GC) methods for the determination of residual solvents (RS) start from a homogenous sample solution. Subsequently, it is challenging to determine RS using HS-GC techniques from insoluble solid samples like gelatin which is practically impossible to dissolve or distribute uniformly in water and common organic solvents. In this study, a thermal desorber combined with capillary gas chromatography and flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry (TD-GC-FID/MS) was used for quantitative determination of residual dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in gelatin without sample pretreatment. A sample of gelatin was sandwiched between two quartz filter double layers in a polytetrafluoroethylene insert which was then placed in its entirety into a thermal desorption tube. Factors affecting the performance of TD-GC including desorption time, desorption temperature, desorption flow and type of adsorbent were studied by applying a standard solution of DMSO in methanol on a blank gelatin bed. Validation results of the proposed method showed good linearity with an R 2 -value higher than 0.999 for a wide concentration range and good sensitivity with a limit of detection and limit of quantification of 0.1 μg and 0.2 μg on tube, respectively. The proposed method shows recovery values close to 100%. In addition, a conventional HS-GC method following enzymatic degradation of gelatin was developed to verify the proposed TD-GC method. Both methods were applied for the determination of residual DMSO in gelatin that was loaded with an experimental drug. Results were comparable, but the enzyme assisted HS-GC method was more time consuming and expensive. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Computer simulation of void formation in residual gas atom free metals by dual beam irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Y.; Nishiguchi, R.; La Rubia, T.D. de; Guinan, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In our recent experiments (1), we found that voids nucleate at vacancy clusters which trap gas atoms such as hydrogen and helium in ion- and neutron-irradiated copper. A molecular dynamics computer simulation, which implements an empirical embedded atom method to calculate forces that act on atoms in metals, suggests that a void nucleation occurs in pure copper at six and seven vacancy clusters. The structure of six and seven vacancy clusters in copper fluctuates between a stacking fault tetrahedron and a void. When a hydrogen is trapped at voids of six and seven vacancy, a void can keep their structure for appreciably long time; that is, the void do not relax to a stacking fault tetrahedron and grows to a large void. In order to explore the detailed atomics of void formation, it is emphasized that dual-beam irradiation experiments that utilize beams of gas atoms and self-ions should be carried out with residual gas atom free metal specimens. (author)

  2. Microstructural damage and residual mechanical properties in helium-bearing gas metal Arc weldments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goods, S. H.; Yang, N. Y. C.

    1992-03-01

    The influence of entrapped helium on microstructural damage and residual mechanical properties subsequent to applying low-penetration gas metal arc (GMA) weld overlays was examined for an AISI Type 304 stainless steel. Two helium levels were examined: 22.5 and 85.0 atomic parts per million (appm) He. Detailed scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the presence of intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). The crack surfaces exhibited a dimple structure that was characteristic of a gas bubble embrittled material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the size and spacing of the grain boundary helium gas bubbles remained virtually unchanged (relative to that established by the charging and aging procedure) at distances greater than 1 mm from the fusion line. Within this first millimeter, the diameter of the bubbles increased rapidly, and the bubble spacing increased to the characteristic spacing of the dimples that decorated weld-induced cracks. Mechanical testing revealed a loss in strain-to-fracture and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) at the higher helium level. While the majority of the fracture occurred in a transgranular, ductile manner, some deformation-induced intergranular cracking was observed. This cracking occurred over a very narrow region localized to the HAZ of the weldment. At the lower helium level, ductility and strength were unaffected compared to helium-free specimens.

  3. Generation, Detection and characterization of Gas-Phase Transition Metal containing Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimle, Timothy [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The objective of this project was to generate, detect, and characterize small, gas-phase, metal containing molecules. In addition to being relevant to high temperature chemical environments (e.g. plasmas and combustion), gas-phase experiments on metal containing molecules serve as the most direct link to a molecular-level theoretical model for catalysis. Catalysis (i.e. the addition of a small about of recoverable material to control the rate and direction of a chemical reaction) is critical to the petroleum and pharmaceutical industries as well as environmental remediation. Currently, the majority of catalytic materials are based on very expensive metals such as platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), iridium (Ir,) rhenium (Re), and rhodium (Rh). For example, the catalyst used for converting linear hydrocarbon molecules (e.g. hexane) to cyclic molecules (e.g. cyclohexane) is a mixture of Pt and Re suspended on alumina. It enables straight chain alkanes to be converted into branched-chain alkanes, cyclohexanes and aromatic hydrocarbons which are used, amongst other things, to enhance the octane number of petrol. A second example is the heterogeneous catalysis used in automobile exhaust systems to: a) decrease nitrogen oxide; b) reduce carbon monoxide; and c) oxidize unburned hydrocarbons. The exhaust is vented through a high-surface area chamber lined with Pt, Pd, and Rh. For example, the carbon monoxide is catalytically converted to carbon dioxide by reaction with oxygen. The research results from this work have been published in readily accessible journals1-28. The ground and excited electronic state properties of small metal containing molecules that we determine were: a) electronic state distributions and lifetimes, b) vibrational frequencies, c) bond lengths and angles, d) hyperfine interactions, e) permanent electric dipole moments, mel, and f) magnetic dipoles, μm. In general terms, μel, gives insight into the charge distribution and mm into

  4. Photonic molecules for improving the optical response of macroporous silicon photonic crystals for gas sensing purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardador, D; Segura, D; Rodríguez, A

    2018-02-19

    In this paper, we report the benefits of working with photonic molecules in macroporous silicon photonic crystals. In particular, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that the optical properties of a resonant peak produced by a single photonic atom of 2.6 µm wide can be sequentially improved if a second and a third cavity of the same length are introduced in the structure. As a consequence of that, the base of the peak is reduced from 500 nm to 100 nm, while its amplitude remains constant, increasing its Q-factor from its initial value of 25 up to 175. In addition, the bandgap is enlarged almost twice and the noise within it is mostly eliminated. In this study we also provide a way of reducing the amplitude of one or two peaks, depending whether we are in the two- or three-cavity case, by modifying the length of the involved photonic molecules so that the remainder can be used to measure gas by spectroscopic methods.

  5. Radiation-induced transformations of isolated CH3CN molecules in noble gas matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameneva, Svetlana V.; Volosatova, Anastasia D.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2017-12-01

    The transformations of isolated CH3CN molecules in various solid noble-gas matrices (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) under the action of X-ray irradiation at 5 K were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. The main products are CH3NC, CH2CNH and CH2NCH molecular isomers as well as CH2CN and CH2NC radicals. The matrix has a strong effect on the distribution of reaction channels. In particular, the highest relative yield of keteneimine (CH2CNH) was found in Ne matrix, whereas the formation of CH3NC predominates in xenon. It was explained by differences in the matrix ionization energy (IE) resulting in different distributions of hot ionic reactions. The reactions of neutral excited states are mainly involved in Xe matrix with low IE, while the isomerization of the primary acetonitrile positive ions may be quite effective in Ne and Ar. Annealing of the irradiated samples results in mobilization of trapped hydrogen atoms followed by their reactions with radicals to yield parent molecule and its isomers. The scheme of the radiation-induced processes and its implications for the acetonitrile chemistry in cosmic ices are discussed.

  6. Applying ion-molecule reactions to studies of gas-phase protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorzalek Loo, R.R.; Loo, J.A.; Smith, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    Whether solution phase differences in protein higher order structure persist in the gas phase, is examined by means of proton transfer reactions on ions generated by electrospray ionization of different solution conformations. Ion-molecule reactions were carried out in the atmosphere-vacuum interface of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a Y-shaped capillary inlet-reactor. An amine (dimethyl-, trimethyl-, or diethyl-) were delivered to one inlet arm. Reactivities of bovine cytochrome c ions sprayed from denatured and native solutions were determined; the ions generated shifted to about the same charge states. Addition of equal amounts of amine to ions generated from different solution conformations of bovine ubiquitin also yielded similar final charge states; however, the average charge state increased with temperature. Myoglobin and apomyoglobin also yielded similar final charge states. The results suggest that for the non-disulfide linked proteins, either there are not significant differences in gas phase higher order structure, or proton transfer reactions are not sensitive enough to detect higher order structural differences arising from noncovalent interactions. 2 refs, 2 figs. (DLC)

  7. Properties of clusters in the gas phase: V. Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keesee, R.G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion--molecules association reactions of the form A - (B)/sub n1/-+B=A - (B)/sub n/ were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl - , I - , and NO 2 - with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO 2 - and SO 3 - with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl - , I - , NO 2 - , CO 3 - , and SO 3 - with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions. For any given ion, the relative order of the addition enthalpies among the neutrals was found to be dependent on the polarizabilities of the neutrals and on the covalency in the ion-neutral bond. Dispersion of charge via covalent bonding was found to affect significantly the succeeding clustering steps

  8. Electron space charge effects in ion sources for residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowen, M.C.; Allison, W.

    1993-01-01

    An electron impact ionization source suitable for residual gas analysis (RGA) with a quadrupole mass spectrometer has been studied both experimentally and by computer simulation. The electronic space charge is shown to play a role in limiting the extracted current from RGA ion sources and the simulation treats this aspect of the problem self-consistently. Under certain source conditions, the ion extraction efficiency is observed to decrease for electron currents above approximately 1 mA - well below the current at which space charge limiting of the electron emission is expected. The observed effects are well reproduced by the simulation. We show that whereas the electron trajectories are only weakly perturbed by space charge effects, the loss of ionization efficiency can be attributed to drastic changes in the ion trajectories. (author)

  9. Pyrolysis of automotive shredder residue for the production of fuel-grade gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, L.L.; Ness, R.O. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Every year eight to ten million cars and trucks are disposed of by shredding at one of the 200 auto shredders located in the United States. Automotive shredder residue (ASR) is a by-product created in the dismantling of automobiles. Figure 1 illustrates the process by which ASR is generated. An automobile is stripped of useful and/or hazardous items, such as the gas tank, battery, tires, and radiator. Although it is beneficial to have these items removed for safety and environmental concerns, this is not always accomplished. After removal of some or all of these items, the automobile is shredded to provide a material less than 4 inches in size and composed of approximately 50% organic and 50% inorganic fractions. Ferrous scrap is then separated out magnetically. This ferrous scrap supplies the steel industry with 12 to 14 million tons per year for electric arc furnace feedstock. Air cyclone separators isolate a low density open-quotes fluffclose quotes from the nonferrous fraction (aluminum, copper, etc.). This fluff (shredder residue) is composed of a variety of plastics, fabrics, foams, glass, rubber, and an assortment of contaminants. Fluff bulk density is approximately 20 lb/ft

  10. Procedure of Active Residual Heat Removal after Emergency Shutdown of High-Temperature-Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After emergency shutdown of high-temperature-gas-cooled reactor, the residual heat of the reactor core should be removed. As the natural circulation process spends too long period of time to be utilized, an active residual heat removal procedure is needed, which makes use of steam generator and start-up loop. During this procedure, the structure of steam generator may suffer cold/heat shock because of the sudden load of coolant or hot helium at the first few minutes. Transient analysis was carried out based on a one-dimensional mathematical model for steam generator and steam pipe of start-up loop to achieve safety and reliability. The results show that steam generator should be discharged and precooled; otherwise, boiling will arise and introduce a cold shock to the boiling tubes and tube sheet when coolant began to circulate prior to the helium. Additionally, in avoiding heat shock caused by the sudden load of helium, the helium circulation should be restricted to start with an extreme low flow rate; meanwhile, the coolant of steam generator (water should have flow rate as large as possible. Finally, a four-step procedure with precooling process of steam generator was recommended; sensitive study for the main parameters was conducted.

  11. Ground-State Gas-Phase Structures of Inorganic Molecules Predicted by Density Functional Theory Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury

    2017-11-29

    We tested a battery of density functional theory (DFT) methods ranging from generalized gradient approximation (GGA) via meta-GGA to hybrid meta-GGA schemes as well as Møller–Plesset perturbation theory of the second order and a single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD) theory for their ability to reproduce accurate gas-phase structures of di- and triatomic molecules derived from microwave spectroscopy. We obtained the most accurate molecular structures using the hybrid and hybrid meta-GGA approximations with B3PW91, APF, TPSSh, mPW1PW91, PBE0, mPW1PBE, B972, and B98 functionals, resulting in lowest errors. We recommend using these methods to predict accurate three-dimensional structures of inorganic molecules when intramolecular dispersion interactions play an insignificant role. The structures that the CCSD method predicts are of similar quality although at considerably larger computational cost. The structures that GGA and meta-GGA schemes predict are less accurate with the largest absolute errors detected with BLYP and M11-L, suggesting that these methods should not be used if accurate three-dimensional molecular structures are required. Because of numerical problems related to the integration of the exchange–correlation part of the functional and large scattering of errors, most of the Minnesota models tested, particularly MN12-L, M11, M06-L, SOGGA11, and VSXC, are also not recommended for geometry optimization. When maintaining a low computational budget is essential, the nonseparable gradient functional N12 might work within an acceptable range of error. As expected, the DFT-D3 dispersion correction had a negligible effect on the internuclear distances when combined with the functionals tested on nonweakly bonded di- and triatomic inorganic molecules. By contrast, the dispersion correction for the APF-D functional has been found to shorten the bonds significantly, up to 0.064 Å (AgI), in Ag halides, BaO, BaS, BaF, BaCl, Cu halides, and Li and

  12. Selective trace gas detection of complex molecules with a continuous wave optical parametric oscillator using a planar jet expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngai, A.K.Y.; Persijn, S.T.; Harren, F.J.M.; Verbraak, H.; Linnartz, H.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present a trace gas detection method for complex molecules using continuous cavity ring-down spectroscopy in combination with a continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (tunability wavelength: 2.8-4.8 mu m; power: 1 W) sampling a supersonic planar jet expansion (nozzle dimension: 3

  13. Raman spectroscopic studies on matrix-isolated arsenic and antimony molecules As 4 and Sb 4 in noble gas matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornath, Andreas J.; Kaufmann, Alexander; Cappellacci, Sebastian

    2009-06-01

    The Raman spectra of As 4 and Sb 4 molecules have been studied in neon, argon, krypton, and xenon matrices at 7 K. The vibrational frequencies of the As 4 molecule are up to 17 cm -1 higher than the experimental gas phase data. This evident blue-shift is not caused by matrix effects but originates from an underestimation of the fundamentals in the gas phase as a course of the elevated temperatures. The observed frequencies of As 4 and Sb 4 show a linear dependence toward the matrix host polarizability. Extrapolated values for zero polarizability which best represent a free molecule, are considered fundamental frequencies. The general valence force fields of As 4 and Sb 4 were calculated from the extrapolated frequencies.

  14. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used IP3 accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action...... in CCR8. We find that the 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix (TM)III and ECL2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only...

  15. Residual solvent determination by head space gas chromatography with flame ionization detector in omeprazole API

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Pandey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Residual solvents in pharmaceutical samples are monitored using gas chromatography with head space. Based on good manufacturing practices, measuring residual solvents is mandatory for the release testing of all active pharmaceutical ingredients (API. The analysis of residual organic solvents (methanol, acetone, cyclohexane, dichloromethane, toluene in Omeprazole, an active pharmaceutical ingredient was investigated. Omeprazole is a potent reversible inhibitor of the gastric proton pump H+/K+-ATPase. The Head space gas chromatography (HSGC method described in this investigation utilized a SPB TM-624, Supelco, 30 m long x 0.25 mm internal diameter, 1.4µm-thick column. Since Omeprazole is a thermally labile compound, the selection of the proper injector temperature is critical to the success of the analysis. The injector temperature was set at 170ºC to prevent degradation. The initial oven temperature was set at 40ºC for 12 min and programmed at a rate of 10ºC min-1 to a final temperature of 220ºC for 5 min. Nitrogen was used as a carrier gas. The sample solvent selected was N,N-dimethylacetamide. The method was validated to be specific, linear, precise, sensitive, rugged and showed excellent recovery.Solventes residuais em amostras farmacêuticas são monitoradas utilizando-se cromatografia a gás "headspace". Com base nas boas práticas de fabricação, a medida de solventes residuais é obrigatória para o teste de liberação de todos os ingredientes farmacêuticos (API. Efetuou-se a análise de solventes orgânicos residuais (metanol, acetona, cicloexano, diclorometano, tolueno em omeprazol, ingrediente farmacêutico ativo. O omeprazol é potente inibidor reversível da bomba de prótons H+/K+-ATPase. A cromatografia a gás "headspace" (HSGC descrita nessa pesquisa utilizou um SPB TM-624, Supelco, de 30 m de comprimento x 0,25 mm de diâmetro interno, e coluna de 1,4 µm de espessura. Considerando-se que o omeprazol é termicamente l

  16. Adsorption of gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene and effect of applied electric field: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xiong-Yi; Ding, Ning; Ng, Siu-Pang; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • H 2 O, NH 3 , CO, NO 2 and NO are physically adsorbed on pristine graphene. • The adsorption energies of all gas molecules on graphene are increased after doping with Ga. • NO 2 shows the strongest affinity to Ga-doped graphene. • The electronic properties and adsorption of NO 2 on graphene and can be effectively tuned using an external electric field. - Abstract: Density functional theory calculations have been carried out to study the adsorption of varous gas molecules (H 2 O, NH 3 , CO, NO 2 and NO) on pristine graphene and Ga-doped graphene in order to explore the feasibility of Ga-doped graphene based gas sensor. For each gas molecule, various adsorption positions and orientations were considered. The most stable configuration was determined and the adsorption energies with van der Waals interactions were calculated. Further, electronic properties such as electron density, density of states, charge transfer and band structure were investigated to understand the mechanism of adsorption. The results showed that the gas molecules studied were only weakly adsorbed on pristine graphene with small adsorption energies. On the other hand, the adsorption energies of all gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene increased by various amounts. Adsorption of gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene can open a relatively large band gap ranging from 0.267 to 0.397 eV. NO 2 was found to be very sensitive to Ga-doped graphene with adsorption energy of −1.928 eV due to strong orbital hybridization and large charge transfer. Furthermore, our study suggests that the affinity and electronic properties of NO 2 on Ga-doped graphene can be dramatically changed by an external electric field. A negative electric field enhances the adsorption of NO 2 on Ga-doped graphene as reflected in the increase in adsorption energy. In contrast, the interaction will be weakened under a positive electric field. The results of the DFT calculation indicates the potential application of Ga

  17. Adsorption of gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene and effect of applied electric field: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiong-Yi [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Ding, Ning [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Key Laboratory for Applied Technology of Sophisticated Analytical Instruments, Shandong Academy of Sciences, Jinan 250014 (China); Ng, Siu-Pang [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence, E-mail: lawrence.wu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Key Laboratory for Applied Technology of Sophisticated Analytical Instruments, Shandong Academy of Sciences, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO, NO{sub 2} and NO are physically adsorbed on pristine graphene. • The adsorption energies of all gas molecules on graphene are increased after doping with Ga. • NO{sub 2} shows the strongest affinity to Ga-doped graphene. • The electronic properties and adsorption of NO{sub 2} on graphene and can be effectively tuned using an external electric field. - Abstract: Density functional theory calculations have been carried out to study the adsorption of varous gas molecules (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO, NO{sub 2} and NO) on pristine graphene and Ga-doped graphene in order to explore the feasibility of Ga-doped graphene based gas sensor. For each gas molecule, various adsorption positions and orientations were considered. The most stable configuration was determined and the adsorption energies with van der Waals interactions were calculated. Further, electronic properties such as electron density, density of states, charge transfer and band structure were investigated to understand the mechanism of adsorption. The results showed that the gas molecules studied were only weakly adsorbed on pristine graphene with small adsorption energies. On the other hand, the adsorption energies of all gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene increased by various amounts. Adsorption of gas molecules on Ga-doped graphene can open a relatively large band gap ranging from 0.267 to 0.397 eV. NO{sub 2} was found to be very sensitive to Ga-doped graphene with adsorption energy of −1.928 eV due to strong orbital hybridization and large charge transfer. Furthermore, our study suggests that the affinity and electronic properties of NO{sub 2} on Ga-doped graphene can be dramatically changed by an external electric field. A negative electric field enhances the adsorption of NO{sub 2} on Ga-doped graphene as reflected in the increase in adsorption energy. In contrast, the interaction will be weakened under a positive electric field. The results of the DFT

  18. Collisions of ideal gas molecules with a rough/fractal surface. A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panczyk, Tomasz

    2007-02-01

    The frequency of collisions of ideal gas molecules (argon) with a rough surface has been studied. The rough/fractal surface was created using random deposition technique. By applying various depositions, the roughness of the surface was controlled and, as a measure of the irregularity, the fractal dimensions of the surfaces were determined. The surfaces were next immersed in argon (under pressures 2 x 10(3) to 2 x 10(5) Pa) and the numbers of collisions with these surfaces were counted. The calculations were carried out using a simplified molecular dynamics simulation technique (only hard core repulsions were assumed). As a result, it was stated that the frequency of collisions is a linear function of pressure for all fractal dimensions studied (D = 2, ..., 2.5). The frequency per unit pressure is quite complex function of the fractal dimension; however, the changes of that frequency with the fractal dimension are not strong. It was found that the frequency of collisions is controlled by the number of weakly folded sites on the surfaces and there is some mapping between the shape of adsorption energy distribution functions and this number of weakly folded sites. The results for the rough/fractal surfaces were compared with the prediction given by the Langmuir-Hertz equation (valid for smooth surface), generally the departure from the Langmuir-Hertz equation is not higher than 48% for the studied systems (i.e. for the surfaces created using the random deposition technique).

  19. Comparative investigation of pure and mixed rare gas atoms on coronene molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cantano, Rocío; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Hernández, Marta I; Campos-Martínez, José; González-Lezana, Tomás; Villarreal, Pablo; Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Pirani, Fernando; Hernández-Rojas, Javier; Bretón, José

    2017-01-21

    Clusters formed by the combination of rare gas (RG) atoms of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr on coronene have been investigated by means of a basin-hopping algorithm and path integral Monte Carlo calculations at T = 2 K. Energies and geometries have been obtained and the role played by the specific RG-RG and RG-coronene interactions on the final results is analysed in detail. Signatures of diffuse behavior of the He atoms on the surface of the coronene are in contrast with the localization of the heavier species, Ar and Kr. The observed coexistence of various geometries for Ne suggests the motion of the RG atoms on the multi-well potential energy surface landscape offered by the coronene. Therefore, the investigation of different clusters enables a comparative analysis of localized versus non-localized features. Mixed Ar-He-coronene clusters have also been considered and the competition of the RG atoms to occupy the docking sites on the molecule is discussed. All the obtained information is crucial to assess the behavior of coronene, a prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clustering with RG atoms at a temperature close to that of interstellar medium, which arises from the critical balance of the interactions involved.

  20. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: benzene-benzene vs benzene-rare gas atom collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jie; Li, Zhiying; Krems, Roman V

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom-molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom-benzene calculations with those for benzene-benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  1. Removal of element mercury by medicine residue derived biochars in presence of various gas compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guoliang; Shen, Boxiong; Li, Yongwang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Fumei; He, Chuan; Wang, Yinyin; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Both physisorption and chemisorption of Hg 0 occurred on the surface of M6WN5. • Chemisorption process was an absolute predominant route for Hg 0 removal by M6WN5. • The effect of NO, H 2 O, SO 2 and O 2 on Hg 0 removal by M6WN5 was investigated. • M6WN5 demonstrated to be a promising Hg 0 sorbent in flue gas. - Abstract: Pyrolyzed biochars from an industrial medicinal residue waste were modified by microwave activation and NH 4 Cl impregnation. Mercury adsorption of different modified biochars was investigated in a quartz fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that both physisorption and chemisorption of Hg 0 occurred on the surface of M6WN5 which was modified both microwave and 5 wt.% NH 4 Cl loading, and exothermic chemisorption process was a dominant route for Hg 0 removal. Microwave activation improved pore properties and NH 4 Cl impregnation introduced good active sites for biochars. The presence of NO and O 2 increased Hg 0 adsorption whereas H 2 O inhibited Hg 0 adsorption greatly. A converse effect of SO 2 was observed on Hg 0 removal, namely, low concentration of SO 2 promoted Hg 0 removal obviously whereas high concentration of SO 2 suppressed Hg 0 removal. The Hg 0 removal by M6WN5 was mainly due to the reaction of the C−Cl with Hg 0 to form HgCl 2 , and the active state of C−Cl * groups might be an intermediate group in this process. Thermodynamic analysis showed that mercury adsorption by the biochars was exothermic process and apparent adsorption energy was 43.3 kJ/mol in the range of chemisorption. In spite of low specific surface area, M6WN5 proved to be a promising Hg 0 sorbent in flue gas when compared with other sorbents

  2. The formation of urea in space. I. Ion-molecule, neutral-neutral, and radical gas-phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigiano, Flavio Siro; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Largo, Antonio; Spezia, Riccardo

    2018-02-01

    Context. Many organic molecules have been observed in the interstellar medium thanks to advances in radioastronomy, and very recently the presence of urea was also suggested. While those molecules were observed, it is not clear what the mechanisms responsible to their formation are. In fact, if gas-phase reactions are responsible, they should occur through barrierless mechanisms (or with very low barriers). In the past, mechanisms for the formation of different organic molecules were studied, providing only in a few cases energetic conditions favorable to a synthesis at very low temperature. A particularly intriguing class of such molecules are those containing one N-C-O peptide bond, which could be a building block for the formation of biological molecules. Urea is a particular case because two nitrogen atoms are linked to the C-O moiety. Thus, motivated also by the recent tentative observation of urea, we have considered the synthetic pathways responsible to its formation. Aims: We have studied the possibility of forming urea in the gas phase via different kinds of bi-molecular reactions: ion-molecule, neutral, and radical. In particular we have focused on the activation energy of these reactions in order to find possible reactants that could be responsible for to barrierless (or very low energy) pathways. Methods: We have used very accurate, highly correlated quantum chemistry calculations to locate and characterize the reaction pathways in terms of minima and transition states connecting reactants to products. Results: Most of the reactions considered have an activation energy that is too high; but the ion-molecule reaction between NH2OHNH2OH2+ and formamide is not too high. These reactants could be responsible not only for the formation of urea but also of isocyanic acid, which is an organic molecule also observed in the interstellar medium.

  3. Tunable electronic and optical properties of gas molecules adsorbed monolayer graphitic ZnO: Implications for gas sensor and environment monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Qikui; Zhang, Lifa

    2017-12-01

    Due to the large surface area and the peculiar electronic characters, great attention has been paid to 2D materials for the gas sensing applications. Here, using the hybrid density functional calculations, we systematically study the adsorptions of gas molecules on the monolayer graphitic ZnO (g-ZnO), including CO, H2, H2O, H2S, NH3, NO, NO2, O2, and SO2. For most of the molecules, g-ZnO shows superior sensing performance to the well-known MoS2, black phosphorus, blue phosphorus, antimonene, and germanene. H2S, NO, NO2, and SO2 act as charge acceptors, and CO, H2, H2O, and NH3 serve as charge donors. These molecules also induce distinct modifications to the electronic structures, work functions, and optical adsorptions. NO, NO2, and O2 form flat bands in the bandgaps of the spin-up or spin-down states, whereas other molecules mainly tune the bandgaps and the orbital couplings. In particular, g-ZnO is most likely to adsorb the atmospheric pollutant SO2, which has the strongest interaction through hybridizing its widely broadened 2p orbitals with the 3d orbitals of g-ZnO. Moreover, the improved visible light absorption is demonstrated in the NO2 adsorbed g-ZnO. Our results not only confirm that the electronic and optical properties of g-ZnO can be effectively tuned by the selective adsorption of gas molecules but also provide insightful guidance for the potential application of g-ZnO in the field of gas sensors.

  4. Thermal desorption-Gas chromatographic methodology for the determination of residual solvents in mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaw, Adissu Alemayehu; Wolfs, Kris; Schepdael, Ann Van; Adams, Erwin

    2017-06-02

    In this work, thermal desorption-gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (TD-GC-FID) was adapted to enable the determination of residual solvents (RS) in mesoporous silica (MPSi). MPSi is often utilized in various pharmaceutical formulations or drug delivery systems and the accurate determination of RS is an important part of pharmaceutical quality control. Seven commonly used solvents (methanol, ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, dichloromethane, tetrahydrofuran and hexafluoroisopropanol) were evaluated in combination with 3 types of MPSi having pore sizes of 2-3, 15 and 25nm. Validation results showed general recovery values >98% and good linearity over the concentration ranges studied. The limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) for the different solvents ranged from 0.03 to 0.08μg and from 0.1 to 0.2μg per tube, respectively. Verification of the accuracy of the TD method was investigated by using an alternative method based on complete dissolution of MPSi in hydrofluoric acid (HF) followed by full evaporation headspace-GC (HS-GC). The results obtained from both procedures were not statistically different (p>0.05) when applied to actual experimental drug samples consisting of itraconazole loaded on MPSi. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prediction of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Retention Times of Pesticide Residues by Chemometrics Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Konoz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRRs method is employed to predict the retention time of 300 pesticide residues in animal tissues separated by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Firstly, a six-parameter QSRR model was developed by means of multiple linear regression. The six molecular descriptors that were considered to account for the effect of molecular structure on the retention time are number of nitrogen, Solvation connectivity index-chi 1, Balaban Y index, Moran autocorrelation-lag 2/weighted by atomic Sanderson electronegativity, total absolute charge, and radial distribution function-6.0/unweighted. A 6-7-1 back propagation artificial neural network (ANN was used to improve the accuracy of the constructed model. The standard error values of ANN model for training, test, and validation sets are 1.559, 1.517, and 1.249, respectively, which are less than those obtained reveals by multiple linear regressions model (2.402, 1.858, and 2.036, resp.. Results obtained the reliability and good predictability of nonlinear QSRR model to predict the retention time of pesticides.

  6. NMR and Chemometric Characterization of Vacuum Residues and Vacuum Gas Oils from Crude Oils of Different Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Parlov Vuković

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available NMR spectroscopy in combination with statistical methods was used to study vacuum residues and vacuum gas oils from 32 crude oils of different origin. Two chemometric metodes were applied. Firstly, principal component analysis on complete spectra was used to perform classification of samples and clear distinction between vacuum residues and vacuum light and heavy gas oils were obtained. To quantitatively predict the composition of asphaltenes, principal component regression models using areas of resonance signals spaned by 11 frequency bins of the 1H NMR spectra were build. The first 5 principal components accounted for more than 94 % of variations in the input data set and coefficient of determination for correlation between measured and predicted values was R2 = 0.7421. Although this value is not significant, it shows the underlying linear dependence in the data. Pseudo two-dimensional DOSY NMR experiments were used to assess the composition and structural properties of asphaltenes in a selected crude oil and its vacuum residue on the basis of their different hydrodynamic behavior and translational diffusion coefficients. DOSY spectra showed the presence of several asphaltene aggregates differing in size and interactions they formed. The obtained results have shown that NMR techniques in combination with chemometrics are very useful to analyze vacuum residues and vacuum gas oils. Furthermore, we expect that our ongoing investigation of asphaltenes from crude oils of different origin will elucidate in more details composition, structure and properties of these complex molecular systems.

  7. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, David R.

    2010-01-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N (ge) 3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N = 0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  8. Collimator system for the stabilization of the dynamical residual-gas pressure in the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS18; Kollimatorsystem zur Stabilisierung des dynamischen Restgasdruckes im Schwerionensynchrotron SIS18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omet, Carsten

    2009-01-15

    In order to achieve higher beam intensities of heavy ion beams in ring accelerators, low charge state ions can be used. By lowering the charge state, the space charge limit is shifted to higher particle numbers and stripping losses can be avoided. During test operation of the SIS18 at GSI with high intensity low charge state heavy ion beams, strong intensity dependent beam losses have been observed. It was found that these beam losses are originated to a large extent by the change of charge state of the circulating ions during collisions with residual gas atoms. The resulting deviation of m/q relative to the reference ion leads, in combination with dispersive elements in the ion optic lattice, to a modified trajectory, followed by the loss of the ion on the beam pipe. At the impact position, loosely bound residual gas molecules are released by ion stimulated desorption which increases the residual gas pressure locally. This pressure rise itself enhances the charge exchange rate, which can develop into a self amplifying process of pressure rise and subsequent beam loss. A method for the stabilization of the dynamic residual gas pressure is the use of special catcher systems, which minimize the production of desorption gases and remove them by strong pumping. Therefore, the pressure on the beam axis should remain as stable as possible. Other processes, e.g. Coulomb scattering of the beam ions by residual gas particles and unavoidable systematic beam losses can increase the gas pressure additionally. The pressure in the accelerator is further subjected to ionization of the residual gas atoms themselves, thermal out gassing of the beam pipes, insertions and pumps. In this work, a detailed numerical model of the interplay between the residual gas pressure dynamics in the accelerator, possible stabilization measures, e.g. by catchers and the resulting beam life time has been developed. The forecasted beam life times and pressures are verified by machine experiments, as

  9. Removal of element mercury by medicine residue derived biochars in presence of various gas compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guoliang [School of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300401 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Shen, Boxiong, E-mail: shenbx@nankai.edu.cn [School of Energy and Environmental Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300401 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Yongwang [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhao, Bin [School of Chemical Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300401 (China); Wang, Fumei; He, Chuan; Wang, Yinyin; Zhang, Min [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Both physisorption and chemisorption of Hg{sup 0} occurred on the surface of M6WN5. • Chemisorption process was an absolute predominant route for Hg{sup 0} removal by M6WN5. • The effect of NO, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} on Hg{sup 0} removal by M6WN5 was investigated. • M6WN5 demonstrated to be a promising Hg{sup 0} sorbent in flue gas. - Abstract: Pyrolyzed biochars from an industrial medicinal residue waste were modified by microwave activation and NH{sub 4}Cl impregnation. Mercury adsorption of different modified biochars was investigated in a quartz fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that both physisorption and chemisorption of Hg{sup 0} occurred on the surface of M6WN5 which was modified both microwave and 5 wt.% NH{sub 4}Cl loading, and exothermic chemisorption process was a dominant route for Hg{sup 0} removal. Microwave activation improved pore properties and NH{sub 4}Cl impregnation introduced good active sites for biochars. The presence of NO and O{sub 2} increased Hg{sup 0} adsorption whereas H{sub 2}O inhibited Hg{sup 0} adsorption greatly. A converse effect of SO{sub 2} was observed on Hg{sup 0} removal, namely, low concentration of SO{sub 2} promoted Hg{sup 0} removal obviously whereas high concentration of SO{sub 2} suppressed Hg{sup 0} removal. The Hg{sup 0} removal by M6WN5 was mainly due to the reaction of the C−Cl with Hg{sup 0} to form HgCl{sub 2}, and the active state of C−Cl{sup *} groups might be an intermediate group in this process. Thermodynamic analysis showed that mercury adsorption by the biochars was exothermic process and apparent adsorption energy was 43.3 kJ/mol in the range of chemisorption. In spite of low specific surface area, M6WN5 proved to be a promising Hg{sup 0} sorbent in flue gas when compared with other sorbents.

  10. Greenhouse gas reductions through enhanced use of residues in the life cycle of Malaysian palm oil derived biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sune Balle; Olsen, Stig Irving; Ujang, Zaini

    2012-01-01

    This study identifies the potential greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions, which can be achieved by optimizing the use of residues in the life cycle of palm oil derived biodiesel. This is done through compilation of data on existing and prospective treatment technologies as well as practical experiments...... on methane potentials from empty fruit bunches. Methane capture from the anaerobic digestion of palm oil mill effluent was found to result in the highest GHG reductions. Among the solid residues, energy extraction from shells was found to constitute the biggest GHG savings per ton of residue, whereas energy...... extraction from empty fruit bunches was found to be the most significant in the biodiesel production life cycle. All the studied waste treatment technologies performed significantly better than the conventional practices and with dedicated efforts of optimized use in the palm oil industry, the production...

  11. Conserved surface residues on the feline calicivirus (FCV) capsid are essential for interaction with its receptor feline junctional adhesion molecule A (fJAM-A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhengchun; Ledgerwood, Emily D; Hinchman, Meleana M; Dick, Robert; Parker, John S L

    2018-01-31

    Host cell surface receptors are required for attachment, binding, entry and infection by nonenveloped viruses. Receptor binding can induce conformational changes in the viral capsid and/or the receptor that couple binding with downstream events in the viral life cycle (intracellular signaling, endocytosis and trafficking, and membrane penetration). Virus-receptor interactions also influence viral spread and pathogenicity. The interaction between feline calicivirus (FCV) and its receptor feline Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (fJAM-A) on host cells is required for infection and induces irreversible, inactivating conformational changes in the capsid of some viral strains. Cryo-EM structures of FCV bound to fJAM-A showed several possible virus-receptor interactions. However, the specific residues on the viral capsid required for binding are not known. Capsid residues that may be involved in post-binding events have been implicated by isolation of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants in which changes in the capsid protein sequence change the capacity of such srr mutants to be inactivated upon incubation with soluble fJAM-A. To clarify which residues on the surface of FCV are required for its interaction with fJAM-A, and to potentially identify residues required for post-receptor binding events, we used the existing atomic resolution structures of FCV and the FCV-fJAM-A cryo-EM structures to select 14 capsid residues for mutation and preparation of recombinant viral capsids. Using this approach, we identified residues on the FCV capsid that are required for fJAM-A binding and other residues not required for binding, but required for infection that are likely important for subsequent post-binding events. IMPORTANCE Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a common cause of mild upper respiratory disease in cats. Some FCV isolates can cause virulent systemic disease. The genetic determinants of virulence for FCV are unknown. We previously found that virulent FCV isolates have

  12. Analysis of residual stress in metal-inert-gas-welded Al-2024 using neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Stelmukh, V.; Edwards, L.; Fitzpatrick, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    A combination of neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to measure and map the full three-dimensional state of residual stress across the cross-section in coupon samples of metal-inert-gas (MIG)-welded 2024 aluminium alloy. Samples were analysed both as-welded and following a post-welding skim which served to remove the weld flash and reduce the plate thickness. The profile of the residual stress and its evolution following skimming has been accurately characterized. The longitudinal direction shows the highest residual stress, approaching 300 MPa in tension. The skimming treatment did not change the peak stress, but the overall profile of stress was altered: this is slightly unexpected as machining away stressed material would generally be expected to reduce the peak residual stress. The results are discussed in terms of the generation of stress during welding and its evolution during skimming. Finally a comparison is made with the stress generated in the as-welded and skimmed conditions of a variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA)-welded specimen of similar dimensions, to show the effects of different weld processes on the residual stress generated. The stress measurement in the VPPA sample was carried out under near identical experimental conditions

  13. Formation of Complex Organics by Gas Phase and Intracluster Ion-Molecule Reactions Involving Acetylene and Hydrogen Cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shall, S.; Hamed, A.; Soliman, A. R.; Momoh, P. O.

    2011-05-01

    Many complex organics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are present in flames and combustion processes as well as in interstellar clouds and solar nebulae. Here, we present evidence for the formation of complex covalent organics by gas phase and intracluster reactions of the benzene, phenylium, pyridine, pyrimidine, phenylacetylene and benzonitrile cations with acetylene and hydrogen cyanide molecules. These reactions are studied using mass-selected ion mobility, chemical reactivity, collisional dissociation, and ab initio calculations. Measurements of collision cross sections in helium provide structural information on the adducts and allow probing structural changes at different temperatures (isomerization). We observed multiple additions of five acetylene molecules on the pyridine cation at room temperature. This is a remarkable result considering that only two acetylene molecules were added to the phenyl cation and no addition was observed on the benzene cation at room temperature. The experimental results are in full agreement with the ab initio calculations which predict that the first and second acetylenes add to the pyridine ion in barrierless, highly exothermic reactions. Similar reactions have been observed for the pyrimidine radical cation although the extent of the addition reactions is limited to only two acetylene molecules at room temperature. The results provide the first evidence for the incorporation of nitrogen in the formation cyclic hydrocarbons via the gas phase reactions of pyridine and pyrimidine ions with acetylene molecules. In addition, the formation of covalent adducts in the ionized acetylene/HCN system will be reported for the first time. Sequential reactions leading to the formation of pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and higher adducts are observed over a wide range of temperature and pressure. The formation of these covalent adducts may represent a general class of addition reactions that can form complex

  14. (210)Pb content in natural gas pipeline residues ("black-powder") and its correlation with the chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, José Marcus; Carvalho, Franciane; Cordilha, Aloisio; Matta, Luiz Ernesto; Godoy, Maria Luiza

    2005-01-01

    The present work was carried out to assess the (210)Pb content in "black-powder" found in pigging operations on gas pipelines in Brazil, in particular, on the Campos Basin gas pipeline. Additionally, the chemical composition of such deposits was determined and an eventual correlation with (210)Pb concentration evaluated. Typical "black-powder" generated in the natural gas pipeline from Campos Basin oilfield contains mainly iron oxide ( approximately 81%) and residual organic matter ( approximately 9%). The (210)Pb content ranges from 4.9 to 0.04k Bqkg(-1) and seems to be inversely correlated with the distance to the platforms. On the other hand, (226)Ra concentration is higher on the pipeline branch between the platform and the onshore installations. (228)Ra was only observed in few samples, in particular, in the samples with the highest (226)Ra content.

  15. RESIDUAL GAS MOTIONS IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM AND BIAS IN HYDROSTATIC MEASUREMENTS OF MASS PROFILES OF CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Erwin T.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    We present analysis of bulk and random gas motions in the intracluster medium using high-resolution Eulerian cosmological simulations of 16 simulated clusters, including both very relaxed and unrelaxed systems and spanning a virial mass range of 5 x 10 13 - 2 x 10 15 h -1 M-odot. We investigate effects of the residual subsonic gas motions on the hydrostatic estimates of mass profiles and concentrations of galaxy clusters. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the gas motions contribute up to ∼5%-15% of the total pressure support in relaxed clusters with contribution increasing with the cluster-centric radius. The fractional pressure support is higher in unrelaxed systems. This contribution would not be accounted for in hydrostatic estimates of the total mass profile and would lead to systematic underestimate of mass. We demonstrate that total mass can be recovered accurately if pressure due to gas motions measured in simulations is explicitly taken into account in the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium. Given that the underestimate of mass is increasing at larger radii, where gas is less relaxed and contribution of gas motions to pressure is larger, the total density profile derived from hydrostatic analysis is more concentrated than the true profile. This may at least partially explain some high values of concentrations of clusters estimated from hydrostatic analysis of X-ray data.

  16. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  17. Direct gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite residues in the absence and presence of water vapor: a feasibility study for carbon dioxide sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veetil, Sanoopkumar Puthiya; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra; Mercier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite mining residue offers an environmentally secure and permanent storage of carbon dioxide. The strategy of using readily available mining residue for the direct treatment of flue gas could improve the energy demand and economics of CO2 sequestration by avoiding the mineral extraction and separate CO2 capture steps. The present is a laboratory scale study to assess the possibility of CO2 fixation in serpentinite mining residues via direct gas-solid reaction. The degree of carbonation is measured both in the absence and presence of water vapor in a batch reactor. The gas used is a simulated gas mixture reproducing an average cement flue gas CO2 composition of 18 vol.% CO2. The reaction parameters considered are temperature, total gas pressure, time, and concentration of water vapor. In the absence of water vapor, the gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite mining residues is negligible, but the residues removed CO2 from the feed gas possibly due to reversible adsorption. The presence of small amount of water vapor enhances the gas-solid carbonation, but the measured rates are too low for practical application. The maximum CO2 fixation obtained is 0.07 g CO2 when reacting 1 g of residue at 200 °C and 25 barg (pCO2 ≈ 4.7) in a gas mixture containing 18 vol.% CO2 and 10 vol.% water vapor in 1 h. The fixation is likely surface limited and restricted due to poor gas-solid interaction. It was identified that both the relative humidity and carbon dioxide-water vapor ratio have a role in CO2 fixation regardless of the percentage of water vapor.

  18. In Situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars by Gas Chromatography : Application to the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Arnaud; Sternberg, R.; Freissinet, C.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P.; Garnier, C.; Rodier, C.; Phillipon, C.; El bekri, J.; Stambouli, M.; Goesmann, F.; Raulin, F.; MOMA GC-team

    2009-09-01

    The search for signs of past or present life is one of the primary goals of the future Mars exploratory missions. With this aim the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars 2016 next coming European Space Agency mission is designed to the in situ analysis of organic molecules of exobiological interest in the Martian soil such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). With the aim to extract from the soil, separate and detect organic compounds we have developed a sample processing system allowing the Gas Chromatographic analysis, within space compatible operating conditions, of the refractory organic compounds able to be contained at trace level in the Martian soil. The sample processing is performed in the oven dedicated to the MOMA experiment containing the solid sample ( 200mg). The internal temperature can be ranged from 20 to 1000 °C. The extraction step is achieved by using thermodesorption in the range of 100 to 300°C for 5 to 20 min. Then, the chemical derivatization or thermochemolysis of the extracted compounds is achieved directly on the soil with a mixture of MTBSTFA-DMF, TMAH or DMF-DMA solution when enantiomeric separation is required. By decreasing the polarity of the target molecules, this step allows their volatilization at a temperature below 250°C without any chemical degradation. Once derivatized, the target volatile molecules are trapped in a cold or chemical trap and promptly desorbed in the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer. Organic compounds such as amino and carboxylic acids contained in Martian analogue soil (Atacama) have been detected by using our sample processing system.

  19. Adsorption of small gas molecules on pure and Al-doped graphene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-10-03

    -doped graphene than that of pure graphene (PG). The Al-doped graphene shows the highest adsorption energy with NO2, NH3 and CO2 molecules, whereas the PG binds strongly with NO2. Therefore, the strong interactions ...

  20. Measuring the internal energy content of molecules transported across the liquid-gas interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maselli, Olivia J; Gascooke, Jason R; Buntine, Mark A; Lawrance, Warren D

    2009-01-01

    Many details concerning the mechanism associated with the liberation of molecules from a liquid surface remain to be elucidated. We use the liquid microjet technique coupled with laser spectroscopy to measure the rotational and vibrational energy content of benzene spontaneously evaporating from a water-ethanol solution. These measurements provide molecular level insight into the mass and energy transfer processes associated with evaporation.

  1. H-bonding networks of the distal residues and water molecules in the active site of Thermobifida fusca hemoglobin.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoletti , Francesco P; Droghetti , Enrica; Howes , Barry D; Bustamante , Juan P; Bonamore , Alessandra; Sciamanna , Natascia; Estrin , Darío A; Feis , Alessandro; Boffi , Alberto; Smulevich , Giulietta

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The ferric form of truncated hemoglobin II from Thermobifida fusca (Tf-trHb) and its triple mutant WG8F-YB10F-YCD1F at neutral and alkaline pH, and in the presence of CN(-) have been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Tf-trHb contains three polar residues in the distal site, namely TrpG8, TyrCD1 and TyrB10. Whereas TrpG8 can act as a potential hydrogen-bond donor, the tyrosine...

  2. Drag force and transport property of a small cylinder in free molecule flow: A gas-kinetic theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changran; Li, Zhigang; Wang, Hai

    2016-08-01

    Analytical expressions are derived for aerodynamic drag force on small cylinders in the free molecule flow using the gas-kinetic theory. The derivation considers the effect of intermolecular interactions between the cylinder and gas media. Two limiting collision models, specular and diffuse scattering, are investigated in two limiting cylinder orientations with respect to the drift velocity. The earlier solution of Dahneke [B. E. Dahneke, J. Aerosol Sci. 4, 147 (1973)10.1016/0021-8502(73)90066-9] is shown to be a special case of the current expressions in the rigid-body limit of collision. Drag force expressions are obtained for cylinders that undergo Brownian rotation and for those that align with the drift velocity. The validity of the theoretical expressions is tested against experimental mobility data available for carbon nanotubes.

  3. A stochastic logical system approach to model and optimal control of cyclic variation of residual gas fraction in combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yuhu; Kumar, Madan; Shen, Tielong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An in-cylinder pressure based measuring method for the RGF is derived. • A stochastic logical dynamical model is proposed to represent the transient behavior of the RGF. • The receding horizon controller is designed to reduce the variance of the RGF. • The effectiveness of the proposed model and control approach is validated by the experimental evidence. - Abstract: In four stroke internal combustion engines, residual gas from the previous cycle is an important factor influencing the combustion quality of the current cycle, and the residual gas fraction (RGF) is a popular index to monitor the influence of residual gas. This paper investigates the cycle-to-cycle transient behavior of the RGF in the view of systems theory and proposes a multi-valued logic-based control strategy for attenuation of RGF fluctuation. First, an in-cylinder pressure sensor-based method for measuring the RGF is provided by following the physics of the in-cylinder transient state of four-stroke internal combustion engines. Then, the stochastic property of the RGF is examined based on statistical data obtained by conducting experiments on a full-scale gasoline engine test bench. Based on the observation of the examination, a stochastic logical transient model is proposed to represent the cycle-to-cycle transient behavior of the RGF, and with the model an optimal feedback control law, which targets on rejection of the RGF fluctuation, is derived in the framework of stochastic logical system theory. Finally, experimental results are demonstrated to show the effectiveness of the proposed model and the control strategy.

  4. Determination of 86 Pesticide Residues in Leafy Vegetables using gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    , M. T. Selim; , I. Al-Dossary

    2016-01-01

    A multiresidue method is described for detection and determination of 86 compounds of pesticide residues which commonly used in the pest control programs for crop protection. Good sensitivity and selectivity of the method are obtained with limits of quantiŞcation 0.01 mg/kg in almost all cases. The method was applied very satisfactorily to routine analysis as a complement to traditional GC-MS method and Şnally, limit of detection were also 10-20 times lower than maximum residue levels (MRL) e...

  5. Exploration of bulk and interface behavior of gas molecules and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation and quantum chemical calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Quan; Achenie, Luke E K

    2018-03-28

    Ionic liquids (ILs) show brilliant performance in separating gas impurities, but few researchers have performed an in-depth exploration of the bulk and interface behavior of penetrants and ILs thoroughly. In this research, we have performed a study on both molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and quantum chemical (QC) calculation to explore the transport of acetylene and ethylene in the bulk and interface regions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]-[BF4]). The diffusivity, solubility and permeability of gas molecules in the bulk were researched with MD simulation first. The subdiffusion behavior of gas molecules is induced by coupling between the motion of gas molecules and the ions, and the relaxation processes of the ions after the disturbance caused by gas molecules. Then, QC calculation was performed to explore the optical geometry of ions, ion pairs and complexes of ions and penetrants, and interaction potential for pairs and complexes. Finally, nonequilibrium MD simulation was performed to explore the interface structure and properties of the IL-gas system and gas molecule behavior in the interface region. The research results may be used in the design of IL separation media.

  6. Energy and greenhouse gas balance of the use of forest residues for bioenergy production in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittaker, Carly; Mortimer, Nigel; Murphy, Richard; Matthews, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Life cycle analysis is used to assess the energy requirements and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with extracting UK forest harvesting residues for use as a biomass resource. Three forest harvesting residues were examined (whole tree thinnings, roundwood and brash bales), and each have their own energy and emission profile. The whole forest rotation was examined, including original site establishment, forest road construction, biomass harvesting during thinning and final clear-fell events, chipping and transportation. Generally, higher yielding sites give lower GHG emissions per ‘oven dried tonne’ (ODT) forest residues, but GHG emissions ‘per hectare’ are higher as more biomass is extracted. Greater quantities of biomass, however, ultimately mean greater displacement of conventional fuels and therefore greater potential for GHG emission mitigation. Although forest road construction and site establishment are “one off” events they are highly energy-intensive operations associated with high diesel fuel consumption, when placed in context with the full forest rotation, however, their relative contributions to the overall energy requirements and GHG emissions are small. The lower bulk density of wood chips means that transportation energy requirements and GHG emissions are higher compared with roundwood logs and brash bales, suggesting that chipping should occur near the end-user of application. -- Highlights: ► GHGs and fuel consumption assessed for UK clear-fell conifer forest residues. ► Energy use and GHG emissions for forest road construction characterised. ► Lower energy requirements and GHG emissions per ODT for higher yielding sites. ► Transport energy and GHG emissions higher for wood chip than roundwood or brash bales. ► Results useful in predicting GHG mitigation potential from UK commercial conifer forest residues.

  7. Brome isotope selective control of CF3Br molecule clustering by IR laser radiation in gas-dynamic expansion of CF3Br - Ar mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apatin, V. M.; Lokhman, V. N.; Makarov, G. N.; Ogurok, N.-D. D.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2018-02-01

    We report the results of research on the experimental control of CF3Br molecule clustering under gas-dynamic expansion of the CF3Br - Ar mixture at a nozzle exit by using IR laser radiation. A cw CO2 laser is used for exciting molecules and clusters in the beam and a time-of-flight mass-spectrometer with laser UV ionisation of particles for their detection. The parameters of the gas above the nozzle are determined (compositions and pressure) at which intensive molecule clustering occurs. It is found that in the case of the CF3Br gas without carrier when the pressure P0 above the nozzle does not exceed 4 atm, molecular clusters actually are not generated in the beam. If the gas mixture of CF3Br with argon is used at a pressure ratio 1 : N, where N >= 3, and the total pressure above the nozzle is P0 >= 2 atm, then there occurs molecule clustering. We study the dependences of the efficiency of suppressing the molecule clustering on parameters of the exciting pulse, gas parameters above the nozzle, and on a distance of the molecule irradiation zone from the nozzle exit section. It is shown that in the case of resonant vibrational excitation of gas-dynamically cooled CF3Br molecules at the nozzle exit one can realise isotope-selective suppression of molecule clustering with respect to bromine isotopes. With the CF3Br - Ar mixtures having the pressure ratio 1 : 3 and 1 : 15, the enrichment factors obtained with respect to bromine isotopes are kenr ≈ 1.05 ± 0.005 and kenr ≈ 1.06 ± 0.007, respectively, under jet irradiation by laser emission in the 9R(30) line (1084.635 cm-1). The results obtained let us assume that this method can be used to control clustering of molecules comprising heavy element isotopes, which have a small isotopic shift in IR absorption spectra.

  8. JV Task 5 - Evaluation of Residual Oil Fly Ash As A Mercury Sorbent For Coal Combustion Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Patton

    2006-12-31

    The mercury adsorption capacity of a residual oil fly ash (ROFA) sample collected form Florida Power and Light Company's Port Everglades Power Plant was evaluated using a bituminous coal combustion flue gas simulator and fixed-bed testing protocol. A size-segregated (>38 {micro}g) fraction of ROFA was ground to a fine powder and brominated to potentially enhance mercury capture. The ROFA and brominated-ROFA were ineffective in capturing or oxidizing the Hg{sup 0} present in a simulated bituminous coal combustion flue gas. In contrast, a commercially available DARCO{reg_sign} FGD initially adsorbed Hg{sup 0} for about an hour and then catalyzed Hg{sup 0} oxidation to produce Hg{sup 2+}. Apparently, the unburned carbon in ROFA needs to be more rigorously activated in order for it to effectively capture and/or oxidize Hg{sup 0}.

  9. Development and validation of a multi-residue method for the detection of a wide range of hormonal anabolic compounds in hair using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambaud, Lauriane; Monteau, Fabrice; Deceuninck, Yoann; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Andre, Francois; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of anabolic steroid residues in hair is undoubtedly one of the most efficient strategies to demonstrate the long-term administration of these molecules in meat production animals. A multi-residue sample preparation procedure was developed and validated for 28 steroids. A 100 mg hair sample was grinded into powder and extracted at 50 deg. C with methanol. After acidic hydrolysis and extraction with ethyl acetate, phenolsteroids, such as estrogens, resorcyclic acid lactones and stilbens in one hand, are separated from androgens and progestagens in the other hand. Solid phase extractions were performed before applying a specific derivatisation for each compound sub-group. Detection and identification were achieved using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with acquisition in the selected reaction monitoring mode after electron ionisation. The method was validated according to the 2002/657/EC guideline. Decision limits (CCα) for main steroids were in the 0.1-10 μg kg -1 range

  10. Possible sequestration of polar gas molecules by superhalogen supported aluminum nitride nanoflakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2016-11-01

    The feasibility of having MF 3 (where M = Rh, Ir, Pd, Pt, Ag, Au) supported AlN nanoflakes (AlNF) was investigated through density functional theory based calculations. The thermodynamic analysis reveals that the superhalogen MF 3 molecules can bind with the host AlNF in a thermodynamically favorable way. The nature of interaction in between the metal centers and the host is of partly covalent type whereas the F centers bind with the host in a non-covalent fashion as vindicated by natural bond orbital and atoms-in a-molecule analyses. An ab initio molecular dynamics study carried out at 298 K temperature confirms the stability of the MF 3 @AlNF moieties in a dynamical context. The MF 3 guests can reduce the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the host nanoflakes. In general, the MF 3 @AlNF complexes can sequestrate polar adsorbates such as CO, NO, and H 2 O in a thermodynamically favorable way in most of the cases. An ab initio molecular dynamics calculation illustrates that the MF 3 @AlNF can adsorb the chosen representative polar molecules in a more favorable way as compared to the corresponding adsorption scenario in the case of pristine AlNF.

  11. Photophysics of sunscreen molecules in the gas phase: a stepwise approach towards understanding and developing next-generation sunscreens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Natércia D. N.; Staniforth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and skin cancer urges the need for extra photoprotection, which is presently provided by widespread commercially available sunscreen lotions. Apart from having a large absorption cross section in the UVA and UVB regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, the chemical absorbers in these photoprotective products should also be able to dissipate the excess energy in a safe way, i.e. without releasing photoproducts or inducing any further, harmful, photochemistry. While sunscreens are tested for both their photoprotective capability and dermatological compatibility, phenomena occurring at the molecular level upon absorption of UV radiation are largely overlooked. To date, there is only a limited amount of information regarding the photochemistry and photophysics of these sunscreen molecules. However, a thorough understanding of the intrinsic mechanisms by which popular sunscreen molecular constituents dissipate excess energy has the potential to aid in the design of more efficient, safer sunscreens. In this review, we explore the potential of using gas-phase frequency- and time-resolved spectroscopies in an effort to better understand the photoinduced excited-state dynamics, or photodynamics, of sunscreen molecules. Complementary computational studies are also briefly discussed. Finally, the future outlook of expanding these gas-phase studies into the solution phase is considered. PMID:27956888

  12. ON THE RELATIVE 'TRANSPARENCY' OF GAS-PHASE CORONENE MOLECULES TO LOW-ENERGY ELECTRONS: EFFECTS ON THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, F.; Gianturco, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Free, gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are understood to play an important role in the interstellar medium (ISM), as they are thought to significantly contribute to both diffused and unidentified infrared interstellar bands. They are also considered fundamental blocks of the interstellar dust, whose nature has important implications for a plethora of physical and chemical nanoscopic processes within the ISM. Since free electrons represent a versatile alternative way to transport energy in the interstellar space, in this paper we compute from quantum scattering methods the angular redistributions of free electrons by gas-phase coronene molecules, the latter of which are believed to be one of the most representative PAHs, in order to assess their role in describing the efficiency of electron deflection by this molecule. The associated rates can provide useful information about the coupling mechanism between external radio-frequency fields and complex molecular plasmas containing neutral and ionized PAHs. They can also yield information on the possible presence of such species in the dust phase of the medium.

  13. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyser : in situ analysis of organic compounds on Mars by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Arnaud; Sternberg, Robert; Freissinet, Caroline; Pinnick, Veronika; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice; Geffroy-Rodier, Claude; Raulin, Francois; Goesmann, Fred

    The search for signs of past or present life is one of the primary goals of the future Mars exploratory missions. With this aim the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars 2016-2018 next coming joint ESA/NASA mission is designed to perform the in situ analysis of exobiological organic molecules of exobiological interest in the Martian soil such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). With the aim to separate and detect organic compounds from Martian soil, US and European teams have respectively built an ion trap mass spectrometer and a gas chromatograph. The mass spectrometer prototype has been coupled with the gas chromatograph prototype which is able to work in standalone mode by using a TCD detector. A GC-MS compatible sample processing system (SPS) allowing the extraction and the chemical transformation of the organic compounds from the soil, within space compatible operating conditions, has also been devel-oped. The sample processing is performed in an oven, dedicated to the MOMA experiment containing the solid sample (50-100mg). The internal temperature of which can be ranged from 20 to 1000 C. The extraction step is achieved by using thermodesorption in the range of 100 to 300C for 5 to 20 min. Then, the chemical derivatization and/or thermochemolysis of the extracted compounds is performed directly on the soil with a mixture of MTBSTFA-DMF, TMAH or DMF-DMA solution when enantiomeric separation is required. By decreasing the polarity of the target molecules, this step allows their volatilization at a temperature below 250C without any chemical degradation. Once derivatized, the volatile target molecules are trapped in a cold and chemical trap and promptly desorbed into the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer. Preliminary tests, performed on Martian analogue soils (Atacama), with the MOMA SPS-GC/MS experiment, allowed the detection of organic compounds such as amino and

  14. Acoustical gas-leak detection in the presence of multiple reflections, dispersion, and uncorrelated noise using optimized residual complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, A M; Amjadi, A; Bahrampour, A R; Ravanbod, H; Tofighi, S

    2016-09-01

    Precise acoustical leak detection calls for robust time-delay estimates, which minimize the probability of false alarms in the face of dispersive propagation, multiple reflections, and uncorrelated background noise. Providing evidence that higher order modes and multi-reflected signals behave like sets of correlated noise, this work uses a regression model to optimize residual complexity in the presence of both correlated and uncorrelated noise. This optimized residual complexity (ORC) is highly robust since it takes into account both the level and complexity of noise. The lower complexity of the dispersive modes and multiple reflections, compared to the complexity of the plane mode, points to the robustness of ORC against multiple reflections and dispersion. Experimental investigations using recorded sounds of gas leaking from a pipe confirm the robustness of ORC against multiple reflections. Numerical simulations also show robustness against dispersive modes, even when they disturb the linearity of the cross-spectrum phase. Comparisons with other methods-mutual information, cross correlation, and residual complexity-underline the general advantages of ORC in terms of robustness in the presence of reflection and dispersion, against both correlated and uncorrelated noise, and to short signals.

  15. Simultaneous determination of organochlorine and pyrethriod pesticide residues in the Chinese patent medicines by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xue J; Zhong, Yao; Yan, Ai P; Wang, Bin; Wang, Yuan X; Wan, Yi Q

    2018-02-01

    A simple, sensitive, reliable method was developed for the simultaneous determination of organochlorine and pyrethriod pesticide residues in Chinese patent medicines Six ingredient rehmannia pills and Xiaoyao pills. These pesticides were extracted by ethyl acetate. The extraction time and volume of ethyl acetate were optimized. Cleanup of extracts was performed with dispersive-solid phase extraction using graphitized carbon black as the sorbent. The determination of pesticides in the final extracts was carried out by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in multiple reaction monitoring mode (GC-MS/MS, MRM). The linearity of the calibration curves is good in matrix-matched standard and yields the coefficients of determination (R 2 ) ≥0.99 for all of the target analytes. Under optimized conditions, the average recoveries (five replicates) for most pesticides range from 75.5% to 114.6%, and RSDs are less than 10.0%. The LODs of 18 pesticides in Six ingredient rehmannia pill and Xiaoyao pills are in the range of 0.01-8.82 μg kg -1 . The developed method meets the requirements of pesticide residue analysis and could be effectively used for routine analysis of the organochlorine and pyrethriod pesticide residues in Six ingredient rehmannia pills and Xiaoyao pills.

  16. Gas phase chemical kinetics at high temperature of carbonaceous molecules: application to circumstellar envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biennier, L.; Gardez, A.; Saidani, G.; Georges, R.; Rowe, B.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar shells of evolved stars are a theater of extremely rich physical and chemical processes. More than seventy molecules of varied nature have been identified in the envelopes through their spectral fingerprints in the microwave or far infrared regions. Many of them are carbon chain molecules and radicals and a significant number are unique to the circumstellar medium. However, observational data remain scarce and more than half of the detected species have been observed in only one object, the nearby carbon star IRC + 10216. Chemical kinetic models are needed to describe the formation of molecules in evolved circumstellar outflows. Upcoming terrestrial telescopes such as ALMA will increase the spatial resolution by several orders of magnitude and provide a wealth of data. The determination of relevant laboratory kinetics data is critical to keep up with the development of the observations and of the refinement of chemical models. Today, the majority of reactions studied in the laboratory are the ones involved in combustion and concerning light hydrocarbons. Our objective is to provide the scientific community with rate coefficients of reactions between abundant species in these warm environments. Cyanopolyynes from HC_2N to HC_9N have all been detected in carbon rich circumstellar envelopes in up to 10 sources for HC_3N. Neutral-neutral reactions of the CN radical with unsaturated hydrocarbons could be a dominant route in the formation of cyanopolyynes, even at low temperatures. Our approach aims to bridge the temperature gap between resistively heated flow tubes and shock tubes. The present kinetic measurements are obtained using a new reactor combining a high enthalpy source (Moudens et al. 2011) with a flow tube and a pulsed laser photolysis and laser induced fluorescence system to probe the undergoing chemical reactions. The high enthalpy flow tube has been used to measure the rate constant of the reaction of the CN radical with propane, propene

  17. Definitive Ideal-Gas Thermochemical Functions of the (H2O)-O-16 Molecule

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Furtenbacher, T.; Szidarovszky, T.; Hrubý, Jan; Kyuberis, A. A.; Zobov, N. F.; Polyansky, O. L.; Tennyson, J.; Császár, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2016), č. článku 043104. ISSN 0047-2689 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-02647S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : ideal-gas thermochemical quantities * ortho- and para-H2 16O * partition function Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 4.204, year: 2016 http://aip.scitation.org/doi/pdf/10.1063/1.4967723

  18. The effects of rape residue mulching on net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity from no-tillage paddy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Cao, Cou-Gui; Guo, Li-Jin; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to provide a complete greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for global warming potential (GWP), net GWP, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from no-tillage (NT) paddy fields with different amounts of oilseed rape residue mulch (0, 3000, 4000, and 6000 kg dry matter (DM) ha(-1)) during a rice-growing season after 3 years of oilseed rape-rice cultivation. Residue mulching treatments showed significantly more organic carbon (C) density for the 0-20 cm soil layer at harvesting than no residue treatment. During a rice-growing season, residue mulching treatments sequestered significantly more organic C from 687 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) to 1654 kg C ha(-1) season(-1) than no residue treatment. Residue mulching significantly increased emissions of CO2 and N2O but decreased CH4 emissions. Residue mulching treatments significantly increased GWP by 9-30% but significantly decreased net GWP by 33-71% and GHGI by 35-72% relative to no residue treatment. These results suggest that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be achieved simultaneously by residue mulching on NT paddy fields in central China.

  19. The Effects of Rape Residue Mulching on Net Global Warming Potential and Greenhouse Gas Intensity from No-Tillage Paddy Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Sheng; Cao, Cou-Gui; Guo, Li-Jin; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to provide a complete greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for global warming potential (GWP), net GWP, and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) from no-tillage (NT) paddy fields with different amounts of oilseed rape residue mulch (0, 3000, 4000, and 6000 kg dry matter (DM) ha−1) during a rice-growing season after 3 years of oilseed rape-rice cultivation. Residue mulching treatments showed significantly more organic carbon (C) density for the 0–20 cm soil layer at harvesting than no residue treatment. During a rice-growing season, residue mulching treatments sequestered significantly more organic C from 687 kg C ha−1 season−1 to 1654 kg C ha−1 season−1 than no residue treatment. Residue mulching significantly increased emissions of CO2 and N2O but decreased CH4 emissions. Residue mulching treatments significantly increased GWP by 9–30% but significantly decreased net GWP by 33–71% and GHGI by 35–72% relative to no residue treatment. These results suggest that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be achieved simultaneously by residue mulching on NT paddy fields in central China. PMID:25140329

  20. Accessing the molecular frame through strong-field alignment of distributions of gas phase molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Katharine L.

    2018-03-01

    A rationale for creating highly aligned distributions of molecules is that it enables vector properties referenced to molecule-fixed axes (the molecular frame) to be determined. In the present work, the degree of alignment that is necessary for this to be achieved in practice is explored. Alignment is commonly parametrized in experiments by a single parameter, ?, which is insufficient to enable predictive calculations to be performed. Here, it is shown that, if the full distribution of molecular axes takes a Gaussian form, this single parameter can be used to determine the complete set of alignment moments needed to characterize the distribution. In order to demonstrate the degree of alignment that is required to approach the molecular frame, the alignment moments corresponding to a few chosen values of ? are used to project a model molecular frame photoelectron angular distribution into the laboratory frame. These calculations show that ? needs to approach 0.9 in order to avoid significant blurring to be caused by averaging. This article is part of the theme issue `Modern theoretical chemistry'.

  1. Gas Separation Membranes Derived from High-Performance Immiscible Polymer Blends Compatibilized with Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panapitiya, Nimanka P; Wijenayake, Sumudu N; Nguyen, Do D; Huang, Yu; Musselman, Inga H; Balkus, Kenneth J; Ferraris, John P

    2015-08-26

    An immiscible polymer blend comprised of high-performance copolyimide 6FDA-DAM:DABA(3:2) (6FDD) and polybenzimidazole (PBI) was compatibilized using 2-methylimidazole (2-MI), a commercially available small molecule. Membranes were fabricated from blends of 6FDD:PBI (50:50) with and without 2-MI for H2/CO2 separations. The membranes demonstrated a matrix-droplet type microstructure as evident with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging where 6FDD is the dispersed phase and PBI is the continuous phase. In addition, membranes with 2-MI demonstrated a uniform microstructure as observed by smaller and more uniformly dispersed 6FDD domains in contrast to 6FDD:PBI (50:50) blend membranes without 2-MI. This compatibilization effect of 2-MI was attributed to interfacial localization of 2-MI that lowers the interfacial energy similar to a surfactant. Upon the incorporation of 2-MI, the H2/CO2 selectivity improved remarkably, compared to the pure blend, and surpassed the Robeson's upper bound. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of a small molecule to compatibilize a high-performance immiscible polymer blend. This approach could afford a novel class of membranes in which immiscible polymer blends can be compatibilized in an economical and convenient fashion.

  2. Highly selective sieving of small gas molecules by using an ultra-microporous metal–organic framework membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Kang, Zixi

    2014-09-12

    © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Two tailor-made microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) membranes were successfully fabricated on nickel screens by secondary growth. The effect of pore structures on gas separation was examined by means of single and binary gas permeation tests. The MOF JUC-150 membrane with its ultra-micropores showed marked preferential permeance to H2 relative to other gas molecules. The selectivity factors of this membrane were 26.3, 17.1 and 38.7 for H2/CH4, H2/N2 and H2/CO2, respectively, at room temperature. To the best of our knowledge, these values represent unprecedentedly high separation selectivity among those for all MOF membranes reported to date. The JUC-150 membrane also shows high thermal stability and outstanding separation performance at a high temperature of 200 °C. The separation performance of these membranes persists even after more than 1 year exposure to air. The superiority of the tailored pore size, high selectivity for H2 over other gases, significant stability and recyclability make these materials potential candidates for industrial H2 recycling applications.

  3. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29

    This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define

  4. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Hans G.J., E-mail: hans.mol@wur.nl; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50–500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg{sup −1}) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5–250 μg kg{sup −1}. The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive

  5. Towards sympathetic cooling of large molecules: cold collisions between benzene and rare gas atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, P; Tennyson, J; Barker, P F [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.barletta@ucl.ac.uk

    2009-05-15

    This paper reports on calculations of collisional cross sections for the complexes X-C{sub 6}H{sub 6} (X={sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, Ne) at temperatures in the range 1 {mu}K-10 K and shows that relatively large cross sections in the 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} A{sup 2} range are available for collisional cooling. Both elastic and inelastic processes are considered in this temperature range. The calculations suggest that sympathetically cooling benzene to microkelvin temperatures is feasible using these co-trapped rare gas atoms in an optical trap.

  6. GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON ANIONS WITH MOLECULES OF INTERSTELLAR RELEVANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang Zhibo; Martinez, Oscar; Wehres, Nadine; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied reactions of small dehydrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anions with neutral species of interstellar relevance. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K for the reactions of phenide (C 6 H – 5 ), naphthalenide (C 10 H – 7 ), and anthracenide (C 14 H – 9 ) with atomic H, H 2 , and D 2 using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube instrument. Reaction rate constants of phenide with neutral molecules (CO, O 2 , CO 2 , N 2 O, C 2 H 2 , CH 3 OH, CH 3 CN, (CH 3 ) 2 CO, CH 3 CHO, CH 3 Cl, and (CH 3 CH 2 ) 2 O) are also measured under the same conditions. Experimental measurements are accompanied by ab initio calculations to provide insight into reaction pathways and enthalpies. Our measured reaction rate constants should prove useful in the modeling of astrophysical environments, particularly when applied to dense regions of the interstellar and circumstellar medium.

  7. Gas-phase Reactions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions with Molecules of Interstellar Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang, Zhibo; Martinez, Oscar; Wehres, Nadine; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2012-02-01

    We have studied reactions of small dehydrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anions with neutral species of interstellar relevance. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K for the reactions of phenide (C6H- 5), naphthalenide (C10H- 7), and anthracenide (C14H- 9) with atomic H, H2, and D2 using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube instrument. Reaction rate constants of phenide with neutral molecules (CO, O2, CO2, N2O, C2H2, CH3OH, CH3CN, (CH3)2CO, CH3CHO, CH3Cl, and (CH3CH2)2O) are also measured under the same conditions. Experimental measurements are accompanied by ab initio calculations to provide insight into reaction pathways and enthalpies. Our measured reaction rate constants should prove useful in the modeling of astrophysical environments, particularly when applied to dense regions of the interstellar and circumstellar medium.

  8. Femtosecond x-ray photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase dibromobenzene molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolles, D; Boll, R; Epp, S W; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Hömke, A; Adolph, M; Gorkhover, T; Aquila, A; Chapman, H N; Coppola, N; Delmas, T; Gumprecht, L; Holmegaard, L; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Coffee, R; Decleva, P; Filsinger, F; Johnsson, P

    2014-01-01

    We present time-resolved femtosecond photoelectron momentum images and angular distributions of dissociating, laser-aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C 6 H 4 Br 2 ) molecules measured in a near-infrared pump, soft-x-ray probe experiment performed at an x-ray free-electron laser. The observed alignment dependence of the bromine 2p photoelectron angular distributions is compared to density functional theory calculations and interpreted in terms of photoelectron diffraction. While no clear time-dependent effects are observed in the angular distribution of the Br(2p) photoelectrons, other, low-energy electrons show a pronounced dependence on the time delay between the near-infrared laser and the x-ray pulse. (paper)

  9. Determination of daminozide residues in apples using gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, J.H.W.; Dijk, A.G. van; Wagenaar, R.; Quirijns, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    A method was developed for the determination of daminozide in apples using gas chromatography (GC) with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (NPD). Daminozide is hydrolysed to 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) by alkaline digestion. The UDMH generated is distilled from the apple matrix, derivatized with

  10. Conversion of forest residues to a clean gas for fuel or synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Liu, K.T.; Longanbach, J.R.; Curran, L.M.; Chauhan, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    A program is described for developing a gasification system specifically for wood and other biomass materials which allows greatly increased gasifier throughputs and direct catalysis of wood. Wood ash, which is a by-product of a wood gasification plant, can be used as a gasification catalyst for wood, as it increases gasification rates and promotes the water-gas shift reaction. The high reactivity of even uncatalyzed biomass allows the potential of very high gasifier throughputs. However, the achievement of this potential requires that the gasifier operate at gas velocities higher than those attainable in conventional reactor systems. Stable and very smooth fluidization with uniform mixing and distribution of chips throughout the bed was observed on addition of an entrained sand phase to a fluidized bed of alumina and wood chips. Economc feasibility studies based on utilization of a proprietary Battelle gasification system which utilizes an entrained-phase heat carrier indicated that an intermediate-Btu gas can be produced in 1000 ton/day plants at a price competitive with liquefied natural gas and No. 2 heating oil.

  11. Pyrolysis Gas as a Renewable Reducing Agent for the Recycling of Zinc- and Lead-Bearing Residues: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, C.; Antrekowitsch, J.

    2017-04-01

    The topic "Zero Waste" has been in existence for several years in the industry, and the metallurgical industry has also made efforts to reduce the amounts of residues occurring and have started several investigations to cut down on metallurgical by-products which have to be landfilled. Especially, the additional costs for CO2 emissions in different metallurgical steps have led to investigations into alternative carbon carriers. Charcoal has been identified to serve as an ideal substitute due its CO2-neutrality. For the applications of this renewable carbon carrier in metallurgical processes, charcoal production by means of a carbonization process needs to be optimized. As a by-product during the heating of agricultural wastes or wood by excluding air, pyrolysis gas occurs. Due to the existence of combustible compounds in this gas, an application as a reduction agent instead of fossil carbon carriers in metallurgy is possible. Based on the prevention of dumping metallurgical by-products, an investigation has been developed to treat zinc- and lead-containing materials. To realize this, a dedicated process concept has been designed and developed. As the main focuses, the usage of the pyrolysis gas from charcoal production for the Waelz kiln process and the recycling of zinc- and lead-containing Waelz slag, resulting from the processing of steel mill dust in a vertical retort, have to be mentioned. Within this research, the process concept was executed from laboratory-scale up to pilot-scale testing, described in this article.

  12. Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas: Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmann, H.G.; Paisley, M.A.; Appelbaum, H.R.

    1986-03-01

    A process is being developed that produces a fuel gas with a heating value of 500 Btu/SCF from diverse forms of biomass, including shredded bark, wood chips, and sawdust. The system uses a high throughput, non-oxygen gasifier that employs sand circulation to supply process heat. Results obtained with a 10-inch I.D. gasifier are presented and compared with those in a 6-inch I.D. reactor. Feed rates up to 12 tons/day (dry) have been achieved corresponding to a specific wood throughput of 2000 lbs/ft/sup 2/-hr. Gas compositions in the two reactors are in excellent agreement and performance in the larger reactor, as measured by carbon conversion, is significantly improved. Cost projections comparing this process with direct combustion are presented that indicate gasification technology should have very significant cost advantages for both generation of plant steam and cogeneration of electricity. 5 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. A Vapor Challenge Method of Measuring the Residual Life of Gas Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    reaction with chromium complexes . Protection against these gases is so effective that these gases are no longer used in gas warfare; however...To do otherwise, would increase the complexity of the test, and provide a less direct measurement of filter performance under actual operation. Second...detected by colorimetric reactions with: * chromotropic acid; 6 J-acid; 0 metal precipitation from nickel dimethylglyoxime ; or 0 metal precipitation from

  14. Simultaneous determination of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in animal tissues by gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with accelerated solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y; Chen, D; Yu, G; Yu, H; Pan, Y; Wang, Y; Huang, L; Yuan, Z

    2011-02-01

    A new multi-dimensional analytical method using gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-NPD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for qualitative and quantitative measurement of lincomycin and spectinomycin residues in food animal tissues. This method is based on a new extraction procedure using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). The analytes were extracted by phosphate buffer with trichloroacetic acid deproteinization and clean-up by C₁₈ solid-phase extraction (SPE) adding dodecanesulfonic acid sodium salt as an ion-pair reagent. The eluted fraction was evaporated and derivatised with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) for GC-NPD analysis and GC-MS confirmation. Parameters for extraction pressure, temperature and cycle of ASE, clean-up, derivatisation and analysis procedure were optimised. The method was validated in muscle, kidney and liver of swine, bovine with a low concentration (limit of quantification) of 16.4 and 21.4 µg kg⁻¹ for these two analytes using GC-NPD. For GC-MS, the limits of quantification were 4.1 and 5.6 µg kg⁻¹, respectively. Spiked recoveries from levels of 20 to 200 µg kg⁻¹ were found to be between 73% and 99% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 17% in GC-NPD. For GC-MS, levels from 5 to 20 µg kg⁻¹ had between 70% and 93% with an RSD of less than 21%. This rapid and reliable method can be used for the characterisation and quantification of residues of lincomycin and spectinomycin in animal tissues.

  15. [Analysis of residues of organochlorine compounds in plant drugs. 3. Identification of residues of polychlorobiphenyl compounds by comparison of gas chromatography on packed and capillary columns and GCMS coupling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benecke, R; Brotka, J; Wijsbeek, J; Franke, J P; Bruins, A P; de Zeeuw, R A

    1988-02-01

    The identification of residues of polychlorinated biphenyls in a test sample of Flores Chamomillae could be achieved by the retention behavior at gas chromatographic analyses on packed and capillary columns compared with reference standard Clophen A 60, respectively as well as well by capillary GC/MS using single ion monitoring of substance-characteristic ion mass.

  16. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes in the gas-phase, ion-molecule reactions and neutralization mechanisms of hydrocarbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausloos, P.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the fate of unreactive hydrocarbon ions in various selected gaseous systems. It is shown that experiments performed with the high radiation dose rates obtained in pulse radiolysis experiments have several advantages over conventional low dose rate experiments for the elucidation of the mechanism of homogeneous neutralization of unreactive hydrocarbon ions. This is so because the charged species has a much shorter lifetime with respect to neutralization under high dose rate (pulse radiolysis) conditions, so that the reaction of the ions with minor impurities or accumulated products is much less probable than in low dose rate experiments. It is further shown through a few examples, that quantitative information about the rate contants of neutralization events and ion-molecule reactions can be obtained when the dose rate is high enough for neutralization and chemical reaction to be in competition. Once reliable rate constants for neutralization and ion-molecule reactions are derived, one can obtain a quantitative evaluation of the products which will by formed in the pulse radiolysis of a hydrocarbon gas mixture from a computer calculation. (author)

  17. Study of radiolytic effect on residual ethylene oxide in perfusion devices for single use by using gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingsuo; Teng Weifang; Liu Keliang; Feng Jixin; Su Liaoyuan

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of the 60 Co γ-rays irradiation induced elimination reaction of residual ethylene oxide (RETO) in the perfusion devices for single use conducted with RETO gas chromatography has been studied. The observations show: 1. the splinting reaction of RETO absorbed by the infusion sets after ethylene oxide (ETO) sterilization occurred accompanied with 4 kGy irradiation, therefore the relative elimination percentage (RELP) calculated from RETO is over 90%. 2. the optimum radiation conditions are as following irradiation dose 4 kGy, dose rate 8 Gy/min, irradiation temperature 20 degree C. 3. the RETO content within medical infusion sets at 2 weeks storing time after radiation was probably controlled under 2.0 ppm. 4. the radiation chemistry mechanism of the RETO elimination reaction is discussed in relation to the primary and secondary actions of elimination reaction

  18. Evaluation of Chemical Interactions between Small Molecules in the Gas Phase Using Chemical Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Ju, Soomi; Kim, In Tae; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Min, Sun-Joon; Kim, Chulki; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2015-12-04

    Chemical force microscopy analyzes the interactions between various chemical/biochemical moieties in situ. In this work we examined force-distance curves and lateral force to measure the interaction between modified AFM tips and differently functionalized molecular monolayers. Especially for the measurements in gas phase, we investigated the effect of humidity on the analysis of force-distance curves and the images in lateral force mode. Flat chemical patterns composed of different functional groups were made through micro-contact printing and lateral force mode provided more resolved analysis of the chemical patterns. From the images of 1-octadecanethiol/11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid patterns, the amine group functionalized tip brought out higher contrast of the patterns than an intact silicon nitride tip owing to the additional chemical interaction between carboxyl and amine groups. For more complex chemical interactions, relative chemical affinities toward specific peptides were assessed on the pattern of 1-octadecanethiol/phenyl-terminated alkanethiol. The lateral image of chemical force microscopy reflected specific preference of a peptide to phenyl group as well as the hydrophobic interaction.

  19. Multi-Residue Analysis of Pesticides in Pistachio Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Emami

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Analysis of pesticide residues in food and other environmental commodities have become an essential requirement for consumers, producers, food inspectors and authorities. This study is focused on validation of an accurate, rapid and reliable method for multi-residual analysis of pesticides in pistachio as a strategic crop for export and one of the main nuts in Iranian food basket. Methods: We developed a "Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS method based on spiking blank samples and used the data for drawing calibration curves instead of standard solutions. Sample preparations were developed for determination of 12 pesticide residues in pistachio by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Results: Recovery of pesticides at 5 concentration levels (n=3 was in the range of 81.40% - 93.08 %. The method proved to be repeatable in the majority of samples with relative standard deviation (RSD of lower than 20%. The limits of detection and quantification for all pesticides were 2 ppb and 10 ppb, respectively. Conclusion: The calibration curves of pesticides were linear in the range of 10-500 (ng/g and correlation coefficient of entire pesticides was higher than 0.994. The recovery of pesticides at 5 concentration levels (n=3 was in range of 81.41- 91.80 %. The method was proved to be repeatable with the majority of RSDs being lower than 20%. The limits of detection and quantification for all pesticides were 2 and 10 ppb, respectively. The recoveries and repeatabilities were in accordance with the criteria set by SANCO Guideline (Commission of the European Communities, 2006.

  20. Validation of a new analytical procedure for determination of residual solvents in [{sup 18}F]FDG by gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Flávia M.; Costa, Cassiano L.S.; Silva, Juliana B.; Ferreira, Soraya M.Z.M.D., E-mail: flaviabiomedica@yahoo.com.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (UPPR/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Pesquisa e Produção de Radiofármacos

    2017-07-01

    Fludeoxyglucose F 18 ([{sup 18}F]FDG) is the most used radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography, especially on oncology. Organic solvents such as ether, ethanol and acetonitrile might be used in the synthesis of [{sup 18}F]FDG; however, they might not be completely removed during purification steps. The determination of residual solvents in [{sup 18}F]FDG is required in the European Pharmacopoeia (EP) and the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) monographs. While the procedure described in the EP is quite general, the one described in the USP requires a long runtime (about 13 minutes). In this work a simple and fast (4-minute) analytical procedure was developed and validated for determination of residual solvents in [{sup 18}F]FDG. Analyses were carried out in a Perkin Elmer gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector. The separation was obtained on a 0.53-mm x 30 m fused-silica column. Validation included the evaluation of various parameters, such as: specificity, linearity and range, limits of detection and quantitation, precision (repeatability and intermediate precision), accuracy, and robustness. Results were found to be within acceptable limits, indicating the developed procedure is suitable for its intended application. Considering the short half-life of fluorine-18 (109.7 minutes), this new method could be a valuable alternative for routine quality control of [{sup 18}F]FDG. (author)

  1. Gas Chromatographic Method: Tool for Rapid and Sensitive Analysis of Residual Solvents in Amoxicillin and Ampicillin Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sk Manirul Haque

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple and sensitive static head space gas chromatographic (SH-GC method equipped with FID has been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of residual solvents e.g.,  methanol, dichloromethane and toluene in two therapeutic drugs such as amoxicillin  and ampicillin. The separation was achieved with 30 m long Elite - 5 fused silica capillary column and 0.32 mm inner diameter. The developed SH-GC method offered symmetric peak shape, good resolution and reasonable retention time for all the solvents. Beer’s law was obeyed in the concentration ranges 100 – 1200, 50 – 1000 and 50 – 500 ppm for methanol, dichloromethane and toluene, respectively. The method was validated according to international conference on harmonization (ICH guidelines in terms of specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, limit of detection, limit of quantitation, robustness and solution stability. The degrees of linearity of the calibration curves, the percent recoveries, relative standard deviation for the method were also determined. All the validation parameters were within the acceptable range. The developed SH-GC method could, therefore, be suitable for simple and rapid detection of trace levels residual solvents in other pharmaceutical products and thereby it could be used for routine analysis in any analytical laboratory.

  2. The Continuation Study of the Measurement of Residual Monomer from theDenture Base After Three Month Worn by Gas Chromatography on the Radiationand Non Radiation Worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isyuniarto; Winoto

    2000-01-01

    Residual monomer measurement on the radiation and non radiation workerafter three month worn the denture has been done. The aim of the research isto investigated residual monomer concentration on after three month worn. Thedenture base material, made of resin acrylic, sometimes is cause mucosairritation in the mouth, and dental irritation or allergic reaction, becauseof residual monomer that left on the mouth cavity. In this research two groupwere needed there are the radiation and non radiation worker, the level ofthe residual monomer count by gas chromatography analysis. The result of thisresearch showed that the level of residual monomer of two group are same orthere have same level of the limit value. The measurement result is in therange of 0.1783 ± 0.011 mg/l to 0.1790 ± 0.004 mg/l. (author)

  3. Rapid gas chromatographic method for the determination of famoxadone, trifloxystrobin and fenhexamid residues in tomato, grape and wine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likas, D T; Tsiropoulos, N G; Miliadis, G E

    2007-05-25

    Trifloxystrobin, fenhexamid and famoxadone belong to the generation of fungicides acting against a broad spectrum of fungi and widely used in Integrated Pest Management strategies in different agricultural crops but mainly in viticulture. In the present work, a gas chromatographic (GC) method for their determination was developed and validated on tomato, grape and wine matrices. The method was based on a simple one step liquid-liquid microextraction with cyclohexane/dichloromethane (9+1, v/v) and determination of fungicides by gas chromatography with nitrogen phosphorous (NP-) and electron capture (EC-) detection, and ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS) for confirmation. The method was validated by recovery experiments, assessment of matrix effect and calculation of the associated uncertainty. Recoveries for GC-NPD and GC-ECD were found in the range of 81-102% with RSD NPD, respectively, depending on the sensitivity of each compound with trifloxystrobin being the most sensitive. The expanded uncertainty, calculated for a sample concentration of 0.10 mg/kg, ranged from 4.8 to 13% for the GC-ECD and from 5.4 to 29% for the GC-NPD. The concentration levels for famoxadone residues found in tomato and grape samples from field experiments were clearly below the EU established MRL values, thus causing no problems in terms of food safety.

  4. Optimal expression of a Fab-effector fusion protein in Escherichia coli by removing the cysteine residues responsible for an interchain disulfide bond of a Fab molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyeon-Ju; Kim, Hye-Jin; Jung, Mun-Sik; Han, Jae-Kyu; Cha, Sang-Hoon

    2017-04-01

    Development of novel bi-functional or even tri-functional Fab-effector fusion proteins would have a great potential in the biomedical sciences. However, the expression of Fab-effector fusion proteins in Escherichia coli is problematic especially when a eukaryotic effector moiety is genetically linked to a Fab due to the lack of proper chaperone proteins and an inappropriate physicochemical environment intrinsic to the microbial hosts. We previously reported that a human Fab molecule, referred to as SL335, reactive to human serum albumin has a prolonged in vivo serum half-life in rats. We, herein, tested six discrete SL335-human growth hormone (hGH) fusion constructs as a model system to define an optimal Fab-effector fusion format for E. coli expression. We found that one variant, referred to as HserG/Lser, outperformed the others in terms of a soluble expression yield and functionality in that HserG/Lser has a functional hGH bioactivity and possesses an serum albumin-binding affinity comparable to SL335. Our results clearly demonstrated that the genetic linkage of an effector domain to the C-terminus of Fd (V H +C H1 ) and the removal of cysteine (Cys) residues responsible for an interchain disulfide bond (IDB) ina Fab molecule optimize the periplasmic expression of a Fab-effector fusion protein in E. coli. We believe that our approach can contribute the development of diverse bi-functional Fab-effector fusion proteins by providing a simple strategy that enables the reliable expression of a functional fusion proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Gas chromatographic determination of residual hydrazine and morpholine in boiler feed water and steam condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatsala, S.; Bansal, V.; Tuli, D.K.; Rai, M.M.; Jain, S.K.; Srivastava, S.P.; Bhatnagar, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrazine, an oxygen scavenger in boiler water, was derivatised to the corresponding acetone azine and determined at the ng ml -1 level by gas chromatography. Morpholine, a corrosion inhibitor used in steam boilers, was estimated either directly (if >2.0 μg ml -1 ) or by quantitative preconcentration (0.1 ng-2.0 μg ml -1 ). To obtain symmetrical peaks for these amines, the column packing was coated with KOH. Use of a nitrogen-specific detector improved accuracy of estimation of hydrazine and morpholine, giving a RSD of 1.9-3.6%. Chromatographic analysis of these amines in boiler feed water and steam condensate samples collected from boilers servicing a pertroleum refinery is described. Environmental safety regulations calls for monitoring of hydrazine and the methods developed can easily be adapted for this purpose. (orig.)

  6. Effects of London dispersion correction in density functional theory on the structures of organic molecules in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Steinmetz, Marc

    2013-10-14

    A benchmark set of 25 rotational constants measured in the gas phase for nine molecules (termed ROT25) was compiled from available experimental data. The medium-sized molecules with 18-35 atoms cover common (bio)organic structure motifs including hydrogen bonding and flexible side chains. They were each considered in a single conformation. The experimental B0 values were back-corrected to reference equilibrium rotational constants (Be) by computation of the vibrational corrections ΔBvib. Various density functional theory (DFT) methods and Hartree-Fock with and without dispersion corrections as well as MP2 type methods and semi-empirical quantum chemical approaches are investigated. The ROT25 benchmark tests their ability to describe covalent bond lengths, longer inter-atomic distances, and the relative orientation of functional groups (intramolecular non-covalent interactions). In general, dispersion corrections to DFT and HF increase Be values (shrink molecular size) significantly by about 0.5-1.5% thereby in general improving agreement with the reference data. Regarding DFT methods, the overall accuracy of the optimized structures roughly follows the 'Jacobs ladder' classification scheme, i.e., it decreases in the series double-hybrid > (meta)hybrid > (meta)GGA > LDA. With B2PLYP-D3, SCS-MP2, B3LYP-D3/NL, or PW6B95-D3 methods and extended QZVP (def2-TZVP) AO basis sets, Be values, accurate to about 0.3-0.6 (0.5-1)% on average, can be computed routinely. The accuracy of B2PLYP-D3/QZVP with a mean deviation of only 3 MHz and a standard deviation of 0.24% is exceptional and we recommend this method when highly accurate structures are required or for problematic conformer assignments. The correlation effects for three inter-atomic distance regimes (covalent, medium-range, long) and the performance of minimal basis set (semi-empirical) methods are discussed.

  7. ESR of the triplet molecules CCO and CNN in rare-gas matrices; isotope and matrix effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.; Weltner, W. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    CCO and CNN, with isotopic substitution of 13 C, 18 O, and 15 N, were prepared by the reaction of C atoms with CO or N 2 and trapped in various matrices at 4 degreeK. ESR spectra of both 3 Σ molecules yielded hyperfine splittings, g values, and zero-field splittings. In solid neon, these parameters for C/sub alpha/C/sub beta/O, assuming g/sub parallel/=g/sube/, were g/sub perpendicular/=2.0029(4), D=0.7392(4) cm -1 , vertical-barA/sub perpendicular/(C/sub alpha/) vertical-bar = 57(3) MHz, vertical-barA/sub parallel/(C/sub alpha/) vertical-bar = 17(3) MHz, vertical-barA/sub perpendicular/(C/sub beta/) vertical-bar = 26(3) MHz, vertical-barA/sub parallel/(C/sub beta/) vertical-bar = 32(3) MHz. Similar but less extensive data were obtained for CN/sub alpha/N/sub beta/ where in solid neon, assuming g/sub parallel/ =g/sub perpendicular/=g/sube/, D = 1.1590(5) cm -1 , vertical-barA/sub perpendicular/( 14 N/sub alpha/) vertical-bar = 35(5), vertical-barA/sub perpendicular/( 14 N/sub beta/) vertical-bar = 19(5), and vertical-barA/sub perpendicular/( 13 C) vertical-bar = 50(5) MHz. D values for isotopic molecules 12 C 12 C 16 O, 13 C 12 C 18 O, etc., varied by small but significant amounts (up to about 0.001 cm -1 ) in Ne and in Ar matrices. These variations could be approximately accounted for by assuming torsional oscillation in the solid. This was supported by a temperature variation study. The observed decrease of D/sub gas/ = 0.772 cm -1 for C 2 O in matrices, particularly large in Kr and Xe, is attributed partially to motional averaging and partially to matrix perturbations of molecular electronic properties. Theory was applied to qualitatively account for the changes in spin--spin, D/sub SS/, and spin--orbit, D/sub SO/, contributions to the zfs of the molecule in the solids

  8. Variability of matrix effects in liquid and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis of pesticide residues after QuEChERS sample preparation of different food crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gas and liquid chromatography (GC and LC) coupled to sophisticated mass spectrometry (MS) instruments are among the most powerful analytical tools currently available to monitor pesticide residues in food, among other applications. However, both GC-MS and LC-MS are susceptible to matrix effects whi...

  9. Adaptive nitrogen and integrated weed management in conservation agriculture: impacts on agronomic productivity, greenhouse gas emissions, and herbicide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeogbe, Anthony Imoudu; Das, T K; Bhatia, Arti; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2017-04-01

    Increasing nitrogen (N) immobilization and weed interference in the early phase of implementation of conservation agriculture (CA) affects crop yields. Yet, higher fertilizer and herbicide use to improve productivity influences greenhouse gase emissions and herbicide residues. These tradeoffs precipitated a need for adaptive N and integrated weed management in CA-based maize (Zea mays L.)-wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.) emend Fiori & Paol] cropping system in the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) to optimize N availability and reduce weed proliferation. Adaptive N fertilization was based on soil test value and normalized difference vegetation index measurement (NDVM) by GreenSeeker™ technology, while integrated weed management included brown manuring (Sesbania aculeata L. co-culture, killed at 25 days after sowing), herbicide mixture, and weedy check (control, i.e., without weed management). Results indicated that the 'best-adaptive N rate' (i.e., 50% basal + 25% broadcast at 25 days after sowing + supplementary N guided by NDVM) increased maize and wheat grain yields by 20 and 14% (averaged for 2 years), respectively, compared with whole recommended N applied at sowing. Weed management by brown manuring (during maize) and herbicide mixture (during wheat) resulted in 10 and 21% higher grain yields (averaged for 2 years), respectively, over the weedy check. The NDVM in-season N fertilization and brown manuring affected N 2 O and CO 2 emissions, but resulted in improved carbon storage efficiency, while herbicide residuals in soil were significantly lower in the maize season than in wheat cropping. This study concludes that adaptive N and integrated weed management enhance synergy between agronomic productivity, fertilizer and herbicide efficiency, and greenhouse gas mitigation.

  10. Residue analysis of organophosphorus and organochlorine pesticides in fatty matrices by gas chromatography coupled with electron-capture detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Woo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Song, Sung-Ok; Shim, Jae-Han

    2006-01-01

    A multiresidue method for the simultaneous determination of 22 organochlorine (OCs) and organophosphorus (Ops) pesticides (including isomers and metabolites), representing a wide range of physicochemical properties, was developed in fatty matrices extracted from meat. Pesticides were extracted from samples with acetonitrile/n-hexane (v:v, 1:1). The analytical screening was performed by gas chromatography coupled with electron-capture detection (ECD). The identification of compounds was based on their retention time and on comparison of the primary and secondary ions. The optimized method was validated by determining accuracy (recovery percentages), precision (repeatability and reproducibility), and sensitivity (detection and quantitation limits) from analyses of samples fortified at 38 to 300 ng/g levels. Correlation coefficients for the 22 extracted pesticide standard curves (linear regression analysis, n = 3) ranged from 0.998 to 1.000. Recovery studies from 2 g samples fortified at 3 levels demonstrated that the GC-ECD method provides 64.4-96.0% recovery for all pesticides except 2,4'-DDE (44.6-50.4%), 4,4'-DDE (51.1-57.5%) and 2,4'-DDT (50.0-51.2%). Both repeatability and reproducibility relative standard deviation values were < 20% for all residues. Detection limits ranged from 0.31 to 1.27 ng/g and quantification limits were between 1.04 and 4.25 ng/g. The proposed analytical method may be used as a simple procedure in routine determinations of OCs and Ops in meat. It can also be applied to the determination of pesticide multi-residues in other animal products such as butter and milk.

  11. Determination of pesticide residues in animal origin baby foods by gas chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Graziella; Pelosi, Patrizia; Attard Barbini, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    A simple, fast and multiresidue method for the determination of pesticide residues in baby foods of animal origin has been developed in order to check the compliance with the Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) set at a general value of 0.01 mg/kg by Commission Directive 2006/125/EC for infant foods. The main classes of organochlorine, organophosphorus and pyrethroid compounds have been considered, which are mainly fat soluble pesticides. The analytical procedure consists in the extraction of baby food samples by acetonitrile (ACN) followed by a clean up using C18 solid-phase extraction column eluted with ACN. The compounds were determined by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry equipped with a Programmed Temperature Vaporizer (PTV) injection and a backflush system. In order to compensate for matrix effects PTV and matrix matched standard calibrations have been used. The method has been fully validated for 57 pesticides according to the Document SANCO/12571/2013. Accuracy and precision (repeatability) have been studied by recoveries at two spiking levels, the Limit of Quantitation (LOQ) (0.003-0.008 mg/kg) and 10 time greater (0.03-0.08 mg/kg), and the results were in the acceptable range of 70-120% with Relative Standards Deviations (RSD) ≤20%. Selectivity, linearity, LOQ and uncertainty of measurement were also determined for all the compounds. The method has been also applied for the analysis of 18 baby food animal origin samples, bought form the local market in Rome (Italy), and no pesticide in the scope of the method has been found above the MRL or the LOQ.

  12. New set-up for high-quality soft-X-ray absorption spectroscopy of large organic molecules in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holch, Florian; Huebner, Dominique [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, Am and Roentgen Reasearch Center for Complex Materials (RCCM) Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Fink, Rainer [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, ICMM and CENEM, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Schoell, Achim, E-mail: achim.schoell@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, Am and Roentgen Reasearch Center for Complex Materials (RCCM) Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Umbach, Eberhard [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} We present a new set-up for x-ray absorption (NEXAFS) on large molecules in the gas-phase. {yields} The cell has a confined volume and can be heated. {yields} The spectra can be acquired fast, are of very high quality with respect tosignal-to-noise ratio and energy resolution. {yields} This allowsthe analysis of spectroscopic details (e.g. solid state effects by comparing gas- and condensed phase data). - Abstract: We present a new experimental set-up for the investigation of large (>128 amu) organic molecules in the gas-phase by means of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in the soft X-ray range. Our approach uses a gas cell, which is sealed off against the surrounding vacuum and which can be heated above the sublimation temperature of the respective molecular compound. Using a confined volume rather than a molecular beam yields short acquisition times and intense signals due to the high molecular density, which can be tuned by the container temperature. In turn, the resulting spectra are of very high quality with respect to signal-to-noise ratio and energy resolution, which are the essential aspects for the analysis of fine spectroscopic details. Using the examples of ANQ, NTCDA, and PTCDA, specific challenges of gas phase measurements on large organic molecules with high sublimation temperatures are addressed in detail with respect to the presented set-up and possible ways to tackle them are outlined.

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy of Gas-Phase M+(CO2)n (M = Co, Rh, Ir) Ion-Molecule Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskra, Andreas; Gentleman, Alexander S; Kartouzian, Aras; Kent, Michael J; Sharp, Alastair P; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2017-01-12

    The structures of gas-phase M + (CO 2 ) n (M = Co, Rh, Ir; n = 2-15) ion-molecule complexes have been investigated using a combination of infrared resonance-enhanced photodissociation (IR-REPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory. The results provide insight into fundamental metal ion-CO 2 interactions, highlighting the trends with increasing ligand number and with different group 9 ions. Spectra have been recorded in the region of the CO 2 asymmetric stretch around 2350 cm -1 using the inert messenger technique and their interpretation has been aided by comparison with simulated infrared spectra of calculated low-energy isomeric structures. All vibrational bands in the smaller complexes are blue-shifted relative to the asymmetric stretch in free CO 2 , consistent with direct binding to the metal center dominated by charge-quadrupole interactions. For all three metal ions, a core [M + (CO 2 ) 2 ] structure is identified to which subsequent ligands are less strongly bound. No evidence is observed in this size regime for complete activation or insertion reactions.

  14. [Determination of propargite, tebuconazole and bromopropylate pesticide residues in Taiwan green jujubes by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Liu, Chunhua; Wu, Nancun; Wu, Xiaofang; Li, Shuhuai

    2014-08-01

    An analytical method was established for the determination of propargite, tebuconazole and bromopropylate in Taiwan green jujubes (Zizyphus mauritiana Lam) by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The sample was extracted with acetonitrile from the Taiwan green jujubes after treated with a homogenizer. The organic phase was then separated from water phase by adding NaCl. The extract was further purified on a carbon/ NH2 cartridge with elution solvents of acetonitrile/toluene (3:1, v/v). Finally, the target analytes were separated by a capillary gas chromatographic column SLB-5MS (30 m x 0. 25 mm x 0. 25 μm). A tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in either full scan mode or in MS/MS mode for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the constituents, respectively. The results showed that the average recoveries of the three pesticides ranged from 75. 8% to 103. 6% with the RSDs of 1. 7%-9. 3% at the spiking levels from 0.01 mg/kg to 0. 50 mg/kg (n= 5). The calibration curves showed good linearity in the range of 0.01-0.50 mg/kg, with the determination coefficients over 0.99 (R2>0.99). The limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.01 mg/kg for propargite, tebuconazole and bromopropylate in Taiwan green jujubes. The method is available for the determination of propargite, tebuconazole and bromopropylate pesticide residues in Taiwan green jujubes.

  15. Environmental Stress Testing of the Single Sample Cylinder: A Proven Consensus Standard for Internal Gas Analysis (IGA) or Residual Gas Analysis (RGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuessler, Philipp WH

    2010-01-01

    In August 2008, Schuessler Consulting was contracted by NASA GSFC in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) program to perform two separate studies on moisture laden air in a stainless steel cylinder that had been designed to become a consensus standard for Test Method 1018. This Test Method was originally released for hybrids under Mil. Std. 883 but was quickly utilized on other microelectronic devices under the auspice of Mil. Std. 750. The cylinder had subsequently been fabricated for the 750 community. It was back-filled with moist air and subsequently analyzed over a period of time under a previous NASA contract. It had been shown that moisture in the 4000 - 5000 ppm range could be analyzed rather precisely with a mass spectrometer, commonly referred to as a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). The scope of this study was to ascertain if the composition and precision varied as a function of thermal shock at sub-zero temperatures and whether there was consensus when the standard was submitted to other RGA units. It was demonstrated and published that the consensus standard would yield precise RGA data for moisture within +/- 1% when optimized for a given RGA unit. It has been subsequently shown in this study at Oneida Research Services, that sub-zero storage did not affect that precision when a well-defined protocol for the analysis was followed. The consensus standard was taken to a second facility for analysis where it was found that moisture adsorption on the transfer lines caused precision to drop to +/- 12%. The Single Sample Cylinder (SSC) is a one liter stainless steel cylinder with associated sampling valves and has considerable weight and volume. But this considerable size allows for approximately 300 gas samples of the same composition to be delivered to any RGA unit. Lastly, a smaller cylinder, approximately 75 cc, of a second consensus standard was fabricated and tested with a different mix of fixed gases where moisture was kept in the

  16. Evaluation of Pentachlorophenol Residues in Some Hygienic Papers Prepared from Virgin and Secondary Pulp by Electron Capture Gas Chromatographic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Akbari-adergani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, residual amount of pentachlorophenol (PCP as the most important paper preservative, which is extremely hazardous pollutant, was determined in some tissue papers and napkins. Twenty-five samples of two producing hygienic paper factories prepared from virgin and secondary pulp were analyzed for the presence of trace amount of PCP. The analytical procedure involved direct extraction of PCP from hygienic paper and its determination by gas chromatography with electron capture detection. The statistical results for the analysis of all samples revealed that there were significant differences between mean of PCP in hygienic papers prepared from virgin and secondary pulp (P<0.05. This method gave recoveries of 86-98% for hygienic paper made from virgin pulp and 79-92% for hygienic paper made from secondary pulp. The limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantification (LOQ for PCP were 6.3 and 21.0 mg/kg, respectively. The analytical method has the requisite sensitivity, accuracy, precision and specificity to assay PCP in hygienic papers. This study demonstrates a concern with exposition to PCP considering that hygienic paper is largely consumed in the society.

  17. Residual gas analysis of a cryostat vacuum chamber during the cool down of SST - 1 superconducting magnet field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semwal, P.; Joshi, K.S.; Thankey, P.L.; Pathan, F.S.; Raval, D.C.; Patel, R.J.; Pathak, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important feature of Steady state Superconducting Tokamak -1 (SST-l) is the Nb-Ti superconducting magnet field coils. The coils will be kept in a high vacuum chamber (Cryostat) and liquid Helium will be flown through it to cool it down to its critical temperature of 4.5K. The coil along with its hydraulics has four types of joints (1) Stainless Steel (S.S.) to Copper (Cu) weld joints (2) S. S. to S. S. weld joints (3) Cu to Cu brazed joints and (4) G-10 to S. S. joints with Sti-cast as the binding material. The joints were leak tested with a Helium mass spectrometer leak detector in vacuum as well as in sniffer mode. However during the cool-down of the coil, these joints may develop leaks. This would deteriorate the vacuum inside the cryostat and coil cool-down would subsequently become more difficult. To study the effect of cooling on the vacuum condition of the Cryostat, a dummy Cryostat chamber was fabricated and a toroidal Field (TF) magnet was kept inside this chamber and cooled down to 4.5 K.A residual gas analyzer (RGA) was connected to the Cryostat chamber to study the behaviour of major gases inside this chamber with temperature. An analysis of the RGA data acquired during the coo-down has been presented in this chamber. (author)

  18. Determination of alkylphenolic residues in fresh fruits and vegetables by extractive steam distillation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Kai; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2005-09-23

    This study describes a simple and sensitive method for determining the alkylphenolic compounds, 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), 4-nonylphenol isomers (4-NPs), and their monoethoxylates (4-t-OP1EO and 4-NP1EOs), in fresh fruits and vegetables. The method involves extracting a sample by a modified Nielson-Kryger steam distillation extraction using n-hexane for 1 h. The alkylphenolic compounds were identified and quantitated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Various pH values and amounts of NaCl added to the sample solution were evaluated as extraction conditions. The quantitation limit of this method was less than 0.2 ng/g in 10 g (fresh weight) of sample. Recovery of alkylphenolic compounds in spiked samples exceeded 64% while R.S.D. ranged from 1.0 to 9.8%. Alkylphenolic residues were detected in fresh fruits and vegetables at concentrations of 4-NPs and 4-t-OP from n.d. to 16 ng/g and from n.d. to 4.8 ng/g (fresh weight), respectively. NP1EO and OP1EO were always below the quantitation limit.

  19. Determination of alkylphenol residues in baby-food purees by steam distillation extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chia-Tien; Cheng, Chin-Yuan; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes a simple and sensitive method for determining alkylphenols namely 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP) and the isomers of 4-nonylphenol (4-NPs) present in various types of baby-food purees. The method involves extracting a sample with n-hexane for 1h using a modified Nielson-Kryger steam distillation extraction system and then identifying and quantitating the alkylphenols using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operated in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The extraction conditions were evaluated at various values of pH of the sample solution. The limits of quantitation for this method were 0.2 ng/g from 1.0 g (wet weight) samples of 4-t-OP and the 4-NPs. The intra- and interbatch precisions and accuracies were also determined. The precision, in terms of the relative standard deviation (RSD), were less than 8%. Most of the recoveries of the alkylphenols from various spiked samples exceeded 60%, while the values of RSD ranged from 1% to 10%. Alkylphenol residues were detected in baby-food purees at concentrations of up to 19 ng/g (wet weight) for 4-t-OP and up to 21 ng/g (wet weight) for the 4-NPs.

  20. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident.

  1. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-06-15

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident.

  2. Luminescence characteristics of Xe2Cl excimer molecules under pumping the dense Xe—CCl4 gas mixtures with a pulsed electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mis'kevich, A. I.; Jinbo, Guo

    2013-05-01

    Temporal and spectral characteristics of the luminescence of dense Xe—CCl4 gas mixtures of different composition, excited by a 5-ns pulsed electron beam, were measured. The energy of the electrons amounted to 150 keV and the electron beam current pulse amplitude was 5 A. The gas mixtures were used containing Xe (38-700 Torr) and CCl4 (0.03-0.3 Torr). The studies were performed within the wavelength range 200-1200 nm using a MAYA-2000Pro diffraction grating spectrometer and a RIGOL DS 5022 ME fast digital oscilloscope. The luminescence lifetimes of the excimer molecules XeCl* (band with λmax = 308 nm) and Xe2Cl* (band with λmax = 486 nm) were measured, as well as the constants of quenching by the components of the gas mixture for Xe2Cl* molecules. A model of plasma-chemical processes for dense Xe—CCl4 gas mixtures with a very low content of the CCl4 donor is proposed. It is shown that in such 'poor' mixtures Xe2Cl* molecules are mainly produced as a result of recombination of the Xe2+ and Cl- ions.

  3. Luminescence characteristics of Xe{sub 2}Cl excimer molecules under pumping the dense Xe-CCl{sub 4} gas mixtures with a pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mis' kevich, A I; Jinbo, Guo [National Research Nuclear University ' Moscow Engineering Physics Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-31

    Temporal and spectral characteristics of the luminescence of dense Xe-CCl{sub 4} gas mixtures of different composition, excited by a 5-ns pulsed electron beam, were measured. The energy of the electrons amounted to 150 keV and the electron beam current pulse amplitude was 5 A. The gas mixtures were used containing Xe (38-700 Torr) and CCl{sub 4} (0.03-0.3 Torr). The studies were performed within the wavelength range 200-1200 nm using a MAYA-2000Pro diffraction grating spectrometer and a RIGOL DS 5022 ME fast digital oscilloscope. The luminescence lifetimes of the excimer molecules XeCl* (band with {lambda}{sub max} = 308 nm) and Xe{sub 2}Cl* (band with {lambda}{sub max} = 486 nm) were measured, as well as the constants of quenching by the components of the gas mixture for Xe{sub 2}Cl* molecules. A model of plasma-chemical processes for dense Xe-CCl{sub 4} gas mixtures with a very low content of the CCl{sub 4} donor is proposed. It is shown that in such 'poor' mixtures Xe{sub 2}Cl* molecules are mainly produced as a result of recombination of the Xe{sub 2}{sup +} and Cl{sup -} ions. (active media)

  4. Different Analytical Procedures for the Study of Organic Residues in Archeological Ceramic Samples with the Use of Gas Chromatography-mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Rosiak, Angelina; Kwapińska, Marzena; Kwapiński, Witold

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the composition of organic residues present in pottery is an important source of information for historians and archeologists. Chemical characterization of the materials provides information on diets, habits, technologies, and original use of the vessels. This review presents the problem of analytical studies of archeological materials with a special emphasis on organic residues. Current methods used in the determination of different organic compounds in archeological ceramics are presented. Particular attention is paid to the procedures of analysis of archeological ceramic samples used before gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Advantages and disadvantages of different extraction methods and application of proper quality assurance/quality control procedures are discussed.

  5. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  6. Vacuum stability and residual gas density estimation for the vacuum chamber upgrade of the ATLAS interaction region of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bregliozzi, G; Baglin, V; Jimenez, J M

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has 54 km of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) beam chambers out of which about 90% are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K) and the rest at room temperature. During operation, the residual gas density in the beam pipes is dominated by beam induced effect such ion, electron and photon-stimulated gas desorption. Therefore, the computation of gas density profile is of great importance to confirm the vacuum stability, and to estimate the beam lifetime. Moreover, the gas density profiles are essential to determine the machine induced background in the experimental areas, and to define the pressure profile in the cryogenic sectors where there is no vacuum instrumentation available. In this paper, the vacuum stability is studied for a newly proposed upgrade of the vacuum chamber at the ATLAS interaction point, using the vacuum stability code called VASCO. The residual gas density profile along the ATLAS vacuum chambers and the effects of photon and electron flux hitting the vacuum chamber wal...

  7. Analysis of residual crosslinking agent content in UV cross-linked poly(ethylene oxide hydrogels for dermatological application by gas chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Shet Hui Wong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Acrylates have been widely used in the synthesis of pharmaceutical polymers. The quantitation of residual acrylate monomers is vital as they are strong irritants and allergens, but after polymerization, are relatively inert, causing no irritation and allergies. Poly(ethylene oxide (PEO hydrogels were prepared using pentaerythritol tetra-acrylate (PETRA as UV crosslinking agent. A simple, accurate, and robust quantitation method was developed based on gas chromatographic techniques (GC, which is suitable for routine analysis of residual PETRA monomers in these hydrogels. Unreacted PETRA was initially identified using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS. The quantitation of analyte was performed and validated using gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC–FID. A linear relationship was obtained over the range of 0.0002%–0.0450% (m/m with a correlation coefficient (r2 greater than 0.99. The recovery (>90%, intra-day precision (%RSD <0.67, inter-day precision (%RSD <2.5%, and robustness (%RSD <1.62% of the method were within the acceptable values. The limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantitation (LOQ were 0.0001% (m/m and 0.0002% (m/m, respectively. This assay provides a simple and quick way of screening for residual acrylate monomer in hydrogels.

  8. Development and validation of a multi-residue method for the detection of a wide range of hormonal anabolic compounds in hair using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambaud, Lauriane [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Monteau, Fabrice [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Deceuninck, Yoann [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Bichon, Emmanuelle [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Andre, Francois [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Le Bizec, Bruno [LABERCA, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Nantes, Route de Gachet, BP50707, 44307 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)]. E-mail: lebizec@vet-nantes.fr

    2007-03-14

    The monitoring of anabolic steroid residues in hair is undoubtedly one of the most efficient strategies to demonstrate the long-term administration of these molecules in meat production animals. A multi-residue sample preparation procedure was developed and validated for 28 steroids. A 100 mg hair sample was grinded into powder and extracted at 50 deg. C with methanol. After acidic hydrolysis and extraction with ethyl acetate, phenolsteroids, such as estrogens, resorcyclic acid lactones and stilbens in one hand, are separated from androgens and progestagens in the other hand. Solid phase extractions were performed before applying a specific derivatisation for each compound sub-group. Detection and identification were achieved using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with acquisition in the selected reaction monitoring mode after electron ionisation. The method was validated according to the 2002/657/EC guideline. Decision limits (CC{alpha}) for main steroids were in the 0.1-10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} range.

  9. The P9 pocket of HLA-DQ2 (non-Aspbeta57) has no particular preference for negatively charged anchor residues found in other type 1 diabetes-predisposing non-Aspbeta57 MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarsten, H; Paulsen, G; Johansen, B H

    1998-01-01

    Susceptibility and resistance to type 1 diabetes are associated with MHC class II alleles that carry non-Asp and Asp at residue 57 of their beta chain respectively. The effect of Asp or non-Aspbeta57 may relate to a differential ability of distinct class II molecules to bind specific immuno......-pathogenic peptides. Recent studies in man and mouse have revealed that some type 1 diabetes-predisposing non-Aspbeta57 class II molecules (i.e. DQ8, DR4Dw15 and I-Ag7) preferentially bind peptides with a negatively charged anchor residue at P9. It has been suggested that this is a common feature of type 1 diabetes......-predisposing class II molecules. The molecular explanation for such a phenomenon could be that class II beta chains with Aspbeta57 form a salt bridge between Aspbeta57 and a conserved Arg of the a chain, whereas in non-Aspbeta57 molecules the Arg is unopposed and free to interact with negatively charged P9 peptide...

  10. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of the combustion process of a leather residuals gasification fuel gas: influence of fuel moisture content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonietti, Anderson Jose; Beskow, Arthur Bortolin; Silva, Cristiano Vitorino da [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Missoes (URI), Erechim, RS (Brazil)], E-mails: arthur@uricer.edu.br, mlsperb@unisinos.br; Indrusiak, Maria Luiza Sperb [Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos (UNISINOS), Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: cristiano@uricer.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    This work presents a numerical study of the combustion process of leather residuals gasification gas, aiming the improvement of the process efficiency, considering different concentrations of water on the gas. The heating produced in this combustion process can be used to generation of thermal and/or electrical energy, for use at the leather industrial plant. However, the direct burning of this leather-residual-gas into the chambers is not straightforward. The alternative in development consists in processing this leather residuals by gasification or pyrolysis, separating the volatiles and products of incomplete combustion, for after use as fuel in a boiler. At these processes, different quantities of water can be used, resulting at different levels of moisture content in this fuel gas. This humidity can affect significantly the burning of this fuel, producing unburnt gases, as the carbon monoxide, or toxic gases as NOx, which must have their production minimized on the process, with the purpose of reducing the emission of pollutants to the atmosphere. Other environment-harmful-gases, remaining of the chemical treatment employed at leather manufacture, as cyanide, and hydrocarbons as toluene, must burn too, and the moisture content has influence on it. At this way, to increase understanding of the influence of moisture in the combustion process, it was made a numerical investigation study of reacting flow in the furnace, evaluating the temperature field, the chemical species concentration fields, flow mechanics and heat transfer at the process. The commercial CFD code CFX Ansys Inc. was used. Considering different moisture contents in the fuel used on the combustion process, with this study was possible to achieve the most efficient burning operation parameters, with improvement of combustion efficiency, and reduction of environmental harmful gases emissions. It was verified that the different moisture contents in the fuel gas demand different operation conditions

  11. The role of tetragonal-metal-organic framework-5 loadings with extra ZnO molecule on the gas separation performance of mixed matrix membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjmandi, Mehrzad; Pakizeh, Majid; Pirouzram, Omid

    2015-01-01

    The effect of more ZnO molecule in tetragonal structure of MOF-5 than cubic structure on the gas permeation properties of T-MOF-5/polyetherimide mixed matrix membranes was investigated. T-MOF-5 was first successfully synthesized and carefully characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM and N 2 adsorption technique at 77 K. Novel T-MOF-5/PEI MMMs were prepared using solution casting method and characterized by FTIR and SEM. The SEM pictures of the MMMs showed that T-MOF-5 nanocrystals changed the morphology of PEI and exhibited acceptable contacts between the filler particles and the polymer chains. Gas permeation properties of these membranes with different T-MOF-5 contents were studied for pure H 2 , CO 2 , CH 4 and N 2 gases. Permeation measurement showed that the all gases' permeability, diffusivity and solubility were increased with T-MOF-5 loading. H 2 permeability and the ideal selectivity of H 2 /CO 2 and H 2 /CH 4 in MMM with 25 wt% loading of T-MOF-5 nanocrystals were increased. This behavior was attributed to more ZnO molecule in T-MOF-5 structure. The experimental gas permeations through T-MOF-5/PEI nanocomposite with different filler loadings were fitted on Higuchi model. Good agreement between the experimental data and the predicted gas permeability was obtained

  12. The role of tetragonal-metal-organic framework-5 loadings with extra ZnO molecule on the gas separation performance of mixed matrix membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjmandi, Mehrzad; Pakizeh, Majid [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pirouzram, Omid [Kurdistan University, Kurdistan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The effect of more ZnO molecule in tetragonal structure of MOF-5 than cubic structure on the gas permeation properties of T-MOF-5/polyetherimide mixed matrix membranes was investigated. T-MOF-5 was first successfully synthesized and carefully characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM and N{sub 2} adsorption technique at 77 K. Novel T-MOF-5/PEI MMMs were prepared using solution casting method and characterized by FTIR and SEM. The SEM pictures of the MMMs showed that T-MOF-5 nanocrystals changed the morphology of PEI and exhibited acceptable contacts between the filler particles and the polymer chains. Gas permeation properties of these membranes with different T-MOF-5 contents were studied for pure H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gases. Permeation measurement showed that the all gases' permeability, diffusivity and solubility were increased with T-MOF-5 loading. H{sub 2} permeability and the ideal selectivity of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} in MMM with 25 wt% loading of T-MOF-5 nanocrystals were increased. This behavior was attributed to more ZnO molecule in T-MOF-5 structure. The experimental gas permeations through T-MOF-5/PEI nanocomposite with different filler loadings were fitted on Higuchi model. Good agreement between the experimental data and the predicted gas permeability was obtained.

  13. Characterisation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in flue gas and residues of a full scale fluidized bed combustor combusting non-hazardous industrial waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caneghem, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2014-11-01

    This paper studies the fate of PAHs in full scale incinerators by analysing the concentration of the 16 EPA-PAHs in both the input waste and all the outputs of a full scale Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC). Of the analysed waste inputs i.e. Waste Water Treatment (WWT) sludge, Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR), RDF and ASR were the main PAH sources, with phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene being the most important PAHs. In the flue gas sampled at the stack, naphthalene was the only predominant PAH, indicating that the PAHs in FBC's combustion gas were newly formed and did not remain from the input waste. Of the other outputs, the boiler and fly ash contained no detectable levels of PAHs, whereas the flue gas cleaning residue contained only low concentrations of naphthalene, probably adsorbed from the flue gas. The PAH fingerprint of the bottom ash corresponded rather well to the PAH fingerprint of the RDF and ASR, indicating that the PAHs in this output, in contrast to the other outputs, were mainly remainders from the PAHs in the waste inputs. A PAH mass balance showed that the total PAH input/output ratio of the FBC ranged from about 100 to about 2600 depending on the waste input composition and the obtained combustion conditions. In all cases, the FBC was clearly a net PAH sink. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biochemical effects of manufactured gas plant residue following ingestion by B6C3F1 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyand, E.H.; Wu, Yun; Patel, S. (State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)); Goldstein, L. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palto Alto, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The toxic potential of manufactured gas plant residue (MGP) given in the diet to male and female B6C3F1 mice was evaluated. In addition, the bioavailability of chemical components of MGP were also investigated by monitoring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites in urine and DNA adduct formation in forestomach and lung tissue. Basal gel diets containing 0.05, 0.25, 0.50% benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) were fed to animals for 94 and 185 d. Mice readily consumed adulterated diets without any evidence of acute toxicity. The total amount of MGP and BaP consumed by mice ranged from 118 to 2604 mg and from 12 to 29 mg, respectively. Male mice fed a control or BaP diet and female mice fed a 0.05% MGP diet had the highest body weight gains. Male and female mice fed a 0.50% MGP diet had the lowest body weight gains. the bioavailability of chemical components of MGP was evaluated by monitoring the urinary excretion of PAH metabolites by male mice fed a 0.25% MGP diet. 1-Hydroxypyrene was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis to be the major fluorescent metabolite excreted by mice throughout the 185 d of diet administration. At necropsy, no chemical-related gross lesions were detected. In addition, no treatment-related microscopic lesions were evident in tissues obtained from animals fed a 0.50% MGP- or BaP-adulterated diet. The [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay was used to evaluate MGP- and BaP-induced DNA adduct formation in lung and forestomach tissue. The level of DNA adducts formed from the chemical components of MGP paralleled the amount of material ingested by animals. Lung DNA adduct levels were considerably higher than forestomach levels when mice ingested a 0.25% or 0.50% MGP diet. These studies demonstrate that the continuous ingestion of MGP or BaP for 185 d does not result in acute toxicity or chemical-related lesions at doses up to 0.50% MGP or 0.005% BaP. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Single molecule TPM analysis of the catalytic pentad mutants of Cre and Flp site-specific recombinases: contributions of the pentad residues to the pre-chemical steps of recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Cheng, Yong-Song; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-03-31

    Cre and Flp site-specific recombinase variants harboring point mutations at their conserved catalytic pentad positions were characterized using single molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) analysis. The findings reveal contributions of these amino acids to the pre-chemical steps of recombination. They suggest functional differences between positionally conserved residues in how they influence recombinase-target site association and formation of 'non-productive', 'pre-synaptic' and 'synaptic' complexes. The most striking difference between the two systems is noted for the single conserved lysine. The pentad residues in Cre enhance commitment to recombination by kinetically favoring the formation of pre-synaptic complexes. These residues in Flp serve a similar function by promoting Flp binding to target sites, reducing non-productive binding and/or enhancing the rate of assembly of synaptic complexes. Kinetic comparisons between Cre and Flp, and between their derivatives lacking the tyrosine nucleophile, are consistent with a stronger commitment to recombination in the Flp system. The effect of target site orientation (head-to-head or head-to-tail) on the TPM behavior of synapsed DNA molecules supports the selection of anti-parallel target site alignment prior to the chemical steps. The integrity of the synapse, whose establishment/stability is fostered by strand cleavage in the case of Flp but not Cre, appears to be compromised by the pentad mutations. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Single molecule TPM analysis of the catalytic pentad mutants of Cre and Flp site-specific recombinases: contributions of the pentad residues to the pre-chemical steps of recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Cheng, Yong-Song; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-01-01

    Cre and Flp site-specific recombinase variants harboring point mutations at their conserved catalytic pentad positions were characterized using single molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) analysis. The findings reveal contributions of these amino acids to the pre-chemical steps of recombination. They suggest functional differences between positionally conserved residues in how they influence recombinase-target site association and formation of ‘non-productive’, ‘pre-synaptic’ and ‘synaptic’ complexes. The most striking difference between the two systems is noted for the single conserved lysine. The pentad residues in Cre enhance commitment to recombination by kinetically favoring the formation of pre-synaptic complexes. These residues in Flp serve a similar function by promoting Flp binding to target sites, reducing non-productive binding and/or enhancing the rate of assembly of synaptic complexes. Kinetic comparisons between Cre and Flp, and between their derivatives lacking the tyrosine nucleophile, are consistent with a stronger commitment to recombination in the Flp system. The effect of target site orientation (head-to-head or head-to-tail) on the TPM behavior of synapsed DNA molecules supports the selection of anti-parallel target site alignment prior to the chemical steps. The integrity of the synapse, whose establishment/stability is fostered by strand cleavage in the case of Flp but not Cre, appears to be compromised by the pentad mutations. PMID:25765648

  17. Effect of hydration on the organo-noble gas molecule HKrCCH: role of krypton in the stabilization of hydrated HKrCCH complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Biswajit; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2015-11-11

    The effect of hydration on the fluorine free organo-noble gas compound HKrCCH and the role of krypton in the stabilization of the hydrated HKrCCH complexes have been investigated using the quantum chemical calculations on the HKrCCH-(H2O)n=1-6 clusters. Structure and energetics calculations show that water stabilizes HKrCCH through the π hydrogen bond in which the OH group of water interacts with the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C group of HKrCCH. A maximum of four water molecules can directly interact with the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C of HKrCCH and after that only inter-hydrogen bonding takes place between the water molecules indicating that the primary hydration shell contains four water molecules. Atom in molecule analysis depicts that π hydrogen bonded complexes of the hydrated HKrCCH are cyclic structures in which the OKr interaction cooperates in the formation of strong O-HC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C interaction. Structure, energetics and charge analysis clearly established that krypton plays an important role in the stabilization as well as the formation of the primary hydration shell of hydrated HKrCCH complexes.

  18. Fuel gas production from animal and agricultural residues and biomass. Quarterly coordination meeting, December 11-12, 1978, Denver, Colorado. Second Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, D L; Ashare, E; Wentworth, R L

    1979-01-05

    The tenth quarterly coordination meeting of the methane production group of the Fuels from Biomass Systems Branch, US Department of Energy was held at Denver, Colorado, December 11-12, 1978. Progress reports were presented by the contractors and a site visit was made to the Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado. A meeting agenda, a list of attendees, and progress are presented. Report titles are: pipeline fuel gas from an environmental feedlot; operation of a 50,000 gallon anaerobic digester at the Monroe State Dairy Farm near Monroe, Washington; anaerobic fermentation of livestock and crop residues; anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residues - potential for improvement and implementation; heat treatment of organics for increasing anaerobic biodegradability; and biological conversion of biomass to methane. (DC)

  19. Laboratory Studies on the Formation of Carbon-Bearing Molecules in Extraterrestrial Environments: From the Gas Phase to the Solid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, C. S.; Guo, Y.; Gu, X.; Zhang, F.; Bennett, C. J.; Kaiser, R. I.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed knowledge of the formation of carbon-bearing molecules in interstellar ices and in the gas phase of the interstellar medium is of paramount interest to understand the astrochemical evolution of extraterrestrial environments (1). This research also holds strong implications to comprehend the chemical processing of Solar System environments such as icy planets and their moons together with the atmospheres of planets and their satellites (2). Since the present composition of each interstellar and Solar System environment reflects the matter from which it was formed and the processes which have changed the chemical nature since the origin (solar wind, planetary magnetospheres, cosmic ray exposure, photolysis, chemical reactions), a detailed investigation of the physicochemical mechanisms altering the pristine environment is of paramount importance to grasp the contemporary composition. Once these underlying processes have been unraveled, we can identify those molecules, which belonged to the nascent setting, distinguish molecular species synthesized in a later stage, and predict the imminent chemical evolution of, for instance, molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments under controlled physicochemical conditions (temperature, pressure, chemical composition, high energy components) present ideal tools for simulating the chemical evolution of interstellar and Solar System environments. Here, laboratory experiments can predict where and how (reaction mechanisms; chemicals necessary) in extraterrestrial environments and in the interstellar medium complex, carbon bearing molecules can be formed on interstellar grains and in the gas phase. This paper overviews the experimental setups utilized in our laboratory to mimic the chemical processing of gas phase and solid state (ices) environments. These are a crossed molecular beams machine (3) and a surface scattering setup (4). We also present typical results of each setup (formation of amino acids, aldehydes, epoxides

  20. Cytosine Radical Cations: A Gas-Phase Study Combining IRMPD Spectroscopy, UVPD Spectroscopy, Ion-Molecule Reactions, and Theoretical Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesslie, M.; Lawler, J. T.; Dang, A.; Korn, J. A.; Bím, Daniel; Steinmetz, V.; Maitre, P.; Tureček, F.; Ryzhov, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 10 (2017), s. 1293-1301 ISSN 1439-4235 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ion- molecule reactions * IRMPD spectroscopy * nucleobases * radical ions * UVPD spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.075, year: 2016

  1. X-ray Diffraction from Isolated and Strongly Aligned Gas-Phase Molecules with a Free-Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küpper, Jochen; Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental results on x-ray diffraction of quantum-state-selected and strongly aligned ensembles of the prototypical asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile using the Linac Coherent Light Source. The experiments demonstrate first steps toward a new approach to diffractive ima...

  2. Gas-phase ion/molecule isotope-exchange reactions: methodology for counting hydrogen atoms in specific organic structural environments by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, D.F.; Sethi, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ion/molecule reactions are described which facilitate exchange of hydrogens for deuteriums in a variety of different chemical environments. Aromatic hydrogens in alkylbenzenes, oxygenated benzenes, m-toluidine, m-phenylenediamine, thiophene, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metallocenes are exchanged under positive ion CI conditions by using either D 2 O, EtOD, or ND 3 as the reagent gas. Aromatic hydrogens, benzylic hydrogens, and hydrogens on carbon adjacent to carbonyl groups suffer exchange under negative ion CI conditions in ND 3 , D 2 O, and EtOD, respectively. A possible mechanism for the exchange process is discussed. 1 figure, 2 tables

  3. Study of ions - molecules reactions in the gas phase with collision reaction cell devices: Applications to the direct resolution of spectroscopic interferences in ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, G.

    2008-12-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry emerged as the most widespread mass spectrometry technique in inorganic analytical chemistry for determining the concentration of a given isotope or an isotope ratio. The problem of spectroscopic interferences, inherent to this technique, finds a solution through the use of reaction cell devices. An in situ interference removal is feasible with the addition of a well selected gas in the cell. The understanding of the chemistry of ions-molecules interactions in the gas phase is however fundamental to optimize the efficiency of such devices. An accurate knowledge of experimental conditions in the reaction zone according to instrumental parameters appears crucial in order to interpret observed reactivities. This preliminary study is then used for the resolution of two nuclear field characteristic interferences. (author)

  4. Effect of the Basic Residue on the Energetics, Dynamics and Mechanisms of Gas- Phase Fragmentation of Protonated Peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Song, Tao; Lam, Corey; Chu, Ivan K.

    2010-11-17

    The effect of the basic residue on the energetics, dynamics and mechanisms of backbone fragmentation of protonated peptides was investigated. Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of singly protonated peptides with the N-terminal arginine residue and their analogs, in which arginine is replaced with less basic lysine and histidine residues was examined using in a specially configured Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). SID experiments demonstrated very different kinetics of formation of several primary product ions of peptides with and without arginine residue. The energetics and dynamics of these pathways were determined from the RRKM modeling of the experimental data. Comparison between the kinetics and energetics of fragmentation of arginine-containing peptides and the corresponding methyl ester derivatives provides important information on the effect of dissociation pathways involving salt bridge (SB) intermediates on the observed fragmentation behavior. It is found that because pathways involving SB intermediates are characterized by low threshold energies, they efficiently compete with classical oxazolone pathways of arginine-containing peptides on a long timescale of the FT-ICR instrument. In contrast, fragmentation of histidine- and lysine-containing peptides is largely determined by classical oxazolone pathways. Because SB pathways are characterized by negative activation entropies, fragmentation of arginine-containing peptides is kinetically hindered and observed at higher collision energies as compared to their lysine- and histidine-containing analogs.

  5. Screening of the presence organophosphates and organochlorines pesticide residues in vegetables and fruits using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Dillani; Aryana, Nurhani; Aristiawan, Yosi; Styarini, Dyah

    2017-01-01

    Pesticides is commonly used to improve the quality of agricultural product, especially in vegetables and fruits. Due to pesticide residues in the product become a concern to consumer health, monitoring and analysis of pesticide residues in agriculture product need to be established. The certified reference material (CRM) is often benefited to obtain accurate results in analysis. It is required as the quality control to improve quality assurance of the testing results. Unfortunately in Indonesia, the development of matrix CRM for the analysis of pesticide residues in vegetables and fruits is still limited. This study is aimed to determine the type of commodity and target analyte to be employed in the development of CRM for pesticides in vegetables and fruits. As the preliminary study, the screening of 11 commodities of fresh vegetables and fruits has been conducted to review the information about the presence of organophosphates (OPs) and organochlorines (OCs) in the sample. In this analysis, QuEChERS technique was used in the extraction process and the qualitative analysis was evaluated by using GC-MS. The results showed that strawberry and celery contain residues of pesticide chlorpyrifos. Further analysis of the commodity celery from seven different places has been conducted, resulting that from 3 of all 7 samples (43%) were positive containing chlorpyrifos. Therefore, the development of CRM for chlorpyrifos in celery will be our next research project.

  6. DRY WELLS IN QUADRANT 25, 26 & 30 – GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS INTO RESIDUAL OIL & GAS IN DRY WELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Maqbool, Waqas

    2014-01-01

    This thesis represents the findings concerning core samples from 15 examined exploration wells (with a total of 91 samples) on the eastern flank of the Viking Graben, North Sea, that were classified as dry by NPD (meaning no discovery of oil and gas). These samples were studied using geochemical methodology and analytical methods to evaluate if there might exist the remains of migrated oil or gas. Sample selection at NPD was based on apparent coloration or staining of the sandstone cores. The...

  7. Investigation of the adsorption of ozone molecules on TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites by DFT computations: Applications to gas sensor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Amirali; Sardroodi, Jaber Jahanbin

    2018-04-01

    The adsorption of O3 molecule on the undoped and N-doped TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites was studied using first principles density functional theory calculations. O3 interaction with TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites is considered so as to investigate WSe2 effects on the adsorption process. WSe2 favors the adsorption of O3 on TiO2 particles. In other words, WSe2 is conducive to the interaction of O3 molecule with fivefold coordinated titanium sites of TiO2. The effects of vdW interactions were taken into account in order to obtain equilibrium geometries of O3 molecules at TiO2/WSe2 interfaces. For all adsorption configurations, the binding site was positioned on the fivefold coordinated titanium atoms. The results show that the interactions between O3 and TiO2 in TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites are stronger than those between O3 and bare TiO2, suggesting that WSe2 helps to strengthen the interaction of ozone molecule with TiO2 particles. The results also indicate that the adsorption of the O3 molecule on the N-doped TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposite is more energetically favorable than the adsorption of O3 on the pristine one, representing that the N-doped nanocomposites are more sensitive than the undoped ones. Our DFT results clearly show that the N-doped TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposite would be a promising O3 gas sensor. The electronic structure of the adsorption system was also investigated, including analysis of the total and projected density of states, and charge density differences of the TiO2/WSe2 with adsorbed O3 molecules. The charge density difference calculations indicate that the charges were accumulated over the adsorbed O3 molecule. Besides, the N-doped nanocomposites have better sensing response than the pristine ones. This work was devoted to provide the theory basis for the design and development of novel and advanced O3 sensors based on modified TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites.

  8. First-principles investigation on defect-induced silicene nanoribbons - A superior media for sensing NH3, NO2 and NO gas molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Gurleen Kaur; Randhawa, Deep Kamal Kaur

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the electronic and transport properties of armchair silicene nanoribbons (ASiNRs) are analyzed for their application as highly selective and sensitive gas molecule sensors. The study is focused on sensing three nitrogen based gases; ammonia (NH3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitric oxide (NO), which depending upon their adsorption energy and charge transfer, form bonds of varying strength with ASiNRs. The negligible band gap of ASiNRs is tuned by adding a defect in ASiNRs. Adsorption of NH3 leads to the opening of band gap whereas on adsorption of NO2 and NO, ASiNRs exhibit metallic nature. Distinctly divergent electronic and transport properties of ASiNRs are observed and on adsorption of NH3, NO2 and NO, renders them suitable for sensing them. All gas molecules show stronger adsorption on defective ASiNRs (D-ASiNRs) as compared to pristine ASiNRs (P-ASiNRs). The work reveals that introduction of defect can drastically improve the sensitivity of ASiNRs.

  9. Adsorption of gas molecules on graphene-like InN monolayer: A first-principle study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiang; Yang, Qun [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Meng, Ruishen [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Tan, Chunjian [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Liang, Qiuhua [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Jiang, Junke [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Ye, Huaiyu [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China); Chen, Xianping, E-mail: xianpingchen@cqu.edu.cn [Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, 541004 Guilin (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology & Systems, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University and College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, 400044 Chongqing (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • A comprehensive adsorption mechanism of InN monolayer is theoretical studied to distinguish the physic/chemi-sorption. • Different adsorption sites for different gases are systematically discussed. • The influence (enhanced or weakened) of external electric field to InN-gas system is well investigated. • The influences of gas adsorption to the optical properties (work function and light adsorption ability) of InN monolayer are also researched. - Abstract: Using first-principles calculation within density functional theory (DFT), we study the gas (CO, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, NO{sub 2}, NO, SO{sub 2}) adsorption properties on the surface of single-layer indium nitride (InN). Four different adsorption sites (Bridge, In, N, Hollow) are chosen to explore the most sensitive adsorption site. On the basis of the adsorption energy, band gap and charge transfer, we find that the most energetic favourable site is changeable between In site and N site for different gases. Moreover, our results reveal that InN is sensitive to NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and NO{sub 2}, by a physisorption or a chemisorption nature. We also perform a perpendicular electric field to the system and find that the applied electric field has a significant effect for the adsorption process. Besides, we also observed the desorption effects on NH{sub 3} adsorbed at the hollow site of InN when the electric field applied. In addition, the optical properties of InN monolayer affected by different gases are also discussed. Most of the gas adsorptions will cause the inhibition of light adsorption while the others can reduce the work function or enhance the adsorption ability in visible region. Our theoretical results indicate that monolayer InN is a promising candidate for gas sensing applications.

  10. Charge-Dipole Acceleration of Polar Gas Molecules towards Charged Nanoparticles: Involvement in Powerful Charge-Induced Catalysis of Heterophase Chemical Reactions and Ball Lightning Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Meshcheryakov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In humid air, the substantial charge-dipole attraction and electrostatic acceleration of surrounding water vapour molecules towards charged combustible nanoparticles cause intense electrostatic hydration and preferential oxidation of these nanoparticles by electrostatically accelerated polar water vapour molecules rather than nonaccelerated nonpolar oxygen gas molecules. Intense electrostatic hydration of charged combustible nanoparticles converts the nanoparticle's oxide-based shells into the hydroxide-based electrolyte shells, transforming these nanoparticles into reductant/air core-shell nanobatteries, periodically short-circuited by intraparticle field and thermionic emission. Partially synchronized electron emission breakdowns within trillions of nanoparticles-nanobatteries turn a cloud of charged nanoparticles-nanobatteries into a powerful radiofrequency aerosol generator. Electrostatic oxidative hydration and charge-catalyzed oxidation of charged combustible nanoparticles also contribute to a self-oscillating thermocycling process of evolution and periodic autoignition of inflammable gases near to the nanoparticle's surface. The described effects might be of interest for the improvement of certain nanotechnological heterophase processes and to better understand ball lightning phenomenon.

  11. Detection and characterization of the tin dihydride (SnH2 and SnD2) molecule in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tony C.; Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2018-01-01

    The SnH2 and SnD2 molecules have been detected for the first time in the gas phase by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and emission spectroscopic techniques through the à 1B1-X ˜ 1A1 electronic transition. These reactive species were prepared in a pulsed electric discharge jet using (CH3)4Sn or SnH4/SnD4 precursors diluted in high pressure argon. Transitions to the electronic excited state of the jet-cooled molecules were probed with LIF, and the ground state energy levels were measured from single rovibronic level emission spectra. The LIF spectrum of SnD2 afforded sufficient rotational structure to determine the ground and excited state geometries: r0″ = 1.768 Å, θ0″ = 91.0°, r0' = 1.729 Å, θ0' = 122.9°. All of the observed LIF bands show evidence of a rotational-level-dependent predissociation process which rapidly decreases the fluorescence yield and lifetime with increasing rotational angular momentum in each excited vibronic level. This behavior is analogous to that observed in SiH2 and GeH2 and is suggested to lead to the formation of ground state tin atoms and hydrogen molecules.

  12. Development and validation of a stability-indicating gas chromatographic method for quality control of residual solvents in blonanserin: a novel atypical antipsychotic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ming; Liu, Jin; Lu, Dan; Yang, Yong-Jian

    2012-09-01

    Blonanserin is a novel atypical antipsychotic agent for the treatment of schizophrenia. Ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol and toluene are utilized in the synthesis route of this bulk drug. A new validated gas chromatographic (GC) method for the simultaneous determination of residual solvents in blonanserin is described in this paper. Blonanserin was dissolved in N, N-dimethylformamide to make a sample solution that was directly injected into a DB-624 column. A postrun oven temperature at 240°C for approximately 2 h after the analysis cycle was performed to wash out blonanserin residue in the GC column. Quantitation was performed by external standard analyses and the validation was carried out according to International Conference on Harmonization validation guidelines Q2A and Q2B. The method was shown to be specific (no interference in the blank solution), linear (correlation coefficients ≥0.99998, n = 10), accurate (average recoveries between 94.1 and 101.7%), precise (intra-day and inter-day precision ≤2.6%), sensitive (limit of detection ≤0.2 ng, and limit of quantitation ≤0.7 ng), robust (small variations of carrier gas flow, initial oven temperature, temperature ramping rate, injector and detector temperatures did not significantly affect the system suitability test parameters and peak areas) and stable (reference standard and sample solutions were stable over 48 h). This extensively validated method is ready to be used for the quality control of blonanserin.

  13. CO2 Biofixation by the Cyanobacterium Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and the Green Alga Chlorella fusca LEB 111 Grown Using Gas Effluents and Solid Residues of Thermoelectric Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Vaz, Bruna; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased from 280 to 400 ppm in the last 10 years, and the coal-fired power plants are responsible for approximately 22 % of these emissions. The burning of fossil fuel also produces a great amount of solid waste that causes serious industrial and environmental problems. The biological processes become interesting alternative in combating pollution and developing new products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the CO2 biofixation potential of microalgae that were grown using gaseous effluents and solid residues of thermoelectric origin. The microalgae Chlorella fusca LEB 111 presented higher rate of CO2 biofixation (42.8 %) (p Spirulina sp. LEB 18. The values for the CO2 biofixation rates and the kinetic parameters of Spirulina and Chlorella cells grown using combustion gas did not differ significantly from those of cells grown using CO2 and a carbon source in the culture media. These microalgae could be grown using ash derived from coal combustion, using the minerals present in this residue as the source of the essential metals required for their growth and the CO2 derived from the combustion gas as their carbon source.

  14. Validation of QuEChERS based method for determination of fenitrothion residues in tomatoes by gas chromatography-flame photometric detector: Decline pattern and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhat, Farag; Boulangé, Julien; Abdelraheem, Ehab; Abd Allah, Osama; Abd El-Hamid, Rania; Abd El-Salam, Shokr

    2017-08-15

    A simple and rapid gas chromatography with flame photometric detector (GC-FPD) determination method was developed to detect residue levels and investigate the dissipation pattern and safe use of fenitrothion in tomatoes. A modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) using an ethyl acetate-based extraction, followed by a dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) with primary-secondary amine (PSA) and graphite carbon black (GCB) for clean up, was applied prior to GC-FPD analysis. The method showed satisfactory linearity, recovery and precision. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.005 and 0.01mg/kg, respectively. The residue levels of fenitrothion were best described by first order kinetics with a half-life of 2.2days in tomatoes. The potential health risks posed by fenitrothion were not significant, based on supervised residue trial data. The current findings could provide guidance for safe and reasonable use of fenitrothion in tomatoes and prevent health problems to consumers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of cyflumetofen residue in water, soil, and fruits by modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method coupled to gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minmin; Liu, Xingang; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Qin, Dongmei; Zheng, Yongquan

    2012-10-01

    A new, highly sensitive, and selective method was developed for the determination of the cyflumetofen residue in water, soil, and fruits by using gas chromatography quadruple mass spectrometry. The target compound was extracted using acetonitrile and then cleaned up using dispersive solid-phase extraction with primary and secondary amine and graphitized carbon black, and optionally by a freezing-out cleanup step. The matrix-matched standards gave satisfactory recoveries and relative standard deviation values in different matrices at three fortified levels (0.05, 0.5, and 1.0 mg kg(-1) ). The overall average recoveries for this method in water, soil, and all fruits matrix at three fortified levels ranged from 76.3 to 101.5% with relative standard deviations in the range of 1.2-11.8% (n = 5). The calculated limits of detection and quantification were typically below 0.005 and 0.015 μg kg(-1), which were much lower than the maximum residue levels established by Japanese Positive List. This study provides a theoretical basis for China to draw up maximum residue level and analytical method for cyflumetofen acaricide in different fruits. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Changes in the hydrogen-bonding strength of internal water molecules and cysteine residues in the conductive state of channelrhodopsin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A.; Muders, Vera; Schlesinger, Ramona; Heberle, Joachim

    2014-12-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, particularly in the less understood class of membrane proteins. As the first of its kind, channelrhodopsin is a light-gated cation channel and paved the way for the new and vibrant field of optogenetics, where nerve cells are activated by light. Still, the molecular mechanism of channelrhodopsin is not understood. Here, we applied time-resolved FT-IR difference spectroscopy to channelrhodopsin-1 from Chlamydomonas augustae. It is shown that the (conductive) P2380 intermediate decays with τ ≈ 40 ms and 200 ms after pulsed excitation. The vibrational changes between the closed and the conductive states were analyzed in the X-H stretching region (X = O, S, N), comprising vibrational changes of water molecules, sulfhydryl groups of cysteine side chains and changes of the amide A of the protein backbone. The O-H stretching vibrations of "dangling" water molecules were detected in two different states of the protein using H218O exchange. Uncoupling experiments with a 1:1 mixture of H2O:D2O provided the natural uncoupled frequencies of the four O-H (and O-D) stretches of these water molecules, each with a very weakly hydrogen-bonded O-H group (3639 and 3628 cm-1) and with the other O-H group medium (3440 cm-1) to moderately strongly (3300 cm-1) hydrogen-bonded. Changes in amide A and thiol vibrations report on global and local changes, respectively, associated with the formation of the conductive state. Future studies will aim at assigning the respective cysteine group(s) and at localizing the "dangling" water molecules within the protein, providing a better understanding of their functional relevance in CaChR1.

  17. Development of a multi-residue screening method for the determination of pesticides in cereals and dry animal feed using gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walorczyk, Stanisław

    2007-09-21

    A multi-residue screening method for simultaneous analysis of 122 gas chromatography amenable pesticides in dry matrices such as cereal grain and certain feedingstuffs was developed. The method entails a simple extraction of re-hydrated sample with acetonitrile followed by a dispersive solid phase extraction (dispersive-SPE) clean-up step prior to the final determination by gas chromatography/triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Due to complexity of analyzed matrices, two MS/MS transitions were set for each pesticide to eliminate the need for re-analysis of potentially positive samples, and provide unequivocal identification of detected pesticides in accordance with recent guidelines, in a single analytical run. Thus, in the developed GC-MS/MS acquisition method, a total of 216 different multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) transitions were monitored in one set of experimental conditions. To evaluate performance of the method, validation experiments were carried out on wheat grain at three spiking levels (0.01, 0.02 and 0.05 mg kg(-1)). Additional recovery tests at 0.05 mg kg(-1) were carried out on several other matrices. The recoveries ranged between 73 and 129% with associated relative standard deviations between 1 and 29% for the majority of pesticides. Limits of detection were less or equal to 0.01 mg kg(-1) for approximately 68% of pesticides. The applicability of the proposed method to detect and quantify pesticide residues has been demonstrated in the analysis of 136 real samples. Additionally, the method was favorably compared with an acetone extraction method (accepted as a reference method by some of European and U.S. authorities) in the analysis of real samples known to contain pesticide residues.

  18. Zirconium silicate assisted removal of residual proteins after organic solvent deproteinization of human plasma, enhancing the stability of the LC–ESI-MS response for the bioanalysis of small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Shah; Pezzei, Cornelia [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, CCB-Center for Chemistry and Biomedicine, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 80/82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Güzel, Yüksel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, CCB-Center for Chemistry and Biomedicine, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 80/82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); ADSI-Austrian Drug Screening Institute, Innrain 66a, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rainer, Matthias [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, CCB-Center for Chemistry and Biomedicine, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 80/82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huck, Christian W., E-mail: Christian.W.Huck@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, CCB-Center for Chemistry and Biomedicine, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 80/82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonn, Günther K. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, CCB-Center for Chemistry and Biomedicine, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 80/82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); ADSI-Austrian Drug Screening Institute, Innrain 66a, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • A novel sample preparation technique for isolation of small molecules from human plasma. • Effectiveness of zirconium silicate for the removal of residual proteins after protein precipitation. • Abolishing the consumption of salts for the depletion of residual proteins after protein precipitation. • More than 99.6% removal of plasma proteins. - Abstract: An efficient blood plasma clean-up method was developed, where methanol protein precipitation was applied, followed by zirconium silicate assisted exclusion of residual proteins. A strong binding of zirconium (IV) silicate to the proteins enabled the elimination of remaining proteins after solvent deproteinization through a rapid solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) was used for monitoring the proteins during clean-up practice applied to human plasma samples. The proteins were quantified by colorimetric detection using the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay. The presented analytical strategy resulted in the depletion of >99.6% proteins from human plasma samples. Furthermore, high-performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to diode-array and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection (HPLC–DAD/ESI MS) was applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) and their metabolites in human plasma. The procedure demonstrated high recoveries for the standard compounds spiked at different concentrations. Cynarin and chlorogenic acid were recovered in the range of 81–86% and 78–83%, respectively. Caffeic acid was extracted in the excess of 89–92%, while ferulic acid and dihydroxyhydrocinnamic acid showed a recovery of 87–91% and 92–95%, respectively. The method was partially validated in accordance with FDA-Industry Guidelines for Bioanalytical Method Validation (2001). The presented scheme improves the clean-up efficacy of the methanol deproteinization

  19. Determination of pesticide residues (> 0.5 microg/L) in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kathleen D; Milne, Paul

    2008-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted on a method for the measurement of 19 low-level pesticide residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The pesticide residues determined were 2,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (2,4'-DDE); 2,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (2,4'-DDD); 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4'-DDE); 2,4'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (2,4'-DDT); 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (4,4'-DDT); 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (4,4'-DDD); alpha-endosulfan; endosulfan-sulfate; dieldrin; aldrin; ethion; chlorpyrifos; beta-endosulfan; malathion; methyl-parathion; alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH); beta-HCH; delta-HCH; and gamma-HCH. Blind fortification solutions containing 4 different levels of pesticide residues (0, 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 microg/L) were provided to 8 collaborating laboratories who used them to create test samples in 6 matrixes (also provided): 2 colas, a diet cola, a clear lemon-lime soft drink, an orange soft drink, and a sports drink. Reproducibility (RSDR) for all 19 pesticide residues in all matrixes ranged from 7 to 151% at the 0.1 microg/L level, 11 to 121% at 0.5 microg/L, and 14 to 67% at 1.0 microg/L. Repeatability (RSDr), applicable to the diet cola and the sports drink, ranged from 1 to 76% for the 19 pesticide residues at the 0.1 microg/L level, 9 to 38% at 0.5 microg/L, and 9 to 38% at 1.0 microg/L. Recoveries for the 19 pesticide residues in all matrixes ranged from 77 to 645% at the 0.1 microg/L level, 60 to 231% at 0.5 microg/L, and 61 to 146% at 1.0 microg/L. It is recommended that the method be accepted by AOAC as Official First Action with a limit of quantification (LOQ) equal to 0.5 microg/L for 4,4'-DDT; 2,4'-DDT; 2,4'-DDD; 4,4'-DDE; 4,4'-DDD; 2,4'-DDE; aldrin; dieldrin; alpha-endosulfan; endosulfan-sulfate; chlorpyrifos; and ethion, and an LOQ equal to 1.0 microg/L for beta-endosulfan; alpha-HCH; beta-HCH; delta-HCH; gamma-HCH; methyl-parathion; and

  20. UV laser induced proton-transfer of protein molecule in the gas phase produced by droplet-beam laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Jun-ya; Kondow, Tamotsu

    2008-09-01

    Droplet-beam laser-ablation mass-spectrometry was applied for a study of the UV-laser induced proton-transfer reaction of protonated lysozyme hydrated clusters in the gas phase. Protonated lysozyme hydrated clusters were produced by irradiation of an IR laser onto a droplet-beam of an aqueous solution of lysozyme and were subsequently irradiated by a UV laser. It is found that H + and H 3O + are produced through photodissociation of protonated lysozyme hydrated clusters. The mechanism of the proton-transfer reaction is discussed.

  1. High-resolution diffraction for residual stress determination in the NiCrMoV wheel of an axial compressor for a heavy-duty gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogante, M.; Török, G.; Ceschini, G. F.; Tognarelli, L.; Füzesy, I.; Rosta, L.

    2004-07-01

    The wheel of an axial compressor for a heavy-duty gas turbine has been investigated for residual stresses (RS) evaluation of the teeth-section where SANS measurements have previously been performed. Such a component can contain internal RS, either due to the manufacturing process, or to the operating cycles fatigue. The constitutive material is a NiCrMoV steel to ASTM A 471 (type 2) norms (equivalent to B50A420B10); this material is usually adopted in the manufacturing of forged components for gas turbines. Internal radial and hoop RS have been determined, whose values are under the limit of 200kPa. Hoop RS, in general, resulted in higher value than the radial ones. The present experiment represents a particularly important step in the RS determination for gas turbine components, since the measurements reveal that the fatigue of the wheel is also a lifetime limiting factor although, in the same technological field, the available data in the actual neutron techniques literature mainly concern turbine buckets.

  2. High-resolution diffraction for residual stress determination in the NiCrMoV wheel of an axial compressor for a heavy-duty gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogante, M.; Toeroek, G.; Ceschini, G.F.; Tognarelli, L.; Fuezesy, I.; Rosta, L.

    2004-01-01

    The wheel of an axial compressor for a heavy-duty gas turbine has been investigated for residual stresses (RS) evaluation of the teeth-section where SANS measurements have previously been performed. Such a component can contain internal RS, either due to the manufacturing process, or to the operating cycles fatigue. The constitutive material is a NiCrMoV steel to ASTM A 471 (type 2) norms (equivalent to B50A420B10); this material is usually adopted in the manufacturing of forged components for gas turbines. Internal radial and hoop RS have been determined, whose values are under the limit of 200 kPa. Hoop RS, in general, resulted in higher value than the radial ones. The present experiment represents a particularly important step in the RS determination for gas turbine components, since the measurements reveal that the fatigue of the wheel is also a lifetime limiting factor although, in the same technological field, the available data in the actual neutron techniques literature mainly concern turbine buckets

  3. Online Simultaneous Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange of Multitarget Gas-Phase Molecules by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Gas Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun Sook; Cha, Eunju; Cha, Sangwon; Kim, Sunghwan; Oh, Han Bin; Kwon, Oh-Seung; Lee, Jaeick

    2017-11-21

    In this study, a hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange method using gas chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (GC-ESI/MS) was first investigated as a novel tool for online H/D exchange of multitarget analytes. The GC and ESI source were combined with a homemade heated column transfer line. GC-ESI/MS-based H/D exchange occurs in an atmospheric pressure ion source as a result of reacting the gas-phase analyte eluted from GC with charged droplets of deuterium oxide infused as the ESI spray solvent. The consumption of the deuterated solvent at a flow rate of 2 μL min -1 was more economical than that in online H/D exchange methods reported to date. In-ESI-source H/D exchange by GC-ESI/MS was applied to 11 stimulants with secondary amino or hydroxyl groups. After H/D exchange, the spectra of the stimulants showed unexchanged, partially exchanged, and fully exchanged ions showing various degrees of exchange. The relative abundances corrected for naturally occurring isotopes of the fully exchanged ions of stimulants, except for etamivan, were in the range 24.3-85.5%. Methylephedrine and cyclazodone showed low H/D exchange efficiency under acidic, neutral, and basic spray solvent conditions and nonexchange for etamivan with an acidic phenolic OH group. The in-ESI-source H/D exchange efficiency by GC-ESI/MS was sufficient to determine the number of hydrogen by elucidation of fragmentation from the spectrum. Therefore, this online H/D exchange technique using GC-ESI/MS has potential as an alternative method for simultaneous H/D exchange of multitarget analytes.

  4. Application of Gas Chromatography Coupled to Quadrupole-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry for Pesticide Residue Analysis in Cereals and Feed Ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienstra, Marc; Mol, Hans G J

    2018-03-01

    A method for residue analysis of pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in cereals and feed ingredients based on QuEChERS extraction, programmed temperature vaporizer large-volume injection, and GC with electron ionization (EI) quadrupole Orbitrap full-scan high-resolution MS (60 000 full width at half-maximum at m/z 200) has been developed. In addition to full-scan acquisition, simultaneous full-scan and selected-ion monitoring acquisition was used to improve detectability in incidental cases in which analytes coeluted with intense signals from coextractants. The method was successfully validated down to 10 µg/kg for a single commodity (wheat) using matrix-matched calibration, and for multiple-feed matrixes using standard addition. Identification according to European Union requirements was achieved in >90% of the analyte/matrix combinations, and suggestions for further increasing identification rates have been made. Performance characteristics were compared to an existing method for residue analysis based on GC with EI tandem MS (triple quadrupole).

  5. Determination of pyrethroid pesticide residues in processed fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography with electron capture and mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, Anna; Bandini, Mirella; Bolzoni, Luciana

    2003-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 12 pyrethroids (tefluthrin, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, cyhalothrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, alpha-cypermethrin, flucythrinate, fenvalerate, fluvalinate, and deltamethrin) in tomato puree, peach nectar, orange juice, and canned peas. A miniaturized extraction-partition procedure requiring small amounts of nonchlorinated solvents is used. Samples are extracted with acetone, partitioned with ethyl acetate-cyclohexane (50 + 50, v/v), and cleaned up on a Florisil cartridge. The final extract is analyzed by gas chromatography with both electron capture and mass spectrometric detection modes. Studies at fortification levels of 0.010-0.100 mg/kg gave mean recoveries ranging from 70.2 to 96.0% and coefficients of variation between 4.0 and 13.9% for all compounds. Quantitation limits were < 0.010 mg/kg for electron capture detection.

  6. Detecting Pesticide Residue by Using Modulating Temperature Over a Single SnO2-Based Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Yu

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available A new rapid detecting method (called dynamic measurements was reported to detect and distinguish the presence of two pesticide gases in the ambient atmosphere. The method employed only a single SnO2-based gas sensor in a rectangular temperature mode to perform the qualitative analysis of a binary gas mixture (acephate and trichlorphon in air. Polar plots was used for quantitative analysis which the feature extraction was performed by FFT. Experimental results showed that high selectivity of the sensor achieved in the range of 250~3000C and modulating frequency 20mHz, one can easily observe the qualitative difference among the response to pure acephate and trichlorphon gases of the same concentration and to the mixture, and the concentration of pesticide gases can be obtained based on the changes of polar plots.

  7. Multiple fault detection and diagnosis in a gas turbine using nonlinear principal component analysis and structured residuals

    OpenAIRE

    Rincon-Charris, Amilcar; Quevedo Casín, Joseba Jokin

    2013-01-01

    Multiple fault detection and diagnosis is a challenging problem because the number of candidates grows exponentially in the number of faults. In add ition, multiple faults in dynamic systems may be hard to detect, because they can mask or compensate each other’s effects. This paper presents the study of the detection and diagnosis of multiple faults in a SR-30 Gas Turbine using nonlinear principal component analys is as the detection method and structured residua...

  8. Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to modify the conditions of extension of local natural gas authorities to neighbouring districts. The European Union is studying the conditions of internal gas market with the objective of more open markets although considering public service requirements

  9. Hydrogen gas acts as a novel bioactive molecule in enhancing plant tolerance to paraquat-induced oxidative stress via the modulation of heme oxygenase-1 signalling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qijiang; Zhu, Kaikai; Cui, Weiti; Xie, Yanjie; Han, Bin; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-05-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) was recently proposed as a novel antioxidant and signalling molecule in animals. However, the physiological roles of H2 in plants are less clear. Here, we showed that exposure of alfalfa seedlings to paraquat stress increased endogenous H2 production. When supplied with exogenous H2 or the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-inducer hemin, alfalfa plants displayed enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress induced by paraquat. This was evidenced by alleviation of the inhibition of root growth, reduced lipid peroxidation and the decreased hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion radical levels. The activities and transcripts of representative antioxidant enzymes were induced after exposure to either H2 or hemin. Further results showed that H2 pretreatment could dramatically increase levels of the MsHO-1 transcript, levels of the protein it encodes and HO-1 activity. The previously mentioned H2-mediated responses were specific for HO-1, given that the potent HO-1-inhibitor counteracted the effects of H2. The effects of H2 were reversed after the addition of an aqueous solution of 50% carbon monoxide (CO). We also discovered enhanced tolerance of multiple environmental stresses after plants were pretreated with H2 . Together, these results suggested that H2 might function as an important gaseous molecule that alleviates oxidative stress via HO-1 signalling. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Expression of the C- KIT Molecule in Acute Myeloid Leukemias: Implications of the Immuno phenotypes CD117 and CD15 in the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, S.

    2001-01-01

    Study of the c-kit proto-oncogene (CD117) may be of help for the identification of phenotypic profiles that are absent or present at very low frequencies on normal human blast cells and therefore might be of great value for the detection of leukemic cells displaying such immuno phenotypes in patients in complete remission. Design and methods: Ninety patients with acute myeloid leukemias, diagnosed according to FAB criteria and immunological marker studies, were studied for the dual expression on blast cells of the CD117/CD15 immuno phenotype co expression by direct immunofluorescence assay using dual staining combination flow cytometry. Results: In 69/90 acute myeloid leukemia patients analyzed (77%), blast cells expressed the CD117 antigen. Moreover, in 38 of them (42% of acute myeloid leukemia cases), leukemic blasts co expressed the CD117 and CD15 antigens. There was no significant correlation between the FAB classification and the CD117 and CD15 expression in acute myeloid leukemia cases. Conclusions: These results suggest that immunological methods for the detection of MRD based on the existence of aberrant phenotypes could be used in the majority of AML patients. This phenotype CD117/CD15, present in acute myeloid leukemia cases at a relatively high frequency (42%), represents an aberrant phenotype, because it was not detected on normal human blast cells, suggesting that the use of these combinations of monoclonal antibodies could be of help in detecting residual leukemic blasts among normal blast cells. The use of the CD117 antigen in different monoclonal antibodies combinations may be of great help for the detection of minimal residual disease in a high proportion of acute myeloid leukemia cases, especially in those patients displaying the CD117+/CD15+ immuno phenotype, because cells co expressing both antigens in normal blasts, if present, are at very low frequencies. The simultaneous assessment of two or more markers in single cells has facilitated the

  11. Determination of some selected pesticide residues in apple juice by solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography – mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hercegová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of solid phase microextraction (SPME for enrichment of pesticides from apple juice was investigated. Samples were diluted with water, extracted by solid-phase microextraction and analysed by gas chromatography using mass-spectrometry detector (MSD in selected ion monitoring mode (SIM. The method was tested for the following pesticides used mostly in fruit culturing at Slovakia: tebuthylazine, fenitrothion, chlorpyrifos, myclobutanil, cyprodinil, phosalone, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, kresoxim-methyl, methidathion, penconazole. All pesticides were extracted with polydimethylsiloxane fibre 100 μm thickness. The linear concentration range of application was 0.05 μg dm−3–10 μg dm−3. The method described provides detectabilities complying with the maximum residue levels (MRLs set by regulatory organizations for pesticides in apple juice matrices. The solvent – free SPME procedure was found to be quicker and more cost effective then the solvent extraction methods commonly used.

  12. Determination of pesticide residues and related compounds in water and industrial effluent by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Manoel L; Donato, Filipe F; Prestes, Osmar D; Adaime, Martha B; Zanella, Renato

    2013-09-01

    Pollution of drinking water supplies from industrial waste is a result of several industrial processes and disposal practices, and the establishment of analytical methods for monitoring organic compounds related to environmental and health problems is very important. In this work, a method using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of pesticide residues and related compounds in drinking and surface water as well as in industrial effluent. Optimization of the method was achieved by using a central composite design approach on parameters such as the sample pH and SPE eluent composition. A single SPE consisting of the loading on a polymeric sorbent of 100 mL of sample adjusted to pH 3 and elution with methanol/methylene chloride (10:90, v/v) permitted the obtaining of acceptable recoveries in most cases. The concentration factor associated with sensitivity of the chromatographic analysis permitted the achievement of the method limit of detection values between 0.01 and 0.25 μg L(-1). Recovery assays presented mean recoveries between 70 and 120% for most of the compounds with very good precision, despite the different chemical nature of the compounds analyzed. The selectivity of the method, evaluated through the relative intensity of quantification and qualification ions obtained by GC-QqQ-MS/MS, was considered adequate. The developed method was finally applied to the determination of target analytes in real samples. River water and treated industrial effluent samples presented residues of some compounds, but no detectable residues were found in the drinking water samples evaluated.

  13. [Determination of pesticide residues in fugu, eel and prawn using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with gel permeation chromatographic clean-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feng; Pang, Guofang; Li, Yan; Wang, Minglin; Fan, Chunlin

    2009-09-01

    A multiresidue analytical method was developed for the determination of 191 pesticides in fugu, eel and prawn using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The samples were extracted with ethyl acetate and cyclohexane (1:1, v/v), and cleaned-up by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The GPC eluant collected from 26 min to 44 min was concentrated to 1 mL, then analyzed using GC-MS. A DB-1701 column was used for the separation. The MS detection was performed in selected ion monitoring mode. The recoveries were determined at the two spiked levels of I LOQ and 4 LOQ (LOQ: limit of quantification). The overall recoveries were from 50.2% to 120%, and in which the recoveries of 89.5% pesticides were from 70% to 120%. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the recoveries were from 0.6% to 21.6%. The calibration curves of all pesticides showed good linearities in the respective ranges with the correlation coefficient above 0.97. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification were 0.002-0.3 mg/kg and 0.007-1.2 mg/kg, respectively. The sensitivity and accuracy of the method met the requirements of the multiple pesticide residues. This method was applicable to determine 191 multiple pesticide residues in fugu, eel, prawn and other fishes.

  14. Determination of 1,2-dibromoethane, 1,4-dichlorobenzene and naphthalene residues in honey by gas chromatography--mass spectrometry using purge and trap thermal desorption extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananaki, Chrisoula; Zotou, Anastasia; Thrasyvoulou, Andreas

    2005-08-12

    A highly sensitive method for the determination of 1,2-dibromoethane, 1,2-dichlorobenzene and naphthalene residues in honey was developed, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with a purge and trap thermal desorption system as the extraction technique. Optimal conditions for isolation and separation were established and calibration curves were constructed. Linearity was held between 2.4 and 300 microg kg(-1) honey for 1,2-dibromoethane, 0.5 and 300 microg kg(-1) for 1,4-dichlorobenzene and 0.125 and 3000 microg kg(-1) for naphthalene. The detection limits were found to be 0.8, 0.15 and 0.05 microg kg(-1) honey for 1,2-dibromoethane, 1,4-dichlorobenzene and naphthalene, respectively. The method was applied to the analysis of 25 Greek honey samples. 1,2-Dibromoethane was not found in the majority of the samples, while only one sample was found to contain both 1,4-dichlorobenzene and naphthalene residues at concentrations exceeding 10 microg kg(-1).

  15. Residual deposits (residual soil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Residual soil deposits is accumulation of new formate ore minerals on the earth surface, arise as a result of chemical decomposition of rocks. As is well known, at the hyper genes zone under the influence of different factors (water, carbonic acid, organic acids, oxygen, microorganism activity) passes chemical weathering of rocks. Residual soil deposits forming depends from complex of geologic and climatic factors and also from composition and physical and chemical properties of initial rocks

  16. Environmental performance, mechanical and microstructure analysis of concrete containing oil-based drilling cuttings pyrolysis residues of shale gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Qiang; Lin, Xiao-Yan; He, Ming; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Si-Lan

    2017-09-15

    The overall objective of this research project is to investigate the feasibility of incorporating oil-based drilling cuttings pyrolysis residues (ODPR) and fly ash serve as replacements for fine aggregates and cementitious materials in concrete. Mechanical and physical properties, detailed environmental performances, and microstructure analysis were carried out. Meanwhile, the early hydration process and hydrated products of ODPR concrete were analyzed with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The results indicated that ODPR could not be categorize into hazardous wastes. ODPR had specific pozzolanic characteristic and the use of ODPR had certain influence on slump and compressive strength of concrete. The best workability and optimal compressive strength were achieved with the help of 35% ODPR. Environmental performance tests came to conclusion that ODPR as recycled aggregates and admixture for the preparation of concrete, from the technique perspective, were the substance of mere environmental contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Design of a compressed air modulator to be used in comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography and its application in the determination of pesticide residues in grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzutti, Ionara R; Vreuls, René J J; de Kok, André; Roehrs, Rafael; Martel, Samile; Friggi, Caroline A; Zanella, Renato

    2009-04-10

    In this study, a new modulator that is simple, robust and presents low operation costs, was developed. This modulator uses compressed air to cool two small portions in the first centimeters of the second chromatographic column of a comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) system. The results show a variation in the peak area less than 3 and 5% to alkanes and pesticides, respectively. The standard deviations for the retention times in the first and second dimension are around 0.05 min and 0.05s for all the compounds. The system was optimized with n-alkanes. The GCxGC system proposed was applied in the determination of pyrethroid pesticides (bifenthrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, fenvalerate, esfenvalerate, cis- and trans-permethrin) in grape samples. Samples were extracted by the mini-Luke modified method and pesticides were quantified by comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography with micro electron-capture detection (microECD). The values of method limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.01-0.02 mg kg(-1) for all studied pyrethroid and the values of recovery were between 94.3 and 115.2%, with good precision (RSDcompressed air has the potential for application in the analysis of a wider range of pesticide residues in other commodities since it provides low values of LOQ with acceptable accuracy and precision.

  18. Different clinical and biochemical phenotypes resulting from the same substitution at the same glycine residue in different chains of the type I collagen molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paepe, A. De; Nuytinck, L. [Univ. of Gent, Brussels (Belgium); Spotila, L. [Jefferson Institute of Molecular Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in type I collagen produce osteogenesis imperfecta (OI; brittle bone disease), ranging in severity from lethal to very mild. This phenotypic variation is largely determined by the position and nature of the mutation. Because type I collagen consists of two {alpha}1 chains and one {alpha}2 chain, {alpha}1(I) mutations are generally regarded to have more serious consequences than {alpha}2(I) mutations. We have characterized a point mutation causing substitution of serine for glycine at position 661 of the {alpha}1(I) chain in a child with severe OI. This is precisely the same substitution that had been detected in the {alpha}2(I) chain in a woman with post-menopausal osteoporosis. She and two of her sons were heterozygous and the third son was homozygous as a result of uniparental disomy. Biochemical collagen profiles were studied in each of the patients and compared with a control. Medium and cell-layer collagens were overmodified in all patients. Overmodification was pronounced in the patient with the {alpha}1(I) mutation, but mild in the patients with the {alpha}2(I) mutation, being slightly less evident in the heterozygotes than in the homozygote. Thermal stability assays showed that the melting temperature of the mutant {alpha}1(I) chains was reduced by 3{degrees}C, whereas the melting curves in the patients with the {alpha}2(I) mutation were not significantly different from the control. These results show that the type of {alpha}-chain harboring the mutation influences the fundamental biochemical behavior of type I collagen molecules and strikingly emphasizes the predominant role of {alpha}1(I) chains compared with {alpha}2(I) in this respect.

  19. Proposed systematic methodology for analysis of Pb-210 radioactivity in residues produced in Brazilian natural gas pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Aloisio Cordilha

    2003-11-01

    Since the 80's, the potential radiological hazards due to the handling of solid wastes contaminated with Rn-222 long-lived progeny - Pb-210 in special - produced in gas pipes and removed by pig operations have been subject of growing concern abroad our country. Nevertheless, little or no attention has been paid to this matter in the Brazilian plants up to now, being these hazards frequently underestimated or even ignored. The main purpose of this work was to propose a systematic methodology for analysis of Pb-210 radioactivity in black powder samples from some Brazilian plants, through the evaluation of direct Pb-210 gamma spectrometry and Bi-210 beta counting technical viabilities. In both cases, one in five samples of black powder analysed showed relevant activity (above 1Bq/kg) of Pb-210, being these results probably related to particular features of each specific plant (production levels, reservoir geochemical profile, etc.), in such a way that a single pattern is not observed. For the proposed methodology, gamma spectrometry proved to be the most reliable technique, showing a 3.5% standard deviation, and, for a 95% confidence level, overall fitness in the range of Pb-210 concentration of activity presented in the standard sample reference sheet, provided by IAEA for intercomparison purposes. In the Brazilian scene, however, the availability of statistically supported evidences is insufficient to allow the potential radiological hazard due to the management of black powder to be discarded. Thus, further research efforts are recommended in order to detect the eventually critical regions or plants where gas exploration, production and processing practices will require a regular program of radiological surveillance, in the near future. (author)

  20. 1H NMR study of effects of synergistic anion and metal ion binding on pH titration of the histidinyl side-chain residues of the half-molecules of ovotransferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodworth, R.C.; Butcher, N.D.; Brown, S.A.; Brown-Mason, A.

    1987-01-01

    Separation of ovotransferrin into C-terminal (OTf/2C) and N-terminal (OTf/2N) half-molecules has made possible the resolution of all expected histidinyl C(2)H resonances by proton nuclear magnetic resonance at 250 MHz. The chemical shift of many of the resonances decreases with increasing pH, allowing construction of titration curves, whereas a few resonances fail to titrate. On formation of the Ga/sup III/OTf/2(C 2 O 4 ) ternary complexes, two of the low-field C(2)H resonances in each half-molecule fail to titrate. This behavior implicates the imidazole groups giving rise to these resonances as ligands to the bound metal ion. A third C(2)H resonance in each half-molecule undergoes a marked reduction in pK'/sub a/ on formation of the ternary complex. The imidazole group displaying this resonance is implicated in a proton-relay scheme involved in binding the synergistic anion, oxalate, and a water of hydration on the bound metal ion. The titration curves for the various imidazole resonances have been fit to a four-parameter equation involving estimation of the pK'/sub a/, the limiting chemical shift values, and a Hill constant n. Hill constants of 1, which suggests positive cooperativity in the titration of this residue. The basis for this behavior cannot be rationalized at this time. 13 C NMR studies of [zeta- 13 C]Arg-OTf suggest the Arg side chains may not be intimately involved in formation of the ternary complex

  1. The effect of H2O gas on volatilities of planet-forming major elements. I - Experimental determination of thermodynamic properties of Ca-, Al-, and Si-hydroxide gas molecules and its application to the solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Akihiko

    1992-01-01

    The vapor pressures of Ca(OH)2(g), Al(OH)3(g), and Si(OH)4(g) molecules in equilibrium with solid calcium-, aluminum, and silicon-oxides, respectively, were determined, and were used to derive the heats of formation and entropies of these species, which are expected to be abundant under the currently postulated physical conditions in the primordial solar nebula. These data, in conjunction with thermodynamic data from literature, were used to calculate the relative abundances of M, MO(x), and M(OH)n gas species and relative volatilities of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Al for ranges of temperature, total pressure, and H/O abundance ratio corresponding to the plausible ranges of physical conditions in the solar nebula. The results are used to explain how Ca and Al could have evaporated from Ca,Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites, while Si, Mg, and Fe condensed onto them during the preaccretion alteration of CAIs.

  2. Novel and rapid method for determination of organophosphorus pesticide residues in edible fungus using direct gas purge microsyringe extraction coupled on-line with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Jingxi; Wang, Juan; Piao, Xiangfan; Yang, Cui; Wu, Xue; Quinto, Maurizio; Li, Donghao

    2015-09-01

    In this work a new analytical method for a rapid and simultaneous determination of 28 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) residues in edible fungus using gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE), coupled with on-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GP-MSE-GC-MS) has been developed and optimized. GP-MSE, a novel gas flow liquid-phase microextraction technique, has been then fruitfully used as innovative and one-step extraction procedure, allowing a direct injection into the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometry detector (GC-MS) system without any further cleaning step. Once optimized, the GP-MSE-GC-MS analysis procedure showed reproducibility values, resolutions, linear responses, detection and quantification limits that allowed to consider this method suitable for the analysis of the 28 OPPs in real samples. Furthermore, OPP recoveries and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 85.26% to 100.21%, and from 1.6% to 6.9%, respectively. This procedure was then used for the analysis of real samples and the obtained results were compared with those of ultrasonic extraction-solid phase extraction. Among the 28 OPPs, 14 of them were found in Lentinus edodes and Enoki mushrooms fungus samples, with a total concentrations of 112.7 and 210.7 μg kg(-1), respectively. This work demonstrated then that GP-MSE-GC-MS provided a highly efficient, solvent-saving, accurate and sensitive quantitative analysis method for a rapid determination of OPPs in edible fungus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. On possibility of using E, H - crossed fields and gas-dynamic flowing of argon in the processes of degassing by the method of ion-stimulated desorption of residual gas in the KUTI-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharapov, V.E.

    1985-01-01

    In the project considered if the possibility to use the degassing of an adhezatior chamber inner walls, using the method of ion-stimulated desorption (ISD) of residual gas in the glow discharge is considered. It is suggested that the experiment should be realized using the model or the KUTI (PKUTI) prototype to decrease operation pressure to p -7 Pa (2x10 -9 Tor) at the expense of introduction of the technology described and certain modifications in the processes of leak-in and pumping. The use of crossed E,H-fields and gasodynamic regime of argon flow in the process of preliminary degassing of the adhezator chamber by the glow discharge is the main idea of the project

  4. Fast gas chromatographic residue analysis in animal feed using split injection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienstra, M; Portolés, T; Hernández, F; Mol, J G J

    2015-11-27

    Significant speed improvement for instrumental runtime would make GC–MS much more attractive for determination of pesticides and contaminants and as complementary technique to LC–MS. This was the trigger to develop a fast method (time between injections less than 10 min) for the determination of pesticides and PCBs that are not (or less) amenable to LC–MS. A key factor in achieving shorter analysis time was the use of split injection (1:10) which allowed the use of a much higher initial GC oven temperature. A shorter column (15 m), higher temperature ramp, and higher carrier gas flow rate (6 mL/min) further contributed to analysis-time reduction. Chromatographic resolution was slightly compromised but still well fit-for-purpose. Due to the high sensitivity of the technique used (GC–APCI-triple quadrupole MS/MS), quantification and identification were still possible down to the 10 μg/kg level, which was demonstrated by successful validation of the method for complex feed matrices according to EU guidelines. Other advantages of the method included a better compatibility of acetonitrile extracts (e.g. QuEChERS) with GC, and a reduced transfer of co-extractants into the GC column and mass spectrometer.

  5. Energy partitioning in polyatomic chemical reactions: Quantum state resolved studies of highly exothermic atom abstraction reactions from molecules in the gas phase and at the gas-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolot, Alexander M.

    , whereby newly formed molecules leave the surface without equilibrating, and (ii) a partially accommodated fraction that shares vibrational, rotational, and translational energy with the liquid surface before returning to the gas phase. Finally, a velocity map ion imaging apparatus has been implemented to investigate reaction dynamics in crossed molecular beams. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) results in rotational, vibrational, and electronic state selectivity. Velocity map imaging measurements provide differential cross sections and information about the internal energy distribution of the undetected collision partner.

  6. Application of acetone acetals as water scavengers and derivatization agents prior to the gas chromatographic analysis of polar residual solvents in aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Niels; Wolfs, Kris; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2015-12-18

    The sensitivity of gas chromatography (GC) combined with the full evaporation technique (FET) for the analysis of aqueous samples is limited due to the maximum tolerable sample volume in a headspace vial. Using an acetone acetal as water scavenger prior to FET-GC analysis proved to be a useful and versatile tool for the analysis of high boiling analytes in aqueous samples. 2,2-Dimethoxypropane (DMP) was used in this case resulting in methanol and acetone as reaction products with water. These solvents are relatively volatile and were easily removed by evaporation enabling sample enrichment leading to 10-fold improvement in sensitivity compared to the standard 10μL FET sample volumes for a selection of typical high boiling polar residual solvents in water. This could be improved even further if more sample is used. The method was applied for the determination of residual NMP in an aqueous solution of a cefotaxime analogue and proved to be considerably better than conventional static headspace (sHS) and the standard FET approach. The methodology was also applied to determine trace amounts of ethylene glycol (EG) in aqueous samples like contact lens fluids, where scavenging of the water would avoid laborious extraction prior to derivatization. During this experiment it was revealed that DMP reacts quantitatively with EG to form 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane (2,2-DD) under the proposed reaction conditions. The relatively high volatility (bp 93°C) of 2,2-DD makes it possible to perform analysis of EG using the sHS methodology making additional derivatization reactions superfluous. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of residual acetone and acetone related impurities in drug product intermediates prepared as Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) using gas chromatography with headspace autosampling (GCHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Emma; Doggett, Adrian; Bretnall, Alison

    2014-08-05

    Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) are uniform mixtures of a specific ratio of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and polymer prepared via a spray drying process. Volatile solvents are employed during spray drying to facilitate the formation of the SDD material. Following manufacture, analytical methodology is required to determine residual levels of the spray drying solvent and its associated impurities. Due to the high level of polymer in the SDD samples, direct liquid injection with Gas Chromatography (GC) is not a viable option for analysis. This work describes the development and validation of an analytical approach to determine residual levels of acetone and acetone related impurities, mesityl oxide (MO) and diacetone alcohol (DAA), in drug product intermediates prepared as SDDs using GC with headspace (HS) autosampling. The method development for these analytes presented a number of analytical challenges which had to be overcome before the levels of the volatiles of interest could be accurately quantified. GCHS could be used after two critical factors were implemented; (1) calculation and application of conversion factors to 'correct' for the reactions occurring between acetone, MO and DAA during generation of the headspace volume for analysis, and the addition of an equivalent amount of polymer into all reference solutions used for quantitation to ensure comparability between the headspace volumes generated for both samples and external standards. This work describes the method development and optimisation of the standard preparation, the headspace autosampler operating parameters and the chromatographic conditions, together with a summary of the validation of the methodology. The approach has been demonstrated to be robust and suitable to accurately determine levels of acetone, MO and DAA in SDD materials over the linear concentration range 0.008-0.4μL/mL, with minimum quantitation limits of 20ppm for acetone and MO, and 80ppm for DAA. Copyright

  8. An accurate, residue-level, pair potential of mean force for folding and binding based on the distance-scaled, ideal-gas reference state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Hongyi; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2004-02-01

    Structure prediction on a genomic scale requires a simplified energy function that can efficiently sample the conformational space of polypeptide chains. A good energy function at minimum should discriminate native structures against decoys. Here, we show that a recently developed, residue-specific, all-atom knowledge-based potential (167 atomic types) based on distance-scaled, finite ideal-gas reference state (DFIRE-all-atom) can be substantially simplified to 20 residue types located at side-chain center of mass (DFIRE-SCM) without a significant change in its capability of structure discrimination. Using 96 standard multiple decoy sets, we show that there is only a small reduction (from 80% to 78%) in success rate of ranking native structures as the top 1. The success rate is higher than two previously developed, all-atom distance-dependent statistical pair potentials. Applied to structure selections of 21 docking decoys without modification, the DFIRE-SCM potential is 29% more successful in recognizing native complex structures than an all-atom statistical potential trained by a database of dimeric interfaces. The potential also achieves 92% accuracy in distinguishing true dimeric interfaces from artificial crystal interfaces. In addition, the DFIRE potential with the C(alpha) positions as the interaction centers recognizes 123 native structures out of a comprehensive 125-protein TOUCHSTONE decoy set in which each protein has 24,000 decoys with only C(alpha) positions. Furthermore, the performance by DFIRE-SCM on newly established 25 monomeric and 31 docking Rosetta-decoy sets is comparable to (or better than in the case of monomeric decoy sets) that of a recently developed, all-atom Rosetta energy function enhanced with an orientation-dependent hydrogen bonding potential.

  9. Multi-residue method for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in fish feed based on a cleanup approach followed by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardelli, Valeria; dell'Oro, Daniela; Palermo, Carmen; Centonze, Diego

    2010-07-23

    A multi-residue method for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in fish feed samples was developed and optimized. The method is based on a cleanup step of the extracted fat, carried out by liquid-liquid extraction on diatomaceous earth cartridge with n-hexane/acetonitrile (80/20, v/v) followed by solid phase extraction (SPE) with silica gel-SCX cartridge, before the identification and quantification of the residues by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Performance characteristics, such as accuracy, precision, linear range, limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ), for each pesticide were determined. Instrumental LODs ranged from 0.01 to 0.11 microg L(-1), LOQs were in the range of 0.02-0.35 microg L(-1), and calibration curves were linear (r2>0.999) in the whole range of explored concentrations (5-100 microg L(-1)). Repeatability values were in the range of 3-15%, evaluated from the relative standard deviation of six samples spiked at 100 microg kg(-1) of fat, and in compliance with that derived by the Horwitz's equation. No matrix effects or interfering substances were observed in fish feed analyses. The proposed method allowed high recoveries (92-116%) of spiked extracted fat samples at 100 microg kg(-1), and very low LODs (between 0.02 and 0.63 microg kg(-1)) and LOQs (between 0.05 and 2.09 microg kg(-1)) determined in fish feed samples. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Monitoring of the residue of fosthiazate in water samples using solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Zhou, Xin; Fu, Chunmei; Liu, Sankang; Li, Zhangwan

    2004-11-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to determine the fosthiazate residue in water samples. The water samples were first filtered through cellulose filters (0.45 microm pore size). A 100 mL volume of filtered water, in which 1 mL of methanol has been added, was then passed through a pre-conditioned 3 cm C18 cartridge at a flow-rate of 1.5 mL/min. Elution was performed by 1 mL of methanol. The eluant was finally dried under reduced pressure for solvent evaporation. The volume was quantitatively adjusted to 0.5 mL with methanol. The analysis was carried out on GC/MS. The mass spectrometer was operated in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. According to mass spectrum of fosthiazate, three selected ions at m/z of 126, 195, 283, respectively, were monitored for identification and quantification. High sensitivity and selectivity were achieved by using this method. The limit of detection for fosthiazate in water samples was determined to be 56.4 ng/L. The linearity was demonstrated over a wide range of concentrations covering from 0.282 to 141 microg/L. The recoveries were more than 85.5% and the relative standard deviations for the overall procedure were less than 4.42%. The fosthiazate residue was detected in the water samples from a pool near cropland where fosthiazate was used. The results demonstrate the suitability of the SPE-GC/MS approach for the analysis of fosthiazate in water.

  11. Deep eutectic solvent based gas-assisted dispersive liquid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography and flame ionization detection for the determination of some pesticide residues in fruit and vegetable samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Sattari Dabbagh, Masoumeh; Yadeghari, Adeleh

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a gas-assisted dispersive liquid-phase microextraction method using a deep eutectic solvent as the extraction solvent combined with gas chromatography and flame ionization detection was developed for the extraction and determination of some pesticide residues in vegetable and fruit juice samples. In this method, choline chloride and 4-chlorophenol at a molar ratio of 1:2 were mixed. By heating and vortexing, a clear, water-immiscible, and homogeneous liquid was formed. The obtained deep eutectic solvent was added to an aqueous solution of the analytes in a conical test tube. Air was bubbled into the aqueous solution and a cloudy solution was obtained. During this step, the analytes were extracted into the fine droplets of the extraction solvent. After centrifugation, an aliquot of the settled phase was injected into the separation system. Under the optimum extraction conditions, enrichment factors, and extraction recoveries were obtained in the ranges of 247-355 and 49-71%, respectively. The obtained values for the limits of detection and quantification were in the ranges of 0.24-1.4 and 0.71-4.2 μg/L, respectively. The proposed method is simple, fast, efficient, and inexpensive. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D)> HBr (0.83 D) > HI (0.45 D) [8]. Hence, these molecules can and do induce a dipole moment in the rare gas atoms when the two interact. The induced dipole moment is proportional to the inducing field E and the proportionality constant is the polariz- ability, i.e., μ i. = αE. However, as mentioned above, dispersion.

  13. Gas chromatographic determination of electron capture sensitive volatile industrial chemical residues in foods, using AOAC pesticide multiresidue extraction and cleanup procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurawecz, M P; Puma, B J

    1986-01-01

    Electron capture (EC) gas chromatographic (GC) parameters have been developed for determining some of the more volatile industrial chemicals that can be determined by the AOAC multiresidue method for organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides with modified GC operating conditions. Retention times relative to pentachlorobenzene are reported for 143 industrial chemicals, pesticides, and related compounds on OV-101 GC columns at 130 degrees C. Also reported for most of the compounds are recoveries from fortified samples carried through the AOAC extraction and cleanup procedures for fatty and/or nonfatty foods, Florisil elution characteristics, and GC relative retention times on mixed OV-101 + OV-210 columns at 130 degrees C. Our laboratory has used the modified EC/GC parameters with the AOAC multiresidue extraction/cleanup procedures to determine many volatile halogenated industrial chemical contaminants in foods, chiefly in samples of fresh-water fish. Other modifications of the AOAC method are described to improve the tentative identification and quantitative measurement of these volatile residues.

  14. Determination of the limits of identification and quantitation of selected organochlorine and organophosphorous pesticide residues in surface water by full-scan gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahboub, Yahya R; Zaater, Mohammad F; Al-Talla, Zeiad A

    2005-12-09

    In this work, we report a reliable method for quantitation and determination of the limits of identification of 14 organochlorine and organophosphorous pesticide (OPP) residues in surface water. The method features the simultaneous identification and quantitation of targeted pesticides and the possibility of identification of any other eluting compounds. The method is based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with a mixture of petroleum ether and dichloromethane (70:30, v/v) followed by gas chromatographic separation and a full-scan mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS). The method presents a new validation parameter, limit of identification (LOI) which is defined for our purpose as the lowest analyte concentration that yields a library searchable mass spectrum. The method is linear over the range 0.048-1.20microgL(-1) for nine pesticides and 0.024-0.60microgL(-1) for the other five pesticides. Correlation coefficients vary between 0.988 and 0.998. Limits of detection (LODs) vary between 0.005 and 0.05microgL(-1) for 4,4'-DDT and LOIs vary between 0.012 and 0.048microgL(-1).

  15. Optimization of a multi-residue method for 101 pesticides in green tea leaves using gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Hou

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A method for analysis of 101 pesticide residues in tea leaves was developed and validated for the first time. Pure acetonitrile was used as extraction solvent rather than acetonitrile after matrix hydration based on the amount of co-extracts and recoveries performance. During clean-up procedure, primary-secondary amine/graphitized carbon black (500 mg was selected, which exhibited outstanding properties in clean-up capabilities and recoveries of pesticides comparing to primary-secondary amine/graphitized carbon black (250 mg, NH2-Carbon and TPT absorbents. The method was validated employing gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry at the spiked concentration levels of 0.050 and 0.100 mg kg−1. For most of the targeted pesticides, the percent recoveries range from 70 to 120%, with relative standard deviations <20%. The linear correlation coefficients (r 2 were higher than 0.99 at concentration levels of 0.025–0.250 mg kg−1. Limits of quantification ranged from 1.1 to 25.3 µg kg−1 for all pesticides. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticides in tea leaf samples.

  16. Determination of residual volatile organic compounds migrated from polystyrene food packaging into food simulant by headspace solid phase micro extraction-gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Marsin Sanagi; Ling, Susie Lu; Zalilah Nasir; Wan Aini Wan Ibrahim; Abu Naim, Ahmedy

    2008-01-01

    The residual styrene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in the polystyrene food packaging are of concern as these compounds have the potential to migrate into the food in contact. This work describes a method for quantitative determination of VOCs, namely styrene, toluene, ethyl benzene, iso-propylbenzene and n-propylbenzene that have migrated from polystyrene food packaging into food stimulant by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Headspace solid phase micro extraction (HS-SPME) technique was applied for migration test using water as food stimulant. The effects of extraction variables including sample volume, eluotropic strength, extraction temperature, extraction time, desorption time, sample agitation, and salt addition on the amounts of the extracted analyses were studied to obtain the optimal HS-SPME conditions. The optimized method was applied to test the VOCs migrated from polystyrene bowls and cups at storage temperatures ranging from 24 to 80 degree Celsius for 30 min. Styrene and ethyl benzene were found to migrate from the samples into the food stimulant. The migration of analyze was found to be strongly dependent upon the storage temperature. The HS-SPME is useful as an alternative method to determine the migration of VOCs from food packaging material into food stimulant. (author)

  17. A multi-residue method for determination of 70 organic micropollutants in surface waters by solid-phase extraction followed by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzopoulou, Evangelia; Voutsa, Dimitra; Kaklamanos, George

    2015-01-01

    A multi-residue method, based on gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), has been developed for the determination of 70 organic micropollutants from various chemical classes (organochlorinated, organophosphorous, triazines, carbamate and urea, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pharmaceuticals, phenols, etc.) in surface waters. A single-step SPE extraction using OASIS HLB cartridges was employed for the recovery of target micropollutants. The method has been validated according to monitoring performance criteria of the Water Framework Directive, taking into account the approved guidelines on quality assurance and quality control. The recoveries ranged from 60 to 110 %, the coefficient of variation from 0.84 to 27.4 %, and the uncertainty from 6 to 37 %. The LOD varied from 6.0 to 40 ng/L. The limits of quantification for the priority pollutants anthracene, alachlor, atrazine, benzo(a)pyrene, chlorfenvinphos, diuron, isoproturon, nonylphenol, simazine, and terbutryn fulfill the criterion of diuron, isoproturon, salicylic acid, chlorfenvinphos, 1,2-benzanthracene, pyrene, diflubenzuron, and carbaryl exhibited the highest detection frequencies.

  18. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is a very stable and inert molecule due to the formation of a triple bond between the two atoms. Surpris- ingly isoelectronic molecules are quite reactive making dinitrogen very useful and unique. Dinitrogen (N. 2. ) is such an innocuous molecule that you might not think it worthy of special attention. We take this molecule for.

  19. Fe-doped graphene nanosheet as an adsorption platform of harmful gas molecules (CO, CO2, SO2 and H2S), and the co-adsorption in O2 environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego; Villegas-Escobar, Nery; Ortega, Daniela E.

    2018-01-01

    The adsorption of pollutant gases (CO, CO2, SO2 and H2S) onto Fe-doped graphene nanosheets (FeG) is studied on the basis of density functional theory calculations at the PBE/Def2-SVP level of theory. The most stable adsorption configurations, binding characteristics, electronic properties and stability at room temperature of the FeG-Gas interactions is fully analyzed. The gas molecules are chemisorbed onto FeG with adsorption energies in the range of 0.54-1.8 eV, with an enhanced adsorption strength compared to intrinsic graphene. The stability of the FeG-Gas interactions is dominated by Lewis-acid-base interactions, and its strength is sorted as SO2 > CO > H2S > CO2. The adsorption stability is also retained at room temperature (300 K). Due to the strong interaction of SO2, CO, and H2S, FeG could catalyze or activate these gas molecules, suggesting the possibility of FeG as a catalyst substrate. The electron acceptor/donor character of CO, CO2, SO2 and H2S molecules when adsorbed onto FeG causes charge transfer processes that are responsible for the change in conductance of FeG; thus, the response of the HOMO-LUMO gap of FeG under gas adsorption could be useful for sensing applications. Furthermore, the analysis of the co-adsorption in O2 environments shows that the CO2 interaction turns unstable onto FeG, while the sensing response towards H2S is suppressed. Finally, these results give new insights into the emerging applications of Fe-doped graphene in gas capture/filtration devices, solid-state gas sensors or as a catalyst substrate.

  20. Neutron residual stress measurements in linepipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Michael; Gnaëpel-Herold, Thomas; Luzin, Vladimir; Bowie, Graham

    2006-11-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines are generated by manufacturing and construction processes and may affect the subsequent pipe integrity. In the present work, the residual stresses in eight samples of linepipe were measured by neutron diffraction. Residual stresses changed with some coating processes. This has special implications in understanding and mitigating stress corrosion cracking, a major safety and economic problem in some gas pipelines.

  1. Neutron residual stress measurements in linepipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Michael; Gnaepel-Herold, Thomas; Luzin, Vladimir; Bowie, Graham

    2006-01-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines are generated by manufacturing and construction processes and may affect the subsequent pipe integrity. In the present work, the residual stresses in eight samples of linepipe were measured by neutron diffraction. Residual stresses changed with some coating processes. This has special implications in understanding and mitigating stress corrosion cracking, a major safety and economic problem in some gas pipelines

  2. Determination of low-level agricultural residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography with mass-selective detection: single-laboratory validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paske, Nathan; Berry, Bryan; Schmitz, John; Sullivan, Darryl

    2007-01-01

    In this study, sponsored by PepsiCo Inc., a method was validated for measurement of 19 pesticide residues in soft drinks and sports drinks by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with mass selective detection The pesticide residues determined in this validation were alpha-benzenehexachloride (BHC); beta-BHC; gamma-BHC; delta-BHC; methyl parathion; malathion; chlorpyrifos; aldrin; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE); alpha-endosulfan; 4,4-DDE; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD); dieldrin; ethion; 4,4-DDD; 2,4-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene (DDT); beta-endosulfan; 4,4-DDT; and endosulfan sulfate when spiked into a 200 mL matrix sample at 0.50 microg/L. The samples were diluted with acetonitrile and water, then liquid-liquid phase extracted into petroleum ether. The resulting extract was concentrated to near dryness and diluted with hexane:dichloromethane (50:50). The concentrated samples were purified by gel permeation chromatography. The resulting solution was concentrated and separated on a Florisil substrate. The eluent was concentrated to near dryness, reconstituted to produce a 200-fold concentration, and analyzed using a GC/MS instrument operated in the selective ion monitoring mode. The GC/MS instrument was equipped with a large volume injector capable of injecting 25 microL. External standards prepared in dichloromethane were used for quantification without the need for matrix-matched calibration because the extraction step minimized the matrix effects. The calibration curves for all agricultural residues had coefficients of determination (r2) of greater than or equal to 0.9900, with the exception of one value that was 0.988. Fortification spikes at 0.50 microg/L in 3 matrixes (7UP, Gatorade, and Diet Pepsi) over the course of 2 days (4 days for Gatorade), where n=8 each day, yielded average percent recoveries (and percent relative standard deviations) as follows (n=64): 95.6 (24.8) for alpha-BHC; 91.9 (23.6) for beta-BHC; 89.1 (21

  3. Development and comparison of two multi-residue methods for the analysis of select pesticides in honey bees, pollen, and wax by gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanbo; Kelley, Rebecca A; Anderson, Troy D; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    One of the hypotheses that may help explain the loss of honey bee colonies worldwide is the increasing potential for exposure of honey bees to complex mixtures of pesticides. To better understand this phenomenon, two multi-residue methods based on different extraction and cleanup procedures have been developed, and compared for the determination of 11 relevant pesticides in honey bees, pollen, and wax by gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Sample preparatory methods included solvent extraction followed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) cleanup and cleanup using a dispersive solid-phase extraction with zirconium-based sorbents (Z-Sep). Matrix effects, method detection limits, recoveries, and reproducibility were evaluated and compared. Method detection limits (MDL) of the pesticides for the GPC method in honey bees, pollen, and wax ranged from 0.65 to 5.92 ng/g dw, 0.56 to 6.61 ng/g dw, and 0.40 to 8.30 ng/g dw, respectively, while MDLs for the Z-Sep method were from 0.33 to 4.47 ng/g dw, 0.42 to 5.37 ng/g dw, and 0.51 to 5.34 ng/g dw, respectively. The mean recoveries in all matrices and at three spiking concentrations ranged from 64.4% to 149.5% and 71.9% to 126.2% for the GPC and Z-Sep methods, with relative standard deviation between 1.5-25.3% and 1.3-15.9%, respectively. The results showed that the Z-Sep method was more suitable for the determination of the target pesticides, especially chlorothalonil, in bee hive samples. The Z-Sep method was then validated using a series of field-collected bee hive samples taken from honey bee colonies in Virginia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of soil organic C content on the greenhouse gas emission potential after application of biogas residues or cattle slurry - Results from a pot experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Gawan

    2017-04-01

    Influence of soil organic C content on the greenhouse gas emission potential after application of biogas residues or cattle slurry - Results from a pot experiment Gawan Heintze1,2, Tim Eickenscheidt1, Urs Schmidthalter2 and Matthias Drösler1 1University of Applied Sciences Weihenstephan-Triesdorf, Chair of Vegetation Ecology, Weihenstephaner Berg 4, 85354 Freising, Germany 2Technische Universität München, Chair of Plant Nutrition, Emil-Ramann-Str. 2, 85354 Freising, Germany The European Union Renewable Energy Directive, which sets a binding target of a final energy consumption of 20% from renewable sources by 2020, has markedly promoted the increase of biogas plants, particularly in Germany. As a consequence, a large amount of biogas residue remains as a by-product of the fermentative process. These residues are now widely used instead of mineral fertilizers or animal slurries to maintain soil fertility and productivity. However, to date, the effect of the application of biogas residue on greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, compared to that of other organic fertilizers, is contradictory in literature, not having been completely understood. It is often stated that GHG fluxes are closely related to the quality of the raw material, particularly the type of soil to which the digestates are applied. This study addresses the questions (a) to what extent are the applications of biogas digestate and cattle slurry different in terms of their GHG emission (CO2, CH4 and N2O) potential, and (b) how do different soil organic carbon contents (SOCs) influence the rate of GHG exchange. We hypothesize that, i) cattle slurry application enhances the CO2 and N2O fluxes compared to the biogas digestate due to the overall higher C and N input, and ii) that with increasing SOC and N content, higher emissions of CO2 and N2O can be expected. The study was conducted as a pot experiment. Biogas digestate and cattle slurry were applied to and incorporated into three different soil types with

  5. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  6. Influence of parameters of gas medium on the fluorescence of iodine molecules 129I2, 127I129I and 127I2 excited by semiconductor laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Calculated and experimental results of studies of the influence of vapor temperature of iodine molecules (129I2, 127I129I, and 127I2) and pressure of the analyzed medium on the intensity of fluorescence of the molecules excited by semiconductor laser radiation in the red spectrum region are reported. It is demonstrated that depending on the wavelength of laser radiation there exist different ranges of temperatures and pressure values at which the fluorescence intensities of each of the indicated iodine molecules reach their maximum values.

  7. Low pressure tritiation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, T.F.; Powers, J.C.; Lively, M.O.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described of tritiating sensitive biological molecules by depositing molecules of the substance to be tritiated on a supporting substrate in an evacuated vacuum chamber near, but not in the path of, an electron beam which traverses the chamber, admitting tritium gas into the chamber, and subjecting the tritium to the electron beam. Vibrationally excited tritium gas species are generated which collide and react with the substance thus incorporating tritium atoms into the substance. (U.K.)

  8. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  9. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  10. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  11. Rule-based programming and strategies for automated generation of detailed kinetic models for gas phase combustion of polycyclic hydrocarbon molecules; Programmation par regles et strategies pour la generation automatique de mecanismes de combustion d'hydrocarbures polycycliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanescu, L.

    2004-06-15

    The primary objective of this thesis is to explore the approach of using rule-based systems and strategies, for a complex problem of chemical kinetic: the automated generation of reaction mechanisms. The chemical reactions are naturally expressed as conditional rewriting rules. The control of the chemical reactions chaining is easy to describe using a strategies language, such as the one of the ELAN system, developed in the Protheo team. The thesis presents the basic concepts of the chemical kinetics, the chemical and computational problems related to the conception and validation of a reaction mechanism, and gives a general structure for the generator of reaction mechanisms called GasEI. Our research focuses on the primary mechanism generator. We give solutions for encoding the chemical species, the reactions and their chaining, and we present the prototype developed in ELAN. The representation of the chemical species uses the notion of molecular graphs, encoded by a term structure called GasEI terms. The chemical reactions are expressed by rewriting rules on molecular graphs, encoded by a set of conditional rewriting rules on GasEI terms. The strategies language of the ELAN system is used to express the reactions chaining in the primary mechanism generator. This approach is illustrated by coding ten generic reactions of the oxidizing pyrolysis. Qualitative chemical validations of the prototype show that our approach gives, for acyclic molecules, the same results as the existing mechanism generators, and for polycyclic molecules produces original results.

  12. Residuation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Blyth, T S; Sneddon, I N; Stark, M

    1972-01-01

    Residuation Theory aims to contribute to literature in the field of ordered algebraic structures, especially on the subject of residual mappings. The book is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on ordered sets; directed sets; semilattices; lattices; and complete lattices. Chapter 2 tackles Baer rings; Baer semigroups; Foulis semigroups; residual mappings; the notion of involution; and Boolean algebras. Chapter 3 covers residuated groupoids and semigroups; group homomorphic and isotone homomorphic Boolean images of ordered semigroups; Dubreil-Jacotin and Brouwer semigroups; and loli

  13. Time Resolved Energy Transfer and Photodissociation of Vibrationally Excited Molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crim, F. F

    2007-01-01

    ...) in solution and in the gas phase. This second experiment is one of the few direct comparisons of intramolecular vibrational energy flow in a solvated molecule with that in the same molecule isolated in a gas...

  14. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  15. Analysis of organo-chlorine pesticides residue in raw coffee with a modified "quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe" extraction/clean up procedure for reducing the impact of caffeine on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresin, Bruno; Piol, Maria; Fabbro, Denis; Mancini, Maria Antonietta; Casetta, Bruno; Del Bianco, Clorinda

    2015-01-09

    The control of pesticide residues on raw coffee is a task of great importance due to high consumption of this beverage in Italy and in many other countries. High caffeine content can hamper extraction and measurement of any pesticide residue. A tandem extraction protocol has been devised by exploiting the quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe (QuEChERS) scheme for extraction, coupled to a dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) in order to drastically reduce caffeine content in the final extract. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been used for quantification of organo-chlorine pesticides in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Method has been validated and performances meet the criteria prescribed by European Union regulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A multi-residue method for pesticides analysis in green coffee beans using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in selective ion monitoring mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzutti, Ionara R; de Kok, Andre; Dickow Cardoso, Carmem; Reichert, Bárbara; de Kroon, Marijke; Wind, Wouter; Weber Righi, Laís; Caiel da Silva, Rosselei

    2012-08-17

    In this study, a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method, using the very selective negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode, was developed and applied in combination with a modified acetonitrile-based extraction method (QuEChERS) for the analysis of a large number of pesticide residues (51 pesticides, including isomers and degradation products) in green coffee beans. A previously developed integrated sample homogenization and extraction method for both pesticides and mycotoxins analysis was used. An homogeneous slurry of green milled coffee beans and water (ratio 1:4, w/w) was prepared and extracted with acetonitrile/acetic acid (1%), followed by magnesium sulfate addition for phase separation. Aliquots from this extract could be used directly for LC-MS/MS analysis of mycotoxins and LC-amenable pesticides. For GC-MS analysis, a further clean-up was necessary. C18- and PSA-bonded silica were tested as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) sorbents, separate and as a mixture, and the best results were obtained using C18-bonded silica. For the optimal sensitivity and selectivity, GC-MS detection in the NCI-selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode had to be used to allow the fast analysis of the difficult coffee bean matrix. The validation was performed by analyzing recovery samples at three different spike concentrations, 10, 20 and 50 μg kg(-1), with 6 replicates (n=6) at each concentration. Linearity (r(2)) of calibration curves, estimated instrument and method limits of detection and limits of quantification (LOD(i), LOD(m), LOQ(i) and LOQ(m), respectively), accuracy (as recovery %), precision (as RSD%) and matrix effects (%) were determined for each individual pesticide. From the 51 analytes (42 parent pesticides, 4 isomers and 5 degradation products) determined by GC-MS (NCI-SIM), approximately 76% showed average recoveries between 70-120% and 75% and RSD ≤ 20% at the lowest spike concentration of 10 μg kg(-1), the target method LOQ. For the

  17. The P9 pocket of HLA-DQ2 (non-Aspbeta57) has no particular preference for negatively charged anchor residues found in other type 1 diabetes-predisposing non-Aspbeta57 MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarsten, H; Paulsen, G; Johansen, B H

    1998-01-01

    -predisposing class II molecules. The molecular explanation for such a phenomenon could be that class II beta chains with Aspbeta57 form a salt bridge between Aspbeta57 and a conserved Arg of the a chain, whereas in non-Aspbeta57 molecules the Arg is unopposed and free to interact with negatively charged P9 peptide...

  18. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  19. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  20. Coupled cluster calculations of mean excitation energies of the noble gas atoms He, Ne and Ar and of the H2 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Haq, Inam U.; Sabin, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Using an asymmetric-Lanczos-chain algorithm for the calculation of the coupled cluster linear response functions at the CCSD and CC2 levels of approximation, we have calculated the mean excitation energies of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar, and of the hydrogen molecule H2. Convergence with respect...

  1. The electronic spectrum of CUONg(4) (Ng = Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe): New insights in the interaction of the CUO molecule with noble gas matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tecmer, P.; van Lingen, H.; Gomes, A.S.P.; Visscher, L.

    2012-01-01

    The electronic spectrum of the CUO molecule was investigated with the IHFSCC-SD (intermediate Hamiltonian Fock-space coupled cluster with singles and doubles) method and with TD-DFT (time-dependent density functional theory) employing the PBE and PBE0 exchange-correlation functionals. The importance

  2. [Plant drugs with residues of organochlorine compounds. 2. Identification of residues of DDT and its analogs by comparison of gas chromatography on packed and capillary columns and GC/MS coupling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benecke, R; Brotka, J; Wijsbeek, J; Franke, J P; Bruins, A P; de Zeeuw, R A

    1986-07-01

    For the GC analysis of DDT isomers and metabolites in extracts of Flores Chamomillae end Radix Valerianae the separation on a packed QF-1/OV-17 column was compared with various capillary columns of the CP-Sil type. Identification of the individual compounds could be achieved by comparing the retention behavior, chemical transformation of DDT and DDE, as well as by capillary GC-MS using single ion monitoring of substance-characteristic ion mass. In this way, residues of p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDE and p,p'-TDE could be identified.

  3. Photon Stimulated Desorption and the Effect of Cracking of Condensed Molecules in a Cryogenic Vacuum System

    CERN Document Server

    Anashin, V V; Gröbner, Oswald; Malyshev, O B

    2000-01-01

    The design of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) vacuum system requires a complete understanding of all processes which may affect the residual gas density in the cold bore of the 1.9 K cryomagnets. A wealth of data has been obtained which may be used to predict the residual gas density inside a cold vacuum system exposed to synchrotron radiation. In this study the effect of cracking of cryosorbed molecules by synchrotron radiation photons has been included. Cracking of the molecular species CO2 and CH4 has been observed in recent studies and these findings have been incorporated in a more detailed dynamic gas density model for the LHC. In this paper, we describe the relevant physical processes and the parameters required for a full evaluation. It is shown that the dominant gas species in the LHC vacuum system with its beam screen are H2 and CO. The important result of this study is that while the surface coverage of cryosorbed CH4 and CO2 molecules is limited due to cracking, the coverage of H2 and CO molecules...

  4. A density functional tight binding/force field approach to the interaction of molecules with rare gas clusters: application to (C6H6)(+/0)Ar(n) clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftner, Christophe; Simon, Aude; Korchagina, Kseniia; Rapacioli, Mathias; Spiegelman, Fernand

    2014-01-21

    We propose in the present paper a SCC-DFTB/FF (Self-Consistent-Charge Density Functional based Tight Binding/Force-Field) scheme adapted to the investigation of molecules trapped in rare gas environments. With respect to usual FF descriptions, the model involves the interaction of quantum electrons in a molecule with rare gas atoms in an anisotropic scheme. It includes polarization and dispersion contributions and can be used for both neutral and charged species. Parameters for this model are determined for hydrocarbon-argon complexes and the model is validated for small hydrocarbons. With the future aim of studying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Ar matrices, extensive benchmark calculations are performed on (C6H6)(+/0)Arn clusters against DFT and CCSD(T) calculations for the smaller sizes, and more generally against other experimental and theoretical data. Results on the structures and energetics (isomer ordering and energy separation, cohesion energy per Ar atom) are presented in detail for n = 1-8, 13, 20, 27, and 30, for both neutrals and cations. We confirm that the clustering of Ar atoms leads to a monotonous decrease of the ionization potential of benzene for n ⩽ 20, in line with previous experimental and FF data.

  5. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  6. Residue processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieg, W.; Rank, V.

    1942-10-15

    In the first stage of coal hydrogenation, the liquid phase, light and heavy oils were produced; the latter containing the nonliquefied parts of the coal, the coal ash, and the catalyst substances. It was the problem of residue processing to extract from these so-called let-down oils that which could be used as pasting oils for the coal. The object was to obtain a maximum oil extraction and a complete removal of the solids, because of the latter were returned to the process they would needlessly burden the reaction space. Separation of solids in residue processing could be accomplished by filtration, centrifugation, extraction, distillation, or low-temperature carbonization (L.T.C.). Filtration or centrifugation was most suitable since a maximum oil yield could be expected from it, since only a small portion of the let-down oil contained in the filtration or centrifugation residue had to be thermally treated. The most satisfactory centrifuge at this time was the Laval, which delivered liquid centrifuge residue and centrifuge oil continuously. By comparison, the semi-continuous centrifuges delivered plastic residues which were difficult to handle. Various apparatus such as the spiral screw kiln and the ball kiln were used for low-temperature carbonization of centrifuge residues. Both were based on the idea of carbonization in thin layers. Efforts were also being made to produce electrode carbon and briquette binder as by-products of the liquid coal phase.

  7. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  8. Analysis of class 1 residual solvents in pharmaceuticals using headspace-programmed temperature vaporization-fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Pavón, José Luis; Del Nogal Sánchez, Miguel; Fernández Laespada, M A Esther; García Pinto, Carmelo; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo

    2007-02-02

    A sensitive method is presented for the fast screening and determination of residual class 1 solvents (1,1-dichloroethene, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride and benzene) in pharmaceutical products. The applicability of a headspace (HS) autosampler in combination with GC equipped with a programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) and a MS detector is explored. Different injection techniques were compared. The benefits of using solvent vent injection instead of split or splitless-hot injection for the measurement of volatile compounds are shown: better peak shapes, better signal-to-noise ratios, and hence better detection limits. The proposed method is extremely sensitive. The limits of detection ranged from 4.9 ppt (benzene) to 7.9 ppt (1,2-dichloroethane) and precision (measured as the relative standard deviation) was equal to or lower than 12% in all cases. The method was applied to the determination of residual solvents in nine different pharmaceutical products. The analytical performance of the method shows that it is appropriate for the determination of residual class 1 solvents and has much lower detection limits than the concentration limits proposed by the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) of Technical Requirements for the Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. The proposed method achieves a clear improvement in sensitivity with respect to conventional headspace methods due to the use of the PTV.

  9. A rapid, solid phase extraction (SPE technique for the extraction and gas chromatographic determination lindane pesticide residue in tissue and milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuningsih

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Organochlorine pesticide contamination in feed can cause residue in animal product (tissue and milk, so its become a problem in food safety. Solid phase extraction (SPE has been carried out for determination organochlorine pesticide residues in food animal production. The technique was rapid, not costly and produce limited amount of hazardous-waste. Samples were homogenized with acetonitrile trough cartridge C18, eluted in fluorocyl column with 2% ether-petroleum or acetonitrile fortissue and milk samples respectively. The recoveries of tissue sample by addition lindane standard solution: 0.50 and 1.00 μg are 85.10 and 103.10% respectively, while that of milk with the addition of 0.50, 1.00 and 1.50 μg are 83.80, 88.69 and 91.24% respectively. Three replicates were carried out for every sample. According of validation criteria of FAO/IAEA the recovery for analysis of pesticide residues was 70-110%. Therefore, the method is applicable.

  10. Rapid analytical method for the determination of pesticide residues in sunflower seeds based on focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extraction prior to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados-Rosales, R C; Luque García, J L; Luque de Castro, M D

    2003-04-18

    A rapid analytical method for determination of organochlorine pesticide residues in sunflower seeds based on focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extraction has been developed. The main factors affecting the extraction efficiency--namely microwave power, irradiation time, volume of extractant and number of cycles--were optimized by a two-level factorial fractional design. After extraction, a liquid-liquid extraction and a clean-up step including the use of Florisil macrocolumns were required prior to injection of the extracts into the chromatograph in order to isolate the pesticide residues from the lipid fraction of the original extract. The MS-MS ion preparation mode was selected due to the high sensitivity and selectivity it provides. Seed samples were used collected near a crop subjected to aerial pesticide application. Residues of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers and endosulfan were found in the seeds although they were not subjected to pesticide application, thus showing the spray-drift contamination. The validation of the proposed approach was carried out by comparison with the ISO 659-1988 reference extraction method obtaining similar, or even better efficiencies by the proposed approach.

  11. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  12. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 5. Molecule Matters - N-Heterocyclic Carbenes - The Stable Form of R2 C: Anil J Elias. Feature Article Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 456-467. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Management of NORM Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA attaches great importance to the dissemination of information that can assist Member States in the development, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of systems, programmes and activities that support the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications, and that address the legacy of past practices and accidents. However, radioactive residues are found not only in nuclear fuel cycle activities, but also in a range of other industrial activities, including: - Mining and milling of metalliferous and non-metallic ores; - Production of non-nuclear fuels, including coal, oil and gas; - Extraction and purification of water (e.g. in the generation of geothermal energy, as drinking and industrial process water; in paper and pulp manufacturing processes); - Production of industrial minerals, including phosphate, clay and building materials; - Use of radionuclides, such as thorium, for properties other than their radioactivity. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) may lead to exposures at some stage of these processes and in the use or reuse of products, residues or wastes. Several IAEA publications address NORM issues with a special focus on some of the more relevant industrial operations. This publication attempts to provide guidance on managing residues arising from different NORM type industries, and on pertinent residue management strategies and technologies, to help Member States gain perspectives on the management of NORM residues

  15. Design of a compressed air modulator to be used in comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography and its application in the determination of pesticide residues in grapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pizzutti, I.R.; Vreuls, J.J.; Kok, A; Roehrs, R.; Martel, S.; Friggi, C.A.; Zanella, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a new modulator that is simple, robust and presents low operation costs, was developed. This modulator uses compressed air to cool two small portions in the first centimeters of the second chromatographic column of a comprehensive multidimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) system.

  16. Electron-induced damage of biotin studied in the gas phase and in the condensed phase at a single-molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Adrian; Kopyra, Janina; Gothelf, Kurt V.; Bald, Ilko

    2013-08-01

    Biotin is an essential vitamin that is, on the one hand, relevant for the metabolism, gene expression and in the cellular response to DNA damage and, on the other hand, finds numerous applications in biotechnology. The functionality of biotin is due to two particular sub-structures, the ring structure and the side chain with carboxyl group. The heterocyclic ring structure results in the capability of biotin to form strong intermolecular hydrogen and van der Waals bonds with proteins such as streptavidin, whereas the carboxyl group can be employed to covalently bind biotin to other complex molecules. Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to biotin results in a decomposition of the ring structure and the carboxyl group, respectively, within resonant features in the energy range 0-12 eV, thereby preventing the capability of biotin for intermolecular binding and covalent coupling to other molecules. Specifically, the fragment anions (M-H)-, (M-O)-, C3N2O-, CH2O2-, OCN-, CN-, OH- and O- are observed, and exemplarily the DEA cross section of OCN- formation is determined to be 3 × 10-19 cm2. To study the response of biotin to electrons within a complex condensed environment, we use the DNA origami technique and determine a dissociation yield of (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10-14 cm2 at 18 eV electron energy, which represents the most relevant energy for biomolecular damage induced by secondary electrons. The present results thus have important implications for the use of biotin as a label in radiation experiments.

  17. Using landfill gas as the primary fuel for a 200 WTPD thermal dryer[Held jointly with the 4. Canadian organic residuals and biosolids managment conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulmister, D. [Manattee County, Manatee, FL (United States). Wastewater Division; Monroe, A. [McKim and Creed, Cary, NC (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Although there is no evidence of health problems, there is a growing opposition to class B land application of biosolids in many localities in the United States, resulting in less sites available to dispose of class B biosolids. Manatee County, located on the West Coast of Florida, decided to implement thermal drying of its biosolids. This produced a class A pellet that could be used without restriction as a fertilizer or soil amendment. The dryer will be located at the county's southeast water reclamation facility, adjacent to the county's Lena Road landfill. The methane gas from the landfill will be used as the primary fuel for the dryer. This paper presented how Manatee County, Florida decided to meet its long term biosolids handling and disposal needs. The paper provided background information on Manatee County, Florida. It discussed the reasons for the dryer technology selection, location of the dryer, sizing criteria as well as listing the components of the dryer. The paper also discussed dryer procurement. Other topics that were presented included fuel requirements and an analysis of landfill gas. The County expects to save approximately two million dollars per year by selecting landfill gas from its Lena Road landfill as the primary fuel for the dryer. 5 tabs.

  18. Residual risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ing the residual risk of transmission of HIV by blood transfusion. An epidemiological approach assumed that all HIV infections detected serologically in first-time donors were pre-existing or prevalent infections, and that all infections detected in repeat blood donors were new or incident infections. During 1986 - 1987,0,012%.

  19. In Situ Analysis of Martian Regolith with the SAM Experiment During the First Mars Year of the MSL Mission: Identification of Organic Molecules by Gas Chromatography from Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, M.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Coll, P.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Francois, P.; Coscia, D.; Bonnet, J. Y.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover, is specifically designed for in situ molecular and isotopic analyses of martian surface materials and atmosphere. It contributes to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions primary scientific goal to characterize the potential past, present or future habitability of Mars. In all of the analyses of solid samples delivered to SAM so far, chlorinated organic compounds have been detected above instrument background levels and identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (Freissinet et al., 2015; Glavin et al., 2013). While some of these may originate from reactions between oxychlorines and terrestrial organic carbon present in the instrument background (Glavin et al., 2013), others have been demonstrated to originate from indigenous organic carbon present in samples (Freissinet et al., 2015). We present here laboratory calibrations that focused on the analyses performed with the MXT-CLP GC column (SAM GC-5 channel) used for nearly all of the GC-MS analyses of the martian soil samples carried out with SAM to date. Complementary to the mass spectrometric data, gas chromatography allows us to separate and identify the species analyzable in a nominal SAM-GC run time of about 21 min. To characterize the analytical capabilities of this channel within the SAM Flight Model (FM) operating conditions on Mars, and their implications on the detection of organic matter, it is required to perform laboratory experimental tests and calibrations on spare model components. This work assesses the SAM flight GC-5 column efficiency, confirms the identification of the molecules based on their retention time, and enables a better understanding of the behavior of the SAM injection trap (IT) and its release of organic molecules. This work will enable further optimization of the SAM-GC runs for additional samples to be analyzed during the MSL mission.

  20. Gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry of Pinot Noir wine volatile compounds (δ13C) and solid residues (δ13C, δ15N) for the reassessment of vineyard water-status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Jorge E; Vogiatzaki, Maria; Zufferey, Vivian

    2017-09-29

    This paper describes a novel approach to reassess the water status in vineyards based on compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of wine volatile organic compounds (δ 13 C VOC/VPDB ) and bulk carbon and nitrogen isotopes, and the C/N molar ratios of the wine solid residues (δ 13 C SR/VPDB , δ 15 N SR/Air-N2 ). These analyses link gas chromatography/combustion and elemental analysis to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS, EA/IRMS). Field-grown cultivars of Pinot Noir grapevines were exposed during six growing seasons (2009-2014) to controlled soil water availability, while maintaining identical the other environmental variables and agricultural techniques. Wines were produced from the grapes by the same oenological protocol. This permitted for the assessment of the effects in the biochemistry of wines solely induced by the changes in the plant-soil water status. This mimicked the more recurrent and prolonged periods of soil water deficiency due to climate changes. Water stress in grapevine was assessed by the measurement of the predawn leaf water potential (Ψ pd ) and the stable carbon isotope composition of the berry sugars during harvest (must sugars). For quantitation purposes and the normalization of the measured stable carbon isotope ratios of the VOCs, the wine samples were spiked with three standard compounds with known concentration and δ 13 C VPDB values. VOCs were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID), gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and GC/C/IRMS. δ 13 C values were obtained for eighteen VOCs. The solid residues were obtained by freeze-drying wine aliquots and were analyzed for their C and N content and isotope composition by EA/IRMS. All the isotopic ratios (δ 13 C SR , δ 15 N SR , δ 13 C VOC ) are highly correlated with the Ψ pd values, indicating that the proposed gas chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry approach is a useful tool to

  1. Enhancement Corrosion Resistance of (γ-Glycidyloxypropyl-Silsesquioxane-Titanium Dioxide Films and Its Validation by Gas Molecule Diffusion Coefficients Using Molecular Dynamics (MD Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on silsesquioxanes (SSO derived from the hydrolytic condensation of (γ-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPMS and titanium tetrabutoxide (TTB, hybrid films on aluminum alloy (AA, film-GPMS-SSO (f-GS and f-GS-TTBi% (f-GSTT5%–25%, i = 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 wt%, were prepared and tested by electrochemical measurements with typical potentiodynamic polarization curves. The Icorr values of the samples were significantly lower, comparing with the Icorr values of the f-GS, AA and f-GS modified tetraethoxysilane (TEOS in the previous study, which implies that the TTB5%–25% (TiO2 additions in the coatings indeed enhance the electrochemical corrosion resistance. Correlations between the film structures and anticorrosion properties were discussed. To validate the corresponding anticorrosion experiment results, different 3D-amorphous cubic unit cells were employed as models to investigate the self-diffusion coefficient (SDC for SO2, NO2 and H2O molecules by molecular dynamics (MD simulation. All of the SDCs calculated for SO2, NO2 and H2O diffusing in f-GSTT5%–25% cells were less than the SDCs in f-GS. These results validated the corresponding anticorrosion experiment results.

  2. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  3. Methodology for the determination of residues of organophosphorous pesticides in milk of domestic consumption by means of gas chromatography and extraction in solid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero Blanco, Eric; Meza Nunez, Humberto; Poveda Calvo, Vanessa

    2005-01-01

    A new method oriented to the detection and quantification of 15 organophosphate pesticide in raw milk samples for national consumption has been developed by using a gas chromatograph equipped with polydimethylsiloxane capillary column and a nitrogen-phosphorus detector (NPD), in combination with the extraction technique in solid phase (SPE) for the sample cleaning process and pesticide extraction. Recovery percentages obtained were close to 100% and the detection limits obtained were lower than 20 μg/L for 13 of the organophosphates analyzed. Overall, the method showed important improvement as compared to conventional liquid/liquid extraction methodologies. (Author) [es

  4. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-27

    This report compared the composition of samples from Wesseling and Leuna. In each case the sample was a residue from carbonization of the residues from hydrogenation of the brown coal processed at the plant. The composition was given in terms of volatile components, fixed carbon, ash, water, carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, volatile sulfur, and total sulfur. The result of carbonization was given in terms of (ash and) coke, tar, water, gas and losses, and bitumen. The composition of the ash was given in terms of silicon dioxide, ferric oxide, aluminum oxide, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, potassium and sodium oxides, sulfur trioxide, phosphorus pentoxide, chlorine, and titanium oxide. The most important difference between the properties of the two samples was that the residue from Wesseling only contained 4% oil, whereas that from Leuna had about 26% oil. Taking into account the total amount of residue processed yearly, the report noted that better carbonization at Leuna could save 20,000 metric tons/year of oil. Some other comparisons of data included about 33% volatiles at Leuna vs. about 22% at Wesseling, about 5 1/2% sulfur at Leuna vs. about 6 1/2% at Leuna, but about 57% ash for both. Composition of the ash differed quite a bit between the two. 1 table.

  5. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  6. Residue analysis of organochlorine pesticides in water and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr Willims

    2013-05-12

    May 12, 2013 ... residues were performed by injecting 1 µL of purified extract into the injection port of a gas chromatograph with a 63Ni electron capture .... Identification and determination of OCP residues by gas chromatography. A gas chromatograph with ..... Distribution of chlorine- ted pesticides in shellfishes from Lagos ...

  7. Automatic prediction of catalytic residues by modeling residue structural neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passerini Andrea

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of catalytic residues is a major step in characterizing the function of enzymes. In its simpler formulation, the problem can be cast into a binary classification task at the residue level, by predicting whether the residue is directly involved in the catalytic process. The task is quite hard also when structural information is available, due to the rather wide range of roles a functional residue can play and to the large imbalance between the number of catalytic and non-catalytic residues. Results We developed an effective representation of structural information by modeling spherical regions around candidate residues, and extracting statistics on the properties of their content such as physico-chemical properties, atomic density, flexibility, presence of water molecules. We trained an SVM classifier combining our features with sequence-based information and previously developed 3D features, and compared its performance with the most recent state-of-the-art approaches on different benchmark datasets. We further analyzed the discriminant power of the information provided by the presence of heterogens in the residue neighborhood. Conclusions Our structure-based method achieves consistent improvements on all tested datasets over both sequence-based and structure-based state-of-the-art approaches. Structural neighborhood information is shown to be responsible for such results, and predicting the presence of nearby heterogens seems to be a promising direction for further improvements.

  8. Assessing fuel spill risks in polar waters: Temporal dynamics and behaviour of hydrocarbons from Antarctic diesel, marine gas oil and residual fuel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathryn E; King, Catherine K; Kotzakoulakis, Konstantinos; George, Simon C; Harrison, Peter L

    2016-09-15

    As part of risk assessment of fuel oil spills in Antarctic and subantarctic waters, this study describes partitioning of hydrocarbons from three fuels (Special Antarctic Blend diesel, SAB; marine gas oil, MGO; and intermediate grade fuel oil, IFO 180) into seawater at 0 and 5°C and subsequent depletion over 7days. Initial total hydrocarbon content (THC) of water accommodated fraction (WAF) in seawater was highest for SAB. Rates of THC loss and proportions in equivalent carbon number fractions differed between fuels and over time. THC was most persistent in IFO 180 WAFs and most rapidly depleted in MGO WAF, with depletion for SAB WAF strongly affected by temperature. Concentration and composition remained proportionate in dilution series over time. This study significantly enhances our understanding of fuel behaviour in Antarctic and subantarctic waters, enabling improved predictions for estimates of sensitivities of marine organisms to toxic contaminants from fuels in the region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Trace analysis of residual methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate and isopropyl methanesulfonate in pharmaceuticals by capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiyong

    2004-08-13

    A capillary gas chromatographic method using flame ionization detection was developed and validated for the trace analysis (ppm level) of methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, and isopropyl methanesulfonate in pharmaceutical drug substance. The method utilizes a megabore capillary column with bonded and crosslinked polyethylene glycol stationary phase. A dissolve-and-injection approach was adopted for sample introduction in a splitless mode. The investigated sample solvents include acetonitrile, ethyl acetate, methylene chloride, 1,2-dichloromethane, and toluene. Aqueous mixtures of acetonitrile and water can also be used as sample solvent. A limit of detection of about 1 microg/g (1 ppm) and limit of quantitation of 5 microg/g (5 ppm) were achieved for the mesylate esters in drug substance samples. The method optimization and validation are also discussed in this paper.

  10. Determination of residual 1,4-dioxane in surfactants and cleaning agents using headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraji, M; Shirvani, N

    2017-02-01

    Polyethoxylated surfactants are widely used in the formulation of different cleaning agents such as shampoo, dish washing and hand washing products and lotion formulation. During the production of polyethoxylated surfactants, 1,4-dioxane as a toxic and carcinogenic by-product is formed. A simple low-cost method based on headspace single-drop microextraction combined with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection was developed for the determination of 1,4-dioxane in surfactants and cleaning agents. In this method, 1,4-dioxane was extracted from 8.0 mL sample solution into a microdrop of an organic solvent, and then, it was injected to gas chromatography. The effects of such parameters as the solvent type, salt addition, microdrop volume, stirring rate, equilibrium time, extraction time and the temperature of sample solution on the extraction performance were studied and optimized. An ethoxylated surfactant containing 1,4-dioxane was used as the sample for the optimization of the extraction parameters. The linear range, determination coefficient, limit of detection and relative standard deviation of the method were 0.5-100 μg g -1 , 0.9977, 0.4 μg g -1 and 7.2% (n = 5), respectively. Different real samples including sodium lauryl ether sulphate, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), four brands of shampoo, and hand washing and dish washing liquids were analysed by the method. 1,4-Dioxane was detected at the concentration range of 2.4-201 μg g -1 in the samples, except dish washing liquid and SLS. A new method with the merits of simplicity, low cost, low organic solvent consumption, short analysis time, good repeatability and suitable detection limit was developed for the analysis of 1,4-dioxane in surfactants and cleaning agents. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  11. Variation and decomposition of the partial molar volume of small gas molecules in different organic solvents derived from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Marco; Martin, Alistair; Cheong, Daniel W; Garland, Marc V

    2013-12-28

    The partial molar volumes, V(i), of the gas solutes H2, CO, and CO2, solvated in acetone, methanol, heptane, and diethylether are determined computationally in the limit of infinite dilution and standard conditions. Solutions are described with molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the OPLS-aa force field for solvents and customized force field for solutes. V(i) is determined with the direct method, while the composition of V(i) is studied with Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBIs). Subsequently, the amount of unoccupied space and size of pre-formed cavities in pure solvents is determined. Additionally, the shape of individual solvent cages is analyzed. Calculated V(i) deviate only 3.4 cm(3) mol(-1) (7.1%) from experimental literature values. Experimental V(i) variations across solutions are reproduced qualitatively and also quantitatively in most cases. The KBI analysis identifies differences in solute induced solvent reorganization in the immediate vicinity of H2 (<0.7 nm) and solvent reorganization up to the third solvation shell of CO and CO2 (<1.6 nm) as the origin of V(i) variations. In all solutions, larger V(i) are found in solvents that exhibit weak internal interactions, low cohesive energy density and large compressibility. Weak internal interactions facilitate solvent displacement by thermal solute movement, which enhances the size of solvent cages and thus V(i). Additionally, attractive electrostatic interactions of CO2 and the solvents, which do not depend on internal solvent interactions only, partially reversed the V(i) trends observed in H2 and CO solutions where electrostatic interactions with the solvents are absent. More empty space and larger pre-formed cavities are found in solvents with weak internal interactions, however, no evidence is found that solutes in any considered solvent are accommodated in pre-formed cavities. Individual solvent cages are found to be elongated in the negative direction of solute movement. This wake behind

  12. Variation and decomposition of the partial molar volume of small gas molecules in different organic solvents derived from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klähn, Marco; Martin, Alistair; Cheong, Daniel W.; Garland, Marc V.

    2013-12-01

    The partial molar volumes, bar V_i, of the gas solutes H2, CO, and CO2, solvated in acetone, methanol, heptane, and diethylether are determined computationally in the limit of infinite dilution and standard conditions. Solutions are described with molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the OPLS-aa force field for solvents and customized force field for solutes. bar V_i is determined with the direct method, while the composition of bar V_i is studied with Kirkwood-Buff integrals (KBIs). Subsequently, the amount of unoccupied space and size of pre-formed cavities in pure solvents is determined. Additionally, the shape of individual solvent cages is analyzed. Calculated bar V_i deviate only 3.4 cm3 mol-1 (7.1%) from experimental literature values. Experimental bar V_i variations across solutions are reproduced qualitatively and also quantitatively in most cases. The KBI analysis identifies differences in solute induced solvent reorganization in the immediate vicinity of H2 (<0.7 nm) and solvent reorganization up to the third solvation shell of CO and CO2 (<1.6 nm) as the origin of bar V_i variations. In all solutions, larger bar V_i are found in solvents that exhibit weak internal interactions, low cohesive energy density and large compressibility. Weak internal interactions facilitate solvent displacement by thermal solute movement, which enhances the size of solvent cages and thus bar V_i. Additionally, attractive electrostatic interactions of CO2 and the solvents, which do not depend on internal solvent interactions only, partially reversed the bar V_i trends observed in H2 and CO solutions where electrostatic interactions with the solvents are absent. More empty space and larger pre-formed cavities are found in solvents with weak internal interactions, however, no evidence is found that solutes in any considered solvent are accommodated in pre-formed cavities. Individual solvent cages are found to be elongated in the negative direction of solute

  13. Low-level Determination of Residual Methyl Methane Sulfonate and Ethyl Methane Sulfonate in Pharmaceuticals by Gas Chromatography with Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sarat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A capillary gas chromatographic method using mass spectrometric detection was developed and validated for the trace analysis (ppm level of methyl methane sulfonate and ethyl methane sulfonate in pharmaceutical drug substances. The method utilizes a capillary column (DB-624 with 6% cyanopropyl phenyl and 94% dimethyl polysiloxane stationary phase. A dissolve-and-injection approach was adopted for sample introduction in a split less mode. Mixture of (80:20 ratio of methanol and chloroform was used as a diluent or sample solvent. A limit of detection of about 0.17 μg/g (0.17 ppm for methyl methane sulfonate and 0.18 μg/g (0.18 ppm for ethyl methane sulfonate were achieved and limit of quantitation of 0.52 μg/g (0.52 ppm for methyl methane sulfonate and 0.54 μg/g (0.54 ppm for ethyl methane sulfonate were achieved for alkyl sulfonates in drug substance samples.

  14. Determination of triazole pesticide residues in edible oils using air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Feriduni, Behruz; Mogaddam, Mohammad Reza Afshar

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, a rapid, simple, and highly efficient sample preparation method based on air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection was developed for the extraction, preconcentration, and determination of five triazole pesticides (penconazole, hexaconazole, diniconazole, tebuconazole, and triticonazole) in edible oils. Initially, the oil samples were diluted with hexane and a few microliter of a less soluble organic solvent (extraction solvent) in hexane was added. To form fine and dispersed extraction solvent droplets, the mixture of oil sample solution and extraction solvent is repeatedly aspirated and dispersed with a syringe. Under the optimum extraction conditions, the method showed low limits of detection and quantification between 2.2-6.1 and 7.3-20 μg/L, respectively. Enrichment factors and extraction recoveries were in the ranges of 71-96 and 71-96%, respectively. The relative standard deviations for the extraction of 100 and 250 μg/L of each pesticide were less than 5% for intraday (n = 6) and interday (n = 3) precisions. Finally edible oil samples were successfully analyzed using the proposed method, and hexaconazole was found in grape seed oil. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Multi-residue analysis of legacy POPs and emerging organic contaminants in Singapore's coastal waters using gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Bayen, Stéphane; Kelly, Barry C

    2015-08-01

    A gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) based method was developed for determination of 86 hydrophobic organic compounds in seawater. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was employed for sequestration of target analytes in the dissolved phase. Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) and florisil chromatography were utilized for determination of concentrations in suspended sediments (particulate phase). The target compounds included multi-class hydrophobic contaminants with a wide range of physical-chemical properties. This list includes several polycyclic and nitro-aromatic musks, brominated and chlorinated flame retardants, methyl triclosan, chlorobenzenes, organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Spiked MilliQ water and seawater samples were used to evaluate the method performance. Analyte recoveries were generally good, with the exception of some of the more volatile target analytes (chlorobenzenes and bromobenzenes). The method is very sensitive, with method detection limits typically in the low parts per quadrillion (ppq) range. Analysis of 51 field-collected seawater samples (dissolved and particulate-bound phases) from four distinct coastal sites around Singapore showed trace detection of several polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and other legacy POPs, as well as several current-use emerging organic contaminants (EOCs). Polycyclic and nitro-aromatic musks, bromobenzenes, dechlorane plus isomers (syn-DP, anti-DP) and methyl triclosan were frequently detected at appreciable levels (2-20,000pgL(-1)). The observed concentrations of the monitored contaminants in Singapore's marine environment were generally comparable to previously reported levels in other coastal marine systems. To our knowledge, these are the first measurements of these emerging contaminants of concern in Singapore or Southeast Asia. The developed method may prove beneficial for future environmental monitoring of hydrophobic organic contaminants

  16. Analyses of organochlorine pesticides residues in eels (Anguilla anguilla from Lake Garda using Gas chromatography coupled with Tandem Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Federico Labella

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lake Garda is located in Insubria region, that is known for being the most populated and industrialized area of Italy (Camusso et al., 2001. Therefore, the Lake water, and also the fish species present, could be affected by environmental contamination.  European eel (Anguilla anguilla are considered as suitable matrix for biomonitoring environmental contaminants in European water (Belpaire et al., 2007, being widespread in many European waters and highly contaminated by lipophilic compounds, due to the high lipid content (up to 40% (Larsson et al., 1991. Moreover, eel is an edible species (its farming currently supplies approximately 45,000 tons/year (Nielsen et al., 2008, so it also represents a public health issue. Based on these considerations, the aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of fourteen organochlorine pesticides (OCs in forty-five eels (Anguilla anguilla from Lake Garda, using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE procedure for the analytes extraction and Gas chromatography coupled with Tandem Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS for the analysis of OCs. GC-MS/MS analysis was developed and validated according to the SANTE/11945/2015 guidelines.  Uncontaminated eel sample (previously checked for the presence of OCs and considered blank with a concentration of compounds < Limit of Detection were used for all procedure's optimization steps. For all the OCs analysed, satisfactory results were achieved. Regarding eel samples, several pesticides were detected, but DDTs (DDT and its metabolites were found with the highest prevalence (92 %. The concentration rage was from not detected (n.d. to 19000 ng g-1. Although DDTs levels in the environment are declining (Albaiges et al., 2011, they continue to bioaccumulate in tissues of human and animal and biomagnify in food chains.

  17. Experimental decoherence in molecule interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackermueller, L.; Hornberger, K.; Stibor, A.; Zeilinger, A.; Arndt, M.; Kiesewetter, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We present three mechanisms of decoherence that occur quite naturally in matter wave interferometer with large molecules. One way molecules can lose coherence is through collision with background gas particles. We observe a loss of contrast with increasing background pressure for various types of gases. We can understand this phenomenon quantitatively with a new model for collisional decoherence which corrects older models by a factor of 2 π;. The second experiment studies the thermal emission of photons related to the high internal energy of the interfering molecules. When sufficiently many or sufficiently short photons are emitted inside the interferometer, the fringe contrast is lost. We can continuously vary the temperature of the molecules and compare the loss of contrast with a model based on decoherence theory. Again we find good quantitative agreement. A third mechanism that influences our interference pattern is dephasing due to vibrations of the interference gratings. By adding additional vibrations we study this effect in more detail. (author)

  18. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENTS - RESIDUAL RISK ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Coke Ovens. These assesments utilize existing models and data bases to examine the multi-media and multi-pollutant impacts of air toxics emissions on human health and the environment. Details on the assessment process and methodologies can be found in EPA's Residual Risk Report to Congress issued in March of 1999 (see web site). To assess the health risks imposed by air toxics emissions from Coke Ovens to determine if control technology standards previously established are adequately protecting public health.

  19. Electrodialytic remediation of air pollution control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland

    Air pollution control (APC) residue from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) consists of the fly ash, and, in dry and semi-dry systems, also the reaction products from the flue gas cleaning process. APC residue is considered a hazardous waste due to its high alkalinity, high content of salts...

  20. Development of a multi-residue method for the determination of pesticides in cereals and dry animal feed using gas chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry II. Improvement and extension to new analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walorczyk, Stanisław

    2008-10-24

    This paper describes the extension and re-validation of a previously published multi-residue method to currently 140 pesticides and 4 pesticide degradation products in cereals and feedingstuffs. The pesticides were extracted using buffered QuEChERS ("quick, easy, cheap, rugged, effective and safe") method and then cleaned up using dispersive solid-phase extraction with Bondesil PSA and C18 sorbents, and optionally by a freezing-out clean-up step. The final extracts were analyzed in a single injection gas chromatographic-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometric (GC-MS/MS) acquisition method. A high degree of confidence was achieved by entering two multiple reaction monitoring transitions per compound. In this way, quantification of analytical results and unequivocal identification of pesticide residues in compliance with the recent European Union criteria could be done in a single analysis. Thorough optimization of the GC-MS/MS acquisition conditions and application of an effective clean-up procedure has resulted in a remarkable enhancement of the validation parameters. The linearity of the calibration curves was excellent in matrix-matched standards, and yielded the coefficients of determination (R(2))> or =0.99 for approximately 96% of the target analytes. Average recoveries of the pesticides spiked at 0.01mgkg(-1) into a feed mixture and wheat grain were in the range 70-120% with associated RSD values feed mixtures and other samples such as malt, starch and dry vegetables have been analyzed. A total of 15 different pesticides have been detected, among which pirimiphos methyl (19 cases), deltamethrin (14 cases), tolylfluanid (5 cases), dichlofluanid (5 cases), and tebuconazole (4 cases) were the most frequently encountered ones.

  1. Proposed systematic methodology for analysis of Pb-210 radioactivity in residues produced in Brazilian natural gas pipes; Proposicao de um modelo analitico sistematico da atividade de Pb-210 em residuos gerados em linhas de gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Aloisio Cordilha

    2003-11-15

    Since the 80's, the potential radiological hazards due to the handling of solid wastes contaminated with Rn-222 long-lived progeny - Pb-210 in special - produced in gas pipes and removed by pig operations have been subject of growing concern abroad our country. Nevertheless, little or no attention has been paid to this matter in the Brazilian plants up to now, being these hazards frequently underestimated or even ignored. The main purpose of this work was to propose a systematic methodology for analysis of Pb-210 radioactivity in black powder samples from some Brazilian plants, through the evaluation of direct Pb-210 gamma spectrometry and Bi-210 beta counting technical viabilities. In both cases, one in five samples of black powder analysed showed relevant activity (above 1Bq/kg) of Pb-210, being these results probably related to particular features of each specific plant (production levels, reservoir geochemical profile, etc.), in such a way that a single pattern is not observed. For the proposed methodology, gamma spectrometry proved to be the most reliable technique, showing a 3.5% standard deviation, and, for a 95% confidence level, overall fitness in the range of Pb-210 concentration of activity presented in the standard sample reference sheet, provided by IAEA for intercomparison purposes. In the Brazilian scene, however, the availability of statistically supported evidences is insufficient to allow the potential radiological hazard due to the management of black powder to be discarded. Thus, further research efforts are recommended in order to detect the eventually critical regions or plants where gas exploration, production and processing practices will require a regular program of radiological surveillance, in the near future. (author)

  2. Infrared emission from electronically excited biacetyl molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, E.; Kommandeur, J.

    1971-01-01

    The infrared emission of electronically excited biacetyl molecules in the gas phase at low pressure was observed. Some experimental details are given, and it is shown that the emission derives from biacetyl molecules in their triplet state. The emission is dependent on the wavelength of excitation.

  3. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  4. Molecules in the Spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  5. Photon-stimulated desorption and the effect of cracking of condensed molecules in a cryogenic vacuum system [of LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Anashin, V V; Collins, I R; Gröbner, Oswald

    2001-01-01

    The design of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) vacuum system requires a complete understanding of all processes which may affect the residual gas density in the cold bore of the 1.9 K cryomagnets. A wealth of data has been obtained which may be used to predict the residual gas density inside a cold vacuum system exposed to synchrotron radiation. In this study, the effect of cracking of cryosorbed molecules by synchrotron radiation photons has been included. Cracking of the molecular species CO/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ has been observed in recent studies and these findings have been incorporated in a more detailed dynamic gas density model for the LHC. In this paper, we describe the relevant physical processes and the parameters required for a full evaluation. It is shown that the dominant gas species in the LHC vacuum system with its beam screen are H/sub 2/ and CO. The important result of this study is that, while the surface coverage of cryosorbed CH/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/ molecules is limited due to cracking, the...

  6. RESIDUES IN CARROTS TREATED WITH LINURON

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke, Hans

    1974-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out on residues of linuron and its breakdown products in carrots sprayed with Jinuron at 1, 2, or 4 kg a.i./ha, 0, 19, 28, 36 or 60 days after sowing (up to 57 days before harvesting). The extracted residues were separated into three fractions by liquid......,4-dichloroaniline and iodide ion, followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detector. Only 5-13% of the extract-able residues were breakdown products. Most of the detectable residue (87-95%) was identified as linuron. The relative proportions of linuron and breakdown products in carrots at the time...

  7. A Promising Material by Using Residue Waste from Bisphenol A Manufacturing to Prepare Fluid-Loss-Control Additive in Oil Well Drilling Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Lei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The residues mixture from Bisphenol A manufacturing process was analyzed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR were used to characterize the residues. The results indicated that the residues were complex mixture of several molecules. 3-(2-Hydroxyphenyl-1,1,3-trimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-5-ol and phenol were the main components of the residues. The technical feasibility of using it as phenol replacement in fluid-loss-control additive production was also investigated. The fluid-loss-control capacity of the novel additive was systematically investigated. It was discovered that the well fluid-loss performance of the prepared additive can be achieved, especially at high temperature.

  8. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  10. Trace gas emissions from combustion of peat, crop residue, domestic biofuels, grasses, and other fuels: configuration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) component of the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, C. E.; Yokelson, R. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Robinson, A. L.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; Reardon, J.; Ryan, K. C.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Stevens, L.

    2014-09-01

    During the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4, October-November 2012) a large variety of regionally and globally significant biomass fuels was burned at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particle emissions were characterized by an extensive suite of instrumentation that measured aerosol chemistry, size distribution, optical properties, and cloud-nucleating properties. The trace gas measurements included high-resolution mass spectrometry, one- and two-dimensional gas chromatography, and open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. This paper summarizes the overall experimental design for FLAME-4 - including the fuel properties, the nature of the burn simulations, and the instrumentation employed - and then focuses on the OP-FTIR results. The OP-FTIR was used to measure the initial emissions of 20 trace gases: CO2, CO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C3H6, HCHO, HCOOH, CH3OH, CH3COOH, glycolaldehyde, furan, H2O, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, HCN, HCl, and SO2. These species include most of the major trace gases emitted by biomass burning, and for several of these compounds, this is the first time their emissions are reported for important fuel types. The main fire types included African grasses, Asian rice straw, cooking fires (open (three-stone), rocket, and gasifier stoves), Indonesian and extratropical peat, temperate and boreal coniferous canopy fuels, US crop residue, shredded tires, and trash. Comparisons of the OP-FTIR emission factors (EFs) and emission ratios (ERs) to field measurements of biomass burning verify that the large body of FLAME-4 results can be used to enhance the understanding of global biomass burning and its representation in atmospheric chemistry models. Crop residue fires are widespread globally and account for the most burned area in the US, but their emissions were previously poorly characterized. Extensive results are presented for burning rice and wheat straw: two major global crop residues

  11. Modelling of energetic molecule-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerford, M.

    2000-09-01

    This thesis contains the results of molecular dynamics simulations of molecule-surface interactions, looking particularly at fullerene molecules and carbon surfaces. Energetic impacts of fullerene molecules on graphite create defect craters. The relationship between the parameters of the impacting molecule and the parameters of the crater axe examined and found to be a function of the energy and velocity of the impacting molecule. Less energetic fullerene molecules can be scattered from a graphite surface and the partitioning of energy after a scattering event is investigated. It is found that a large fraction of the kinetic energy retained after impact is translational energy, with a small fraction of rotational energy and a number of vibrational modes. At impact energies where the surface is not broken and at normal incidence, surface waves axe seen to occur. These waves axe used to develop a method of desorbing molecules from a graphite surface without damage to either the surface or the molecules being desorbed. A number of fullerene molecules are investigated and ways to increase the desorption yield are examined. It is found that this is a successful technique for desorbing large numbers of intact molecules from graphite. This technique could be used for desorbing intact molecules into a gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. (author)

  12. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    RESONANCE. February 2015. GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule ..... Resonance Energy. Transfer (FRET) is an elegant technique to measure the distance between a donor and an acceptor molecule. FRET refers to the.

  13. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. Corannulene - A Bucky Bowl. H Surya Prakash Rao. The structure, properties and synthesis of a bowl shaped molecule, which resembles a fragment of fullerene, are described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have ...

  14. What drives natural gas prices?

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Stephen P. A.; Yücel, Mine K.

    2007-01-01

    For many years, fuel switching between natural gas and residual fuel oil kept natural gas prices closely aligned with those for crude oil. More recently, however, the number of U.S. facilities able to switch between natural gas and residual fuel oil has declined, and over the past five years, U.S. natural gas prices have been on an upward trend with crude oil prices but with considerable independent movement. Natural gas market analysts generally emphasize weather and inventories as drivers o...

  15. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 1 covers papers on the advances of gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the advances in flow tubes and the measurement of ion-molecule rate coefficients and product distributions; the ion chemistry of the earth's atmosphere; and the classical ion-molecule collision theory. The text also describes statistical methods in reaction dynamics; the state selection by photoion-photoelectron coincidence; and the effects of temperature and pressure in the kinetics of ion-molecule reactions. The energy distribution in the unimolecular decomposition of ions, as well

  16. Interactions of electrons with biologically important molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisklova, K.; Papp, P.; Stano, M.

    2012-01-01

    For the study of interactions of low-energy electrons with the molecules in the gas phase, the authors used electron-molecule cross-beam apparatus. The experiment is carried out in high vacuum, where molecules of the tested compound are inducted through a capillary. For purposes of this experiment the sample was electrically heated to 180 Deg C., giving a bundle of GlyGly molecules into the gas phase. The resulting signals can be evaluated in two different modes: mass spectrum - at continuous electron energy (e.g. 100 eV) they obtained the signal of intensity of the ions according to their mass to charge ratio; ionization and resonance spectra - for selected ion mass when the authors received the signal of intensity of the ions, depending on the energy of interacting electron.

  17. Residual stress measurement at Budapest Neutron Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyula, T.

    2005-01-01

    The use of residual stress measurements of different construction element and recent possibilities of Budapest Neutron Centre are presented. The details investigated already: gas turbine wheel, axial compressor blade, turbine blade and plastically deformed stainless steel. We demonstrated the use of a neutron scattering (SANS, residual stress, diffraction) for the materials behavior investigation in order to analyze the processes going on under the different mechanical loading. The direction of possible instrumental development is presented. (author)

  18. Contamination of boreholes water by 76 pesticides molecules in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user2

    76 residues of pesticides, especially insecticides, herbicides and fungicides, with accumulated contents which could average 0.350 or 350 μg/L per borehole. Indeed, all the prospected boreholes were contaminated. Every molecules of pesticides analyzed were present with at least 1 μg/L, some molecules concentration ...

  19. Understanding and modulating the high-energy properties of noble-gas hydrides from their long-bonding: an NBO/NRT investigation on HNgCO+/CS+/OSi+ and HNgCN/NC (Ng = He, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiqiu; Song, Junjie; Fu, Lei; Tang, Kongshuang; Su, Yue; Chen, Dezhan

    2018-04-03

    The noble-gas hydrides, HNgX (X is an electronegative atom or fragment), represent potential high-energy materials because their two-body decomposition process, HNgX → Ng + HX, is strongly exoergic. Our previous studies have shown that each member of the HNgX (X = halogen atom or CN/NC fragment) molecules is composed of three leading resonance structures: two ω-bonding structures (H-Ng+ :X- and H:- Ng+-X) and one long-bonding structure (H∧X). The last one paints a novel [small sigma, Greek, circumflex]-type long-bonding picture. The present study focuses on the relationship between this novel bonding motif and the unusual energetic properties. We chose HNgCO+/CS+/OSi+/CN/NC, with the formula HNgAB (Ng = He, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn; AB = CO+/CS+/OSi+/CN/NC) as the research system. We first investigated the bonding of HNgCO+ and its analogous HNgCS+/OSi+ species using NBO/NRT methods, and quantitatively compared the bonding with that in HNgCN/NC molecules. NBO/NRT results showed that each of the HNgCO+/CS+/OSi+ molecules could be better represented as a resonance hybrid of ω-bonding and long-bonding structures, but the long-bonding is much weaker than that in HNgCN/NC molecules. Furthermore, we introduced the long-bonding concept into the rationalization of the high-energy properties, and found a good correlation between the highly exothermic two-body dissociation channel and the long-bond order, bH-A. We also found that the long-bond order is highly tunable for these noble-gas hydrides due to its dependence on the nature of the electronegative AB fragments or the central noble-gas atoms, Ng. On the basis of these results, we could optimize the energetic properties by changing the long-bonding motif of our studied molecules. Overall, this study shows that the long-bonding model provides an easy way to rationalize and modulate the unusual energy properties of noble-gas hydrides, and that it is helpful to predict some noble-gas hydrides as potential energetic materials.

  20. Multi-class, multi-residue analysis of pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and novel flame retardants in fish using fast, low-pressure gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapozhnikova, Yelena, E-mail: yelena.sapozhnikova@ars.usda.gov [US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 East Mermaid Lane, Wyndmoor, PA 193038 (United States); Lehotay, Steven J. [US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 East Mermaid Lane, Wyndmoor, PA 193038 (United States)

    2013-01-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for analysis of POPs and novel flame retardants in catfish was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method is based on a QuEChERS extraction, d-SPE clean-up and low pressure GC/MS-MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method validation demonstrated good recoveries and low detection limits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method was successfully applied for analysis of catfish samples from the market. - Abstract: A multi-class, multi-residue method for the analysis of 13 novel flame retardants, 18 representative pesticides, 14 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 7 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners in catfish muscle was developed and evaluated using fast low pressure gas chromatography triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (LP-GC/MS-MS). The method was based on a QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe) extraction with acetonitrile and dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) clean-up with zirconium-based sorbent prior to LP-GC/MS-MS analysis. The developed method was evaluated at 4 spiking levels and further validated by analysis of NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) 1974B and 1947. Sample preparation for a batch of 10 homogenized samples took about 1 h/analyst, and LP-GC/MS-MS analysis provided fast separation of multiple analytes within 9 min achieving high throughput. With the use of isotopically labeled internal standards, recoveries of all but one analyte were between 70 and 120% with relative standard deviations less than 20% (n = 5). The measured values for both SRMs agreed with certified/reference values (72-119% accuracy) for the majority of analytes. The detection limits were 0.1-0.5 ng g{sup -1} for PCBs, 0.5-10 ng g{sup -1} for PBDEs, 0.5-5 ng g{sup -1} for select pesticides and PAHs and 1-10 ng g{sup -1} for flame retardants. The developed method was successfully applied for analysis of catfish samples

  1. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons are summarized. A brief history of the subject is given, and a few good candidates are discussed. Some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states are studied. It is shown that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches. A few more recent molecule candidates which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures are also discussed. (author). 50 refs

  2. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to produce gas. Often, relatively simple changes in eating habits can lessen bothersome gas. Certain digestive system disorders, ... such as soda and beer, increase stomach gas. Eating habits, such as eating too quickly, drinking through a ...

  3. Degradation of Alkali-Based Photocathodes from Exposure to Residual Gases: A First-Principles Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Gaoxue; Batista, Enrique R.

    2017-01-01

    Photocathodes are a key component in the production of electron beams in systems such as X-ray free-electron lasers and X-ray energy-recovery linacs. Alkali-based materials display high quantum efficiency (QE), however, their QE undergoes degradation faster than metal photocathodes even in the high vacuum conditions where they operate. The high reactivity of alkali-based surfaces points to surface reactions with residual gases as one of the most important factors for the degradation of QE. In order to advance the understanding on the degradation of the QE, we investigated the surface reactivity of common residual gas molecules (e.g., O 2 , CO 2 , CO, H 2 O, N 2 , and H 2 ) on one of the best-known alkali-based photocathode materials, cesium antimonide (Cs 3 Sb), using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Furthermore, the reaction sites, adsorption energy, and effect in the local electronic structure upon reaction of these molecules on (001), (110), and (111) surfaces of Cs 3 Sb were computed and analyzed. The adsorption energy of these molecules on Cs3Sb follows the trend of O 2 (-4.5 eV) > CO 2 (-1.9 eV) > H 2 O (-1.0 eV) > CO (-0.8 eV) > N 2 (-0.3 eV) ≈ H 2 (-0.2 eV), which agrees with experimental data on the effect of these gases on the degradation of QE. The interaction strength is determined by the charge transfer from the surfaces to the molecules. The adsorption and dissociation of O containing molecules modify the surface chemistry such as the composition, structure, charge distribution, surface dipole, and work function of Cs 3 Sb, resulting in the degradation of QE with exposure to O 2 , CO 2 , H 2 O, and CO.

  4. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126 ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  5. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule spectroscopy. (SMS), confocal microscopy,. FCS, sm-FRET, FLIM. 1 High-resolution spectrum re- fers to a spectrum consisting of very sharp lines. The sharp lines clearly display transitions to ...

  6. Surface topography of immunoglobulin molecules. I. Accessibility of aromatic chromophores of rabbit IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białkowska, H; Morawiecki, A

    1978-01-01

    Non-ionic detergent, Tween-20, was used in solvent perturbation studies of accessibility of aromatic amino acid residues in rabbit IgG molecules. It has been found that surface aromatic residues are localized in cervices inaccessible to perturbant molecules larger than ca. 10 A in diameter.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Gas Sensor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sensing gas molecules is critical to environmental monitoring, control of chemical processes, space missions as well as agricultural and medical applications....

  8. Determination of Pesticide Residues in Cannabis Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in order to quantify to what extent cannabis consumers may be exposed to pesticide and other chemical residues through inhaled mainstream cannabis smoke. Three different smoking devices were evaluated in order to provide a generalized data set representative of pesticide exposures possible for medical cannabis users. Three different pesticides, bifenthrin, diazinon, and permethrin, along with the plant growth regulator paclobutrazol, which are readily available to cultivators in commercial products, were investigated in the experiment. Smoke generated from the smoking devices was condensed in tandem chilled gas traps and analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Recoveries of residues were as high as 69.5% depending on the device used and the component investigated, suggesting that the potential of pesticide and chemical residue exposures to cannabis users is substantial and may pose a significant toxicological threat in the absence of adequate regulatory frameworks.

  9. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas; Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-03-01

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth.

  10. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  11. DDT residues in sediments from the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.; SenGupta, R.

    in the sediments from the Bay of Bengal. Peterson grab and hydrographic winch was used to collect the sediment samples. Each sample was extracted and cleaned. Residues were detected by electron capture gas chromatography. A range variation in the concentration...

  12. Laser cooling of a diatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, E S; Barry, J F; Demille, D

    2010-10-14

    It has been roughly three decades since laser cooling techniques produced ultracold atoms, leading to rapid advances in a wide array of fields. Laser cooling has not yet been extended to molecules because of their complex internal structure. However, this complexity makes molecules potentially useful for a wide range of applications. For example, heteronuclear molecules possess permanent electric dipole moments that lead to long-range, tunable, anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. The combination of the dipole-dipole interaction and the precise control over molecular degrees of freedom possible at ultracold temperatures makes ultracold molecules attractive candidates for use in quantum simulations of condensed-matter systems and in quantum computation. Also, ultracold molecules could provide unique opportunities for studying chemical dynamics and for tests of fundamental symmetries. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of the polar molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). Using an optical cycling scheme requiring only three lasers, we have observed both Sisyphus and Doppler cooling forces that reduce the transverse temperature of a SrF molecular beam substantially, to a few millikelvin or less. At present, the only technique for producing ultracold molecules is to bind together ultracold alkali atoms through Feshbach resonance or photoassociation. However, proposed applications for ultracold molecules require a variety of molecular energy-level structures (for example unpaired electronic spin, Omega doublets and so on). Our method provides an alternative route to ultracold molecules. In particular, it bridges the gap between ultracold (submillikelvin) temperatures and the ∼1-K temperatures attainable with directly cooled molecules (for example with cryogenic buffer-gas cooling or decelerated supersonic beams). Ultimately, our technique should allow the production of large samples of molecules at ultracold temperatures for species that are chemically

  13. Formation of ultracold NaRb Feshbach molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fudong; He, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoke; Zhu, Bing; Chen, Jun; Wang, Dajun

    2015-01-01

    We report the creation of ultracold bosonic 23 Na 87 Rb Feshbach molecules via magneto-association. By ramping the magnetic field across an interspecies Feshbach resonance (FR), at least 4000 molecules can be produced out of the near degenerate ultracold mixture. Fast loss due to inelastic atom–molecule collisions is observed, which limits the pure molecule number, after residual atoms removal, to 1700. The pure molecule sample can live for 21.8(8) ms in the optical trap, long enough for future molecular spectroscopy studies toward coherently transferring to the singlet ro-vibrational ground state, where these molecules are stable against chemical reaction and have a permanent electric dipole moment of 3.3 Debye. We have also measured the Feshbach molecule’s binding energy near the FR by the oscillating magnetic field method and found these molecules have a large closed-channel fraction. (paper)

  14. Natural gas; Gas Natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Carlos A.; Moraes, Claudia C.D. [Eletricidade de Sao Paulo S.A. (ELETROPAULO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Carlos H.F. [Centrais Eletricas de Santa Catarina S.A., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Clecio Fabricio da; Alves, Ricardo P. [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (COPEL), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sposito, Edivaldo Soares; Hulle, Lutero [Espirito Santo Centrais Eletricas S.A. (ESCELSA), Vitoria, ES (Brazil); S. Martins, Icaro da [Centrais Eletricas do Norte do Brasil S.A. (ELETRONORTE), Belem, PA (Brazil); Vilhena, Joao Luiz S. de [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fagundes, Zaluar Aquino [Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    An increase in the consumption of natural gas in Brazil is an expected fact in what concerns energetic planning. This work presents the existing situation in what concerns natural gas utilization in the main world economies, as well as an analysis of the participation of this fuel among the energy final consumption per sources. The Brazilian consumption of natural gas is also analysed as well as the international agreement between Brazil and Bolivia for natural gas commercialization. Some legal, institutional and political aspects related to natural gas commercialization are also discussed. Finally, several benefits to be brought by the utilization of natural gas are presented 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  16. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  17. Functional residual capacity measurement by heptafluoropropane in ventilated newborn lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Kusztrich, Ariane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Heptafluoropropane is an inert gas commercially used as propellant for inhalers. Since heptafluoropropane can be detected in low concentrations, it could also be used as a tracer gas to measure functional residual capacity. The aim of the present study was to validate functional residual capacity measurements by heptafluoropropane wash-in/wash-out (0.8%) during mechanical ventilation in small, surfactant-depleted lungs using a newborn piglet model. Design: Prospective laborato...

  18. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  19. Assessment of Pesticide Residue Levels in Vegetables sold in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated pesticide residue levels in the two vegetables commonly eaten in Lagos state Nigeria. The vegetables (Telfairia occidentalis and Celosia argentea) were purchased from six markets (Oyingbo, Mile 12, Mushin, Ajah, Agege and Festac) in Lagos. The pesticide residue levels were determined using gas ...

  20. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gas and gas pains Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  1. Simulation of diatomic gas-wall interaction and accommodation coefficients for negative ion sources and accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Brescaccin, L.

    2016-01-01

    Particle-wall interactions determine in different ways the operating conditions of plasma sources, ion accelerators, and beams operating in vacuum. For instance, a contribution to gas heating is given by ion neutralization at walls; beam losses and stray particle production—detrimental for high current negative ion systems such as beam sources for fusion—are caused by collisional processes with residual gas, with the gas density profile that is determined by the scattering of neutral particles at the walls. This paper shows that Molecular Dynamics (MD) studies at the nano-scale can provide accommodation parameters for gas-wall interactions, such as the momentum accommodation coefficient and energy accommodation coefficient: in non-isothermal flows (such as the neutral gas in the accelerator, coming from the plasma source), these affect the gas density gradients and influence efficiency and losses in particular of negative ion accelerators. For ideal surfaces, the computation also provides the angular distribution of scattered particles. Classical MD method has been applied to the case of diatomic hydrogen molecules. Single collision events, against a frozen wall or a fully thermal lattice, have been simulated by using probe molecules. Different modelling approximations are compared

  2. Simulation of diatomic gas-wall interaction and accommodation coefficients for negative ion sources and accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E.; Brescaccin, L.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-wall interactions determine in different ways the operating conditions of plasma sources, ion accelerators, and beams operating in vacuum. For instance, a contribution to gas heating is given by ion neutralization at walls; beam losses and stray particle production—detrimental for high current negative ion systems such as beam sources for fusion—are caused by collisional processes with residual gas, with the gas density profile that is determined by the scattering of neutral particles at the walls. This paper shows that Molecular Dynamics (MD) studies at the nano-scale can provide accommodation parameters for gas-wall interactions, such as the momentum accommodation coefficient and energy accommodation coefficient: in non-isothermal flows (such as the neutral gas in the accelerator, coming from the plasma source), these affect the gas density gradients and influence efficiency and losses in particular of negative ion accelerators. For ideal surfaces, the computation also provides the angular distribution of scattered particles. Classical MD method has been applied to the case of diatomic hydrogen molecules. Single collision events, against a frozen wall or a fully thermal lattice, have been simulated by using probe molecules. Different modelling approximations are compared.

  3. Simulation of diatomic gas-wall interaction and accommodation coefficients for negative ion sources and accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E; Brescaccin, L; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    Particle-wall interactions determine in different ways the operating conditions of plasma sources, ion accelerators, and beams operating in vacuum. For instance, a contribution to gas heating is given by ion neutralization at walls; beam losses and stray particle production-detrimental for high current negative ion systems such as beam sources for fusion-are caused by collisional processes with residual gas, with the gas density profile that is determined by the scattering of neutral particles at the walls. This paper shows that Molecular Dynamics (MD) studies at the nano-scale can provide accommodation parameters for gas-wall interactions, such as the momentum accommodation coefficient and energy accommodation coefficient: in non-isothermal flows (such as the neutral gas in the accelerator, coming from the plasma source), these affect the gas density gradients and influence efficiency and losses in particular of negative ion accelerators. For ideal surfaces, the computation also provides the angular distribution of scattered particles. Classical MD method has been applied to the case of diatomic hydrogen molecules. Single collision events, against a frozen wall or a fully thermal lattice, have been simulated by using probe molecules. Different modelling approximations are compared.

  4. Contribution of the study of the radiolysis of amide compounds Tc the knowledge of the electron-molecule interaction in various gas and liquid phases. An attempt of correlation with the molecular orbital theory calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Thi Thu Hoa.

    1985-08-01

    A study of electron attachment processes on selected amides, respectively at low pressure or under pressure inert gas (C 2 H 4 , N 2 , Ar) has been carried out. The results were compared with presolvated electron scavenging reactions in various polar liquids. The effect of the environment and density of the medium on the stabilisation of anionic transient species has been determined, which led us to propose a generalized electron attachment scheme for the liquid and gas phases, taking into account the different energy levels of the attaching electrons. A quanto-chemical approach using the ''effective charge'' model has demonstrated that the solvation increases the amide electron affinity and decreases the vertical attachment energy which is in agreement with the gas phase experimental results [fr

  5. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  6. An experimental guided-ion-beam and ab initio study of the ion-molecule gas-phase reactions between Li+ ions and iso-C3H7Cl in their ground electronic state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, J. M.; Andres, J. de; Sogas, J.; Alberti, M.; Aguilar, A.; Bofill, J. M.; Bassi, D.; Ascenzi, D.; Tosi, P.

    2009-01-01

    Reactive collisions between Li + ions and i-C 3 H 7 Cl molecules have been studied in the 0.20-12.00 eV center-of-mass energy range using an octopole radio frequency guided-ion beam apparatus recently developed in our laboratory. At low collision energies, dehydrohalogenation reactions giving rise to Li(C 3 H 6 ) + and Li(HCl) + are the main reaction channels, while at higher ones C 3 H 7 + and C 2 H 3 + become dominant, all their reactive cross sections having been measured as a function of the collision energy. To obtain information about the potential energy surfaces (PESs) on which the reactive processes take place, ab initio calculations at the MP2 level have been performed. For dehydrohalogenations, the reactive ground singlet PES shows ion-molecule adduct formation in both the reactant and product sides of the surface. Following the minimum energy path connecting both minima, an unstable intermediate and the corresponding barriers, both lying below the reactant's energy, have been characterized. The entrance channel ion-molecule adduct is also involved in the formation of C 3 H 7 + , which then generates C 2 H 3 + via an CH 4 unimolecular elimination. A qualitative interpretation of the experimental results based on ab initio calculations is also included.

  7. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  8. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  9. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  11. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have been isolated or made in the laboratory over the years. These are called polycondensed aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH for short). ... a bowl like symmetric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon of the.

  12. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! ... Author Affiliations. Kankan Bhattacharyya1. Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 India.

  13. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    “What are electrons doing in molecules?” This is a deceptively simple question that scientists have been trying to answer for more than eighty years. With the advent of quantum mechanics in 1926, it became clear that we must understand the dynamics of electronic motion in atoms, molecules and solids in order to explain ...

  14. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  15. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nature is an excellent synthetic organic chemist. Using mild reaction conditions and a few elemental combinations, a large variety of complex molecules are made in and around us. The atoms are put together in precise arrangements to enable the molecules to carry out different tasks with remarkable specificity.

  16. Topological px+ipy superfluid phase of fermionic polar molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levinsen, J.; Cooper, N.R.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the topological px+ipy superfluid phase in a 2D gas of single-component fermionic polar molecules dressed by a circularly polarized microwave field. This phase emerges because the molecules may interact with each other via a potential Vo(r) that has an attractive dipole-dipole 1/r^3 tail,

  17. Pesticide residues in locally available cereals and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunanan, S.A.; Santos, F.L.; Bonoan, L.S.

    1976-03-01

    Vegetable samples (pechay, cabbage, lettuce, green beans and tomatoes) bought from public markets in the Metro Manila area were analyzed for pesticide residues using gas chromatography. The samples analyzed in 1968-69 contained high levels of chlorinated pesticides such as DDT, Aldrin, Endrin, and Thiodan, while in the samples analyzed in January 1976, no chlorinated and organophosphate pesticides were detected. Cereal samples (rice, corn and sorghum) were obtained from the National Grains Authority and analyzed for pesticide residues and bromine residues. Total bromine residues was determined by neutron activation analysis. In most of the samples analyzed, the concentrations of pesticide residues were below the tolerance levels set by the FAO/WHO Committee on Pesticide Residues in Foods. An exception was one rice sample from Thailand, the bromine residue content (110ppm) of which exceeds the tolerance level of 50ppm

  18. Agricultural pesticide residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuehr, F.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of tracer techniques in the study of agricultural pesticide residues is reviewed under the following headings: lysimeter experiments, micro-ecosystems, translocation in soil, degradation of pesticides in soil, biological availability of soil-applied substances, bound residues in the soil, use of macro- and microautography, double and triple labelling, use of tracer labelling in animal experiments. (U.K.)

  19. Determinação de resíduos de pesticidas em plasma bovino por cromatografia gasosa-espectrometria de massas Pesticides residue determination in cattle plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Daniele Fernanda Maffei; Ana Rita de Araújo Nogueira; Silvia Helena Govoni Brondi

    2009-01-01

    An analytical method for the isolation based on matrix solid-phase dispersion technique and gas chromatographic determination of pesticides in cattle plasma is presented. It was fortified 0.25 g of plasma with pesticides and blended with 1 g each C18 and Na2SO4. The homogenized matter was transferred to a SPE cartridge, which contained 1 g of activated florisil with 5 mL acetonitrile. The analites were eluted under vaccum with 15 mL acetonitrile, the extract was analyzed by gas chromatography...

  20. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  1. 30 CFR 202.151 - Royalty on processed gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Royalty on processed gas. 202.151 Section 202... MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Federal Gas § 202.151 Royalty on processed gas. (a)(1) A royalty, as provided in the... settlement without resorting to processing; and (ii) Residue gas and all gas plant products resulting from...

  2. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  3. Gas-on-gas competition in Shanghai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuhutu, Chassty; Owen, Anthony D.

    2010-01-01

    In common with other major economic centres in China, Shanghai's energy consumption has been increasing rapidly to support the high growth rate of its economy. To achieve rational, efficient and clean use of energy, together with improved environmental quality within the city, the Shanghai municipal government has decided to expand the supply and utilization of natural gas. Shanghai plans to increase the share of natural gas in its primary energy mix to 7 per cent by 2010, up from 3 per cent in 2005. This increase in natural gas demand has to be matched with a corresponding increase in supply. To date, the Shanghai region has relied on offshore extracted natural gas but this supply is limited due to the size of the reserves. Since 2005, the West-East pipeline has provided an alternative for Shanghai but demands from other regions could reduce the potential for expanding supplies from that source. Since domestic production will not be sufficient to meet demand in the near future, Shanghai is building a liquefied natural gas (LNG) regasification terminal at the Yangshan deep-water port that would allow an additional supply of more than 3 billion cubic meters per year of natural gas. Malaysia has already committed to supply LNG to the Shanghai terminal at a price that is significantly higher than the wholesale 'city-gate' price for natural gas transported via pipeline, but still lower than the gas price to end-use consumers. The presence of both an LNG terminal and a transmission pipeline that connects Shanghai to domestic gas-producing regions will create gas-on-gas competition. This study assesses the benefits of introducing such competition to one of China's most advanced cities under various scenarios for demand growth. In this paper, the impact of imported LNG on market concentration in Shanghai's gas market will be analysed using the Herfindahl-Hirschmann index (HHI) and the residual supply index (RSI). Our results show that Shanghai remains a supply

  4. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  5. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  6. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  7. Improvement and extension to new analytes of a multi-residue method for the determination of pesticides in cereals and dry animal feed using gas chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walorczyk, Stanisław; Drożdżyński, Dariusz

    2012-08-17

    This article describes a substantially improved multi-residue method for the determination of a large number of pesticides in cereal samples (wheat, rye, barley, oats, maze, buckwheat etc.) and various animal feeds. The sample preparation method and the GC-MS/MS acquisition method were modified to accommodate new complex cereal and feed matrices and to extend the existing analytical scope to 167 pesticides. The co-extractives were reduced by the joint use of primary secondary amine (PSA) and octadecyl (C18), 75 mg and 50 mg/1 mL of acetonitrile extract, in the presence of MgSO(4), and thus the optimal recovery and analytical selectivity were obtained simultaneously. The new cleanup procedure was faster and easier to handle than our previously applied cleanup procedure. The overall recoveries of the pesticides from buckwheat and rye at the three spiking levels of 0.01, 0.05 and 0.25 mg kg(-1) were 96 ± 9% with relative standard deviations of 10 ± 4% on average. At the lowest spiking level of 0.01 mg kg(-1), 137 of 167 pesticide residues (82%) fulfilled the validation criteria with recoveries in the range of 70-120% and RSDs less or equal 20% whereas in the previous approach it was 93 out of 140 analytes (66%). The developed method was implemented in a routine analysis of approximately 900 real samples, providing an increased scope of the analysis, improved analytical performance parameters and improved ruggedness versus the previous approach. A total of 17% analyzed samples contained pesticide residues. There were 24 different compounds encountered in the samples, of which pirimiphos-methyl, tebuconazole, deltamethrin, and chlorpyrifos-methyl were the most frequent ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rotational excitation of molecules by electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu; Mason, Nigel

    2005-01-01

    The anisotropic charge distribution of a molecule can easily induce a rotational transition in the molecule during an electron collision. Further, since the level spacing of the rotational states is very small, the transition can take place over a wide range of electron energies. The rotational excitation is the dominant energy-loss process for an electron in a molecular gas, when the electron energy lies below the vibrational threshold of the molecule. In the case of polar molecules, the rotationally excited molecule promptly emits microwave (or far infrared) radiation. In this way, the rotational excitation effectively cools electrons. The present paper reviews theoretical and experimental studies of the electron-impact rotational excitation of molecules. After a general introduction of the relevant theory and experiment, case studies of five different molecular species (H 2 , N 2 , CH 4 , HCl, and H 2 O) are presented to show the characteristics of rotational cross sections. From those studies, common features of the cross sections are discussed

  9. Studies on tryptophan residues of Abrus agglutinin. Stopped-flow kinetics of modification and fluorescence-quenching studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Patanjali, S R; Swamy, M J; Surolia, A

    1987-01-01

    The presence of two essential tryptophan residues/molecule was implicated in the binding site of Abrus agglutinin [Patanjali, Swamy, Anantharam, Khan & Surolia (1984) Biochem. J. 217, 773-781]. A detailed study of the stopped-flow kinetics of the oxidation of tryptophan residues revealed three classes of tryptophan residues in the native protein. A discrete reorganization of tryptophan residues revealed three classes of tryptophan residues in the native protein. A discrete reorganization of t...

  10. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  11. Our Galactic Neighbor Hosts Complex Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-03-01

    For the first time, data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveal the presence of methyl formate and dimethyl ether in a star-forming region outside our galaxy. This discovery has important implications for the formation and survival of complex organic compounds importantfor the formation of life in low-metallicity galaxies bothyoung and old.No Simple Picture of Complex Molecule FormationALMA, pictured here with the Magellanic Clouds above, has observed organic molecules in our Milky Way Galaxy and beyond. [ESO/C. Malin]Complex organic molecules (those with at least six atoms, one or more of which must be carbon) are the precursors to the building blocks of life. Knowing how and where complex organic molecules can form is a key part of understanding how life came to be on Earth and how it might arise elsewhere in the universe. From exoplanet atmospheres to interstellar space, complex organic molecules are ubiquitous in the Milky Way.In our galaxy, complex organic molecules are often found in the intense environments of hot cores clumps of dense molecular gas surrounding the sites of star formation. However, its not yet fully understood how the complex organic molecules found in hot cores come to be. One possibility is that the compounds condense onto cold dust grains long before the young stars begin heating their natal shrouds. Alternatively, they might assemble themselves from the hot, dense gas surrounding the blazing protostars.Composite infrared and optical image of the N 113 star-forming region in the LMC. The ALMA coverage is indicated by the gray line. Click to enlarge. [Sewio et al. 2018]Detecting Complexity, a Galaxy AwayUsing ALMA, a team of researchers led by Marta Sewio (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) recently detected two complex organic molecules methyl formate and dimethyl ether for the first time in our neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Previous searches for organic molecules in the LMC detected

  12. Determinação de resíduos de pesticidas em plasma bovino por cromatografia gasosa-espectrometria de massas Pesticides residue determination in cattle plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Fernanda Maffei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method for the isolation based on matrix solid-phase dispersion technique and gas chromatographic determination of pesticides in cattle plasma is presented. It was fortified 0.25 g of plasma with pesticides and blended with 1 g each C18 and Na2SO4. The homogenized matter was transferred to a SPE cartridge, which contained 1 g of activated florisil with 5 mL acetonitrile. The analites were eluted under vaccum with 15 mL acetonitrile, the extract was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The limit of quantification of the method was 0.04 mg L-1 for chlorphenvinfos and fipronil and 0.02 mg L-1 for cypermethrin..

  13. Synthesis of molecules in interstellar clouds and star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, K.K.; Ghosh, S.N.

    1981-01-01

    Study of the formation and destruction processes of interstellar molecules may throw certain light on interstellar medium. Formation and destruction processes of some interstellar molecules are proposed on the basis of laboratory data. The abundances of these molecules are calculated under steady-state condition. The calculated values are then compared with the observed values, obtained by different investigators. It appears that gas phase ion-neutral reactions are capable of synthesizing most interstellar molecules. The role of ion-neutral reactions to star formation has also been discussed. (author)

  14. Natural radioactivity in petroleum residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazineu, M.H.P.; Gazineu, M.H.P.; Hazin, C.A.; Hazin, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    The oil extraction and production industry generates several types of solid and liquid wastes. Scales, sludge and water are typical residues that can be found in such facilities and that can be contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (N.O.R.M.). As a result of oil processing, the natural radionuclides can be concentrated in such residues, forming the so called Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material, or T.E.N.O.R.M.. Most of the radionuclides that appear in oil and gas streams belong to the 238 U and 232 Th natural series, besides 40 K. The present work was developed to determine the radionuclide content of scales and sludge generated during oil extraction and production operations. Emphasis was given to the quantification of 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 40 K since these radionuclides,are responsible for most of the external exposure in such facilities. Samples were taken from the P.E.T.R.O.B.R.A.S. unity in the State of Sergipe, in Northeastern Brazil. They were collected directly from the inner surface of water pipes and storage tanks, or from barrels stored in the waste storage area of the E and P unit. The activity concentrations for 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 40 K were determined by using an HP Ge gamma spectrometric system. The results showed concentrations ranging from 42.7 to 2,110.0 kBq/kg for 226 Ra, 40.5 to 1,550.0 kBq/kg for 228 Ra, and 20.6 to 186.6 kBq/kg for 40 K. The results highlight the importance of determining the activity concentration of those radionuclides in oil residues before deciding whether they should be stored or discarded to the environment. (authors)

  15. Natural radioactivity in petroleum residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazineu, M.H.P. [UNICAP, Dept. de Quimica, Recife (Brazil); Gazineu, M.H.P.; Hazin, C.A. [UFPE, Dept. de Energia Nuclear, Recife (Brazil); Hazin, C.A. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares/ CNEN, Recife (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The oil extraction and production industry generates several types of solid and liquid wastes. Scales, sludge and water are typical residues that can be found in such facilities and that can be contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (N.O.R.M.). As a result of oil processing, the natural radionuclides can be concentrated in such residues, forming the so called Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material, or T.E.N.O.R.M.. Most of the radionuclides that appear in oil and gas streams belong to the {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th natural series, besides 40 K. The present work was developed to determine the radionuclide content of scales and sludge generated during oil extraction and production operations. Emphasis was given to the quantification of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and 40 K since these radionuclides,are responsible for most of the external exposure in such facilities. Samples were taken from the P.E.T.R.O.B.R.A.S. unity in the State of Sergipe, in Northeastern Brazil. They were collected directly from the inner surface of water pipes and storage tanks, or from barrels stored in the waste storage area of the E and P unit. The activity concentrations for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and 40 K were determined by using an HP Ge gamma spectrometric system. The results showed concentrations ranging from 42.7 to 2,110.0 kBq/kg for {sup 226}Ra, 40.5 to 1,550.0 kBq/kg for {sup 228}Ra, and 20.6 to 186.6 kBq/kg for 40 K. The results highlight the importance of determining the activity concentration of those radionuclides in oil residues before deciding whether they should be stored or discarded to the environment. (authors)

  16. Residual Stresses In 3013 Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-01-01

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  17. Decelerating and Trapping Large Polar Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David

    2016-11-18

    Manipulating the motion of large polyatomic molecules, such as benzonitrile (C 6 H 5 CN), presents significant difficulties compared to the manipulation of diatomic molecules. Although recent impressive results have demonstrated manipulation, trapping, and cooling of molecules as large as CH 3 F, no general technique for trapping such molecules has been demonstrated, and cold neutral molecules larger than 5 atoms have not been trapped (M. Zeppenfeld, B. G. U. Englert, R. Glöckner, A. Prehn, M. Mielenz, C. Sommer, L. D. van Buuren, M. Motsch, G. Rempe, Nature 2012, 491, 570-573). In particular, extending Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping to such species remains challenging. Here, we propose to combine a novel "asymmetric doublet state" Stark decelerator with recently demonstrated slow, cold, buffer-gas-cooled beams of closed-shell volatile molecules to realize a general system for decelerating and trapping samples of a broad range of volatile neutral polar prolate asymmetric top molecules. The technique is applicable to most stable volatile molecules in the 100-500 AMU range, and would be capable of producing trapped samples in a single rotational state and at a motional temperature of hundreds of mK. Such samples would immediately allow for spectroscopy of unprecedented resolution, and extensions would allow for further cooling and direct observation of slow intramolecular processes such as vibrational relaxation and Hertz-level tunneling dynamics. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. [Residual neuromuscular blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs-Buder, T; Schmartz, D

    2017-06-01

    Even small degrees of residual neuromuscular blockade, i. e. a train-of-four (TOF) ratio >0.6, may lead to clinically relevant consequences for the patient. Especially upper airway integrity and the ability to swallow may still be markedly impaired. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that residual neuromuscular blockade may affect postoperative outcome of patients. The incidence of these small degrees of residual blockade is relatively high and may persist for more than 90 min after a single intubating dose of an intermediately acting neuromuscular blocking agent, such as rocuronium and atracurium. Both neuromuscular monitoring and pharmacological reversal are key elements for the prevention of postoperative residual blockade.

  19. TENORM: Wastewater Treatment Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water and wastes which have been discharged into municipal sewers are treated at wastewater treatment plants. These may contain trace amounts of both man-made and naturally occurring radionuclides which can accumulate in the treatment plant and residuals.

  20. Residuation in orthomodular lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chajda Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We show that every idempotent weakly divisible residuated lattice satisfying the double negation law can be transformed into an orthomodular lattice. The converse holds if adjointness is replaced by conditional adjointness. Moreover, we show that every positive right residuated lattice satisfying the double negation law and two further simple identities can be converted into an orthomodular lattice. In this case, also the converse statement is true and the corresponence is nearly one-to-one.

  1. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1994-06-07

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber. 25 figs.

  2. Characterization of Hospital Residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Meza, A.; Bonilla Jimenez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the characterization of the solid residuals. A description of the handling of the liquid and gassy waste generated in hospitals is also given, identifying the source where they originate. To achieve the proposed objective the work was divided in three stages: The first one was the planning and the coordination with each hospital center, in this way, to determine the schedule of gathering of the waste can be possible. In the second stage a fieldwork was made; it consisted in gathering the quantitative and qualitative information of the general state of the handling of residuals. In the third and last stage, the information previously obtained was organized to express the results as the production rate per day by bed, generation of solid residuals for sampled services, type of solid residuals and density of the same ones. With the obtained results, approaches are settled down to either determine design parameters for final disposition whether for incineration, trituration, sanitary filler or recycling of some materials, and storage politics of the solid residuals that allow to determine the gathering frequency. The study concludes that it is necessary to improve the conditions of the residuals handling in some aspects, to provide the cleaning personnel of the equipment for gathering disposition and of security, minimum to carry out this work efficiently, and to maintain a control of all the dangerous waste, like sharp or polluted materials. In this way, an appreciable reduction is guaranteed in the impact on the atmosphere. (Author) [es

  3. Cold guided beams of polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motsch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    spectroscopy of formaldehyde. First, ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy of the A 1 A 2 1 A 1 transition of formaldehyde is performed in a room-temperature gas to extract molecular constants. These findings are used to address single rotational states of guided molecules. Since the formaldehyde molecules dissociate upon ultraviolet excitation, the laser-frequency-dependent decrease in the number of guided molecules allows to extract the population of individual rotational states in the beam. With the source temperature set to 155 K, populations of rotational states exceeding 10% are observed, which validates the theoretical model of velocity filtering. Finally, Rayleigh scattering into an optical cavity is investigated as an alternative, non-destructive detection method for cold molecules. Comparing the rate of scattering into the fundamental cavity mode to that into the same mode under free-space conditions, an enhancement by a factor of up to 38 is observed for room-temperature gases. This Purcell-like enhancement is explained by interference of electromagnetic fields scattered by a classical driven dipole oscillator in the resonator. (orig.)

  4. Emerging small molecule drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Staels, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidaemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Pharmacological lowering of LDL-C levels using statins reduces cardiovascular risk. However, a substantial residual risk persists especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Because of the inverse association observed in

  5. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  6. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  7. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  8. Hadron Molecules Revisted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longacre, R. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Hadron Molecules are particles made out of hadrons that are held together by self interactions. In this report we discuss seven such molecules and their self interactions. The f0(980), a0(980), f1(1400), ΔN(2150) and π1(1400) molecular structure is given. We predict that two more states the $K\\bar{K}K$(1500) and a1(1400) should be found.

  9. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  10. Hydration dynamics of protein molecules in aqueous solution: Unity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Dielectric dispersion and NMRD experiments have revealed that a significant fraction of water molecules in the hydration shell of various proteins do not exhibit any slowing down of dynamics. This is usually attributed to the presence of the hydrophobic residues (HBR) on the surface, although HBRs alone ...

  11. Is molecular gas necessary for star formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.

    2012-03-01

    On galactic scales, the surface density of star formation appears to be well correlated with the surface density of molecular gas. This has led many authors to suggest that there exists a causal relationship between the chemical state of the gas and its ability to form stars - in other words, the assumption that the gas must be molecular before star formation can occur. We test this hypothesis by modelling star formation within a dense cloud of gas with properties similar to a small molecular cloud using a series of different models of the chemistry, ranging from one in which the formation of molecules is not followed and the gas is assumed to remain atomic throughout, to one that tracks the formation of both H2 and CO. We find that the presence of molecules in the gas has little effect on the ability of the gas to form stars: star formation can occur just as easily in atomic gas as in molecular gas. At low densities (makeup, we find that the most important factor controlling the rate of star formation is the ability of the gas to shield itself from the interstellar radiation field. As this is also a prerequisite for the survival of molecules within the gas, our results support a picture in which molecule formation and the formation of cold gas are both correlated with the column density of the cloud - and thus its ability to shield itself - rather than being directly correlated with each other.

  12. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic absorption spectrum of a molecule often depends on the solvent used. The change in position (and, sometimes, intensity) of the UV/Vis band accompanying a change in the polarity of the medium is called solvatochromism. The phenomenon has its origins in intermolecular solute–solvent interactions, such as ...

  13. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. A Dicopper (II) Complex Hydrolyzes the Phosphate Diester Bond! R N Mukherjee is with the Department of. Chemistry at Indian. Institute of Technology,. Kanpur. 1 DNA: Deoxyribonucleic Acid;. RNA: Ribonucleic Acid; HPNP: 2-Hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate; Phosphodiester: Di- ester of ...

  15. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of ...

  16. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Faraday opened up a new chapter in chemistry when he isolated benzene from the distillate of coal tar. The deceptively simple molecule with the formula C6H6 has triggered many experiments and theoretical proposals. The correct ring struc- ture, shown in 1 (see Figure 1), was assigned by Kekule after his.

  17. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1232-1237. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coordination polymers and molecular systems in which metal ions serve as the source of the ... cobalt, nickel and gadolinium which are themselves ferromagnetic in their bulk state (Box 1). ... their complexes, organic free and ion radicals and molecules such as 02 and NO are good examples of paramagnetic systems.

  19. Excitons: Molecules in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Forming molecules from atoms is commonplace in dense atomic gases. But it now seems that some two-dimensional materials provide a suitable environment for creating complex molecular states from the hydrogen-like electron-hole pairs that form in semiconductors.

  20. Quantum Interference of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    C60, the third allotropic form of carbon was discovered in 1985 by Kroto and colleagues. These carbon mole- cules have a structure of a truncated icosahedron (see. Figure 5). The truncated icosahedron has 12 pentagon and 20 hexagon rings and has 60 vertices { the shape of a soccer ball. These molecules have been ...

  1. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Molecules to Materials Liquid Crystals and Molecular Conductors. T P Radhakrishnan. Series Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 6-23. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  4. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  5. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  6. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Molecule of the Month Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 66-71. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 ... Author Affiliations. V Chandrasekhar1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India.

  8. The Generation of Dehydroalanine Residues in Protonated Polypeptides: Ion/Ion Reactions for Introducing Selective Cleavages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhou; Bu, Jiexun; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-09-01

    We examine a gas-phase approach for converting a subset of amino acid residues in polypeptide cations to dehydroalanine (Dha). Subsequent activation of the modified polypeptide ions gives rise to specific cleavage N-terminal to the Dha residue. This process allows for the incorporation of selective cleavages in the structural characterization of polypeptide ions. An ion/ion reaction within the mass spectrometer between a multiply protonated polypeptide and the sulfate radical anion introduces a radical site into the multiply protonated polypeptide reactant. Subsequent collisional activation of the polypeptide radical cation gives rise to radical side chain loss from one of several particular amino acid side chains (e.g., leucine, asparagine, lysine, glutamine, and glutamic acid) to yield a Dha residue. The Dha residues facilitate preferential backbone cleavages to produce signature c- and z-ions, demonstrated with cations derived from melittin, mechano growth factor (MGF), and ubiquitin. The efficiencies for radical side chain loss and for subsequent generation of specific c- and z-ions have been examined as functions of precursor ion charge state and activation conditions using cations of ubiquitin as a model for a small protein. It is noted that these efficiencies are not strongly dependent on ion trap collisional activation conditions but are sensitive to precursor ion charge state. Moderate to low charge states show the greatest overall yields for the specific Dha cleavages, whereas small molecule losses (e.g., water/ammonia) dominate at the lowest charge states and proton catalyzed amide bond cleavages that give rise to b- and y-ions tend to dominate at high charge states. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Developing an Efficient and General Strategy for Immobilization of Small Molecules onto Microarrays Using Isocyanate Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenggang; Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P; Cui, Zhaomeng; Li, Quanfu; Dang, Yongjun; Mi, Lan; Zheng, Fengyun; Fei, Yiyan

    2016-03-16

    Small-molecule microarray (SMM) is an effective platform for identifying lead compounds from large collections of small molecules in drug discovery, and efficient immobilization of molecular compounds is a pre-requisite for the success of such a platform. On an isocyanate functionalized surface, we studied the dependence of immobilization efficiency on chemical residues on molecular compounds, terminal residues on isocyanate functionalized surface, lengths of spacer molecules, and post-printing treatment conditions, and we identified a set of optimized conditions that enable us to immobilize small molecules with significantly improved efficiencies, particularly for those molecules with carboxylic acid residues that are known to have low isocyanate reactivity. We fabricated microarrays of 3375 bioactive compounds on isocyanate functionalized glass slides under these optimized conditions and confirmed that immobilization percentage is over 73%.

  10. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  11. Analysis of Organic Molecules Extracted from Mars Analogues and Influence of Their Mineralogy Using N-Methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)Trifluoroacetamide Derivatization Coupled with Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry in Preparation for the Sample Analysis at Mars Derivatization Experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalport, F.; Glavin, D. P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Coll, P.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; McAdam, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The search for complex organic molecules on Mars, including important biomolecules such as amino acids and carboxylic acids will require a chemical extraction and derivatization step to transform these organic compounds into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). We have developed, a one-pot extraction and chemical derivatization protocol using N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF) for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The temperature and duration the derivatization reaction, pre-concentration of chemical derivatives, and gas chromatographic separation parameters have been optimized under SAM instrument design constraints. MTBSTFA/DMF extraction and derivatization at 300 C for several minutes of a variety of terrestrial Mars analogue materials facilitated the detection of amino acids and carboxylic acids in a surface soil sample collected from the Atacama Desert and a carbonate-rich stromatolite sample from Svalbard. However, the rapid reaction of MTBSTFA with water in several analogue materials that contained high abundances of hydrated minerals and the possible deactivation of derivatized compounds by iron oxides, as detected by XRD/XRF using the CheMin field unit Terra, proved to be highly problematic for the direct extraction of organics using MTBSTFA, The combination of pyrolysis and two different chemical derivatization methods employed by SAM should enable a wide range of organic compounds to be detected by GCMS if present on Mars,

  12. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoichi Tezuka; Tatsuhiko Taguchi; Saman Alavi; Amadeu K. Sum; Ryo Ohmura

    2012-01-01

    This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the ...

  13. Review of environmental exposure concentrations of chemical warfare agent residues and associated the fish community risk following the construction and completion of the Nord Stream gas pipeline between Russia and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Hans; Fauser, Patrik; Rahbek, Malene; Larsen, Jørn Bo

    2014-08-30

    This paper compiles all the measured chemical warfare agent (CWA) concentrations found in relation to the Nord Stream pipeline work in Danish waters for the past 5 years. Sediment and biota sampling were performed along the pipeline route in four campaigns, prior to (in 2008 and 2010), during (in 2011) and after (in 2012) the construction work. No parent CWAs were detected in the sediments. Patchy residues of CWA degradation products of Adamsite, Clark I, phenyldichloroarsine, trichloroarsine and Lewisite II, were detected in a total of 29 of the 391 sediment samples collected and analyzed the past 5 years. The cumulative fish community risk quotient for the different locations, calculated as a sum of background and added risk, ranged between 0 and 0.017 suggesting a negligible acute CWA risk toward the fish community. The added risk from sediment disturbance in relation to construction of the pipelines represents less than 2% of the total risk in the areas with the highest calculated risk. The analyses of benthic infauna corroborate the finding of CWA related low risk across the years. There was no significant difference in CWA risk before (2008) and after the pipeline construction (2012). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of Active-Site Amino-Acid Residues of Human Serum Paraoxonase Using Competitive Substrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yeung, David T; Lenz, David E; Cerasoli, Douglas M

    2005-01-01

    ...(s) or its catalytic mechanism. Through site-directed mutagenesis studies, designed from a DFPase-like homology model, and from a crystal structure of a hybrid PONl molecule, amino-acid residues essential for enzyme function...

  15. In-vitro cancer cell cytotoxicity and alpha amylase inhibition effect of seven tropical fruit residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Gupta

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Study suggests that these fruit residues demonstrate promising antidiabetic and anticancer activity that substantiated its ethno medicinal use and may provide new molecules for the treatment of these diseases.

  16. Protection of a PWR nuclear power stations against corrosion using hydrogen molecules to capture oxygen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahili, M.

    2004-01-01

    A protection method for the primary loops metals of nuclear power plants from corrosion was investigated. Hydrogen molecules were added to the primary circuit to eliminate oxygen molecules produced by radiolysis of coolant at the reactor core. The hydrogen molecules were produced by electrolyses of water and then added when the coolant water was passing through the primary coolant circuit. Thermodynamical process and the protection methods from corrosion were discussed, the discussion emphasized on the removal of oxygen molecules as one of the protection methods, and compared with other methods. The amount of hydrogen molecules needed for complete removal of oxygen was estimated in two cases: in the case without passing the water through the oxygen removal system, and in the case of passing water through the system. A pressurized water reactor VVER was chosen to be investigated in this study. The amount of hydrogen molecules was estimated so as to eliminate completely the oxygen molecules from coolant water. The estimated value was found to be less than the permissible range for coolant water for such type of reactors. A simulation study for interaction mechanism between hydrogen and oxygen molecules as water flowing in a tube similar to that of coolant water was performed with different water flow velocities. The interaction between the molecules of hydrogen and oxygen was described. The gas diffusion at the surface of the tube was found to play a major role in the interaction. A mathematical model was found to give full description of the change of oxygen concentration through the tube, as well as, to calculate the length of the tube where the concentration of oxygen reduced to few order of magnitude. (Author)

  17. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A.N.; Webster, G.A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P.J. [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  18. CONSTRUCTION OF A FUNCTIONAL LACTOSE PERMEASE DEVOID OF CYSTEINE RESIDUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANIWAARDEN, PR; PASTORE, JC; KONINGS, WN; KABACK, HR

    1991-01-01

    By use of oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis, a lactose (lac) permease molecule was constructed in which all eight cysteinyl residues were simultaneously mutagenized (C-less permease). Cys154 was replaced with valine, and Cys117, -148, -176, -234, -333, -353, and -355 were replaced

  19. Development of a General Modelling Methodology for Vacuum Residue Hydroconversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira de Oliveira L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns the development of a methodology for kinetic modelling of refining processes, and more specifically for vacuum residue conversion. The proposed approach allows to overcome the lack of molecular detail of the petroleum fractions and to simulate the transformation of the feedstock molecules into effluent molecules by means of a two-step procedure. In the first step, a synthetic mixture of molecules representing the feedstock for the process is generated via a molecular reconstruction method, termed SR-REM molecular reconstruction. In the second step, a kinetic Monte-Carlo method (kMC is used to simulate the conversion reactions on this mixture of molecules. The molecular reconstruction was applied to several petroleum residues and is illustrated for an Athabasca (Canada vacuum residue. The kinetic Monte-Carlo method is then described in detail. In order to validate this stochastic approach, a lumped deterministic model for vacuum residue conversion was simulated using Gillespie’s Stochastic Simulation Algorithm. Despite the fact that both approaches are based on very different hypotheses, the stochastic simulation algorithm simulates the conversion reactions with the same accuracy as the deterministic approach. The full-scale stochastic simulation approach using molecular-level reaction pathways provides high amounts of detail on the effluent composition and is briefly illustrated for Athabasca VR hydrocracking.

  20. Testing the efficiency of extraction of incurred residues from soil with optimized multi-residue method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszter, Gabriella K; Ambrus, Árpád

    2017-08-03

    The reproducibility of extraction of residues from spiked soil samples and from soils containing incurred residues was tested with 14 C-labeled test compounds of different physical-chemical properties. Nearly 100% of the compounds added to the sample before extraction could be recovered with an average reproducibility relative standard deviation (CV) of 5.4%. The additional steps of the determination process (cleanup, evaporation, etc.) contributed to the major part of the variability of the results (CV = 10-20%). The incurred residues were most efficiently extracted with acetone for 30 min followed by the mixture of acetone/ethyl acetate 1:1 for additional 30 min. However, they could only be recovered at various extent (64-90% of total residues), underlying the importance of testing the efficiency of extraction. The residues were identified and quantified by gas chromatography applying thermionic detector. The performance parameters of the method complied with the international method validation guidelines, and they proved to be robust and suitable for determination of pesticide residues in soils of widely different physical-chemical properties.

  1. Single-Molecule Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2010-04-01

    Single-molecule magnets straddle the classical and quantum mechanical worlds, displaying many fascinating phenomena. They may have important technological applications in information storage and quantum computation. We review the physical properties of two prototypical molecular nanomagnets, Mn12-acetate and Fe8: Each behaves as a rigid, spin-10 object and exhibits tunneling between up and down directions. As temperature is lowered, the spin-reversal process evolves from thermal activation to pure quantum tunneling. At low temperatures, magnetic avalanches occur in which the magnetization of an entire sample rapidly reverses. We discuss the important role that symmetry-breaking fields play in driving tunneling and in producing Berry-phase interference. Recent experimental advances indicate that quantum coherence can be maintained on timescales sufficient to allow a meaningful number of quantum computing operations to be performed. Efforts are under way to create monolayers and to address and manipulate individual molecules.

  2. Influence of post-harvest crop residue fires on surface ozone mixing ratios in the N.W. IGP analyzed using 2 years of continuous in situ trace gas measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V.; Sarkar, C.; Sinha, V.

    2016-04-01

    O3, CO, and NOx affect air quality and tropospheric chemistry but factors that control them in the densely populated N.W. Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) are poorly understood. This work presents the first simultaneous 2 year long in situ data set acquired from August 2011 to September 2013 at a N.W. IGP site (30.667°N, 76.729°E; 310 m asl). We investigate the impact of emissions and meteorology on the diel and seasonal variability of O3, CO, and NOx. Regional post-harvest crop residue fires contribute majorly to an enhancement of 19 ppb in hourly averaged ozone concentrations under similar meteorological conditions in summer and 7 ppb under conditions of lower radiation during the post monsoon. d[O3]/dt (from sunrise to daytime O3 maxima) was highest during periods influenced by post-harvest fires in post monsoon season (9.2 ppb h-1) and lowest during monsoon season (4.1 ppb h-1). Analysis of air mass clusters revealed that enhanced chemical formation of O3 and not transport was the driver of the summertime and post monsoon ambient O3 maxima. Despite having high daytime NOx (>12 ppb) and CO (>440 ppb) in winter, average daytime O3 was less than 40 ppb due to reduced photochemistry and fog. Average daytime O3 during the monsoon was less than 45 ppb due to washout of precursors and suppressed photochemistry due to cloud cover. The 8 h ambient air quality O3 standard was violated on 451 days in the period August 2011-September 2013. The results show that substantial mitigation efforts are required to reduce regional O3 pollution in the N.W. IGP.

  3. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  4. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  5. Designing with residual materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walhout, W.; Wever, R.; Blom, E.; Addink-Dölle, L.; Tempelman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many entrepreneurial businesses have attempted to create value based on the residual material streams of third parties. Based on ‘waste’ materials they designed products, around which they built their company. Such activities have the potential to yield sustainable products. Many of such companies

  6. [Aerodynamic focusing of particles and heavy molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Mora, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    By accelerating a gas containing suspended particles or large molecules through a converging nozzle, the suspended species may be focused and therefore used to write fine lines on a surface. Our objective was to study the limits on how narrow this focal region could be as a function of particle size. We find that, for monodisperse particles with masses m p some 3.6 x 10 5 times larger than the molecular mass m of the carrier gas (diameters above some 100 angstrom), there is no fundamental obstacle to directly write submicron features. However, this conclusion has been verified experimentally only with particles larger than 0.1 μm. Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies on the defocusing role of Brownian motion for very small particles or heavy molecules have shown that high resolution (purely aerodynamic) focusing is impossible with volatile molecules whose masses are typically smaller than 1000 Dalton. For these, the minimal focal diameter after optimization appears to be 5√(m/m p ) times the nozzle diameter d n . But combinations of focused lasers and aerodynamic focusing appear as promising for direct writing with molecular precursors. Theoretical and numerical schemes capable of predicting the evolution of the focusing beam, including Brownian motion effects, have been developed, although further numerical work would be desirable. 11 refs

  7. A New Radio Spectral Line Survey of Planetary Nebulae: Exploring Radiatively-driven Heating and Chemistry of Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Jesse; Kastner, Joel H.; Santander-García, Miguel; Montez, Rodolfo; Alcolea, Javier; Balick, Bruce; Bujarrabal, Valentín

    2018-01-01

    We report the results of a survey of mm-wave molecular line emission from nine nearby (molecular line frequencies were chosen to investigate the molecular chemistry of these nebulae. New detections of one or more of five molecules -- the molecular mass tracer 13CO and the chemically important trace species HCO+, CN, HCN, and HNC -- were made in at least one PN. We present analysis of emission line flux ratios that are potential diagnostics of the influence that ultraviolet and X-ray radiation have on the chemistry of residual molecular gas in PNe.

  8. Air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction-gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection: a fast and simple method for the assessment of triazole pesticides residues in surface water, cucumber, tomato and grape juices samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Khoshmaram, Leila

    2013-12-01

    A recently reported microextraction technique namely air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) has been described for the extraction/preconcentration of some triazole pesticides from different samples prior to gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (GC-FID). This technique is similar to dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) but in this method there is no need to use a disperser solvent and also volume of the used extraction solvent is less than DLLME. In this study, toluene with a density lower than that of water was used as an extraction solvent. Under the optimum extraction conditions, the method showed wide linear ranges with R(2)>0.996 and low limits of detection and quantification between 0.53-1.13 and 1.76-3.77 ng mL(-1), respectively. Enrichment factors (EFs) and extraction recoveries (ERs) were in the ranges of 713-808 and 100-113%, respectively. Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for the extraction of 25 and 250 ng mL(-1) of each selected triazole pesticide were less than 7% for intra-day (n=6) and inter-days (n=5) precision. The method was successfully used for analytes determination in different surface water, grape juice, cucumber, and tomato samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebdoua, Samira; Lazali, Mohamed; Ounane, Sidi Mohamed; Tellah, Sihem; Nabi, Fahima; Ounane, Ghania

    2017-06-01

    A total of 160 samples of 13 types of fresh fruits and vegetables from domestic production and import were analysed to detect the presence of pesticide residues. Analysis was performed by multi-residual extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In 42.5% of the tested samples, no residues were found and 12.5% of samples contained pesticide residues above maximum residue limits. Risk assessment for long-term exposure was done for all pesticides detected in this study. Except chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin, exposure to pesticides from vegetables and fruits was below 1% of the acceptable daily intake. Short-term exposure assessment revealed that in seven pesticide/commodity combinations, including three pesticides (chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin), the acute reference dose had been exceeded.

  10. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley; Crum, Bruce Robert; Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank

    2000-01-01

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  11. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, LG.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules are discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to hot molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules (electron affinity), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies

  12. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Argon gas atoms trapping by carbon dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilaev, M. P.; Bogoslov, E. A.; Polskii, Y. E.

    2017-11-01

    The conditions of argon gas atoms trapping by carbon dendrites, which growing in atmospheric pressure gas-discharge plasma, are considered in that paper. It’s showing that the argons atoms trapping by the carbon diamond-like cell can occur in arc gas discharge with current density more than j 0 ∼ 45 mA/sm2 and provided that the eximer molecules of noble gas and carbon atoms (e.g., ArC) can be formed.

  14. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegemann, Robert; Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas; Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko; Kreutzbruck, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth. - Highlights: • Comparison of magnetic microstructure with neutron diffraction stress analysis. • High spatial resolution magnetic stray field images of hypereutectoid TIG welds. • Spatial variations of the stray fields are below the magnetic field of the earth. • GMR spin valve gradiometer arrays adapted for the evaluation of magnetic microstructures. • Magnetic stray fields are closely linked to microstructure of the material.

  15. Residual stress characterization of steel TIG welds by neutron diffraction and by residual magnetic stray field mappings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegemann, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Stegemann@bam.de [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Cabeza, Sandra; Lyamkin, Viktor; Bruno, Giovanni; Pittner, Andreas [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Wimpory, Robert; Boin, Mirko [HZB Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Kreutzbruck, Marc [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12200 Berlin (Germany); IKT, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The residual stress distribution of tungsten inert gas welded S235JRC+C plates was determined by means of neutron diffraction (ND). Large longitudinal residual stresses with maxima around 600 MPa were found. With these results as reference, the evaluation of residual stress with high spatial resolution GMR (giant magneto resistance) sensors was discussed. The experiments performed indicate a correlation between changes in residual stresses (ND) and the normal component of local residual magnetic stray fields (GMR). Spatial variations in the magnetic field strength perpendicular to the welds are in the order of the magnetic field of the earth. - Highlights: • Comparison of magnetic microstructure with neutron diffraction stress analysis. • High spatial resolution magnetic stray field images of hypereutectoid TIG welds. • Spatial variations of the stray fields are below the magnetic field of the earth. • GMR spin valve gradiometer arrays adapted for the evaluation of magnetic microstructures. • Magnetic stray fields are closely linked to microstructure of the material.

  16. Organic molecules in translucent interstellar clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krełowski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    Absorption spectra of translucent interstellar clouds contain many known molecular bands of CN, CH+, CH, OH, OH(+), NH, C2 and C3. Moreover, one can observe more than 400 unidentified absorption features, known as diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), commonly believed to be carried by complex, carbon-bearing molecules. DIBs have been observed in extragalactic sources as well. High S/N spectra allow to determine precisely the corresponding column densities of the identified molecules, rotational temperatures which differ significantly from object to object in cases of centrosymmetric molecular species, and even the (12)C/(13)C abundance ratio. Despite many laboratory based studies of possible DIB carriers, it has not been possible to unambiguously link these bands to specific species. An identification of DIBs would substantially contribute to our understanding of chemical processes in the diffuse interstellar medium. The presence of substructures inside DIB profiles supports the idea that DIBs are very likely features of gas phase molecules. So far only three out of more than 400 DIBs have been linked to specific molecules but none of these links was confirmed beyond doubt. A DIB identification clearly requires a close cooperation between observers and experimentalists. The review presents the state-of-the-art of the investigations of the chemistry of interstellar translucent clouds i.e. how far our observations are sufficient to allow some hints concerning the chemistry of, the most common in the Galaxy, translucent interstellar clouds, likely situated quite far from the sources of radiation (stars).

  17. Thermal Adsorption Processing Of Hydrocarbon Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudad H. Al.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The raw materials of secondary catalytic processes must be pre-refined. Among these refining processes are the deasphalting and demetallization including their thermo adsorption or thermo-contact adsorption variety. In oil processing four main processes of thermo-adsorption refining of hydrocarbon residues are used ART Asphalt Residual Treating - residues deasphaltizing 3D Discriminatory Destructive Distillation developed in the US ACT Adsorption-Contact Treatment and ETCC Express Thermo-Contact Cracking developed in Russia. ART and ACT are processes with absorbers of lift type reactor while 3D and ETCC processes are with an adsorbing reactor having ultra-short contact time of the raw material with the adsorbent. In all these processes refining of hydrocarbon residues is achieved by partial Thermo-destructive transformations of hydrocarbons and hetero-atomic compounds with simultaneous adsorption of the formed on the surface of the adsorbents resins asphaltene and carboids as well as metal- sulphur - and nitro-organic compounds. Demetallized and deasphalted light and heavy gas oils or their mixtures are a quality raw material for secondary deepening refining processes catalytic and hydrogenation cracking etc. since they are characterized by low coking ability and low content of organometallic compounds that lead to irreversible deactivation of the catalysts of these deepening processes.

  18. Fungicide and insecticide residues in rice grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Mack Teló

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyse residues of fungicides and insecticides in rice grains that were subjected to different forms of processing. Field work was conducted during three crop seasons, and fungicides and insecticides were applied at different crop growth stages on the aerial portion of the rice plants. Azoxystrobin, difenoconazole, propiconazole, tebuconazole, and trifloxystrobin fungicides were sprayed only once at the R2 growth stage or twice at the R2 and R4 growth stages; cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, permethrin, and thiamethoxam insecticides were sprayed at the R2 growth stage; and permethrin was sprayed at 5-day intervals from the R4 growth stage up to one day prior to harvest. Pesticide residues were analysed in uncooked, cooked, parboiled, polished and brown rice grains as well as rice hulls during the three crop seasons, for a total of 1458 samples. The samples were analysed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD using modified QuEChERS as the extraction method. No fungicide or insecticide residues were detected in rice grain samples; however, azoxystrobin and cypermethrin residues were detected in rice hull samples.

  19. Calculation of gas Bremsstrahlung power from straight sections of storage ring at SSRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Zhengdong; Xu Xunjiang; Fang Keming; Xu Jiaqiang

    2008-01-01

    The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) is a third-generation synchrotron radiation light source with 3.5 GeV in energy, which is composed of the linear accelerator, the booster and the storage ring. The storage ring provides 16 standard straight sections of 6.5 m and 4 long straight sections of 12 meters. Gas Bremsstrahlung (GB) produced by the interaction of the stored beam with the residual gas molecules in straight section, which is so intense and has a very small angular that the GB spectra, the GB power and the GB power distribution should be known. The characters of GB are studied by means of Fluka Monte Carlo code. Our result shows agreement with those obtained by the experiential formulae. (authors)

  20. Watching single molecules dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less