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Sample records for residual carbide layer

  1. The effect of fiber microstructure on evolution of residual stresses in silicon carbide/titanium aluminide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Freed, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of the morphology of the SCS6 silicon carbide fiber on the evolution of residual stresses in SiC/Ti composites. A micromechanics model based on the concentric cylinder concept is presented which is used to calculate residual stresses in a SiC/Ti composite during axisymmetric cooling by a spatially uniform temperature change. The silicon carbide fiber is modeled as a layered material with five distinct transversely isotropic and orthotropic, elastic layers, whereas the titanium matrix is taken to be isotropic, with temperature-dependent elastoplastic properties. The results arc compared with those obtained based on the assumption that the silicon carbide fiber is isotropic and homogeneous.

  2. Silicon carbide layer structure recovery after ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violin, Eh.E.; Demakov, K.D.; Kal'nin, A.A.; Nojbert, F.; Potapov, E.N.; Tairov, Yu.M.

    1984-01-01

    The process of recovery of polytype structure of SiC surface layers in the course of thermal annealing (TA) and laser annealing (LA) upon boron and aluminium implantation is studied. The 6H polytype silicon carbide C face (0001) has been exposed to ion radiation. The ion energies ranged from 80 to 100 keV, doses varied from 5x10 14 to 5x10 16 cm -2 . TA was performed in the 800-2000 K temperature range. It is shown that the recovery of the structure of silicon carbide layers after ion implantation takes place in several stages. Considerable effect on the structure of the annealed layers is exerted by the implantation dose and the type of implanted impurity. The recovery of polytype structure is possible only under the effect of laser pulses with duration not less than the time for the ordering of the polytype in question

  3. Mechanism of protective action of surface carbide layers on titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukalovskaya, T.V.; Chebotareva, N.P.; Tomashov, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    The protective action of surface carbide layer on titanium produced in methane atmosphere at 1000 deg C and under 6.7 kPa pressure in H 2 SO 4 solutions is studied through comparison of microsection metallographic specimens prior to and after corrosion testing (after specimen activation); through comparison of anodic characteristics after partial stripping of the layer up to its complete stripping; through analysis of the behaviour of Ti-TiC galvanic couple, and through investigation of corresponding corrosion diagrams under test conditions. It is shown that screening protective mechanism is primarily got involved in highly agressive media (high temperature and concentration of solution), and in less agressive environment the protection of titanium with carbide layer is primarily ensured by electrochemical mechanism

  4. Characterization of Transition Metal Carbide Layers Synthesized by Thermo-reactive Diffusion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Mads Brink; Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    . In this study halide-activated pack cementation techniques were used on tool steel Vanadis 6 and martensitic stainless steel AISI 420 in order to produce hard layers of titanium carbide (TiC), vanadium carbide (V8C7) and chromium carbides (Cr23C6 and Cr7C3). Surface layers were characterized by scanning......Hard wear resistant surface layers of transition metal carbides can be produced by thermo-reactive diffusion processes where interstitial elements from a steel substrate together with external sources of transition metals (Ti, V, Cr etc.) form hard carbide and/or nitride layers at the steel surface...... electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers hardness testing. The study shows that porosityfree, homogenous and very hard surface layers can be produced by thermo-reactive diffusion processes. The carbon availability of the substrate influences thickness of obtained layers, as Vanadis 6 tool steel...

  5. Influence of Hot Implantation on Residual Radiation Damage in Silicon Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawski, M.; Zuk, J.; Kulik, M.; Drozdziel, A.; Pyszniak, K.; Turek, M.; Lin, L.; Prucnal, S.

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable thermomechanical and electrical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this material very attractive for high-temperature, high-power, and high-frequency applications. Because of very low values of diffusion coefficient of most impurities in SiC, ion implantation is the best method to selectively introduce dopants over well-defined depths in SiC. Aluminium is commonly used for creating p-type regions in SiC. However, post-implantation radiation damage, which strongly deteriorates required electric properties of the implanted layers, is difficult to anneal even at high temperatures because of remaining residual damage. Therefore implantation at elevated target temperatures (hot implantation) is nowadays an accepted method to decrease the level of the residual radiation damage by avoiding ion beam-induced amorphization. The main objective of this study is to compare the results of the Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy with channeling and micro-Raman spectroscopy investigations of room temperature and 500 o C Al + ion implantation-induced damage in 6H-SiC and its removal by high temperature (up to 1600 o C) thermal annealing. (author)

  6. Design and simulation of thermal residual stresses of coatings on WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tool substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Anhai; Zhao, Jun; Zang, Jian; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Large thermal residual stresses in coatings during the coating deposition process may easily lead to coating delamination of coated carbide tools in machining. In order to reduce the possibility of coating delamination during the tool failure process, a theoretical method was proposed and a numerical method was constructed for the coating design of WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tools. The thermal residual stresses of multi-layered coatings were analytically modeled based on equivalent parameters of coating properties, and the stress distribution of coatings are simulated by Finite element method (FEM). The theoretically calculated results and the FEM simulated results were verified and in good agreement with the experimental test results. The effects of coating thickness, tool substrate, coating type and interlayer were investigated by the proposed geometric and FEM model. Based on the evaluations of matchability of tool substrate and tool coatings, the basic principles of tool coating design were proposed. This provides theoretical basis for the selection and design of coatings of cutting tools in high-speed machining

  7. Fracture and Residual Characterization of Tungsten Carbide Cobalt Coatings on High Strength Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Donald S

    2003-01-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt coatings applied via high velocity oxygen fuel thermal spray deposition are essentially anisotropic composite structures with aggregates of tungsten carbide particles bonded...

  8. The stability of clay using Portland cement and calsium carbide residue with California bearing ratio (cbr) value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puji Hastuty, Ika; Roesyanto; Novia Sari, Intan; Simanjuntak, Oberlyn

    2018-03-01

    Clay is a type of soil which is often used for stabilization. This is caused by its properties which are very hard in dry conditions and plastic in the medium content of water. However, at a higher level of water, clay will be cohesive and very lenient causing a large volume change due to the influence of water and also causing the soil to expand and shrink for a short period of time. These are the reasons why stabilization is needed in order to increase bearing capacity value of the clay. Stabilization is one of the ways to the conditon of soil that has the poor index properties, for example by adding chemical material to the soil. One of the chemical materials than can be added to the soil is calsium carbide residue. The purpose of this research is to know the fixation of index properties as the effect of adding 2% PC and calsium carbide residue to the clay, and to know the bearing capacity value of CBR (California Bearing Ratio) as the effect of adding the stabilization agent and to know the optimum content of adding calsium carbide residue. The result of the research shows that the usage of 2% cement in the soil that has CBR value 5,76%, and adding 2% cement and 9% calsium carbide residue with a period of curing 14 days has the lagerst of CBR value that is 9,95%. The unsoaked CBR value shows the increase of CBR value upto the mixture content of calsium carbide residue 9% and, decreases at the mixture content of calsium carbide residue 10% and 11%.

  9. Effect of Ti additive on (Cr, Fe)7C3 carbide in arc surfacing layer and its refined mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yefei; Yang Yulin; Yang Jian; Hao Feifei; Li Da; Ren Xuejun; Yang Qingxiang

    2012-01-01

    Arc surfacing layer of hypoeutectic high chromium cast iron (HCCI) expects refiner carbides in the microstructure to improve its mechanical properties. In this paper, Ti additive as a strong carbide forming element was added in the hypoeutectic HCCI arc surfacing layer. Microstructure of titaniferous hypoeutectic HCCI was studied by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electronic microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer. Furthermore, the M(M = Cr, Fe) 7 C 3 carbide refinement mechanism was explained by the phase diagram calculation and lattice misfit theory. The results show that, the M 7 C 3 carbide in arc surfacing microstructure of hypoeutectic HCCI has been refined with 2 wt.% Ti additive, and TiC carbide can be observed in/around the M 7 C 3 carbide. With Ti addictive increasing, the micro-hardness along the depth in profile section of layer becomes more uniform, and the wear resistance has been improved. According to the phase diagram calculation, MC carbide precipitates prior to M 7 C 3 carbide in Fe-Cr-C-Ti alloy. In addition, the lattice misfit between (1 1 0) TiC and (010) Cr 7 C 3 is 9.257%, which indicates that the TiC as heterogeneous nuclei of the M 7 C 3 is medium effective. Therefore, the M 7 C 3 carbide can be refined.

  10. Nanoparticles and nanorods of silicon carbide from the residues of corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, S. B.; Gorzkowski, E.; Rath, B. B.; Feng, J.; Qadri, S. N.; Kim, H.; Caldwell, J. D.; Imam, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the thermally induced transformation of various residues of the corn plant into nanoparticles and nanorods of different silicon carbide (SiC) polytypes. This has been accomplished by both microwave-induced and conventional furnace pyrolysis in excess of 1450 °C in an inert atmosphere. This simple process of producing nanoparticles of different polytypes of SiC from the corn plant opens a new method of utilizing agricultural waste to produce viable industrial products that are technologically important for nanoelectronics, molecular sensors, nanophotonics, biotechnology, and other mechanical applications. Using x-ray and Raman scattering characterization, we have demonstrated that the processed samples of corn husk, leaves, stalks, and cob consist of SiC nanostructures of the 2H, 3C, 4H, and 6H polytypes.

  11. Relation between psi-splitting and microscopic residual shear stresses in x-ray stress measurement on uni-directionally deformed layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanabusa, Takao; Fujiwara, Haruo

    1982-01-01

    The psi-splitting behaviors were investigated for the ground and the milled surface layers of both iron and high speed steel in order to find out the relation among microscopic residual shear stresses. For the high speed steel, the X-ray elastic constants and the residual strains were measured on the carbide phase as well as on the matrix phase. It was clarified that the psi-splitting was caused by a combination of the selective nature of X-ray diffractions and the microscopic residual shear stresses within the interior of cells and the carbide particles. The volume fraction occupied by the cell walls and the residual shear stresses sustained by them were estimated from the equilibrium condition of the microscopic residual shear stresses. The distributions of residual stresses over the deformed layers indicate that the thermal effect is dominant in grinding and the mechanical effect is dominant in milling for forming residual stresses. (author)

  12. Influence of oxygen on the ion-beam synthesis of silicon carbide buried layers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamanov, V.V.; Valakh, M.Ya.; Klyui, N.I.; Mel'nik, V.P.; Romanyuk, A.B.; Romanyuk, B.N.; Yukhimchuk, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of silicon structures with silicon carbide (SiC) buried layers produced by high-dose carbon implantation followed by a high-temperature anneal are investigated by Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The influence of the coimplantation of oxygen on the features of SiC buried layer formation is also studied. It is shown that in identical implantation and post-implantation annealing regimes a SiC buried layer forms more efficiently in CZ Si wafers or in Si (CZ or FZ) subjected to the coimplantation of oxygen. Thus, oxygen promotes SiC layer formation as a result of the formation of SiO x precipitates and accommodation of the volume change in the region where the SiC phase forms. Carbon segregation and the formation of an amorphous carbon film on the SiC grain boundaries are also discovered

  13. Properties of Chemically Combusted Calcium Carbide Residue and Its Influence on Cement Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfang Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbide residue (CCR is a waste by-product from acetylene gas production. The main component of CCR is Ca(OH2, which can react with siliceous materials through pozzolanic reactions, resulting in a product similar to those obtained from the cement hydration process. Thus, it is possible to use CCR as a substitute for Portland cement in concrete. In this research, we synthesized CCR and silica fume through a chemical combustion technique to produce a new reactive cementitious powder (RCP. The properties of paste and mortar in fresh and hardened states (setting time, shrinkage, and compressive strength with 5% cement replacement by RCP were evaluated. The hydration of RCP and OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement pastes was also examined through SEM (scanning electron microscope. Test results showed that in comparison to control OPC mix, the hydration products for the RCP mix took longer to formulate. The initial and final setting times were prolonged, while the drying shrinkage was significantly reduced. The compressive strength at the age of 45 days for RCP mortar mix was found to be higher than that of OPC mortar and OPC mortar with silica fume mix by 10% and 8%, respectively. Therefore, the synthesized RCP was proved to be a sustainable active cementitious powder for the strength enhanced of building materials, which will result in the diversion of significant quantities of this by-product from landfills.

  14. Properties of Chemically Combusted Calcium Carbide Residue and Its Influence on Cement Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongfang; Li, Zishanshan; Bai, Jing; Memon, Shazim Ali; Dong, Biqin; Fang, Yuan; Xu, Weiting; Xing, Feng

    2015-02-13

    Calcium carbide residue (CCR) is a waste by-product from acetylene gas production. The main component of CCR is Ca(OH)₂, which can react with siliceous materials through pozzolanic reactions, resulting in a product similar to those obtained from the cement hydration process. Thus, it is possible to use CCR as a substitute for Portland cement in concrete. In this research, we synthesized CCR and silica fume through a chemical combustion technique to produce a new reactive cementitious powder (RCP). The properties of paste and mortar in fresh and hardened states (setting time, shrinkage, and compressive strength) with 5% cement replacement by RCP were evaluated. The hydration of RCP and OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement) pastes was also examined through SEM (scanning electron microscope). Test results showed that in comparison to control OPC mix, the hydration products for the RCP mix took longer to formulate. The initial and final setting times were prolonged, while the drying shrinkage was significantly reduced. The compressive strength at the age of 45 days for RCP mortar mix was found to be higher than that of OPC mortar and OPC mortar with silica fume mix by 10% and 8%, respectively. Therefore, the synthesized RCP was proved to be a sustainable active cementitious powder for the strength enhanced of building materials, which will result in the diversion of significant quantities of this by-product from landfills.

  15. The role of defects in fluorescent silicon carbide layers grown by sublimation epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schimmel, Saskia; Kaiser, Michl; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2014-01-01

    Donor-acceptor co-doped SiC is a promising light converter for novel monolithic all-semiconductor white LEDs due to its broad-band donor-acceptor pair luminescence and potentially high internal quantum efficiency. Besides sufficiently high doping concentrations in an appropriate ratio yielding...... short radiative lifetimes, long nonradiative lifetimes are crucial for efficient light conversion. The impact of different types of defects is studied by characterizing fluorescent silicon carbide layers with regard to photoluminescence intensity, homogeneity and efficiency taking into account...

  16. The role of defects in fluorescent silicon carbide layers grown by sublimation epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schimmel, Saskia; Kaiser, Michl; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    Donor-acceptor co-doped silicon carbide layers are promising light converters for novel monolithic all-semiconductor LEDs due to their broad-band donor-acceptor pair luminescence and potentially high internal quantum efficiency. Besides appropriate doping concentrations yielding low radiative...... lifetimes, high nonradiative lifetimes are crucial for efficient light conversion. Despite the excellent crystalline quality that can generally be obtained by sublimation epitaxy according to XRD measurements, the role of defects in f-SiC is not yet well understood. Recent results from room temperature...... photoluminescence, charge carrier lifetime measurements by microwave detected photoconductivity and internal quantum efficiency measurements suggest that the internal quantum efficiency of f-SiC layers is significantly affected by the incorporation of defects during epitaxy. Defect formation seems to be related...

  17. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak

    2016-02-24

    In this study, a transition from metallic to semiconducting-like behavior has been demonstrated in two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides by replacing titanium with molybdenum in the outer transition metal (M) layers of M3C2 and M4C3 MXenes. The MXene structure consists of n + 1 layers of near-close packed M layers with C or N occupying the octahedral site between them in an [MX]nM arrangement. Recently, two new families of ordered 2D double transition metal carbides MXenes were discovered, M′2M′′C2 and M′2M′′2C3 – where M′ and M′′ are two different early transition metals, such as Mo, Cr, Ta, Nb, V, and Ti. The M′ atoms only occupy the outer layers and the M′′ atoms fill the middle layers. In other words, M′ atomic layers sandwich the middle M′′–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer layers of the [MC]nM structures. The electronic properties of these Mo-containing MXenes are compared with their Ti3C2 counterparts, and are found to be no longer metallic-like conductors; instead the resistance increases mildly with decreasing temperatures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that OH terminated Mo–Ti MXenes are semiconductors with narrow band gaps. Measurements of the temperature dependencies of conductivities and magnetoresistances have confirmed that Mo2TiC2Tx exhibits semiconductor-like transport behavior, while Ti3C2Tx is a metal. This finding opens new avenues for the control of the electronic and optical applications of MXenes and for exploring new applications, in which semiconducting properties are required.

  18. Effective optimization of surface passivation on porous silicon carbide using atomic layer deposited Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Iwasa, Yoshimi; Ou, Yiyu

    2017-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide (B–N co-doped SiC) produced by anodic oxidation showed strong photoluminescence (PL) at around 520 nm excited by a 375 nm laser. The porous SiC samples were passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films, resulting in a significant enhancement...

  19. Modeling of CMUTs with Multiple Anisotropic Layers and Residual Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Mathias; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2014-01-01

    Usually the analytical approach for modeling CMUTs uses the single layer plate equation to obtain the deflection and does not take anisotropy and residual stress into account. A highly accurate model is developed for analytical characterization of CMUTs taking an arbitrary number of layers...... and residual stress into account. Based on the stress-strain relation of each layer and balancing stress resultants and bending moments, a general multilayered anisotropic plate equation is developed for plates with an arbitrary number of layers. The exact deflection profile is calculated for a circular...... clamped plate of anisotropic materials with residual bi-axial stress. From the deflection shape the critical stress for buckling is calculated and by using the Rayleigh-Ritz method the natural frequency is estimated....

  20. Effect of laser pulsed radiation on the properties of implanted layers of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violin, Eh.E.; Voron'ko, O.N.; Nojbert, F.; Potapov, E.N.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of investigation into pulsed laser radiation effects on the layers of GH polytype silicon carbide converted to amorphous state by implantation of boron and aluminium ions. The implantation doses were selected to be 5x10 16 for boron and 5x10 15 cm -2 for aluminium, with the ion energies being 60 and 80 keV, respectively. The samples annealed under nanosecond regime are stated to posseys neither photoluminescence (PL) nor cathodoluminescence (CL). At the same time the layers annealed in millisecond regime have a weak PL at 100 K and CL at 300 K. The PL and CL are observed in samples, laser-annealed at radiation energy density above 150-160 J/cm 2 in case of boron ion implantation and 100-120 J/cm 2 in case of aluminium ion implantation. Increasing the radiation energy density under the nanosecond regime of laser annealing results in the surface evaporation due to superheating of amorphous layers. Increasing the energy density above 220-240 J/cm 2 results in destruction of the samples

  1. Cementing Material From Rice Husk-Broken Bricks-Spent Bleaching Earth-Dried Calcium Carbide Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthengia Jackson Washira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A cementious material, coded CSBR (Carbide residue Spent bleaching earth Broken bricks and Rice husks, was made from dried calcium carbide residue (DCCR and an incinerated mix of rice husks (RH, broken bricks (BB and spent bleaching earth (SBE. Another material, coded SBR (Spent bleaching earth Broken bricks and Rice husk ash, was made from mixing separately incinerated RH, SBE and ground BB in the same ash ratio as in CSBR. When CSBR was inter-ground with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC, it showed a continued decrease in Ca(OH2 in the hydrating cement as a function of curing time and replacement levels of the cement. Up to 45 % replacement of the OPC by CSBR produced a Portland pozzolana cement (PPC material that passed the relevant Kenyan Standard. Incorporation of the CSBR in OPC reduces the resultant calcium hydroxide from hydrating Portland cement. The use of the waste materials in production of cementitious material would rid the environment of wastes and lead to production of low cost cementitious material.

  2. Few-Layer Black Phosphorus Carbide Field-Effect Transistor via Carbon Doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wee Chong; Cai, Yongqing; Ng, Rui Jie; Huang, Li; Feng, Xuewei; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Nijhuis, Christian A; Liu, Xinke; Ang, Kah-Wee

    2017-06-01

    Black phosphorus carbide (b-PC) is a new family of layered semiconducting material that has recently been predicted to have the lightest electrons and holes among all known 2D semiconductors, yielding a p-type mobility (≈10 5 cm 2 V -1 s -1 ) at room temperature that is approximately five times larger than the maximum value in black phosphorus. Here, a high-performance composite few-layer b-PC field-effect transistor fabricated via a novel carbon doping technique which achieved a high hole mobility of 1995 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at room temperature is reported. The absorption spectrum of this material covers an electromagnetic spectrum in the infrared regime not served by black phosphorus and is useful for range finding applications as the earth atmosphere has good transparency in this spectral range. Additionally, a low contact resistance of 289 Ω µm is achieved using a nickel phosphide alloy contact with an edge contacted interface via sputtering and thermal treatment. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Modeling of plates with multiple anisotropic layers and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Mathias; Pedersen, Thomas; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2016-01-01

    Usually the analytical approach for modeling of plates uses the single layer plate equation to obtain the deflection and does not take anisotropy and residual stress into account. Based on the stress–strain relation of each layer and balancing stress resultants and bending moments, a general...... multilayered anisotropic plate equation is developed for plates with an arbitrary number of layers. The exact deflection profile is calculated for a circular clamped plate of anisotropic materials with residual bi-axial stress.From the deflection shape the critical stress for buckling is calculated......, and an excellent agreement between the two models is seen with a relative difference of less than 2% for all calculations. The model was also used to extract the cell capacitance, the parasitic capacitance and the residual stress of a pressure sensor composed of a multilayered plate of silicon and silicon oxide...

  4. Atomic diffusion induced degradation in bimetallic layer coated cemented tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Zirong; Rohwerder, Michael; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Gault, Baptiste; Meiners, Thorsten; Friedrichs, Marcel; Kreilkamp, Holger; Klocke, Fritz; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the temporal degradation of PtIr/Cr/WC and PtIr/Ni/WC systems. • Short cut diffusion, segregation, oxidation and interdiffusion reactions occurred. • Outward diffusion of Cr (Ni) via PtIr grain boundaries triggered the degradation. • The microstructure of the PtIr layer controlled the systems stability. • We propose an atomic diffusion induced degradation mechanism. - Abstract: We investigated the temporal degradation of glass moulding dies, made of cemented tungsten carbide coated with PtIr on an adhesive Cr or Ni interlayer, by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. During the exposure treatments at 630 °C under an oxygen partial pressure of 1.12 × 10"−"2"3 bar, Cr (Ni) was found to diffuse outwards via grain boundaries in the PtIr, altering the surface morphology. Upon dissolution of the interlayer, the WC substrate also started degrading. Extensive interdiffusion processes involving PtIr, Cr (Ni) and WC took place, leading to the formation of intermetallic phases and voids, deteriorating the adhesion of the coating.

  5. Properties of p-type amorphous silicon carbide window layers prepared using boron trifluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandia, J J [Inst. de Energias Renovables, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Gutierrez, M T [Inst. de Energias Renovables, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Carabe, J [Inst. de Energias Renovables, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    1993-03-01

    One set (A) of undoped and three sets (B, C and D) of doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide samples have been made in the framework of a research plan for obtaining high quality p-type window layers by radiofrequency glow discharge of silane-based gas mixtures. The samples of sets A and B were made using different RF-power-density to mass-flow ratios for various methane percentages in the gas mixture. The best carbon incorporation in the amorphous silicon lattice was obtained at the highest RF-power density. The properties of sets C and D, prepared using different RF-power densities and silane and methane proportions have been analysed as functions of the concentration of boron trifluoride with respect to silane. In both cases, the optical gap E[sub G], after a slight initial decrease, remains at a value of approximately 2.1 eV without quenching in the doping ranges covered. The best conductivity obtained is 2x10[sup -7] ([Omega] cm)[sup -1]. IR spectra allow to associate these features with the structural quality of the films. (orig.)

  6. Atomic layer deposition of cobalt carbide films and their magnetic properties using propanol as a reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarr, Mouhamadou, E-mail: sarrtapha44@yahoo.fr [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Bahlawane, Naoufal; Arl, Didier [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Dossot, Manuel [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Microbiology for the Environment, UMR 7564 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54601 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); McRae, Edward [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198CNRS-Université de Lorraine, FST, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Lenoble, Damien, E-mail: damien.lenoble@list.lu [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Conformal carbon-Co-carbide thin films. • Chemically growth carbone-Co-carbide composite. • Tuneable magnetic properties. - Abstract: The investigation of highly conformal thin films using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is driven by a variety of applications in modern technologies. In particular, the emergence of 3D memory device architectures requires conformal materials with tuneable magnetic properties. Here, nanocomposites of carbon, cobalt and cobalt carbide are deposited by ALD using cobalt acetylacetonate with propanol as a reducing agent. Films were grown by varying the ALD deposition parameters including deposition temperature and propanol exposure time. The morphology, the chemical composition and the crystalline structure of the cobalt carbide film were investigated. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements revealed magnetic hysteresis loops with a coercivity reaching 500 Oe and a maximal saturation magnetization of 0.9 T with a grain size less than 15 nm. Magnetic properties are shown to be tuneable by adjusting the deposition parameters that significantly affect the microstructure and the composition of the deposited films.

  7. Silicon Carbide Found in K/T Boundary Layer: Implication for Asteroid Collision with Planet Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, I. S.; Tsao, C.

    2016-12-01

    An event at the end of the Cretaceous Period 65.5 m.y. ago produced an impact structure 300 km in diameter designated the Chicxulub Crater, located partly on the Yucatan Peninsula and the Caribbian Sea floor. Mass extinction following that event killed 75% of Earth's living species, including dinosaurs. To this date, the killer space object has not been identified, but it was frequently conjectured to be a comet or an asteroid. The goal of our study was to search for evidence which might implicate the culprit. The Chicxulub impact caused extensive wildfires producing Ir-rich dust fallouts in worldwide localities, among which the least contaminated by land-derived sediments may be situated on deep ocean floors. Our study is based on a sample of pelagic clay from the giant piston core LL44-GPC3 taken from the Pacific Plate, north of the Hawaiian Islands (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution). The 1-cm thick Ir-rich layer was located at a downcore depth of 1055-1056 cm below sea floor. From a 5 cubic cm sample provided by Jim Broda, we found 29 impact glass spherules and 4 silicon carbide (SiC) crystals. SiC has been reported in carbonaceous meteorites. Our findings of SiC in the K/T boundary layer seem to implicate that an asteroid having composition akin to that of carbonaceous chondrites might have been the killer projectile during the Chicxulub event. However, impact by a comet cannot be ruled out, since the mineralogy of cometary dust is as yet unknown.

  8. Optimizing the dual elemental thermal reactive deposition time in carbide layer formation on SUJ2 tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochtar, Myrna Ariati; Putra, Wahyuaji Narottama; Mahardika, Bayu

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents developments contributing to the improvement of thermo-reactive deposition (TRD) process in producing hard carbide layers, on automotive components application. The problem in using FeV powder as a coating material that has been applied in the industries is it is high cost. In this study, FeCr powder coating material was mixed into FeV powder with a ratio of 35:65 weight percent. The SUJ2 steel pins components are processed at 980° C, with varying TRD time was 4,6,8 and 10 hours. Scanning Electron microscope (SEM), Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were applied to analyze the coating layers. The thickness of the carbide layer formed will increase with the longer processing time, which thickness at 4-10 hours is increase from 22.7 to 29.7 micron. The gained thickness tends to be homogeneous. Increasing the TRD process holding time results in a higher hardness of the carbide layerwith hardness at 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours is 2049, 2184, 2175 and 2343 HV. The wear rate at TRD holding time of 4-10 hours with the Ogoshi method was reduced from 5.1 × 10-4 mm3/m to 2.5 × 10-4 mm3/m. Optical microscope observations shows that substrate phases consisting of pearlite and cementite and grains that tend to enlarge with the addition of time. Carbide compounds that are formed are vanadium carbide (V8C7, V6C5, V2C) and chromium carbide (Cr3C2, Cr23C7, Cr3C7). While EDS-Linescan results show complex phase (Fe, V, Cr) xC formed. The research shows that addition of FeCr into FeV powder in TRD process in 980°C with optimum time of 10 hours processing meet the mechanical properties requirement of automotive components.

  9. ELASTO-PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COMPOSITE POWDERS WITH LAYERED CARBON AND CARBIDE-FORMING ELEMENT COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coating structure formation under magnetron spraying of titanium and carbon cathodes and combined cathodes, namely cobalt (EP 131 – nickel, tungsten – carbon have been investigated under conditions of carbide separate synthesis within the temperature range of 650–1200 °C. Usage of cobalt and nickel particles as matrix material leads to their rapid thermal expansion under heating during sintering process in the dilatometer. Subsequent plastic deformation of sintered samples provides obtaining a composite powder material that is a composite with framing structure of cobalt, titanium and tungsten carbides in the coatings.

  10. Microcrystalline silicon carbide alloys prepared with HWCVD as highly transparent and conductive window layers for thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finger, F.; Astakhov, O.; Bronger, T.; Carius, R.; Chen, T.; Dasgupta, A.; Gordijn, A.; Houben, L.; Huang, Y.; Klein, S.; Luysberg, M.; Wang, H.; Xiao, L.

    2009-01-01

    Crystalline silicon carbide alloys have a very high potential as transparent conductive window layers in thin-film solar cells provided they can be prepared in thin-film form and at compatible deposition temperatures. The low-temperature deposition of such material in microcrystalline form (μc-Si:C:H) was realized by use of monomethylsilane precursor gas diluted in hydrogen with the Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition process. A wide range of deposition parameters has been investigated and the structural, electronic and optical properties of the μc-SiC:H thin films have been studied. The material, which is strongly n-type from unintentional doping, has been used as window layer in n-side illuminated microcrystalline silicon solar cells. High short-circuit current densities are obtained due to the high transparency of the material resulting in a maximum solar cell conversion efficiency of 9.2%.

  11. Microstructure analysis of zirconium carbide layer on pyrocarbon-coated particles prepared by zirconium chloride vapor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongsheng; Liu Bing; Zhang Kaihong; Tang Chunhe

    2012-01-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) layer on pyrocarbon-coated particles was successfully prepared in a fluidized bed coater furnace by chemical vapor deposition using a zirconium chloride (ZrCl 4 ) vapor method and quantitative controlling of the Zr-source through a ZrCl 4 powder feeder. The crystal phase, microstructure and chemical composition of ZrC-coating layer were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical metallographical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the deposited ZrC-coating layer has smooth and compact surface, no obvious holes, clear interface with dense pyrocarbon layer, and a thickness of 35 μm. The main phase of ZrC-coating layer is fcc-ZrC crystal, which is composed of small grains with the size of 20–50 nm. The grain size increases monotonously with the deposition temperature increasing. The main elements of ZrC-coating layer are Zr and C, and the Zr/C molar ratio is close to 1:1. The analysis of composition and crystal structure suggest that a stoichiometric fcc-ZrC crystal was obtained and no obvious preferred orientation of the grains was found.

  12. Preparation of tantalum carbide layers on carbon using the metalliding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massot, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: massot@chimie.ups-tlse.fr; Chamelot, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Winterton, P. [UFR Langues vivantes, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Taxil, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-03-05

    This work concerns the preparation of tantalum carbide films on carbon-based substrates using the metalliding process in LiF/NaF molten medium (60-40 mol%), containing tantalum heptafluorotantalate ions TaF{sub 7}{sup 2-}, in the 800-900 deg. C temperature range. The process uses a metalliding cell symbolised as: (+) C, TaC{sub x}/LiF-NaF-K{sub 2}TaF{sub 7}/Ta (-) involving the dissolution of Ta at the anode and the reduction of Ta ions in TaC{sub x} at the cathode. The experiments of this process were performed with different carbon substrates as cathodic material: graphite, glassy carbon and carbon braid. Samples analysis (SEM-EDS and XRD) after metalliding showed the formation of tantalum carbides (TaC and Ta{sub 2}C) at the surface of the substrate at a relatively low temperature. A kinetic study, based on the control of the cathodic reaction by the intermetallic diffusion, allowed the diffusion parameters, such as Ta/C diffusion coefficient, to be determined at several temperatures. Furthermore, the results are shown to be independent of the type of carbon substrate.

  13. The Effect of High Temperature Annealing on the Grain Characteristics of a Thin Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide Layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen; Philippus M van Rooyen; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

    2013-08-01

    The unique combination of thermo-mechanical and physiochemical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) provides interest and opportunity for its use in nuclear applications. One of the applications of SiC is as a very thin layer in the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This SiC layer, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is designed to withstand the pressures of fission and transmutation product gases in a high temperature, radiation environment. Various researchers have demonstrated that macroscopic properties can be affected by changes in the distribution of grain boundary plane orientations and misorientations [1 - 3]. Additionally, various researchers have attributed the release behavior of Ag through the SiC layer as a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon [4 - 6]; further highlighting the importance of understanding the actual grain characteristics of the SiC layer. Both historic HTGR fission product release studies and recent experiments at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [7] have shown that the release of Ag-110m is strongly temperature dependent. Although the maximum normal operating fuel temperature of a HTGR design is in the range of 1000-1250°C, the temperature may reach 1600°C under postulated accident conditions. The aim of this specific study is therefore to determine the magnitude of temperature dependence on SiC grain characteristics, expanding upon initial studies by Van Rooyen et al, [8; 9].

  14. Local solid phase growth of few-layer graphene on silicon carbide from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobedo-Cousin, Enrique; Vassilevski, Konstantin; Hopf, Toby; Wright, Nick; O'Neill, Anthony; Horsfall, Alton; Goss, Jonathan; Cumpson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Patterned few-layer graphene (FLG) films were obtained by local solid phase growth from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon, following a fabrication scheme, which allows the formation of self-aligned ohmic contacts on FLG and is compatible with conventional SiC device processing methods. The process was realised by the deposition and patterning of thin Ni films on semi-insulating 6H-SiC wafers followed by annealing and the selective removal of the resulting nickel silicide by wet chemistry. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm both the formation and subsequent removal of nickel silicide. The impact of process parameters such as the thickness of the initial Ni layer, annealing temperature, and cooling rates on the FLG films was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and atomic force microscopy. The thickness of the final FLG film estimated from the Raman spectra varied from 1 to 4 monolayers for initial Ni layers between 3 and 20 nm thick. Self-aligned contacts were formed on these patterned films by contact photolithography and wet etching of nickel silicide, which enabled the fabrication of test structures to measure the carrier concentration and mobility in the FLG films. A simple model of diffusion-driven solid phase chemical reaction was used to explain formation of the FLG film at the interface between nickel silicide and silicon carbide.

  15. Development of Plasma-Sprayed Molybdenum Carbide-Based Anode Layers with Various Metal Oxides for SOFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, N. H.; Ahmed, R.; Katikaneni, S. P.; Souentie, S.; Goosen, M. F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Air plasma-sprayed (APS) coatings provide an ability to deposit a range of novel fuel cell materials at competitive costs. This work develops three separate types of composite anodes (Mo-Mo2C/Al2O3, Mo-Mo2C/ZrO2, Mo-Mo2C/TiO2) using a combination of APS process parameters on Hastelloy®X for application in intermediate temperature proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells. Commercially available carbide of molybdenum powder catalyst (Mo-Mo2C) and three metal oxides (Al2O3, ZrO2, TiO2) was used to prepare three separate composite feedstock powders to fabricate three different anodes. Each of the modified composition anode feedstock powders included a stoichiometric weight ratio of 0.8:0.2. The coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, nanoindentation, and conductivity. We report herein that three optimized anode layers of thicknesses between 200 and 300 µm and porosity as high as 20% for Mo-Mo2C/Al2O3 (250-µm thick) and Mo-Mo2C/TiO2 (300 µm thick) and 17% for Mo-Mo2C/ZrO2 (220-µm thick), controllable by a selection of the APS process parameters with no addition of sacrificial pore-forming material. The nanohardness results indicate the upper layers of the coatings have higher values than the subsurface layers in coatings with some effect of the deposition on the substrate. Mo-Mo2C/ZrO2 shows high electrical conductivity.

  16. Properties of carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides based on Ti and Mo multicomponent layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, J.; Markowski, J.; Prajzner, A.; Zdanowski, J. [Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland). Inst. Technologii Elektronowej

    1998-01-01

    Coating have been produced by bias activated reactive evaporation method (BARE) [1] on polished HSS steel and Corning glass substrates. Titanium and molybdenum were co-evaporated using a special two-hearth electron gun with separate Ti and Mo evaporation sources. Various chemical compositions were obtained by means of heating time control of respective materials. The working gases were nitrogen, acetylene and a 1:1 mixture of both. The investigation of properties of layers with various chemical compositions covered samples: TiC, TiCN, TiN, (Ti,Mo)C, (Ti,Mo)CN, (Ti,Mo)N, MoC, MoCN, MoN. The chemical film compositions were determined using the energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) method. Vickers hardness measurements were made. The structures of the deposited layers were examined by means of X-ray diffraction. The electrical measurements of the deposited layers covered resistivity ({rho}) and temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR). It has been found that the measurements of electrical properties may be very sensitive indicators of the layer composition and structure. (orig.) 5 refs.

  17. Control of electronic properties of 2D carbides (MXenes) by manipulating their transition metal layers

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak; Shi, Chenyang; Moon, Eun Ju; Xie, Yu; Voigt, Cooper A.; Kent, Paul R. C.; May, Steven J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Barsoum, Michel W.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    M′′–C layers. Using X-ray atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis on Mo2TiC2 and Mo2Ti2C3 MXenes, we present the first quantitative analysis of structures of these novel materials and experimentally confirm that Mo atoms are in the outer

  18. Design optimization of multi-layer Silicon Carbide cladding for light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho, E-mail: euo@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, MSC01 1120 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); NO, Hee Cheon, E-mail: hcno@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Ik, E-mail: jeongiklee@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • SiC cladding designs are optimized with a multi-layer structural analysis code. • Layer radial thickness fraction that minimizes cladding fracture probability exists. • The demonstrated procedure is applicable for multi-layer SiC cladding design. • Duplex SiC with the inner composite fraction ∼0.4 is optimal in a reference case. • Increasing composite thermal conductivity markedly decreases SiC cladding stress. - Abstract: A parametric study that demonstrates a methodology for determining the optimum bilayer composition in a duplex SiC cladding is discussed. The structural performance of multi-layer SiC cladding design is significantly affected by radial thickness fraction of each layer. This study shows that there exists an optimal composite/monolith radial thickness fraction that minimizes failure probability for a duplex SiC cladding in steady-state operation. An exemplary reference case study shows that the duplex cladding with the inner composite fraction ∼0.4 and the outer CVD-SiC fraction ∼0.6 is found to be the optimal SiC cladding design for the current PWRs with the reference material choice for CVD-SiC and fiber reinforced composite. A marginal increase in the composite fraction from the presented optimal designs may lead to increase structural integrity by introducing some unquantified merits such as increasing damage tolerance. The major factors that affect the optimum cladding designs are temperature gradients and internal gas pressure. Clad wall thickness, thermal conductivity, and Weibull modulus are among the key design parameters/material properties.

  19. Analysis of residual stress in subsurface layers after precision hard machining of forging tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czan Andrej

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on analysis of residual stress of functional surfaces and subsurface layers created by precision technologies of hard machining for progressive constructional materials of forging tools. Methods of experiments are oriented on monitoring of residual stress in surface which is created by hard turning (roughing and finishing operations. Subsequently these surfaces were etched in thin layers by electro-chemical polishing. The residual stress was monitored in each etched layer. The measuring was executed by portable X-ray diffractometer for detection of residual stress and structural phases. The results significantly indicate rise and distribution of residual stress in surface and subsurface layers and their impact on functional properties of surface integrity.

  20. Thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibrium in system Ti-B-Si-C, synthesis and phases composition of borides and carbides layers on titanic alloyVT-1 at electron beam treatment in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnyagina, N. N.; Khaltanova, V. M.; Lapina, A. E.; Dasheev, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Composite layers on the basis of carbides and borides the titan and silicon on titanic alloy VT-1 are generated at diffused saturation in vacuum. Formation in a composite of MAX phase Ti3SiC2 is shown. Thermodynamic research of phase equilibrium in systems Ti-Si-C and Ti-B-C in the conditions of high vacuum is executed. The thermodynamics, formation mechanisms of superfirm layers borides and carbides of the titan and silicon are investigated.

  1. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  2. Energy and power performance of electrochemical double-layer capacitors based on molybdenum carbide derived carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomberg, T.; Jaenes, A.; Lust, E.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry, constant current charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been applied to establish the electrochemical characteristics for electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) consisting of the 1 M (C 2 H 5 ) 3 CH 3 NBF 4 electrolyte in acetonitrile and micro/mesoporous carbon electrodes prepared from Mo 2 C, noted as C(Mo 2 C). The N 2 sorption (total BET specific surface area (S BET ≤ 1855 m 2 g -1 ), micropore area (S micro ≤ 1823 m 2 g -1 ), total pore volume (V tot ≤ 1.399 m 3 g -1 ) and pore size distribution (average NLDFT pore width d NLDFT ≥ 0.89 nm) values obtained have been correlated with the electrochemical characteristics for EDLCs (region of ideal polarizability (ΔV = 3.0 V), characteristic time constant (τ R = 1.05 s), gravimetric capacitance (C m ≤ 143 F g -1 )) dependent strongly on the C(Mo 2 C) synthesis temperature. High gravimetric energy (35 Wh kg -1 ) and gravimetric power (237 kW kg -1 ) values, normalised to the total active mass of both C(Mo 2 C) electrodes, synthesised at T synt = 800 deg. C, have been demonstrated at cell voltage 3.0 V and T = 20 deg. C.

  3. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...... be delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  4. Role of residual layer and large-scale phenomena on the evolution of the boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blay, E.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Boer, van de A.; Coster, de O.; Faloona, I.; Garrouste, O.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-layer theory and large-eddy simulations are used to analyze the dynamics of the boundary layer on two intensive operational periods during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) campaign: 1st and 2nd of July 2011, when convective boundary layers (CBLs) were observed.

  5. Atomic layer deposited nanocrystalline tungsten carbides thin films as a metal gate and diffusion barrier for Cu metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Beom; Kim, Soo-Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@ynu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan-si 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Won Seok [UP Chemical 576, Chilgoedong, Pyeongtaek-si, Gyeonggi-do 459-050 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Do-Joong [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Tungsten carbides (WC{sub x}) thin films were deposited on thermally grown SiO{sub 2} substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a fluorine- and nitrogen-free W metallorganic precursor, tungsten tris(3-hexyne) carbonyl [W(CO)(CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}C ≡ CCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 3}], and N{sub 2} + H{sub 2} plasma as the reactant at deposition temperatures between 150 and 350 °C. The present ALD-WC{sub x} system showed an ALD temperature window between 200 and 250 °C, where the growth rate was independent of the deposition temperature. Typical ALD characteristics, such as self-limited film growth and a linear dependency of the film grown on the number of ALD cycles, were observed, with a growth rate of 0.052 nm/cycle at a deposition temperature of 250 °C. The ALD-WC{sub x} films formed a nanocrystalline structure with grains, ∼2 nm in size, which consisted of hexagonal W{sub 2}C, WC, and nonstoichiometric cubic β-WC{sub 1−x} phase. Under typical deposition conditions at 250 °C, an ALD-WC{sub x} film with a resistivity of ∼510 μΩ cm was deposited and the resistivity of the ALD-WC{sub x} film could be reduced even further to ∼285 μΩ cm by further optimizing the reactant pulsing conditions, such as the plasma power. The step coverage of ALD-WC{sub x} film was ∼80% on very small sized and dual trenched structures (bottom width of 15 nm and aspect ratio of ∼6.3). From ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, the work function of the ALD-WC{sub x} film was determined to be 4.63 eV. Finally, the ultrathin (∼5 nm) ALD-WC{sub x} film blocked the diffusion of Cu, even up to 600 °C, which makes it a promising a diffusion barrier material for Cu interconnects.

  6. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  7. Automatic detection of photoresist residual layer in lithography using a neural classification approach

    KAUST Repository

    Gereige, Issam

    2012-09-01

    Photolithography is a fundamental process in the semiconductor industry and it is considered as the key element towards extreme nanoscale integration. In this technique, a polymer photo sensitive mask with the desired patterns is created on the substrate to be etched. Roughly speaking, the areas to be etched are not covered with polymer. Thus, no residual layer should remain on these areas in order to insure an optimal transfer of the patterns on the substrate. In this paper, we propose a nondestructive method based on a classification approach achieved by artificial neural network for automatic residual layer detection from an ellipsometric signature. Only the case of regular defect, i.e. homogenous residual layer, will be considered. The limitation of the method will be discussed. Then, an experimental result on a 400 nm period grating manufactured with nanoimprint lithography is analyzed with our method. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A hierarchical structure through imprinting of a polyimide precursor without residual layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, I-Ting; Hon, Min-Hsiung; Leu, Ing-Chi

    2008-01-01

    A patterned polyimide without a residual layer is obtained by imprinting with the assistance of a residual solvent. The effects of the wetting behaviors of the poly-amic acid (PAA) solution coated on various surfaces are examined and the formation of hierarchical patterns without residual layers is demonstrated. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and PEI/PDMS are used as imprinting molds with Si and 300 nm SiO 2 /Si as substrates. The results indicate that the various ambits of patterns without a residual layer are formed due to the dewetting phenomena caused by surface tension (Suh 2006 Small 2 832). During imprinting, PDMS with a low surface energy makes the PAA solution flow away from its surface exposing the contact area due to dewetting. Self-organized hierarchical structures are also obtained from this process due to effective dewetting. The present study provides a new approach for fabricating patterns without residual layers and the consequent preparation of hierarchical structures, which is considered to be impossible using the lithographic technique

  9. Wear characteristics of TiO[sub 2] coating and silicon carbide alloyed layer on Ti-6Al-4V material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamis, M.B. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Erciyes Univ., Kayseri (Turkey))

    1992-08-14

    Wear properties of Ti-6Al-4V material (IMI-318) TiO[sub 2] coated and electron beam alloyed with silicon carbide were tested. Thickness of oxide coating, alloying conditions and properties of the alloyed layer such as hardness, layer thickness and microstructure are described. Wear tests were carried out on a general-purpose wear machine by using a disc-disc sample configuration under lubricated conditions. Counterface materials to oxide-coated and to surface-alloyed specimens were plasma-nitrided AISI 51100 and hardened AISI 4140 respectively. The resulting weight loss and wear resistance were monitored as a function of sliding distance and applied load. Although the electron beam alloying improved the wear resistance of Ti-6Al-4V material, the oxide coatings on the material were not resistant to wear. (orig.).

  10. Effect of residual stress in layered ceramic microcomposites on crack propagation during fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaszewski, H.; Strzeszewski, J.; Gebicki, W.

    1998-01-01

    Laminar composites, containing layers of Y-ZrO 2 and either Al 2 O 3 or a mixture of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 have been fabricated using a sequential centrifuging technique of water solutions containing of suspended particles. Controlled crack growth experiments with notched beams of composites were done and showed the significant effect of barrier layer thickness and composition of the crack propagation path during fracture. Distinct crack deflection in alumina layers was observed. The increase of crack deflection angle with the alumina layer thickness was also found. In the case of the barrier layer made of mixture, crack deflection did not occur independently on layer thickness. The observed changes have been correlated with the radial distribution of residual stresses in barrier layers created during cooling of sintered composites from fabrication temperature. The stress found were the result of the differences in the thermal expansion and sintering shrinkage of alumina and zirconia and the crystallographically anisotropic thermal expansion of the alumina. The residual stress distribution has been measured by piezo-spectroscopy based on the optical fluorescence of Cr + dopants in alumina. (author)

  11. Thermal analysis of silicon carbide coating on a nickel based superalloy substrate and thickness measurement of top layers by lock-in infrared thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Kim, Won Tae [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper, we investigate the capacity of the lock-in infrared thermography technique for the evaluation of non-uniform top layers of a silicon carbide coating with a nickel based superalloy sample. The method utilized a multilayer heat transfer model to analyze the surface temperature response. The modelling of the sample was done in ANSYS. The sample consists of three layers, namely, the metal substrate, bond coat and top coat. A sinusoidal heating at different excitation frequencies was imposed upon the top layer of the sample according to the experimental procedures. The thermal response of the excited surface was recorded, and the phase angle image was computed by Fourier transform using the image processing software, MATLAB and Thermofit Pro. The correlation between the coating thickness and phase angle was established for each excitation frequency. The most appropriate excitation frequency was found to be 0.05 Hz. The method demonstrated potential in the evaluation of coating thickness and it was successfully applied to measure the non-uniform top layers ranging from 0.05 mm to 1 mm with an accuracy of 0.000002 mm to 0.045 mm.

  12. Effective deleting of residual photoconductivity in high-resistance layers GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaev, B.S.; Kadirova, I.T.; Sharipov, E.I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The phenomenon of residual photoconductivity as the storage of optical memory (OM) represents practical interest in micro and optoelectronics. The finding - out of the nature OM represents undoubtedly and scientific interest. Now residual photoconductivity (RPC) is explained by potential barriers arising because of non-monocharacteristical of distribution components of the semiconductor or carriers of a current in volume. Depending on a nature non-monocharacteristical the time relaxation RPC changes in a wide limit. The special interest represents RPC created by impurity. In the given work the results of research of a nature RPC created photos by ionization of the filled centres of chrome in compensated epitaxilogic layers arsenide galls are resulted. Epitaxilogic layers were brought up by a vertical method ZFE. Highness was reached (achieved) by special indemnification of the residual donors deep acceptors of chrome. Substrates served n-GoAs. Lassitude of i-layers has made 70-80 microns. Specific resistance of layers has made (1/3) 108 om·sm. (T= 300 K). The structures were photosensitive as at low (T = 77 K) and at room temperatures. The photosensitivity of structures in impurity to a strip of absorption chrome (= 1,4 microns) was comparable (compared) with own. The researches show, that the structures have RPC. Size RPC the greatest ambassador impurity of illumination is carrying out photoionization Cr2 + - of the centres. That is established, RPC impurity of a photocurrent is effectively erased only at certain length of a wave of external illumination

  13. Chip-scale pattern modification method for equalizing residual layer thickness in nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Sung-Won; Suzuki, Kenta; Hiroshima, Hiroshi

    2018-06-01

    A software program for modifying a mold design to obtain a uniform residual layer thickness (RLT) distribution has been developed and its validity was verified by UV-nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) simulation. First, the effects of granularity (G) on both residual layer uniformity and filling characteristics were characterized. For a constant complementary pattern depth and a granularity that was sufficiently larger than the minimum pattern width, filling time decreased with the decrease in granularity. For a pattern design with a wide density range and an irregular distribution, the choice of a small granularity was not always a good strategy since the etching depth required for a complementary pattern occasionally exceptionally increased with the decrease in granularity. On basis of the results obtained, the automated method was applied to a chip-scale pattern modification. Simulation results showed a marked improvement in residual layer thickness uniformity for a capacity-equalized (CE) mold. For the given conditions, the standard deviation of RLT decreased in the range from 1/3 to 1/5 in accordance with pattern designs.

  14. One step deposition of highly adhesive diamond films on cemented carbide substrates via diamond/β-SiC composite interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tao; Zhuang, Hao; Jiang, Xin, E-mail: xin.jiang@uni-siegen.de

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel diamond/beta-silicon carbide composite gradient interlayers were synthesized. • The interlayer features a cross-sectional gradient with increasing diamond content. • Diamond top layers and the interlayers were deposited in one single process. • The adhesion of the diamond film is drastically improved by employing the interlayer. • The stress was suppressed by manipulating the distribution of diamond and silicon carbide. - Abstract: Deposition of adherent diamond films on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide substrates has been realized by application of diamond/beta-silicon carbide composite interlayers. Diamond top layers and the interlayers were deposited in one single process by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. Two different kinds of interlayers have been employed, namely, gradient interlayer and interlayer with constant composition. The distribution of diamond and beta-silicon carbide phases was precisely controlled by manipulating the gas phase composition. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to determine the existence of diamond, beta-silicon carbide and cobalt silicides (Co{sub 2}Si, CoSi) phases, as well as the quality of diamond crystal and the residual stress in the films. Rockwell-C indentation tests were carried out to evaluate the film adhesion. It is revealed that the adhesion of the diamond film is drastically improved by employing the interlayer. This is mainly influenced by the residual stress in the diamond top layer, which is induced by the different thermal expansion coefficient of the film and the substrate. It is even possible to further suppress the stress by manipulating the distribution of diamond and beta-silicon carbide in the interlayer. The most adhesive diamond film on cemented carbide is thus obtained by employing a gradient composite interlayer.

  15. The different influence of the residual layer on the development of the summer convective boundary layer in two deserts in northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhao; Bo, Han; Shihua, Lv; Lijuan, Wen; Xianhong, Meng; Zhaoguo, Li

    2018-02-01

    The development of the atmospheric boundary layer is closely connected with the exchange of momentum, heat, and mass near the Earth's surface, especially for a convective boundary layer (CBL). Besides being modulated by the buoyancy flux near the Earth's surface, some studies point out that a neutrally stratified residual layer is also crucial for the appearance of a deep CBL. To verify the importance of the residual layer, the CBLs over two deserts in northwest China (Badan Jaran and Taklimakan) were investigated. The summer CBL mean depth over the Taklimakan Desert is shallower than that over the Badan Jaran Desert, even when the sensible heat flux of the former is stronger. Meanwhile, the climatological mean residual layer in the Badan Jaran Desert is much deeper and neutrally stratified in summer. Moreover, we found a significant and negative correlation between the lapse rate of the residual layer and the CBL depth over the Badan Jaran Desert. The different lapse rates of the residual layer in the two regions are partly connected with the advection heating from large-scale atmospheric circulation. The advection heating tends to reduce the temperature difference in the 700 to 500-hPa layer over the Badan Jaran Desert, and it increases the stability in the same atmospheric layer over the Taklimakan Desert. The advection due to climatological mean atmospheric circulation is more effective at modulating the lapse rate of the residual layer than from varied circulation. Also, the interannual variation of planetary boundary layer (PBL) height over two deserts was found to covary with the wave train.

  16. X-ray evaluation of residual stress distributions within surface machined layer generated by surface machining and sequential welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Yuu; Okano, Shigetaka; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    The excessive tensile residual stress generated by welding after surface machining may be an important factor to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nuclear power plants. Therefore we need to understand and control the residual stress distribution appropriately. In this study, residual stress distributions within surface machined layer generated by surface machining and sequential welding were evaluated by X-ray diffraction method. Depth directional distributions were also investigated by electrolytic polishing. In addition, to consider the effect of work hardened layer on the residual stress distributions, we also measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) obtained from X-ray diffraction. Testing material was a low-carbon austenitic stainless steel type SUS316L. Test specimens were prepared by surface machining with different cutting conditions. Then, bead-on-plate welding under the same welding condition was carried out on the test specimens with different surface machined layer. As a result, the tensile residual stress generated by surface machining increased with increasing cutting speed and showed nearly uniform distributions on the surface. Furthermore, the tensile residual stress drastically decreased with increasing measurement depth within surface machined layer. Then, the residual stress approached 0 MPa after the compressive value showed. FWHM also decreased drastically with increasing measurement depth and almost constant value from a certain depth, which was almost equal regardless of the machining condition, within surface machined layer in all specimens. After welding, the transverse distribution of the longitudinal residual stress varied in the area apart from the weld center according to machining conditions and had a maximum value in heat affected zone. The magnitude of the maximum residual stress was almost equal regardless of the machining condition and decreased with increasing measurement depth within surface machined layer. Finally, the

  17. Hafnium carbide formation in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbücher, C. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Hildebrandt, E.; Sharath, S. U.; Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Alff, L. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institute of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Szot, K. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); University of Silesia, A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Breuer, U. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Central Institute for Engineering, Electronics and Analytics (ZEA-3), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Waser, R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, Institute of Electronic Materials (IWE 2), 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-06-20

    On highly oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide (hafnia, HfO{sub 2−x}) contaminated with adsorbates of carbon oxides, the formation of hafnium carbide (HfC{sub x}) at the surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures as low as 600 °C is reported. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the evolution of the HfC{sub x} surface layer related to a transformation from insulating into metallic state is monitored in situ. In contrast, for fully stoichiometric HfO{sub 2} thin films prepared and measured under identical conditions, the formation of HfC{sub x} was not detectable suggesting that the enhanced adsorption of carbon oxides on oxygen deficient films provides a carbon source for the carbide formation. This shows that a high concentration of oxygen vacancies in carbon contaminated hafnia lowers considerably the formation energy of hafnium carbide. Thus, the presence of a sufficient amount of residual carbon in resistive random access memory devices might lead to a similar carbide formation within the conducting filaments due to Joule heating.

  18. An Improved Iterative Fitting Method to Estimate Nocturnal Residual Layer Height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The planetary boundary layer (PBL is an atmospheric region near the Earth’s surface. It is significant for weather forecasting and for the study of air quality and climate. In this study, the top of nocturnal residual layers—which are what remain of the daytime mixing layer—are estimated by an elastic backscatter Lidar in Wuhan (30.5°N, 114.4°E, a city in Central China. The ideal profile fitting method is widely applied to determine the nocturnal residual layer height (RLH from Lidar data. However, the method is seriously affected by an optical thick layer. Thus, we propose an improved iterative fitting method to eliminate the optical thick layer effect on RLH detection using Lidar. Two typical case studies observed by elastic Lidar are presented to demonstrate the theory and advantage of the proposed method. Results of case analysis indicate that the improved method is more practical and precise than profile-fitting, gradient, and wavelet covariance transform method in terms of nocturnal RLH evaluation under low cloud conditions. Long-term observations of RLH performed with ideal profile fitting and improved methods were carried out in Wuhan from 28 May 2011 to 17 June 2016. Comparisons of Lidar-derived RLHs with the two types of methods verify that the improved solution is practical. Statistical analysis of a six-year Lidar signal was conducted to reveal the monthly average values of nocturnal RLH in Wuhan. A clear RLH monthly cycle with a maximum mean height of about 1.8 km above ground level was observed in August, and a minimum height of about 0.7 km was observed in January. The variation in monthly mean RLH displays an obvious quarterly dependence, which coincides with the annual variation in local surface temperature.

  19. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  20. Mocvd Growth of Group-III Nitrides on Silicon Carbide: From Thin Films to Atomically Thin Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Zakaria Y.

    Group-III nitride semiconductors (AlN, GaN, InN and their alloys) are considered one of the most important class of materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices. This is not limited to the blue light-emitting diode (LED) used for efficient solid-state lighting, but other applications as well, such as solar cells, radar and a variety of high frequency power electronics, which are all prime examples of the technological importance of nitride based wide bandgap semiconductors in our daily lives. The goal of this dissertation work was to explore and establish new growth schemes to improve the structural and optical properties of thick to atomically thin films of group-III nitrides grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on SiC substrates for future novel devices. The first research focus of this dissertation was on the growth of indium gallium nitride (InGaN). This wide bandgap semiconductor has attracted much research attention as an active layer in LEDs and recently as an absorber material for solar cells. InGaN has superior material properties for solar cells due to its wavelength absorption tunability that nearly covers the entire solar spectrum. This can be achieved by controlling the indium content in thick grown material. Thick InGaN films are also of interest as strain reducing based layers for deep-green and red light emitters. The growth of thick films of InGaN is, however, hindered by several combined problems. This includes poor incorporation of indium in alloys, high density of structural and morphological defects, as well as challenges associated with the segregation of indium in thick films. Overcoming some of these material challenges is essential in order integrate thick InGaN films into future optoelectronics. Therefore, this dissertation research investigated the growth mechanism of InGaN layers grown in the N-polar direction by MOCVD as a route to improve the structural and optical properties of thick InGaN films. The growth

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkharov, V.I.; Yar-Mukhamedov, Sh.Kh.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings has been studied depending on the conditions of their formation; the specific features of the mechanism of oxidation at 1200 deg in an air atmosphere have been elucidated. It has been established that kinetics of high temperature oxidation of the coatings depends essentially on the conditions of their formation and on the composition of steel to which the coating is applied. It has been shown that two oxidation mechanisms are possible: by diffusion of the residual chromium through a carbide layer along the carbide grain boundaries outwards or, when there is no residual chromium, by chemical reaction of carbon combustion and oxidation of the liberated chromium. The comparison of oxidation kinetic curves of the samples of 38KhMYuA, 35KhGSA, and DI-22 steels with and without coating has shown that the coatings under study have a better protective effect on 38KhMYuA steel than on 35KhGSA, although without coating oxidability of the first steel is higher than that of the second

  2. Towards a high performing UV-A sensor based on Silicon Carbide and hydrogenated Silicon Nitride absorbing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzillo, M.; Renna, L.; Costa, N.; Badalà, P.; Sciuto, A.; Mannino, G.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major risk factor for most skin cancers. The sun is our primary natural source of UV radiation. The strength of the sun's ultraviolet radiation is expressed as Solar UV Index (UVI). UV-A (320–400 nm) and UV-B (290–320 nm) rays mostly contribute to UVI. UV-B is typically the most destructive form of UV radiation because it has enough energy to cause photochemical damage to cellular DNA. Also overexposure to UV-A rays, although these are less energetic than UV-B photons, has been associated with toughening of the skin, suppression of the immune system, and cataract formation. The use of preventive measures to decrease sunlight UV radiation absorption is fundamental to reduce acute and irreversible health diseases to skin, eyes and immune system. In this perspective UV sensors able to monitor in a monolithic and compact chip the UV Index and relative UV-A and UV-B components of solar spectrum can play a relevant role for prevention, especially in view of the integration of these detectors in close at hand portable devices. Here we present the preliminary results obtained on our UV-A sensor technology based on the use of hydrogenated Silicon Nitride (SiN:H) thin passivating layers deposited on the surface of thin continuous metal film Ni 2 Si/4H-SiC Schottky detectors, already used for UV-Index monitoring. The first UV-A detector prototypes exhibit a very low leakage current density of about 0.2 pA/mm 2 and a peak responsivity value of 0.027 A/W at 330 nm, both measured at 0V bias.

  3. Effect of processing conditions and methods on residual stress in CeO2 buffer layers and YBCO superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jie; Qin Wenfeng; Cui Xumei; Tao Bowan; Tang Jinlong; Li Yanrong

    2006-01-01

    CeO 2 layers have been fabricated by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on (1 1 0 2) sapphire substrate. Microstructure of CeO 2 layers is characterized by X-ray diffraction as functions of substrate temperature. The effects of the substrate temperature on the residual stress have been studied. The results show that residual stress in CeO 2 film decreased with increasing substrate temperature, not the same development tendency as that of thermal stress. This means that the thermal stress is only a fraction of the residual stress. Moreover, YBCO superconducting films were prepared by direct current (DC) sputtering and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. The residual stress and thermal stress of both YBCO films were measured. PLD processing apparently generated higher intrinsic compressive stresses in comparison to DC sputtering

  4. Improved performance and stability of field-effect transistors with polymeric residue-free graphene channel transferred by gold layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi; Trung, Tran Quang; Jung, Jin-Heak; Kim, Bo-Yeong; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2014-03-07

    One of the most significant issues that occurs when applying chemical-vapor deposited (CVD) graphene (Gr) to various high-performance device applications is the result of polymeric residues. Polymeric residues remain on the Gr surface during Gr polymer support transfer to an arbitrary substrate, and these residues degrade CVD Gr electrical properties. In this paper, we propose that a thin layer of gold be used as a CVD Gr transfer layer, instead of a polymer support layer, to enable a polymer residue-free transfer. Comparative investigation of the surface morphological and qualitative analysis of residues on Gr surfaces and Gr field-effect transistors (GFETs) using two transfer methods demonstrates that gold-transferred Gr, with uniform, smooth, and clean surfaces, enable GFETs to perform better than Gr transferred by the polymer, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). In GFETs fabricated by the gold transfer method, field-effect carrier mobility was greatly enhanced and the position of the Dirac point was significantly reduced compared to GFETs fabricated by the PMMA transfer method. In addition, compared to the PMMA-transferred GFETs, the gold-transferred GFETs showed greatly increased stability with smaller hysteresis and higher resistance to gate bias stress effects. These results suggest that the gold transfer method for Gr provides significant improvements in GFET performance and reliability by minimizing the polymeric residues and defects on Gr.

  5. Modeling and simulation of stamp deflections in nanoimprint lithography: Exploiting backside grooves to enhance residual layer thickness uniformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Hayden; Smistrup, Kristian; Boning, Duane

    2011-01-01

    We describe a model for the compliance of a nanoimprint stamp etched with a grid of backside grooves. We integrate the model with a fast simulation technique that we have previously demonstrated, to show how etched grooves help reduce the systematic residual layer thickness (RLT) variations...

  6. One-step synthesis of 2D-layered carbon wrapped transition metal nitrides from transition metal carbides (MXenes) for supercapacitors with ultrahigh cycling stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenyu; Cheng, Laifei; Wu, Heng; Zhang, Yani; Lv, Shilin; Guo, Xiaohui

    2018-03-13

    A novel one-step method to synthesize 2D carbon wrapped TiN (C@TiN) was proposed via using 2D metal carbides (MXenes) as precursors. This study provides a novel approach to synthesize carbon wrapped metal nitrides.

  7. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tions, they concluded that either reaction sintering or liquid phase .... α-6H silicon carbide single crystal by three different laboratories ... silicon carbide particles by the overall reaction .... layer displacement is likely to occur in such a manner as.

  8. Determination of residual stresses in objects at their additive manufacturing by layer-by-layer photopolymerization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, P. S.; Chentsov, A. V.; Kozintsev, V. M.; Popov, A. L.

    2018-04-01

    A calculation-experimental technique is developed for identification of the shrinkage stresses generated in objects after their additive manufacturing by layer-by-layer photopolymerization. The technique is based on the analysis of shrinkage deformations at bending occurring in a series of samples in the form of plates-stripes with identical sizes, but with different time of polymerization which is predetermined during their production on the 3D printer.

  9. Vanadium carbide coatings: deposition process and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, A.; Borisov, Y.; Shavlovsky, E.; Mits, I.; Castermans, L.; Jongbloed, R.

    2001-01-01

    Vanadium carbide coatings on carbon and alloyed steels were produced by the method of diffusion saturation from the borax melt. Thickness of the vanadium carbide layer was 5-15 μm, depending upon the steel grade and diffusion saturation parameters. Microhardness was 20000-28000 MPa and wear resistance of the coatings under conditions of end face friction without lubrication against a mating body of WC-2Co was 15-20 times as high as that of boride coatings. Vanadium carbide coatings can operate in air at a temperature of up to 400 o C. They improve fatigue strength of carbon steels and decrease the rate of corrosion in sea and fresh water and in acid solutions. The use of vanadium carbide coatings for hardening of various types of tools, including cutting tools, allows their service life to be extended by a factor of 3 to 30. (author)

  10. Estimation of selected residual antibiotics in muscle, kidney, liver, and egg of layer chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amjad, H.; Iqbal, J.; Naeem, M.

    2006-01-01

    The present studies were conducted for the estimation of quinolone residues in our local poultry products. The poultry products included muscle, kidney, liver and egg (yolk and white). The quinolones included in this study were, oxolonic acid, flumequine, enrofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. An assessment of the variation of each analyte (quinolones antibiotic residues) in these products was made. A comparison was made among the analyte (quinolones) concentrations in different tissues/organs and their internationally permissible safer maximum residue limits (MRLS'). Infra Red spectra were used to detect the presence and identification of different quinolones. HPLC with ODS Column and U.V. detector was used for the quantification. (author)

  11. Structural, optical and mechanical properties of thin diamond and silicon carbide layers grown by low pressure microwave linear antenna plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taylor, Andrew; Drahokoupil, Jan; Fekete, Ladislav; Klimša, Ladislav; Kopeček, Jaromír; Purkrt, Adam; Remeš, Zdeněk; Čtvrtlík, Radim; Tomáštík, Jan; Frank, Otakar; Janíček, P.; Mistrík, J.; Mortet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 69, Oct (2016), s. 13-18 ISSN 0925-9635 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA TA ČR TA03010743; GA ČR GA13-31783S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14011; GA MŠk LM2015088 Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568; AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : diamond * silicon carbide * adherence * mechanical properties * optical properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CG - Electrochemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 2.561, year: 2016

  12. Residual stress and crack initiation in laser clad composite layer with Co-based alloy and WC + NiCr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Changmin; Park, Hyungkwon; Yoo, Jaehong; Lee, Changhee; Woo, WanChuck; Park, Sunhong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Major problem, clad cracking in laser cladding process, was researched. • Residual stress measurements were performed quantitatively by neutron diffraction method along the surface of specimens. • Relationship between the residual stress and crack initiation was showed clearly. • Ceramic particle effect in the metal matrix was showed from the results of residual stress measurements. • Initiation sites of generating clad cracks were specifically studied in MMC coatings. - Abstract: Although laser cladding process has been widely used to improve the wear and corrosion resistance, there are unwanted cracking issues during and/or after laser cladding. This study investigates the tendency of Co-based WC + NiCr composite layers to cracking during the laser cladding process. Residual stress distributions of the specimen are measured using neutron diffraction and elucidate the correlation between the residual stress and the cracking in three types of cylindrical specimens; (i) no cladding substrate only, (ii) cladding with 100% stellite#6, and (iii) cladding with 55% stellite#6 and 45% technolase40s. The microstructure of the clad layer was composed of Co-based dendrite and brittle eutectic phases at the dendritic boundaries. And WC particles were distributed on the matrix forming intermediate composition region by partial melting of the surface of particles. The overlaid specimen exhibited tensile residual stress, which was accumulated through the beads due to contraction of the coating layer generated by rapid solidification, while the non-clad specimen showed compressive. Also, the specimen overlaid with 55 wt% stellite#6 and 45 wt% technolase40s showed a tensile stress higher than the specimen overlaid with 100% stellite#6 possibly, due to the difference between thermal expansion coefficients of the matrix and WC particles. Such tensile stresses can be potential driving force to provide an easy crack path ways for large brittle fractures

  13. Residual stress and crack initiation in laser clad composite layer with Co-based alloy and WC + NiCr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Changmin; Park, Hyungkwon; Yoo, Jaehong [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changhee, E-mail: chlee@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, WanChuck [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sunhong [Research Institute of Industrial Science & Technology, Hyo-ja-dong, Po-Hang, Kyoung-buk, San 32 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Major problem, clad cracking in laser cladding process, was researched. • Residual stress measurements were performed quantitatively by neutron diffraction method along the surface of specimens. • Relationship between the residual stress and crack initiation was showed clearly. • Ceramic particle effect in the metal matrix was showed from the results of residual stress measurements. • Initiation sites of generating clad cracks were specifically studied in MMC coatings. - Abstract: Although laser cladding process has been widely used to improve the wear and corrosion resistance, there are unwanted cracking issues during and/or after laser cladding. This study investigates the tendency of Co-based WC + NiCr composite layers to cracking during the laser cladding process. Residual stress distributions of the specimen are measured using neutron diffraction and elucidate the correlation between the residual stress and the cracking in three types of cylindrical specimens; (i) no cladding substrate only, (ii) cladding with 100% stellite#6, and (iii) cladding with 55% stellite#6 and 45% technolase40s. The microstructure of the clad layer was composed of Co-based dendrite and brittle eutectic phases at the dendritic boundaries. And WC particles were distributed on the matrix forming intermediate composition region by partial melting of the surface of particles. The overlaid specimen exhibited tensile residual stress, which was accumulated through the beads due to contraction of the coating layer generated by rapid solidification, while the non-clad specimen showed compressive. Also, the specimen overlaid with 55 wt% stellite#6 and 45 wt% technolase40s showed a tensile stress higher than the specimen overlaid with 100% stellite#6 possibly, due to the difference between thermal expansion coefficients of the matrix and WC particles. Such tensile stresses can be potential driving force to provide an easy crack path ways for large brittle fractures

  14. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  15. Welding-induced local maximum residual stress in heat affected zone of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with machined surface layer and its influential factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Shigetaka; Ihara, Ryohei; Kanamaru, Daisuke; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of work-hardening and pre-existing stress in the machined surface layer of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel on the welding-induced residual stress were experimentally investigated through the use of weld specimens with three different surface layers; as-cutout, mechanically-polished and electrolytically-polished. The high tensile and compressive stresses exist in the work-hardened surface layer of the as-cutout and mechanically-polished specimens, respectively. Meanwhile, no stress and work-hardened surface layer exist in the electrolytically-polished specimen. TIG bead-on-plate welding under the same welding heat input conditions was performed to introduce the residual stress into these specimens. Using these welded specimens, the distributions of welding-induced residual stress were measured by the X-ray diffraction method. Similarly, the distributions of hardness in welds were estimated by the Vickers hardness test. And then, these distributions were compared with one another. Based on the results, the residual stress in the weld metal (WM) is completely unaffected by the machined surface layer because the work-hardened surface layer disappears through the processes of melting and solidification during welding. The local maximum longitudinal tensile residual stress in the heat affected zone (HAZ) depends on the work-hardening but not on the existing stress, regardless of whether tensile or compressive, in the machined surface layer before welding. At the base metal far from WM and HAZ, the residual stress is formed by the addition of the welding-induced residual stress to the pre-existing stress in the machined surface layer before welding. The features of the welding-induced residual stress in low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with the machined surface layer and their influential factors were thus clarified. (author)

  16. Residual stresses and mechanical properties of Si3N4/SiC multilayered composites with different SiC layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liua, S.; Lia, Y.; Chena, P.; Lia, W.; Gaoa, S.; Zhang, B.; Yeb, F.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of residual stresses on the strength, toughness and work of fracture of Si3N4/SiC multilayered composites with different SiC layers has been investigated. It may be an effective way to design and optimize the mechanical properties of Si3N4/SiC multilayered composites by controlling the properties of SiC layers. Si3N4/SiC multilayered composites with different SiC layers were fabricated by aqueous tape casting and pressureless sintering. Residual stresses were calculated by using ANSYS simulation, the maximum values of tensile and compressive stresses were 553.2MPa and −552.1MPa, respectively. Step-like fracture was observed from the fracture surfaces. Fraction of delamination layers increased with the residual stress, which can improve the reliability of the materials. Tensile residual stress was benefit to improving toughness and work of fracture, but the strength of the composites decreased. [es

  17. Influence of thermal expansion mismatch on residual stress profile in veneering ceramic layered on zirconia: Measurement by hole-drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie K; Najjar, Achref; Jakubowicz-Kohen, Boris D; Sadoun, Michaël J

    2015-09-01

    Mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient between core and veneering ceramic (Δα=αcore-αveneer, ppm/°C) is reported as a crucial parameter influencing veneer fractures with Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal (Y-TZP) prostheses, which still constitutes a misunderstood problem. However, the common positive Δα concept remains empirical. The objective of this study is to investigate the Δα dependence of residual stress profiles in veneering ceramic layered on Y-TZP frameworks. The stress profile was measured with the hole-drilling method in bilayered disc samples of 20mm diameter with a 0.7mm thick Y-TZP framework and a 1.5mm thick veneer layer. 3 commercial and 4 experimental veneering ceramics (n=3 per group) were used to obtain different Δα varying from -1.3ppm/°C to +3.2ppm/°C, which were determined by dilatometric analyses. Veneer fractures were observed in samples with Δα≥+2.3 or ≤-0.3ppm/°C. Residual stress profiles measured in other groups showed compressive stresses in the surface, these stresses decreasing with depth and then becoming more compressive again near the interface. Small Δα variations were shown to induce significant changes in residual stress profiles. Compressive stress near the framework was found to decrease inversely to Δα. Veneer CTE close to Y-TZP (+0.2ppm/°C Δα) gived the most favorable stress profile. Yet, near the framework, Δα-induced residual stress varied inversely to predictions. This could be explained by the hypothesis of structural changes occurrence within the Y-TZP surface. Consequently, the optimum Δα value cannot be determined before understanding Y-TZP's particular behavior when veneered. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Steam and air co-injection in removing residual TCE in unsaturated layered sandy porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sheng; Wang, Ning; Chen, Jiajun

    2013-10-01

    Steam and air co-injection is a promising technique for volatile and semi-volatile organic contaminant remediation in heterogeneous porous media. In this study, removal of trichloroethene (TCE) with steam-air co-injection was investigated through a series of 2D sandbox experiments with different layered sand structures, and through numerical simulations. The results show that a layered structure with coarse sand, in which steam and air convection are relatively rapid, resulted in a higher removal rate and a larger removal ratio than those observed in an experiment using finer sand; however, the difference was not significant, and the removal ratios from three experiments ranged from 85% to 94%. Slight downward movement of TCE was observed for Experiment 1 (TCE initially in a fine sand zone encased in a coarse sand), while no such movement was observed for Experiment 2 (TCE initially in two fine sand layers encased in a coarse sand) or 3 (TCE initially in a silty sand zone encased in a coarse sand). Simulations show accumulation of TCE at the interface of the layered sands, which indicates a capillary barrier effect in restraining the downward movement of TCE. This effect is illustrated further by a numerical experiment with homogeneous coarse sand, in which continuous downward TCE movement to the bottom of the sandbox was simulated. Another numerical experiment with higher water saturation was also conducted. The results illustrate a complicated influence of water saturation on TCE removal in a layered sand structure. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Joining of boron carbide using nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosughi, A.; Hadian, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Carbide ceramics such as boron carbide due to their unique properties such as low density, high refractoriness, and high strength to weight ratio have many applications in different industries. This study focuses on direct bonding of boron carbide for high temperature applications using nickel interlayer. The process variables such as bonding time, temperature, and pressure have been investigated. The microstructure of the joint area was studied using electron scanning microscope technique. At all the bonding temperatures ranging from 1150 to 1300 d eg C a reaction layer formed across the ceramic/metal interface. The thickness of the reaction layer increased by increasing temperature. The strength of the bonded samples was measured using shear testing method. The highest strength value obtained was about 100 MPa and belonged to the samples bonded at 1250 for 75 min bonding time. The strength of the joints decreased by increasing the bonding temperature above 1250 d eg C . The results of this study showed that direct bonding technique along with nickel interlayer can be successfully utilized for bonding boron carbide ceramic to itself. This method may be used for bonding boron carbide to metals as well.

  20. Application of the whole powder pattern decomposition procedure in the residual stress analysis of layers and coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoderböck, Peter; Brechbühl, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray investigation of stress states in materials, based on the determination of elastic lattice strains which are converted to stresses by means of theory of elasticity, is a necessity in quality control of thin layers and coatings for optimizing manufacturing steps and process parameters. This work introduces the evaluation of residual stress from complex and overlapping diffraction patterns using a whole-powder pattern decomposition procedure defining a 2θ-offset caused by residual stresses. Furthermore corrections for sample displacement and refraction are directly implemented in the calculation procedure. The correlation matrices of the least square fitting routines have been analyzed for parameter interactions and obvious interdependencies have been decoupled by the introduction of an internal standard within the diffraction experiment. This decomposition based evaluation has been developed on tungsten as a model material system and its efficiency was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell multilayer system. The results are compared with those obtained by the classical sin 2 Ψ-method. - Highlights: • Analysis of complex multiphase diffraction patterns with respect to residual stress • Stress-gradient determination with in situ correction of displacement and refraction • Consideration of the elastic anisotropy within the refinement

  1. Simulations of Proton Implantation in Silicon Carbide (SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Simulations of Proton Implantation in Silicon Carbide (SiC) Jonathan P. McCandless, Hailong Chen, Philip X.-L. Feng Electrical Engineering, Case...of implanting protons (hydrogen ions, H+) into SiC thin layers on silicon (Si) substrate, and explore the ion implantation conditions that are...relevant to experimental radiation of SiC layers. Keywords: silicon carbide (SiC); radiation effects; ion implantation ; proton; stopping and range of

  2. XRF intermediate thickness layer technique for analysis of residue of hard to dissolve materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mzyk, Z.; Mzyk, J.; Buzek, L.; Baranowska, I.

    1998-01-01

    This work presents a quick method for lead and silver determination in materials, such as slags from silver metallurgy and slimes from copper electrorefining, which are very difficult to dissolve, even using a microwave technique. The idea was to dissolve the possibly greatest amount of the sample using acids. Insoluble deposit was filtered out. Silver content in the solution was analysed by potentiometric titration or AAS, lead content by XRS, while sediment deposit on filter - by XRF intermediate thickness technique. The results of silver and lead analysis obtained by this method were compared with those obtained by classical method, i.e. melting the residue with sodium peroxide. (author)

  3. Egg shell and yolk quality characteristics of layers fed with sugarcane press residue in soya and fish based diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Suma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Sugarcane press residue (SPR, a by-product of sugarcane industry, which is rich in inorganic salts was assessed at different levels in both soya based and fish based diets of layers for egg shell and yolk quality characteristics. Materials and Methods: SPR was incorporated in 32-week-old white leghorn layer diets at 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% either in the soya based or fish based diets to form T1 to T8 diets, respectively. Each diet was offered to five replicates of four laying hens each constituting a total of one sixty birds kept for 84 days under colony cages. Results: Mean egg shell thickness obtained from eggs of experimental hens measured was 0.342, 0.329, 0.320, 0.322, 0.319, 0.332, 0.328 and 0.336 mm in T1 through T8 groups, respectively. About the main factor effects, both showed non-significant results. Similarly, influence of different treatment diets, in imparting colour to the yolks, was found to be non-significant (p>0.05 at different 28-day time intervals. Further, the average yolk index values ranged non-significantly from 0.360 (T6 to 0.383 (T4. Conclusion: The SPR can be incorporated into layer diet as a source of inorganic as well as organic nutrients without affecting its egg quality characteristics.

  4. Preparation and Fatigue Properties of Functionally Graded Cemented Carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Liu Fengxiao; Liaw, Peter K.; He Yuehui

    2008-01-01

    Cemented carbides with a functionally graded structure have significantly improved mechanical properties and lifetimes in cutting, drilling and molding. In this work, WC-6 wt.% Co cemented carbides with three-layer graded structure (surface layer rich in WC, mid layer rich in Co and the inner part of the average composition) were prepared by carburizing pre-sintered η-phase-containing cemented carbides. The three-point bending fatigue tests based on the total-life approach were conducted on both WC-6wt%Co functionally graded cemented carbides (FGCC) and conventional WC-6wt%Co cemented carbides. The functionally graded cemented carbide shows a slightly higher fatigue limit (∼100 MPa) than the conventional ones under the present testing conditions. However, the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of FGCC is different from that of the conventional ones. The crack nucleates preferentially along the Co-gradient and perpendicular to the tension surface in FGCC, while parallel to the tension surface in conventional cemented carbides

  5. Measurement of Young’s modulus and residual stress of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 and Pt thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkl, Fabian; Daus, Alwin; English, Timothy S.; Provine, J.; Feyh, Ando; Urban, Gerald; Kenny, Thomas W.

    2017-08-01

    The accurate measurement of mechanical properties of thin films is required for the design of reliable nano/micro-electromechanical devices but is increasingly challenging for thicknesses approaching a few nanometers. We apply a combination of resonant and static mechanical test structures to measure elastic constants and residual stresses of 8-27 nm thick Al2O3 and Pt layers which have been fabricated through atomic layer deposition. Young’s modulus of poly-crystalline Pt films was found to be reduced by less than 15% compared to the bulk value, whereas for amorphous Al2O3 it was reduced to about half of its bulk value. We observed no discernible dependence of the elastic constant on thickness or deposition method for Pt, but the use of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition was found to increase Young’s modulus of Al2O3 by 10% compared to a thermal atomic layer deposition. As deposited, the Al2O3 layers had an average tensile residual stress of 131 MPa. The stress was found to be higher for thinner layers and layers deposited without the help of a remote plasma. No residual stress values could be extracted for Pt due to insufficient adhesion of the film without an underlying layer to promote nucleation.

  6. Effect of using the double layer technique on the microstructure, microhardness and residual stress of welded ASTM A516 GR70 structural steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, George Luiz Gomes de; Miranda, Helio Cordeiro de

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of using the double layer technique on the microstructure, microhardness and residual stresses of welded ASTM A516 Gr70 structural steel. Samples were welded with the same welding parameters and two types of chamfers, while the samples welded using the double layer technique underwent a buttering process on their chamfer face. Residual stress measurement was accomplished through x-ray diffraction, using a mini diffractometer for measurement in field. Metallographic analysis was accomplished in the transverse section of the welded joint, using optic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The double layer technique showed that can be used in the welding of ASTM A516 Gr70 steel, because, besides promote a refinement and a drawing back of the CG-HAZ, it increased compressive residual stress in the whole surface of the analyzed samples.(author)

  7. Observational assessment of the role of nocturnal residual-layer chemistry in determining daytime surface particulate nitrate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prabhakar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses an analysis of combined airborne and ground observations of particulate nitrate (NO3−(p concentrations made during the wintertime DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to Air Quality study at one of the most polluted cities in the United States – Fresno, CA – in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV and focuses on developing an understanding of the various processes that impact surface nitrate concentrations during pollution events. The results provide an explicit case-study illustration of how nighttime chemistry can influence daytime surface-level NO3−(p concentrations, complementing previous studies in the SJV. The observations exemplify the critical role that nocturnal chemical production of NO3−(p aloft in the residual layer (RL can play in determining daytime surface-level NO3−(p concentrations. Further, they indicate that nocturnal production of NO3−(p in the RL, along with daytime photochemical production, can contribute substantially to the buildup and sustaining of severe pollution episodes. The exceptionally shallow nocturnal boundary layer (NBL heights characteristic of wintertime pollution events in the SJV intensify the importance of nocturnal production aloft in the residual layer to daytime surface concentrations. The observations also demonstrate that dynamics within the RL can influence the early-morning vertical distribution of NO3−(p, despite low wintertime wind speeds. This overnight reshaping of the vertical distribution above the city plays an important role in determining the net impact of nocturnal chemical production on local and regional surface-level NO3−(p concentrations. Entrainment of clean free-tropospheric (FT air into the boundary layer in the afternoon is identified as an important process that reduces surface-level NO3−(p and limits buildup during pollution episodes. The influence of dry deposition of HNO

  8. Introduction of Nickel Coated Silicon Carbide Particles in Aluminum Metal Matrix Hardfaced by MIG/TIG Processes on Precoated Flux Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kamburov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate an aluminium metal matrix surface layer hardfaced by shielded gas metal arc welding processes applying either metal inert gas (MIG or tungsten inert gas (TIG, with standard wire filler onto the precoated flux layer - a baked resistant film containing electroless nickel coated micro/nano SiC particles. During baking, the components of the flux (MgCl2, NaCl, KCl and Na3AlF6 form a low melting eutectic, which: protects the hardfaced surface from oxidation, provides electrical conductance and keeps the particles on the surface during welding, as well as facilitates particles wettability and their interfacial bonding with the molten metal into the weld puddle.

  9. Plasma spraying process of disperse carbides for spraying and facing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkov, I.V.; Vishnevetskaya, I.A.; Kostyukovich, T.G.; Ostapovich, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    A possibility to metallize carbides in plasma of impulsing capacitor discharge is considered. Powders granulation occurs during plasma spraying process, ceramic core being completely capped. X-ray phase and chemical analyses of coatings did not show considerable changes of carbon content in carbides before and after plasma processing. This distinguishes the process of carbides metallization in impulsing plasma from the similar processing in arc and high-frequency plasma generator. Use of powder composites produced in the impulsing capacitor discharge, for plasma spraying and laser facing permits 2-3 times increasing wear resistance of the surface layer as against the coatings produced from mechanical powders mixtures

  10. Shock Response of Boron Carbide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandekar, D. P. (Dattatraya Purushottam)

    2001-01-01

    .... The present work was undertaken to determine tensile/spall strength of boron carbide under plane shock wave loading and to analyze all available shock compression data on boron carbide materials...

  11. The valve effect of the carbide interlayer of an electric resistance plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakomskii, V.

    1998-01-01

    The welded electric resistance plug (ERP) usually contains a carbide interlayer at the plug-carbon material interface. The interlayer forms during welding the contact metallic alloy with the carbon material when the oxide films of the alloy are reduced on the interface surface by carbon to the formation of carbides and the surface layer of the plug material dissolves carbon to saturation. Subsequently, during solidification of the plug material it forms carbides with the alloy components. The structural composition of the carbide interlayer is determined by the chemical composition of the contact alloy. In alloys developed by the author and his colleagues the carbide forming elements are represented in most cases by silicon and titanium and, less frequently, by chromium and manganese. Therefore, the carbide interlayers in the ERP consisted mainly of silicon and titanium carbides

  12. Surface metallurgy of cemented carbide tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, K.L.; Kashyap, S.C.; Rao, T.V.; Rajagopalan, S.; Srivastava, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Transition metal carbides, owing to their high melting point, hardness and wear resistance, are potential candidates for specific application in rockets, nuclear engineering equipment and cutting tools. Tungsten carbide sintered with a binder (either cobalt metal or a mixture of Co + TiC and/or TaC(NbC)) is used for cutting tools. The surface metallurgy of several commercially available cemented carbide tools was studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The tool surfaces were contaminated by adsorbed oxygen up to a depth of nearly 0.3 μm causing deterioration of the mechanical properties of the tools. Studies of fractured samples indicated that the tool surfaces were prone to oxygen adsorption. The fracture path passes through the cobalt-rich regions. The ineffectiveness of a worn cutting tool is attributed to the presence of excessive iron from the steel workpiece and carbon and oxygen in the surface layers of the tool. The use of appropriate hard coatings on cemented carbide tools is suggested. (Auth.)

  13. Elastic/plastic analyses of advanced composites investigating the use of the compliant layer concept in reducing residual stresses resulting from processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Arya, Vinod K.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1990-01-01

    High residual stresses within intermetallic and metal matrix composite systems can develop upon cooling from the processing temperature to room temperature due to the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the fiber and matrix. As a result, within certain composite systems, radial, circumferential, and/or longitudinal cracks have been observed to form at the fiber-matrix interface. The compliant layer concept (insertion of a compensating interface material between the fiber and matrix) was proposed to reduce or eliminate the residual stress buildup during cooling and thus minimize cracking. The viability of the proposed compliant layer concept is investigated both elastically and elastoplastically. A detailed parametric study was conducted using a unit cell model consisting of three concentric cylinders to determine the required character (i.e., thickness and material properties) of the compliant layer as well as its applicability. The unknown compliant layer mechanical properties were expressed as ratios of the corresponding temperature dependent Ti-24Al-11Nb (a/o) matrix properties. The fiber properties taken were those corresponding to SCS-6 (SiC). Results indicate that the compliant layer can be used to reduce, if not eliminate, radial and circumferential residual stresses within the fiber and matrix and therefore also reduce or eliminate the radial cracking. However, with this decrease in in-plane stresses, one obtains an increase in longitudinal stress, thus potentially initiating longitudinal cracking. Guidelines are given for the selection of a specific compliant material, given a perfectly bonded system.

  14. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  15. Residual stress analysis of a multi-layer thin film structure by destructive (curvature) and non-destructive (x-ray) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.C.; Oshida, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Multi-layer thin film which has structure of Cu/Cr/K/Cr/Cu prepared by sputtering process was analyzed for interfacial stresses for as-deposited conditions. This structure was also annealed at 150 degrees C, and 350 degrees C for around 15 min. in a vacuum and cooled slowly down for stress analyses. Equations for residual stress estimations for homogeneous material system using layer removal technique (stress relief) is now applied for inhomogeneous system (multi-layer structure). The results are compared with the data obtained from x-ray diffraction technique by using sin 2 Ψ - 2 θ method, for Cu layer. From the present analyses, the data obtained using layer removal seem to be qualitatively consistent with but not quantitatively in agreement with x-ray method

  16. Highly uniform residual layers for arrays of 3D nanoimprinted cavities in Fabry-Pérot-filter-array-based nanospectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Imran; Shen, Yannan; Khan, Abdullah; Woidt, Carsten; Hillmer, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Miniaturized optical spectrometers can be implemented by an array of Fabry-Pérot (FP) filters. FP filters are composed of two highly reflecting parallel mirrors and a resonance cavity. Each filter transmits a small spectral band (filter line) depending on its individual cavity height. The optical nanospectrometer, a miniaturized FP-based spectrometer, implements 3D NanoImprint technology for the fabrication of multiple FP filter cavities in a single process step. However, it is challenging to avoid the dependency of residual layer (RL) thickness on the shape of the printed patterns in NanoImprint. Since in a nanospectrometer the filter cavities vary in height between neighboring FP filters and, thus, the volume of each cavity varies causing that the RL varies slightly or noticeably between different filters. This is one of the few disadvantages of NanoImprint using soft templates such as substrate conformal imprint lithography which is used in this paper. The advantages of large area soft templates can be revealed substantially if the problem of laterally inhomogeneous RLs can be avoided or reduced considerably. In the case of the nanospectrometer, non-uniform RLs lead to random variations in the designed cavity heights resulting in the shift of desired filter lines. To achieve highly uniform RLs, we report a volume-equalized template design with the lateral distribution of 64 different cavity heights into several units with each unit comprising four cavity heights. The average volume of each unit is kept constant to obtain uniform filling of imprint material per unit area. The imprint results, based on the volume-equalized template, demonstrate highly uniform RLs of 110 nm thickness.

  17. Hadfield steels with Nb and Ti carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatavuk, J.; Goldenstein, H.

    1987-01-01

    The Hadfield Steels and the mechanisms responsible for its high strain hardening rate were reviewed. Addition of carbide forming alloying elements to the base compostion was discussed, using the matrix sttel concept. Three experimental crusher jaws were cast, with Nb and Nb + Ti added to the usual Hadfiedl compostion, with enough excess carbon to allow the formation of MC carbides. Samples for metallographic analysis were prepared from both as cast and worn out castings. The carbic morphology was described. Partition of alloying elements was qualitatively studied, using Energy Dispersive Espectroscopy in SEM. The structure of the deformed layer near the worn surface was studied by optical metalography and microhardness measurements. The results showed that fatigue cracking is one of the wear mechanisms is operation in association with the ciclic work hardening of the surface of worn crusher jaws. (Author) [pt

  18. Joining elements of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of joining together at least two silicon carbide elements (e.g.in forming a heat exchanger) is described, comprising subjecting to sufficiently non-oxidizing atmosphere and sufficiently high temperature, material placed in space between the elements. The material consists of silicon carbide particles, carbon and/or a precursor of carbon, and silicon, such that it forms a joint joining together at least two silicon carbide elements. At least one of the elements may contain silicon. (author)

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF GRINDING CONDITIONS ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF RESIDUAL STRESS IN THE SURFACE LAYER OF 17crni6-6 STEEL AFTER CARBURIZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Sawicki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study aimed at determining the residual stress which results from developing the surface layer by low-pressure and conventional carburizing and grinding of 17CrNi6-6 steel. A synergistic effect of thermochemical and abrasive treatment was examined on ring samples used to study residual stress by Davidenkov’s method. Samples were subjected to vacuum carburizing and conventional carburizing, which was followed by grinding with a 38A60K8V aloxite grinding wheel and a CBN grinding wheel - RNB80/63B75V. The following cutting fluids were used during the grinding process: oil emulsion 5%, supply rate ca. 20 l/min, Micro5000 oil supplied at the minimum quantity lubrication (MQL of ca. 25 ml/h, dry machining. The study determined the effect of the type of grinding wheel and the cooling and lubricating agent on the distribution of residual stress in the sur-face layer. The best effects of grinding with respect to the residual stress were achieved with flood cooling with oil emulsion and grinding with a CBN grinding wheel.

  20. Residual stress improvement in multi-layer welded plates using water-shower cooling during welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Nobuyoshi; Koide, Hiroo

    2006-01-01

    To reduce tensile residual stress in a welded region, we developed a new welding method that applies a water-shower behind the welding torch. When this method is applied to welding of austenitic stainless steel plates, cooling conditions mainly determine how much the residual stress can be reduced. To determine the conditions, we first used FEM to evaluate the effects of interpass temperature on the residual stress. And we found effective conditions for reducing tensile residual stress. To verify the validity of the conditions, specimens welded with or without water shower cooling were manufactured. Residual stresses of the specimens were experimentally measured. It was found that tensile residual stresses were generated on the surface of the welds and those were reduced in the case that the water-shower was applied. These measurement results agree well with the FEM analyses. It can therefore be concluded that the water-shower cooling during welding is appropriate for reducing tensile residual stress in austenitic stainless steel welding. (author)

  1. Laser deposition of carbide-reinforced coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, W.; Martinella, R.; Mor, G.P.; Bianchi, P.; D'Angelo, D.

    1991-01-01

    CO 2 laser cladding with blown powder presents many advantages: fusion bonding with the substrate with low dilution, metallurgical continuity in the metallic matrix, high solidification rates, ease of automation, and reduced environmental contamination. In the present paper, laser cladding experimental results using families of carbides (tungsten and titanium) mixed with metallic alloys are reported. As substrates, low alloy construction steel (AISI 4140) (austenitic stainless steel) samples have been utilized, depending on the particular carbide reinforcement application. The coating layers obtained have been characterized by metallurgical examination. They show low dilution, absence of cracks, and high abrasion resistance. The WC samples, obtained with different carbide sizes and percentages, have been characterized with dry and rubber wheel abrasion tests and the specimen behaviour has been compared with the behaviour of materials used for similar applications. The abrasion resistance proved to be better than that of other widely used hardfacing materials and the powder morphology have a non-negligible influence on the tribological properties. (orig.)

  2. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimbert, J.

    1999-01-01

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  3. Metal Carbides for Biomass Valorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine E. Chan-Thaw

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal carbides have been utilized as an alternative catalyst to expensive noble metals for the conversion of biomass. Tungsten and molybdenum carbides have been shown to be effective catalysts for hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation and isomerization reactions. The satisfactory activities of these metal carbides and their low costs, compared with noble metals, make them appealing alternatives and worthy of further investigation. In this review, we succinctly describe common synthesis techniques, including temperature-programmed reaction and carbothermal hydrogen reduction, utilized to prepare metal carbides used for biomass transformation. Attention will be focused, successively, on the application of transition metal carbide catalysts in the transformation of first-generation (oils and second-generation (lignocellulose biomass to biofuels and fine chemicals.

  4. Residual stress determination in oxide layers at different length scales combining Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction: Application to chromia-forming metallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerain, Mathieu; Grosseau-Poussard, Jean-Luc; Geandier, Guillaume; Panicaud, Benoit; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Dejoie, Catherine; Micha, Jean-Sebastien; Thiaudière, Dominique; Goudeau, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    In oxidizing environments, the protection of metals and alloys against further oxidation at high temperature is provided by the oxide film itself. This protection is efficient only if the formed film adheres well to the metal (substrate), i.e., without microcracks and spalls induced by thermomechanical stresses. In this study, the residual stresses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales in the oxide film adhering to the substrate and over the damaged areas have been rigorously determined on the same samples for both techniques. Ni-30Cr and Fe-47Cr alloys have been oxidized together at 900 and 1000 °C, respectively, to create films with a thickness of a few microns. A multi-scale approach was adopted: macroscopic stress was determined by conventional X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, while microscopic residual stress mappings were performed over different types of bucklings using Raman micro-spectroscopy and synchrotron micro-diffraction. A very good agreement is found at macro- and microscales between the residual stress values obtained with both techniques, giving confidence on the reliability of the measurements. In addition, relevant structural information at the interface between the metallic substrate and the oxide layer was collected by micro-diffraction, a non-destructive technique that allows mapping through the oxide layer, and both the grain size and the crystallographic orientation of the supporting polycrystalline metal located either under a buckling or not were measured.

  5. MOCVD growth of GaN layer on InN interlayer and relaxation of residual strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Keon-Hun; Park, Sung Hyun; Kim, Jong Hack; Kim, Nam Hyuk; Kim, Min Hwa [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Hyunseok [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Daejin University, Pocheon, 487-711 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Euijoon, E-mail: eyoon@snu.ac.k [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 433-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-01

    100 nm InN layer was grown on sapphire c-plane using a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. Low temperature (LT) GaN layer was grown on InN layer to protect InN layer from direct exposure to hydrogen flow during high temperature (HT) GaN growth and/or abrupt decomposition. Subsequently, thick HT GaN layer (2.5 {mu}m thick) was grown at 1000 {sup o}C on LT GaN/InN/sapphire template. Microstructure of epilayer-substrate interface was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From the high angle annular dark field TEM image, the growth of columnar structured LT GaN and HT GaN with good crystallinity was observed. Though thickness of InN interlayer is assumed to be about 100 nm based on growth rate, it was not clearly shown in TEM image due to the InN decomposition. The lattice parameters of GaN layers were measured by XRD measurement, which shows that InN interlayer reduces the compressive strain in GaN layer. The relaxation of compressive strain in GaN layer was also confirmed by photoluminescence (PL) measurement. As shown in the PL spectra, red shift of GaN band edge peak was observed, which indicates the reduction of compressive strain in GaN epilayer.

  6. Growth of Vanadium Carbide by Halide-Activated Pack Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    The present work investigates growth of vanadium carbide (VC) layers by the pack diffusion method on a Vanadis 6 tool steel. The VC layers were produced by pack diffusion at 1000°C for 1, 4 and 16 hours. The VC layers were characterized with optical and electron microscopy, Vickers hardness tests...... and X-ray diffraction. Homogeneous VC mono-phase layers with Vickers hardness of more than 2400 HV were obtained. Hardening and tempering of the vanadized Vanadis 6 steel did not affect the VC layers....

  7. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  8. Dependence of silicon carbide coating properties on deposition parameters: preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauf, R.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-05-01

    Fuel particles for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contain a layer of pyrolytic silicon carbide, which acts as a pressure vessel and provides containment of metallic fission products. The silicon carbide (SiC) is deposited by the thermal decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 or MTS) in an excess of hydrogen. The purpose of the current study is to determine how the deposition variables affect the structure and properties of the SiC layer

  9. Residual stress and texture in Aluminum doped Zinc Oxide layers deposited by reactive radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azanza Ricardo, C.L., E-mail: Cristy.Azanza@ing.unitn.it [Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, 38123 via Mesiano 77, Trento (Italy); Pastorelli, M.; D' Incau, M. [Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, 38123 via Mesiano 77, Trento (Italy); Aswath, P. [College of Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, TX (United States); Scardi, P. [Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, 38123 via Mesiano 77, Trento (Italy)

    2016-04-30

    Aluminum doped Zinc Oxide thin films were deposited on standard soda-lime substrates by reactive radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Residual stress and texture were studied by X-ray diffraction, while X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy provided information on the Al environment in the best performing thin films. The influence of deposition parameters on structural and microstructural properties is discussed. A correlation between microstructure and residual stress state with electrical and optical properties is proposed. - Highlights: • Al doped ZnO thin films were obtained by reactive radio frequency magnetron sputtering. • Correlation of stresses and texture with electrical and optical properties is shown. • Homogeneous and stress-free thin-films are the best performing ones. • XANES confirmed the doping mechanism and excluded some spurious phases.

  10. Study of residual stresses, microstructure, and hardness in FeB and Fe2B ultra-hard layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pala, Zdeněk; Fojtíková, J.; Koubský, T.; Mušálek, Radek; Stráský, J.; Kyncl, J.; Beránek, L.; Kolárik, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 30, S1 (2015), S83-S89 ISSN 0885-7156 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : iron borides elastic constants * boriding * residual stresses * wear Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 0.763, year: 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0885715615000019

  11. Cooling rate and microstructure of surface layers of 5KhNM steel, machined by electroerosion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foteev, N.K.; Ploshkin, V.V.; Lyakishev, V.A.; Shirokov, S.V.

    1982-01-01

    The cooling rate and microstructure of surface layers of steel 5KhNM machined by electroerosion method have been studied. It is shown that the difference in heating rate of the surface layers with electric discharge over the 5KhNM steel samples depth results in the intensive size reduction of the microstructure. In the surface layer alongside with martensite residual austenite is present, the lattice period of which increases with the increase of pulse duration, carbide phase of complex composition appears, and concentrational heterogeneity in alloying elements (except carbon) is absent

  12. Cooling rate and microstructure of surface layers of 5KhNM steel, machined by electroerosion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foteev, N.K.; Ploshkin, V.V.; Lyakishev, V.A.; Shirokov, S.V.

    1982-01-01

    The cooling rate and microstructure of surface layers of steel 5KhNM machined by electroerosion method have been studied. It is shown that the difference in heating rate of the surface layers with electric discharge over the 5KhNM steel samples depth results in the intensive size reduction of the microstructure. In the surface layer alongside with martensite residual austenite is present, the lattice period of which increases with the increase of pulse duration, carbide phase of complex composition appears, and concentrational heterogeneity in alloying elements (except carbon) is absent.

  13. The effect of ammonium partial pressure on residual stresses in surface layer of SW7M HSS steel after vacuum nitriding 'NITROVAC'79'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawronski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of the nitriding atmosphere on the residual stresses in the surface layer of the SW7M HSS steel has been investigated in the work. It has been proved that the pressure influences the distribution of those stresses to a great extent. At lower pressures (20 hPa and 40 hPa) at which only one zone is being created - the one of internal nitriding, without that of ε type nitrides on the surface - the highest residual stresses are operating on the HSS steel surface itself or eventually in the subsurface region very close to the surface. In the difference, in case of higher pressure (120 hPa and 240 hPa), the highest stresses are operating at great depth 8-12 μm from the steel surface - depending on the thickness of the ε type nitride layer created on the steel surface at those pressure. All the relevant stresses are compressive one. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  14. Tungsten--carbide critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1975-06-01

    The tungsten--carbide critical assembly mainly consists of three close-fitting spherical shells: a highly enriched uranium shell on the inside, a tungsten--carbide shell surrounding it, and a steel shell on the outside. Ideal critical specifications indicate a rather low computed value of k/sub eff/. Observed and calculated fission-rate distributions for 235 U, 238 U, and 237 Np are compared, and calculated leakage neutrons per fission in various energy groups are given. (U.S.)

  15. Microstructure and phase evolution in laser clad chromium carbide-NiCrMoNb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, L.; Samajdar, I.; Tak, Manish; Doherty, Roger D.; Gundakaram, Ravi C.; Prasad, K. Satya; Joshi, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructural development during laser cladding has been studied. • In this multi component system Cr 7 C 3 is found to be the stable carbide phase. • Phases were identified by EBSD since XRD results were not conclusive. • Increase in laser power and/or scanning speed reduced the carbide content. • Hardness seems to depend on phase content as well as microstructure. - Abstract: Microstructural development in laser clad layers of Chromium carbide (Cr x C y )-NiCrMoNb on SA 516 steel has been investigated. Although the starting powder contained both Cr 3 C 2 and Cr 7 C 3 , the clad layers showed only the presence of Cr 7 C 3 . Microtexture measurements by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed primary dendritic Cr 7 C 3 with Ni rich FCC metallic phase being present in the interdendritic spaces. Further annealing of the laser clad layers and furnace melting of the starting powder confirmed that Cr 7 C 3 is the primary as well as stable carbide phase in this multi component system. Increase in laser power and scanning speed progressively reduced carbide content in the laser clad layers. Increased scanning speed, which enhances the cooling rate, also led to reduction in the secondary arm spacing (λ 2 ) of the Cr 7 C 3 dendrites. The clad layer hardness increased with carbide content and with decreased dendrite arm spacing.

  16. Thin layer chromatography: a simple and reliable technique for the determination of pesticides residue in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asi, M.R.; Hussain, A.; Iqbal, Z.; Chaudhary, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for the detection of pesticides by thin-layer chromatography is described. These pesticides on chlorination and treatment with 0-toluidine, yield an intensively colored blue product. Some of the organophosphates and carbonates can be determined at low level (mu g/ g) by this method. The limit of minimum detectable quantity is 10-100 ng. (author)

  17. Numerical analysis of the influence of buffer layer thickness on the residual stresses in YBCO/La2Zr2O7/Ni superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celik, Erdal; Sayman, Onur; Karakuzu, Ramazan; Ozman, Yilmaz

    2007-01-01

    The present paper addresses a numerical investigation of the influence of buffer layer thickness on the residual stress in YBCO/La 2 Zr 2 O 7 /Ni architectured materials under cryogenic conditions by using classical lamination theory (CLT) and finite element method (FEM) for coated conductor applications. YBCO/La 2 Zr 2 O 7 multilayer films were fabricated on Ni tape substrate using reel-to-reel sol-gel and pulse laser deposition (PLD) systems. The microstructural evolution of high temperature superconducting YBCO film and buffer layers with La 2 Zr 2 O 7 configuration grown on textured Ni tape substrates was investigated by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thermal stress analysis of YBCO/La 2 Zr 2 O 7 /Ni multilayer sample was performed by using CLT in the temperature range of 298-175 K in liquid helium media. The YBCO/La 2 Zr 2 O 7 /Ni sample strip was solved by using FEM for linear or nonlinear cases in the temperature range of 298-3 K in liquid helium media. SEM observations revealed that crack-free, pinhole-free, continuous superconducting film and buffer layer were obtained by sol-gel and PLD systems. In addition to microstructural observations, it was found that the largest compressive stresses and failure occur in La 2 Zr 2 O 7 buffer layer due to its smallest thermal expansion coefficient. The thickness of La 2 Zr 2 O 7 buffer layer affects the failure. The stress component of σ x is the smallest in Ni tape substrate due to its largest thickness

  18. Advanced technologies of production of cemented carbides and composite materials based on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.; Pavlotskaya, E.; Martynova, L.; Epik, I.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents new technological processes of production of W, WC and (Ti, W)C powders, cemented carbides having a controlled carbon content, high-strength nonmagnetic nickel-bonded cemented carbides, cemented carbide-based composites having a wear-resistant antifriction working layer as well as processes of regeneration of cemented carbide waste. It is shown that these technological processes permit radical changes in the production of carbide powders and products of VK, TK, VN and KKhN cemented carbides. The processes of cemented carbide production become ecologically acceptable and free of carbon black, the use of cumbersome mixers is excluded, the power expenditure is reduced and the efficiency of labor increases. It becomes possible to control precisely the carbon content within a two-phase region -carbide-metal. A high wear resistance of parts of friction couples which are lubricated with water, benzine, kerosene, diesel fuel and other low-viscosity liquids, is ensured with increased strength and shock resistance. (author)

  19. Pulverization of boron element and proportions of boron carbide in boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, F.M.; Finck, C.

    1956-01-01

    It is possible to reduce boron element into fine powder by means of a mortar and pestle made of sintered boron carbide, the ratio of boron carbide introduced being less than one per cent. Boron element at our disposal is made of sharp edged, dark brown, little grains of average size greater than 5 μ. Grain sizes smaller than 1μ are required for applying thin layers of such boron. (author) [fr

  20. Seasonal variation of aerosol size distributions in the free troposphere and residual layer at the puy de Dôme station, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Venzac

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Particle number concentration and size distribution are important variables needed to constrain the role of atmospheric particles in the Earth radiation budget, both directly and indirectly through CCN activation. They are also linked to regulated variables such as particle mass (PM and therefore of interest to air quality studies. However, data on their long-term variability are scarce, in particular at high altitudes. In this paper, we investigate the diurnal and seasonal variability of the aerosol total number concentration and size distribution at the puy de Dôme research station (France, 1465 m a.s.l.. We report a variability of aerosol particle total number concentration measured over a five-year (2003–2007 period for particles larger than 10 nm and aerosol size distributions between 10 and 500 nm over a two-year period (January 2006 to December 2007. Concentrations show a strong seasonality with maxima during summer and minima during winter. A diurnal variation is also observed with maxima between 12:00 and 18:00 UTC. At night (00:00–06:00 UTC, the median hourly total concentration varies from 600 to 800 cm−3 during winter and from 1700 to 2200 cm−3 during summer. During the day (08:00–18:00 UTC, the concentration is in the range of 700 to 1400 cm−3 during winter and of 2500 to 3500 cm−3 during summer. An averaged size distribution of particles (10–500 nm was calculated for each season. The total aerosol number concentrations are dominated by the Aitken mode integral concentrations, which drive most of the winter to summer total concentrations increase. The night to day increase in dominated by the nucleation mode integral number concentration. Because the site is located in the free troposphere only a fraction of the time, in particular at night and during the winter season, we have subsequently analyzed the variability for nighttime and free tropospheric (FT/residual layer (RL

  1. New Icosahedral Boron Carbide Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria Mora, Elena Maria

    Novel semiconductor boron carbide films and boron carbide films doped with aromatic compounds have been investigated and characterized. Most of these semiconductors were formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The aromatic compound additives used, in this thesis, were pyridine (Py), aniline, and diaminobenzene (DAB). As one of the key parameters for semiconducting device functionality is the metal contact and, therefore, the chemical interactions or band bending that may occur at the metal/semiconductor interface, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the interaction of gold (Au) with these novel boron carbide-based semiconductors. Both n- and p-type films have been tested and pure boron carbide devices are compared to those containing aromatic compounds. The results show that boron carbide seems to behave differently from other semiconductors, opening a way for new analysis and approaches in device's functionality. By studying the electrical and optical properties of these films, it has been found that samples containing the aromatic compound exhibit an improvement in the electron-hole separation and charge extraction, as well as a decrease in the band gap. The hole carrier lifetimes for each sample were extracted from the capacitance-voltage, C(V), and current-voltage, I(V), curves. Additionally, devices, with boron carbide with the addition of pyridine, exhibited better collection of neutron capture generated pulses at ZERO applied bias, compared to the pure boron carbide samples. This is consistent with the longer carrier lifetimes estimated for these films. The I-V curves, as a function of external magnetic field, of the pure boron carbide films and films containing DAB demonstrate that significant room temperature negative magneto-resistance (> 100% for pure samples, and > 50% for samples containing DAB) is possible in the resulting dielectric thin films. Inclusion of DAB is not essential for significant negative magneto

  2. Production of silicon carbide bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, K.

    1981-01-01

    A body consisting essentially of a coherent mixture of silicon carbide and carbon for subsequent siliconising is produced by casting a slip comprising silicon carbide and carbon powders in a porous mould. Part of the surface of the body, particularly internal features, is formed by providing within the mould a core of a material which retains its shape while casting is in progress but is compressed by shrinkage of the cast body as it dries and is thereafter removable from the cast body. Materials which are suitable for the core are expanded polystyrene and gelatinous products of selected low elastic modulus. (author)

  3. High yield silicon carbide prepolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Prepolymers which exhibit good handling properties, and are useful for preparing ceramics, silicon carbide ceramic materials and articles containing silicon carbide, are polysilanes consisting of 0 to 60 mole% (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and 40 to 100 mole% CH 3 Si units, all Si valences being satisfied by CH 3 groups, other Si atoms, or by H atoms, the latter amounting to 0.3 to 2.1 weight% of the polysilane. They are prepared by reducing the corresponding chloro- or bromo-polysilanes with at least the stoichiometric amount of a reducing agent, e.g. LiAlH 4 . (author)

  4. Transition metal carbide and boride abrasive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdsaar, H.

    1978-01-01

    Abrasive particles and their preparation are discussed. The particles consist essentially of a matrix of titanium carbide and zirconium carbide, at least partially in solid solution form, and grains of crystalline titanium diboride dispersed throughout the carbide matrix. These abrasive particles are particularly useful as components of grinding wheels for abrading steel. 1 figure, 6 tables

  5. Oxidation of mullite-zirconia-alumina-silicon carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, C.; Moya, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the isothermal oxidation of mullite-alumina-zirconia-silicon carbide composites obtained by reaction sintering studied in the temperature interval 800 degrees to 1400 degrees C. The kinetics of the oxidation process was related to the viscosity of the surface glassy layer as well as to the crystallization of the surface film. The oxidation kinetics was halted to T ≤ 1300 degrees C, presumably because of crystallization

  6. Carbon in palladium catalysts: A metastable carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seriani, Nicola; Mittendorfer, Florian; Kresse, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic activity of palladium towards selective hydrogenation of hydrocarbons depends on the partial pressure of hydrogen. It has been suggested that the reaction proceeds selectively towards partial hydrogenation only when a carbon-rich film is present at the metal surface. On the basis of first-principles simulations, we show that carbon can dissolve into the metal because graphite formation is delayed by the large critical nucleus necessary for graphite nucleation. A bulk carbide Pd 6 C with a hexagonal 6-layer fcc-like supercell forms. The structure is characterized by core level shifts of 0.66-0.70 eV in the core states of Pd, in agreement with experimental x-ray photoemission spectra. Moreover, this phase traps bulk-dissolved hydrogen, suppressing the total hydrogenation reaction channel and fostering partial hydrogenation. (author)

  7. Synthesis of transfer-free graphene on cemented carbide surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Fei; Ren, Yi

    2018-03-19

    Direct growth of spherical graphene with large surface area is important for various applications in sensor technology. However, the preparation of transfer-free graphene on different substrates is still a challenge. This study presents a novel approach for the transfer-free graphene growth directly on cemented carbide. The used simple thermal annealing induces an in-situ transformation of magnetron-sputtered amorphous silicon carbide films into the graphene matrix. The study reveals the role of Co, a binding phase in cemented carbides, in Si sublimation process, and its interplay with the annealing temperature in development of the graphene matrix. A detailed physico-chemical characterisation was performed by structural (XRD analysis and Raman spectroscopy with mapping studies), morphological (SEM) and chemical (EDS) analyses. The optimal bilayer graphene matrix with hollow graphene spheres on top readily grows at 1000 °C. Higher annealing temperature critically decreases the amount of Si, which yields an increased number of the graphene layers and formation of multi-layer graphene (MLG). The proposed action mechanism involves silicidation of Co during thermal treatment, which influences the existing chemical form of Co, and thus, the graphene formation and variations in a number of the formed graphene layers.

  8. CALCIUM CARBIDE: AN EFFICIENT ALTERNATIVE TO THE USE OF ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilton Carlos Pinheiro Cardoso Filho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The steel demand for fine applications have increased considerably in the last years, and the criteria for its production are even stricter, mainly in relation to the residual elements content and cleanness required. In relation to the steel cleanness, the main problem faced is the control of the amount and morphology of alumina inclusions, generated in the steel deoxidation with aluminum. Besides harming the products quality, the presence of non metallic inclusions can originate nozzle clogging, and consequently interruptions in the process flux. Aiming to improve the steel cleanness and to minimize nozzle clogging, this study is developed to evaluate the partial substitution of aluminum by calcium carbide in the steel deoxidation. Along the operational procedures, the calcium carbide was applied to 397 heats, through what the improvement in steel cleanness is confirmed, with consequent reduction in the nozzle clogging occurrence.

  9. Reaction of Oxygen with Chromium and Chromium Carbide at Low O2 Pressures and High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Dong O.; Kang, Sung G.; Paik, Young N.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation rate of chromium carbide has been measured continuously using thermogravimetric analysis at different oxygen pressures ranging from 1.33x10 -2 to 2.67x10 -1 Pa O 2 at 1000-1300 .deg. C. The oxidation of pure chromium has also been studied between 1000-1300 .deg. C under 6.67x10 -2 Pa O 2 and compared with that of chromium carbide. The oxidation of chromium carbide showed a linear behavior which was different from that of chromium. The oxidation rate of chromium carbide increased with increasing temperature and oxygen pressure was lower than of pure chromium. Above 1200 .deg. C, the volatile oxide was formed and evaporated causing a weight loss. The compositions and morphology of the oxide were studied with X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope, respectively. The morphology of oxide changed with varying temperature and pressure. The oxide scale was consisted of mainly two different layers of Cr 2 O 3 and CrO, and the properties of oxide scale were correlated with oxidation behavior. The oxide film formed in the above test condition has been detached from the carbide surface. The crack and pore were thought to be from CO gas evolving at the interface of chromium carbide and its oxide and the major factor of the linear behavior of chromium carbide

  10. Optical characterisation of cubic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, S.M.

    1998-09-01

    The varied properties of Silicon Carbide (SiC) are helping to launch the material into many new applications, particularly in the field of novel semiconductor devices. In this work, the cubic form of SiC is of interest as a basis for developing integrated optical components. Here, the formation of a suitable SiO 2 buried cladding layer has been achieved by high dose oxygen ion implantation. This layer is necessary for the optical confinement of propagating light, and hence optical waveguide fabrication. Results have shown that optical propagation losses of the order of 20 dB/cm are obtainable. Much of this loss can be attributed to mode leakage and volume scattering. Mode leakage is a function of the effective oxide thickness, and volume scattering related to the surface layer damage. These parameters have been shown to be controllable and so suggests that further reduction in the waveguide loss is feasible. Analysis of the layer growth mechanism by RBS, XTEM and XPS proves that SiO 2 is formed, and that the extent, of formation depends on implant dose and temperature. The excess carbon generated is believed to exit the oxide layer by a number of varying mechanisms. The result of this appears to be a number of stable Si-C-O intermediaries that, form regions to either depth extreme of the SiO 2 layer. Early furnace tests suggest a need to anneal at, temperatures approaching the melting point of the silicon substrate, and that the quality of the virgin material is crucial in controlling the resulting oxide growth. (author)

  11. Aluminum oxide from trimethylaluminum and water by atomic layer deposition: The temperature dependence of residual stress, elastic modulus, hardness and adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ylivaara, Oili M.E.; Liu, Xuwen; Kilpi, Lauri; Lyytinen, Jussi; Schneider, Dieter; Laitinen, Mikko; Julin, Jaakko; Ali, Saima; Sintonen, Sakari; Berdova, Maria; Haimi, Eero; Sajavaara, Timo; Ronkainen, Helena; Lipsanen, Harri

    2014-01-01

    Use of atomic layer deposition (ALD) in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) has increased as ALD enables conformal growth on 3-dimensional structures at relatively low temperatures. For MEMS device design and fabrication, the understanding of stress and mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, hardness and adhesion of thin film is crucial. In this work a comprehensive characterization of the stress, elastic modulus, hardness and adhesion of ALD aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) films grown at 110–300 °C from trimethylaluminum and water is presented. Film stress was analyzed by wafer curvature measurements, elastic modulus by nanoindentation and surface-acoustic wave measurements, hardness by nanoindentation and adhesion by microscratch test and scanning nanowear. The films were also analyzed by ellipsometry, optical reflectometry, X-ray reflectivity and time-of-flight elastic recoil detection for refractive index, thickness, density and impurities. The ALD Al 2 O 3 films were under tensile stress in the scale of hundreds of MPa. The magnitude of the stress decreased strongly with increasing ALD temperature. The stress was stable during storage in air. Elastic modulus and hardness of ALD Al 2 O 3 saturated to a fairly constant value for growth at 150 to 300 °C, while ALD at 110 °C gave softer films with lower modulus. ALD Al 2 O 3 films adhered strongly on cleaned silicon with SiO x termination. - Highlights: • The residual stress of Al 2 O 3 was tensile and stable during the storage in air. • Elastic modulus of Al 2 O 3 saturated to at 170 GPa for films grown at 150 to 300 °C. • At 110 °C Al 2 O 3 films were softer with high residual hydrogen and lower density. • The Al 2 O 3 adhered strongly on the SiO x -terminated silicon

  12. Fabricating porous silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The formation of porous SiC occurs under electrochemical anodization. A sample of SiC is contacted electrically with nickel and placed into an electrochemical cell which cell includes a counter electrode and a reference electrode. The sample is encapsulated so that only a bare semiconductor surface is exposed. The electrochemical cell is filled with an HF electrolyte which dissolves the SiC electrochemically. A potential is applied to the semiconductor and UV light illuminates the surface of the semiconductor. By controlling the light intensity, the potential and the doping level, a porous layer is formed in the semiconductor and thus one produces porous SiC.

  13. High resolution electron back-scatter diffraction analysis of thermally and mechanically induced strains near carbide inclusions in a superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamched, Phani S., E-mail: phani.karamched@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    Cross-correlation-based analysis of electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns has been used to obtain high angular resolution maps of lattice rotations and elastic strains near carbides in a directionally solidified superalloy MAR-M-002. Lattice curvatures were determined from the EBSD measurements and used to estimate the distribution of geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) induced by the deformation. Significant strains were induced by thermal treatment due to the lower thermal expansion coefficient of the carbide inclusions compared to that of the matrix. In addition to elastic strains the mismatch was sufficient to have induced localized plastic deformation in the matrix leading to a GND density of 3 x 10{sup 13} m{sup -2} in regions around the carbide. Three-point bending was then used to impose strain levels within the range {+-}12% across the height of the bend bar. EBSD lattice curvature measurements were then made at both carbide-containing and carbide-free regions at different heights across the bar. The average GND density increases with the magnitude of the imposed strain (both in tension and compression), and is markedly higher near the carbides particles. The higher GND densities near the carbides (order of 10{sup 14} m{sup -2}) are generated by the large strain gradients produced around the plastically rigid inclusion during mechanical deformation with some minor contribution from the pre-existing residual deformation caused by the thermal mismatch between carbide and nickel matrix.

  14. A two layer coating system for metallic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Plasma deposited cermet coatings are used for protecting components in sodium or helium cooled reactors. An inner layer of cermet made from a powder mixture of chromium carbide and a nickel -20% chromium and an outer layer of chromium carbide is preferred. (UK)

  15. Methods and systems for utilizing carbide lime or slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenney, Martin; Fernandez, Miguel; Chen, Irvin; Calas, Guillaume; Weiss, Michael Joseph; Tester, Chantel Cabrera

    2018-02-27

    Provided herein are methods comprising a) treating a slag solid or carbide lime suspension with an ammonium salt in water to produce an aqueous solution comprising calcium salt, ammonium salt, and solids; b) contacting the aqueous solution with carbon dioxide from an industrial process under one or more precipitation conditions to produce a precipitation material comprising calcium carbonate and a supernatant aqueous solution wherein the precipitation material and the supernatant aqueous solution comprise residual ammonium salt; and c) removing and optionally recovering ammonia and/or ammonium salt using one or more steps of (i) recovering a gas exhaust stream comprising ammonia during the treating and/or the contacting step; (ii) recovering the residual ammonium salt from the supernatant aqueous solution; and (iii) removing and optionally recovering the residual ammonium salt from the precipitation material.

  16. Temperature dependence of the residual stresses and mechanical properties in TiN/CrN nano-layered coatings processed by cathodic arc deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomello, F.; Arab Pour Yazdi; Sanchette, F.; Schuster, F.; Tabarant, M.; Billard, A.

    2014-01-01

    Nano-layered TiN-CrN coatings were synthesized by cathodic arc deposition (CAD) on M2 tool steel substrates. The aim of this study was to establish a double-correlation between the influence of the bilayer period and the deposition temperature on the resulting mechanical-tribological properties. The superlattice hardening enhancement was observed in samples deposited at different temperatures - i.e. without additional heating, 300 C and 400 C. Nonetheless, the residual compressive stresses are believed to be the responsible for reducing the hardness enhancement when the deposition temperature was increased. For instance, sample deposited without additional heating presented a hardness of 48.5 ± 1.3 GPa, while by increasing the processing temperature up to 400 C it was reduced down to 31.2 ± 4.1 GPa due to the stress relaxation. Indeed, the sample deposited at low temperature which possesses the thinnest bilayer period (13 nm) exhibited better mechanical properties. On the contrary, the role of the interfaces introduced when the period is decreased seems to rule the wear resistance. (authors)

  17. Superconductivity in borides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    It was thought that intermetallic superconductors do not exhibit superconductivity at temperatures over 30 K because of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) limit; therefore, researchers have been interested in high-T c cuprates. Our group discovered high-T c superconductivity in MgB 2 at 39 K in 2001. This discovery has initiated a substantial interest in the potential of high-T c superconductivity in intermetallic compounds that include 'light' elements (borides, carbides, etc.). (author)

  18. Helium diffusion in irradiated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1981-03-01

    Boron carbide has been internationally adopted as the neutron absorber material in the control and safety rods of large fast breeder reactors. Its relatively large neutron capture cross section at high neutron energies provides sufficient reactivity worth with a minimum of core space. In addition, the commercial availability of boron carbide makes it attractive from a fabrication standpoint. Instrumented irradiation experiments in EBR-II have provided continuous helium release data on boron carbide at a variety of operating temperatures. Although some microstructural and compositional variations were examined in these experiments most of the boron carbide was prototypic of that used in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The density of the boron carbide pellets was approximately 92% of theoretical. The boron carbide pellets were approximately 1.0 cm in diameter and possessed average grain sizes that varied from 8 to 30 μm. Pellet centerline temperatures were continually measured during the irradiation experiments

  19. The precipitation behavior of titanium carbide on the surface of SUS 321 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshihara, Kazuhiro; Nii, Kazuyoshi

    1982-01-01

    The surface composition of SUS 321 stainless steel at high temperatures was observed in vacuum with Auger electron spectroscopy. The precipitation of titanium carbide was found on the surface of SUS 321. The thickness of precipitated titanium carbide layer increased in proportion to the square root of annealing time and became about 0.05 μm after heated at 1100 K for 432 ks. The precipitated titanium carbide was not replaced by the most surface active element sulfur, and remained stable on the surface. The precipitated layer, however, was not even and had many holes about 1 μm in diameter. The bottom of a hole was SUS 321, on which phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur segregated. As the annealing time was prolonged, these segregants were replaced one by one in the order of the surface activity, and finally the most surface active element, sulfur, remained on the bottom of the hole. Moreover, sulfur diffused over the outside of the hole. The precipitation of titanium carbide on the surface occurred according to the following processes: (1) The titanium and carbon which had been dissolved in the bulk diffused onto the surface of the stainless steel. (2) The titanium carbide which had been precipitated in the bulk dissolved because the concentration of titanum and carbon fell under their solubility limits in the bulk. (3) The titanium and carbon diffused onto the surface which was exposed to vacuum. (4) The titanium and carbon recombined into titanium carbide and precipitated on the surface. The growth rate of the thickness of the precipitated layer was controlled by the diffusion of titanium and carbon in the precipitated titanium carbide. (J.P.N.)

  20. Crystallization of nodular cast iron with carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a crystallization process of nodular cast iron with carbides having a different chemical composition have been presented. It have been found, that an increase of molybdenum above 0,30% causes the ledeburutic carbides crystallization after (γ+ graphite eutectic phase crystallization. When Mo content is lower, these carbides crystallize as a pre-eutectic phase. In this article causes of this effect have been given.

  1. Microstructure and phase evolution in laser clad chromium carbide-NiCrMoNb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, L., E-mail: venkatesh@arci.res.in [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India); Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Samajdar, I. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering & Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Tak, Manish [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India); Doherty, Roger D. [Department of Materials Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundakaram, Ravi C.; Prasad, K. Satya; Joshi, S.V. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials (ARCI), Balapur, Hyderabad 500005 (India)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Microstructural development during laser cladding has been studied. • In this multi component system Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} is found to be the stable carbide phase. • Phases were identified by EBSD since XRD results were not conclusive. • Increase in laser power and/or scanning speed reduced the carbide content. • Hardness seems to depend on phase content as well as microstructure. - Abstract: Microstructural development in laser clad layers of Chromium carbide (Cr{sub x}C{sub y})-NiCrMoNb on SA 516 steel has been investigated. Although the starting powder contained both Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} and Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, the clad layers showed only the presence of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}. Microtexture measurements by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) revealed primary dendritic Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} with Ni rich FCC metallic phase being present in the interdendritic spaces. Further annealing of the laser clad layers and furnace melting of the starting powder confirmed that Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} is the primary as well as stable carbide phase in this multi component system. Increase in laser power and scanning speed progressively reduced carbide content in the laser clad layers. Increased scanning speed, which enhances the cooling rate, also led to reduction in the secondary arm spacing (λ{sub 2}) of the Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} dendrites. The clad layer hardness increased with carbide content and with decreased dendrite arm spacing.

  2. Evolution Of Chemical Conditions And Estimated Plutonium Solubility In The Residual Waste Layer During Post-Closure Aging Of Tank 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, M.

    2012-01-01

    This document updates the Eh-pH transitions from grout aging simulations and the plutonium waste release model of Denham (2007, Rev. 1) based on new data. New thermodynamic data for cementitious minerals are used for the grout simulations. Newer thermodynamic data, recommended by plutonium experts (Plutonium Solubility Peer Review Report, LA-UR-12-00079), are used to estimate solubilities of plutonium at various pore water compositions expected during grout aging. In addition, a new grout formula is used in the grout aging simulations and apparent solubilities of coprecipitated plutonium are estimated using data from analysis of Tank 18 residual waste. The conceptual model of waste release and the grout aging simulations are done in a manner similar to that of Denham (2007, Rev. 1). It is assumed that the pore fluid composition passing from the tank grout into the residual waste layer controls the solubility, and hence the waste release concentration of plutonium. Pore volumes of infiltrating fluid of an assumed composition are reacted with a hypothetical grout block using The Geochemist's Workbench(reg s ign) and changes in pore fluid chemistry correspond to the number of pore fluid volumes reacted. As in the earlier document, this results in three states of grout pore fluid composition throughout the simulation period that are termed Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. The one major difference from the earlier document is that pyrite is used to account for reducing capacity of the tank grout rather than pyrrhotite. This poises Eh at -0.47 volts during Reduced Region II. The major transitions in pore fluid composition are shown. Plutonium solubilities are estimated for discrete PuO2(am,hyd) particles and for plutonium coprecipitated with iron phases in the residual waste. Thermodynamic data for plutonium from the Nuclear Energy Agency are used to estimate the solubilities of the discrete particles for the three stages of pore fluid

  3. Tribology of carbide derived carbon films synthesized on tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlustochowicz, Marcin

    Tribologically advantageous films of carbide derived carbon (CDC) have been successfully synthesized on binderless tungsten carbide manufactured using the plasma pressure compaction (P2CRTM) technology. In order to produce the CDC films, tungsten carbide samples were reacted with chlorine containing gas mixtures at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1000°C in a sealed tube furnace. Some of the treated samples were later dechlorinated by an 800°C hydrogenation treatment. Detailed mechanical and structural characterizations of the CDC films and sliding contact surfaces were done using a series of analytical techniques and their results were correlated with the friction and wear behavior of the CDC films in various tribosystems, including CDC-steel, CDC-WC, CDC-Si3N4 and CDC-CDC. Optimum synthesis and treatment conditions were determined for use in two specific environments: moderately humid air and dry nitrogen. It was found that CDC films first synthesized at 1000°C and then hydrogen post-treated at 800°C performed best in air with friction coefficient values as low as 0.11. However, for dry nitrogen applications, no dechlorination was necessary and both hydrogenated and as-synthesized CDC films exhibited friction coefficients of approximately 0.03. A model of tribological behavior of CDC has been proposed that takes into consideration the tribo-oxidation of counterface material, the capillary forces from adsorbed water vapor, the carbon-based tribofilm formation, and the lubrication effect of both chlorine and hydrogen.

  4. Irradiation and annealing of p-type silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Alexander A.; Bogdanova, Elena V.; Grigor' eva, Maria V.; Lebedev, Sergey P. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Kozlovski, Vitaly V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-21

    The development of the technology of semiconductor devices based on silicon carbide and the beginning of their industrial manufacture have made increasingly topical studies of the radiation hardness of this material on the one hand and of the proton irradiation to form high-receptivity regions on the other hand. This paper reports on a study of the carrier removal rate (V{sub d}) in p-6H-SiC under irradiation with 8 MeV protons and of the conductivity restoration in radiation- compensated epitaxial layers of various p-type silicon carbide polytypes. V{sub d} was determined by analysis of capacitance-voltage characteristics and from results of Hall effect measurements. It was found that the complete compensation of samples with the initial value of Na - Nd ≈ 1.5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} occurs at an irradiation dose of ∼1.1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. It is shown that specific features of the sublimation layer SiC (compared to CVD layers) are clearly manifested upon the gamma and electron irradiation and are hardly noticeable under the proton and neutron irradiation. It was also found that the radiation-induced compensation of SiC is retained after its annealing at ≤1000°C. The conductivity is almost completely restored at T ≥ 1200°C. This character of annealing of the radiation compensation is independent of a silicon carbide polytype and the starting doping level of the epitaxial layer. The complete annealing temperatures considerably exceed the working temperatures of SiC-based devices. It is shown that the radiation compensation is a promising method in the technology of high-temperature devices based on SiC.

  5. Optimization of the etch-and-rinse technique: New perspectives to improve resin-dentin bonding and hybrid layer integrity by reducing residual water using dimethyl sulfoxide pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stape, Thiago Henrique Scarabello; Tjäderhane, Leo; Abuna, Gabriel; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2018-04-13

    To determine whether bonding effectiveness and hybrid layer integrity on acid-etched dehydrated dentin would be comparable to the conventional wet-bonding technique through new dentin biomodification approaches using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Etched dentin surfaces from extracted sound molars were randomly bonded in wet or dry conditions (30s air drying) with DMSO/ethanol or DMSO/H 2 O as pretreatments using a simplified (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE: SU) and a multi-step (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE: SBMP) etch-and-rinse adhesives. Untreated dentin surfaces served as control. Bonded teeth (n=8) were stored in distilled water for 24h and sectioned into resin-dentin beams (0.8mm 2 ) for microtensile bond strength test and quantitative interfacial nanoleakage analysis (n=8) under SEM. Additional teeth (n=2) were prepared for micropermeability assessment by CFLSM under simulated pulpar pressure (20cm H 2 O) using 5mM fluorescein as a tracer. Microtensile data was analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by Tukey Test and nanoleakage by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni multiple comparison test (α=0.05). While dry-bonding of SBMP produced significantly lower bond strengths than wet-bonding (padhesives to demineralized air-dried dentin beyond conventional wet-bonding. Less porous resin-dentin interfaces with higher bond strengths on air-dried etched dentin were achieved; nonetheless, overall efficiency varied according to DMSO's co-solvent and adhesive type. DMSO pretreatments permit etched dentin to be air-dried before hybridization facilitating residual water removal and thus improving bonding effectiveness. This challenges the current paradigm of wet-bonding requirement for the etch-and-rinse approach creating new possibilities to enhance the clinical longevity of resin-dentin interfaces. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Muonium states in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.D.; Baumeler, H.; Keller, H.; Kiefl, R.F.; Kuendig, W.; Odermatt, W.; Schneider, J.W.; Estle, T.L.; Spencer, D.P.; Savic, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    Implanted muons in samples of silicon carbide have been observed to form paramagnetic muonium centers (μ + e - ). Muonium precession signals in low applied magnetic fields have been observed at 22 K in a granular sample of cubic β-SiC, however it was not possible to determine the hyperfine frequency. In a signal crystal sample of hexagonal 6H-SiC, three apparently isotropic muonium states were observed at 20 K and two at 300 K, all with hyperfine frequencies intermediate between those of the isotropic muonium centers in diamond and silicon. No evidence was seen of an anisotropic muonium state analogous to the Mu * state in diamond and silicon. (orig.)

  7. Low temperature study of nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.

    2005-05-01

    By low temperature neutron diffraction method was studied structure in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide from room temperature up to 12K. It is found of low temperature phase in titanium carbide- TiC 0.71 . It is established region and borders of this phase. It is determined change of unit cell parameter. (author)

  8. Elastic modulus and fracture of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Walther, G.

    1978-12-01

    The elastic modulus of hot-pressed boron carbide with 1 to 15% porosity was measured at room temperature. K/sub IC/ values were determined for the same porosity range at 500 0 C by the double torsion technique. The critical stress intensity factor of boron carbide with 8% porosity was evaluated from 25 to 1200 0 C

  9. Carbon-coated tungsten and molybdenum carbides for electrode of electrochemical capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Takahiro; Soneda, Yasushi; Hatori, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Michio

    2007-01-01

    New electrode materials for electrochemical capacitor, tungsten carbide WC and molybdenum carbide Mo 2 C coated by porous carbon, were prepared through a simple heat treatment of the mixture of K 2 WO 4 and K 2 MoO 4 , respectively, with hydroxy propyl cellulose. Carbide changed to hydroxide during the 1st charge-discharge cycle in H 2 SO 4 aqueous electrolyte, which showed redox reaction in further charge-discharge cycles, in addition to electric double layers of the carbon formed on its surface. The carbon-coated carbide gave a high capacitance in 1 mol L -1 H 2 SO 4 electrolyte, as about 350 F cm -3 for carbon-coated WC and 550-750 F cm -3 for carbon-coated Mo 2 C. Coating of carbon inhibits the growth of carbide particles during their formation, of which the small particle size make possible to complete transformation to hydroxides during the 1st charge-discharge cycle, and also disturbs the agglomeration of tungsten and molybdenum hydroxides during charge-discharge cycles, as well as porous carbon coated act as electrode material for electric double layers of electrolyte ions

  10. Metal-carbide multilayers for molten Pu containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, T.S.E.; Curtis, P.G.; Juntz, R.S.; Krueger, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    Multilayers composed of nine or ten alternating layers of Ta or W and TaC were studied for the feasibility of their use in containing molten plutonium (Pu) at 1200 degrees C. Single layers of W and TaC were also investigated. A two-source electron beam evaporation process was developed to deposit these coatings onto the inside surface of hemispherical Ta cups about 38 mm in diameter. Pu testing was done by melting Pu in the coated hemispherical cups and holding them under vacuum at 1200 degrees C for two hours. Metallographic examination and microprobe analysis of cross sections showed that Pu had penetrated to the Ta substrate in all cases to some extent. Full penetration to the outer surface of the Ta substrate, however, occurred in only a few of the samples. The fact that full penetration occurred in any of the samples suggests that it would have occurred in uncoated Ta under these testing conditions which in turn suggests that the multilayer coatings do afford some protection against Pu attack. The TaC used for these specimens was wet by Pu under these testing conditions, and following testing, Pu was found uniformly distributed throughout the carbide layers which appeared to be rather porous. Pu was seen in the W and Ta layers only when exposed directly to molten Pu during testing or near defects suggesting that Pu penetrated the multilayers at defects in the coating and traveled parallel to the layers along the carbide layers. These results indicate that the use of alternating metal and ceramic layers for Pu containment should be possible through the use of nonporous ceramic that is not wet by molten Pu and defect-free films

  11. Precipitation hardening of a FeMnC TWIP steel by vanadium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateau, J P; Dumay, A; Jacques, A; Allain, S

    2010-01-01

    A fine precipitation of spherical vanadium carbides is obtained in a Fe22Mn0.6C base steel during the final recrystallisation heat treatment. Precipitates formed in recrystallised grains have a cube-cube orientation relation with the matrix, confirmed by Moire patterns observed in TEM. The theoretical size for loss of coherency is below the nm, much lower than the precipitates' size. Deformation contrasts were observed around the precipitates and their residual coherency was measured. It was shown to decrease when the carbides' size increases, to vanish above 30 nm. The net increase of the yield stress was estimated to be 140 MPa. Precipitation hardening by vanadium carbides do not alter the strain hardening rate by TWIP effect, as they do not seem to act as obstacles for the propagation of microtwins.

  12. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first...... example of a cationic terminal carbide complex, [RuC(Cl)(CH3CN)(PCy3)2]+, is described and characterized by NMR, MS, X-ray crystallography, and computational studies. The experimentally observed irregular variation of the carbide 13C chemical shift is shown to be accurately reproduced by DFT, which also...... demonstrates that details of the coordination geometry affect the carbide chemical shift equally as much as variations in the nature of the auxiliary ligands. Furthermore, the kinetics of formation of the sqaure pyramidal dicyano complex, trans-[RuC(CN)2(PCy3)2], from RuC has been examined and the reaction...

  13. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen.The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  14. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrowski S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  15. Characterisation of silicon carbide films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Chen Bangtao; Wei Jiashen; Pang, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a characterisation of amorphous silicon carbide films deposited in plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) reactors for MEMS applications. The main parameter was optimised in order to achieve a low stress and high deposition rate. We noticed that the high frequency mode (13.56 MHz) gives a low stress value which can be tuned from tensile to compressive by selecting the correct power. The low frequency mode (380 kHz) generates high compressive stress (around 500 MPa) due to ion bombardment and, as a result, densification of the layer achieved. Temperature can decrease the compressive value of the stress (due to annealing effect). A low etching rate of the amorphous silicon carbide layer was noticed for wet etching in KOH 30% at 80 o C (around 13 A/min) while in HF 49% the layer is practically inert. A very slow etching rate of amorphous silicon carbide layer in XeF 2 -7 A/min- was observed. The paper presents an example of this application: PECVD-amorphous silicon carbide cantilevers fabricated using surface micromachining by dry-released technique in XeF 2

  16. Formation of Al2O3-HfO2 Eutectic EBC Film on Silicon Carbide Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Seya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure, the preparation method, and the formation mechanism of the eutectic EBC layer on the silicon carbide substrate are summarized. Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic EBC film is prepared by optical zone melting method on the silicon carbide substrate. At high temperature, a small amount of silicon carbide decomposed into silicon and carbon. The components of Al2O3 and HfO2 in molten phase also react with the free carbon. The Al2O3 phase reacts with free carbon and vapor species of AlO phase is formed. The composition of the molten phase becomes HfO2 rich from the eutectic composition. HfO2 phase also reacts with the free carbon and HfC phase is formed on the silicon carbide substrate; then a high density intermediate layer is formed. The adhesion between the intermediate layer and the substrate is excellent by an anchor effect. When the solidification process finished before all of HfO2 phase is reduced to HfC phase, HfC-HfO2 functionally graded layer is formed on the silicon carbide substrate and the Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure grows from the top of the intermediate layer.

  17. A flexible method for residual stress measurement of spray coated layers by laser made hole drilling and SLM based beam steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, W.; Pedrini, G.; Weidmann, P.; Gadow, R.

    2015-08-01

    A minimum invasive but high resolution method for residual stress analysis of ceramic coatings made by thermal spraycoating using a pulsed laser for flexible hole drilling is described. The residual stresses are retrieved by applying the measured surface data for a model-based reconstruction procedure. While the 3D deformations and the profile of the machined area are measured with digital holography, the residual stresses are calculated by FE analysis. To improve the sensitivity of the method, a SLM is applied to control the distribution and the shape of the holes. The paper presents the complete measurement and reconstruction procedure and discusses the advantages and challenges of the new technology.

  18. Microstructural Characterization of Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Ceramics. Materials Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    Microstructural characterization of two reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics has been carried out by interference layering, plasma etching, and microscopy. These specimens contained free silicon and niobium disilicide as minor phases with silicon carbide as the major phase. In conventionally prepared samples, the niobium disilicide cannot be distinguished from silicon in optical micrographs. After interference layering, all phases are clearly distinguishable. Back scattered electron (BSE) imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) confirmed the results obtained by interference layering. Plasma etching with CF4 plus 4% O2 selectively attacks silicon in these specimens. It is demonstrated that interference layering and plasma etching are very useful techniques in the phase identification and microstructural characterization of multiphase ceramic materials.

  19. Plasma metallization of refractory carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroleva, E.B.; Klinskaya, N.A.; Rybalko, O.F.; Ugol'nikova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of treatment conditions in plasma on properties of produced metallized powders of titanium, tungsten and chromium carbides with the main particle size of 40-80 μm is considered. It is shown that plasma treatment permits to produce metallized powders of carbide materials with the 40-80 μm particle size. The degree of metallization, spheroidization, chemical and phase composition of metallized carbide powders are controlled by dispersivity of the treated material, concentration of a metal component in the treated mixtures, rate of plasma flow and preliminary spheroidization procedure

  20. Laser cladding of Ti-6Al-4V with various carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkes, J.A.; Shibata, K.

    1994-01-01

    Laser cladding Ti-6Al-4V can be achieved with various weight percentages of different carbide powders. The microstructure and morphology of the clad layer is determined by the cladding powder composition, for a given set of laser parameters, such that 10 and 20 wt% Cr 3 C 2 results in a β + TiC clad microstructure; 10 and 20 wt% WC results in an α + TiC clad microstructure (plus some original WC); and Mo 2 C gives an α + β + TiC or β + TiC structure, depending on the weight percentage of Mo 2 C. The morphology of the TiC in all cases is dendritic or feathery, depending on the carbide content. The microstructure observed in all cases agreed well with that theoretically predicted from the energetics of carbide formation and β-stabilizing properties of each element

  1. Structure and strength of carbide-steel cermet and their changes during heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariel, M.P.; Frage, N.R.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Kaputkin, D.M.; Sverdlova, N.R.

    2004-01-01

    Both homogeneous and 'graded' materials were produced by pressing and sintering of titanium carbide TiC x (0.7 x takes place during the joining. If the titanium carbide is carbon deficient that the carbon goes from the steel binder to TiC x , and this redistribution intensity with the x decreases. So-named graded cermets were produced on controlled distribution of TiC x with different x. An additional flow of carbon from C-rich to C-poor TiC x layers was obtained in these cermets. These changes both in the steel and TiC x compositions result in changes in such processes as austenitization, carbide dissolution and precipitation, and martensitic transformation. Both general strength of the material and the gradient of properties in graded cermets can be increased using kinetic factors of element redistribution and structure changes resulted from the heat treatment. (author)

  2. Carbides precipitated from the melt in a Zr-2.5 Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrkowski, R.; Garcia, E.A.; Vigna, G.L.; Bermudez, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental method is presented which leads to the formation of carbides similar in size (3 to 8 microns) and composition to those observed in some pressure tubes of CANDU type reactors. The method is based on melting the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy in a graphite crucible, where isothermal C diffusion in the Zr-Nb melt took place. It can be inferred that the carbides observed in pressure tubes could be originated in high temperature stages of the manufacture process. Otherwise, they could have been incorporated in the Zr sponge. As a result of the diffusion couple Liquid Zr-2.5 Nb/Solid Graphite, a carbide layer, up to 100μm thick, grew attached to the crucible wall, together with carbide particles whose size was in the some microns range. The smallest particles were arranged in rows determined by the prior β phase grains. The main carbide phase detected was the cubic MC 1-x ; the hexagonal M 2 C was also detected; M for metal. (Author)

  3. Creation of leak-proof silicon carbide diffusion barriers by means of pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinecke, A.-M.; Lustfeld, M.; Lippmann, W., E-mail: wolfgang.lippmann@tu-dresden.de; Hurtado, A.

    2014-05-01

    TRISO (tristructural isotropic) coated fuel particles are a crucial element of the HTR safety concept. While TRISO coated particles have been proven as a very efficient barrier for a large range of fission products in HTR experimental reactors, some particular fission products could still diffuse at a considerable rate. Most importantly, radioactive silver {sup 110m}Ag was found to be released from coated particles. In future HTRs with active components like a gas turbine in the primary circuit, such silver contamination may severely limit maintainability of these parts with the result of reduced life-time performance. So far, experimental analyses on silver diffusion through silicon carbide have led to contradictory results. In this work, an alternative method was used to generate silicon carbide layers as a basis for analysis of silver diffusion. With pulsed laser deposition (PLD), it is possible to generate coatings of different materials and various kinds of compounds. In particular, this technology allows the generation of layers very well defined with respect to their composition, purity and density. The microstructure can precisely be manipulated through various parameters. Based on different silicon carbide coatings with well-defined properties, we are going to investigate the silver diffusion process. Our goal is to derive the properties of an ideal silicon carbide coating preventing silver diffusion entirely. In this paper we present the major aspects of our work creating crystalline SiC layers as well as silver and CsI layers both on plane and spherical substrates. Analyses with X-ray diffraction, X-ray spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry show that complex multilayer systems comprising a graphite substrate, a crystalline SiC layer and an intermediate silver layer were successfully created. Major challenges to approach in the future are the handling of high-level intrinsic stresses forming in the layer structure as well as the high vapour

  4. Stable carbides in transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrkowski, R.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work different techniques were employed for the identification of stable carbides in two sets of transition metal alloys of wide technological application: a set of three high alloy M2 type steels in which W and/or Mo were total or partially replaced by Nb, and a Zr-2.5 Nb alloy. The M2 steel is a high speed steel worldwide used and the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy is the base material for the pressure tubes in the CANDU type nuclear reactors. The stability of carbide was studied in the frame of Goldschmidt's theory of interstitial alloys. The identification of stable carbides in steels was performed by determining their metallic composition with an energy analyzer attached to the scanning electron microscope (SEM). By these means typical carbides of the M2 steel, MC and M 6 C, were found. Moreover, the spatial and size distribution of carbide particles were determined after different heat treatments, and both microstructure and microhardness were correlated with the appearance of the secondary hardening phenomenon. In the Zr-Nb alloy a study of the α and β phases present after different heat treatments was performed with optical and SEM metallographic techniques, with the guide of Abriata and Bolcich phase diagram. The α-β interphase boundaries were characterized as short circuits for diffusion with radiotracer techniques and applying Fisher-Bondy-Martin model. The precipitation of carbides was promoted by heat treatments that produced first the C diffusion into the samples at high temperatures (β phase), and then the precipitation of carbide particles at lower temperature (α phase or (α+β)) two phase field. The precipitated carbides were identified as (Zr, Nb)C 1-x with SEM, electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction techniques. (Author) [es

  5. Point defects and transport properties in carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1984-01-01

    Carbides of transition metals and of actinides are interesting and technologically important. The transition-metal carbides (or carbonitrides) are extensively being used as hard materials and some of them are of great interest because of the high transition temperature for superconductivity, e.g. 17 K for Nb(C,N). Actinide carbides and carbonitrides, (U,Pu)C and (U,Pu)(C,N) are being considered as promising advanced fuels for liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactors. Basic interest exists in all these materials because of their high melting points (e.g. 4250 K for TaC) and the unusually broad range of homogeneity of nonstoichiometric compositions (e.g. from UCsub(0.9) to UCsub(1.9) at 2500 K). Interaction of point defects to clusters and short-range ordering have recently been studied with elastic neutron diffraction and diffuse scattering techniques, and calculations of energies of formation and interaction of point defects became available for selected carbides. Diffusion measurements also exist for a number of carbides, in particular for the actinide carbides. The existing knowledge is discussed and summarized with emphasis on informative examples of particular technological relevance. (Auth.)

  6. Boriding with boron carbide base pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop an advanced technique of boriding using pastes under the conditions of furnace heating. The research is carried out on flat specimens of 20 and U8 steels pre-annealed in vacuum. B 4 C base pastes were used as saturating media, and the glue prepared by dissolving of nitrocellulose in the mixture of butylacetate and acetone was used as a bond. Measured was the depth of diffusion layers, produced on the 20 and u8 steels after boriding with the pastes under different temperatures and saturation times. The results of metallographic analysis show that borided layers have a specific needle-like structure. The surface of the specimens is clean and free from any paste residues and traces of partial melting

  7. Fabrication of mesoporous and high specific surface area lanthanum carbide-carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biasetto, L.; Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Zanonato, P.; Bernardo, P. Di; Colombo, P.; Andrighetto, A.; Prete, G.

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous lanthanum carbide-carbon nanotube composites were produced by means of carbothermal reaction of lanthanum oxide, graphite and multi-walled carbon nanotube mixtures under high vacuum. Residual gas analysis revealed the higher reactivity of lanthanum oxide towards carbon nanotubes compared to graphite. After sintering, the composites revealed a specific surface area increasing with the amount of carbon nanotubes introduced. The meso-porosity of carbon nanotubes was maintained after thermal treatment.

  8. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  9. Plasma spraying of zirconium carbide – hafnium carbide – tungsten cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Cheong, D.-I.; Yang, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-64 ISSN 1335-8987 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * cermet coatings * microhardness * zirconium carbide * hafnium carbide * tungsten * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  10. Joining of cemented carbides to steel by laser beam welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbatti, C.; Garcia, J.; Pyzalla, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Liedl, G. [TU Wien, Institut fuer Umform- und Hochleistungslasertechnik (IFLT), 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2007-11-15

    Welding of dissimilar materials such as steel and cemented carbides (hardmetals, cermets) is particularly challenging e.g. because mismatches in their thermal expansion coefficients and thermal conductivities result in residual stress formation and because of the formation of brittle intermetallic phases. Laser beam welding of cemented carbides to steel appears as an attractive complementary technique to conventional brazing processes due to its high precision, high process speed, low heat input and the option of welding without filler. Here a laser welding process including pre-heat treatment and post-heat treatment was applied successfully to joining as-sintered and nitrided hardmetals and cermets to low alloyed steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the welds are investigated by microscopy, X-ray diffraction, microhardness measurements, and bending tests. The results reveal that the three-step laser beam welding process produced crack-free and non-porous joints. Nitridation of the cemented carbides results in a significant reduction of the amount of brittle intermetallic phases. The mechanical properties of the joints are competitive to those of the conventional brazed steel-cemented carbide joints. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Das Schweissen von ungleichartigen Werkstoffen wie z. B. Staehlen mit Hartmetallen und Cermets stellt eine erhebliche Herausforderung dar, u. a. infolge der unterschiedlichen thermischen Ausdehnungskoeffizienten und Waermeleitfaehigkeiten, welche die Bildung von Eigenspannungen zur Folge haben, sowie aufgrund der Bildung sproeder intermetallischer Phasen. Das Laserstrahlschweissen von Hartmetallen/Cermets mit Stahl erscheint als attraktives komplementaeres Verfahren zum ueblicherweise verwendeten Loeten, da es die Herstellung von Verbindungen mit hoeherer Praezision, hoeherer Geschwindigkeit sowie geringerem Waermeeintrag erlaubt und die Verwendung eines Zusatzwerkstoffs nicht notwendig ist

  11. Tungsten carbide and tungsten-molybdenum carbides as automobile exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, L.; Daubrege, F.; Gengembre, L.; Leclercq, G.; Prigent, M.

    1987-01-01

    Several catalyst samples of tungsten carbide and W, Mo mixed carbides with different Mo/W atom ratios, have been prepared to test their ability to remove carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and propane from a synthetic exhaust gas simulating automobile emissions. Surface characterization of the catalysts has been performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and selective chemisorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Tungsten carbide exhibits good activity for CO and NO conversion, compared to a standard three-way catalyst based on Pt and Rh. However, this W carbide is ineffective in the oxidation of propane. The Mo,W mixed carbides are markedly different having only a very low activity. 9 refs.; 10 figs.; 5 tabs

  12. High temperature evaporation of titanium, zirconium and hafnium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.I.; Rempel', A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Evaporation of cubic nonstoichiometric carbides of titanium, zirconium and hafnium in a comparatively low-temperature interval (1800-2700) with detailed crystallochemical sample certification is studied. Titanium carbide is characterized by the maximum evaporation rate: at T>2300 K it loses 3% of sample mass during an hour and at T>2400 K titanium carbide evaporation becomes extremely rapid. Zirconium and hafnium carbide evaporation rates are several times lower than titanium carbide evaporation rates at similar temperatures. Partial pressures of metals and carbon over the carbides studied are calculated on the base of evaporation rates

  13. Galileo Probe Doppler Residuals as the Wave-Dynamical Signature of Weakly Stable, Downward-Increasing Stratification in Jupiter's Deep Wind Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Michael; Atkinson, David H.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Doppler radio tracking of the Galileo probe-to-orbiter relay, previously analyzed for its in situ measure of Jupiter's zonal wind at the equatorial entry site, also shows a record of significant residual fluctuations apparently indicative of varying vertical motions. Regular oscillations over pressure depth in the residual Doppler measurements of roughly 1-8 Hz (increasing upward), as filtered over a 134 sec window, are most plausibly interpreted as gravity waves, and imply a weak, but downward increasing static stability within the 5 - 20 bar region of Jupiter's atmosphere. A matched extension to deeper levels of an independent inertial stability constraint from the measured vertical wind shear at 1 - 4 bars is roughly consistent with a static stability of approximately 0.5 K/km near the 20 bar level, as independently detected by the probe Atmospheric Structure Instrument.

  14. ELABORATION OF AN EPOXY COATING REINFORCED WITH ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE NANOSTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia G. Díaz-Barriga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the preparation of a transparent epoxy coating reinforced with 200 PPM of zirconium carbide nanostructures. The nanostructures of ZrC were prepared by mechanosynthesis. The additive characteristics analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were presented. Epoxy coating adhesion on a steel plate was analyzed using MEB. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was performed to the reinforced paints between 20-700 °C. The reinforced enamel was compared with an enamel without nanostructures. There is not vaporization of reinforced enamel at a 95 y 100 °C with ZrC particles size of 10 µm y 120 nm respectively. The final enamel degradation is slower when there is a 14% by weight of the residue and 426 °C with 120nm diameter particles.

  15. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed

  16. Deposition and Characterization of TRISO Coating Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. K.; Choi, D. J.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, J. H.; Chun, J. H. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Zirconium carbide has been chosen and studied as an advanced material of silicon carbide. In order to collect data on the basic properties and characteristics of Zirconium carbide, studies have been conducted using various methods. As a result of chemically vapor deposed subliming zirconium tetrachloride(ZrCl4) and using methane(CH4) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere, graphite film is deposited.. Zirconium carbide was deposited on the sample where silicon carbide was deposited on a graphite substrate using Zirconium sponge as a Zirconium source. In terms of physical characteristics, the deposited Zirconium carbide showed higher strength, but slightly lower elastic modulus than silicon carbide. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of a coating layer in pre-irradiation step, internal pressure induced method and direct strength measurement method is carried out. In the internal pressure induced method, in order to produce the requirement pressure, pressure media is used. In the direct strength measurement method, the indentation experiment that indent on a hemisphere shell with plate indenter is conducted. For this method, the finite element analysis is used and the analysis is verified by indentation experiments. To measure the strength of TRISO particle SiC coating, SiC hemisphere shell is performed through grinding and heat treatment. Through the finite element analysis, strength evaluation equation is suggested. Using suggested equation, Strength evaluation is performed and the strength value shows 1025MPa as a result of statistical analysis.

  17. Deposition and Characterization of TRISO Coating Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. K.; Choi, D. J.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, J. H.; Chun, J. H.

    2007-03-01

    Zirconium carbide has been chosen and studied as an advanced material of silicon carbide. In order to collect data on the basic properties and characteristics of Zirconium carbide, studies have been conducted using various methods. As a result of chemically vapor deposed subliming zirconium tetrachloride(ZrCl4) and using methane(CH4) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere, graphite film is deposited.. Zirconium carbide was deposited on the sample where silicon carbide was deposited on a graphite substrate using Zirconium sponge as a Zirconium source. In terms of physical characteristics, the deposited Zirconium carbide showed higher strength, but slightly lower elastic modulus than silicon carbide. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of a coating layer in pre-irradiation step, internal pressure induced method and direct strength measurement method is carried out. In the internal pressure induced method, in order to produce the requirement pressure, pressure media is used. In the direct strength measurement method, the indentation experiment that indent on a hemisphere shell with plate indenter is conducted. For this method, the finite element analysis is used and the analysis is verified by indentation experiments. To measure the strength of TRISO particle SiC coating, SiC hemisphere shell is performed through grinding and heat treatment. Through the finite element analysis, strength evaluation equation is suggested. Using suggested equation, Strength evaluation is performed and the strength value shows 1025MPa as a result of statistical analysis

  18. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use .... or open dumping which have effect on surface and ... Table 1: Chemical Composition of Calcium Carbide Waste and Cement.

  19. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 microm to 100 microm) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both α-SiC and β-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the α-SiC and β-SiC polytypes were similar

  20. Reaction between molybdenum and carbon, and several carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozumi, Shotaro; Kikuchi, Michio; Sugai, Shinzo; Hayashi, Masaaki.

    1980-01-01

    Diffusion couples of molybdenum with carbon and several carbides, i.e. B 4 C, SiC, TiC, and TaC, respectively, were heated for up to 3.6 x 10 5 s at various temperatures ranging from 1373 to 2223 K. The couples were then examined for composition, growth rate, structure, and hardness of reaction layers. Main results obtained are as follows: (1) In the Mo-C system, only Mo 2 C layer was formed at below 1873 K, while two sub- layers consisted of Mo 2 C and eta (MoC sub(1-x)), respectively, were found at above 1873 K. The activation energy for growth of total layer was 374 kJ/mol. (2) In the Mo-B 4 C system, two sub-layers consisted of Mo 2 B and MoB, respectively, with dispersed carbon particles were formed. (3) In the Mo-SiC system, Mo 2 C layer, including eta (MoC sub(1-x)) phase at high temperature, mixture of Mo 2 C and Mo 3 Si 2 phases, and Mo 3 Si 2 phase in order from the Mo side were formed. The activation energy for growth of total layer was 477 kJ/mol. (4) In the Mo-TiC system, two kinds of TiC in point of view of free carbon content were used; one is with 0.2% free carbon and the other is with 0.01%. In the Mo-TiC with 0.2% free carbon system, two sub-layers, i.e. relatively thick Mo 2 C layer and thin (Ti, Mo)C layer, were formed, while in the Mo-TiC with 0.01% free carbon system two thin sub-layers, Mo 2 C and (Ti, Mo)C, were formed; the Mo 2 C layer in the latter case was very thin and was not found after short time heating at low temperature. The activation energy for growth of Mo 2 C layer in the former system was 393 kJ/mol. (5) In the Mo-TaC with 0.02% free carbon system, two thin sub-layers, (Mo, Ta) 2 C and (Ta, Mo)C, were observed. (6) TEM studies on the interface between Mo (bcc) and Mo 2 C (hcp) showed that there was the following orientation relation, called as the Burgers relation, between these two phases; (110)sub(Mo)//(0001)sub(Mo 2 C), sub(Mo)// - 0>sub(Mo 2 C). (author)

  1. Fission product phases in irradiated carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewart, F.T.; Sharpe, B.M.; Taylor, R.G.

    1975-09-01

    Oxide fuels have been widely adopted as 'first charge' fuels for demonstration fast reactors. However, because of the improved breeding characteristics, carbides are being investigated in a number of laboratories as possible advanced fuels. Irradiation experiments on uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium carbides have been widely reported but the instances where segregate phases have been found and subjected to electron probe analysis are relatively few. Several observations of such segregate phases have now been made over a period of time and these are collected together in this document. Some seven fuel pins have been examined. Two of the irradiations were in thermal materials testing reactors (MTR); the remainder were experimental assemblies of carbide gas bonded oxycarbide and sodium bonded oxycarbide in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR). All fuel pins completed their irradiation without failure. (author)

  2. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  3. Determination of free carbon content in boron carbide ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de; Lima, N.B. de; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1990-01-01

    Boron carbide is a ceramic material of technological importance due to its hardness and high chemical and thermal stabilities. Free carbon is always found as a process dependent impurity in boron carbide. The development of procedures for its detection is required because its presence leads to a degradation of the boron carbide properties. In this work, several procedures for determining free carbon content in boron carbide specimens are reported and discussed for comparison purposes. (author) [pt

  4. Fabrication of uranium carbide/beryllium carbide/graphite experimental-fuel-element specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenzer, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    A method has been developed for fabricating uranium carbide/beryllium carbide/graphite fuel-element specimens for reactor-core-meltdown studies. The method involves milling and blending the raw materials and densifying the resulting blend by conventional graphite-die hot-pressing techniques. It can be used to fabricate specimens with good physical integrity and material dispersion, with densities of greater than 90% of the theoretical density, and with a uranium carbide particle size of less than 10 μm

  5. Morphology study of refractory carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrda, J.; Blazhikova, Ya.

    1982-01-01

    Refractory carbides were investigated using JSM-U3 electron microscope of Joelco company at 27 KV accelerating voltage. Some photographs of each powder were taken with different enlargements to characterise the sample upon the whole. It was shown that morphological and especially topographic study of powders enables to learn their past history (way of fabrication and treatment). The presence of steps of compact particle fractures and cracks is accompanied by occurence of fine dispersion of carbides subjected to machining after facrication. On the contrary, the character of crystallographic surfaces and features of surface growth testify to the way of crystallization

  6. Silicon carbide microsystems for harsh environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wijesundara, Muthu B J

    2011-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Microsystems for Harsh Environments reviews state-of-the-art Silicon Carbide (SiC) technologies that, when combined, create microsystems capable of surviving in harsh environments, technological readiness of the system components, key issues when integrating these components into systems, and other hurdles in harsh environment operation. The authors use the SiC technology platform suite the model platform for developing harsh environment microsystems and then detail the current status of the specific individual technologies (electronics, MEMS, packaging). Additionally, methods

  7. Tool steel for cold worck niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenstein, H.

    1984-01-01

    A tool steel was designed so as to have a microstructure with the matrix similar a cold work tool steel of D series, containing a dispersion of Niobium carbides, with no intention of putting Niobium in solution on the matrix. The alloy was cast, forged and heat treated. The alloy was easily forged; the primary carbide morfology, after forging, was faceted, tending to equiaxed. The hardness obtained was equivalent to the maximum hardness of a D-3 sttel when quenched from any temperature between 950 0 C, and 1200 0 , showing a very small sensitivy to the quenching temperature. (Author) [pt

  8. Abundances of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites determined by NanoSIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jemma; Busemann, Henner; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O.'D.; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Franchi, Ian A.; Hoppe, Peter

    2014-08-01

    It has been suggested that the matrices of all chondrites are dominated by a common material with Ivuna-like (CI) abundances of volatiles, presolar grains and insoluble organic matter (IOM) (e.g., Alexander, 2005). However, matrix-normalized abundances of presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains estimated from their noble gas components show significant variations in even the most primitive chondrites (Huss and Lewis, 1995; Huss et al., 2003), in contradiction to there being a common chondrite matrix material. Here we report presolar SiC abundances determined by NanoSIMS raster ion imaging of IOM extracted from primitive members of different meteorite groups. We show that presolar SiC abundance determinations are comparable between NanoSIMS instruments located at three different institutes, between residues prepared by different demineralization techniques, and between microtomed and non-microtomed samples. Our derived SiC abundances in CR chondrites are comparable to those found in the CI chondrites (∼30 ppm) and are much higher than previously determined by noble gas analyses. The revised higher CR SiC abundances are consistent with the CRs being amongst the most primitive chondrites in terms of the isotopic compositions and disordered nature of their organic matter. Similar abundances between CR1, CR2, and CR3 chondrites indicate aqueous alteration on the CR chondrite parent body has not progressively destroyed SiC grains in them. A low SiC abundance for the reduced CV3 RBT 04133 can be explained by parent body thermal metamorphism at an estimated temperature of ∼440 °C. Minor differences between primitive members of other meteorite classes, which did not experience such high temperatures, may be explained by prolonged oxidation at lower temperatures under which SiC grains formed outer layers of SiO2 that were not thermodynamically stable, leading to progressive degassing/destruction of SiC.

  9. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined. Etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the WC and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation. The wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  10. Microstructures and properties of ceramic particle-reinforced metal matrix composite layers produced by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingmao; He, Jingjiang; Liu, Wenjin; Zhong, Minlin

    2005-01-01

    Different weight ratio of titanium, zirconium, WC and Fe-based alloy powders were mixed, and cladded onto a medium carbon steel substrate using a 3kW continuous wave CO2 laser, aiming at producing Ceramic particles- reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) layers. The microstructures of the layers are typical hypoeutectic, and the major phases are Ni3Si2, TiSi2, Fe3C, FeNi, MC, Fe7Mo3, Fe3B, γ(residual austenite) and M(martensite). The microstructure morphologies of MMCs layers are dendrites/cells. The MC-type reinforcements are in situ synthesis Carbides which main compositions consist of transition elements Zr, Ti, W. The MC-type particles distributed within dendrite and interdendritic regions with different volume fractions for single and overlapping clad layers. The MMCs layers are dense and free of cracks with a good metallurgical bonding between the layer and substrate. The addition ratio of WC in the mixtures has the remarkable effect on the microhardness of clad layers.

  11. The influence of solder mask and hygroscopic flux residues on water layer formation on PCBA surface and corrosion reliability of electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piotrowska, Kamila; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    was described in terms of their varying hygroscopicity defined by chemical structure and test temperature. The climatic testing of two acids was performed under relative humidity (RH) conditions varying from 30% to ~99% at 25˚C and 40˚C using gravimetric water vapour sorption/desorption and electrochemical...... impedance methods. The corrosivity of WOAs was evaluated via leakage current measurements using surface insulation resistance (SIR) comb patterns. The corrosion studies were correlated with the hygroscopicity studies. The results show that the water layer formation depends on the PCBA surface topography...

  12. Densification rate and interfacial adhesion of bilayer cemented tungsten carbide and steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojo-kupoluyi, Oluwatosin Job; Tahir, Suraya Mohd; Ariff, Azmah Hanim Mohamed; Baharudin, B.T. Hang Tuah [Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Dept. of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering; Matori, Khamirul Amin [Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Dept. of Physics; Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Inst. of Advanced Technology (ITMA); Shamsul Anuar, Mohd [Univ. Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia). Dept. of Process and Food Engineering

    2017-12-15

    Manufacturing tailored materials is commonly faced with the challenge of shrinkage mismatch between layers resulting in delamination. The effects of sintering temperature and carbon variation on the densification and interfacial bond strength of bilayer cemented tungsten carbide and steel processed through powder metallurgy are analyzed. It is revealed through field-emission scanning electron microscopy images that inter-layer diffusion induced by liquid-phase sintering plays a major role in the densification and bonding of layers. Through dimensional analysis of sintered bilayer specimens, the strain rate of cemented tungsten carbide is observed to surpass that of steel. An enhanced densification rate of 6.1 % and M{sub 6}C (eta carbide) reduction with increased carbon level results in strong interfacial bonding in specimens sintered at 1 280 C. At 1 295 C, diffusion accelerates and the axial and radial shrinkage increase by 14.05 % and 13.35 %, respectively, in 93.8 wt.% WC - 6 wt.% Fe - 0.2 wt.% C and 93.2 wt.% Fe - 6 wt.% WC - 0.8 wt.% C, thereby increasing the tendency for complete delamination.

  13. Densification rate and interfacial adhesion of bilayer cemented tungsten carbide and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo-kupoluyi, Oluwatosin Job; Tahir, Suraya Mohd; Ariff, Azmah Hanim Mohamed; Baharudin, B.T. Hang Tuah; Shamsul Anuar, Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Manufacturing tailored materials is commonly faced with the challenge of shrinkage mismatch between layers resulting in delamination. The effects of sintering temperature and carbon variation on the densification and interfacial bond strength of bilayer cemented tungsten carbide and steel processed through powder metallurgy are analyzed. It is revealed through field-emission scanning electron microscopy images that inter-layer diffusion induced by liquid-phase sintering plays a major role in the densification and bonding of layers. Through dimensional analysis of sintered bilayer specimens, the strain rate of cemented tungsten carbide is observed to surpass that of steel. An enhanced densification rate of 6.1 % and M 6 C (eta carbide) reduction with increased carbon level results in strong interfacial bonding in specimens sintered at 1 280 C. At 1 295 C, diffusion accelerates and the axial and radial shrinkage increase by 14.05 % and 13.35 %, respectively, in 93.8 wt.% WC - 6 wt.% Fe - 0.2 wt.% C and 93.2 wt.% Fe - 6 wt.% WC - 0.8 wt.% C, thereby increasing the tendency for complete delamination.

  14. The All Boron Carbide Diode Neutron Detector: Experiment and Modeling Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabirianov, Ildar F.; Brand, Jennifer I.; Fairchild, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Boron carbide diode detectors, fabricated from two different polytypes of semiconducting boron carbide, will detect neutrons in reasonable agreement with theoretical expectations. The performance of the all boron carbide neutron detector differs, as expected, from devices where a boron rich neutron capture layer is distinct from the diode charge collection region (i.e. a conversion layer solid state detector). Diodes were fabricated from natural abundance boron (20% 10 B and 80% 11 B.) directly on the metal substrates and metal contacts applied to the films as grown. The total boron depth was on the order of 2 microns. This is clearly not a conversion-layer configuration. The diodes were exposed to thermal neutrons generated from a paraffin moderated plutonium-beryllium source in moderated and un-moderated, as well as shielded and unshielded experimental configurations, where the expected energy peaks at at 2.31 MeV and 2.8 MeV were clearly observed, albeit with some incomplete charge collection typical of thinner diode structures. The results are compared with other boron based thin film detectors and literature models. (authors)

  15. Preparation of aluminum nitride-silicon carbide nanocomposite powder by the nitridation of aluminum silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itatani, K.; Tsukamoto, R.; Delsing, A.C.A.; Hintzen, H.T.J.M.; Okada, I.

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)-silicon carbide (SiC) nanocomposite powders were prepared by the nitridation of aluminum-silicon carbide (Al4SiC4) with the specific surface area of 15.5 m2·g-1. The powders nitrided at and above 1400°C for 3 h contained the 2H-phases which consisted of AlN-rich and SiC-rich

  16. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahotra, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The principal effect of unloading a material strained into the plastic range is to create a permanent set (plastic deformation), which if restricted somehow, gives rise to a system of self-balancing within the same member or reaction balanced by other members of the structure., known as residual stresses. These stresses stay there as locked-in stresses, in the body or a part of it in the absence of any external loading. Residual stresses are induced during hot-rolling and welding differential cooling, cold-forming and extruding: cold straightening and spot heating, fabrication and forced fitting of components constraining the structure to a particular geometry. The areas which cool more quickly develop residual compressive stresses, while the slower cooling areas develop residual tensile stresses, and a self-balancing or reaction balanced system of residual stresses is formed. The phenomenon of residual stresses is the most challenging in its application in surface modification techniques determining endurance mechanism against fracture and fatigue failures. This paper discusses the mechanism of residual stresses, that how the residual stresses are fanned and what their behavior is under the action of external forces. Such as in the case of a circular bar under limit torque, rectangular beam under limt moment, reclaiming of shafts welds and peening etc. (author)

  17. Surface/subsurface observation and removal mechanisms of ground reaction bonded silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang; Zhang, Yu-Min; Han, Jie-cai; Zhang, Yun-long; Zhang, Jian-han; Zhou, Yu-feng; Han, Yuan-yuan

    2006-01-01

    Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide (RBSiC) has long been recognized as a promising material for optical applications because of its unique combination of favorable properties and low-cost fabrication. Grinding of silicon carbide is difficult because of its high hardness and brittleness. Grinding often induces surface and subsurface damage, residual stress and other types of damage, which have great influence on the ceramic components for optical application. In this paper, surface integrity, subsurface damage and material removal mechanisms of RBSiC ground using diamond grinding wheel on creep-feed surface grinding machine are investigated. The surface and subsurface are studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. The effects of grinding conditions on surface and subsurface damage are discussed. This research links the surface roughness, surface and subsurface cracks to grinding parameters and provides valuable insights into the material removal mechanism and the dependence of grind induced damage on grinding conditions.

  18. Role of intericosahedral chains on the hardness of sputtered boron carbide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsohn, L.G.; Averitt, R.D.; Wetteland, C.J.; Schulze, R.K.; Nastasi, M.; Daemen, L.L.; Jenei, Z.; Asoka-Kumar, P.

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between the structure and mechanical properties of sputter-deposited boron carbide films was investigated. Changes in the structure induced by annealing were characterized in terms of chemical composition, chemical bonding, and concentrations of defects and trapped impurities. The creation of intericosahedral chains for higher annealing temperatures was revealed by infrared and Raman measurements, and the intensity of the infrared band at 1500 cm-1 was found to be related to the hardness. The presence of residual trapped Ar atoms and of open-volume defects is insensitive to relatively high annealing temperatures and does not influence the recovery of the hardness. Our results suggest postdeposition annealing as a pathway to enhance the mechanical properties of boron carbide films

  19. Growth and structure of carbide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieber, C.M.; Wong, E.W.; Dai, H.; Maynor, B.W.; Burns, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    Recent research on the growth and structure of carbide nanorods is reviewed. Carbide nanorods have been prepared by reacting carbon nanotubes with volatile transition metal and main group oxides and halides. Using this approach it has been possible to obtain solid carbide nanorods of TiC, SiC, NbC, Fe 3 C, and BC x having diameters between 2 and 30 nm and lengths up to 20 microm. Structural studies of single crystal TiC nanorods obtained through reactions of TiO with carbon nanotubes show that the nanorods grow along both [110] and [111] directions, and that the rods can exhibit either smooth or saw-tooth morphologies. Crystalline SiC nanorods have been produced from reactions of carbon nanotubes with SiO and Si-iodine reactants. The preferred growth direction of these nanorods is [111], although at low reaction temperatures rods with [100] growth axes are also observed. The growth mechanisms leading to these novel nanomaterials have also been addressed. Temperature dependent growth studies of TiC nanorods produced using a Ti-iodine reactant have provided definitive proof for a template or topotactic growth mechanism, and furthermore, have yielded new TiC nanotube materials. Investigations of the growth of SiC nanorods show that in some cases a catalytic mechanism may also be operable. Future research directions and applications of these new carbide nanorod materials are discussed

  20. Silicon Carbide Power Devices and Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Samsel, Isaak; LaBel, Ken; Chen, Yuan; Ikpe, Stanley; Wilcox, Ted; Phan, Anthony; Kim, Hak; Topper, Alyson

    2017-01-01

    An overview of the NASA NEPP Program Silicon Carbide Power Device subtask is given, including the current task roadmap, partnerships, and future plans. Included are the Agency-wide efforts to promote development of single-event effect hardened SiC power devices for space applications.

  1. Low temperature CVD deposition of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariel, M.; Yeheskel, J.; Agam, S.; Edelstein, D.; Lebovits, O.; Ron, Y.

    1991-04-01

    The coating of graphite on silicon carbide from the gaseous phase in a hot-well, open flow reactor at 1150degC is described. This study constitutes the first part of an investigation of the process for the coating of nuclear fuel by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

  2. Anomalous Seebeck coefficient in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aselage, T.L.; Emin, D.; Wood, C.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Howard, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Boron carbides exhibit an anomalously large Seebeck coefficient with a temperature coefficient that is characteristic of polaronic hopping between inequivalent sites. The inequivalence in the sites is associated with disorder in the solid. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for materials prepared by different techniques provides insight into the nature of the disorder

  3. Reaction of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.V.; Melekhin, V.F.; Pegov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation results of interaction in the B 4 C-MoSi 2 system during sintering in vacuum are presented. Sintering of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide is shown to lead to the formation of MoB 2 , SiC, Mo 5 Si 3 compounds, the presence of carbon-containing covering plays an important role in sintering

  4. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  5. Visible light emission from porous silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Lu, Weifang

    2017-01-01

    Light-emitting silicon carbide is emerging as an environment-friendly wavelength converter in the application of light-emitting diode based white light source for two main reasons. Firstly, SiC has very good thermal conductivity and therefore a good substrate for GaN growth in addition to the small...

  6. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Residual Smear Layer Following Preparation of Curved Root Canals Using Hand Instrumentation or Two Engine-Driven Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Abbasali; Saatchi, Masoud; Shokouhi, Mohammad Mehdi; Baghaei, Badri

    2015-01-01

    In this experimental study, the amount of smear layer (SL) remnants in curved root canals after chemomechanical instrumentation with two engine-driven systems or hand instrumentation was evaluated. Forty-eight mesiobuccal roots of mandibular first molars with curvatures ranging between 25 and 35 degrees (according to Schneider's method) were divided into three groups (n=16) which were prepared by either the ProTaper Universal file series, Reciproc single file system or hand instrumentation. The canals were intermittently irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl and 17% (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) EDTA, followed by distilled water as the final rinse. The roots were split longitudinally and the apical third of the specimens were evaluated under 2500× magnification with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mean scores of the SL were calculated and analyzed using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The mean scores of the SL were 2.00±0.73, 1.94±0.68 and 1.44±0.63 µm for the ProTaper Universal, Reciproc and hand instrumentation, respectively. Mean score of SL was significantly less in the hand instrumentation group than the ProTaper (P=0.027) and Reciproc (P=0.035) groups. The difference between the two engine-driven systems, however, was not significant (P=0.803). The amount of smear layer in the apical third of curved root canals prepared with both engine-driven systems was similar and greater than the hand instrumentation technique. Complete cleanliness was not attained.

  7. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.

    1978-01-01

    Residual stresses are stresses which exist in a material without the influence of external powers and moments. They come into existence when the volume of a material constantly changes its form as a consequence of mechanical, thermal, and/or chemical processes and is hindered by neighbouring volumes. Bodies with residual stress are in mechanical balance. These residual stresses can be manifested by means of all mechanical interventions disturbing this balance. Acoustical, optical, radiological, and magnetical methods involving material changes caused by residual stress can also serve for determining residual stress. Residual stresses have an ambivalent character. In technical practice, they are feared and liked at the same time. They cause trouble because they can be the cause for unexpected behaviour of construction elements. They are feared since they can cause failure, in the worst case with catastrophical consequences. They are appreciated, on the other hand, because, in many cases, they can contribute to improvements of the material behaviour under certain circumstances. But they are especially liked for their giving convenient and (this is most important) mostly uncontrollable explanations. For only in very few cases we have enough knowledge and possibilities for the objective evaluation of residual stresses. (orig.) [de

  8. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, H.

    2001-01-01

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report

  9. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. radulescu

    2001-09-28

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report.

  10. Tribological Characteristics of Tungsten Carbide Reinforced Arc Sprayed Coatings using Different Carbide Grain Size Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tillmann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide reinforced coatings play an important role in the field of surface engineering to protect stressed surfaces against wear. For thermally sprayed coatings, it is already shown that the tribological properties get mainly determined by the carbide grain size fraction. Within the scope of this study, the tribological characteristics of iron based WC-W2C reinforced arc sprayed coatings deposited using cored wires consisting of different carbide grain size fractions were examined. Microstructural characteristics of the produced coatings were scrutinized using electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses. Ball-on-disk test as well as Taber Abraser and dry sand rubber wheel test were employed to analyze both the dry sliding and the abrasive wear behavior. It was shown that a reduced carbide grain size fraction as filling leads to an enhanced wear resistance against sliding. In terms of the Taber Abraser test, it is also demonstrated that a fine carbide grain size fraction results in an improved wear resistant against abrasion. As opposed to that, a poorer wear resistance was found within the dry sand rubber wheel tests. The findings show that the operating mechanisms for both abrasion tests affect the stressed surface in a different way, leading either to microcutting or microploughing.

  11. Neutron irradiation damage in transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hisayuki; Nesaki, Kouji; Kiritani, Michio

    1991-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the physical properties of light transition metal carbides, TiC x , VC x and NbC x , were examined, emphasizing the characterization of irradiation induced defects in the nonstoichiometric composition. TiC x irradiated with 14 MeV (fusion) neutrons showed higher damage rates with increasing C/Ti (x) ratio. A brief discussion is made on 'cascade damage' in TiC x irradiated with fusion neutrons. Two other carbides (VC x and NbC x ) were irradiated with fission reactor neutrons. The irradiation effects on VC x were not so simple, because of the complex irradiation behavior of 'ordered' phases. For instance, complete disordering was revealed in an ordered phase, 'V 8 C 7 ', after an irradiation dose of 10 25 n/m 2 . (orig.)

  12. Seebeck effect of some thin film carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beensh-Marchwicka, G.; Prociow, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several materials have been investigated for high-temperature thin film thermocouple applications. These include silicon carbide with boron (Si-C-B), ternary composition based on Si-C-Mn, fourfold composition based on Si-C-Zr-B and tantalum carbide (TaC). All materials were deposited on quartz or glass substrates using the pulse sputter deposition technique. Electrical conduction and thermoelectric power were measured for various compositions at 300-550 K. It has been found, that the efficiency of thermoelectric power of films containing Si-C base composition was varied from 0.0015-0.034 μW/cmK 2 . However for TaC the value about 0.093 μW/cmK 2 was obtained. (author)

  13. METHOD FOR PRODUCING CEMENTED CARBIDE ARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstott, E.I.; Cremer, G.D.

    1959-07-14

    A method is described for making molded materials of intricate shape where the materials consist of mixtures of one or more hard metal carbides or oxides and matrix metals or binder metals thereof. In one embodiment of the invention 90% of finely comminuted tungsten carbide powder together with finely comminuted cobalt bonding agent is incorporated at 60 deg C into a slurry with methyl alcohol containing 1.5% paraffin, 3% camphor, 3.5% naphthalene, and 1.8% toluene. The compact is formed by the steps of placing the slurry in a mold at least one surface of which is porous to the fluid organic system, compacting the slurry, removing a portion of the mold from contact with the formed object and heating the formed object to remove the remaining organic matter and to sinter the compact.

  14. Radiation stability of proton irradiated zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Dickerson, Clayton A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for the deep burn (DB)-TRISO fuel as a replacement for the silicon carbide coating. The radiation stability of ZrC was studied using 2.6 MeV protons, across the irradiation temperature range from 600 to 900degC and to doses up to 1.75 dpa. The microstructural characterization shows that the irradiated microstructure is comprised of a high density of nanometer-sized dislocation loops, while no irradiation induced amorphization or voids are observed. The lattice expansion induced by point defects is found to increase as the dose increases for the samples irradiated at 600 and 800degC, while for the 900degC irradiation, a slight lattice contraction is observed. The radiation hardening is also quantified using a micro indentation technique for the temperature and doses studies. (author)

  15. Oxidation of boron carbide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrueck, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of various types of boron carbides (pellets, powder) were investigated in the temperature range between 1073 and 1873 K. Oxidation rates were measured in transient and isothermal tests by means of mass spectrometric gas analysis. Oxidation of boron carbide is controlled by the formation of superficial liquid boron oxide and its loss due to the reaction with surplus steam to volatile boric acids and/or direct evaporation at temperatures above 1770 K. The overall reaction kinetics is paralinear. Linear oxidation kinetics established soon after the initiation of oxidation under the test conditions described in this report. Oxidation is strongly influenced by the thermohydraulic boundary conditions and in particular by the steam partial pressure and flow rate. On the other hand, the microstructure of the B 4 C samples has a limited influence on oxidation. Very low amounts of methane were produced in these tests

  16. An improved method of preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of preparing silicon carbide is described which comprises forming a desired shape from a polysilane of the average formula:[(CH 3 ) 2 Si][CH 3 Si]. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent CH 3 Si units. The remaining bonds on the silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a halogen atom in such manner that the average ratio of halogen to silicon in the polysilane is from 0.3:1 to 1:1. The polysilane has a melt viscosity at 150 0 C of from 0.005 to 500 Pa.s and an intrinsic viscosity in toluene of from 0.0001 to 0.1. The shaped polysilane is heated in an inert atmosphere or in a vacuum to an elevated temperature until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. (author)

  17. Degradation of Silicon Carbide Reflective Surfaces in the LEO Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileti, Sandro; Coluzzi, Plinio; Marchetti, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Space mirrors in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) encounter a degradation problem caused by the impact of atomic oxygen (ATOX) in the space environment. This paper presents an experiment of the atomic oxygen impact degradation and UV synergic effects on ground simulation. The experiment was carried out in a dedicated ATOX simulation vacuum chamber. As target materials, a polished CVD Beta-silicon carbide (SiC) coating was investigated. The selection of silicon carbide is due to its high potential candidate as a mirror layer substrate material for its good reflectance at UV wavelengths and excellent thermal diffusivity. It has highly desirable mechanical and thermal properties and can achieve an excellent surface finish. The deposition of the coatings were on carbon-based material substrate; i.e., silicon impregnated carbon fiber composite (C/SiC). Mechanical and thermal properties of the coatings such as hardness and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) were achieved. Several atomic oxygen impact angles were studied tilting the target samples respect to the flux direction. The various impact angles permitted to analyze the different erosion rates and typologies which the mirrors would encounter in LEO environment. The degradation was analyzed in various aspects. Macroscopic mass loss per unit area, surface roughness and morphology change were basically analyzed. The exposed surfaces of the materials were observed through a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Secondly, optical diagnostic of the surfaces were performed in order to investigate their variation in optical properties as the evaluation of reflectance degradation. The presence of micro-cracks caused by shrinkage, grinding, polishing or thermal cycling and the porosity in the coatings, could have led to the undercutting phenomenon. Observation of uprising of undercutting was also conducted. Remarks are given regarding capabilities in short-term mission exposures to the LEO environment of this coating.

  18. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B 13 C 2 sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B 4 C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions

  19. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleghi, Evan; Lin, Yen-Shan; Meyers, Marc A.; Olevsky, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A tantalum carbide powder was consolidated by spark plasma sintering. The specimens were processed under various temperature and pressure conditions and characterized in terms of relative density, grain size, rupture strength and hardness. The results are compared to hot pressing conducted under similar settings. It is shown that high densification is accompanied by substantial grain growth. Carbon nanotubes were added to mitigate grain growth; however, while increasing specimens' rupture strength and final density, they had little effect on grain growth.

  20. HCl removal using cycled carbide slag from calcium looping cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xin; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Wenjing; Shi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cycled carbide slag from calcium looping cycles is used to remove HCl. • The optimum temperature for HCl removal of cycled carbide slag is 700 °C. • The presence of CO 2 restrains HCl removal of cycled carbide slag. • CO 2 capture conditions have important effects on HCl removal of cycled carbide slag. • HCl removal capacity of carbide slag drops with cycle number rising from 1 to 50. - Abstract: The carbide slag is an industrial waste from chlor-alkali plants, which can be used to capture CO 2 in the calcium looping cycles, i.e. carbonation/calcination cycles. In this work, the cycled carbide slag from the calcium looping cycles for CO 2 capture was proposed to remove HCl in the flue gas from the biomass-fired and RDFs-fired boilers. The effects of chlorination temperature, HCl concentration, particle size, presence of CO 2 , presence of O 2 , cycle number and CO 2 capture conditions in calcium looping cycles on the HCl removal behavior of the carbide slag experienced carbonation/calcination cycles were investigated in a triple fixed-bed reactor. The chlorination product of the cycled carbide slag from the calcium looping after absorbing HCl is not CaCl 2 but CaClOH. The optimum temperature for HCl removal of the cycled carbide slag from the carbonation/calcination cycles is 700 °C. The chlorination conversion of the cycled carbide slag increases with increasing the HCl concentration. The cycled carbide slag with larger particle size exhibits a lower chlorination conversion. The presence of CO 2 decreases the chlorination conversions of the cycled carbide slag and the presence of O 2 has a trifling impact. The chlorination conversion of the carbide slag experienced 1 carbonation/calcination cycle is higher than that of the uncycled calcined sorbent. As the number of carbonation/calcination cycles increases from 1 to 50, the chlorination conversion of carbide slag drops gradually. The high calcination temperature and high CO 2

  1. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  2. Electronic specific heat of transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, R.

    1964-07-01

    The experimental results that make it possible to define the band structure of transition metal carbides having an NaCI structure are still very few. We have measured the electronic specific heat of some of these carbides of varying electronic concentration (TiC, either stoichiometric or non-stoichiometric, TaC and mixed (Ti, Ta) - C). We give the main characteristics (metallography, resistivity, X-rays) of our samples and we describe the low temperature specific heat apparatus which has been built. In one of these we use helium as the exchange gas. The other is set up with a mechanical contact. The two use a germanium probe for thermometer. The measurement of the temperature using this probe is described, as well as the various measurement devices. The results are presented in the form of a rigid band model and show that the density of the states at the Fermi level has a minimum in the neighbourhood of the group IV carbides. (author) [fr

  3. Evolution of chemical conditions and estimated solubility controls on radionuclides in the residual waste layer during post-closure aging of high-level waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Millings, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2012-08-28

    in a flow and transport model were estimated for 27 elements in each of the chemical stages generated in the grout simulations plus local groundwater. The grout simulations were run with the initial infiltrating fluid in equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen to account for degradation of the reduction capacity of the grout. However, a lower Eh was used in pore fluids in the oxidizing conditions used to estimate solubilities to be more consistent with measured Eh values and natural systems. Solubilities of plutonium are affected by this decision, but those of other elements are not. In addition, the baseline for H-Area tanks is that they will be washed with oxalic acid prior to being filled with grout. Hence, oxalate was included in the pore fluids by assuming equilibrium with calcium oxalate. Solubility estimates were done by equilibrating a solubility controlling phase for each element with the pore fluid compositions using The Geochemist’s Workbench®. Condition B pore fluids are similar to Condition D. Therefore, solubilities for Condition B were not estimated, but assumed to be the same as in Condition D. In general solubility controlling phases were selected to bias solubilities to higher values. Several elements had no solubility controls and solubility estimates for other elements were omitted because the elements had short half-lives or were present in residual waste in very low amounts. For these it is recommended that release from the tank be instantaneous when the tank liner is breached. There is considerable uncertainty in this approach to enabling a flow and transport model to account for variable waste release. Yet, it is also flexible and requires much less computing time than a fully coupled reactive transport model. This allows some of the uncertainty to be addressed by multiple flow and transport sensitivity cases. Some of the uncertainties are addressed within this document. These include uncertainty in infiltrate composition, grout mineralogy, and

  4. Solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, E.; Duin, P.J. van; Grootenboer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A summary is presented of the many investigations that have been done on solid residues of atmospheric fluid bed combustion (AFBC). These residues are bed ash, cyclone ash and bag filter ash. Physical and chemical properties are discussed and then the various uses of residues (in fillers, bricks, gravel, and for recovery of aluminium) are summarised. Toxicological properties of fly ash and stack ash are discussed as are risks of pneumoconiosis for workers handling fly ash, and contamination of water by ashes. On the basis of present information it is concluded that risks to public health from exposure to emissions of coal fly ash from AFBC appear small or negligible as are health risk to workers in the coal fly ash processing industry. 35 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs

  5. Synthesis of IV-VI Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles Using a Reactive Mesoporous Template for Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-01-01

    content rather than nitride. In addition, the reactivity of the transition metals of group IV-VI with the reactive template was investigated under a flow of N2 at different temperatures in the range of 1023 to 1573 K while keeping the weight ratio constant at 1:1. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr reacted with mpg-C3N4 at 1023 K to form nitride phase with face centered cubic structure. The nitride phase destabilized at higher temperature ≥1223 K through the reaction with the remaining carbon residue originated from the decomposition of the template to form carbonitride and carbide phases. Whereas, Mo and W produce a hexagonal structure of carbide irrespective of the applying reaction temperature. The tendency to form transition metal nitrides and carbides at 1023 K was strongly driven by the free energy of formation. The observed trend indicates that the free energy of formation of nitride is relatively lower for group IV and V transition metals, whereas the carbide phase is thermodynamically more favorable for group VI, in particular for Mo and W. The thermal stability of nitride decreases at high temperature due to the evolution of nitrogen gas. The electrocatalytic activities of the produced nanoparticles were tested for hydrogen evolution reaction in acid media and the results demonstrated that molybdenum carbide nanoparticles exhibited the highest HER current with over potential of 100 mV vs. RHE, among the samples prepared in this study. This result is attributed to the sufficiently small particle size (8 nm on average) and accordingly high surface area (308 m2 g-1). Also, the graphitized carbon layer with a thickness of 1 nm on its surface formed by this synthesis provides excellent electron pathway to the catalyst which will improve the rate of electron transfer reaction.

  6. Microhardness and grain size of disordered nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatnikov, V.N.; Zueva, L.V.; Gusev, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    Effect of the disordered nonstoichiometric titanium carbide on its microhardness and grain size is studied. It is established that decrease in defectiveness of carbon sublattice of disordered carbide is accompanied by microhardness growth and decrease in grain size. Possible causes of the TiC y microhardness anomalous behaviour in the area 0.8 ≤ y ≤ 0.9 connected with plastic deformation mechanism conditioned by peculiarities of the electron-energetic spectrum of nonstoichiometric carbide are discussed [ru

  7. Fabrication of chamfered uranium-plutonium mixed carbide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yasuo; Iwai, Takashi; Shiozawa, Kenichi; Handa, Muneo

    1985-10-01

    Chamfered uranium-plutonium mixed carbide pellets for high burnup irradiation test in JMTR were fabricated in glove boxes with purified argon gas. The size of die and punch in a press was decided from pellet densities and dimensions including the angle of chamfered parts. No chip or crack caused by adopting chamfered pellets was found in both pressing and sintering stages. In addition to mixed carbide pellets, uranium carbide pellets used as insulators were also successfully fabricated. (author)

  8. Morphology of silicon carbide formed by chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pampuch, R.; Stobierski, L.

    1977-01-01

    Silicon carbide polycrystalline layers and particulate crystals were obtained in a modified van Arkel-de Boer apparatus on SiC-covered graphite and molybdenum susceptors. Gaseous SiCl 4 + CCl 4 + H 2 reactive mixtures with Si/C mole ratios varying between 0.9 and 1.4 and with Cl/Cl + H ratios varying between 2.10 -5 and 1.10 -3 were used. The morphology and structure of SiC products obtained at temperatures between 1400 and 1900 0 C and input gas flow rates between 5.10 -4 and 6.10 -2 moles per hour have been systematically investigated by scanning electronmicrographs, X-rays (using the Laue, Weissenberg, and rotation photographers), IR-spectra, and under the polarising microscope. The ranges of temperature and input gas flow rates in which the given habits and forms of the SiC products are formed have been assessed. The habits of the particulate crystals as function of temperature have been interpreted in terms of the existing theories of heterogeneous nucleation assuming layer growth of the crystals by two-dimensional nucleation. The influence of the composition of the gaseous mixtures upon the formation of the 2H polytype as well as the probable reasons for the common occurrence of stacking fault twins in the 3C polytype have been discussed. (author)

  9. Carbides in Nodular Cast Iron with Cr and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In these paper results of elements microsegregation in carbidic nodular cast iron have been presented. A cooling rate in the centre of the cross-section and on the surface of casting and change of moulding sand temperature during casting crystallization and its self-cooling have been investigated. TDA curves have been registered. The linear distribution of elements concentration in an eutectic grain, primary and secondary carbides have been made. It was found, that there are two kinds of carbides: Cr and Mo enriched. A probable composition of primary and secondary carbides have been presented.

  10. Silicon Carbide Corrugated Mirrors for Space Telescopes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trex Enterprises Corporation (Trex) proposes technology development to manufacture monolithic, lightweight silicon carbide corrugated mirrors (SCCM) suitable for...

  11. Fast heterogeneous N2O5 uptake and ClNO2 production in power plant and industrial plumes observed in the nocturnal residual layer over the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Weihao; Tham, Yee Jun; Li, Qinyi; Wang, Hao; Wen, Liang; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Tao

    2017-10-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) and nitryl chloride (ClNO2) are key species in nocturnal tropospheric chemistry and have significant effects on particulate nitrate formation and the following day's photochemistry through chlorine radical production and NOx recycling upon photolysis of ClNO2. To better understand the roles of N2O5 and ClNO2 in the high-aerosol-loading environment of northern China, an intensive field study was carried out at a high-altitude site (Mt. Tai, 1465 m a.s.l.) in the North China Plain (NCP) during the summer of 2014. Elevated ClNO2 plumes were frequently observed in the nocturnal residual layer with a maximum mixing ratio of 2.1 ppbv (1 min), whilst N2O5 was typically present at very low levels (coal-fired industry and power plants in the NCP. The heterogeneous N2O5 uptake coefficient (γ) and ClNO2 yield (ϕ) were estimated from steady-state analysis and observed growth rate of ClNO2. The derived γ and ϕ exhibited high variability, with means of 0.061 ± 0.025 and 0.28 ± 0.24, respectively. These values are higher than those derived from previous laboratory and field studies in other regions and cannot be well characterized by model parameterizations. Fast heterogeneous N2O5 reactions dominated the nocturnal NOx loss in the residual layer over this region and contributed to substantial nitrate formation of up to 17 µg m-3. The estimated nocturnal nitrate formation rates ranged from 0.2 to 4.8 µg m-3 h-1 in various plumes, with a mean of 2.2 ± 1.4 µg m-3 h-1. The results demonstrate the significance of heterogeneous N2O5 reactivity and chlorine activation in the NCP, and their unique and universal roles in fine aerosol formation and NOx transformation, and thus their potential impacts on regional haze pollution in northern China.

  12. On the use of Raman spectroscopy and instrumented indentation for characterizing damage in machined carbide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Benjamin Peter

    Machining is a necessary post-processing step in the manufacturing of many ceramic materials. Parts are machined to meet specific dimensions, with tight tolerances, not attainable from forming alone, as well as to achieve a desired surface finish. However, the machining process is very harsh, often employing the use of high temperatures and pressures to achieve the wanted result. In the case of silicon carbide, a material with extremely high hardness and stiffness, machining is very difficult and requires machining conditions that are highly aggressive. This can leave behind residual stresses in the surface of the material, cause unwanted phase transformations, and produce sub-surface deformation that can lead to failure. This thesis seeks to determine the effect of various machining conditions on the Raman spectra and elastic properties of sintered silicon carbide materials. Sample sets examined included hot-pressed silicon carbide tiles with four different surface finishes, as well as "ideal" single crystal silicon carbide wafers. The surface finishes studied were as follows: an as-pressed finish; a grit blast finish; a harsh rotary ground finish; and a mirror polish. Each finish imparts a different amount, as well as type, of deformation to the sample and are each utilized for a specific application. The sample surfaces were evaluated using a combination of Raman spectroscopy, for phase identification and stress analysis, and nanoindentation, for obtaining elastic properties and imparting uniform controlled deformation to the samples. Raman spectroscopy was performed over each sample surface using 514- and 633-nm wavelength excitation, along with confocal and non-confocal settings to study depth variation. Surfaces stresses were determined using peak shift information extracted from Raman spectra maps, while other spectral variations were used to compare levels of machining damage. Elastic modulus, hardness, and plastic work of indentation maps were generated

  13. Characterization of Nanometric-Sized Carbides Formed During Tempering of Carbide-Steel Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matus K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article of this paper is to present issues related to characterization of nanometric-sized carbides, nitrides and/or carbonitrides formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. Closer examination of those materials is important because of hardness growth of carbide-steel cermet after tempering. The results obtained during research show that the upswing of hardness is significantly higher than for high-speed steels. Another interesting fact is the displacement of secondary hardness effect observed for this material to a higher tempering temperature range. Determined influence of the atmosphere in the sintering process on precipitations formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. So far examination of carbidesteel cermet produced by powder injection moulding was carried out mainly in the scanning electron microscope. A proper description of nanosized particles is both important and difficult as achievements of nanoscience and nanotechnology confirm the significant influence of nanocrystalline particles on material properties even if its mass fraction is undetectable by standard methods. The following research studies have been carried out using transmission electron microscopy, mainly selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The obtained results and computer simulations comparison were made.

  14. Reactor irradiation effect on the physical-mechanical properties of zirconium carbides and niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrievskij, R.A.; Vlasov, K.P.; Shevchenko, A.S.; Lanin, A.G.; Pritchin, S.A.; Klyushin, V.V.; Kurushin, S.P.; Maskaev, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of the reactor radiation by a flux of neutrons 1.5x10 20 n/cm 2 (E>=1 meV) at radiation temperatures of 150 and 1100 deg C on the physico-mechanical properties of carbides of zirconium and niobium and their equimolar hard solution. A difference has been discovered in the behaviour of the indicated carbides under the effect of radiation. Under the investigated conditions of radiation the density of zirconium carbide is being decreased, while in the niobium carbide no actual volumetric changes occur. The increase of the lattice period in ZrC is more significant than in NbC. The electric resistance of ZrC is also changed more significantly than in the case of NbC, while for the microhardness a reverse relationship is observed. Strength and elasticity modulus change insignificantly in both cases. Resistance to crack formation shows a higher reduction for ZrC than for NbC, while the thermal strength shows an approximately similar increase. The equimolar hard solution of ZrC and NbC behaves to great extent similar to ZrC, although the change in electric resistance reminds of NbC while thermal strength changes differently. The study of the microstructure of the specimens has shown that radiation causes a large number of etching patterns-dislocations in NbC which are almost absent in ZrC

  15. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  16. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandergraaf, T. T.; Wikjord, A. G.

    1973-10-15

    Instrumentel neutron activation analysis was used to determine trace constituents in silicon carbide. Four commercial powders of different origin, an NBS reference material, and a single crystal were characterized. A total of 36 activation species were identified nondestructively by high resolution gamma spectrometry; quantitative results are given for 12 of the more predominant elements. The limitations of the method for certain elements are discussed. Consideration is given to the depression of the neutron flux by impurities with large neutron absorption cross sections. Radiation fields from the various specimens were estimated assuming all radionuclides have reached their saturation activities. (auth)

  17. Crack propagation and fracture in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.G.; Lange, F.F.

    1975-01-01

    Fracture mechanics and strength studies performed on two silicon carbides - a hot-pressed material (with alumina) and a sintered material (with boron) - have shown that both materials exhibit slow crack growth at room temperature in water, but only the hot-pressed material exhibits significant high temperature slow crack growth (1000 to 1400 0 C). A good correlation of the observed fracture behaviour with the crack growth predicted from the fracture mechanics parameters shows that effective failure predictions for this material can be achieved using macro-fracture mechanics data. (author)

  18. An improved method for preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A desired shape is formed from a polysilane and the shape is heated in an inert atmosphere or under vacuum to 1150 to 1600 0 C until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent of (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent of CH 3 Si units. The remaining bonds on silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a chlorine or bromine atom, such that the polysilane contains from 10 to 43 weight percent of hydrolyzable chlorine or from 21 to 63 weight percent of hydrolyzable bromine. (author)

  19. Hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, W.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds of metals with non-metals such as C, N, and B show different hardness. Wagner's interaction parameter characterizes manner and extent of the interaction between the atoms of the substance dissolved and the additional elements in metallic mixed phases. An attempt has been made to correlate the hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides (data taken from literature) with certain interaction parameters and associated thermodynamic quantities (ΔH, ΔG). For some metals of periods 4, 5, and 6 corresponding relations were found between microhardness, interaction parameters, heat of formation, and atomic number

  20. Room-temperature Electrochemical Synthesis of Carbide-derived Carbons and Related Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotsi, Yury [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Nanomaterials Group. Materials Science and Engineering Dept.

    2015-02-28

    This project addresses room-temperature electrochemical etching as an energy-efficient route to synthesis of 3D nanoporous carbon networks and layered 2D carbons and related structures, as well as provides fundamental understanding of structure and properties of materials produced by this method. Carbide-derived-carbons (CDCs) are a growing class of nanostructured carbon materials with properties that are desirable for many applications, such as electrical energy and gas storage. The structure of these functional materials is tunable by the choice of the starting carbide precursor, synthesis method, and process parameters. Moving from high-temperature synthesis of CDCs through vacuum decomposition above 1400°C and chlorination above 400°C, our studies under the previous DOE BES support led to identification of precursor materials and processing conditions for CDC synthesis at temperatures as low as 200°C, resulting in amorphous and highly reactive porous carbons. We also investigated synthesis of monolithic CDC films from carbide films at 250-1200°C. The results of our early studies provided new insights into CDC formation, led to development of materials for capacitive energy storage, and enabled fundamental understanding of the electrolyte ions confinement in nanoporous carbons.

  1. Diffusion mechanism in molten salt baths during the production of carbide coatings via thermal reactive diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aliakbar Ghadi; Hassan Saghafian; Mansour Soltanieh; Zhi-gang Yang

    2017-01-01

    The diffusion mechanism of carbide-forming elements from a molten salt bath to a substrate surface was studied in this research, with particular focus on the processes occurring in the molten bath at the time of coating. Metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths were investi-gated, and the coating process was performed on H13 steel substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and electron-probe microanalysis were used to study the coated samples and the quenched salt bath. The thickness of the carbide coating layer was 6.5 ± 0.5, 5.2 ± 0.5, or 5.7 ± 0.5μm depending on whether it was deposited in a metal, oxide, or metal-oxide bath, respectively. The phase distribution of vanadium-rich regions was 63%, 57%, and 74% of the total coating deposited in metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths, respectively. The results obtained using the metal bath indicated that undissolved suspended metal particles deposited onto the substrate surface. Then, carbon subsequently diffused to the sub-strate surface and reacted with the metal particles to form the carbides. In the oxide bath, oxide powders dissolved in the bath with or without binding to the oxidative structure (Na2O) of borax; they were then reduced by aluminum and converted into metal particles. We concluded that, in the metal and oxide baths, the deposition of metal particles onto the sample surface is an important step in the formation of the coating.

  2. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation; Dopage du carbure de silicium par implantation ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimbert, J

    1999-03-04

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  3. High temperature corrosion of silicon carbide and silicon nitride in the presence of chloride compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNallan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride are resistant to oxidation because a protective silicon dioxide films on their surfaces in most oxidizing environments. Chloride compounds can attack the surface in two ways: 1) chlorine can attack the silicon directly to form a volatile silicon chloride compound or 2) alkali compounds combined with the chlorine can be transported to the surface where they flux the silica layer by forming stable alkali silicates. Alkali halides have enough vapor pressure that a sufficient quantity of alkali species to cause accelerated corrosion can be transported to the ceramic surface without the formation of a chloride deposit. When silicon carbide is attacked simultaneously by chlorine and oxygen, the corrosion products include both volatile and condensed spices. Silicon nitride is much more resistance to this type of attack than silicon carbide. Silicon based ceramics are exposed to oxidizing gases in the presence of alkali chloride vapors, the rate of corrosion is controlled primarily by the driving force for the formation of alkali silicate, which can be quantified as the activity of the alkali oxide in equilibrium with the corrosive gas mixture. In a gas mixture containing a fixed partial pressure of KCl, the rate of corrosion is accelerated by increasing the concentration of water vapor and inhibited by increasing the concentration of HCl. Similar results have been obtained for mixtures containing other alkalis and halogens. (Orig./A.B.)

  4. Boron carbide-coated carbon material, manufacturing method therefor and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Hyakki, Yasuo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plasma facing material suitable to a thermonuclear device. The material comprises a carbon material formed by converting the surface of a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material comprising a carbon matrix and carbon fibers to a boron carbide, the material has a surface comprising vertically or substantially vertically oriented carbon fibers, and the thickness of the surface converted to boron carbide is reduced in the carbon fiber portion than in the carbon matrix portion. Alternatively, a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material containing carbon fibers having a higher graphitizing degree than the carbon matrix is converted to boron carbide on the surface where the carbon fibers are oriented vertically or substantially vertically. The carbon fiber-reinforced material is used as a base material, and a resin material impregnated into a shaped carbon fiber product is carbonized or thermally decomposed carbon is filled as a matrix. The material of the present invention has high heat conduction and excellent in heat resistance thereby being suitable to a plasma facing material for a thermonuclear device. Electric specific resistivity of the entire coating layer can be lowered, occurrence of arc discharge is prevented and melting can be prevented. (N.H.)

  5. The chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide onto ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass A, John Jr.; Palmisiano, Nick Jr.; Welsh R, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Zirconium carbide is an attractive ceramic material due to its unique properties such as high melting point, good thermal conductivity, and chemical resistance. The controlled preparation of zirconium carbide films of superstoichiometric, stoichiometric, and substoichiometric compositions has been achieved utilizing zirconium tetrachloride and methane precursor gases in an atmospheric pressure high temperature chemical vapor deposition system

  6. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents a preliminary study on obtaining and characterization of phenolic resin-based com- posites modified with nanometric silicon carbide. The nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating nanometric silicon carbide (nSiC) into phenolic resin at 0.5, 1 and 2 wt% contents using ultrasonication to ...

  7. Determination of free and combined carbon in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankaran, P.S.; Kulkarni, Amit S.; Pandey, K.L.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Yadav, C.S.; Sayi, Y.S.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and fast method for the determination of free and combined carbon in boron carbide samples, based on combustion in presence of oxygen at different temperatures, has been developed. Method has been standardized by analyzing mixture of two different boron carbide samples. Error associated with the method in the determination of free carbon is less than 5%. (author)

  8. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature.

  9. Process for the preparation of fine grain metal carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gortsema, F.P.

    1976-01-01

    Fine grain metal carbide powders are conveniently prepared from the corresponding metal oxide by heating in an atmosphere of methane in hydrogen. Sintered articles having a density approaching the theoretical density of the metal carbide itself can be fabricated from the powders by cold pressing, hot pressing or other techniques. 8 claims, no drawings

  10. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    the stabilization of soil will ensure economy in road construction, while providing an effective way of disposing calcium carbide waste. KEYWORDS: Cement, Calcium carbide waste, Stabilization, Ikpayongo laterite, Pavement material. INTRODUCTION. Road building in the developing nations has been a major challenge to ...

  11. Ternary carbide uranium fuels for advanced reactor design applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-01

    Solid-solution mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides such as the pseudo-ternary carbide, (U, Zr, Nb)C, hold significant promise for advanced reactor design applications because of their high thermal conductivity and high melting point (typically greater than 3200 K). Additionally, because of their thermochemical stability in a hot-hydrogen environment, pseudo-ternary carbides have been investigated for potential space nuclear power and propulsion applications. However, their stability with regard to sodium and improved resistance to attack by water over uranium carbide portends their usefulness as a fuel for advanced terrestrial reactors. An investigation into processing techniques was conducted in order to produce a series of (U, Zr, Nb)C samples for characterization and testing. Samples with densities ranging from 91% to 95% of theoretical density were produced by cold pressing and sintering the mixed constituent carbides at temperatures as high as 2650 K. (author)

  12. Thermal shock behaviour of mullite-bonded porous silicon carbide ceramics with yttria addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Shuqiang; Zeng Yuping; Jiang Dongliang

    2007-01-01

    Thermal shock resistance of mullite (3Al 2 O 3 · 2SiO 2 )-bonded porous silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics with 3.0 wt% yttria (Y 2 O 3 ) addition was evaluated by a water-quenching technique. The thermal shock damage was investigated as a function of the quenching temperature, quenching cycles and specimen thickness. The residual flexural strength of the quenched specimens decreases with increasing quenching temperature and specimen thickness due to the larger thermal stress caused by thermal shock. However, quenching cycles at the temperature difference of 1200 deg. C have no effect on the residual strength since the same thermal stress was produced in repeated thermal shock processes. The good thermal shock damage resistance of the specimens is contributed mainly by the low strength and moderate elastic modulus. Moreover, the pores prevent the continuous propagation of cracks and alleviate further damage

  13. Carbide-forming groups IVB-VIB metals: a new territory in the periodic table for CVD growth of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhiyu; Fu, Lei; Song, Xiuju; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2014-07-09

    Early transition metals, especially groups IVB-VIB metals, can form stable carbides, which are known to exhibit excellent "noble-metal-like" catalytic activities. We demonstrate herein the applications of groups IVB-VIB metals in graphene growth using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique. Similar to the extensively studied Cu, Ni, and noble metals, these transition-metal foils facilitate the catalytic growth of single- to few-layer graphene. The most attractive advantage over the existing catalysts is their perfect control of layer thickness and uniformity with highly flexible experimental conditions by in situ converting the dissolved carbons into stable carbides to fully suppress the upward segregation/precipitation effect. The growth performance of graphene on these transition metals can be well explained by the periodic physicochemical properties of elements. Our work has disclosed a new territory of catalysts in the periodic table for graphene growth and is expected to trigger more interest in graphene research.

  14. An experimental study of flank wear in the end milling of AISI 316 stainless steel with coated carbide inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odedeyi, P. B.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.; Liman, M.

    2017-05-01

    Stainless steel 316 is a difficult-to-machine iron-based alloys that contain minimum of about 12% of chromium commonly used in marine and aerospace industry. This paper presents an experimental study of the tool wear propagation variations in the end milling of stainless steel 316 with coated carbide inserts. The milling tests were conducted at three different cutting speeds while feed rate and depth of cut were at (0.02, 0.06 and 01) mm/rev and (1, 2 and 3) mm, respectively. The cutting tool used was TiAlN-PVD-multi-layered coated carbides. The effects of cutting speed, cutting tool coating top layer and workpiece material were investigated on the tool life. The results showed that cutting speed significantly affected the machined flank wears values. With increasing cutting speed, the flank wear values decreased. The experimental results showed that significant flank wear was the major and predominant failure mode affecting the tool life.

  15. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A., E-mail: catledge@uab.edu

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A detailed phase analysis after PECVD boriding shows WCoB, CoB and/or W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2}. • EDS of PECVD borides shows boron diffusion into the carbide grain structure. • Nanoindentation hardness and modulus of borides is 23–27 GPa and 600–780 GPa. • Scratch testing shows hard coating with cracking at 40N and spallation at 70N. - Abstract: Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2} with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600–730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  16. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A detailed phase analysis after PECVD boriding shows WCoB, CoB and/or W_2CoB_2. • EDS of PECVD borides shows boron diffusion into the carbide grain structure. • Nanoindentation hardness and modulus of borides is 23–27 GPa and 600–780 GPa. • Scratch testing shows hard coating with cracking at 40N and spallation at 70N. - Abstract: Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W_2CoB_2 with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600–730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  17. Method for fabricating boron carbide articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardary, Z.; Reynolds, C.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for fabricating an essentially uniformly dense boron carbide article of a length-to-diameter or width ratio greater than 2 to 1 comprising the steps of providing a plurality of article segments to be joined together to form the article with each of said article segments having a length-to-diameter or width ratio less than 1.5 to 1. Each segment is fabricated by hot pressing a composition consisting of boron carbide powder at a pressure and temperature effective to provide the article segment with a density greater than about 85% of theoretical density, providing each article segment with parallel planar end surfaces, placing a plurality of said article segments in a hot-pressing die in a line with the planar surfaces of adjacent article segments being disposed in intimate contact, and hot pressing the aligned article segments at a temperature and pressure effective to provide said article with a density over the length thereof in the range of about 94 to 98 percent theoretical density and greater than the density provided in the discrete hot pressing of each of the article segments and to provide a bond between adjacent article segments with said bond being at least equivalent in hardness, strength and density to a remainder of said article

  18. Carbon potential measurement on some actinide carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthonysamy, S.; Ananthasivan, K.; Kaliappan, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Mathews, C.K.; Jacob, K.T.

    1994-01-01

    Uranium-Plutonium mixed carbides with a Pu/(U+Pu) ratio of 0.55 are to be used as the fuel in the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam, India. Carburization of the stainless steel clad by this fuel is determined by its carbon potential. Because the carbon potential of this fuel composition is not available in the literature, it was measured by the methane-hydrogen gas equilibration technique. The sample was equilibrated with purified hydrogen and the equilibrium methane-to-hydrogen ratio in the gas phase was measured with a flame ionization detector. The carbon potential of the ThC-ThC 2 as well as Mo-Mo 2 C system, which is an important binary in the actinide-fission product-carbon systems, were also measured by this technique in the temperature range 973 to 1,173 K. The data for the Mo-Mo 2 C system are in agreement with values reported in the literature. The results for the ThC-ThC 2 system are different from estimated values with large uncertainty limits given in the literature. The data on (U, Pu) mixed carbides indicates the possibility of stainless steel clad attack under isothermal equilibrium conditions

  19. Development of silicon carbide composites for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    The use of silicon carbide composites for structural materials is of growing interest in the fusion community. However, radiation effects in these materials are virtually unexplored, and the general state of ceramic matrix composites for nonnuclear applications is still in its infancy. Research into the radiation response of the most popular silicon carbide composite, namely, the chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC-carbon-Nicalon fiber system is discussed. Three areas of interest are the stability of the fiber and matrix materials, the stability of the fiber-matrix interface, and the true activation of these open-quotes reduced activityclose quotes materials. Two methods are presented that quantitatively measure the effect of radiation on fiber and matrix elastic modulus as well as the fiber-matrix interfacial strength. The results of these studies show that the factor limiting the radiation performance of the CVD SiC-carbon-Nicalon system is degradation of the Nicalon fiber, which leads to a weakened carbon interface. The activity of these composites is significantly higher than expected and is dominated by impurity isotopes. 52 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of tantalum on graphite cloth for making hot pressed fiber reinforced carbide-graphite composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Davidson, K.V.; Radosevich, C.L.; Riley, R.E.; Wallace, T.C.

    1977-01-01

    Conditions for the CVD of a uniform coating of Ta on fibers of a woven graphite cloth were established. The effect of gas composition, pressure, and temperature were investigated, and the conditions that gave the desired results are presented. Several layers of the coated cloth were hot pressed to produce a TaC--C composite having uniformly dispersed, fine-grained TaC in graphite. Three compositions were hot pressed: 15, 25, and 40 volume percent carbide. 8 figures, 2 tables

  1. A Computational-Experimental Study of Plasma Processing of Carbides at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, Arturo [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States); Kumar, Vinod [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The effects of plasma on carbides were computationally investigated for the ultimate development of adherent, dense scales such as Al2O3-TiO2 systems toward oxidation resistance at 1873 K. An alumina scale forms on the carbide because of the significant stability of Al2O3 as the outer scale adjacent to the gas phase compared to rutile, though TiO and Ti2O3 may form as components of an inner layer of a complicated scale. A sequence of surface reactions starting with the adsorption of oxygen on the surface was applied to experimental data from Donnelly’s research group who reported the adsorption of O2 in a plasma atmosphere as a function of power. In addition to the adsorbed oxygen (Oad) as the rate determining step, it controlled the cascading reaction sequence of the adsorbed species of AlO, AlO2 and AlO3, as indicated in the present study. The rate of oxygen adsorption also depends on the ratio of the final to initial adsorbed oxygen as a function the oxygen potential. In a secondary research thrust, Ti3AlC was synthesized and subsequently oxidized. A 39Ti-14Al-47TiC (in wt%) mixture was equilibrated by using a pseudo-isopiestic technique to form ultimately an aggregate of Ti3AlC, Ti2AlC and TiC phases. The aggregate was primarily composed of Ti3AlC with minor amounts of Ti2AlC and TiC, as determined by an X-ray diffraction analysis. The Ti3AlC/Ti2AlC/TiC aggregate was subsequently oxidized at 1873 K to form a scale composed of an outer layer of Al2O3-TiO2-Al2TiO5 with an inner layer consisting of TiO-Al2O3- Al4CO3. The measured scale thickness grew according to Wagner’s parabolic growth rate, which estimates an effective diffusion coefficient of 6 (10)-8 cm2/s. The scale

  2. Modification of the surface of metal products with carbide coatings by electrospark alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshuro, Vladimir A.; Fomina, Marina A.; Fomin, Aleksandr A.

    2018-04-01

    Electrospark alloying (ESA) technology has existed for a long time (since the middle of the 20th century) but its potential has not been exhausted yet. In the present paper it is proposed to increase the mechanical properties of steel and titanium products by doping with a hard carbide alloy based on "WC-TiC-Co" system. As a result, the hardness of coatings obtained by ESA reaches at least 18-22 GPa with a layer thickness of up to 0.5 mm. The proposed solution can improve the functional qualities of various friction surfaces that are used in engineering, as well as in friction elements.

  3. Dual ohmic contact to N- and P-type silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous formation of electrical ohmic contacts to silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor having donor and acceptor impurities (n- and p-type doping, respectively) is disclosed. The innovation provides for ohmic contacts formed on SiC layers having n- and p-doping at one process step during the fabrication of the semiconductor device. Further, the innovation provides a non-discriminatory, universal ohmic contact to both n- and p-type SiC, enhancing reliability of the specific contact resistivity when operated at temperatures in excess of 600.degree. C.

  4. Molybdenum carbide coating electrodeposited from molten fluoride bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topor, D.C.; Selman, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Molybdenum carbide has been recently considered as a candidate material for the protection of common steel-based substrates in high-temperature high-sulfur activity applications. Methods to produce coatings of materials such as Mo/sub 2/C are scarce and only the electrodeposition from molten salts can yield dense, pore-free layers on various metallic profiles. Recently Stern reported the deposition of a Mo/sub 2/C coating on nickel substrate form, FLINAK + K/sub 2/MoCl/sub 6/ + Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ mixture at 850 0 C. Electrodeposition of Mo/sub 2/C on a cathode surface proceeds according to a rather complicated mechanism which may involve simultaneous reduction of carbonate to C, of molybdate to Mo and a subsequent chemical reaction between both species. The deposit grows further as a coherent coating. Reduction of CO/sub 2/ or carbonate to carbon in a fused salt medium could follow different paths but Li/sup +/ ions or other highly polarizing ions must be present. A similar situation in which a polyatomic anion discharges at the cathode is encountered when molybdates are used as source of molybdenum. In fluoride melts the chemistry of Mo(VI) species is considered to be much simpler due to the hard fluoride ions. These ions form strong complexes with molybdenum and the resulting solution is more stable

  5. 2D metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) for energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-01-01

    The family of 2D transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (collectively referred to as MXenes) has expanded rapidly since the discovery of Ti3C2 in 2011. The materials reported so far always have surface terminations, such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine, which impart hydrophilicity to their surfaces. About 20 different MXenes have been synthesized, and the structures and properties of dozens more have been theoretically predicted. The availability of solid solutions, the control of surface terminations and a recent discovery of multi-transition-metal layered MXenes offer the potential for synthesis of many new structures. The versatile chemistry of MXenes allows the tuning of properties for applications including energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, reinforcement for composites, water purification, gas- and biosensors, lubrication, and photo-, electro- and chemical catalysis. Attractive electronic, optical, plasmonic and thermoelectric properties have also been shown. In this Review, we present the synthesis, structure and properties of MXenes, as well as their energy storage and related applications, and an outlook for future research.

  6. Electronic properties of epitaxial 6H silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessels, B.W.; Gatos, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    The electrical conductivity and Hall coefficient were measured in the temperature range from 78 to 900 K for n-type epitaxially grown 6H silicon carbide. A many-valley model of the conduction band was used in the analysis of electron concentration as a function of temperature. From this analysis, the density of states mass to the free electron mass ratio per ellipsoid was calculated to be 0.45. It was estimated that the constant energy surface of the conduction band consists of three ellipsoids. The ionization energy of the shallowest nitrogen donor was found to be 105 meV, when the valley-orbit interaction was taken into account. The electron scattering mechanisms in the epitaxial layers were analyzed and it was shown that the dominant mechanism limiting electron mobility at high temperatures is inter-valley scattering and at low temperatures (200K), impurity and space charge scattering. A value of 360 cm 2 /V sec was calculated for the maximum room temperature Hall mobility expected for electrons in pure 6H SiC. The effect of epitaxial growth temperature on room temperature Hall mobility was also investigated. (author)

  7. 2D metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) for energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Anasori, Babak

    2017-01-17

    The family of 2D transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (collectively referred to as MXenes) has expanded rapidly since the discovery of Ti3C2 in 2011. The materials reported so far always have surface terminations, such as hydroxyl, oxygen or fluorine, which impart hydrophilicity to their surfaces. About 20 different MXenes have been synthesized, and the structures and properties of dozens more have been theoretically predicted. The availability of solid solutions, the control of surface terminations and a recent discovery of multi-transition-metal layered MXenes offer the potential for synthesis of many new structures. The versatile chemistry of MXenes allows the tuning of properties for applications including energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, reinforcement for composites, water purification, gas- and biosensors, lubrication, and photo-, electro- and chemical catalysis. Attractive electronic, optical, plasmonic and thermoelectric properties have also been shown. In this Review, we present the synthesis, structure and properties of MXenes, as well as their energy storage and related applications, and an outlook for future research.

  8. Electronic properties of intrinsic and doped amorphous silicon carbide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, M.; Voz, C.; Ferre, R.; Martin, I.; Orpella, A.; Puigdollers, J.; Andreu, J.; Alcubilla, R.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC x : H) films have shown excellent surface passivation of crystalline silicon. With the aim of large area deposition of these films the influence of the rf plasma power was investigated. It is found that homogenous deposition with effective surface recombination velocity lower than 100 cms -1 is possible up to 6'' diameter in a simple parallel plate reactor by optimizing deposition parameters. For application in solar cell processes the conductivity of these a-SiC x : H films might become of importance since good surface passivation results from field-effect passivation which needs an insulating dielectric layer. Therefore, the temperature dependence of the dark dc conductivity of these films was investigated in the temperature range from - 20 to 260 deg. C. Two transition temperatures, T s ∼80 deg. C and T s ∼170 deg. C, were found where conductivity increases, resp. decreases over-exponential. From Arrhenius plots activation energy (E a ) and conductivity pre-factor (σ 0 ) were calculated for a large number of samples with different composition. A correlation between E a and σ 0 was found giving a Meyer-Neldel relation with a slope of 59 mV, corresponding to a material characteristic temperature T m = 400 deg. C, and an intercept at σ 00 = 0.1 Ω -1 cm -1

  9. Silicon carbide transparent chips for compact atomic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, L.; Ammar, M.; Morvan, E.; Sarazin, N.; Pocholle, J.-P.; Reichel, J.; Guerlin, C.; Schwartz, S.

    2017-11-01

    Atom chips [1] are an efficient tool for trapping, cooling and manipulating cold atoms, which could open the way to a new generation of compact atomic sensors addressing space applications. This is in particular due to the fact that they can achieve strong magnetic field gradients near the chip surface, hence strong atomic confinement at moderate electrical power. However, this advantage usually comes at the price of reducing the optical access to the atoms, which are confined very close to the chip surface. We will report at the conference experimental investigations showing how these limits could be pushed farther by using an atom chip made of a gold microcircuit deposited on a single-crystal Silicon Carbide (SiC) substrate [2]. With a band gap energy value of about 3.2 eV at room temperature, the latter material is transparent at 780nm, potentially restoring quasi full optical access to the atoms. Moreover, it combines a very high electrical resistivity with a very high thermal conductivity, making it a good candidate for supporting wires with large currents without the need of any additional electrical insulation layer [3].

  10. Solid phase epitaxy of amorphous silicon carbide: Ion fluence dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, I.-T.; Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of radiation damage and impurity concentration on solid phase epitaxial growth of amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) as well as microstructures of recrystallized layer using transmission electron microscopy. Single crystals of 6H-SiC with (0001) orientation were irradiated with 150 keV Xe ions to fluences of 10 15 and 10 16 /cm 2 , followed by annealing at 890 deg. C. Full epitaxial recrystallization took place in a specimen implanted with 10 15 Xe ions, while retardation of recrystallization was observed in a specimen implanted with 10 16 /cm 2 Xe ions. Atomic pair-distribution function analyses and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results suggested that the retardation of recrystallization of the 10 16 Xe/cm 2 implanted sample is attributed to the difference in amorphous structures between the 10 15 and 10 16 Xe/cm 2 implanted samples, i.e., more chemically disordered atomistic structure and higher Xe impurity concentration in the 10 16 Xe/cm 2 implanted sample

  11. Effect of bond coat and preheat on the microstructure, hardness, and porosity of flame sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto, Winarto; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Rooscote, Didi

    2017-06-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are used to improve the surface properties of tool steel materials. Bond coatings are commonly used as intermediate layers deposited on steel substrates (i.e. H13 tool steel) before the top coat is applied in order to enhance a number of critical performance criteria including adhesion of a barrier coating, limiting atomic migration of the base metal, and corrosion resistance. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the effect of nickel bond coat and preheats temperatures (i.e. 200°C, 300°C and 400°C) on microstructure, hardness, and porosity of tungsten carbide coatings sprayed by flame thermal coating. Micro-hardness, porosity and microstructure of tungsten carbide coatings are evaluated by using micro-hardness testing, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results show that nickel bond coatings reduce the susceptibility of micro crack formation at the bonding area interfaces. The percentage of porosity level on the tungsten carbide coatings with nickel bond coat decreases from 5.36 % to 2.78% with the increase of preheat temperature of the steel substrate of H13 from 200°C to 400°C. The optimum hardness of tungsten carbide coatings is 1717 HVN in average resulted from the preheat temperature of 300°C.

  12. Effects of heat treatment on the microstructure of amorphous boron carbide coating deposited on graphite substrates by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Siwei; Zeng Bin; Feng Zude; Liu Yongsheng; Yang Wenbin; Cheng Laifei; Zhang Litong

    2010-01-01

    A two-layer boron carbide coating is deposited on a graphite substrate by chemical vapor deposition from a CH 4 /BCl 3 /H 2 precursor mixture at a low temperature of 950 o C and a reduced pressure of 10 KPa. Coated substrates are annealed at 1600 o C, 1700 o C, 1800 o C, 1900 o C and 2000 o C in high purity argon for 2 h, respectively. Structural evolution of the coatings is explored by electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Results demonstrate that the as-deposited coating is composed of pyrolytic carbon and amorphous boron carbide. A composition gradient of B and C is induced in each deposition. After annealing, B 4 C crystallites precipitate out of the amorphous boron carbide and grow to several hundreds nanometers by receiving B and C from boron-doped pyrolytic carbon. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy proves that the crystallization is controlled by element diffusion activated by high temperature annealing, after that a larger concentration gradient of B and C is induced in the coating. Quantified Raman spectrum identifies a graphitization enhancement of pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy exhibits an epitaxial growth of B 4 C at layer/layer interface of the annealed coatings. Mechanism concerning the structural evolution on the basis of the experimental results is proposed.

  13. Chemical, mechanical, and tribological properties of pulsed-laser-deposited titanium carbide and vanadium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzanowski, J.E.; Leuchtner, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    The chemical, mechanical, and tribological properties of pulsed-laser-deposited TiC and VC films are reported in this paper. Films were deposited by ablating carbide targets using a KrF (λ = 248 nm) laser. Chemical analysis of the films by XPS revealed oxygen was the major impurity; the lowest oxygen concentration obtained in a film was 5 atom%. Oxygen was located primarily on the carbon sublattice of the TiC structure. The films were always substoichiometric, as expected, and the carbon in the films was identified primarily as carbidic carbon. Nanoindentation hardness tests gave values of 39 GPa for TiC and 26 GPa for VC. The friction coefficient for the TiC films was 0.22, while the VC film exhibited rapid material transfer from the steel ball to the substrate resulting in steel-on-steel tribological behavior

  14. Study on the performance of fuel elements with carbide and carbide-nitride fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchenko, Yu.M.; Davydov, E.F.; Maershin, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics, test conditions and basic results of material testing of fuel elements with carbide and carbonitride fuel irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor up to 3-10% burn-up at specific power rate of 55-70 kW/m and temperatures of the cladding up to 720 deg C are described. Increase of cladding diameter is stated mainly to result from pressure of swelling fuel. The influence of initial efficient porosity of the fuel on cladding deformation and fuel stoichiometry on steel carbonization is considered. Utilization of carbide and carbonitride fuel at efficient porosity of 20% at the given test modes is shown to ensure their operability up to 10% burn-up

  15. Graphite and boron carbide composites made by hot-pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Hagio, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    1981-01-01

    Composites consisting of graphite and boron carbide were made by hot-pressing mixed powders of coke carbon and boron carbide. The change of relative density, mechanical strength and electrical resistivity of the composites and the X-ray parameters of coke carbon were investigated with increase of boron carbide content and hot-pressing temperature. From these experiments, it was found that boron carbide powder has a remarkable effect on sintering and graphitization of coke carbon powder above the hot-pressing temperature of 2000 0 C. At 2200 0 C, electrical resistivity of the composite and d(002) spacing of coke carbon once showed minimum values at about 5 to 10 wt% boron carbide and then increased. The strength of the composite increased with increase of boron carbide content. It was considered that some boron from boron carbide began to diffuse substitutionally into the graphite structure above 2000 0 C and densification and graphitization were promoted with the diffusion of boron. Improvements could be made to the mechanical strength, density, oxidation resistance and manufacturing methods by comparing with the properties and processes of conventional graphites. (author)

  16. State of residual stress in laser-deposited ceramic composite coatings on aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadolkar, P. B.; Watkins, T. R.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Kooi, B. J.; Dahotre, N. B.

    The nature and magnitude of the residual stresses within laser-deposited titanium carbide (TiC) coatings on 2024 and 6061 aluminum (Al) alloys were investigated. Macro- and micro-stresses within the coatings were determined using an X-ray diffraction method. Owing to increased debonding between the

  17. Precipitation behavior of carbides in high-carbon martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao; Shi, Chang-min [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy; Li, Ji-hui [Yang Jiang Shi Ba Zi Group Co., Ltd, Guangdong (China)

    2017-01-15

    A fundamental study on the precipitation behavior of carbides was carried out. Thermo-calc software, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the precipitation and transformation behaviors of carbides. Carbide precipitation was of a specific order. Primary carbides (M7C3) tended to be generated from liquid steel when the solid fraction reached 84 mol.%. Secondary carbides (M7C3) precipitated from austenite and can hardly transformed into M23C6 carbides with decreasing temperature in air. Primary carbides hardly changed once they were generated, whereas secondary carbides were sensitive to heat treatment and thermal deformation. Carbide precipitation had a certain effect on steel-matrix phase transitions. The segregation ability of carbon in liquid steel was 4.6 times greater that of chromium. A new method for controlling primary carbides is proposed.

  18. On the carbide formation in high-carbon stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujahid, M.; Qureshi, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steels containing high Cr as well as carbon contents in excess of 1.5 weight percent have been developed for applications which require high resistance erosion and environmental corrosion. Formation of carbides is one of important parameters for controlling properties of these materials especially erosion characteristics. Percent work includes the study of different type of carbides which from during the heat treatment of these materials. It has been found that precipitation of secondary carbides and the nature of matrix transformation plays an important role in determining the hardness characteristics of these materials. (author)

  19. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process

  20. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  1. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tin, Chin-Che, E-mail: cctin@physics.auburn.ed [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Mendis, Suwan [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Chew, Kerlit [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin [Physical Technical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700084 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Atabaev, Bakhtiyar [Institute of Electronics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adedeji, Victor [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina 27909 (United States); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-10-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  2. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin, Chin-Che; Mendis, Suwan; Chew, Kerlit; Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin; Atabaev, Bakhtiyar; Adedeji, Victor; Rusli

    2010-01-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  3. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancino T, F.; Lopez H, E.

    2013-10-01

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  4. Method of producing silicon carbide articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milewski, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity

  5. Production of titanium carbide from ilmenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Niyomwas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of titanium carbide (TiC powders from ilmenite ore (FeTiO3 powder by means of carbothermal reduction synthesis coupled with hydrochloric acid (HCl leaching process was investigated. A mixture of FeTiO3 and carbon powders was reacted at 1500oC for 1 hr under flowing argon gas. Subsequently, synthesized product of Fe-TiC powders were leached by 10% HCl solutions for 24 hrs to get final product of TiC powders. The powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The product particles were agglomerated in the stage after the leaching process, and the size of this agglomerate was 12.8 μm with a crystallite size of 28.8 nm..

  6. Stored energy in irradiated silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report presents a short review of the phenomenon of Wigner stored energy release from irradiated graphite and discusses it in relation to neutron irradiation of silicon carbide. A single published work in the area of stored energy release in SiC is reviewed and the results are discussed. It appears from this previous work that because the combination of the comparatively high specific heat of SiC and distribution in activation energies for recombining defects, the stored energy release of SiC should only be a problem at temperatures lower than those considered for fusion devices. The conclusion of this preliminary review is that the stored energy release in SiC will not be sufficient to cause catastrophic heating in fusion reactor components, though further study would be desirable.

  7. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 x 10 25 n/m 2 . Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C

  8. Boron carbide in pile behaviour Rapsodie experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryger, B.; Colin, M.

    1983-04-01

    Results concerning boron carbide irradiation experiments performed in RAPSODIE up to 10 22 .cm - 3 capture density in the temperature range 600-1100 0 lead to the following main conclusions: initial density and grain size lowering contribute to swelling decrease but density is the major parameter for swelling limitation; swelling rate can vary in a wide range (ratio 1 to 3) according to combinations of density (1.8 to 2.3) and grain size (10 to 50 μm) values; a swelling balance reveals that the most important contribution to swelling should be a high density of helium small bubbles (<400 A); helium retention increases with density and grain size and decreases with temperature elevation. A diffusion law is proposed to describe the rate of helium release

  9. Texaco, carbide form hydrogen plant venture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Texaco Inc. and Union Carbide Industrial Gases Inc. (UCIG) have formed a joint venture to develop and operate hydrogen plants. The venture, named HydroGEN Supply Co., is owned by Texaco Hydrogen Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Texaco, and UCIG Hydrogen Services Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of UCIG. Plants built by HydroGEN will combine Texaco's HyTEX technology for hydrogen production with UCIG's position in cryogenic and advanced air separation technology. Texaco the U.S. demand for hydrogen is expected to increase sharply during the next decade, while refinery hydrogen supply is expected to drop. The Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 require U.S. refiners to lower aromatics in gasoline, resulting in less hydrogen recovered by refiners from catalytic reforming units. Meanwhile, requirements to reduce sulfur in diesel fuel will require more hydrogen capacity

  10. Ordering effects in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatnikov, V.N.; Zueva, L.V.; Gusev, A.I.; Kottar, A.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of nonstoichiometry and ordering on crystalline structure and specific electric resistance (ρ) of TiC y (0.52≤y≤0.98) is studied within the temperature range of 300-1100 K. It is shown that the titanium carbide ordering in the areas 0.52≤y≤0.55, 0.56≤y≤0.58 and 0.62≤y≤0.68 leads to formation of the Ti 2 C cubic and trigonal ordered phase and the Ti 3 C 2 rhombic ordered phase correspondingly. Availability of hysteresis on the ρ(T) dependences in the area of the disorder-order reversible equilibrium transition points out to the fact that the TiC y ↔Ti 2 C and TiC y ↔Ti 3 C 2 transformations are the first order phase transitions [ru

  11. Oxalate complexation in dissolved carbide systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.; Bokelund, H.; Valkiers, S.

    1983-01-01

    It has been shown that the oxalic acid produced in the dissolution of mixed uranium, plutonium carbides in nitric acid can account for the problems of incomplete uranium and plutonium extraction on the Purex process. Moreover, it was demonstrated that other identified products such as benzene polycarboxylic acids are either too insoluble or insufficiently complexing to be of concern. The stability constants for oxalate complexing of UO 2 +2 and Pu +4 ions (as UO 2 (C 2 O 4 ), Pu(C 2 O 4 ) 2+ and Pu(C 2 O 4 ) 2 , respectively) were measured in nitrate solutions of 4.0 molar ionic strength (0-4 M HNO 3 ) by extraction of these species with TBP. (orig.)

  12. Study on niobium carbide dispersed superconducting tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, H; Tachikawa, K [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tokyo (Japan); Oh' asa, M [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1977-11-01

    Niobium carbide (NbC) dispersed superconducting tapes have been fabricated by two metallurgical processes. In the first process, Ni-Nb-C alloys are directly arc melted and hot worked in air and the NbC phase is distributed in the form of fine discrete particles. In the second process, Ni-Nb and Ni-Nb-Cu alloys are arc melted, hot worked and subjected to solid-state carburization. NbC then precipitates along the grain boundaries, forming a network. The highest superconducting transition temperature attained is about 11 K. Taken together with the lattice parameter measurement, this indicates that NbC with a nearly perfect NaCl structure is formed in both processes. Measured values of the upper critical field, the critical current density and the volume fraction of the NbC phase are also discussed.

  13. Single Photon Sources in Silicon Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brett Johnson

    2014-01-01

    Single photon sources in semiconductors are highly sought after as they constitute the building blocks of a diverse range of emerging technologies such as integrated quantum information processing, quantum metrology and quantum photonics. In this presentation, we show the first observation of single photon emission from deep level defects in silicon carbide (SiC). The single photon emission is photo-stable at room temperature and surprisingly bright. This represents an exciting alternative to diamond color centers since SiC possesses well-established growth and device engineering protocols. The defect is assigned to the carbon vacancy-antisite pair which gives rise to the AB photoluminescence lines. We discuss its photo-physical properties and their fabrication via electron irradiation. Preliminary measurements on 3C SiC nano-structures will also be discussed. (author)

  14. Visible light emission from porous silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Lu, Weifang

    2017-01-01

    Light-emitting silicon carbide is emerging as an environment-friendly wavelength converter in the application of light-emitting diode based white light source for two main reasons. Firstly, SiC has very good thermal conductivity and therefore a good substrate for GaN growth in addition to the small...... lattice mismatch. Secondly, SiC material is abundant, containing no rear-earth element material as commercial phosphor. In this paper, fabrication of porous SiC is introduced, and their morphology and photoluminescence are characterized. Additionally, the carrier lifetime of the porous SiC is measured...... by time-resolved photoluminescence. The ultrashort lifetime in the order of ~70ps indicates porous SiC is very promising for the application in the ultrafast visible light communications....

  15. White light emission from engineered silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide indirect bandgap semiconductor. The light emission efficiency is low in nature. But this material has very unique physical properties like good thermal conductivity, high break down field etc in addition to its abundance. Therefore it is interesting to engineer its...... light emission property so that to take fully potential applications of this material. In this talk, two methods, i.e. doping SiC heavily by donor-acceptor pairs and making SiC porous are introduced to make light emission from SiC. By co-doping SiC with nitrogen and boron heavily, strong yellow emission...... is demonstrated. After optimizing the passivation conditions, strong blue-green emission from porous SiC is demonstrated as well. When combining the yellow emission from co-doped SiC and blue-green from porous SiC, a high color rendering index white light source is achieved....

  16. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  17. Mechanical-thermal synthesis of chromium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintho, Osvaldo Mitsuyuki; Favilla, Eliane Aparecida Peixoto; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the synthesis of chromium carbides (Cr 3 C 2 and Cr 7 C 3 ), starting from metallic chromium (obtained from the reduction of Cr 2 O 3 with Al) and carbon (graphite). The synthesis was carried out via high energy milling, followed by heat-treating of pellets made of different milled mixtures at 800 o C, for 2 h, under an atmosphere of argon. A SPEX CertPrep 8000 Mixer/Mill was used for milling under argon atmosphere. A tool steel vat and two 12.7 mm diameter chromium steel balls were used. The raw materials used and the products were characterized by differential thermal analysis, thermo gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, electronic microscopy and X-ray fluorescence chemical analysis. The following variables were investigated: the quantity of carbon in the mixture, the milling time and the milling power. Mechanical activation of the reactant mixture depends upon the milling power ratio used for processing. The energy liberated by the reduction of the chromium oxide with aluminium exhibits a maximum for milling power ratio between 5:1 and 7.5:1. Self-propagating reaction occurred for all heat-treated samples whatever the carbon content of the sample and the milling power ratio used. Bearing carbon samples exhibited hollow shell structures after the reaction. The level of iron contamination of the milled samples was kept below 0.3% Fe. The self-propagated reaction caused high temperatures inside the samples as it may be seen by the occurrence of spherules, dendrites and whiskers. The carbon content determines the type of chromium carbide formed

  18. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  19. In situ formation of titanium carbide using titanium and carbon-nanotube powders by laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savalani, M.M.; Ng, C.C.; Li, Q.H.; Man, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium metal matrix composite coatings are considered to be important candidates for high wear resistance applications. In this study, TiC reinforced Ti matrix composite layers were fabricated by laser cladding with 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% carbon-nanotube. The effects of the carbon-nanotube content on phase composition, microstructure, micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coating were studied. Microstructural observation using scanning electron microscopy showed that the coatings consisted of a matrix of alpha-titanium phases and the reinforcement phase of titanium carbide in the form of fine dendrites, indicating that titanium carbide was synthesized by the in situ reaction during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of carbon-nanotube in the starting precursor materials and were enhanced by increasing the carbon-nanotube content. Results indicated that the composite layers exhibit high hardness and excellent wear resistance.

  20. All-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon using graphene from silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bei; Ahmed, Mohsin; Iacopi, Francesca, E-mail: f.iacopi@griffith.edu.au [Environmental Futures Research Institute, Griffith University, Nathan 4111 (Australia); Wood, Barry [Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia 4072 (Australia)

    2016-05-02

    Carbon-based supercapacitors are lightweight devices with high energy storage performance, allowing for faster charge-discharge rates than batteries. Here, we present an example of all-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon for on-chip applications, paving the way towards energy supply systems embedded in miniaturized electronics with fast access and high safety of operation. We present a nickel-assisted graphitization method from epitaxial silicon carbide on a silicon substrate to demonstrate graphene as a binder-free electrode material for all-solid-state supercapacitors. We obtain graphene electrodes with a strongly enhanced surface area, assisted by the irregular intrusion of nickel into the carbide layer, delivering a typical double-layer capacitance behavior with a specific area capacitance of up to 174 μF cm{sup −2} with about 88% capacitance retention over 10 000 cycles. The fabrication technique illustrated in this work provides a strategic approach to fabricate micro-scale energy storage devices compatible with silicon electronics and offering ultimate miniaturization capabilities.

  1. In situ formation of titanium carbide using titanium and carbon-nanotube powders by laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savalani, M.M., E-mail: mmfsmm@inet.polyu.edu.hk [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Ng, C.C.; Li, Q.H.; Man, H.C. [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong)

    2012-01-15

    Titanium metal matrix composite coatings are considered to be important candidates for high wear resistance applications. In this study, TiC reinforced Ti matrix composite layers were fabricated by laser cladding with 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% carbon-nanotube. The effects of the carbon-nanotube content on phase composition, microstructure, micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coating were studied. Microstructural observation using scanning electron microscopy showed that the coatings consisted of a matrix of alpha-titanium phases and the reinforcement phase of titanium carbide in the form of fine dendrites, indicating that titanium carbide was synthesized by the in situ reaction during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of carbon-nanotube in the starting precursor materials and were enhanced by increasing the carbon-nanotube content. Results indicated that the composite layers exhibit high hardness and excellent wear resistance.

  2. All-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon using graphene from silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Bei; Ahmed, Mohsin; Iacopi, Francesca; Wood, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based supercapacitors are lightweight devices with high energy storage performance, allowing for faster charge-discharge rates than batteries. Here, we present an example of all-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon for on-chip applications, paving the way towards energy supply systems embedded in miniaturized electronics with fast access and high safety of operation. We present a nickel-assisted graphitization method from epitaxial silicon carbide on a silicon substrate to demonstrate graphene as a binder-free electrode material for all-solid-state supercapacitors. We obtain graphene electrodes with a strongly enhanced surface area, assisted by the irregular intrusion of nickel into the carbide layer, delivering a typical double-layer capacitance behavior with a specific area capacitance of up to 174 μF cm"−"2 with about 88% capacitance retention over 10 000 cycles. The fabrication technique illustrated in this work provides a strategic approach to fabricate micro-scale energy storage devices compatible with silicon electronics and offering ultimate miniaturization capabilities.

  3. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  4. Properties of cemented carbides alloyed by metal melt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovsky, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations into the influence of alloying elements introduced by metal melt treatment (MMT-process) on properties of WC-Co and WC-Ni cemented carbides. Transition metals of the IV - VIll groups (Ti, Zr, Ta, Cr, Re, Ni) and silicon were used as alloying elements. It is shown that the MMT-process allows cemented carbides to be produced whose physico-mechanical properties (bending strength, fracture toughness, total deformation, total work of deformation and fatigue fracture toughness) are superior to those of cemented carbides produced following a traditional powder metallurgy (PM) process. The main mechanism and peculiarities of the influence of alloying elements added by the MMT-process on properties of cemented carbides have been first established. The effect of alloying elements on structure and substructure of phases has been analyzed. (author)

  5. Structure and thermal expansion of NbC complex carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsinskaya, I.M.; Chaporova, I.N.; Cheburaeva, R.F.; Samojlov, A.I.; Logunov, A.V.; Ignatova, I.A.; Dodonova, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    Alloying dependences of the crystal lattice parameters at indoor temperature and coefficient of thermal linear exspansion within a 373-1273 K range are determined for complex NbC-base carbides by the method of mathematical expemental design. It is shown that temperature changes in the linear expansion coefficient of certain complex carbides as distinct from NbC have an anomaly (minimum) within 773-973 K caused by occurring reversible phase transformations. An increase in the coefficient of thermal linear expansion and a decrease in hardness of NbC-base tungsten-, molybdenum-, vanadium- and hafnium-alloyed carbides show a weakening of a total chemical bond in the complex carbides during alloying

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF CARBIDE AND NITRIDE CERAMICS OF INCREASED RESISTIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Roman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The developments of carbide and nitrite ceramics of high solidity are presented. It is shown that development of nanotechnology led to creation of thenanostructural ceramics, the composition of which is controlled on cluster level.

  7. Medium temperature reaction between lanthanide and actinide carbides and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, G.; Lorenzelli, R.; Pascard, R.

    1964-01-01

    Hydrogen is fixed reversibly by the lanthanide and actinide mono carbides in the range 25 - 400 C, as for pure corresponding metals. Hydrogen goes into the carbides lattice through carbon vacancies and the total fixed amount is approximately equal to two hydrogen atoms per initial vacancy. Final products c.n thus be considered as carbo-hydrides of general formula M(C 1-x , H 2x ). The primitive CFC, NaCl type, structure remains unchanged but expands strongly in the case of actinide carbides. With lanthanide carbides, hydrogenation induces a phase transformation with reappearance of the metal structure (HCP). Hydrogen decomposition pressures of all the studied carbo-hydrides are greater than those of the corresponding di-hydrides. (authors) [fr

  8. Iron Carbides and Nitrides: Ancient Materials with Novel Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhantong; Zhang, Peng; Lei, Xiang; Wang, Xiaobai; Zhao, Nan; Yang, Hua

    2018-02-07

    Iron carbides and nitrides have aroused great interest in researchers, due to their excellent magnetic properties, good machinability and the particular catalytic activity. Based on these advantages, iron carbides and nitrides can be applied in various areas such as magnetic materials, biomedical, photo- and electrocatalysis. In contrast to their simple elemental composition, the synthesis of iron carbides and nitrides still has great challenges, particularly at the nanoscale, but it is usually beneficial to improve performance in corresponding applications. In this review, we introduce the investigations about iron carbides and nitrides, concerning their structure, synthesis strategy and various applications from magnetism to the catalysis. Furthermore, the future prospects are also discussed briefly. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Synthesis of carbon fibre-reinforced, silicon carbide composites by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    carbon fibre (Cf) reinforced, silicon carbide matrix composites which are ... eral applications, such as automotive brakes, high-efficiency engine systems, ... The PIP method is based on the use of organo metallic pre-ceramic precursors.

  10. Analytical chemistry methods for boron carbide absorber material. [Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELVIN WL

    1977-07-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of boron carbide powder and pellets for the following: total C and B, B isotopic composition, soluble C and B, fluoride, chloride, metallic impurities, gas content, water, nitrogen, and oxygen. (DLC)

  11. Spheroidization of transition metal carbides in low temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinskaya, N.A.; Koroleva, E.B.; Petrunichev, V.A.; Rybalko, O.F.; Solov'ev, P.V.; Ugol'nikova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma process of preparation of titanium, tungsten and chromium carbide spherical powders with the main particle size 40-80 μm is considered. Spheroidization degree, granulometric and phase composition of the product are investigated

  12. Stochastic Distribution of Wear of Carbide Tools during Machining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... The stochastic point model was used to determine the rate of wear distribution of the carbide tool ... Keywords: cutting speed, feed rate, machining time, tool life, reliability, wear.

  13. Calculation of vapour pressures over mixed carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, M.; Mathews, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Vapour pressure over the uranium-plutonium mixed carbide (Usub(l-p) Pusub(p C) was calculated in the temperature range of 1300-9000 for various compositions (p=0.1 to 0.7). Effects of variation of the sesquicarbide content were also studied. The principle of corresponding states was applied to UC and mixed carbides to obtain the equation of state. (author)

  14. Study of aging and ordering processes in titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, M.P.; Khaenko, B.V.; Kachkovskaya, Eh.T.

    1977-01-01

    Aging and ordering processes in titanium carbide were investigated on monocrystals (fragments of alloys) with the aid of roentgenographic method. The sequence of phase transformations during aging was ascertained,and a monoclinic structure of the carbon atoms ordering is suggested. The microhardness of titanium carbide was studied as a function of the heat treatment of alloys and the main factors (ordering and dislocation structure) which govern the difference in the microhardness of hardened and aged (annealed) specimens were determined

  15. Bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In these paper the possibility of upper and lower bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings are presented. Conditions, when in cast iron with carbides castings during continuous free air cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite or its mixture with lower bainte proceeds, have been given. A mechanism of this transformation has been given, Si, Ni, Mn and Mo distribution in the eutectic cell has been tested and hardness of tested castings has been determined.

  16. Single-Event Effects in Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ikpe, Stanley; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program Silicon Carbide Power Device Subtask efforts in FY15. Benefits of SiC are described and example NASA Programs and Projects desiring this technology are given. The current status of the radiation tolerance of silicon carbide power devices is given and paths forward in the effort to develop heavy-ion single-event effect hardened devices indicated.

  17. A novel plastification agent for cemented carbides extrusion molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Cheng Zhou; Bai-Yun Huang

    2001-01-01

    A type of novel plastification agent for plasticizing powder extrusion molding of cemented carbides has been developed. By optimizing their formulation and fabrication method, the novel plastification agent, with excellent properties and uniform distribution characters, were manufactured. The thermal debinding mechanism has been studied, the extruding rheological characteristics and debinding behaviors have been investigated. Using the newly developed plastification agent, the cemented carbides extrusion rods, with diameter up to 25 mm, have been manufactured. (author)

  18. Platinum group metal nitrides and carbides: synthesis, properties and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L

    2009-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical data on new compounds, nitrides and carbides of the platinum group 4d and 5d metals (ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum), published over the past five years are summarized. The extreme mechanical properties of platinoid nitrides and carbides, i.e., their high strength and low compressibility, are noted. The prospects of further studies and the scope of application of these compounds are discussed.

  19. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  20. Investigations on diffusion-controlled transformations in creep resistant steels and graded cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prat Borquez, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    resistant thin films by (CVD). The production of a graded outer-surface layer is necessary in order to ensure good adhesion of the coating to the cemented carbide and to avoid crack propagation. The formation of the graded outer-layer is a diffusioncontrolled process. DICTRA calculations were carried out to model the formation of the graded layers. The particular objectives of the investigations were: a) to simulate the growth kinetics of the graded layer for different periods of sintering time, b) to observe the influence of the mobility values on the kinetics of layer formation, c) to adjust the mobilities of the diffusing elements in order to have a good fitting with the experimental results.

  1. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Akio; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Goto, Sumitaka; Saito, Yukio; Jinbo, Ryutaro; Ogiwara, Norio; Saido, Masahiro.

    1996-01-01

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  2. Conceptual design study of LMFBR core with carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, H.; Hojuyama, T.; Osada, H.; Ishii, T.; Hattori, S.; Nishimura, T.

    1987-01-01

    Carbide fuel is a hopeful candidate for demonstration FBR(DFBR) fuel from the plant cost reduction point of view. High thermal conductivity and high heavy metal content of carbide fuel lead to high linear heat rate and high breeding ratio. We have analyzed carbide fuel core characteristics and have clarified the concept of carbide fuel core. By survey calculation, we have obtained a correlation map between core parameters and core characteristics. From the map, we have selected a high efficiency core whose features are better than those of an oxide core, and have obtained reactivity coefficients. The core volume and the reactor fuel inventory are approximately 20% smaller, and the burn-up reactivity loss is 50% smaller compared with the oxide fuel core. These results will reduce the capital cost. The core reactivity coefficients are similar to the conventional oxide DFBR's. Therefore the carbide fuel core is regarded as safe as the oxide core. Except neutron fluence, the carbide fuel core has better nuclear features than the oxide core

  3. The growth mechanism of grain boundary carbide in Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hui; Xia, Shuang; Zhou, Bangxin; Peng, Jianchao

    2013-01-01

    The growth mechanism of grain boundary M 23 C 6 carbides in nickel base Alloy 690 after aging at 715 °C was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The grain boundary carbides have coherent orientation relationship with only one side of the matrix. The incoherent phase interface between M 23 C 6 and matrix was curved, and did not lie on any specific crystal plane. The M 23 C 6 carbide transforms from the matrix phase directly at the incoherent interface. The flat coherent phase interface generally lies on low index crystal planes, such as (011) and (111) planes. The M 23 C 6 carbide transforms from a transition phase found at curved coherent phase interface. The transition phase has a complex hexagonal crystal structure, and has coherent orientation relationship with matrix and M 23 C 6 : (111) matrix //(0001) transition //(111) carbide , ¯ > matrix // ¯ 10> transition // ¯ > carbide . The crystal lattice constants of transition phase are c transition =√(3)×a matrix and a transition =√(6)/2×a matrix . Based on the experimental results, the growth mechanism of M 23 C 6 and the formation mechanism of transition phase are discussed. - Highlights: • A transition phase was observed at the coherent interfaces of M 23 C 6 and matrix. • The transition phase has hexagonal structure, and is coherent with matrix and M 23 C 6 . • The M 23 C 6 transforms from the matrix directly at the incoherent phase interface

  4. Design, Fabrication and Performance of Boron-Carbide Control Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, H.A.; Jacobson, J.

    1964-01-01

    A control blade design, incorporating boron-carbide (B 4 C) in stainless-steel tubes, was introduced into service in boiling water reactors in April 1961. Since that time this blade has become the standard reference control element in General Electric boiling-water reactors, replacing the 2% boron-stainless-steel blades previously used. The blades consist of a sheathed, cruciform array of small vertical stainless-steel tubes filled with compácted boron-carbide powder. The boron-carbide powder is confined longitudinally into several independent compartments by swaging over ball bearings located inside the tubes. The development and use of boron-carbide control rods is discussed in five phases: 1. Summary of experience with boron-steel blades and reasons for transition to boron-carbide control; 2. Design of the boron-carbide blade, beginning with developmental experiments, including early measurements performed in the AEC ''Control Rod Material and Development Program'' at the Vallecitos Atomic Laboratory, through a description of the final control blade configuration; 3. Fabrication of the blades and quality control procedures; 4. Results of confirmatory pre-operational mechanical and reactivity testing; and 5. Post-operational experience with the blades, including information on the results of mechanical inspection and reactivity testing after two years of reactor service. (author) [fr

  5. Residual stresses and mechanical properties of Si3N4/SiC multilayered composites with different SiC layers; Las tensiones residuales y las propiedades mecánicas de compuestos multicapa de Si3N4/SiC con diferentes capas de SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liua, S.; Lia, Y.; Chena, P.; Lia, W.; Gaoa, S.; Zhang, B.; Yeb, F.

    2017-11-01

    The effect of residual stresses on the strength, toughness and work of fracture of Si3N4/SiC multilayered composites with different SiC layers has been investigated. It may be an effective way to design and optimize the mechanical properties of Si3N4/SiC multilayered composites by controlling the properties of SiC layers. Si3N4/SiC multilayered composites with different SiC layers were fabricated by aqueous tape casting and pressureless sintering. Residual stresses were calculated by using ANSYS simulation, the maximum values of tensile and compressive stresses were 553.2MPa and −552.1MPa, respectively. Step-like fracture was observed from the fracture surfaces. Fraction of delamination layers increased with the residual stress, which can improve the reliability of the materials. Tensile residual stress was benefit to improving toughness and work of fracture, but the strength of the composites decreased. [Spanish] Se ha investigado el efecto de las tensiones residuales en la resistencia, dureza y trabajo de fractura de los compuestos multicapa de Si3N4/SiC con diferentes capas de SiC. Puede ser una manera eficaz de diseñar y optimizar las propiedades mecánicas de los compuestos multicapa de Si3N4/SiC mediante el control de las propiedades de las capas de SiC. Los compuestos multicapa de Si3N4/SiC con diferentes capas de SiC se fabricaron por medio de colado en cinta en medio acuoso y sinterización sin presión. Las tensiones residuales se calcularon mediante el uso de la simulación ANSYS, los valores máximos de las fuerzas de tracción y compresión fueron 553,2 MPa y −552,1 MPa, respectivamente. Se observó una fractura escalonada a partir de las superficies de fractura. La fracción de capas de deslaminación aumenta con la tensión residual, lo que puede mejorar la fiabilidad de los materiales. La fuerza de tracción residual era beneficiosa para la mejora de la dureza y el trabajo de fractura, pero la resistencia de los compuestos disminuyó.

  6. Fabrication and Characterization of Silicon Carbide Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James

    Nanoscale fillers can significantly enhance the performance of composites by increasing the extent of filler-to-matrix interaction. Thus far, the embedding of nanomaterials into composites has been achieved, but the directional arrangement has proved to be a challenging task. Even with advances in in-situ and shear stress induced orientation, these methods are both difficult to control and unreliable. Therefore, the fabrication of nanomaterials with an ability to orient along a magnetic field is a promising pathway to create highly controllable composite systems with precisely designed characteristics. To this end, the goal of this dissertation is to develop magnetically active nanoscale whiskers and study the effect of the whiskers orientation in a polymer matrix on the nanocomposite's behavior. Namely, we report the surface modification of silicon carbide whiskers (SiCWs) with magnetic nanoparticles and fabrication of SiC/epoxy composite materials. The magnetic nanoparticles attachment to the SiCWs was accomplished using polyelectrolyte polymer-to-polymer complexation. The "grafting to" and adsorption techniques were used to attach the polyelectrolytes to the surface of the SiCWs and magnetic nanoparticles. The anchored polyelectrolytes were polyacrylic acid (PAA) and poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP). Next, the SiC/epoxy composites incorporating randomly oriented and magnetically oriented whiskers were fabricated. The formation of the composite was studied to determine the influence of the whiskers' surface composition on the epoxy curing reaction. After curing, the composites' thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. These properties were related to the dispersion and orientation of the fillers in the composite samples. The obtained results indicated that the thermal and thermo-mechanical properties could be improved by orienting magnetically-active SiCWs inside the matrix. Silanization, "grafting to", adsorption, and complexation were used to modify

  7. Interaction of noble-metal fission products with pyrolytic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauf, R.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    Fuel particles for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contain layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which act as a miniature pressure vessel and form the primary fission product barrier. Of the many fission products formed during irradiation, the noble metals are of particular interest because they interact significantly with the SiC layer and their concentrations are somewhat higher in the low-enriched uranium fuels currently under consideration. To study fission product-SiC interactions, particles of UO 2 or UC 2 are doped with fission product elements before coating and are then held in a thermal gradient up to several thousand hours. Examination of the SiC coatings by TEM-AEM after annealing shows that silver behaves differently from the palladium group

  8. The quantitative analysis of silicon carbide surface smoothing by Ar and Xe cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieshkin, A. E.; Kireev, D. S.; Ermakov, Yu. A.; Trifonov, A. S.; Presnov, D. E.; Garshev, A. V.; Anufriev, Yu. V.; Prokhorova, I. G.; Krupenin, V. A.; Chernysh, V. S.

    2018-04-01

    The gas cluster ion beam technique was used for the silicon carbide crystal surface smoothing. The effect of processing by two inert cluster ions, argon and xenon, was quantitatively compared. While argon is a standard element for GCIB, results for xenon clusters were not reported yet. Scanning probe microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques were used for the analysis of the surface roughness and surface crystal layer quality. The gas cluster ion beam processing results in surface relief smoothing down to average roughness about 1 nm for both elements. It was shown that xenon as the working gas is more effective: sputtering rate for xenon clusters is 2.5 times higher than for argon at the same beam energy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the surface defect layer gives values of 7 ± 2 nm and 8 ± 2 nm for treatment with argon and xenon clusters.

  9. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450ee)C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800ee)C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  10. Review of experimental studies of zirconium carbide coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Ogawa, Toru; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1995-03-01

    Experimental studies of zirconium carbide(ZrC) coated fuel particles were reviewed from the viewpoints of fuel particle designs, fabrication, characterization, fuel performance, and fission product retentiveness. ZrC is known as a refractory and chemically stable compound, so ZrC is a candidate to replace the silicon carbide(SiC) coating layer of the Triso-coated fuel particles. The irradiation experiments, the postirradiation heating tests, and the out-of-reactor experiments showed that the ZrC layer was less susceptible than the SiC layer to chemical attack by fission products and fuel kernels, and that the ZrC-coated fuel particles performed better than the standard Triso-coated fuel particles at high temperatures, especially above 1600degC. The ZrC-coated fuel particles demonstrated better cesium retention than the standard Triso-coated fuel particles though the ZrC layer showed a less effective barrier to ruthenium than the SiC layer. (author) 51 refs

  11. Effect of the reinforced boron carbide particulate content of AA6061 alloy on formation of the passive film in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katkar, V.A.; Gunasekaran, G.; Rao, A.G.; Koli, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Presence of boron carbide increases the corrosion rate of A6061 alloy in seawater. → Increasing the B 4 C content decreases passive layer thickness. → Passive films formed on A6061 and its B 4 C composites are n-type semiconductors. - Abstract: The effect of boron carbide (B 4 C) reinforcement on the corrosion of AA6061 alloy was studied by investigating passive films formed in seawater. The higher passive current and its potential-dependence for these composites indicated formation of porous passive film. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) graph suggests that the alloy surface is partly or totally active. The formed passive film is n-type semiconductor junction in nature. The difference between corrosion potential (E corr ) and potential at zero charge (PZC) suggests that the chloride ions responsible for film breakdown exist within the passive film. A suitable mechanism is proposed for the passive film breakdown.

  12. Formation of hexagonal silicon carbide by high energy ion beam irradiation on Si (1 0 0) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuyan, H; Favre, M; Valderrama, E; Avaria, G; Chuaqui, H; Mitchell, I; Wyndham, E; Saavedra, R; Paulraj, M

    2007-01-01

    We report the investigation of high energy ion beam irradiation on Si (1 0 0) substrates at room temperature using a low energy plasma focus (PF) device operating in methane gas. The unexposed and ion exposed substrates were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photothermal beam deflection, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the results are reported. The interaction of the pulsed PF ion beams, with characteristic energy in the 60-450 keV range, with the Si surface, results in the formation of a surface layer of hexagonal silicon carbide. The SEM and AFM analyses indicate clear step bunching on the silicon carbide surface with an average step height of 50 nm and a terrace width of 800 nm

  13. Molybdenum carbide-carbon nanocomposites synthesized from a reactive template for electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum carbide nanocrystals (Mo2C) with sizes ranging from 3 to 20 nm were synthesized within a carbon matrix starting from a mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4) template with confined pores. A molybdenum carbide phase (Mo2C) with a hexagonal structure was formed using a novel synthetic method involving the reaction of a molybdenum precursor with the carbon residue originating from C3N4 under nitrogen at various temperatures. The synthesized nanocomposites were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reaction with mass spectroscopy (MS), CHN elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that the synthesized samples have different surface structures and compositions, which are accordingly expected to exhibit different electrocatalytic activities toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Electrochemical measurements demonstrated that the sample synthesized at 1323 K exhibited the highest and most stable HER current in acidic media, with an onset potential of -100 mV vs. RHE, among the samples prepared in this study. This result is attributed to the sufficiently small particle size (∼8 nm on average) and accordingly high surface area (308 m2 g-1), with less oxidized surface entrapped within the graphitized carbon matrix. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  14. Recent Advances in the Deposition of Diamond Coatings on Co-Cemented Tungsten Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Polini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-cemented tungsten carbides, namely, hard metals are largely used to manufacture high wear resistant components in several manufacturing segments. Coating hard metals with superhard materials like diamond is of utmost interest as it can further extend their useful lifespan. The deposition of diamond coatings onto WC-Co can be extremely complicated as a result of poor adhesion. This can be essentially ascribed to (i the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between diamond and WC-Co, at the typical high temperatures inside the chemical vapour deposition (CVD chamber, generates large residual stresses at the interface; (ii the role of surface Co inside the WC-Co matrix during diamond CVD, which promotes carbon dissolution and diffusion. The present investigation reviews the techniques by which Co-cemented tungsten carbides can be treated to make them prone to receive diamond coatings by CVD. Further, it proposes interesting ecofriendly and sustainable alternatives to further improve the diamond deposition process as well as the overall performance of the coated hard metals.

  15. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs

  16. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  17. Evaluation on machined surface of hardened stainless steel generated by hard turning using coated carbide tools with wiper geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noordin, M.Y.; Kurniawan, D.; Sharif, S.

    2007-01-01

    Hard turning has been explored to be the finish machining operation for parts made of hardened steel. Its feasibility is determined partially by the quality of the resulting machined surface. This study evaluates the surface integrity of martensitic stainless steel (48 HRC) resulting from hard turning using coated carbide tool with wiper geometry at various cutting speed and feed and compares to that obtained using coated carbide tool with conventional geometry. The wiper coated carbide tool is able to produce machined surface which is of finer finish (Ra is finer than 0.4 μm at most cutting parameters) and yet is similarly inducing only minor microstructural alteration compared to its conventional counterpart. From the view of the chip morphology where continuous type of chip is desired rather than sawtooth chip type, the wiper tool generates continuous chip at almost similar range of cutting parameters compared to the case when using conventional tool. Additionally, the use of wiper tool also induces the preferred compressive residual stress at the machined surface. (author)

  18. Hafnium carbide nanocrystal chains for field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Song; Li, Hejun; Zhang, Yulei; Ren, Jincui; Qiang, Xinfa; Zhang, Shouyang

    2014-01-01

    A hafnium carbide (HfC) nanostructure, i.e., HfC nanocrystal chain, was synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. X-ray diffractometer, field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer were employed to characterize the product. The synthesized one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with many faceted octahedral nanocrystals possess diameters of tens of nanometers to 500 nm and lengths of a few microns. The chain-like structures possess a single crystalline structure and preferential growth direction along the [1 0 0] crystal orientation. The growth of the chains occurred through the vapor–liquid–solid process along with a negative-feedback mechanism. The field emission (FE) properties of the HfC nanocrystal chains as the cold cathode emitters were examined. The HfC nanocrystal chains display good FE properties with a low turn-on field of about 3.9 V μm −1 and a high field enhancement factor of 2157, implying potential applications in vacuum microelectronics.

  19. Precision Surface Grinding of Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Konneh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC is well known for its excellent material properties, high durability, high wear resistance, light weight and extreme hardness. Among the engineering applications of this material, it is an excellent candidate for optic mirrors used in an Airbone Laser (ABL device. However, the low fracture toughness and extreme brittleness characteristics of SiC are predominant factors for its poor machinability. This paper presents surface grinding of SiC using diamond cup wheels to assess the performance of diamond grits with respect to the roughness produced on the machined surfaces and also the morphology of the ground work-piece. Resin bonded diamond cup wheels of grit sizes 46 µm, 76 µm and 107 µm; depth of cut of 10 µm, 20 µm and 30 µm; and feed rate of 2 mm/min, 12 mm/min and 22 mm/min were used during this machining investigation. It has been observed that the 76 grit performs better in terms of low surface roughness value and morphology.

  20. Lattice location of impurities in silicon Carbide

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085259; Correia Martins, João Guilherme

    The presence and behaviour of transition metals (TMs) in SiC has been a concern since the start of producing device-grade wafers of this wide band gap semiconductor. They are unintentionally introduced during silicon carbide (SiC) production, crystal growth and device manufacturing, which makes them difficult contaminants to avoid. Once in SiC they easily form deep levels, either when in the isolated form or when forming complexes with other defects. On the other hand, using intentional TM doping, it is possible to change the electrical, optical and magnetic properties of SiC. TMs such as chromium, manganese or iron have been considered as possible candidates for magnetic dopants in SiC, if located on silicon lattice sites. All these issues can be explored by investigating the lattice site of implanted TMs. This thesis addresses the lattice location and thermal stability of the implanted TM radioactive probes 56Mn, 59Fe, 65Ni and 111Ag in both cubic 3C- and hexagonal 6H SiC polytypes by means of emission cha...

  1. Vapor pressure and thermodynamics of beryllium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinehart, G.H.; Behrens, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The vapor pressure of beryllium carbide has been measured over the temperature range 1388 to 1763 K using Knudsen-effusion mass spectrometry. Vaporization occurs incongruently according to the reaction Be 2 C(s) = 2Be(g) + C(s). The equilibrium vapor pressure above the mixture of Be 2 C and C over the experimental temperature range is (R/J K -1 mol -1 )ln(p/Pa) = -(3.610 +- 0.009) x 10 5 (K/T) + (221.43 +- 1.06). The third-law enthalpy change for the above reaction obtained from the present vapor pressures is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (740.5 +- 0.1) kJ mol -1 . The corresponding second-law result is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (732.0 +- 1.8) kJ mol -1 . The enthalpy of formation for Be 2 C(s) calculated from the present third-law vaporization enthalpy and the enthalpy of formation of Be(g) is ΔH 0 sub(f)(298.15 K) = -(92.5 +- 15.7) kJ mol -1 . (author)

  2. The etching behaviour of silicon carbide compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepps, N.W.; Page, T.F.

    1981-01-01

    A series of microstructural investigations has been undertaken in order to explore the reliability of particular etches in revealing microstructural detail in silicon carbide compacts. A series of specimens has been etched and examined following complete prior microstructural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometry techniques. In particular, the sensitivity of both a molten salt (KOH/KNO 3 ) etch and a commonly-used oxidizing electrolytic 'colour' etch to crystal purity, crystallographic orientation and polytypic structure has been established. The molten salt etch was found to be sensitive to grain boundaries and stacking disorder while the electrolytic etch was found to be primarily sensitive to local purity and crystallographic orientation. Neither etch appeared intrinsically polytype sensitive. Specifically, for the 'colour' etch, the p- or n-type character of impure regions appears critical in controlling etching behaviour; p-type impurities inhibiting, and n-type impurities enhancing, oxidation. The need to interpret etching behaviour in a manner consistent with the results obtained by a variety of other microstructural techniques will be emphasized. (author)

  3. Auger electron spectroscopy studies of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, H.H.; Nelson, G.C.; Wallace, W.O.

    1986-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy has been used to probe the electronic structure of ion bombardment (IB) cleaned surfaces of B 9 C and B 4 C samples. The shapes of the B-KVV and C-KVV Auger lines were found to be relatively insensitive to the bulk stoichiometry of the samples. This indicates that the local chemical environments surrounding B and C atoms, respectively, on the surfaces of the IB cleaned samples do not change appreciably in going from B 9 C to B 4 C. Fracturing the sample in situ is a way of producing a clean representative internal surface to compare with the IB surfaces. Microbeam techniques have been used to study a fracture surface of the B 9 C material with greater spatial resolution than in our studies of IB surfaces. The B 9 C fracture surface was not homogeneous and contained both C-rich and B-rich regions. The C-KVV line for the C-rich regions was graphitic in shape. Much of the C-rich regions was found by IB to be less than 100 nm in thickness. The C-KVV line from the B-rich regions was carbidic and did not differ appreciably in shape from those recorded for the IB cleaned surfaces

  4. Graphene ribbon growth on structured silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehr, Alexander; Link, Stefan; Starke, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Baringhaus, Jens; Aprojanz, Johannes; Tegenkamp, Christoph [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Niu, Yuran [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University (Sweden); present address: School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Zakharov, Alexei A. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University (Sweden); Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C. [Synchrotron SOLEIL and Universite Paris-Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2017-11-15

    Structured Silicon Carbide was proposed to be an ideal template for the production of arrays of edge specific graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), which could be used as a base material for graphene transistors. We prepared periodic arrays of nanoscaled stripe-mesas on SiC surfaces using electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Subsequent epitaxial graphene growth by annealing is differentiated between the basal-plane mesas and the faceting stripe walls as monitored by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Microscopic low energy electron diffraction (μ-LEED) revealed that the graphene ribbons on the facetted mesa side walls grow in epitaxial relation to the basal-plane graphene with an armchair orientation at the facet edges. The π-band system of the ribbons exhibits linear bands with a Dirac like shape corresponding to monolayer graphene as identified by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Trends and advances in pesticide residue analysis | Yeboah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nature, origin and the economic significance of pesticide residues are reviewed to underscore the need for countries to develop the ability and capacity to monitor pesticide residues. An overview of pesticide residues analytical procedures is also presented with emphasis on thin layer chromatography (TLC) as an ...

  6. Multilayer-Forming Behavior of Cr Nitrides and Carbides for Thermoreactive Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeongmo Park

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a nitride layer on the forming behavior of CrN and (Cr, Fe7C3 multilayers for thermoreactive deposition (TRD was investigated. Plasma nitriding followed by TRD (PN-TRD produced a larger coating thickness than the case of direct TRD with no plasma nitriding. For PN-TRD, an Fe2-3N layer of 10 μm in thickness was produced on AISI 52100 steels using plasma nitriding, followed by TRD using a mixed powder composed of 30 wt % Cr, 2 wt % NH4Cl, and 68 wt % Al2O3. During TRD at 800 °C, a CrN layer of 2 μm in thickness was formed along with a thin layer of mixed carbide (Cr7C3 and nitride (CrN on top. As the deposition temperature was increased to 950 °C, a new layer of Cr7C3 was formed underneath the outermost layer composed of mixed Cr7C3 and CrN. At 950 °C, a Cr-rich zone indicated a thickness of ~7 μm. As the deposition time increased to 3 h at 950 °C, a new layer of (Cr, Fe7C3 was produced at the interface between the CrN formed at 800 °C and the base metal. This layer formed because of the abundant resources of Cr and C provided from the TRD powder and base metal, respectively. The multilayer and interface were concretely filled without the formation of voids as the TRD time increased to 6 h at 950 °C. The TRD process on a pre-nitrided layer was successfully applied to produce multilayers of CrN and Cr7C3.

  7. Influence of carbon on the formation of the surface layer in the process of electroerosion alloying of steel with tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, E. V.; Bochkov, V. E.; Mikheev, É. A.; Lyakishev, V. A.; Afanas'eva, T. N.

    1983-10-01

    With an increase in carbon content in the steel being treated, the thickness of the alloyed layer increases and its microhardness also increases. The carbon exerts a deoxidizing action on the layer being formed and promotes a reduction in the threshold of deerosion and also additional strengthening of the layer as the result of the formation of binary η-carbides.

  8. Residual Stress Analysis Based on Acoustic and Optical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanichiro Yoshida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Co-application of acoustoelasticity and optical interferometry to residual stress analysis is discussed. The underlying idea is to combine the advantages of both methods. Acoustoelasticity is capable of evaluating a residual stress absolutely but it is a single point measurement. Optical interferometry is able to measure deformation yielding two-dimensional, full-field data, but it is not suitable for absolute evaluation of residual stresses. By theoretically relating the deformation data to residual stresses, and calibrating it with absolute residual stress evaluated at a reference point, it is possible to measure residual stresses quantitatively, nondestructively and two-dimensionally. The feasibility of the idea has been tested with a butt-jointed dissimilar plate specimen. A steel plate 18.5 mm wide, 50 mm long and 3.37 mm thick is braze-jointed to a cemented carbide plate of the same dimension along the 18.5 mm-side. Acoustoelasticity evaluates the elastic modulus at reference points via acoustic velocity measurement. A tensile load is applied to the specimen at a constant pulling rate in a stress range substantially lower than the yield stress. Optical interferometry measures the resulting acceleration field. Based on the theory of harmonic oscillation, the acceleration field is correlated to compressive and tensile residual stresses qualitatively. The acoustic and optical results show reasonable agreement in the compressive and tensile residual stresses, indicating the feasibility of the idea.

  9. Corrosion behavior of porous chromium carbide in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Ziqiang; Chen Weixing; Zheng Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion behavior of porous Cr 3 C 2 in various SCW conditions was investigated. ► Cr 3 C 2 is stable in SCW at temperature below 420–430 °C. ► Cracks and disintegration were observed at elevated testing temperatures. ► Degradation of Cr 3 C 2 is related to the intermediate product CrOOH. - Abstract: The corrosion behavior of highly porous chromium carbide (Cr 3 C 2 ) prepared by a reactive sintering process was characterized at temperatures ranging from 375 °C to 625 °C in a supercritical water environment with a pressure of 25–30 MPa. The test results show that porous chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures under 425 °C, above which disintegration occurred. The porous carbide was also tested under hydrothermal conditions of pressures between 12 MPa and 50 MPa at constant temperatures of 400 °C and 415 °C, respectively. The pressure showed little effect on the stability of chromium carbide in the tests at those temperatures. The mechanism of disintegration of chromium carbide in SCW environments is discussed.

  10. Effect of metallic coating on the properties of copper-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, M.; Pietrzak, K.; Teodorczyk, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Jarząbek, D.; Zybała, R.; Bazarnik, P.; Lewandowska, M.; Strojny-Nędza, A.

    2017-11-01

    In the presented paper a coating of SiC particles with a metallic layer was used to prepare copper matrix composite materials. The role of the layer was to protect the silicon carbide from decomposition and dissolution of silicon in the copper matrix during the sintering process. The SiC particles were covered by chromium, tungsten and titanium using Plasma Vapour Deposition method. After powder mixing of components, the final densification process via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) method at temperature 950 °C was provided. The almost fully dense materials were obtained (>97.5%). The microstructure of obtained composites was studied using scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. The microstructural analysis of composites confirmed that regardless of the type of deposited material, there is no evidence for decomposition process of silicon carbide in copper. In order to measure the strength of the interface between ceramic particles and the metal matrix, the micro tensile tests have been performed. Furthermore, thermal diffusivity was measured with the use of the laser pulse technique. In the context of performed studies, the tungsten coating seems to be the most promising solution for heat sink application. Compared to pure composites without metallic layer, Cu-SiC with W coating indicate the higher tensile strength and thermal diffusitivy, irrespective of an amount of SiC reinforcement. The improvement of the composite properties is related to advantageous condition of Cu-SiC interface characterized by well homogenity and low porosity, as well as individual properties of the tungsten coating material.

  11. Kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendt, D.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a NbC precipitation modelling in ferrite. This theoretical study is motivated by the fact it considers a ternary system and focus on the concurrence of two different diffusion mechanisms. An experimental study with TEP, SANS and Vickers micro-hardening measurements allows a description of the NbC precipitation kinetics. The mean radius of the precipitates is characterized by TEM observations. To focus on the nucleation stage, we use the Tomographic Atom Probe that analyses, at an atomistic scale, the position of the solute atoms in the matrix. A first model based on the classical nucleation theory and the diffusion-limited growth describes the precipitation of spherical precipitates. To solve the set of equations, we use a numerical algorithm that furnishes an evaluation of the precipitated fraction, the mean radius and the whole size distribution of the particles. The parameters that are the interface energy, the solubility product and the diffusion coefficients are fitted with the data available in the literature and our experimental results. It allows a satisfactory agreement as regards to the simplicity of the model. Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the evolution of a ternary alloy Fe-Nb-C on a cubic centred rigid lattice with vacancy and interstitial mechanisms. This is realized with an atomistic description of the atoms jumps and their related frequencies. The model parameters are fitted with phase diagrams and diffusion coefficients. For the sake of simplicity, we consider that the precipitation of NbC is totally coherent and we neglect any elastic strain effect. We can observe different kinetic paths: for low supersaturations, we find an expected precipitation of NbC but for higher supersaturations, the very fast diffusivity of carbon atoms conducts to the nucleation of iron carbide particles. We establish that the occurrence of this second phenomenon depends on the vacancy arrival kinetics and can be related

  12. Carbide process picked for Chinese polyethylene plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-01-01

    Union Carbide (Danbury, CT) is set to sign up its eighth polyethylene (PE) license in China. The company has been selected to supply its Unipol technology to Jilin Chemical Industrial Corp. (JCIC) for a 100,000-m.t./year linear low-density PE (LLDPE) plant at Jilin. The plant will form part of a $2-billion petrochemical complex, based on a 300,000-m.t./year ethylene unit awarded to a consortium made up of Samsung Engineering (Seoul) and Linde. A 10,000-m.t./year butene-1 unit will also be built. Toyo Engineering, Snamprogetti, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, and Linde are competing for the contract to supply the LLDPE plant. The signing is expected this spring. Two contenders are vying to supply an 80,000-m.t./year phenol plant for JCIC. They are Mitsui Engineering, offering the Mitsui Petrochemical process, and Chisso, with UOP technology. Four Unipol process PE plants are under construction in China and three are in operation. At Guangzhou, Toyo Engineering is building a 100,000-m.t./year plant, due onstream in 1995, while Snamprogetti is to finish construction of two plants in the same year at Zhonguyan (120,000 m.t./year) and at Maoming (140,000 m.t./year). The Daquing Design Institute is responsible for the engineering of a 60,000-m.t./year Unipol process PE plant, expected onstream early in 1995. Existing Unipol process PE plants are located in Qilu (60,000 m.t./year LLDPE and 120,000 m.t./year HDPE) and at Taching (60,000 m.t./year HDPE)

  13. Design and Fabrication of Silicon-on-Silicon-Carbide Substrates and Power Devices for Space Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammon P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of power electronic semiconductor devices are being developed for the benefit of space and terrestrial harsh-environment applications. 200-600 V lateral transistors and diodes are being fabricated in a thin layer of silicon (Si wafer bonded to silicon carbide (SiC. This novel silicon-on-silicon-carbide (Si/SiC substrate solution promises to combine the benefits of silicon-on-insulator (SOI technology (i.e device confinement, radiation tolerance, high and low temperature performance with that of SiC (i.e. high thermal conductivity, radiation hardness, high temperature performance. Details of a process are given that produces thin films of silicon 1, 2 and 5 μm thick on semi-insulating 4H-SiC. Simulations of the hybrid Si/SiC substrate show that the high thermal conductivity of the SiC offers a junction-to-case temperature ca. 4× less that an equivalent SOI device; reducing the effects of self-heating, and allowing much greater power density. Extensive electrical simulations are used to optimise a 600 V laterally diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (LDMOSFET implemented entirely within the silicon thin film, and highlight the differences between Si/SiC and SOI solutions.

  14. Determining the minimum required uranium carbide content for HTGR UCO fuel kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurray, Jacob W.; Lindemer, Terrence B.; Brown, Nicholas R.; Reif, Tyler J.; Morris, Robert N.; Hunn, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The minimum required uranium carbide content for HTGR UCO fuel kernels is calculated. • More nuclear and chemical factors have been included for more useful predictions. • The effect of transmutation products, like Pu and Np, on the oxygen distribution is included for the first time. - Abstract: Three important failure mechanisms that must be controlled in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel for certain higher burnup applications are SiC layer rupture, SiC corrosion by CO, and coating compromise from kernel migration. All are related to high CO pressures stemming from O release when uranium present as UO 2 fissions and the O is not subsequently bound by other elements. In the HTGR kernel design, CO buildup from excess O is controlled by the inclusion of additional uranium apart from UO 2 in the form of a carbide, UC x and this fuel form is designated UCO. Here general oxygen balance formulas were developed for calculating the minimum UC x content to ensure negligible CO formation for 15.5% enriched UCO taken to 16.1% actinide burnup. Required input data were obtained from CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) chemical thermodynamic models and the Serpent 2 reactor physics and depletion analysis tool. The results are intended to be more accurate than previous estimates by including more nuclear and chemical factors, in particular the effect of transmuted Pu and Np oxides on the oxygen distribution as the fuel kernel composition evolves with burnup.

  15. The role of free carbon in the transport and magnetic properties of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, A.K.; Beuneu, F.; Zuppiroli, L.; Beauvy, M.

    1984-01-01

    Boron carbide is a ceramic which has a wide field of application because of its mechanical and nuclear properties. This material is difficult to characterise due to the presence of different levels of disorder and inhomogeneities which are found in the usual available samples. The transport and magnetic properties of several samples of boron carbide have been measured from liquid helium to room temperature as a function of temperature and composition. We have attempted to attribute the different features of these properties to the different levels of disorder. The role of free carbon, in form of thin layers of graphite within the disordered semi-conducting matrix, was investigated in particular details, because it was either ignored or neglected by others. Free carbon is found to dominate the D.C. transport when its concentration is larger than 5%; while the principal features of the electron spin resonance (E.S.R.) line show a dominance of free carbon when the concentration is larger than 3.5%. Below these concentrations conductivities as well as spin relaxation rates do not depend very much on free carbon; neither these have been found to be correlated in a simple way to the stoichiometry. (author)

  16. Laser cladding of tungsten carbides (Spherotene) hardfacing alloys for the mining and mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Alvarez, J.C.; Lamas, J.; Yanez, A.

    2009-01-01

    The abrasive nature of the mechanical processes involved in mining and mineral industry often causes significant wear to the associated equipment and derives non-negligible economic costs. One of the possible strategies to improve the wear resistance of the various components is the deposition of hardfacing layers on the bulk parts. The use of high power lasers for hardfacing (laser cladding) has attracted a great attention in the last decade as an alternative to other more standard methods (arc welding, oxy-fuel gas welding, thermal spraying). In laser cladding the hardfacing material is used in powder form. For high hardness applications Ni-, Co- or Fe-based alloys containing hard phase carbides at different ratios are commonly used. Tungsten carbides (WC) can provide coating hardness well above 1000 HV (Vickers). In this respect, commercially available WC powders normally contain spherical micro-particles consisting of crushed WC agglomerates. Some years ago, Spherotene powders consisting of spherical-fused monocrystaline WC particles, being extremely hard, between 1800 and 3000 HV, were patented. Very recently, mixtures of Ni-based alloy with Spherotene powders optimized for laser processing were presented (Technolase). These mixtures have been used in our study. Laser cladding tests with these powders were performed on low carbon steel (C25) substrates, and results in terms of microstructure and hardness will be discussed

  17. Performance of PVD-Coated Carbide Tools When Turning Inconel 718 in Dry Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusri Akhyar Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 has found its niche in many industries, owing to its unique properties such as high oxidation resistance and corrosion resistance even at very high temperatures. Coated carbide tool with hard layer of PVD TiAlN is used to turn Inconel 718. Taguchi method with the orthogonal array L9 is applied in this experiment with the parameter cutting speed of 60–80 m/min, feed rate of 0.2–0.3 mm/rev, and depth of cut of 0.3–0.5 mm. The results show that depth of cut is a significant influence to the tool life. Cutting speed of 60 m/min, feed rate of 0.2 mm/rev, and depth of cut of 0.3 mm are the optimum parameters. The flank wear, crater wear, notch wear, and nose wear are the wear mechanisms on the carbide tool. Through the SEM, abrasion, attrition, and adhesion are the wear mechanisms which can be seen on the cutting tool.

  18. Laser cladding of tungsten carbides (Spherotene) hardfacing alloys for the mining and mineral industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain); Tobar, M.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain)], E-mail: cote@udc.es; Alvarez, J.C.; Lamas, J.; Yanez, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    The abrasive nature of the mechanical processes involved in mining and mineral industry often causes significant wear to the associated equipment and derives non-negligible economic costs. One of the possible strategies to improve the wear resistance of the various components is the deposition of hardfacing layers on the bulk parts. The use of high power lasers for hardfacing (laser cladding) has attracted a great attention in the last decade as an alternative to other more standard methods (arc welding, oxy-fuel gas welding, thermal spraying). In laser cladding the hardfacing material is used in powder form. For high hardness applications Ni-, Co- or Fe-based alloys containing hard phase carbides at different ratios are commonly used. Tungsten carbides (WC) can provide coating hardness well above 1000 HV (Vickers). In this respect, commercially available WC powders normally contain spherical micro-particles consisting of crushed WC agglomerates. Some years ago, Spherotene powders consisting of spherical-fused monocrystaline WC particles, being extremely hard, between 1800 and 3000 HV, were patented. Very recently, mixtures of Ni-based alloy with Spherotene powders optimized for laser processing were presented (Technolase). These mixtures have been used in our study. Laser cladding tests with these powders were performed on low carbon steel (C25) substrates, and results in terms of microstructure and hardness will be discussed.

  19. Fluidized bed deposition and evaluation of silicon carbide coatings on microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federer, J.I.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel element for the HTGR is an array of closely packed fuel microspheres in a carbonaceous matrix. A coating of dense silicon carbide (SiC), along with pyrocarbon layers, is deposited on the fueled microspheres to serve as a barrier against diffusion of fission products. The microspheres are coated with silicon carbide in a fluidized bed by reaction of methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 or MTS) and hydrogen at elevated temperatures. The principal variables of coating temperature and reactant gas composition (H 2 /MTS ratio) have been correlated with coating rate, morphology, stoichiometry, microstructure, and density. The optimum temperature for depositing highly dense coatings is in the range 1475 to 1675 0 C. Lower temperatures result in silicon-rich deposits, while higher temperatures may cause unacceptable porosity. The optimum H 2 /MTS ratio for highly dense coatings is 20 or more (approximately 5% MTS or less). The amount of grown-in porosity increases as the H 2 /MTS ratio decreases below 20. The requirement that the H 2 /MTS ratio be about 20 or more imposes a practical restraint on coating rate, since increasing the total flow rate would eventually expel microspheres from the coating tube. Evaluation of stoichiometry, morphology, and microstructure support the above mentioned optimum conditions of temperature and reactant gas composition. 18 figures, 3 tables

  20. Effect of carbides on erosion resistance of 23-8-N steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    8-N nitronic steel, carbides present in the form of bands are observed to accelerate the erosion rate. Coarse ... lar carbides, precipitating at random boundaries, were more likely to ... 23-8-N nitronic steel is basically austenitic stainless steel.

  1. On the processing, microstructure, mechanical and wear properties of cermet/stainless steel layer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Akhtar; Guo Shiju

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with layer composites of carbide reinforcements and stainless steel prepared successfully by powder technology. The layer material consisted of two layers. The top layer consisted of reinforcements (TiC and NbC) and 465 stainless steel as the binder material for the carbides. The bottom layer was entirely of binder material (465 stainless steel). The microstructure of the composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microstructural study revealed that the top layer (TiC-NbC/465 stainless steel) showed the typical core-rim microstructure of conventional steel bonded cermets and the bottom layer showed the structure of sintered steel. An intermediate layer was found with a gradient microstructure, having a higher carbide content towards the cermet layer and lower carbide content towards the stainless steel layer. The bending strength of the layered material measured in the direction perpendicular to the layer alignment was remarkably high. The variation of strength as a function of the thickness of the bottom layer revealed that the character of the material changed from the cermet, to a layer composite and then towards metallic materials. The wear resistance of the top layer was studied against high speed steel. The wear mechanisms were discussed by means of microscopical observations on the worn surfaces. The wear was severe at higher wear loads and lower TiC content. Microploughing of the stainless steel matrix was found to be the dominant wear mechanism. Heavy microploughing and rapid removal of material from the wear surface was observed at high wear load. The fracture morphologies of the top, bottom and intermediate layers are reported

  2. Structure-Property Relationship in Metal Carbides and Bimetallic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguan [University of Delaware

    2014-03-04

    The primary objective of our DOE/BES sponsored research is to use carbide and bimetallic catalysts as model systems to demonstrate the feasibility of tuning the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability. Our efforts involve three parallel approaches, with the aim at studying single crystal model surfaces and bridging the “materials gap” and “pressure gap” between fundamental surface science studies and real world catalysis. The utilization of the three parallel approaches has led to the discovery of many intriguing catalytic properties of carbide and bimetallic surfaces and catalysts. During the past funding period we have utilized these combined research approaches to explore the possibility of predicting and verifying bimetallic and carbide combinations with enhanced catalytic activity, selectivity and stability.

  3. Supported molybdenum carbide for higher alcohol synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Chiarello, Gian Luca

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum carbide supported on active carbon, carbon nanotubes, and titanium dioxide, and promoted by K2CO3, has been prepared and tested for methanol and higher alcohol synthesis from syngas. At optimal conditions, the activity and selectivity to alcohols (methanol and higher alcohols) over...... carbide, while the selectivity to methanol follows the opposite trend. The effect of Mo2C loading on the alcohol selectivity at a fixed K/Mo molar ratio of 0.14 could be related to the amount of K2CO3 actually on the active Mo2C phase and the size, structure and composition of the supported carbide...... alcohols is obtained at a K/Mo molar ratio of 0.21 over the active carbon supported Mo2C (20wt%)....

  4. Development of Gradient Cemented Carbides Through ICME Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Peng, Yingbiao; Zhang, Weibin; Chen, Weimin; Zhou, Peng; Xie, Wen; Cheng, Kaiming; Zhang, Lijun; Wen, Guanghua; Wang, Shequan

    An integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) including CALPHAD method is a powerful tool for materials process optimization and alloy design. The quality of CALPHAD-type calculations is strongly dependent on the quality of the thermodynamic and diffusivity databases. The development of a thermodynamic database, CSUTDCC1, and a diffusivity database, CSUDDCC1, for cemented carbides is described. Several gradient cemented carbides sintered under vacuum and various partial pressures of N2 have been studied via experiment and simulation. The microstructure and concentration profile of the gradient zones have been investigated via SEM and EPMA. Examples of ICME applications in design and manufacture for different kinds of cemented carbides are shown using the databases and comparing where possible against experimental data, thereby validating its accuracy.

  5. Preparation of hafnium carbide by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, Dominique.

    1974-01-01

    Hard, adhesive coatings of single-phase hafnium carbide were obtained by chemical vapor reaction in an atmosphere containing hafnium tetrachloride, methane and a large excess of hydrogen. By varying the gas phase composition and temperature the zones of formation of the different solid phases were studied and the growth of elementary hafnium and carbon deposits evaluated separately. The results show that the mechanism of hafnium carbide deposition does not hardly involve phenomene of homogeneous-phase methane decomposition or tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen unless the atmosphere is very rich or very poor in methane with respect to tetrachloride. However, hydrogen acting inversely on these two reactions, affects the stoichiometry of the substance deposited. The methane decomposition reaction is fairly slow, the reaction leading to hafnium carbide deposition is faster and that of tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen is quite fast [fr

  6. Synthesis of carbides of refractory metals in salt melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyushchenko, N.G.; Anfinogenov, A.I.; Chebykin, V.V.; Chernov, Ya.B.; Shurov, N.I.; Ryaposov, Yu.A.; Dobrynin, A.I.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Chub, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    The ion-electron melts, obtained through dissolving the alkali and alkali-earth metals in the molten chlorides above the chloride melting temperature, were used for manufacturing the high-melting metal carbides as the transport melt. The lithium, calcium and magnesium chlorides and the mixture of the lithium chloride with the potassium or calcium chloride were used from the alkali or alkali-earth metals. The metallic lithium, calcium, magnesium or the calcium-magnesium mixtures were used as the alkali or alkali-earth metals. The carbon black or sugar was used as carbon. It is shown, that lithium, magnesium or calcium in the molten salts transfer the carbon on the niobium, tantalum, titanium, forming the carbides of the above metals. The high-melting metal carbides are obtained both from the metal pure powders and from the oxides and chlorides [ru

  7. Carbides crystalline structure of AISI M2 high-speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, M.M.; Galego, E.; Rossi, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the crystallographic structure of the extracted carbides of AISI M2 steel spray formed The structure determination of these carbides. The structure determination of these carbides is a very hard work. Since these structures were formed by atom migration it is not possible to reproduce them by a controlled process with a determined chemical composition. The solution of this problem is to obtain the carbide by chemical extraction from the steel. (Author)

  8. Dilatometry Analysis of Dissolution of Cr-Rich Carbides in Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuliang; Volkova, Olena; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution of Cr-rich carbides formed in the martensitic constituent of a 13 pct Cr stainless steel was studied by dilatometry and correlative electron channeling contrast examinations. The dissolution of carbides subsequent to the martensite reversion to austenite was associated with a net volume expansion which in turn increased the dilatometry-based apparent coefficient of thermal expansion (CTEa) during continuous heating. The effects of carbides fraction and size on the CTEa variations during carbides dissolution are discussed.

  9. Plastic deformation of particles of zirconium and titanium carbide subjected to vibration grinding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchik, A.E.; Neshpor, V.S.; Savel' ev, G.A.; Ordan' yan, S.S.

    1976-12-01

    A study is made of the influence of stoichiometry on the characteristics of microplastic deformation in powders of zirconium and titanium carbide subjected to vibration grinding. The carbide powders were produced by direct synthesis from the pure materials: metallic titanium and zirconium and acetylene black. As to the nature of their elastic deformation, zirconium and titanium carbides can be considered elastic-isotropic materials. During vibration grinding, the primary fracture planes are the (110) planes. Carbides of nonstoichiometric composition are more brittle.

  10. Nonmetal effect on ordering structures in titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.; Ehm, V.T.; Savenko, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of oxygen and nitrogen atoms on formation of intermediate, cubic and trigonal ordering structures in the titanium carbide is studied through the roentgenography and neutron radiography methods. Metal atoms in the TiC 0.545 O 0.08 , TiC 0.545 N 0.09 samples under study are shifted from ideal positions in the direction from vacancies to metalloid atoms. In the intermediate cubic phase the values of the titanium atoms free parameter in both samples are identical, but they differ from analogous values in the titanium carbide

  11. Thermodynamic Calculation of Carbide Precipitate in Niobium Microalloyed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun-bo; YU Yong-mei; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of regular solution sublattice model, thermodynamic equilibrium of austenite/carbide in Fe-Nb-C ternary system was investigated. The equilibrium volume fraction, chemical driving force of carbide precipitates and molar fraction of niobium and carbon in solution at different temperatures were evaluated respectively. The volume fraction of precipitates increases, molar fraction of niobium dissolved in austenite decreases and molar fraction of carbon increases with decreasing the niobium content. The driving force increases with the decrease of temperature, and then comes to be stable at relatively low temperatures. The predicted ratio of carbon in precipitates is in good agreement with the measured one.

  12. Comparative sinterability of combustion synthesized and commercial titanium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of various parameters on the sinterability of combustion synthesized titanium carbide was investigaged. Titanium carbide powders, prepared by the combustion synthesis process, were sintered in the temperature range 1150 to 1600 0 C. Incomplete combustion and high oxygen contents were found to be the cause of reduced shrinkage during sintering of the combustion syntheized powders when compared to the shrinkage of commercial TiC. Free carbon was shown to inhibit shrinkage. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on stoichiometry (C/Ti). With decreasing C/Ti, the rate of sintering increased. 29 references, 16 figures, 13 tables

  13. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L; Orozco, E; Garibay-Febles, V; Bucio-Galindo, L; Mendoza Leon, H; Castillo-Ocampo, P; Montoya, A

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 μm in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 μm in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process

  14. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Orozco, E [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Garibay-Febles, V [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Bucio-Galindo, L [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Mendoza Leon, H [FM-UPALM, IPN, Apartado Postal 75-395 CP 07300, DF (Mexico); Castillo-Ocampo, P [UAM-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-334 CP 09340, DF (Mexico); Montoya, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 {mu}m in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process.

  15. Pilot production of 325 kg of uranium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clozet, C.; Dessus, J.; Devillard, J.; Guibert, M.; Morlot, G.

    1969-01-01

    This report describes the pilot fabrication of uranium carbide rods to be mounted in bundles and assayed in two channels of the EL 4 reactor. The fabrication process includes: - elaboration of uranium carbide granules by carbothermic reduction of uranium dioxide; - electron bombardment melting and continuous casting of the granules; - machining of the raw ingots into rods of the required dimensions; finally, the rods will be piled-up to make the fuel elements. Both qualitative and quantitative results of this pilot production chain are presented and discussed. (authors) [fr

  16. Enhanced optical performance of electrochemically etched porous silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naderi, N; Hashim, M R; Saron, K M A; Rouhi, J

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide (PSC) was successfully synthesized via electrochemical etching of an n-type hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) substrate using various current densities. The cyclic voltammograms of SiC dissolution show that illumination is required for the accumulation of carriers at the surface, followed by surface oxidation and dissolution of the solid. The morphological and optical characterizations of PSC were reported. Scanning electron microscopy results demonstrated that the current density can be considered an important etching parameter that controls the porosity and uniformity of PSC; hence, it can be used to optimize the optical properties of the porous samples. (paper)

  17. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0.39 m (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together ...

  18. Liquid phase sintering of carbides using a nickel-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, J.M.; Warenchak, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid phase vacuum sintering was used to densify four carbide groups. These were titanium carbide, tungsten carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide. The liquid phase consisted of nickel with additions of molybdenum of from 6.25 to 50.0 weight percent at doubling increments. The liquid phase or binder comprised 10, 20, and 40 percent by weight of the pressed powders. The specimens were tested using 3 point bending. Tungsten carbide showed the greatest improvement in bend rupture strength, flexural modulus, fracture energy and hardness using 20 percent binder with lesser amounts of molybdenum (6.25 or 12.5 wt %) added to nickel compared to pure nickel. A refinement in the carbide microstructure and/or a reduction in porosity was seen for both the titanium and tungsten carbides when the alloy binder was used compared to using the nickel alone. Curves depicting the above properties are shown for increasing amounts of molybdenum in nickel for each carbide examined. Loss of binder phase due to evaporation was experienced during heating in vacuum at sintering temperatures. In an effort to reduce porosity, identical specimens were HIP processed at 15 ksi and temperatures averaging 110 C below the sintering g temperature. The tungsten carbide and titanium carbide series containing 80 and 90 weight percent carbide phase respectively showed improvement properties after HIP while properties decreased for most other compositions

  19. Active carbon supported molybdenum carbides for higher alcohols synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Chiarello, Gian Luca; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    This work provides an investigation of the high pressure CO hydrogenation to higher alcohols on K2CO3 promoted active carbon supported molybdenum carbide. Both activity and selectivity to alcohols over supported molybdenum carbides increased significantly compared to bulk carbides in literatures...

  20. Recovery of pure slaked lime from carbide sludge: Case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adaobi

    Carbide sludge is the by-product of reaction between calcium carbide and water in the production of ... soluble in water. The optimum percentage yield was 78.2% at a ratio of 1:1000(w/v) of sludge to water held for 24 h at room temperature. Key words: Carbide, recovery, ..... calcium carbonate and other calcium products.

  1. Process for producing uranium carbide spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shennan, J.V.; Ford, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to fabricate UC spheroids which are filled into moulds made of refractory material for fuel elements. The UC fuel particles are double-coated: a first thin layer of pyrolytic carbon is coated at low temperature 1200-1400 0 C, a record layer of pyrolytic material (e.g. Si c) is coated at a higher temperature (above 1500 0 C) which holds back the fission products. The method is described more closely by means of an example. (GSC) [de

  2. Process for producing uranium carbide spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shennan, J.V.; Ford, L.H.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to produce UC spheroids which are filled into molded bodies of fire-proof material for fuel elements. The UC fuel particles are doubly coated: a first thin layer of pyrolytic carbon is coated at low temperature (1,200-1,400 0 C), a second layer of fire-proof material (e.g. SiC) is coated at a higher temperature (above 1,500 0 C) which holds back the fission products. The process is explained in more detail using an example. (GSCH) [de

  3. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets. [B/sub 4/C-Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, D.C.; Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A.

    1985-05-06

    Hard, tough, lighweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidated step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modules of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi..sqrt..in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  4. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei, E-mail: jwchen@scu.edu.cn; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin, E-mail: rl.wang@scu.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Graphical abstract: A hybrid catalyst was prepared via a quite green and simple method to achieve an one-pot synthesis of the N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides. It exhibited comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability and ability to methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C to ORR. - Highlights: • A novel type of hybrid Fe/Co/WC@NC catalysts have been successfully synthesized. • The hybrid catalyst also exhibited better durability and methanol tolerance. • Multiple effective active sites of Fe{sub 3}C, Co{sub 3}C, WC, and NC help to improve catalytic performance. - Abstract: This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe{sub 3}C and Co{sub 3}C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe{sub 3}C, and Co{sub 3}C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  5. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leparoux, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)], E-mail: susanne.leparoux@empa.ch; Diot, C. [Consultant, allee de Mozart 10, F-92300 Chatillon (France); Dubach, A. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Vaucher, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2007-10-15

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  6. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leparoux, S.; Diot, C.; Dubach, A.; Vaucher, S.

    2007-01-01

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  7. Design and Thermal Analysis for Irradiation of Pyrolytic Carbon/Silicon Carbide Diffusion Couples in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerczak, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Kurt R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO)–coated particle fuel is a promising advanced fuel concept consisting of a spherical fuel kernel made of uranium oxide and uranium carbide, surrounded by a porous carbonaceous buffer layer and successive layers of dense inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), silicon carbide (SiC) deposited by chemical vapor , and dense outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC). This fuel concept is being considered for advanced reactor applications such as high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) and molten salt reactors (MSRs), as well as for accident-tolerant fuel for light water reactors (LWRs). Development and implementation of TRISO fuel for these reactor concepts support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy mission to promote safe, reliable nuclear energy that is sustainable and environmentally friendly. During operation, the SiC layer serves as the primary barrier to metallic fission products and actinides not retained in the kernel. It has been observed that certain fission products are released from TRISO fuel during operation, notably, Ag, Eu, and Sr [1]. Release of these radioisotopes causes safety and maintenance concerns.

  8. Experimental investigation on material migration phenomena in micro-EDM of reaction-bonded silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, Pay Jun [Department of Mechanical Systems and Design, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aoba 6-6-01, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Manufacturing Process Department, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100, Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Yan, Jiwang, E-mail: yan@mech.keio.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, 223-8522 (Japan); Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto [Department of Mechanical Systems and Design, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aoba 6-6-01, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Material migration between tool electrode and workpiece material in micro electrical discharge machining of reaction-bonded silicon carbide was experimentally investigated. The microstructural changes of workpiece and tungsten tool electrode were examined using scanning electron microscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray under various voltage, capacitance and carbon nanofibre concentration in the dielectric fluid. Results show that tungsten is deposited intensively inside the discharge-induced craters on the RB-SiC surface as amorphous structure forming micro particles, and on flat surface region as a thin interdiffusion layer of poly-crystalline structure. Deposition of carbon element on tool electrode was detected, indicating possible material migration to the tool electrode from workpiece material, carbon nanofibres and dielectric oil. Material deposition rate was found to be strongly affected by workpiece surface roughness, voltage and capacitance of the electrical discharge circuit. Carbon nanofibre addition in the dielectric at a suitable concentration significantly reduced the material deposition rate.

  9. Experimental investigation on material migration phenomena in micro-EDM of reaction-bonded silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, Pay Jun; Yan, Jiwang; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto

    2013-01-01

    Material migration between tool electrode and workpiece material in micro electrical discharge machining of reaction-bonded silicon carbide was experimentally investigated. The microstructural changes of workpiece and tungsten tool electrode were examined using scanning electron microscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray under various voltage, capacitance and carbon nanofibre concentration in the dielectric fluid. Results show that tungsten is deposited intensively inside the discharge-induced craters on the RB-SiC surface as amorphous structure forming micro particles, and on flat surface region as a thin interdiffusion layer of poly-crystalline structure. Deposition of carbon element on tool electrode was detected, indicating possible material migration to the tool electrode from workpiece material, carbon nanofibres and dielectric oil. Material deposition rate was found to be strongly affected by workpiece surface roughness, voltage and capacitance of the electrical discharge circuit. Carbon nanofibre addition in the dielectric at a suitable concentration significantly reduced the material deposition rate.

  10. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchoel Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5 layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  11. Apparatus for surface treatment of U-Pu carbide fuel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Susumu; Arai, Yasuo; Handa, Muneo; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Shiozawa, Ken-ichi.

    1979-05-01

    Apparatus has been constructed for treating the surface of U-Pu carbide fuel samples for EPMA. The treatment is to clean off oxide layer on the surface, then coat with an electric-conductive material. The apparatus, safe in handling plutonium, operates as follows. (1) To avoid oxidation of the analyzing surface by oxygen and water in the air, series of cleaning and coating, i.e. ion-etching and ion-coating or ion-etching and vacuum-evaporation is done at the same time in an inert gas atmosphere. (2) Ion-etching is possible on samples embedded in non-electric-conductive and low heat-conductive resin. (3) Since the temperature rise in (2) is negligible, there is no deterioration of the samples. (author)

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of thermal plasma process of composite zirconium carbide and silicon carbide production from zircon concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Z.G.; Stefanovic, P.Lj.; Pavlovic; Pavlovic, Z.N.; Zivkovic, N.V.

    2000-01-01

    Improved zirconium ceramics and composites have been invented in an effort to obtain better resistance to ablation at high temperature. These ceramics are suitable for use as thermal protection materials on the exterior surfaces of spacecraft, and in laboratory and industrial environments that include flows of hot oxidizing gases. Results of thermodynamic consideration of the process for composite zirconium carbide and silicon carbide ultrafine powder production from ZrSiO 4 in argon thermal plasma and propane-butane gas as reactive quenching reagents are presented in the paper. (author)

  13. Deposition of multicomponent chromium carbide coatings using a non-conventional source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Ruiz, Jesus Eduardo, E-mail: jesus.gonzalez@biomat.uh.cu [Biomaterials Center, University of Havana (Cuba); Rodriguez Cristo, Alejandro [Mechanical Plants Company, Road of the Sub-Plan, Farm La Cana, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Ramos, Adrian Paz [Department of Chemistry, Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Quintana Puchol, Rafael [Welding Research Center, Central University Marta Abreu of Las Villas, Villa Clara (Cuba)

    2017-01-15

    The chromium carbide coatings are widely used in the mechanical industry due to its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In this work, we evaluated a new source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron on the deposition of multi-component coatings of chromium carbides in W108 steel. The coatings were obtained by the pack cementation method, using a simultaneous deposition at 1000 deg for 4 hours. The coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, microhardness test method and pin-on-disc wear test. It was found that the coatings formed on W108 steel were mainly constituted by (Cr,Fe){sub 23}C{sub 6} , (Cr,Fe){sub 7} C{sub 3} , Cr{sub 5-x}Si{sub 3-x} C{sub x+z}, Cr{sub 3} B{sub 0,44}C{sub 1,4} and (or) Cr{sub 7} BC{sub 4} . The carbide layers showed thicknesses between 14 and 15 μm and maximum values of microhardness between 15.8 and 18.8 GPa. Also, the micro-additions of boron to the mixtures showed statistically significant influence on the thickness, microhardness and abrasive wear resistance of the carbide coatings. (author)

  14. The Study of Heat Treatment Effects on Chromium Carbide Precipitation of 35Cr-45Ni-Nb Alloy for Repairing Furnace Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakarin Srisuwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a specific kind of failure in ethylene pyrolysis furnace tubes. It considers the case in which the tubes made of 35Cr-45Ni-Nb high temperature alloy failed to carburization, causing creep damage. The investigation found that used tubes became difficult to weld repair due to internal carburized layers of the tube. The microstructure and geochemical component of crystallized carbide at grain boundary of tube specimens were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM with back-scattered electrons mode (BSE, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Micro-hardness tests was performed to determine the hardness of the matrix and the compounds of new and used tube material. The testing result indicated that used tubes exhibited a higher hardness and higher degree of carburization compared to those of new tubes. The microstructure of used tubes also revealed coarse chromium carbide precipitation and a continuous carbide lattice at austenite grain boundaries. However, thermal heat treatment applied for developing tube weld repair could result in dissolving or breaking up chromium carbide with a decrease in hardness value. This procedure is recommended to improve the weldability of the 35Cr-45Ni-Nb used tubes alloy.

  15. Residual stress analysis in thick uranium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, A.M.; Foreman, R.J.; Gallegos, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    Residual stress analysis was performed on thick, 1-25 μm, depleted uranium (DU) films deposited on an Al substrate by magnetron sputtering. Two distinct characterization techniques were used to measure substrate curvature before and after deposition. Stress evaluation was performed using the Benabdi/Roche equation, which is based on beam theory of a bi-layer material. The residual stress evolution was studied as a function of coating thickness and applied negative bias voltage (0, -200, -300 V). The stresses developed were always compressive; however, increasing the coating thickness and applying a bias voltage presented a trend towards more tensile stresses and thus an overall reduction of residual stresses

  16. Model Research On Synthesis Of Al2O3-C Layers By MOCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawka A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available These are model studies whose aim is to obtain information that would allow development of new technology for synthesizing monolayers of Al2O3-C with adjusted microstructure on cemented carbides. The Al2O3-C layer will constitute an intermediate layer on which the outer layer of Al2O3 without carbon is synthesized. The purpose of the intermediate layer is to block the cobalt diffusion to the synthesized outer layer of Al2O3 and to stop the diffusion of air oxygen to the substrate during the synthesis of the outer layer. This layer should be thin, continuous, dense and uniform in thickness.

  17. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    phosphoric acid were investigated in a temperature range from 80 to 170°C. A significant dependence of the activities on temperature was observed for all five carbide samples. Through the entire temperature range Group 6 metal carbides showed higher activity than that of the Group 5 metal carbides......Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated...

  18. Behavior of tungsten carbide in water stabilized plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Matějíček, Jiří; Neufuss, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2007), s. 213-220 ISSN 1335-8987 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : water stabilized plasma * tungsten carbide * tungsten hemicarbide * decarburization Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  19. PECVD silicon carbide surface micromachining technology and selected MEMS applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajaraman, V.; Pakula, L.S.; Yang, H.; French, P.J.; Sarro, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Attractive material properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon carbide (SiC) when combined with CMOS-compatible low thermal budget processing provides an ideal technology platform for developing various microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and merging them with

  20. Helium generation and diffusion in graphite and some carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.B.; Guinan, M.W.; Hosmer, D.W.; Condit, R.H.; Borg, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The cross section for the generation of helium in neutron irradiated carbon was found to be 654 mb at 14.4 MeV and 744 mb at 14.9 MeV. Extrapolating to 14.1 MeV (the fusion reactor spectrum) gives 615 mb. The diffusion of helium in dense polycrystalline graphite and in pyrographite was measured and found to be D = 7.2 x 10 -7 m 2 s -1 exp (-80 kJ/RT). It is assumed that diffusion is primarily in the basal plane direction in crystals of the graphite. In polycrystalline graphite the path length is a factor of √2 longer than the measured distance due to the random orientation mismatch between successive grains. Isochronal anneals (measured helium release as the specimen is steadily heated) were run and maximum release rates were found at 200 0 C in polycrystalline graphite, 1000 0 C in pyrographite, 1350 0 C in boron carbide, and 1350 0 and 2400 0 C (two peaks) in silicon carbide. It is concluded that in these candidates for curtain materials in fusion reactors the helium releases can probably occur without bubble formation in graphites, may occur in boron carbide, but will probably cause bubble formation in silicon carbide. 7 figures

  1. Hollow microspheres with a tungsten carbide kernel for PEMFC application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Arbigny, Julien Bernard; Taillades, Gilles; Marrony, Mathieu; Jones, Deborah J; Rozière, Jacques

    2011-07-28

    Tungsten carbide microspheres comprising an outer shell and a compact kernel prepared by a simple hydrothermal method exhibit very high surface area promoting a high dispersion of platinum nanoparticles, and an exceptionally high electrochemically active surface area (EAS) stability compared to the usual Pt/C electrocatalysts used for PEMFC application.

  2. Analysis of carbides and inclusions in high speed tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, K.T.; Dahl, K.V.

    2002-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of fatigued specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The aim was to quantify the distribution of cracked carbides and non-metallic inclusions on the fracturesurfaces as well as on polished cross...

  3. RICE-HUSK ASH-CARBIDE-WASTE STABILIZATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper present results of the laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of carbide waste and rice husk ash stabilized reclaimed asphalt pavement waste with a ... of 5.7 % and resistance to loss in strength of 84.1 %, hence the recommendation of the mixture for use as sub-base material in flexible pavement construction.

  4. Hydrotreatment activities of supported molybdenum nitrides and carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolce, G.M.; Savage, P.E.; Thompson, L.T. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    The growing need for alternative sources of transportation fuels encourages the development of new hydrotreatment catalysts. These catalysts must be active and more hydrogen efficient than the current commercial hydrotreatment catalysts. Molybdenum nitrides and carbides are attractive candidate materials possessing properties that are comparable or superior to those of commercial sulfide catalysts. This research investigated the catalytic properties of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported molybdenum nitrides and carbides. These catalysts were synthesized via temperature-programmed reaction of supported molybdenum oxides with ammonia or methane/hydrogen mixtures. Phase constituents and compositions were determined by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and neutral activation analysis. Oxygen chemisorption was used to probe the surface properties of the catalysts. Specific activities of the molybdenum nitrides and carbides were competitive with those of a commercial sulfide catalyst for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). For HDN and HDS, the catalytic activity on a molybdenum basis was a strong inverse function of the molybdenum loading. Product distributions of the HDN, HDO and HDS of a variety of heteroatom compounds indicated that several of the nitrides and carbides were more hydrogen efficient than the sulfide catalyst. 35 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    carbide ceramics. A K MUKHOPADHYAY. Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India. Abstract. Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz.

  6. Thermionic emission of cermets made of refractory carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsonow, G.W.; Bogomol, I.W.; Ochremtschuk, L.N.; Podtschernjajewa, I.A.; Fomenko, W.S.

    1975-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance to thermal variations of refractory carbides having good behavior for thermionic emission, they have been combined with transition metals d. Thermionic emission was studied with cermets in compact samples. Following systems were examined: TiC-Nb, TiC-Mo, TiC-W, ZrC-Nb, ZrC-Mo, ZrC-W, WC-Mo with compositions of: 75% M 1 C-25% M 2 , 50%M 1 C-50%M 2 , 25%M 1 C-75%M 2 . When following the variation of electron emission energy phi versus the composition, it appears that in the range of mixed crystals (M 1 M 2 )C, phi decreases and the resistance to thermal variations of these phases is higher than that of individual carbides. The study of obtained cermets shows that their resistance to thermal variations is largely superior to the one of starting carbides; TiC and ZrC carbides, combined with molybdenum and tungsten support the highest number of thermic cycles

  7. Electron microscopy of boron carbide before and after electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.; Zuppiroli, L.; Beauvy, M.; Athanassiadis, T.

    1984-06-01

    The microstructure of boron carbide has been studied by electron microscopy and related to the composition of the material. After electron irradiations in an usual transmission electron microscope and in a high voltage electron microscope at different temperatures and fluxes no change of these microstructures have been observed but a sputtering of the surface of the samples, which has been studied quantitatively [fr

  8. Ultrafast nonlinear response of silicon carbide to intense THz fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate ultrafast nonlinear absorption induced by strong, single-cycle THz fields in bulk, lightly doped 4H silicon carbide. A combination of Zener tunneling and intraband transitions makes the effect as at least as fast as the excitation pulse. The sub-picosecond recovery time makes...

  9. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results highlight the positive effect of the nanometric silicon carbide addition in phenolic resin on mechanical, thermo-mechanical and tribological performance, improving their strength, stiffness and abrasive properties. The best results were obtained for 1 wt% nSiC, proving that this value is the optimum nanometric ...

  10. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  11. Stabilization of Ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use as pavement material. Atterberg's limits test, California bearing ratio (CBR) and unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests were conducted on the natural laterite and the treated soil specimens. The plasticity ...

  12. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    weight armour plates etc (Alizadeh et al 2004). It can also be used as a reinforcing material for ceramic matrix composites. It is an excellent neutron absorption material in nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption co- efficient (Sinha et al 2002). Boron carbide can be prepared by reaction of elemental boron and ...

  13. Mechanistic evaluation of the effect of calcium carbide waste on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcium Carbide Waste (CCW) was used as an alternative to traditional Portland cement mineral filler in hot mix asphalt concrete to rid its disposal problem. Its effect on mechanical properties of hot mix asphalt was assessed using the Marshall method of mix design. Using the optimum bitumen content determined from ...

  14. Sintering of nano crystalline o silicon carbide doping with

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable silicon carbide powders were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type -SiC. Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of aluminium nitride together with carbon. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by ...

  15. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker's ...

  16. Synthesis and investigation of silicon carbide nanowires by HFCVD ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanowire has been fabricated by hot filament chemical vapour .... −5. Torr by mechanical and dif- fusion vacuum pumps, then high purity H2 gas was fed into it. ... to standard PDF card numbers of 01-074-2307 and 01-.

  17. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...

  18. Filtration characteristics of porous silicon carbide media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung Gil; Seo, Yong Chil; Yim, Sung Paal; Kim, Joon Hyung

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of a filter such as clean filter pressure drop, filtering performance and filter drag variation with dust loading have been studied with fabricated SiC filter specimens in the laboratory and commercial ceramic filters. Several theoretical equations have been modified and applied to investigate such characteristics. To estimate the pressure drop of clean gas flow through a cylindrical porous filter, Forchheimer equation, which contains the terms of permeability and turbulent factor at a high velocity of gas, has been modified and tested with experimental data. The filtering efficiency was found to be above 99.9% and the penetration of dust decreased exponentially with dust loading. The pressure drop during filtration was measured and showed to increase exponentially with dust loading in the beginning because particles were intercepted and a cake layer was formed by structural properties of a filter. And then it increased in proportion as the cake layer thickened. The effect of dust deposition on the pressure drop could be explained theoretically using several characteristic parameters relevant to dust size, structure of filters and cake layer formation

  19. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  20. Advances in carbide fuel element development for fast reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienst, W.; Kleykamp, H.; Muehling, G.; Reiser, H.; Steiner, H.; Thuemmler, F.; Wedermeyer, H.; Weimar, P.

    1977-01-01

    The features of the carbide fuel development programme are reviewed and evaluated. Single pin and bundle irradiations are carried out under thermal, epithermal and fast flux conditions, the latter in the DFR and KNK-II reactors. Several fuel concepts in the region of representative SNR clad temperatures are compared by parameter and performance tests. A conservative concept is based on He-bonded 8 mm pins with (U,Pu)C pellets and a smear density of 75% TD, operating at 800 W/cm rod power and burnup to 70 MWd/kg. The preparation of mixed carbide fuels is carried out by carbothermic reduction of the oxides in different methods supported by equivalent carbon content, grain size and phase distribution analysis. The fuel for subassembly performance tests is produced in a pilot plant of 0,5 t/year capacity. Compatibility studies reveal that cladding carburization is the only chemical interaction with carbide fuels. This effect leads to a reduction in ductility of the stainless steel. Fission products apparently play no role in the compatibility behaviour. Comprehensive studies lead to reliable information on the chemical and thermodynamic state of the fuel under irradiation. The swelling of carbide fuels and the fission gas release are examined and analysed. Cladding plastic strain by fuel swelling occurs during steady-state operation because the irradiation creep is rather slow compared to oxide fuels. The cladding strain observed depends on the fuel porosity and the cladding strength. The development of carbide fuel pins is complemented by the application of comprehensive computer models. In addition to the steady-state tests power cycling and safety tests are under performance. Up to 1980 the results are summarized for the final design and specification. The development target of the present program is to fabricate several subassemblies for test operation in the SNR 300 by 1981

  1. Structure and single-phase regime of boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1988-01-01

    The boron carbides are composed of twelve-atom icosahedral clusters which are linked by direct covalent bonds and through three-atom intericosahedral chains. The boron carbides are known to exist as a single phase with carbon concentrations from about 8 to about 20 at. %. This range of carbon concentrations is made possible by the substitution of boron and carbon atoms for one another within both the icosahedra and intericosahedral chains. The most widely accepted structural model for B 4 C (the boron carbide with nominally 20% carbon) has B/sub 11/C icosahedra with C-B-C intericosahedral chains. Here, the free energy of the boron carbides is studied as a function of carbon concentration by considering the effects of replacing carbon atoms within B 4 C with boron atoms. It is concluded that entropic and energetic considerations both favor the replacement of carbon atoms with boron atoms within the intericosahedral chains, C-B-C→C-B-B. Once the carbon concentration is so low that the vast majority of the chains are C-B-B chains, near B/sub 13/C 2 , subsequent substitutions of carbon atoms with boron atoms occur within the icosahedra, B/sub 11/C→B/sub 12/. Maxima of the free energy occur at the most ordered compositions: B 4 C,B/sub 13/C 2 ,B/sub 14/C. This structural model, determined by studying the free energy, agrees with that previously suggested by analysis of electronic and thermal transport data. These considerations also provide an explanation for the wide single-phase regime found for boron carbides

  2. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon, boron carbide, and titanium carbide coatings against glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, B.K.; Brown, D.W.; Kimock, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    Protection of glass substrates by direct ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings was observed using a commercial pin-on-disk instrument at ambient conditions without lubrication. Ion beam sputter-deposited titanium carbide and boron carbide coatings reduced sliding friction, and provided tribological protection of silicon substrates, but the improvement factor was less than that found for DLC. Observations of unlubricated sliding of hemispherical glass pins at ambient conditions on uncoated glass and silicon substrates, and ion beam deposited coatings showed decreased wear in the order: uncoated glass>uncoated silicon>boron carbide>titanium carbide>DLC>uncoated sapphire. Failure mechanisms varied widely and are discussed. Generally, the amount of wear decreased as the sliding friction decreased, with the exception of uncoated sapphire substrates, for which the wear was low despite very high friction. There is clear evidence that DLC coatings continue to protect the underlying substrate long after the damage first penetrates through the coating. The test results correlate with field use data on commercial products which have shown that the DLC coatings provide substantial extension of the useful lifetime of glass and other substrates. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  3. Nanoscale multilayered and porous carbide interphases prepared by pressure-pulsed reactive chemical vapor deposition for ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, S.; Jouanny, I.; Ledain, O.; Maillé, L.; Weisbecker, P.

    2013-01-01

    In Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) reinforced by continuous fibers, a good toughness is achieved by adding a thin film called “interphase” between the fiber and the brittle matrix, which acts as a mechanical fuse by deflecting the matrix cracks. Pyrocarbon (PyC), with or without carbide sub-layers, is typically the material of choice to fulfill this role. The aim of this work was to study PyC-free nanoscale multilayered carbide coatings as interphases for CMCs. Nanoscale multilayered (SiC–TiC) n interphases were deposited by pressure-Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (P-CVD) on single filament Hi-Nicalon fibers and embedded in a SiC matrix sheath. The thicknesses of the carbide interphase sub-layers could be made as low as a few nanometers as evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. By using the P-ReactiveCVD method (P-RCVD), in which the TiC growth involves consumption of SiC, it was not only possible to obtain multilayered (SiC–TiC) n films but also TiC films with a porous multilayered microstructure as a result of the Kirkendall effect. The porosity in the TiC sequences was found to be enhanced when some PyC was added to SiC prior to total RCVD consumption. Because the porosity volume fraction was still not high enough, the role of mechanical fuse of the interphases could not be evidenced from the tensile curves, which remained fully linear even when chemical attack of the fiber surface was avoided.

  4. Nanoscale multilayered and porous carbide interphases prepared by pressure-pulsed reactive chemical vapor deposition for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, S.; Jouanny, I.; Ledain, O.; Maillé, L.; Weisbecker, P.

    2013-06-01

    In Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) reinforced by continuous fibers, a good toughness is achieved by adding a thin film called "interphase" between the fiber and the brittle matrix, which acts as a mechanical fuse by deflecting the matrix cracks. Pyrocarbon (PyC), with or without carbide sub-layers, is typically the material of choice to fulfill this role. The aim of this work was to study PyC-free nanoscale multilayered carbide coatings as interphases for CMCs. Nanoscale multilayered (SiC-TiC)n interphases were deposited by pressure-Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (P-CVD) on single filament Hi-Nicalon fibers and embedded in a SiC matrix sheath. The thicknesses of the carbide interphase sub-layers could be made as low as a few nanometers as evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. By using the P-ReactiveCVD method (P-RCVD), in which the TiC growth involves consumption of SiC, it was not only possible to obtain multilayered (SiC-TiC)n films but also TiC films with a porous multilayered microstructure as a result of the Kirkendall effect. The porosity in the TiC sequences was found to be enhanced when some PyC was added to SiC prior to total RCVD consumption. Because the porosity volume fraction was still not high enough, the role of mechanical fuse of the interphases could not be evidenced from the tensile curves, which remained fully linear even when chemical attack of the fiber surface was avoided.

  5. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  6. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  7. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, Dennis; Zhang, Dajie

    2009-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm -3 (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  8. Solid-state interfacial reaction in molybdenum-carbide systems at high temperature-pressure, and its application to bonding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Akihiro; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Miyamoto, Yoshinari; Koizumi, Mitsue; Shimada, Masahiko.

    1986-01-01

    Diffusion couples of molybdenum with several carbides, i.e. SiC, B 4 C, TiC, ZrC, HfC and TaC, were heated at various temperatures ranging from 1500 to 1840 deg C under high pressures of 3 GPa and 100 MPa for up to 4 hr. The couples were then examined for the composition of reaction products, the growth rate of reaction layers, interfacial structures, and tensile strength. In case of Mo-transition metal carbides, Mo 2 C layer was mainly formed, so that the carbides, which had supplied carbon, resulted in having the nonstoichiometric composition near the interface. The activation energy for the growth of Mo 2 C layer in Mo-TiC system was 332 kJ/mol, and that in Mo-TaC system was 366 kJ/mol. In Mo-SiC system, Mo 2 C layer, the mixed phase of Mo 2 C and Mo 5 Si 3 , and Mo 5 Si 3 C layer were formed in order from the Mo side. In Mo-B 4 C system, the mixed phase of Mo 2 B and MoB, and Mo 2 BC layer appeared. The decomposed graphite from B 4 C was also observed between B 4 C and Mo 2 BC phase. The activation energy for the growth of total reaction layer in Mo-SiC system was 531 kJ/mol, and that in Mo-B 4 C system was 183 kJ/mol. It can be said that the growth of reaction layers is controlled by diffusion. The orientation of crystals was observed in all reaction products except for Mo 2 BC phase in Mo-B 4 C system and (Mo, Ta) 2 C phase in Mo-TaC system. In HIPed couples, the magnitude of tensile strength was dependent on the difference in thermal expansion coefficient between Mo and carbides. HIPed Mo-TaC couple had the best weldability among the systems examined in the present investigation. (author)

  9. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  10. Post irradiation examinations of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuels irradiated at low linear power rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Atsushi; Sasayama, Tatsuo; Iwai, Takashi; Aizawa, Sakuei; Ohwada, Isao; Aizawa, Masao; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Handa, Muneo

    1988-11-01

    Two pins containing uranium-plutonium carbide fuels which are different in stoichiometry, i.e. (U,Pu)C 1.0 and (U,Pu)C 1.1 , were constructed into a capsule, ICF-37H, and were irradiated in JRR-2 up to 1.0 at % burnup at the linear heat rate of 420 W/cm. After being cooled for about one year, the irradiated capsule was transferred to the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility where the non-destructive examinations of the fuel pins in the β-γ cells and the destructive ones in two α-γ inert gas atmosphere cells were carried out. The release rates of fission gas were low enough, 0.44 % from (U,Pu)C 1.0 fuel pin and 0.09% from (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel pin, which is reasonable because of the low central temperature of fuel pellets, about 1000 deg C and is estimated that the release is mainly governed by recoil and knock-out mechanisms. Volume swelling of the fuels was observed to be in the range of 1.3 ∼ 1.6 % for carbide fuels below 1000 deg C. Respective open porosities of (U,Pu)C 1.0 and (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel were 1.3 % and 0.45 %, being in accordance with the release behavior of fission gas. Metallographic observation of the radial sections of pellets showed the increase of pore size and crystal grain size in the center and middle region of (U,Pu)C 1.0 pellets. The chemical interaction between fuel pellets and claddings in the carbide fuels is the penetration of carbon in the fuels to stainless steel tubes. The depth of corrosion layer in inner sides of cladding tubes ranged 10 ∼ 15 μm in the (U,Pu)C 1.0 fuel and 15 #approx #25 μm in the (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel, which is correlative with the carbon potential of fuels posibly affecting the amount of carbon penetration. (author)

  11. The method for measuring residual stress in stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimov, Georgy; Rozenbaum, Mikhail; Serebryakov, Alexandr; Serebryakov, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The main reason of appearance and growth of corrosion damages of the nuclear steam generator heat exchanger tubes is the process of stress-corrosion cracking of metal under the influence of residual tensile stress. Methods used in the production for estimating residual stresses (such as a method of ring samples) allow measuring only the average tangential stress of the pipe wall. The method of ring samples does not allow to assess the level of residual stress in the surface layer of the pipe. This paper describes an experimental method for measuring the residual stresses on the pipe surface by etching a thin surface layer of the metal. The construction and working principle of a trial installation are described. The residual stresses in the wall of the tubes 16 × 1.5 mm (steel AISI 321) for nuclear steam generators is calculated. Keywords: heat exchange pipes, stress corrosion cracking, residual stresses, stress distribution, stress measurement.

  12. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vast, N.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B 4 C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B 4 C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  13. Epithermal neutron activation analysis using a boron carbide irradiation filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmann, W.D.; Brueckner, J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of boron carbide as a thermal neutron filter in epithermal neutron activation (ENAA) analysis has been investigated. As compared to the use of a cadmium filter, boron provides a greater reduction of activities from elements relatively abundant in terrestrial rocks and fossil fuels, such as Na, La, Sc and Fe. These elements have excitation functions which follow the 1/v law in the 1 to 10 eV lower epithermal region. This enhances the sensitivity of ENAA for elements such as U, Th, Ba and etc. which have strong resonances in the higher epithermal region above 10 eV. In addition, a boron carbide filter has the advantages over cadmium of acquiring a relatively low level of induced activity which poses minimal radiation safety problems, when used for ENAA. (author)

  14. Electronic and vibrational hopping transport in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1991-01-01

    General concepts of hopping-type transport and localization are reviewed. Disorder, electronic correlations and atomic displacements, effects ignored in electronic band structure calculations, foster localization of electronic charge carriers. Examples are given that illustrate the efficacy of these effects in producing localization. This introduction is followed by a brief discussion of the relation between hopping-type transport and localization. The fundamentals of the formation, localization, and hopping transport of small polarons and/or bipolarons is then described. Electronic transport in boron carbides is presented as an example of the adiabatic hopping of small bipolarons. Finally, the notion of vibrational hopping is introduced. The high-temperature thermal diffusion in boron carbides is presented as a potential application of this idea

  15. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  16. Phase transformation order-disorder in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, V.A.; Karmo, Yu.S.; Kustova, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    Titanium carbide delta-phase is studied using the methods of electric conductivity and differential thermal analysis (DTA). It is shown on the Ti-C system phase diagram that two regions of TiCsub(0.46-0.60) and TiCsub(0.65-1.00) compositions, different in their properties, correspond to delta-phase. Both ordered and disordered phases exist within the TiCsub(0.046-0.60) concentration range, and in equilibrium heating or cooling one phase converts to another at 590 deg C (the first order phase transformation). Samples of the TiCsub(0.65-1.00) composition are characterized by low electric conductivity stability, that is explained by strong titanium carbide electric conductivity sensitivity to defects and impurities

  17. PREPARATION OF TANTALUM CARBIDE FROM AN ORGANOMETALLIC PRECURSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. SOUZA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2O5.nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, TaC, in the powder form at 1000oC. The natural sintering of TaC powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400°C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to densify the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value.

  18. Linear electro-optic effect in cubic silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao; Irvine, Kenneth G.; Zhang, Dongping; Spencer, Michael G.

    1991-01-01

    The first observation is reported of the electrooptic effect of cubic silicon carbide (beta-SiC) grown by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor using the hydrogen, silane, and propane gas system. At a wavelength of 633 nm, the value of the electrooptic coefficient r41 in beta-SiC is determined to be 2.7 +/- 0.5 x 10 (exp-12) m/V, which is 1.7 times larger than that in gallium arsenide measured at 10.6 microns. Also, a half-wave voltage of 6.4 kV for beta-SiC is obtained. Because of this favorable value of electrooptic coefficient, it is believed that silicon carbide may be a promising candidate in electrooptic applications for high optical intensity in the visible region.

  19. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; ChangZeng

    2007-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.……

  20. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.

  1. Effect of hydrogen on the microstructure of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischman, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of hydrogenation on the microstructure of a pressureless sintered silicon carbide was studied. Samples which were annealed in a 40:60 mole % H 2 :Ar atmosphere at 1400 0 C for 50 hours were microstructurally compared with unannealed samples and samples that had been annealed in a similar manner but using an argon atmosphere. The results were also compared with microstructural results obtained from in situ studies using both hydrogen and argon atmospheres. These results were compared with a thermodynamic model which was constructed using a free energy minimization technique. The observed effects of hydrogenation were surface decarburization and amorphization throughout the silicon carbide material. Other observations include the thermally induced growth of microcrystalline silicon and accelerated amorphization around the silicon microcrystals in samples used in hydrogen in situ studies. An analysis of the microstructure of the reference material was also performed

  2. Gas cooled fast breeder reactors using mixed carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kypreos, S.

    1976-09-01

    The fast reactors being developed at the present time use mixed oxide fuel, stainless-steel cladding and liquid sodium as coolant (LMFBR). Theoretical and experimental designing work has also been done in the field of gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. The more advanced carbide fuel offers greater potential for developing fuel systems with doubling times in the range of ten years. The thermohydraulic and physics performance of a GCFR utilising this fuel is assessed. One question to be answered is whether helium is an efficient coolant to be coupled with the carbide fuel while preserving its superior neutronic performance. Also, an assessment of the fuel cycle cost in comparison to oxide fuel is presented. (Auth.)

  3. Determination of soluble carbon in nuclear grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Bustillos, J.O.; Gomes, R.; Camaro, J.; Zorzetto, F.; Domingues, P.; Riella, H.

    1990-05-01

    The present work describes two different techniques (manometric and wet chemical) for the soluble carbon determination in nuclear grade boron carbide. The techniques are based on the reaction of the boron carbide with a sulfocromic mixture, generating CO 2 . The techniques differ on the mode they do the measurement of CO 2 produced. By wet chemical technique the CO 2 is absorved in a barium hydroxide solution and is determinated by titration. In the manometric technique the CO 2 gas is measured using a McLeod gauge. The gas produced by the latter technique is analysed by mass spectrometry. The details of the analytical technique and the data obtained are discussed. (author) [pt

  4. Electronic structures of ultra-thin silicon carbides deposited on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Shimoyama, I.; Nath, Krishna G.

    2004-01-01

    Electronic structures of ultra-thin silicon carbide films have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Si K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) using linearly polarized synchrotron soft X-rays. Silicon carbide films were deposited on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by ion beam deposition method. Tetramethylsilane (Si(CH 3 ) 4 ) was used as a discharge gas. The XPS and XANES features for the thick layers were similar to those for the bulk SiC. For sub-monolayered films, the Si 1s binding energy in XPS was higher by 2.5 eV than that for bulk SiC. This suggests the existence of low-dimensional SiC x where the silicon atoms are more positively charged than those in bulk SiC. After annealing the sub-monolayered film at 850 deg. C, a new peak appeared around 1840 eV in the XANES spectrum. The energy of this new peak was lower than those for any other silicon compounds. The low-energy feature of the XANES peak suggests the existence of π*-like orbitals around the silicon atom. On the basis of the polarization dependencies of the XANES spectra, it was revealed that the direction of the π*-like orbitals are nearly perpendicular to the surface. We conclude that sub-monolayered SiC x film exhibits flat-lying structure of which configuration is similar to a single sheet of graphite

  5. Study of carbide-forming element interlayers for diamond nucleation and growth on silicon and WC-Co substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.; Li, Y.S.; Yang, Q.; Hirose, A.

    2010-01-01

    Diamond nucleation and growth on several typical carbide-forming elements (CFE) (Ti, Cr and W) coated Si and WC-Co substrates were studied. The ion beam sputtered CFE interlayers show an amorphous/nanocrystalline microstructure. The diamond formed on the CFE coated substrates shows higher nucleation density and rate and finer grain structure than on uncoated substrates. Consequently, nanocrystalline diamond thin films can be formed on the CFE coated substrates under conventional microcrystalline diamond growth conditions. Among the three tested CFE interlayers, diamond has the highest nucleation density and rate on W layer and the lowest on Ti layer. The diamond nucleation density and rate on CFE coated WC-Co are much higher than those on widely used metal nitride coated WC-Co.

  6. Advanced Characterization Techniques for Silicon Carbide and Pyrocarbon Coatings on Fuel Particles for High Temperature Reactors (HTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, V.; Charollais, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA, BP 1, 13108 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Dugne, O. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SCGS BP 17171 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Garcia, C. [Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux (LCTS), UMR CNRS 5801, 3 allee de La Boetie, 33600 Pessac (France); Perez, M. [CEA Grenoble DRT/DTH/LTH, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Cea and AREVA NP have engaged an extensive research and development program on HTR (high temperature reactor) fuel. The improving of safety of (very) high temperature reactors (V/HTR) is based on the quality of the fuel particles. This requires a good knowledge of the properties of the four-layers TRISO particles designed to retain the uranium and fission products during irradiation or accident conditions. The aim of this work is to characterize exhaustively the structure and the thermomechanical properties of each unirradiated layer (silicon carbide and pyrocarbon coatings) by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), selected area electronic diffraction (SEAD), thermo reflectance microscopy and nano-indentation. The long term objective of this study is to define pertinent parameters for fuel performance codes used to better understand the thermomechanical behaviour of the coated particles. (authors)

  7. Phonon spectrum, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A.M.; Mosca, H.O.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we study, by means of density functional perturbation theory and the pseudopotential method, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide. These properties are derived from the lattice dynamics in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The phonon spectrum of ThC presented in this article, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been studied, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. We compare mechanical properties, volume thermal expansion and molar specific capacities with previous results and find a very good agreement

  8. Phonon spectrum, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientı´ficas y Técnicas (Argentina); Jaroszewicz, S. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientı´ficas y Técnicas (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA (Argentina)

    2013-06-15

    In this work, we study, by means of density functional perturbation theory and the pseudopotential method, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide. These properties are derived from the lattice dynamics in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The phonon spectrum of ThC presented in this article, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been studied, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. We compare mechanical properties, volume thermal expansion and molar specific capacities with previous results and find a very good agreement.

  9. Sodium erosion of boron carbide from breached absorber pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Baker, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of the irradiation experiment was to provide an engineering demonstration of the irradiation behavior of breached boron carbide absorber pins. By building defects into the cladding of prototypic absorber pins, and performing the irradiation under typical FFTF operating conditions, a qualitative assessment of the consequences of a breach was achieved. Additionally, a direct comparison of pin behavior with that of the ex-reactor test could be made

  10. Correlation for boron carbide helium release in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Pitner, A.L.

    1977-04-01

    An empirical helium correlation for the helium release from boron carbide has been developed. The correlation provides a good fit to the experimental data in the temperature range from 800 to 1350 0 K, and burnup levels up to 80 x 10 20 captures/cm 3 . The correlation has the capability of extrapolation to 2200 0 K (3500 0 F) and 200 x 10 20 captures/cm 3 . In this range the helium release rate will not exceed the generation rate

  11. An electrochemical process for the recycling of tungsten carbide scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    An account is given of the development of a number of designs for electrochemical cells, and the subsequent construction and operation of a vibrating-plate cell capable of oxidizing 15 kilograms of tungsten carbide a day to a crude tungstic acid precipitate, with similtaneous recovery of cobalt metal on the cathode. The effects on the process of the reagent concentration, temperature, current density, and cathode material are discussed

  12. Catalytic Conversion of Syngas into Higher Alcohols over Carbide Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the use of the bulk carbides Mo2C, WC, and NbC as catalysts for the conversion of syngas into higher alcohols. K2CO3/WC produces mainly CH3OH and CH4 with a low activity. NbC has a very low activity in CO hydrogenation. K2CO3/Mo2C produces mixed alcohols with a reasonable...

  13. Progress in Studies on Carbon and Silicon Carbide Nanocomposite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, P.; Chen, J.; Xian-feng, X.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanofiber and carbon nanotubes are introduced. The structure and application of nanotubers (nanofibers) in carbon/carbon composites are emphatically presented. Due to the unique structure of nanotubers (nanofibers), they can modify the microstructure of pyrocarbon and induce the deposition of pyrocarbon with high text in carbon/carbon composites. So the carbon/carbon composites modified by CNT/CNF have more excellent properties.

  14. Pipe bend wear - is tungsten carbide the answer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freinkel, D.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to compare the relative wear resistance of various grades of sintered tungsten carbide liners against a mild steel standard in a full-scale pneumatic conveying testing rig. Speciments ranging in cobalt content from 6 to 30 per cent and in grain size from 0,56 to 2,98 microns, including a mild steel standard, were placed on a specially designed holder which fitted into a tee type 100 mm diameter bend. The specimens were tested under various operating conditions, ie air velocity ranging from 28m/s to 52m/s, impact angles of 30 0 to 70 0 mass flow rates of 35kg/min to 83kg/min and phase densities of 1,2 to 2,9, using a 4 mm nominal size crushed granite rock. The experimental results show that the ultrafine-grained, low cobalt (6 per cent) tungsten carbide displays little sensitivity to varying velocities, impact angles, mass flow rates or phase densities, and consistently gave the best wear resistance under all testing conditions. It consistently showed the least wear resistance under all testing conditions and performed only slightly better than mild steel. The effect of the carbide grain size was found to be small, although the finer grain sizes displayed greater wear resistance than the coarse grains. The effect of cobalt content was such that the lower cobalt specimens (6 per cent range) consistently performed better than the higher cobalt contents (10 per cent, 15 per cent, 30 per cent) under all testing conditions; the wear resistance decreasing with increasing cobalt content. An empirical model for the prediction of wear for each type of material tested has been proposed, given the particular operating conditions. Microstructurally it has been shown that there is a definite relationship between erosion resistance and the inverse of the magnetic coercivity of the tungsten carbide alloys

  15. Pulverization of boron element and proportions of boron carbide in boron; Broyage de bore element et dosage de carbure de bore dans le bore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, F M; Finck, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1956-07-01

    It is possible to reduce boron element into fine powder by means of a mortar and pestle made of sintered boron carbide, the ratio of boron carbide introduced being less than one per cent. Boron element at our disposal is made of sharp edged, dark brown, little grains of average size greater than 5 {mu}. Grain sizes smaller than 1{mu} are required for applying thin layers of such boron. (author) [French] Il est possible de pulveriser finement du bore element au moyen de mortier et pilon en carbure de bore fritte, le taux de carbure de bore introduit etant inferieur a 1 pour cent. Le bore element dont nous disposons est constitue de petits grains brun fonce, a aretes vives, de dimension moyenne superieure a 5 {mu}. L'application de ce bore en couches minces demande des grains de dimensions inferieures a 1 {mu}. (aute0008.

  16. Residual stress stability and alternating bending strength of AISI 4140 after shot peening and successive annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menig, R.; Schulze, V.; Voehringer, O. [Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde I, Univ. of Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Increases of residual stress stability and alternating bending strength of shot peened AISI 4140 are obtained by successive annealing treatments. This is caused by static strain aging effects, which lead to pinning of dislocations by carbon atoms and finest carbides. It will be shown that by short-time annealing of a quenched and tempered AISI 4140 it is possible to maximize the positive effect of static strain aging, while minimizing the detrimental effect of thermal residual stress relaxation, which was measured by X-ray diffraction method. Static strain aging effects were also found to be responsible for an increase of the quasi static and cyclic surface yield strengths. (orig.)

  17. Reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouchnino, M.

    1967-01-01

    The reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with austenitic steels has been studied between 650 and 1050 deg. C using UC, steel and (UPu)C, steel diffusion couples. The steels are of the type CN 18.10 with or without addition of molybdenum. The carbides used are hyper-stoichiometric. Tests were also carried out with UCTi, UCMo, UPuCTi and UPuCMo. Up to 800 deg. C no marked diffusion of carbon into stainless steel is observed. Between 800 and 900 deg. C the carbon produced by the decomposition of the higher carbides diffuses into the steel. Above 900 deg. C, decomposition of the monocarbide occurs according to a reaction which can be written schematically as: (U,PuC) + (Fe,Ni,Cr) → (U,Pu) Fe 2 + Cr 23 C 6 . Above 950 deg. C the behaviour of UPuCMo and that of the titanium (CN 18.12) and nickel (NC 38. 18) steels is observed to be very satisfactory. (author) [fr

  18. Toughness behaviour of tungsten-carbide-cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigl, L.S.

    1985-05-01

    In the present work the mechanisms of crack propagation in technically important WC-Co alloys are investigated and a model describing the influence of microstructural parameters and of the mechanical properties of the constituents is developed. An energy concept is used for modelling fracture toughness. The energies dissipated in the four crack-paths (trans- and intergranular carbide fracture, fracture across the binder-ligaments, fracture in the binder close to the carbide/binder interface) are summed up using the experimentally determined area-fractions of the crack-paths, the specific energy of brittle fracture in the carbide and of ductile fracture is calculated by integrating the energy to deform a volume element over the plastically deformed region. In contrast to all earlier models, this concept describes fracture toughness of WC-Co alloys only with physically meaningful parameters. The excellent agreement with experimental toughness values and with qualitative observations of crack propagation show that the new model includes all effects which influence toughness. As demonstrated with WC-based hardmetals with a cobalt-nickel binder, the results open new possibilities for optimizing the toughness of composites in which a small amount of a tough phase is embedded in a brittle matrix. (Author, shortened by G.Q.)

  19. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  20. Electrical Characterization of Irradiated Semiconducting Amorphous Hydrogenated Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George Glenn

    Semiconducting amorphous partially dehydrogenated boron carbide has been explored as a neutron voltaic for operation in radiation harsh environments, such as on deep space satellites/probes. A neutron voltaic device could also be used as a solid state neutron radiation detector to provide immediate alerts for radiation workers/students, as opposed to the passive dosimetry badges utilized today. Understanding how the irradiation environment effects the electrical properties of semiconducting amorphous partially dehydrogenated boron carbide is important to predicting the stability of these devices in operation. p-n heterojunction diodes were formed from the synthesis of semiconducting amorphous partially dehydrogenated boron carbide on silicon substrates through the use of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Many forms of structural and electrical measurements and analysis have been performed on the p-n heterojunction devices as a function of both He+ ion and neutron irradiation including: transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), current versus voltage I(V), capacitance versus voltage C(V), conductance versus frequency G(f), and charge carrier lifetime (tau). In stark contrast to nearly all other electronic devices, the electrical performance of these p-n heterojunction diodes improved with irradiation. This is most likely the result of bond defect passivation and resolution of degraded icosahedral based carborane structures (icosahedral molecules missing a B, C, or H atom(s)).

  1. Gravimetric determination of carbon in uranium-plutonium carbide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanaugh, H.J.; Dahlby, J.W.; Lovell, A.P.

    1979-12-01

    A gravimetric method for determining carbon in uranium-plutonium carbide materials was developed to analyze six samples simultaneously. The samples are burned slowly in an oxygen atmosphere at approximately 900 0 C, and the gases generated are passed through Schuetze's oxidizing reagent (iodine pentoxide on silica gel) to assure quantitative oxidation of the CO to CO 2 . The CO 2 is collected on Ascarite and weighed. This method was tested using a tungsten carbide reference material (NBS-SRM-276) and a (U,Pu)C sample. For 42 analyses of the tungsten carbide, which has a certified carbon content of 6.09%, an average value of 6.09% was obtained with a standard deviation of 0.01 7 % or a relative standard deviation of 0.28%. For 17 analyses of the (U,Pu)C sample, an average carbon content of 4.97% was found with a standard deviation of 0.01 2 % or a relative standard deviation of 0.24%

  2. Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements of uranium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Zanonato, P.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements of uranium carbides were performed. • The tested materials are candidates as targets for radioactive ion beam production. • The results are correlated with the materials composition and microstructure. - Abstract: Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements on different types of uranium carbide are presented, in the context of the ActiLab Work Package in ENSAR, a project within the 7th Framework Program of the European Commission. Two specific techniques were used to carry out the measurements, both taking place in a laboratory dedicated to the research and development of materials for the SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) target. In the case of thermal conductivity, estimation of the dependence of this property on temperature was obtained using the inverse parameter estimation method, taking as a reference temperature and emissivity measurements. Emissivity at different temperatures was obtained for several types of uranium carbide using a dual frequency infrared pyrometer. Differences between the analyzed materials are discussed according to their compositional and microstructural properties. The obtainment of this type of information can help to carefully design materials to be capable of working under extreme conditions in next-generation ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) facilities for the generation of radioactive ion beams.

  3. Frictional Performance Assessment of Cemented Carbide Surfaces Textured by Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, S.; Llanes, L.; Klein, S.; Gachot, C.; Rosenkranz, A.; Bähre, D.; Mücklich, F.

    2017-10-01

    Cemented carbides are advanced engineering materials often used in industry for manufacturing cutting tools or supporting parts in tribological system. In order to improve service life, special attention has been paid to change surface conditions by means of different methods, since surface modification can be beneficial to reduce the friction between the contact surfaces as well as to avoid unintended damage. Laser surface texturing is one of the newly developed surface modification methods. It has been successfully introduced to fabricate some basic patterns on cemented carbide surfaces. In this work, Direct Laser Interference Patterning Technique (DLIP) is implemented to produce special line-like patterns on a cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni) based cemented tungsten carbide grade. It is proven that the laser-produced patterns have high geometrical precision and quality stability. Furthermore, tribology testing using a nano-tribometer unit shows that friction is reduced by the line-like patterns, as compared to the polished one, under both lubricated and dry testing regimes, and the reduction is more pronounced in the latter case.

  4. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to develop carbon fiber-aluminum matrix composites is described. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of TiC on the fibers of graphite tows. Wet chemical coating of fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was also used, but showed little promise as an alternative coating method. Strength measurements on CVD coated fiber tows showed that thin carbide coats can add to fiber strength. The ability of aluminum alloys to wet TiC was successfully demonstrated using TiC-coated graphite surfaces. Pressure-infiltration of TiC- and ZrC-coated fiber tows with aluminum alloys was only partially successful. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of carbide coats on carbon as barriers to prevent reaction between alluminum alloys and carbon. Initial results indicate that composites of aluminum and carbide-coated graphite are stable for long periods of time at temperatures near the alloy solidus.

  5. Emission of blue light from hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, W. A.; Yamagishi, H.; Yamaguchi, M.; Tawada, Y.

    1994-04-01

    THE development of new electroluminescent materials is of current technological interest for use in flat-screen full-colour displays1. For such applications, amorphous inorganic semiconductors appear particularly promising, in view of the ease with which uniform films with good mechanical and electronic properties can be deposited over large areas2. Luminescence has been reported1 in the red-green part of the spectrum from amorphous silicon carbide prepared from gas-phase mixtures of silane and a carbon-containing species (usually methane or ethylene). But it is not possible to achieve blue luminescence by this approach. Here we show that the use of an aromatic species-xylene-as the source of carbon during deposition results in a form of amorphous silicon carbide that exhibits strong blue luminescence. The underlying structure of this material seems to be an unusual combination of an inorganic silicon carbide lattice with a substantial 'organic' π-conjugated carbon system, the latter dominating the emission properties. Moreover, the material can be readily doped with an electron acceptor in a manner similar to organic semiconductors3, and might therefore find applications as a conductivity- or colour-based chemical sensor.

  6. Effect of Cement Replacement with Carbide Waste on the Strength of Stabilized Clay Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntohar A.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cement is commonly used for soil stabilization and many other ground improvement techniques. Cement is believed to be very good to improve the compressive and split-tensile strength of clay subgrades. In some application cement could be partly or fully replaced with carbide waste. This research is to study the effectiveness of the cement replacement and to find the maximum carbide waste content to be allowed for a clay subgrade. The quantities of cement replaced with the carbide waste were 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% by its mass. The results show that replacing the cement with carbide waste decreased both the compressive and split tensile strength. Replacing cement content with carbide waste reduced its ability for stabilization. The carbide waste content should be less than 70% of the cement to provide a sufficient stabilizing effect on a clay subgrade.

  7. Tantalum and niobium carbides obtention by carbothermic reduction of columbotantalite ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordo, E.; Garcia-Carcedo, F.; Torralba, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Tantalum and niobium carbides are characterized by its high hardness and chemical corrosion resistance. Both carbides, but mainly TaC, are used in hard metals (sintered carbides), together with their carbides, to manufacture cutting tools and dies in special machining applications involving mechanical shock at high temperature. Its use as reinforcement of wear resistant materials through powder metallurgy techniques are being investigated. However, the use of TaC is usually limited because of its high cost. Therefore tantalum carbide with niobium content, which is cheaper, is used. In this work the obtention of complex tantalum and niobium carbides from a Spanish columbotantalite ore is studied through relatively cheap and simple process as it is carbothermic reduction. Concentration of the ore, its reduction and the characterization of products are described. (Author) 11 refs

  8. Microstructural studies of carbides in MAR-M247 nickel-based superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotok, A.; Rodak, K.

    2012-05-01

    Carbides play an important role in the strengthening of microstructures of nickel-based superalloys. Grain boundary carbides prevent or retard grain-boundary sliding and make the grain boundary stronger. Carbides can also tie up certain elements that would otherwise promote phase instability during service. Various types of carbides are possible in the microstructure of nickel-based superalloys, depending on the superalloy composition and processing. In this paper, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of carbides occurring in the microstructure of polycrystalline MAR-M247 nickel-based superalloy were carried out. In the present work, MC and M23C6 carbides in the MAR-M247 microstructure were examined.

  9. Porous-shaped silicon carbide ultraviolet photodetectors on porous silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naderi, N., E-mail: naderi.phd@gmail.com [Nano-Optoelectronics Research Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Hashim, M.R. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► Porous-shaped silicon carbide thin film was deposited on porous silicon substrate. ► Thermal annealing was followed to enhance the physical properties of samples. ► Metal–semiconductor-metal ultraviolet detectors were fabricated on samples. ► The effect of annealing temperature on electrical performance of devices was studied. ► The efficiency of photodetectors was enhanced by annealing at elevated temperatures. -- Abstract: A metal–semiconductor-metal (MSM) ultraviolet photodetector was fabricated based on a porous-shaped structure of silicon carbide (SiC). For increasing the surface roughness of SiC and hence enhancing the light absorption effect in fabricated devices, porous silicon (PS) was chosen as a template; SiC was deposited on PS substrates via radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Therefore, the deposited layers followed the structural pattern of PS skeleton and formed a porous-shaped SiC layer on PS substrate. The structural properties of samples showed that the as-deposited SiC was amorphous. Thus, a post-deposition annealing process with elevated temperatures was required to convert its amorphous phase to crystalline phase. The morphology of the sputtered samples was examined via scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. The grain size and roughness of the deposited layers clearly increased upon an increase in the annealing temperature. The optical properties of sputtered SiC were enhanced due to applying high temperatures. The most intense photoluminescence peak was observed for the sample with 1200 °C of annealing temperature. For the metallization of the SiC substrates to fabricate MSM photodetectors, two interdigitated Schottky contacts of Ni with four fingers for each electrode were deposited onto all the porous substrates. The optoelectronic characteristics of MSM UV photodetectors with porous-shaped SiC substrates were studied in the dark and under UV illumination. The electrical characteristics of fabricated

  10. Porous-shaped silicon carbide ultraviolet photodetectors on porous silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naderi, N.; Hashim, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Porous-shaped silicon carbide thin film was deposited on porous silicon substrate. ► Thermal annealing was followed to enhance the physical properties of samples. ► Metal–semiconductor-metal ultraviolet detectors were fabricated on samples. ► The effect of annealing temperature on electrical performance of devices was studied. ► The efficiency of photodetectors was enhanced by annealing at elevated temperatures. -- Abstract: A metal–semiconductor-metal (MSM) ultraviolet photodetector was fabricated based on a porous-shaped structure of silicon carbide (SiC). For increasing the surface roughness of SiC and hence enhancing the light absorption effect in fabricated devices, porous silicon (PS) was chosen as a template; SiC was deposited on PS substrates via radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Therefore, the deposited layers followed the structural pattern of PS skeleton and formed a porous-shaped SiC layer on PS substrate. The structural properties of samples showed that the as-deposited SiC was amorphous. Thus, a post-deposition annealing process with elevated temperatures was required to convert its amorphous phase to crystalline phase. The morphology of the sputtered samples was examined via scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. The grain size and roughness of the deposited layers clearly increased upon an increase in the annealing temperature. The optical properties of sputtered SiC were enhanced due to applying high temperatures. The most intense photoluminescence peak was observed for the sample with 1200 °C of annealing temperature. For the metallization of the SiC substrates to fabricate MSM photodetectors, two interdigitated Schottky contacts of Ni with four fingers for each electrode were deposited onto all the porous substrates. The optoelectronic characteristics of MSM UV photodetectors with porous-shaped SiC substrates were studied in the dark and under UV illumination. The electrical characteristics of fabricated

  11. Ag diffusion in cubic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrader, David; Khalil, Sarah M.; Gerczak, Tyler; Allen, Todd R.; Heim, Andrew J.; Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane

    2011-01-01

    The diffusion of Ag impurities in bulk 3C-SiC is studied using ab initio methods based on density functional theory. This work is motivated by the desire to reduce transport of radioactive Ag isotopes through the SiC boundary layer in the Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) fuel pellet, which is a significant concern for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) nuclear reactor concept. The structure and stability of charged Ag and Ag-vacancy clusters in SiC are calculated. Relevant intrinsic SiC defect energies are also determined. The most stable state for the Ag impurity in SiC is found to be a Ag atom substituting on the Si sub-lattice and bound to a C vacancy. Bulk diffusion coefficients are estimated for different impurity states and values are all found to have very high activation energy. The impurity state with the lowest activation energy for diffusion is found to be the Ag interstitial, with an activation energy of approximately 7.9 eV. The high activation energies for Ag diffusion in bulk 3C-SiC cause Ag transport to be very slow in the bulk and suggests that observed Ag transport in this material is due to an alternative mechanism (e.g., grain boundary diffusion).

  12. Formation of vanadium carbide precipitations at the surface of alloys: Thermodynamics and kinetics aspects; Bildung von Vanadiumcarbid-Ausscheidungen auf Legierungsoberflaechen: Thermodynamische und kinetische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, A.; Uebing, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The paper describes the formation of vanadium carbides on the surface layers of Fe-3%V-C(100) alloys. The phase diagram calculated for this alloyed material using the ThermoCalc program package reveals a co-existence of ferritic matrix and V{sub 3}C{sub 2} at temperatures of T{<=}650 C. This carbide is instable at elevated temperatures, leading to co-existence of ferrite and the cubic VC{sub 1-x}. Experimental analyses revealed the formation of a 2D VC compound in the top layers of the surface of Fe-3%V-C(100) alloys, induced by equilibrium segregation. The paper explains the usefulness of thermodynamic and kinetic calculations for interpretation of precipitation phenomena in steels. Mathematically derived and experimental results of analyses for the case of non-equilibrium segregation showed excellent agreement in the determination of carbide thickness (nanometer scale) and time dependence of segregation under fast cooling conditions. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde die Bildung von Vanadiumcarbiden auf Fe-3%V-C(100)-Legierungsoberflaechen beschrieben. Das anhand des ThermoCalc-Programmpakets fuer diese Legierungszusammensetzung berechnete Phasendiagramm zeigt bei niedrigen Temperaturen T{<=}650 C die Koexistenz von ferritischer Matrix und V{sub 3}C{sub 2}. Bei hoeheren Temperaturen ist dieses Carbid instabil und es liegt Koexistenz von Ferrit und dem kubischen VC{sub 1-x} vor. Die experimentellen Untersuchungen zeigen die Ausbildung einer zweidimensionalen VC-Oberflaechenverbindung auf Fe-3%V-C(100)-Legierungsoberflaechen durch Gleichgewichtssegregation. Diese Arbeit zeigt, dass thermodynamische und kinetische Rechnungen bei der Deutung von Ausscheidungsphaenomenen in Staehlen sinnvoll eingesetzt werden koennen. Bei der Nichtgleichgewichtssegregation wurde bezueglich Carbiddicke (im Nanometerbereich) und Zeitabhaengigkeit der Ausscheidung bei schneller Abkuehlung eine hervorragende Uebereinstimmung zwischen Simulation und Experiment gefunden

  13. Residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, I.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the residual gas composition in vacuum systems by a special mass spectrometric method was presented. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its application in thin film technology was discussed. Results, partial pressure versus time curves as well as the line spectra of the residual gases in case of the vaporization of a Ti-Pd-Au alloy were demonstrated together with the possible construction schemes of QMS residual gas analysers. (Sz.J.)

  14. Influence of Material Coating on the Heat Transfer in a Layered Cu-SiC-Cu Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strojny-Nędza A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process of obtaining Cu-SiC-Cu systems by way of spark plasma sintering. A monocrystalline form of silicon carbide (6H-SiC type was applied in the experiment. Additionally, silicon carbide samples were covered with a layer of tungsten and molybdenum using chemical vapour deposition (CVD technique. Microstructural examinations and thermal properties measurements were performed. A special attention was put to the metal-ceramic interface. During annealing at a high temperature, copper reacts with silicon carbide. To prevent the decomposition of silicon carbide two types of coating (tungsten and molybdenum were applied. The effect of covering SiC with the aforementioned elements on the composite’s thermal conductivity was analyzed. Results were compared with the numerical modelling of heat transfer in Cu-SiC-Cu systems. Certain possible reasons behind differences in measurements and modelling results were discussed.

  15. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  16. The preparation of titanium-vanadium carbide/nickel cermets. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precht, W.; Sprissler, B.

    1976-01-01

    Titanium/vanadium alloy carbide rods were prepared by a zone melting procedure. Wetting studies were carried out using sections of the fused rods and candidate matrix material. It was established that nickel exhibits excellent wetting of (Ti, V) C, and accordingly cermet blends were prepared and liquid phase sintered. Processing parameters are discussed as well as their effect on the final microstructure. Alternate methods for cermet preparation are offered which use as received titanium carbide and vanadium carbide powders

  17. Additive Manufacturing of Silicon Carbide-Based Ceramic Matrix Composites: Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced SiC-based ceramic matrix composites offer significant contributions toward reducing fuel burn and emissions by enabling high overall pressure ratio (OPR) of gas turbine engines and reducing or eliminating cooling air in the hot-section components, such as shrouds, combustor liners, vanes, and blades. Additive manufacturing (AM), which allows high value, custom designed parts layer by layer, has been demonstrated for metals and polymer matrix composites. However, there has been limited activity on additive manufacturing of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). In this presentation, laminated object manufacturing (LOM), binder jet process, and 3-D printing approaches for developing ceramic composite materials are presented. For the laminated object manufacturing (LOM), fiber prepreg laminates were cut into shape with a laser and stacked to form the desired part followed by high temperature heat treatments. For the binder jet, processing optimization was pursued through silicon carbide powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of fibers into the powder bed. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted along with XRD, TGA, and mechanical testing. Various technical challenges and opportunities for additive manufacturing of ceramics and CMCs will be presented.

  18. Rheological Characteristics of 2D Titanium Carbide (MXene) Dispersions: A Guide for Processing MXenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuzum, Bilen; Maleski, Kathleen; Anasori, Babak; Lelyukh, Pavel; Alvarez, Nicolas Javier; Kumbur, E Caglan; Gogotsi, Yury

    2018-03-27

    Understanding the rheological properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials in suspension is critical for the development of various solution processing and manufacturing techniques. 2D carbides and nitrides (MXenes) constitute one of the largest families of 2D materials with >20 synthesized compositions and applications already ranging from energy storage to medicine to optoelectronics. However, in spite of a report on clay-like behavior, not much is known about their rheological response. In this study, rheological behavior of single- and multilayer Ti 3 C 2 T x in aqueous dispersions was investigated. Viscous and viscoelastic properties of MXene dispersions were studied over a variety of concentrations from colloidal dispersions to high loading slurries, showing that a multilayer MXene suspension with up to 70 wt % can exhibit flowability. Processing guidelines for the fabrication of MXene films, coatings, and fibers have been established based on the rheological properties. Surprisingly, high viscosity was observed at very low concentrations for solutions of single-layer MXene flakes. Single-layer colloidal solutions were found to exhibit partial elasticity even at the lowest tested concentrations (<0.20 mg/mL) due to the presence of strong surface charge and excellent hydrophilicity of MXene, making them amenable to fabrication at dilute concentrations. Overall, the findings of this study provide fundamental insights into the rheological response of this quickly growing 2D family of materials in aqueous environments as well as offer guidelines for processing of MXenes.

  19. Neutron shielding behavior of thermoplastic natural rubber/boron carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Zali, Nurazila; Yazid, Hafizal; Megat Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid

    2018-01-01

    Many shielding materials have been designed against the harm of different types of radiation to the human body. Today, polymer-based lightweight composites have been chosen by the radiation protection industry. In the present study, thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) composites with different weight percent of boron carbide (B4C) fillers (0% to 30%) were fabricated as neutron shielding through melt blending method. Neutron attenuation properties of TPNR/B4C composites have been investigated. The macroscopic cross section (Σ), half value layer (HVL) and mean free path length (λ) of the composites have been calculated and the transmission curves have been plotted. The obtained results show that Σ, HVL and λ greatly depend on the B4C content. Addition of B4C fillers into TPNR matrix were found to enhance the macroscopic cross section values thus decrease the mean free path length (λ) and half value layer (HVL) of the composites. The transmission curves exhibited that the neutron transmission of the composites decreased with increasing shielding thickness. These results showed that TPNR/B4C composites have high potential for neutron shielding applications.

  20. Iron Carbides in Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Theoretical and Experimental Understanding in Epsilon-Iron Carbide Phase Assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xing-Wu; Cao, Zhi; Zhao, Shu; Gao, Rui

    2017-01-01

    As active phases in low-temperature Fischer–Tropsch synthesis for liquid fuel production, epsilon iron carbides are critically important industrial materials. However, the precise atomic structure of epsilon iron carbides remains unclear, leading to a half-century of debate on the phase assignment of the ε-Fe 2 C and ε’-Fe 2.2 C. Here, we resolve this decades-long question by a combining theoretical and experimental investigation to assign the phases unambiguously. First, we have investigated the equilibrium structures and thermal stabilities of ε-Fe x C, (x = 1, 2, 2.2, 3, 4, 6, 8) by first-principles calculations. We have also acquired X-ray diffraction patterns and Mössbauer spectra for these epsilon iron carbides, and compared them with the simulated results. These analyses indicate that the unit cell of ε-Fe 2 C contains only one type of chemical environment for Fe atoms, while ε’-Fe 2.2 C has six sets of chemically distinct Fe atoms.

  1. Nanograin boundaries and silicon carbide photoluminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Vlaskina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The luminescence spectra of SiC crystals and films with grain boundaries (GB on the atomic level were observed. The GB spectra are associated with luminescence centers localized in areas of specific structural abnormalities in the crystal, without no reference to the one-dimensional layer-disordering. The zero-phonon part of GB spectra is always within the same energy range (2.890…2.945 eV and does not fit in the dependence of its position in the energy scale on the percent of hexagonality as in the case of stacking faults (SFi and deep level (DLi spectra. The zero-phonon part 2.945…2.890 eV with a fine structure is better observed in crystals with the centers of origin growth of crystal, if ND – NA ~ (2…8•1016 cm–3, ND ~ (2…7•1017 cm–3. The edge phonons of the Brillouin zone TA-46 meV, LA-77 meV, TO-95 meV and LO-104 meV are involved in development of the GB spectrum. This spectrum may occur simultaneously with the DLi and SFi ones. The GB spectra also occur after high temperature processing the β-phase (in the 3C-SiC with appearance of the α-phase. The temperature range of observation is 4.2…40 K. There is synchronous thermal quenching of all elements in the fine structure. The thermal activation energy of quenching is ЕаТ ~ 7 meV.

  2. Silicon carbide MOSFET integrated circuit technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.M.; Downey, E.; Ghezzo, M.; Kretchmer, J.; Krishnamurthy, V.; Hennessy, W.; Michon, G. [General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (United States). Corporate Research and Development Center

    1997-07-16

    The research and development activities carried out to demonstrate the status of MOS planar technology for the manufacture of high temperature SiC ICs will be described. These activities resulted in the design, fabrication and demonstration of the World`s first SiC analog IC - a monolithic MOSFET operational amplifier. Research tasks required for the development of a planar SiC MOSFET IC technology included characterization of the SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface using thermally grown oxides: high temperature (350 C) reliability studies of thermally grown oxides: ion implantation studies of donor (N) and acceptor (B) dopants to form junction diodes: epitaxial layer characterization: N channel inversion and depletion mode MOSFETs; device isolation methods and finally integrated circuit design, fabrication and testing of the World`s first monolithic SiC operational amplifier IC. These studies defined a SiC n-channel depletion mode MOSFET IC technology and outlined tasks required to improve all types of SiC devices. For instance, high temperature circuit drift instabilities at 350 C were discovered and characterized. This type of instability needs to be understood and resolved because it affects the high temperature reliability of other types of SiC devices. Improvements in SiC wafer surface quality and the use of deposited oxides instead of thermally grown SiO{sub 2} gate dielectrics will probably be required for enhanced reliability. The slow reverse recovery time exhibited by n{sup +}-p diodes formed by N ion implantation is a problem that needs to be resolved for all types of planar bipolar devices. The reproducibility of acceptor implants needs to be improved before CMOS ICs and many types of power device structures will be manufacturable. (orig.) 51 refs.

  3. Structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of actinide carbides AnC (An = U, Np)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikandan, M.; Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of actinide carbides AnC (An=U, Np) for three different crystal structures, namely NaCl, CsCl and ZnS. Among the considered structures, NaCl structure is found to be the most stable structure for these carbides at normal pressure. A pressure induced structural phase transition from NaCl to ZnS is observed. The electronic structure reveals that these carbides are metals. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these carbides are mechanically stable at normal pressure.

  4. Formation Energies and Electronic Properties of Vanadium Carbides Found in High Strength Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Krista; Medvedeva, Julia

    2013-03-01

    Carbide formation and stabilization in steels is of great interest owing to its effect on the microstructure and properties of the Fe-based alloys. The appearance of carbides with different metal/C ratios strongly depends on the carbon concentration, alloy composition as well as the heat treatment. Strong carbide-forming elements such as Ti, V, and Nb have been used in microalloyed steels; with VC showing an increased solubility in the iron matrix as compared with TiC and NbC. This allows for dissolution of the VC into the steel during heating and fine precipitation during cooling. In addition to VC, the primary vanadium carbide with cubic structure, a wide range of non-stoichiometric compositions VCy with y varying from 0.72 to 0.88, has been observed. This range includes two ordered compounds, V8C7 and V6C5. In this study, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is employed to examine the stability of the binary carbides by calculating their formation energies. We compare the local structures (atomic coordination, bond distances and angles) and the density of states in optimized geometries of the carbides. Further, the effect of alloying additions, such as niobium and titanium, on the carbide stabilization is investigated. We determine the energetically preferable substitutional atom location in each carbide and study the impurity distribution as well as its role in the carbide formation energy and electronic structure.

  5. MC Carbide Characterization in High Refractory Content Powder-Processed Ni-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Stoichko; Chen, Wei; Huo, Jiajie; Feng, Qiang; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Sun, Eugene; Tin, Sammy

    2018-04-01

    Carbide precipitates in Ni-based superalloys are considered to be desirable phases that can contribute to improving high-temperature properties as well as aid in microstructural refinement of the material; however, they can also serve as crack initiation sites during fatigue. To date, most of the knowledge pertaining to carbide formation has originated from assessments of cast and wrought Ni-based superalloys. As powder-processed Ni-based superalloys are becoming increasingly widespread, understanding the different mechanisms by which they form becomes increasingly important. Detailed characterization of MC carbides present in two experimental high Nb-content powder-processed Ni-based superalloys revealed that Hf additions affect the resultant carbide morphologies. This morphology difference was attributed to a higher magnitude of elastic strain energy along the interface associated with Hf being soluble in the MC carbide lattice. The composition of the MC carbides was studied through atom probe tomography and consisted of a complex carbonitride core, which was rich in Nb and with slight Hf segregation, surrounded by an Nb carbide shell. The characterization results of the segregation behavior of Hf in the MC carbides and the subsequent influence on their morphology were compared to density functional theory calculations and found to be in good agreement, suggesting that computational modeling can successfully be used to tailor carbide features.

  6. On change of vanadium carbide state during 20Kh3MVF steel heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitgarts, M.I.; Maksimenko, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    The Xray diffraction study of vanadium carbide MC has been made in the steel-20KH3MVF quenched from 970 and 1040 deg and tempered at 660 deg for 210 hrs. It has been found that the constant of the MC crystal lattice regularly varies with the temperature of isothermal hold-up. In the steel tempered after quenching two vanadium carbides of different content could co-exist simultaneously: carbide formed in the quenching process and carbide formed during tempering. The discovered effect of the temperature dependence of the MC content is, evidently, inherent also to other steels containing vanadium

  7. Methanol electro-oxidation on platinum modified tungsten carbides in direct methanol fuel cells: a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Tian; Lin, Xiao; Chen, Zhao-Yang; Hu, P; Sun, Shi-Gang; Chu, You-Qun; Ma, Chun-An; Lin, Wen-Feng

    2015-10-14

    In exploration of low-cost electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), Pt modified tungsten carbide (WC) materials are found to be great potential candidates for decreasing Pt usage whilst exhibiting satisfactory reactivity. In this work, the mechanisms, onset potentials and activity for electrooxidation of methanol were studied on a series of Pt-modified WC catalysts where the bare W-terminated WC(0001) substrate was employed. In the surface energy calculations of a series of Pt-modified WC models, we found that the feasible structures are mono- and bi-layer Pt-modified WCs. The tri-layer Pt-modified WC model is not thermodynamically stable where the top layer Pt atoms tend to accumulate and form particles or clusters rather than being dispersed as a layer. We further calculated the mechanisms of methanol oxidation on the feasible models via methanol dehydrogenation to CO involving C-H and O-H bonds dissociating subsequently, and further CO oxidation with the C-O bond association. The onset potentials for the oxidation reactions over the Pt-modified WC catalysts were determined thermodynamically by water dissociation to surface OH* species. The activities of these Pt-modified WC catalysts were estimated from the calculated kinetic data. It has been found that the bi-layer Pt-modified WC catalysts may provide a good reactivity and an onset oxidation potential comparable to pure Pt and serve as promising electrocatalysts for DMFCs with a significant decrease in Pt usage.

  8. The laser surface alloying of the surface layer of the plain carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woldan, A.; Kusinski, J.

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the microstructure and properties (chemical composition, microhardness and the effect of tribological test of the surface laser alloyed layer with tantalum. Scanning electron microscopy examinations show structure, which consist of martensite and Ta2C carbides. Samples covered with Ta and the carbon containing binder showed after laser alloying higher hardness than in case of using silicon-containing binder. (author)

  9. Atomic Layer Deposition of SnO2 on MXene for Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Gogotsi, Yury; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we show that oxide battery anodes can be grown on two-dimensional titanium carbide sheets (MXenes) by atomic layer deposition. Using this approach, we have fabricated a composite SnO2/MXene anode for Li-ion battery applications

  10. Residual stress in Ni-W electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizushima, Io; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, the residual stress in Ni–W layers electrodeposited from electrolytes based on NiSO4 and Na2WO4, is investigated. Citrate, glycine and triethanolamine were used as complexing agents, enabling complex formation between the nickel ion and tungstate. The results show that the type...... of complexing agent and the current efficiency have an influence on the residual stress. In all cases, an increase in tensile stress in the deposit with time after deposition was observed. Pulse plating could improve the stress level for the electrolyte containing equal amounts of citrate...

  11. Mechanical and thermal properties of phthalonitrile resin reinforced with silicon carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derradji, Mehdi; Ramdani, Noureddine; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Jun; Feng, Tian-tian; Wang, Hui; Liu, Wen-bin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • SiC microparticles improve the mechanical properties of phthalonitrile resin. • Excellent thermal stability achieved by adding SiC particles in phthalonitrile resin. • Adding 20 wt.% of SiC microparticles increases the T g by 38 °C. • Silane coupling agent can enhance the adhesion and dispersion of particles/matrix. - Abstract: A new type of composite based on phthalonitrile resin reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) microparticles was prepared. For various weight ratios ranging between 0% and 20%, the effect of the micro-SiC particles on the mechanical and thermal properties has been studied. Results from thermal analysis revealed that the starting decomposition temperature and the residual weight were significantly improved upon adding the reinforcing phase. At the maximum micro-SiC loading, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed an important enhancement in both the storage modulus and glass transition temperature (T g ), reaching 3.1 GPa and 338 °C, respectively. The flexural strength and modulus as well as the microhardness were significantly enhanced by adding the microfillers. Tensile test revealed enhancements in the composites toughness upon adding the microparticles. Polarization optical microscope (POM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis confirmed that mechanical and thermal properties improvements are essentially attributed to the good dispersion and adhesion between the particles and the resin

  12. Hollow Spheres of Iron Carbide Nanoparticles Encased in Graphitic Layers as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Nonprecious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction are the ultimate materials and the foremost subject for low‐temperature fuel cells. A novel type of catalysts prepared by high‐pressure pyrolysis is reported. The catalyst is featured by hollow spherical morphologies consisting...

  13. Ultra-high temperature oxidation behavior of chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    The active oxidation, passive oxidation and bubble formation of CVD SiC were studied in O 2 and CO 2 at temperatures from 1650 to 2000 K. The active oxidation rates in O 2 increased with increasing oxygen partial pressure (P o2 ); however, those in CO 2 showed the maxima at specific P o2 . The passive oxidation kinetics in O 2 were either linear-parabolic or parabolic depending on temperature and P o2 , whereas that in CO 2 was always parabolic. The activation energies for the parabolic oxidation in O 2 and CO 2 were 210 and 150 kJ/mol, respectively, suggesting different rate-determining process between these atmospheres. The bubble formation was controlled by temperature and P o2 being independent of oxidant gas species. (author)

  14. Evaluation of Residual Stresses using Ring Core Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holý S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The method for measuring residual stresses using ring-core method is described. Basic relations are given for residual stress measurement along the specimen depth and simplified method is described for average residual stress estimation in the drilled layer for known principal stress directions. The estimation of calculated coefficients using FEM is described. Comparison of method sensitivity is made with hole-drilling method. The device for method application is described and an example of experiment is introduced. The accuracy of method is discussed. The influence of strain gauge rosette misalignment to the evaluated residual stresses is performed using FEM.

  15. Analytical and Experimental Study of Residual Stresses in CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chin Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber Bragg Grating sensors (FBGs have been utilized in various engineering and photoelectric fields because of their good environment tolerance. In this research, residual stresses of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites (CFRP were studied using both experimental and analytical approach. The FBGs were embedded inside middle layers of CFRP to study the formation of residual stress during curing process. Finite element analysis was performed using ABAQUS software to simulate the CFRP curing process. Both experimental and simulation results showed that the residual stress appeared during cooling process and the residual stresses could be released when the CFRP was machined to a different shape.

  16. Impact of microcrystalline silicon carbide growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on crystalline silicon surface passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomaska, M.; Beyer, W.; Neumann, E.; Finger, F.; Ding, K.

    2015-01-01

    Highly crystalline microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H) with excellent optoelectronic material properties is a promising candidate as highly transparent doped layer in silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. These high quality materials are usually produced using hot wire chemical vapor deposition under aggressive growth conditions giving rise to the removal of the underlying passivation layer and thus the deterioration of the crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. In this work, we introduced the n-type μc-SiC:H/n-type μc-SiO x :H/intrinsic a-SiO x :H stack as a front layer configuration for p-type SHJ solar cells with the μc-SiO x :H layer acting as an etch-resistant layer against the reactive deposition conditions during the μc-SiC:H growth. We observed that the unfavorable expansion of micro-voids at the c-Si interface due to the in-diffusion of hydrogen atoms through the layer stack might be responsible for the deterioration of surface passivation. Excellent lifetime values were achieved under deposition conditions which are needed to grow high quality μc-SiC:H layers for SHJ solar cells. - Highlights: • High surface passivation quality was preserved after μc-SiC:H deposition. • μc-SiC:H/μc-SiO x :H/a-SiO x :H stack a promising front layer configuration • Void expansion at a-SiO x :H/c-Si interface for deteriorated surface passivation • μc-SiC:H provides a high transparency and electrical conductivity.

  17. GEN IV: Carbide Fuel Elaboration for the 'Futurix Concepts' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudez, Stephane; Riglet-Martial, Chantal; Paret, Laurent; Abonneau, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In order to collect information on the behaviour of the future GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) fuel under fast neutron irradiation, an experimental irradiation program, called 'Futurix-concepts' has been launched at the CEA. The considered concept is a composite material made of a fissile fuel embedded in an inert ceramic matrix. Fissile fuel pellets are made of UPuN or UPuC while ceramics are SiC for the carbide fuel and TiN for the nitride fuel. This paper focuses on the description of the carbide composite fabrication. The UPuC pellets are manufactured using a metallurgical powder process. Fabrication and handling of the fuels are carried out in glove boxes under a nitrogen atmosphere. Carbide fuel is synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction under vacuum of a mixture of actinide oxide and graphitic carbon up to 1550 deg. C. After ball milling, the UPuC powder is pressed to create hexagonal or spherical compacts. They are then sintered up to 1750 deg. C in order to obtain a density of 85 % of the theoretical one. The sintered pellets are inserted into an inert and tight capsule of SiC. In order to control the gap between the fuel and the matrix precisely, the pellets are abraded. The inert matrix is then filled with the pellets and the whole system is sealed by a BRASiC R process at high temperature under a helium atmosphere. Fabrication of the sample to be irradiated was done in 2006 and the irradiation began in May 2007 in the Phenix reactor. This presentation will detail and discuss the results obtained during this fabrication phase. (authors)

  18. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  19. In search of amorphization-resistant boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhash, Ghatu; Awasthi, Amnaya P.; Kunka, Cody; Jannotti, Phillip; DeVries, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Despite its superior mechanical properties, boron carbide suffers from amorphization, a pressure-induced phenomenon that disturbs crystalline order and likely reduces shear strength. Numerous experimental and computational studies have investigated the structure and origins of amorphization, yet strategies to mitigate this deleterious phenomenon elude. However, recent investigations have revealed three new research avenues for addressing this issue. First, we identify crystallographic cage spaces that may accommodate foreign atoms to potentially prevent structural collapse. Second, we propose polymorph-level tailoring through strict control of processing conditions. Finally, we demonstrate that reducing grain size to nanometer scale increases hardness and may counter amorphization.

  20. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.