WorldWideScience

Sample records for residing vascular cells

  1. Adult Vascular Wall Resident Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Arterial Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Amato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidences have shown the presence of multipotent stem cells (SCs at sites of arterial aneurysms: they can differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs and are activated after residing in a quiescent state in the vascular wall. Recent studies have implicated the role of matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of arterial aneurysms: in fact the increased synthesis of MMPs by arterial SMCs is thought to be a pivotal mechanism in aneurysm formation. The factors and signaling pathways involved in regulating wall resident SC recruitment, survival, proliferation, growth factor production, and differentiation may be also related to selective expression of different MMPs. This review explores the relationship between adult vascular wall resident multipotent vascular SCs, MMPs, and arterial aneurysms.

  2. Role of the Vasa Vasorum and Vascular Resident Stem Cells in Atherosclerosis

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    Jun-ichi Kawabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is considered an “inside-out” response, that begins with the dysfunction of intimal endothelial cells and leads to neointimal plaque formation. The adventitia of large blood vessels has been recognized as an active part of the vessel wall that is involved in the process of atherosclerosis. There are characteristic changes in the adventitial vasa vasorum that are associated with the development of atheromatous plaques. However, whether vasa vasorum plays a causative or merely reactive role in the atherosclerotic process is not completely clear. Recent studies report that the vascular wall contains a number of stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to vascular remodeling. Microvessels serve as the vascular niche that maintains the resident stem/progenitor cells of the tissue. Therefore, the vasa vasorum may contribute to vascular remodeling through not only its conventional function as a blood conducting tube, but also its new conceptual function as a stem cell reservoir. This brief review highlights the recent advances contributing to our understanding of the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum in the atherosclerosis and discusses new concept that involves vascular-resident factors, the vasa vasorum and its associated vascular-resident stem cells, in the atherosclerotic process.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells in human placental chorionic villi reside in a vascular Niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castrechini, N. M.; Murthi, P.; Gude, N. M.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; Gronthos, S.; Zannettino, A.; Brennecke, S. R.; Kalionis, B.; Brennecke, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    The chorionic villi of human term placentae are a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs) The stem cell "niche" within the chorionic villi regulates how PMSCs participate in placental tissue generation, maintenance and repair, but the anatomic location of the niche has not been defined A numbe

  4. "The preadipocyte factor" DLK1 marks adult mouse adipose tissue residing vascular cells that lack in vitro adipogenic differentiation potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Jensen, Line; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2009-01-01

    Delta-like 1 (Dlk1) is expressed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and has frequently been referred to as "the" preadipocyte marker, yet the phenotype of DLK1(+) cells in adipose tissue remains undetermined. Herein, we demonstrate that DLK1(+) cells encompass around 1-2% of the adult mouse adipose stromal...

  5. The role of the vascular dendritic cell network in atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alberts-Grill, Noah; Denning, Timothy L.; Rezvan, Amir; Jo, Hanjoong

    2013-01-01

    A complex role has been described for dendritic cells (DCs) in the potentiation and control of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Resident vascular DCs are found in the intima of atherosclerosis-prone vascular regions exposed to disturbed blood flow patterns. Several phenotypically and functionally distinct vascular DC subsets have been described. The functional heterogeneity of these cells and their contributions to vascular homeostasis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis are only rec...

  6. In Vitro Generation of Vascular Wall-Resident Multipotent Stem Cells of Mesenchymal Nature from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Jennifer Steens

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The vascular wall (VW serves as a niche for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. In general, tissue-specific stem cells differentiate mainly to the tissue type from which they derive, indicating that there is a certain code or priming within the cells as determined by the tissue of origin. Here we report the in vitro generation of VW-typical MSCs from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, based on a VW-MSC-specific gene code. Using a lentiviral vector expressing the so-called Yamanaka factors, we reprogrammed tail dermal fibroblasts from transgenic mice containing the GFP gene integrated into the Nestin-locus (NEST-iPSCs to facilitate lineage tracing after subsequent MSC differentiation. A lentiviral vector expressing a small set of recently identified human VW-MSC-specific HOX genes then induced MSC differentiation. This direct programming approach successfully mediated the generation of VW-typical MSCs with classical MSC characteristics, both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. General Surgery Resident Vascular Operative Experience in the Era of Endovascular Surgery and Vascular Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Kim, Jerry J; Smith, Brian; Kim, Dennis; Koopmann, Matthew; DeVirgilio, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Advances in endovascular surgery have resulted in a decline in major open arterial reconstructions nationwide. Our objective is to investigate the effect of endovascular surgery on general surgery resident experience with open vascular surgery. Between 2004 and 2014, 112 residents graduated from two academic institutions in Southern California. Residents were separated into those who graduated in 2004 to 2008 (period 1) and in 2009 to 2014 (period 2). Case volumes of vascular procedures were compared using two-sample t test. A total of 43 residents were in period 1 and 59 residents were in period 2. In aggregate, there was no significant difference in open cases recorded between the two periods (84 vs 87, P = 0.194). Subgroup analysis showed period 2 recorded significantly fewer cases of open aneurysm repair (5 vs 3, P surgery residents experienced a significant decline in several index open major arterial reconstruction cases. This decline was offset by maintenance of dialysis access procedures. If the trend continues, future general surgeons will not be proficient in open vascular procedures.

  8. Impact of Integrated Vascular Residencies on Academic Productivity within Vascular Surgery Divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bradford J; Valsangkar, Nakul P; Liang, Tiffany W; Murphy, Michael P; Zimmers, Teresa A; Bell, Teresa M; Davies, Mark G; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2017-02-01

    Changing training paradigms in vascular surgery have been introduced to reduce overall training time. Herein, we sought to examine how shortened training for vascular surgeons may have influenced overall divisional academic productivity. Faculty from the top 55 surgery departments were identified according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. Academic metrics of 315 vascular surgery, 1,132 general surgery, and 2,403 other surgical specialties faculty were examined using institutional Web sites, Scopus, and NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools from September 1, 2014, to January 31, 2015. Individual-level and aggregate numbers of publications, citations, and NIH funding were determined. The mean size of the vascular divisions was 5 faculty. There was no correlation between department size and academic productivity of individual faculty members (R(2) = 0.68, P = 0.2). Overall percentage of vascular surgery faculty with current or former NIH funding was 20%, of which 10.8% had major NIH grants (R01/U01/P01). Vascular surgery faculty associated with integrated vascular training programs demonstrated significantly greater academic productivity. Publications and citations were higher for vascular surgery faculty from institutions with both integrated and traditional training programs (48 of 1,051) compared to those from programs with integrated training alone (37 of 485) or traditional fellowships alone (26 of 439; P productivity was improved within vascular surgery divisions with integrated training programs or both program types. These data suggest that the earlier specialization of integrated residencies in addition to increasing dedicated vascular training time may actually help promote research within the field of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Canadian vascular surgery residents' perceptions regarding future job opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joel A; Dubois, Luc; Power, Adam H; DeRose, Guy; MacKenzie, Kent S; Forbes, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to determine the employment environment for graduates of Canadian vascular surgery training programs. A cross-sectional survey of residents and graduates (2011-2012) was used. Thirty-seven residents were invited with a response rate of 57%, and 14 graduates with a response rate of 71%; 70% of graduates felt the job market played an important role in their decision to pursue vascular surgery as a career compared to 43% of trainees. The top three concerns were the lack of surgeons retiring, the overproduction of trainees, and saturation of the job market. The majority (62%) of trainees see themselves extending their training due to lack of employment. All of the graduates obtained employment, with 50% during their second year (of two years) of training and 30% after training was completed. Graduates spent an average of 12 ± 10.6 months seeking a position and applied to 3.3 ± 1.5 positions, with a mean of 1.9 ± 1.3 interviews and 2 ± 1.2 offers. There was a discrepancy between the favorable employment climate experienced by graduates and the pessimistic outlook of trainees. We must be progressive in balancing the employment opportunities with the number of graduates. Number and timing of job offers is a possible future metric of the optimal number of residents.

  10. Education on, Exposure to, and Management of Vascular Anomalies During Otolaryngology Residency and Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Robert; Jabbour, Noel; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Bauman, Nancy; Darrow, David H; Elluru, Ravindhra; Grimmer, J Fredrik; Perkins, Jonathan; Richter, Gresham; Shin, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    The field of vascular anomalies presents diverse challenges in diagnosis and management. Although many lesions involve the head and neck, training in vascular anomalies is not universally included in otolaryngology residencies and pediatric otolaryngology (POTO) fellowships. To explore the education in, exposure to, and comfort level of otolaryngology trainees with vascular anomalies. A survey was distributed to 39 POTO fellows and 44 residents in postgraduate year 5 who matched into POTO fellowships from April 22 through June 16, 2014. Survey responses from trainees on exposure to, education on, and comfort with vascular anomalies. Forty-four residents in postgraduate year 5 who applied to POTO fellowships and 39 POTO fellows were emailed the survey. Fourteen respondents were unable to be contacted owing to lack of a current email address. Thirty-six of 69 residents and fellows (18 fellows and 18 residents [52%]) responded to the survey. Twenty-seven trainees (75%) reported no participation in a vascular anomalies clinic during residency; 6 of these 27 individuals (22%) trained at institutions with a vascular anomalies clinic but did not participate in the clinic, and 28 of the 36 respondents (78%) reported that they had less than adequate or no exposure to vascular anomalies in residency. Among POTO fellows, 11 of 17 (65%) did not participate in a vascular anomalies clinic during fellowship, even though 8 of the 11 had a vascular anomalies clinic at their fellowship program. During fellowship training, 12 of 18 fellows (67%) reported that they had adequate exposure to vascular anomalies. Only 20 respondents (56%) felt comfortable distinguishing among diagnoses of vascular anomalies, and only 4 residents (22%) and 9 fellows (50%) felt comfortable treating patients with vascular anomalies. All fellows believed that training in vascular anomalies was important in fellowship, and 100% of respondents indicated that increased exposure to diagnosis and management of

  11. Comparative characterization of stromal vascular cells derived from three types of vascular wall and adipose tissue.

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    Yang, Santsun; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Doi, Kentaro; Kuno, Shinichiro; Kinoshita, Kahori; Ma, Hsu; Tsai, Chi-Han; Chou, Wan-Ting; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2013-12-01

    Multipotent stem/progenitor cells localize perivascularly in many organs and vessel walls. These tissue-resident stem/progenitor cells differentiate into vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and other mesenchymal lineages, and participate in physiological maintenance and repair of vasculatures. In this study, we characterized stromal vascular cells obtained through the explant culture method from three different vessel walls in humans: arterial wall (ART; >500 μm in diameter), venous wall (VN; >500 μm in diameter), and small vessels in adipose tissue (SV; arterioles and venules, adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs). All stromal vascular cells of different origins presented fibroblast-like morphology and we could not visually discriminate one population from another. Flow cytometry showed that the cultured population heterogeneously expressed a variety of surface antigens associated with stem/progenitor cells, but CD105 was expressed by most cells in all groups, suggesting that the cells generally shared the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. Our histological and flow cytometric data suggested that the main population of vessel wall-derived stromal vascular cells were CD34(+)/CD31(-) and came from the tunica adventitia and areola tissue surrounding the adventitia. CD271 (p75NTR) was expressed by the vasa vasorum in the VN adventitia and by a limited population in the adventitia of SV. All three populations differentiated into multiple lineages as did ASCs. ART cells induced the largest quantity of calcium formation in the osteogenic medium, whereas ASCs showed the greatest adipogenic differentiation. SV and VN stromal cells had greater potency for network formation than did ART stromal cells. In conclusion, the three stromal vascular populations exhibited differential functional properties. Our results have clinical implications for vascular diseases such as arterial wall calcification and possible applications to regenerative therapies

  12. Vascular inflammatory cells in hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Harrison

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease.

  13. From here to there, progenitor cells and stem cells are everywhere in lung vascular remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Heise

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The field of stem cell biology, cell therapy and regenerative medicine has expanded almost exponentially in the last decade. Clinical trials are evaluating the potential therapeutic use of stem cells in many adult and pediatric lung diseases with vascular component, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. Extensive research activity is exploring lung resident and circulating progenitor cells and their contribution to vascular complications of chronic lung diseases, and researchers hope to use resident or circulating stem/progenitor cells to treat chronic lung diseases and their vascular complications. It is becoming more and more clear that progress in mechanobiology will help to understand the various influences of physical forces and extracellular matrix composition on the phenotype and features of the progenitor cells and stem cells. The current review provides an overview of current concepts in the field.

  14. Vascular Stem Cells in Vascular Remodeling and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blood vessels are a source of stem and progenitor cells, which likely contribute to a variety of vascular processes and diseases. Emerging concepts in this field could influence therapeutic approaches to diseases of blood vessels such as atherosclerosis. CONTENT: Vascular Stem Cells (VSCs field is only beginning to emerge, and thus, many issues regarding VSCs’s identity and function remain poorly understood. In fact, even after decades of intensive research, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC, which is suggested to be VSCs, is still having many outstanding issues of its own. And, on top of this, likewise decades-long intensive pericyte research has not been able resolve the identity issue. While favors Adventitial Progenitor Cells (APCs over pericytes as the likely VSC candidate, it should be pointed out that currently the opposite view (i.e., pericytes as VSCs is more prevalent, and many excellent reviews, including a recent one, have discussed this issue extensively. SUMMARY: It has been postulated that, within the vasculature, APCs could differentiate into pericytes (CD34- CD31- CD140b+ SMA-, endothelial cells (CD34+ CD31+ CD140b- SMA-, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs (CD34- CD31- CD140b- SMA+; and during tissue expansion or repair, APCs could also differentiate into tissue-specific cell types (e.g., muscle and fat Thus, in vitro, APCs fulfill all criteria for being VSCs. Meanwhile, in vivo evidence is still limited and will require further investigation. KEYWORDS: vascular stem cells, VSC, mesenchymal stem cells, MSC, endothelial progenitor cells, EPC, adventitial progenitor cells, APC.

  15. Molecular signal transduction in vascular cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Apoptosis is a form of genetically programmed cell death, which plays a key role in regulation of cellularity in a variety of tissue and cell types including the cardiovascular tissues. Under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, various biophysiological and biochemical factors, including mechanical forces, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, cytokines, growth factors, oxidized lipoproteins, etc., may influence apoptosis of vascular cells. The Fas/Fas ligand/caspase death-signaling pathway, Bcl-2 protein family/mitochondria, the tumor suppressive gene p53, and the proto-oncogene c-myc may be activated in atherosclerotic lesions, and mediates vascular apoptosis during the development of atherosclerosis. Abnormal expression and dysfunction of these apoptosis-regulating genes may attenuate or accelerate vascular cell apoptosis and affect the integrity and stability of atherosclerotic plaques. Clarification of the molecular mechanism that regulates apoptosis may help design a new strategy for treatment of atherosclerosis and its major complication, the acute vascular syndromes.

  16. Stem cell function during plant vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashima, Shunsuke; Sebastian, Jose; Lee, Ji-Young; Helariutta, Yka

    2013-01-23

    The plant vascular system, composed of xylem and phloem, evolved to connect plant organs and transport various molecules between them. During the post-embryonic growth, these conductive tissues constitutively form from cells that are derived from a lateral meristem, commonly called procambium and cambium. Procambium/cambium contains pluripotent stem cells and provides a microenvironment that maintains the stem cell population. Because vascular plants continue to form new tissues and organs throughout their life cycle, the formation and maintenance of stem cells are crucial for plant growth and development. In this decade, there has been considerable progress in understanding the molecular control of the organization and maintenance of stem cells in vascular plants. Noticeable advance has been made in elucidating the role of transcription factors and major plant hormones in stem cell maintenance and vascular tissue differentiation. These studies suggest the shared regulatory mechanisms among various types of plant stem cell pools. In this review, we focus on two aspects of stem cell function in the vascular cambium, cell proliferation and cell differentiation.

  17. Notch Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, J T; Lilly, B

    2017-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved pathway involved in cell fate determination in embryonic development and also functions in the regulation of physiological processes in several systems. It plays an especially important role in vascular development and physiology by influencing angiogenesis, vessel patterning, arterial/venous specification, and vascular smooth muscle biology. Aberrant or dysregulated Notch signaling is the cause of or a contributing factor to many vascular disorders, including inherited vascular diseases, such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, associated with degeneration of the smooth muscle layer in cerebral arteries. Like most signaling pathways, the Notch signaling axis is influenced by complex interactions with mediators of other signaling pathways. This complexity is also compounded by different members of the Notch family having both overlapping and unique functions. Thus, it is vital to fully understand the roles and interactions of each Notch family member in order to effectively and specifically target their exact contributions to vascular disease. In this chapter, we will review the Notch signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells as it relates to vascular development and human disease.

  18. Gap junctional communication between vascular cells. Induction of connexin43 messenger RNA in macrophage foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Polacek, D.; Lal, R; Volin, M. V.; Davies, P F

    1993-01-01

    The structure and function of blood vessels depend on the ability of vascular cells to receive and transduce signals and to communicate with each other. One means by which vascular cells have been shown to communicate is via gap junctions, specifically connexin43. In atherosclerosis, the normal physical patterns of communication are disrupted by the subendothelial infiltration and accumulation of blood monocytes, which in turn can differentiate into resident foam cells. In this paper we repor...

  19. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area.

  20. Cell-to-cell communication in vascular morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehesranta, Satu J; Lichtenberger, Raffael; Helariutta, Ykä

    2010-02-01

    The plant vascular system consists of two conductive cell types, xylem and phloem, which are both produced by procambial cells. Recently, several novel regulatory mechanisms that control the specification of vascular patterning and differentiation have been uncovered. The non-cell-autonomous TDIF/CLE signalling mediates phloem-xylem cross-talk and cambial maintenance; a flowering-related long-distance signal governs secondary development; and novel genetic players such as LHW regulate vascular morphogenesis. A future challenge is to conflate data on the various genetic, hormonal and other factors to understand the networks underlying vascular tissue formation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An In Vitro Murine Model of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelynack, Kristen J; Holt, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is seen ubiquitously in aging blood vessels and prematurely in disease states like renal failure. It is thought to be driven by a number of systemic and local factors that lead to extra-osseous deposition of mineral in the vascular wall and valves as a common endpoint. The response of resident vascular smooth muscle cell to these dystrophic signals appears to be important in this process. Whilst in vivo models allow the observation of global changes in a pro-calcific environment, identifying the specific cells and mechanisms involved has been largely garnered from in vitro experiments, which provide added benefits in terms of reproducibility, cost, and convenience. Here we describe a 7-21 day cell culture model of calcification developed using immortalized murine vascular smooth muscle cells (MOVAS-1). This model provides a method by which vascular smooth muscle cell involvement and manipulation within a mineralizing domain can be studied.

  2. Cell-Cell Interactions Mediate the Response of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Substrate Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga V.; Lee, Kristen L.; Isenberg, Brett C.; Rich, Celeste B.; Nugent, Matthew A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2011-01-01

    The vessel wall experiences progressive stiffening with age and the development of cardiovascular disease, which alters the micromechanical environment experienced by resident vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In vitro studies have shown that VSMCs are sensitive to substrate stiffness, but the exact molecular mechanisms of their response to stiffness remains unknown. Studies have also shown that cell-cell interactions can affect mechanotransduction at the cell-substrate interface. Using flexible substrates, we show that the expression of proteins associated with cell-matrix adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is regulated by substrate stiffness, and that an increase in cell density selectively attenuates some of these effects. We also show that cell-cell interactions exert a strong effect on cell morphology in a substrate-stiffness dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that as VSMCs form cell-cell contacts, substrate stiffness becomes a less potent regulator of focal adhesion signaling. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which VSMCs respond to the mechanical environment of the blood vessel wall, and point to cell-cell interactions as critical mediators of VSMC response to vascular injury. PMID:21806930

  3. A Comparison of Training Experience, Training Satisfaction, and Job Search Experiences between Integrated Vascular Surgery Residency and Traditional Vascular Surgery Fellowship Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Benjamin; Shames, Murray; Schanzer, Andres; Rectenwald, John; Chaer, Rabih; Lee, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    The first 2 integrated vascular residents in the United States graduated in 2012, and in 2013, 11 more entered the job market. The purpose of this study was to compare the job search experiences of the first cohort of integrated 0 + 5 graduates to their counterparts completing traditional 5 + 2 fellowship programs. An anonymous, Web-based, 15-question survey was sent to all 11 graduating integrated residents in 2013 and to the 25 corresponding 5 + 2 graduating fellows within the same institution. Questions focused on the following domains: training experience, job search timelines and outcomes, and overall satisfaction with each training paradigm. Survey response was nearly 81% for the 0 + 5 graduates and 64% for the 5 + 2 graduates. Overall, there was no significant difference between residents and fellows in the operative experience obtained as measured by the number of open and endovascular cases logged. Dedicated research time during the entire training period was similar between residents and fellows. Nearly all graduates were extremely satisfied with their training and had positive experiences during their job searches with respect to starting salaries, numbers of offers, and desired practice type. More 0 + 5 residents chose academic and mixed practices over private practices compared with 5 + 2 fellowship graduates. Although longer term data are needed to understand the impact of the addition of 0 + 5 graduating residents to the vascular surgery work force, preliminary survey results suggest that both training paradigms (0 + 5 and 5 + 2) provide positive training experiences that result in excellent job search experiences. Based on the current and future need for vascular surgeons in the work force, the continued growth and expansion of integrated 0 + 5 vascular surgery residency positions as an alternative to traditional fellowship training is thus far justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. How do resident stem cells repair the damagedmyocardium?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emiko Hayashi; Toru Hosoda

    2015-01-01

    It has been a decade since the monumental discoveryof resident stem cells in the mammalian heart, and thefollowing studies witnessed the continuous turnoverof cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, maintaining thehomeostasis of the organ. Recently, the autologousadministration of c-kit-positive cardiac stem cells inpatients with ischemic heart failure has led to an incredibleoutcome; the left ventricular ejection fraction of the celltreatedgroup improved from 30% at the baseline to 38%after one year and to 42% after two years of cell injection.The potential underlying mechanisms, before and aftercell infusion, are explored and discussed in this article.Some of them are related to the intrinsic property of theresident stem cells, such as direct differentiation, paracrineaction, and immunomodulatory function, whereas othersinvolve environmental factors, leading to cellular reverseremodeling and to the natural selection of "juvenile" cells.It has now been demonstrated that cardiac stem cells fortherapeutic purposes can be prepared from tiny biopsiedspecimens of the failing heart as well as from frozentissues, which may remarkably expand the repertoireof the strategy against various cardiovascular disorders,including non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and congenitalheart diseases. Further translational investigations areneeded to explore these possibilities.

  5. [DEVELOPMENT OF CELL SHEET ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY IN ENGINEERING VASCULARIZED TISSUE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Ma, Dongyang; Ren, Liling

    2015-03-01

    To review the development of cell sheet engineering technology in engineering vascularized tissue. The literature about cell sheet engineering technology and engineering vascularized tissue was reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. Although there are many methods to engineer vascularized tissue, cell sheet engineering technology provides a promising potential to develop a vascularized tissue. Recently, cell sheet engineering technology has become a hot topic in engineering vascularized tissue. Co-culturing endothelial cells on a cell sheet, endothelial cells are able to form three-dimensional prevascularized networks and microvascular cavities in the cell sheet, which facilitate the formation of functional vascular networks in the transplanted tissue. Cell sheet engineering technology is a promising strategy to engineer vascularized tissue, which is still being studied to explore more potential.

  6. Mononuclear Cells and Vascular Repair in HHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calinda eDingenouts

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a rare genetic vascular disorder known for its endothelial dysplasia causing arteriovenous malformations and severe bleedings. HHT-1 and HHT-2 are the most prevalent variants and are caused by heterozygous mutations in endoglin and ALK1, respectively. An undervalued aspect of the disease is that HHT patients experience persistent inflammation. Although endothelial and mural cells have been the main research focus trying to unravel the mechanism behind the disease, wound healing is a process with a delicate balance between inflammatory and vascular cells. Inflammatory cells are part of the mononuclear cells (MNCs fraction, and can, next to eliciting an immune response, also have angiogenic potential. This biphasic effect of MNC can hold a promising mechanism to further elucidate treatment strategies for HHT patients. Before MNC are able to contribute to repair, they need to home to and retain in ischemic and damaged tissue. Directed migration (homing of mononuclear cells following tissue damage is regulated by the stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1. MNCs that express the C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4 migrate towards the tightly regulated gradient of SDF1. This directed migration of monocytes and lymphocytes can be inhibited by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4. Interestingly, MNC of HHT patients express elevated levels of DPP4 and show impaired homing towards damaged tissue. Impaired homing capacity of the MNCs might therefore contribute to the impaired angiogenesis and tissue repair observed in HHT patients. This review summarizes recent studies regarding the role of MNCs in the etiology of HHT and vascular repair, and evaluates the efficacy of DPP4 inhibition in tissue integrity and repair.

  7. Biophysical Cueing and Vascular Endothelial Cell Behavior

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    Joshua A. Wood

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Human vascular endothelial cells (VEC line the vessels of the body and are critical for the maintenance of vessel integrity and trafficking of biochemical cues. They are fundamental structural elements and are central to the signaling environment. Alterations in the normal functioning of the VEC population are associated with a number of vascular disorders among which are some of the leading causes of death in both the United States and abroad. VECs attach to their underlying stromal elements through a specialization of the extracellular matrix, the basement membrane. The basement membrane provides signaling cues to the VEC through its chemical constituents, by serving as a reservoir for cytoactive factors and through its intrinsic biophysical properties. This specialized matrix is composed of a topographically rich 3D felt-like network of fibers and pores on the nano (1–100 nm and submicron (100–1,000 nm size scale. The basement membrane provides biophysical cues to the overlying VECs through its intrinsic topography as well as through its local compliance (relative stiffness. These biophysical cues modulate VEC adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and the cytoskeletal signaling network of the individual cells. This review focuses on the impact of biophysical cues on VEC behaviors and demonstrates the need for their consideration in future vascular studies and the design of improved prosthetics.

  8. Red blood cells in retinal vascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Sherwood, Joseph; Chhablani, Jay; Ricchariya, Ashutosh; Kim, Sangho; Jones, Philip H; Balabani, Stavroula; Shima, David

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular circulation plays a vital role in regulating physiological functions, such as vascular resistance, and maintaining organ health. Pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, or hematologic diseases affect the microcirculation posing a significant risk to human health. The retinal vasculature provides a unique window for non-invasive visualisation of the human circulation in vivo and retinal vascular image analysis has been established to predict the development of both clinical and subclinical cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and retinal disease in epidemiologic studies. Blood viscosity which was otherwise thought to play a negligible role in determining blood flow based on Poiseuille's law up to the 1970s has now been shown to play an equally if not a more important role in controlling microcirculation and quantifying blood flow. Understanding the hemodynamics/rheology of the microcirculation and its changes in diseased states remains a challenging task; this is due to the particulate nature of blood, the mechanical properties of the cells (such as deformability and aggregability) and the complex architecture of the microvasculature. In our review, we have tried to postulate a possible role of red blood cell (RBC) biomechanical properties and laid down future framework for research related to hemorrheological aspects of blood in patients with retinal vascular disorders.

  9. Brain pericytes serve as microglia-generating multipotent vascular stem cells following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Rika; Kawahara, Maiko; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Takahashi, Ai; Tanaka, Yasue; Narita, Aya; Kuwahara-Otani, Sachi; Hayakawa, Tetsu; Yagi, Hideshi; Matsuyama, Tomohiro; Nakagomi, Takayuki

    2016-03-07

    Microglia are the resident macrophage population of the central nervous system (CNS) and play essential roles, particularly in inflammation-mediated pathological conditions such as ischemic stroke. Increasing evidence shows that the population of vascular cells located around the blood vessels, rather than circulating cells, harbor stem cells and that these resident vascular stem cells (VSCs) are the likely source of some microglia. However, the precise traits and origins of these cells under pathological CNS conditions remain unclear. In this study, we used a mouse model of cerebral infarction to investigate whether reactive pericytes (PCs) acquire microglia-producing VSC activity following ischemia. We demonstrated the localization of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1)-expressing microglia to perivascular regions within ischemic areas. These cells expressed platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ), a hallmark of vascular PCs. PDGFRβ(+) PCs isolated from ischemic, but not non-ischemic, areas expressed stem/undifferentiated cell markers and subsequently differentiated into various cell types, including microglia-like cells with phagocytic capacity. The study results suggest that vascular PCs acquire multipotent VSC activity under pathological conditions and may thus be a novel source of microglia.

  10. Cell therapy for ischaemic heart disease: focus on the role of resident cardiac stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamuleau, S A J; Vrijsen, K R; Rokosh, D G; Tang, X L; Piek, J J; Bolli, R

    2009-05-01

    Myocardial infarction results in loss of cardiomyocytes, scar formation, ventricular remodelling, and eventually heart failure. In recent years, cell therapy has emerged as a potential new strategy for patients with ischaemic heart disease. This includes embryonic and bone marrow derived stem cells. Recent clinical studies showed ostensibly conflicting results of intracoronary infusion of autologous bone marrow derived stem cells in patients with acute or chronic myocardial infarction. Anyway, these results have stimulated additional clinical and pre-clinical studies to further enhance the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy. Recently, the existence of cardiac stem cells that reside in the heart itself was demonstrated. Their discovery has sparked intense hope for myocardial regeneration with cells that are obtained from the heart itself and are thereby inherently programmed to reconstitute cardiac tissue. These cells can be detected by several surface markers (e.g. c-kit, Sca-1, MDR1, Isl-1). Both in vitro and in vivo differentiation into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated, and animal studies showed promising results on improvement of left ventricular function. This review will discuss current views regarding the feasibility of cardiac repair, and focus on the potential role of the resident cardiac stem and progenitor cells. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:199-207.).

  11. Regulated Hyaluronan Synthesis by Vascular Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Viola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular microenvironment plays a critical role in several pathologies including atherosclerosis. Hyaluronan (HA content often reflects the progression of this disease in promoting vessel thickening and cell migration. HA synthesis is regulated by several factors, including the phosphorylation of HA synthase 2 (HAS2 and other covalent modifications including ubiquitination and O-GlcNAcylation. Substrate availability is important in HA synthesis control. Specific drugs reducing the UDP precursors are able to reduce HA synthesis whereas the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP increases the concentration of HA precursor UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc leading to an increase of HA synthesis. The flux through the HBP in the regulation of HA biosynthesis in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs was reported as a critical aspect. In fact, inhibiting O-GlcNAcylation reduced HA production whereas increased O-GlcNAcylation augmented HA secretion. Additionally, O-GlcNAcylation regulates HAS2 gene expression resulting in accumulation of its mRNA after induction of O-GlcNAcylation with glucosamine treatments. The oxidized LDLs, the most common molecules related to atherosclerosis outcome and progression, are also able to induce a strong HA synthesis when they are in contact with vascular cells. In this review, we present recent described mechanisms involved in HA synthesis regulation and their role in atherosclerosis outcome and development.

  12. Vascular regeneration in a basal chordate is due to the presence of immobile, bi-functional cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P Braden

    Full Text Available The source of tissue turnover during homeostasis or following injury is usually due to proliferation of a small number of resident, lineage-restricted stem cells that have the ability to amplify and differentiate into mature cell types. We are studying vascular regeneration in a chordate model organism, Botryllus schlosseri, and have previously found that following surgical ablation of the extracorporeal vasculature, new tissue will regenerate in a VEGF-dependent process within 48 hrs. Here we use a novel vascular cell lineage tracing methodology to assess regeneration in parabiosed individuals and demonstrate that the source of regenerated vasculature is due to the proliferation of pre-existing vascular resident cells and not a mobile progenitor. We also show that these cells are bi-potential, and can reversibly adopt two fates, that of the newly forming vessels or the differentiated vascular tissue at the terminus of the vasculature, known as ampullae. In addition, we show that pre-existing vascular resident cells differentially express progenitor and differentiated cell markers including the Botryllus homologs of CD133, VEGFR-2, and Cadherin during the regenerative process.

  13. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  14. Endovascular procedures, carotid endarterectomies, and aortic surgery should preferentially be done by a vascular trainee rather than a general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, Gary R; Sharp, John

    2005-03-01

    This article is the result of a debate. The motion proposed was that "endovascular procedures, carotid endarterectomies, and aortic surgery should be done preferentially by a vascular trainee rather than a general surgery resident.'' Arguments in favor of the motion were that with the development of endovascular surgery, there are now less open vascular procedures to perform and hence, vascular trainees needed to hone their skills on these limited cases rather than waste that experience on a general surgery resident. This focused training experience would allow vascular fellows to be become more highly skilled vascular surgeons. Additionally, endovascular procedures are an important component of modern vascular surgery, and it is important for the vascular fellow to develop significant experience with and acquire the appropriate numbers of endovascular cases to get the necessary credentials when going into a vascular practice. Arguments against the motion were that exposure to vascular cases will make a better general surgeon, one who will also be well equipped to deal with trauma cases and situations where the control of bleeding might be life saving. Additionally, the issue of exposure of general surgery residents to vascular cases might be a positive recruitment strategy for future vascular fellows. The motion was carried by a small majority vote.

  15. Chemerin Regulates Crosstalk Between Adipocytes and Vascular Cells Through Nox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Karla Bianca; Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Lopes, Rheure Alves Moreira; Rios, Francisco Jose; Anagnostopoulou, Aikaterini; Lobato, Nubia Souza; de Oliveira, Ana Maria; Tostes, Rita C; Montezano, Augusto C; Touyz, Rhian M

    2015-09-01

    Adipocytes produce adipokines, including chemerin, a chemoattractant that mediates effects through its ChemR23 receptor. Chemerin has been linked to endothelial dysfunction and vascular injury in pathological conditions, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Molecular mechanisms underlying this are elusive. Here we assessed whether chemerin through redox-sensitive signaling influences molecular processes associated with vascular growth, apoptosis, and inflammation. Human microvascular endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated with chemerin (50 ng/mL). Chemerin increased generation of reactive oxygen species and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, effects that were inhibited by ML171, GKT137831 (Nox inhibitors), and N-acetylcysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger). Chemerin increased mRNA expression of proinflammatory mediators in vascular cells and increased monocyte-to-endothelial cell attachment. In human vascular smooth muscle cells, chemerin induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and stimulated proliferation (increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression [proliferation marker] and BrdU incorporation [proliferation assay]). Chemerin decreased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B activation and increased TUNEL-positive human vascular smooth muscle cells. In human microvascular endothelial cells, chemerin reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide production. Adipocyte-conditioned medium from obese/diabetic mice (db/db), which have elevated chemerin levels, increased reactive oxygen species generation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas adipocyte-conditioned medium from control mice had no effect. Chemerin actions were blocked by CCX 832, a ChemR23 inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that chemerin, through Nox activation and redox-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling, exerts proapoptotic, proinflammatory, and

  16. Autoantibodies and Resident Renal Cells in the Pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis: Getting to Know the Unknown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Yung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by a breakdown of self-tolerance and production of autoantibodies. Kidney involvement (i.e., lupus nephritis is both common and severe and can result in permanent damage within the glomerular, vascular, and tubulo-interstitial compartments of the kidney, leading to acute or chronic renal failure. Accumulating evidence shows that anti-dsDNA antibodies play a critical role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis through their binding to cell surface proteins of resident kidney cells, thereby triggering the downstream activation of signaling pathways and the release of mediators of inflammation and fibrosis. This paper describes the mechanisms through which autoantibodies interact with resident renal cells and how this interaction plays a part in disease pathogenesis that ultimately leads to structural and functional alterations in lupus nephritis.

  17. Cell-free vascular grafts: Recent developments and clinical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Sindhu; Santandreu, Ana; Swartz, Daniel D; Andreadis, Stelios T

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in vascular tissue engineering have led to the development of cell-free grafts that are available off-the-shelf for on demand surgery. Challenges associated with cell-based technologies including cell sourcing, cell expansion and long-term bioreactor culture motivated the development of completely cell-free vascular grafts. These are based on decellularized arteries, decellularized cultured cell-based tissue engineered grafts or biomaterials functionalized with biological signals that promote in situ tissue regeneration. Clinical trials undertaken to demonstrate the applicability of these grafts are also discussed. This comprehensive review summarizes recent developments in vascular graft technologies, with potential applications in coronary artery bypass procedures, lower extremity bypass, vascular injury and trauma, congenital heart diseases and dialysis access shunts, to name a few.

  18. [The characteristics of vascular psychoses in the residents of Chernivtsi Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, S M

    1998-01-01

    Vascular affections of the brain remain a formidable psychiatric challenge nowadays. According to WHO reports cerebrovascular disorders constitute one of the three chief causes of mortality in the population of the economically developed countries of the world. The most important cause of vascular psychoses is considered to be atherosclerosis and hypertensive disease. Today vascular psychoses have become a most common type of abnormal mental states in young adults (greater then 30-40 years old). The studies made have yielded evidence in support of the psychoses morbidity to be dependent upon particular season of year as well as on the climatic features of the locality. Natural factors have been found out to affect the prevalence of vascular psychoses in Chernivtsi Province. The findings obtained suggest to us a substantial prevalence of atherosclerotic and hypertensive psychoses in the plains-men living under conditions of a mild climate.

  19. Temperature-dependent rate models of vascular cambium cell mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Edward A. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    We use two rate-process models to describe cell mortality at elevated temperatures as a means of understanding vascular cambium cell death during surface fires. In the models, cell death is caused by irreversible damage to cellular molecules that occurs at rates that increase exponentially with temperature. The models differ in whether cells show cumulative effects of...

  20. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fu [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Chambon, Pierre [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS UMR7104, INSERM U596, ULP, Collége de France) and Institut Clinique de la Souris, ILLKIRCH, Strasbourg (France); Tellides, George [Department of Surgery, Interdepartmental Program in Vascular Biology and Therapeutics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kong, Wei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Basic Medical College of Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xiaoming, E-mail: rmygxgwk@163.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Wei [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  1. Stem cell-derived vascular endothelial cells and their potential application in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although a 'vascular stem cell' population has not been identified or generated, vascular endothelial and mural cells (smooth muscle cells and pericytes) can be derived from currently known pluripotent stem cell sources, including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. We rev...

  2. Cell proliferation along vascular islands during microvascular network growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly-Goss Molly R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observations in our laboratory provide evidence of vascular islands, defined as disconnected endothelial cell segments, in the adult microcirculation. The objective of this study was to determine if vascular islands are involved in angiogenesis during microvascular network growth. Results Mesenteric tissues, which allow visualization of entire microvascular networks at a single cell level, were harvested from unstimulated adult male Wistar rats and Wistar rats 3 and 10 days post angiogenesis stimulation by mast cell degranulation with compound 48/80. Tissues were immunolabeled for PECAM and BRDU. Identification of vessel lumens via injection of FITC-dextran confirmed that endothelial cell segments were disconnected from nearby patent networks. Stimulated networks displayed increases in vascular area, length density, and capillary sprouting. On day 3, the percentage of islands with at least one BRDU-positive cell increased compared to the unstimulated level and was equal to the percentage of capillary sprouts with at least one BRDU-positive cell. At day 10, the number of vascular islands per vascular area dramatically decreased compared to unstimulated and day 3 levels. Conclusions These results show that vascular islands have the ability to proliferate and suggest that they are able to incorporate into the microcirculation during the initial stages of microvascular network growth.

  3. Stem Cell Sources for Vascular Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Vivek K.

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the stem cell sources with the potential to be used in vascular tissue engineering and to promote vascular regeneration. The first clinical studies using tissue-engineered vascular grafts are already under way, supporting the potential of this technology in the treatment of cardiovascular and other diseases. Despite progress in engineering biomaterials with the appropriate mechanical properties and biological cues as well as bioreactors for generating the correct tissue microenvironment, the source of cells that make up the vascular tissues remains a major challenge for tissue engineers and physicians. Mature cells from the tissue of origin may be difficult to obtain and suffer from limited proliferative capacity, which may further decline as a function of donor age. On the other hand, multipotent and pluripotent stem cells have great potential to provide large numbers of autologous cells with a great differentiation capacity. Here, we discuss the adult multipotent as well as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, their differentiation potential toward vascular lineages, and their use in engineering functional and implantable vascular tissues. We also discuss the associated challenges that need to be addressed in order to facilitate the transition of this technology from the bench to the bedside. PMID:22571595

  4. Vascular smooth muscle progenitor cells: building and repairing blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majesky, Mark W; Dong, Xiu Rong; Regan, Jenna N; Hoglund, Virginia J

    2011-02-04

    Molecular pathways that control the specification, migration, and number of available smooth muscle progenitor cells play key roles in determining blood vessel size and structure, capacity for tissue repair, and progression of age-related disorders. Defects in these pathways produce malformations of developing blood vessels, depletion of smooth muscle progenitor cell pools for vessel wall maintenance and repair, and aberrant activation of alternative differentiation pathways in vascular disease. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that uniquely specify and maintain vascular smooth muscle cell precursors is essential if we are to use advances in stem and progenitor cell biology and somatic cell reprogramming for applications directed to the vessel wall.

  5. Modulation of Vascular Cell Function by Bim Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E. Morrison

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis of vascular cells, including pericytes and endothelial cells, contributes to disease pathogenesis in which vascular rarefaction plays a central role. Bim is a proapoptotic protein that modulates not only apoptosis but also cellular functions such as migration and extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression. Endothelial cells and pericytes each make a unique contribution to vascular formation and function although the details require further delineation. Here we set out to determine the cell autonomous impact of Bim expression on retinal endothelial cell and pericyte function using cells prepared from Bim deficient (Bim−/− mice. Bim−/− endothelial cells displayed an increased production of ECM proteins, proliferation, migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression but, a decreased eNOS expression and nitric oxide production. In contrast, pericyte proliferation decreased in the absence of Bim while migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression were increased. In addition, we demonstrated that the coculturing of either wild-type or Bim−/− endothelial cells with Bim−/− pericytes diminished their capillary morphogenesis. Thus, our data further emphasizes the importance of vascular cell autonomous regulatory mechanisms in modulation of vascular function.

  6. Modulation of vascular cell function by bim expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Margaret E; Palenski, Tammy L; Jamali, Nasim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis of vascular cells, including pericytes and endothelial cells, contributes to disease pathogenesis in which vascular rarefaction plays a central role. Bim is a proapoptotic protein that modulates not only apoptosis but also cellular functions such as migration and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein expression. Endothelial cells and pericytes each make a unique contribution to vascular formation and function although the details require further delineation. Here we set out to determine the cell autonomous impact of Bim expression on retinal endothelial cell and pericyte function using cells prepared from Bim deficient (Bim(-/-)) mice. Bim(-/-) endothelial cells displayed an increased production of ECM proteins, proliferation, migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression but, a decreased eNOS expression and nitric oxide production. In contrast, pericyte proliferation decreased in the absence of Bim while migration, adhesion, and VEGF expression were increased. In addition, we demonstrated that the coculturing of either wild-type or Bim(-/-) endothelial cells with Bim(-/-) pericytes diminished their capillary morphogenesis. Thus, our data further emphasizes the importance of vascular cell autonomous regulatory mechanisms in modulation of vascular function.

  7. Memory NK cells: why do they reside in the liver?

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yonglin; Peng, Hui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Immune memory is the hallmark of adaptive immunity. However, recent studies have shown that natural killer (NK) cells, key components of the innate immune system, also mediate memory responses in mice and humans. Strikingly, memory NK cells were liver-resident in some models, raising the question as to whether the liver is a special organ for the acquisition of NK cell memory. Here, we review the characteristics of NK cell memory by summarizing recent progress and discuss how the liver may ge...

  8. Molecular mechanisms for vascular development and secondary cell wall formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hyun eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and secondary cell wall biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in secondary cell wall biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and secondary cell wall formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses.

  9. Local Augmented Angiotensinogen Secreted from Apoptotic Vascular Endothelial Cells Is a Vital Mediator of Vascular Remodelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Jong Wu

    Full Text Available Vascular remodelling is a critical vasculopathy found in atheromatous diseases and allograft failures. The local renin angiotensin system (RAS has been implicated in vascular remodelling. However, the mechanisms by which the augmented local RAS is associated with the initial event of endothelial cell apoptosis in injured vasculature remain undefined. We induced the apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs through serum starvation (SS. After the cells were subjected to SS, we found that the mRNA expression of angiotensinogen (AGT was increased by >3-fold in HUVECs and by approximately 2.5-fold in VSMCs. In addition, the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE mRNA was increased in VSMCs but decreased to 50% in HUVECs during the same apoptotic process. Increases in the expression of AGT protein and angiotensin II (Ang II were found in a serum-free medium conditioned by HUVECs (SSC. The increased Ang II was suppressed using lisinopril (an ACE inhibitor treatment. Moreover, the activation of ERK1/2 induced by the SSC in VSMCs was also suppressed by losartan. In conclusion, we first demonstrated that the augmented AGT released from apoptotic endothelial cells acts as a vital progenitor of Ang II to accelerate vascular remodelling, and we suggest that blocking local augmented Ang II might be an effective strategy for restraining intimal hyperplasia.

  10. Effects of Estrogen Level on the Function of Vascular Endothelial Cells and Expression of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule - 1φ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Saizhu(吴赛珠); LIU Jiangguo(刘建国); TAN Jiayu(谭家余); ZHoU Kexiang(周可祥); Gorge D Webb; WEI Heming(隗和明); GUO Zhiguang(郭志刚)

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To ob- serve the effect of different estrogen levels on the se- cretory function of vascular endothelial cells of female rats, and study the effect of modulation of estrogen level on the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule - 1 and the concentration of estrogen receptorin vascular endothelial cells. Methods Radioim-munology was used to measure the serum concentrationof endothelin and PGI2, and copper-cadmium re-duction was employed to measure the serum content ofnitrogen monoxide. Radioligand binding and flowcy-tometry were used to measure the expression of estrogenreceptor and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 ) of vascular endothelial cells respectively. Re-sults 1. The serum concentration of nitric oxide andPGI2 decreased when the ovaries of female rats wereremoved. In ovariectomized rats, given estrogen, theconcentration rose ( P < 0.05), but the plasma con-centration of endothelin was adverse to it. 2. Theconcentration of estrogen receptor of vascular endothe-lial cells decreased remarkably when the ovaries of fe-male rats were removed. When given estrogen, it in-creased. 3. The percent of expressed VCAM - 1 in-creased siguificantly after interleukin- lβoperated onthe cells, but 17 - βestradiol at 3 × 10-8 ~ 10-6 mol/lall decreased the percent. Conclusions Estrogenlevel can influence the secretion of nitrogen monoxide,PGI2 and endothlin of vascular endothelial cells, andalso influence the concentration of estrogen receptor ofvascular endothelial cells. 17 -β Estradiol at 3 × 10-8~ 10-6 M can decrease the elevation of VCAM - 1 ofvascular endothelial cells induced by interleukin - 1 β.

  11. Perspectives in inflammation, neoplasia, and vascular cell biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgington, T.S.; Ross, R.; Silverstein, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 25 selections. Some of the titles are: Characterization of cDNAs for the Human Interleukin-2 Receptor; Regulation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor by Phosphorylation; Endothelial Cell Proteases and Cellular Invasion; Structure and Chromosomal Localization of the Human Lymphotoxin Gene; and Vascular Endothelial Cells in Cell-Mediated Immunity: Adoptive Transfer with In Vitro Conditioned Cells is Genetically Restricted at the Endothelial Cell Barrier.

  12. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  13. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  14. Plasticity of vascular progenitor cells: Implications in pulmonary vascular remodelling in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Díez

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Vascular progenitor cells (VPC have shown in vitro and in vivo their ability to differentiate into endothelial cells (EC. Some evidence suggests that the plasticity of these cells to differentiate into other cell types might contribute not only to angiogenesis but also to perpetuate vascular lesions. Studies done in pulmonary arteries (PA of patients with COPD have demonstrated the presence of VPC infiltrating the intima. Since intimal thickening is mainly constituted by smooth muscle cells (SMC, we asked whether VPC could play a role in wall thickening. Accordingly, the objective was to evaluate in vitro the plasticity of VPC to differentiate into SMC and EC of human PA. G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood CD133+ cells from a commercial primary line were expanded and labelled with acetylated-LDL-DiI for tracking cell purposes. Then, cells were co-cultured with commercial primary lines of human PA EC or SMC (n = 3. As control, CD133+ cells were cultured alone, with minimal medium with or without VEGF (50ng·ml–1. After 6 and 12 days of growth, the phenotype of cultures was characterized by immunofluorescence with: lectin, -actin and CD31. Cells were also evaluated morphologically. After 6 days, VPC acquired the morphology and the phenotype of the cells with which they were co-cultured, EC (lectin+, CD31+, alpha-actin- or SMC (alpha-actin+, lectin-, CD31-. VPC cultured 12 days alone or with VEGF did not acquire typical morphology and markers of mature EC or SMC of PA. We conclude that VPC have the potential to differentiate in vitro into SMC, and that this plasticity could contribute to perpetuate pulmonary vascular remodelling in COPD.

  15. Bone Marrow Vascular Niche: Home for Hematopoietic Stem Cells

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    Ningning He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though discovered later than osteoblastic niche, vascular niche has been regarded as an alternative indispensable niche operating regulation on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. As significant progresses gained on this type niche, it is gradually clear that the main work of vascular niche is undertaking to support hematopoiesis. However, compared to what have been defined in the mechanisms through which the osteoblastic niche regulates hematopoiesis, we know less in vascular niche. In this review, based on research data hitherto we will focus on component foundation and various functions of vascular niche that guarantee the normal hematopoiesis process within bone marrow microenvironments. And the possible pathways raised by various research results through which this environment undergoes its function will be discussed as well.

  16. Generation of Functional Blood Vessels from a Single c-kit+ Adult Vascular Endothelial Stem Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shentong; Wei, Jing; Pentinmikko, Nalle; Leinonen, Hannele; Salven, Petri

    2012-01-01

    In adults, the growth of blood vessels, a process known as angiogenesis, is essential for organ growth and repair. In many disorders including cancer, angiogenesis becomes excessive. The cellular origin of new vascular endothelial cells (ECs) during blood vessel growth in angiogenic situations has remained unknown. Here, we provide evidence for adult vascular endothelial stem cells (VESCs) that reside in the blood vessel wall endothelium. VESCs constitute a small subpopulation within CD117+ (c-kit+) ECs capable of undergoing clonal expansion while other ECs have a very limited proliferative capacity. Isolated VESCs can produce tens of millions of endothelial daughter cells in vitro. A single transplanted c-kit-expressing VESC by the phenotype lin−CD31+CD105+Sca1+CD117+ can generate in vivo functional blood vessels that connect to host circulation. VESCs also have long-term self-renewal capacity, a defining functional property of adult stem cells. To provide functional verification on the role of c-kit in VESCs, we show that a genetic deficit in endothelial c-kit expression markedly decreases total colony-forming VESCs. In vivo, c-kit expression deficit resulted in impaired EC proliferation and angiogenesis and retardation of tumor growth. Isolated VESCs could be used in cell-based therapies for cardiovascular repair to restore tissue vascularization after ischemic events. VESCs also provide a novel cellular target to block pathological angiogenesis and cancer growth. PMID:23091420

  17. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Vitor; Pardanaud, Luc; Brunet, Isabelle; Ola, Roxana; Ristori, Emma; Santoro, Massimo M; Nicoli, Stefania; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-06-23

    The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs) develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA) and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA) differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC) recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation.

  18. Cell sheet engineering using the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue as a vascularization strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marina; Cerqueira, Mariana T; Santos, Tírcia C; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Ludovico, Paula; Marques, Alexandra P; Pirraco, Rogério P; Reis, Rui L

    2017-06-01

    Current vascularization strategies for Tissue Engineering constructs, in particular cell sheet-based, are limited by time-consuming and expensive endothelial cell isolation and/or by the complexity of using extrinsic growth factors. Herein, we propose an alternative strategy using angiogenic cell sheets (CS) obtained from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue that can be incorporated into more complex constructs. Cells from the SVF were cultured in normoxic and hypoxic conditions for up to 8days in the absence of extrinsic growth factors. Immunocytochemistry against CD31 and CD146 revealed spontaneous organization in capillary-like structures, more complex after hypoxic conditioning. Inhibition of HIF-1α pathway hindered capillary-like structure formation in SVF cells cultured in hypoxia, suggesting a role of HIF-1α. Moreover, hypoxic SVF cells showed a trend for increased secretion of angiogenic factors, which was reflected in increased network formation by endothelial cells cultured on matrigel using that conditioned medium. In vivo implantation of SVF CS in a mouse hind limb ischemia model revealed that hypoxia-conditioned CS led to improved restoration of blood flow. Both in vitro and in vivo data suggest that SVF CS can be used as simple and cost-efficient tools to promote functional vascularization of TE constructs. Neovascularization after implantation is a major obstacle for producing clinically viable cell sheet-based tissue engineered constructs. Strategies using endothelial cells and extrinsic angiogenic growth factors are expensive and time consuming and may raise concerns of tumorigenicity. In this manuscript, we describe a simplified approach using angiogenic cell sheets fabricated from the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue. The strong angiogenic behavior of these cell sheets, achieved without the use of external growth factors, was further stimulated by low oxygen culture. When implanted in an in vivo model of hind limb

  19. Vascular Remodelling Relates to an Elevated Oscillatory Shear Index and Relative Residence Time in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyan; Yu, Haiyi; Shi, Yue; Zhu, Minjia; Wang, Yueshen; Hu, Xi; Zhang, Youyi; Chang, Yu; Xu, Ming; Gao, Wei

    2017-05-17

    Haemodynamic disorders are common clinical findings in hypertension and lead to adverse cardiovascular events. However, the haemodynamic conditions in hypertension models are poorly understood. This study aimed to observe the characteristics of haemodynamics in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and antihypertensive-treated SHRs. Twenty-four adult male SHRs and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) were randomly divided into four groups and treated for 7 days as follows: WKY-CON (WKYs + saline), WKY-NIF (WKYs + nifedipine, 50 mg/kg/day), SHR-CON (SHRs + saline), and SHR-NIF (SHRs + nifedipine). Aortic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were simulated to obtain the haemodynamic parameters. We found that in the hypertensive (SHR-CON) and blood pressure-controlled (SHR-NIF) groups, the oscillatory shear index (OSI) and relative residence time (RRT), which are key haemodynamics indices, were markedly elevated. Furthermore, there was a correlation between both the elevated OSI and RRT with the vascular wall thickening in regions near the inner wall of the aortic arch. Our research demonstrates that haemodynamics remains disturbed even if the blood pressure is normalized. In addition, vascular remodelling may play an important role in maintaining elevated OSI and RRT values.

  20. Isolation of Endothelial Cells and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Internal Mammary Artery Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Stephanie C.; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E.; Woods, T. Cooper

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell function through tissue culture techniques are often employed to investigate the underlying mechanisms regulating cardiovascular disease. As diseases such as diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease increase a patient's risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of methods for examining the effects of these diseases on vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells is needed. Commercial sources of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells generally provide minimal donor information and are in limited supply. This study was designed to determine if vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells could be isolated from human internal mammary arteries obtained from donors undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. As coronary artery bypass graft surgery is a commonly performed procedure, this method would provide a new source for these cells that when combined with the donor's medical history will greatly enhance our studies of the effects of complicating diseases on vascular biology. Internal mammary artery tissue was obtained from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Through a simple method employing two separate tissue digestions, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were isolated and characterized. The isolated vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells exhibited the expected morphology and were able to be passaged for further analysis. The vascular smooth muscle cells exhibited positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin and the endothelial cells exhibited positive staining for CD31. The overall purity of the isolations was > 95%. This method allows for the isolation of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells from internal mammary arteries, providing a new tool for investigations into the interplay of vascular diseases and complicating diseases such as diabetes and kidney disease. PMID:21603530

  1. Plant Phosphoglycerolipids: The Gatekeepers of Vascular Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujas, Bojan; Rodriguez-Villalon, Antia

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, the plant vascular system has evolved as an inter-organ communication network essential to deliver a wide range of signaling factors among distantly separated organs. To become conductive elements, phloem and xylem cells undergo a drastic differentiation program that involves the degradation of the majority of their organelles. While the molecular mechanisms regulating such complex process remain poorly understood, it is nowadays clear that phosphoglycerolipids display a pivotal role in the regulation of vascular tissue formation. In animal cells, this class of lipids is known to mediate acute responses as signal transducers and also act as constitutive signals that help defining organelle identity. Their rapid turnover, asymmetrical distribution across subcellular compartments as well as their ability to rearrange cytoskeleton fibers make phosphoglycerolipids excellent candidates to regulate complex morphogenetic processes such as vascular differentiation. Therefore, in this review we aim to summarize, emphasize and connect our current understanding about the involvement of phosphoglycerolipids in phloem and xylem differentiation.

  2. Plant phosphoglycerolipids: the gatekeepers of vascular cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan eGujas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In higher plants, the plant vascular system has evolved as an inter-organ communication network essential to deliver a wide range of signaling factors among distantly separated organs. To become conductive elements, phloem and xylem cells undergo a drastic differentiation program that involves the degradation of the majority of their organelles. While the molecular mechanisms regulating such complex process remain poorly understood, it is nowadays clear that phosphoglycerolipids display a pivotal role in the regulation of vascular formation. In animal cells, this class of lipids is known to mediate acute responses as signal transducers and also act as constitutive signals that help defining organelle identity. Their rapid turnover, asymmetrical distribution across subcellular compartments as well as their ability to rearrange cytoskeleton fibers make phosphoglycerolipids excellent candidates to regulate complex morphogenetic processes such as vascular differentiation. Therefore, in this review we aim to summarize, emphasize and connect our current understanding about the involvement of phosphoglycerolipids in phloem and xylem differentiation.

  3. Increasing functional modularity with residence time in the co-distribution of native and introduced vascular plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Cang; Richardson, David M.; Pyšek, Petr; Le Roux, Johannes J.; Kučera, Tomáš; Jarošík, Vojtěch

    2013-01-01

    Species gain membership of regional assemblages by passing through multiple ecological and environmental filters. To capture the potential trajectory of structural changes in regional meta-communities driven by biological invasions, one can categorize species pools into assemblages of different residence times. Older assemblages, having passed through more environmental filters, should become more functionally ordered and structured. Here we calculate the level of compartmentalization (modularity) for three different-aged assemblages (neophytes, introduced after 1500 AD; archaeophytes, introduced before 1500 AD, and natives), including 2,054 species of vascular plants in 302 reserves in central Europe. Older assemblages are more compartmentalized than younger ones, with species composition, phylogenetic structure and habitat characteristics of the modules becoming increasingly distinctive. This sheds light on two mechanisms of how alien species are functionally incorporated into regional species pools: the settling-down hypothesis of diminishing stochasticity with residence time, and the niche-mosaic hypothesis of inlaid neutral modules in regional meta-communities. PMID:24045305

  4. Brain vascular pericytes following ischemia have multipotential stem cell activity to differentiate into neural and vascular lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Takayuki; Kubo, Shuji; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Sakuma, Rika; Lu, Shan; Narita, Aya; Kawahara, Maiko; Taguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Tomohiro

    2015-06-01

    Brain vascular pericytes (PCs) are a key component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB)/neurovascular unit, along with neural and endothelial cells. Besides their crucial role in maintaining the BBB, increasing evidence shows that PCs have multipotential stem cell activity. However, their multipotency has not been considered in the pathological brain, such as after an ischemic stroke. Here, we examined whether brain vascular PCs following ischemia (iPCs) have multipotential stem cell activity and differentiate into neural and vascular lineage cells to reconstruct the BBB/neurovascular unit. Using PCs extracted from ischemic regions (iPCs) from mouse brains and human brain PCs cultured under oxygen/glucose deprivation, we show that PCs developed stemness presumably through reprogramming. The iPCs revealed a complex phenotype of angioblasts, in addition to their original mesenchymal properties, and multidifferentiated into cells from both a neural and vascular lineage. These data indicate that under ischemic/hypoxic conditions, PCs can acquire multipotential stem cell activity and can differentiate into major components of the BBB/neurovascular unit. Thus, these findings support the novel concept that iPCs can contribute to both neurogenesis and vasculogenesis at the site of brain injuries.

  5. Stem cells: a promising source for vascular regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammal, Hassan; Harmouch, Chaza; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Laurent-Maquin, Dominique; Labrude, Pierre; Menu, Patrick; Kerdjoudj, Halima

    2014-12-15

    The rising and diversity of many human vascular diseases pose urgent needs for the development of novel therapeutics. Stem cell therapy represents a challenge in the medicine of the twenty-first century, an area where tissue engineering and regenerative medicine gather to provide promising treatments for a wide variety of diseases. Indeed, with their extensive regeneration potential and functional multilineage differentiation capacity, stem cells are now highlighted as promising cell sources for regenerative medicine. Their multilineage differentiation involves environmental factors such as biochemical, extracellular matrix coating, oxygen tension, and mechanical forces. In this review, we will focus on human stem cell sources and their applications in vascular regeneration. We will also discuss the different strategies used for their differentiation into both mature and functional smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-03-31

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A-nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells.

  7. Heme oxygenase activity modulates vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulak, Jozef; Józkowicz, Alicja; Foresti, Roberta; Kasza, Aneta; Frick, Matthias; Huk, Ihor; Green, Colin J; Pachinger, Otmar; Weidinger, Franz; Motterlini, Roberto

    2002-04-01

    Hypoxia, cytokines, and nitric oxide (NO) stimulate the generation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in vascular tissue. HO-1 degrades heme to carbon monoxide (CO), iron, and biliverdin, the latter being reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. In the present study, we investigated the role of HO-1 in the modulation of VEGF synthesis in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In VSMC stimulated with cytokines, inhibition of NO production significantly, but not completely, reduced VEGF release. In contrast, inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX) totally prevented cytokine-induced increase in VEGF, despite an augmented synthesis of intracellular NO. Stimulation of HO-1 activity by hemin enhanced VEGF production; this effect was abrogated by blockade of the HO pathway. Similarly, VEGF synthesis induced by hypoxia was down-regulated by SnPPIX, but not by inhibitors of NO synthase. To elucidate further a direct involvement of HO-1 in the observed effects, we generated transfected cells that overexpressed the HO-1 gene. Notably, these cells synthesized significantly more VEGF protein than cells transfected with a control gene. Among the products of HO-1, biliverdin and bilirubin showed no effect, whereas iron ions inhibited VEGF synthesis. Exposure of cells to 1% CO resulted in a marked accumulation of VEGF (20-fold increase) over the basal level. Our data indicate that HO-1 activity influences the generation of VEGF in VSMC in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. As CO and iron, respectively the inducer and the inhibitor of VEGF synthesis, are concomitantly produced during the degradation of heme, these data indicate that HO by-products may differentially modulate VEGF production.

  8. Glycoconjugates and Related Molecules in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiko Sasaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cells (ECs form the inner lining of blood vessels. They are critically involved in many physiological functions, including control of vasomotor tone, blood cell trafficking, hemostatic balance, permeability, proliferation, survival, and immunity. It is considered that impairment of EC functions leads to the development of vascular diseases. The carbohydrate antigens carried by glycoconjugates (e.g., glycoproteins, glycosphingolipids, and proteoglycans mainly present on the cell surface serve not only as marker molecules but also as functional molecules. Recent studies have revealed that the carbohydrate composition of the EC surface is critical for these cells to perform their physiological functions. In this paper, we consider the expression and functional roles of endogenous glycoconjugates and related molecules (galectins and glycan-degrading enzymes in human ECs.

  9. DMPD: Lipoprotein trafficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses and cellularsaboteurs. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9287290 Lipoprotein trafficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses and cell...9287290 Title Lipoprotein trafficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses ...ularsaboteurs. Hajjar DP, Haberland ME. J Biol Chem. 1997 Sep 12;272(37):22975-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Lipoprotein traf...ficking in vascular cells. Molecular Trojan horses and cellularsaboteurs. PubmedID

  10. The effects of TSH on human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田利民

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of thyroid-stimulating hormone(TSH)on human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells and to explore the roles of TSH in the development of atherosclerosis.Methods Human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in vitro.MTT method was used to assay the effect of TSH on cell viability.Real-time PCR was used

  11. Temporal modulation of collective cell behavior controls vascular network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kur, Esther; Kim, Jiha; Tata, Aleksandra; Comin, Cesar H; Harrington, Kyle I; Costa, Luciano da F; Bentley, Katie; Gu, Chenghua

    2016-02-24

    Vascular network density determines the amount of oxygen and nutrients delivered to host tissues, but how the vast diversity of densities is generated is unknown. Reiterations of endothelial-tip-cell selection, sprout extension and anastomosis are the basis for vascular network generation, a process governed by the VEGF/Notch feedback loop. Here, we find that temporal regulation of this feedback loop, a previously unexplored dimension, is the key mechanism to determine vascular density. Iterating between computational modeling and in vivo live imaging, we demonstrate that the rate of tip-cell selection determines the length of linear sprout extension at the expense of branching, dictating network density. We provide the first example of a host tissue-derived signal (Semaphorin3E-Plexin-D1) that accelerates tip cell selection rate, yielding a dense network. We propose that temporal regulation of this critical, iterative aspect of network formation could be a general mechanism, and additional temporal regulators may exist to sculpt vascular topology.

  12. The role of mast cells in vascularized recurrent pterygium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riza Cenk Celebi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine and compare the mast cell count in primary and recurrent vascularized pterygium, and in normal bulbar conjunctiva. Methods: The study included 22 patients with primary pterygium (PP group and 28 patients with vascularized recurrent pterygium (VRP group that underwent excision via the limbal conjunctival autograft technique. Normal conjunctiva samples were collected from the superotemporal bulbar conjunctival region, just temporal to the site from which the autograft conjunctival tissue was harvested. The total number of mast cells in the pterygium (primary and recurrent and control tissue samples was calculated microscopically using 1% toluidine blue stain under 400× magnification. Results: The mean mast cell count in primary and vascularized recurrent pterygium tissue was 7.45 ± 2.06 mm–2 and 16.11 ± 4.33 mm–2, respectively, and the difference was significant (independent samples t-test, P<0.001. The mean mast cell count in pterygium tissue was significantly higher than that in normal conjunctiva tissue in both groups (Student's t-test, P<0.001. Conclusion: An increase in the number of mast cells might play a role in the pathogenesis of recurrent pterygium. Determination of a mast cell count cut-off value could be of diagnostic significance for recurrent pterygium.

  13. Vascular potential of human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the US. Understanding the biological activity of stem and progenitor cells, and their ability to contribute to the repair, regeneration and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels affected by pathological processes is an ess...

  14. T cells in vascular inflammatory diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lintermans, Lucas L.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Heeringa, Peter; Abdulahad, Wayel H.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the human vasculature is a manifestation of many different diseases ranging from systemic autoimmune diseases to chronic inflammatory diseases, in which multiple types of immune cells are involved. For both autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases several observations su

  15. Auxin-associated initiation of vascular cell differentiation by LONESOME HIGHWAY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Oguchi, Mio; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2013-02-01

    Plant vascular tissues are essential for the existence of land plants. Many studies of transcriptional regulation and cell-cell communication have revealed the process underlying the development of vascular tissues from vascular initial cells. However, the initiation of vascular cell differentiation is still a mystery. Here, we report that LONESOME HIGHWAY (LHW), which encodes a bHLH transcription factor, is expressed in pericycle-vascular mother cells at the globular embryo stage and is required for proper asymmetric cell division to generate vascular initial cells. In addition, ectopic expression of LHW elicits an ectopic auxin response. Moreover, LHW is required for the correct expression patterns of components related to auxin flow, such as PIN-FORMED 1 (PIN1), MONOPTEROS (MP) and ATHB-8, and ATHB-8 partially rescues the vascular defects of lhw. These results suggest that LHW functions as a key regulator to initiate vascular cell differentiation in association with auxin regulation.

  16. Functional genomics of vascular endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wallgard, Elisabet

    2008-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones, is a process involved in normal development as well as in several pathological conditions, such as cancer, ischemic heart disease, wound healing and certain retinal complications. Antiangiogenic targeting is therefore a promising new therapeutic principle. However, few blood vessel-specific drug targets have been identified, and information is still limited about endothelial cell (EC)-specific molecular ...

  17. Niacin Suppresses Progression of Atherosclerosis by Inhibiting Vascular Inflammation and Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Gang; Sun, Guangli; Liu, Hai; Shu, Liliang; Zhang, Jingchao; Guo, Longhui; Huang, Chen; Xu, Jing

    2015-12-29

    BACKGROUND Niacin is a broad-spectrum lipid-regulating drug used for the clinical therapy of atherosclerosis; however, the mechanisms by which niacin ameliorates atherosclerosis are not clear. MATERIAL AND METHODS The effect of niacin on atherosclerosis was assessed by detection of atherosclerotic lesion area. Adhesion molecules in arterial endothelial cells were determined by using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in ApoE-/- mice were detected by using ELISA. We detected the expression levels of phosphorylated nuclear factors-kB (NF-κB) p65 in aortic endothelial cells of mice using Western blot analysis. Furthermore, we investigated the anti-inflammation effect and endothelium-protecting function of niacin and their regulatory mechanisms in vitro. RESULTS Niacin inhibited the progress of atherosclerosis and decreased the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in ApoE-/- mice. Niacin suppressed the activity of NF-κB and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Furthermore, niacin induced phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and FAK inhibitor PF-573228 reduced the level of Bcl-2 and elevated the level of cleaved caspase-3 in VSMCs. CONCLUSIONS Niacin inhibits vascular inflammation and apoptosis of VSMCs via inhibiting the NF-κB signaling and the FAK signaling pathway, respectively, thus protecting ApoE-/- mice against atherosclerosis.

  18. Endothelial-mural cell signaling in vascular development and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaengel, Konstantin; Genové, Guillem; Armulik, Annika; Betsholtz, Christer

    2009-05-01

    Mural cells are essential components of blood vessels and are necessary for normal development, homeostasis, and organ function. Alterations in mural cell density or the stable attachment of mural cells to the endothelium is associated with several human diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, venous malformation, and hereditary stroke. In addition mural cells are implicated in regulating tumor growth and have thus been suggested as potential antiangiogenic targets in tumor therapy. In recent years our knowledge of mural cell function and endothelial-mural cell signaling has increased dramatically, and we now begin to understand the mechanistic basis of the key signaling pathways involved. This is mainly thanks to sophisticated in vivo experiments using a broad repertoire of genetic technologies. In this review, we summarize the five currently best understood signaling pathways implicated in mural cell biology. We discuss PDGFB/PDGFRbeta- dependent pericyte recruitment, as well as the role of angiopoietins and Tie receptors in vascular maturation. In addition, we highlight the effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling on adherens junction assembly and vascular stability, as well as the role of TGF-beta-signaling in mural cell differentiation. We further reflect recent data suggesting an important function for Notch3 signaling in mural cell maturation.

  19. Memory regulatory T cells reside in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Pauli, Mariela L; Neuhaus, Isaac M; Yu, Siegrid S; Arron, Sarah T; Harris, Hobart W; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Anthony, Bryan A; Sverdrup, Francis M; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; MacKenzie, Tippi C; Johnson, David S; Meyer, Everett H; Löhr, Andrea; Hsu, Andro; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson; Gupta, Rishu; Debbaneh, Maya G; Butler, Daniel; Huynh, Monica; Levin, Ethan C; Leon, Argentina; Hoffman, William Y; McGrath, Mary H; Alvarado, Michael D; Ludwig, Connor H; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M; Gratz, Iris K; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are characterized by expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, are a dynamic and heterogeneous population of cells that control immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. We recently identified a subset of Tregs in murine skin with properties typical of memory cells and defined this population as memory Tregs (mTregs). Due to the importance of these cells in regulating tissue inflammation in mice, we analyzed this cell population in humans and found that almost all Tregs in normal skin had an activated memory phenotype. Compared with mTregs in peripheral blood, cutaneous mTregs had unique cell surface marker expression and cytokine production. In normal human skin, mTregs preferentially localized to hair follicles and were more abundant in skin with high hair density. Sequence comparison of TCRs from conventional memory T helper cells and mTregs isolated from skin revealed little homology between the two cell populations, suggesting that they recognize different antigens. Under steady-state conditions, mTregs were nonmigratory and relatively unresponsive; however, in inflamed skin from psoriasis patients, mTregs expanded, were highly proliferative, and produced low levels of IL-17. Taken together, these results identify a subset of Tregs that stably resides in human skin and suggest that these cells are qualitatively defective in inflammatory skin disease.

  20. Cilia Control Vascular Mural Cell Recruitment in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular mural cells (vMCs are essential components of the vertebrate vascular system, controlling blood vessel maturation and homeostasis. Discrete molecular mechanisms have been associated with vMC development and differentiation. The function of hemodynamic forces in controlling vMC recruitment is unclear. Using transgenic lines marking developing vMCs in zebrafish embryos, we find that vMCs are recruited by arterial-fated vessels and that the process is flow dependent. We take advantage of tissue-specific CRISPR gene targeting to demonstrate that hemodynamic-dependent Notch activation and the ensuing arterial genetic program is driven by endothelial primary cilia. We also identify zebrafish foxc1b as a cilia-dependent Notch-specific target that is required within endothelial cells to drive vMC recruitment. In summary, we have identified a hemodynamic-dependent mechanism in the developing vasculature that controls vMC recruitment.

  1. Characterizing human pluripotent-stem-cell-derived vascular cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Sravanti; Facklam, Amanda; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-02-15

    Tissue-engineered constructs are rendered useless without a functional vasculature owing to a lack of nutrients and oxygen. Cell-based approaches to reconstruct blood vessels can yield structures that mimic native vasculature and aid transplantation. Vascular derivatives of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer opportunities to generate patient-specific therapies and potentially provide unlimited amounts of vascular cells. To be used in engineered vascular constructs and confer therapeutic benefit, vascular derivatives must exhibit additional key properties, including extracellular matrix (ECM) production to confer structural integrity and growth factor production to facilitate integration. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that vascular cells derived from hiPSCs exhibit these critical properties to facilitate their use in engineered tissues. hiPSCs were codifferentiated toward early vascular cells (EVCs), a bicellular population of endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes, under varying low-oxygen differentiation conditions; subsequently, ECs were isolated and passaged. We found that EVCs differentiated under low-oxygen conditions produced copious amounts of collagen IV and fibronectin as well as vascular endothelial growth factor and angiopoietin 2. EVCs differentiated under atmospheric conditions did not demonstrate such abundant ECM expression, but exhibited greater expression of angiopoietin 1. Isolated ECs could proliferate up to three passages while maintaining the EC marker vascular endothelial cadherin. Isolated ECs demonstrated an increased propensity to produce ECM compared with their EVC correlates and took on an arterial-like fate. These findings illustrate that hiPSC vascular derivates hold great potential for therapeutic use and should continue to be a preferred cell source for vascular construction.

  2. Resident cardiac progenitor cells: at the heart of regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollini, Sveva; Smart, Nicola; Riley, Paul R

    2011-02-01

    Stem cell therapy has recently emerged as an innovative strategy over conventional cardiovascular treatments to restore cardiac function in patients affected by ischemic heart disease. Various stem cell populations have been tested and their potential for cardiac repair has been analyzed. Embryonic stem cells retain the greatest differentiation potential, but concerns persist with regard to their immunogenic and teratogenic effects. Although adult somatic stem cells are not tumourigenic and easier to use in an autologous setting, they exist in small numbers and possess reduced differentiation potential. Traditionally the heart was considered to be a post-mitotic organ; however, this dogma has recently been challenged with the identification of a reservoir of resident stem cells, defined as cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). These endogenous progenitors may represent the best candidates for cardiovascular cell therapy, as they are tissue-specific, often pre-committed to a cardiac fate, and display a greater propensity to differentiate towards cardiovascular lineages. This review will focus on current research into the biology of CPCs and their regenerative potential. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  3. Vascular progenitor cells isolated from human embryonic stem cells give rise to endothelial and smooth muscle like cells and form vascular networks in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lino S; Gerecht, Sharon; Shieh, Hester F; Watson, Nicki; Rupnick, Maria A; Dallabrida, Susan M; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Langer, Robert

    2007-08-03

    We report that human embryonic stem cells contain a population of vascular progenitor cells that have the ability to differentiate into endothelial-like and smooth muscle (SM)-like cells. Vascular progenitor cells were isolated from EBs grown in suspension for 10 days and were characterized by expression of the endothelial/hematopoietic marker CD34 (CD34+ cells). When these cells are subsequently cultured in EGM-2 (endothelial growth medium) supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (50 ng/mL), they give rise to endothelial-like cells characterized by a cobblestone cell morphology, expression of endothelial markers (platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1, CD34, KDR/Flk-1, vascular endothelial cadherin, von Willebrand factor), incorporation of acetylated low-density lipoprotein, and formation of capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. In contrast, when CD34+ cells are cultured in EGM-2 supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (50 ng/mL), they give rise to SM-like cells characterized by spindle-shape morphology, expression of SM cell markers (alpha-SM actin, SM myosin heavy chain, calponin, caldesmon, SM alpha-22), and the ability to contract and relax in response to common pharmacological agents such as carbachol and atropine but rarely form capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. Implantation studies in nude mice show that both cell types contribute to the formation of human microvasculature. Some microvessels contained mouse blood cells, which indicates functional integration with host vasculature. Therefore, the vascular progenitors isolated from human embryonic stem cells using methods established in the present study could provide a means to examine the mechanisms of endothelial and SM cell development, and they could also provide a potential source of cells for vascular tissue engineering.

  4. Effects of infection with recombinant adenovirus on human vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, P.H.A.; Lamfers, M.L.M.; Grimbergen, J.M.; Teeling, J.; Hoeben, R.C.; Nieuw Amerongen, G.P. van; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van

    1996-01-01

    The plasminogen activation (PA) system is involved in vascular remodelling. Modulating its activity in vascular cells might be a way to interfere in processes such as angiogenesis and restenosis. Adenoviral vectors have become a favourable tool for direct gene transfer into vascular cells. In the in

  5. The vascular endothelial growth factor expression and vascular regeneration in infarcted myocardium by skeletal muscle satellite cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction results in tissue necrosis, leading to cell loss and ultimately to cardiac failure. Implantation of skeletal muscle satellite cells into the scar area may compensate for the cell loss and provides a new strategy for infarct therapy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a promising reagent for inducing myocardial angiogenesis. Skeletal myoblast transplantation has been shown to improve cardiac function in chronic heart failure models by regenerating muscle. We hypothesized that VEGF expression and vascular regeneration increased in infarcted myocardium by skeletal muscle satellite cells, which can promote vascular producing and improve survival environment in infarcted myocardium.Methods The skeletal muscle satellite cells were implanted into the infarcted myocardium in a model through ligated left anterior artery in Louis Inbrad Strain rat. Specimens were got for identifying the expression of VEGF and the density of vascular by immunochemical method at two weeks after implantation. Results The proliferation and differentiation of the skeletal muscle satellite cell was very well. The expression of VEGF was higher in the implanted group (146.83±2.49) than that in the control group (134.26±6.84) (P<0.05). The vascular density in the implanted group (13.00±1.51) was also higher than that in the control (10.68±1.79) (P<0.05). Conclusion The implanted satellite cell could excrete growth factor that would induce angiogenesis and improve cell survival environment in infarcted myocardium.

  6. Zfp423 promotes adipogenic differentiation of bovine stromal vascular cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Huang

    Full Text Available Intramuscular fat or marbling is critical for the palatability of beef. In mice, very recent studies show that adipocytes and fibroblasts share a common pool of progenitor cells, with Zinc finger protein 423 (Zfp423 as a key initiator of adipogenic differentiation. To evaluate the role of Zfp423 in intramuscular adipogenesis and marbling in beef cattle, we sampled beef muscle for separation of stromal vascular cells. These cells were immortalized with pCI neo-hEST2 and individual clones were selected by G418. A total of 288 clones (3×96 well plates were isolated and induced to adipogenesis. The presence of adipocytes was assessed by Oil-Red-O staining. Three clones with high and low adipogenic potential respectively were selected for further analyses. In addition, fibro/adipogenic progenitor cells were selected using a surface marker, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR α. The expression of Zfp423 was much higher (307.4±61.9%, P<0.05 in high adipogenic cells, while transforming growth factor (TGF-β was higher (156.1±48.7%, P<0.05 in low adipogenic cells. Following adipogenic differentiation, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα were much higher (239.4±84.1% and 310.7±138.4%, respectively, P<0.05 in high adipogenic cells. Over-expression of Zfp423 in stromal vascular cells and cloned low adipogenic cells dramatically increased their adipogenic differentiation, accompanied with the inhibition of TGF-β expression. Zfp423 knockdown by shRNA in high adipogenic cells largely prevented their adipogenic differentiation. The differential regulation of Zfp423 and TGF-β between low and high adipogenic cells is associated with the DNA methylation in their promoters. In conclusion, data show that Zfp423 is a critical regulator of adipogenesis in stromal vascular cells of bovine muscle, and Zfp423 may provide a molecular target for enhancing intramuscular

  7. Stem Cells and Scaffolds for Vascularizing Engineered Tissue Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, E.; Gerecht, S.

    The clinical impact of tissue engineering depends upon our ability to direct cells to form tissues with characteristic structural and mechanical properties from the molecular level up to organized tissue. Induction and creation of functional vascular networks has been one of the main goals of tissue engineering either in vitro, for the transplantation of prevascularized constructs, or in vivo, for cellular organization within the implantation site. In most cases, tissue engineering attempts to recapitulate certain aspects of normal development in order to stimulate cell differentiation and functional tissue assembly. The induction of tissue growth generally involves the use of biodegradable and bioactive materials designed, ideally, to provide a mechanical, physical, and biochemical template for tissue regeneration. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), derived from the inner cell mass of a developing blastocyst, are capable of differentiating into all cell types of the body. Specifically, hESCs have the capability to differentiate and form blood vessels de novo in a process called vasculogenesis. Human ESC-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and endothelial cells have substantial potential for microvessel formation, in vitro and in vivo. Human adult EPCs are being isolated to understand the fundamental biology of how these cells are regulated as a population and to explore whether these cells can be differentiated and reimplanted as a cellular therapy in order to arrest or even reverse damaged vasculature. This chapter focuses on advances made toward the generation and engineering of functional vascular tissue, focusing on both the scaffolds - the synthetic and biopolymer materials - and the cell sources - hESCs and hEPCs.

  8. Interleukin-8 derived from local tissue-resident stromal cells promotes tumor cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, Gabriel; Alt, Eckhard; Devarajan, Eswaran; Krishnappa, Srinivasalu; Jotzu, Constantin; Song, Yao-Hua

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of adipose tissue resident stromal cells on tumor cell invasion. Our data show that a subpopulation of adipose tissue derived stromal cells expressing Nestin, NG2, α-smooth muscle actin and PDGFR-α migrate toward the cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of IL-8 in the migrated cells. We demonstrated that stromal cell derived IL-8 promote the invasion and the anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. We conclude that human breast cancer cells attract a subpopulation of stromal cells that secrete IL-8 to promote tumor cell invasion in a paracrine fashion.

  9. Characterization of vascular endothelial progenitor cells from chicken bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Chunyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC are a type of stem cell used in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and regeneration. At present, most of the EPCs studied are from human and mouse, whereas the study of poultry-derived EPCs has rarely been reported. In the present study, chicken bone marrow-derived EPCs were isolated and studied at the cellular level using immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Results We found that the majority of chicken EPCs were spindle shaped. The growth-curves of chicken EPCs at passages (P 1, -5 and -9 were typically “S”-shaped. The viability of chicken EPCs, before and after cryopreservation was 92.2% and 81.1%, respectively. Thus, cryopreservation had no obvious effects on the viability of chicken EPCs. Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UAE-1 uptake assays and immunofluorescent detection of the cell surface markers CD34, CD133, VEGFR-2 confirmed that the cells obtained in vitro were EPCs. Observation of endothelial-specific Weibel-Palade bodies using transmission electron microscopy further confirmed that the cells were of endothelial lineage. In addition, chicken EPCs differentiated into endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells upon induction with VEGF and PDGF-BB, respectively, suggesting that the chicken EPCs retained multipotency in vitro. Conclusions These results suggest that chicken EPCs not only have strong self-renewal capacity, but also the potential to differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This research provides theoretical basis and experimental evidence for potential therapeutic application of endothelial progenitor cells in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and diabetic complications.

  10. Wave characterization for mammalian cell culture: residence time distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Costa, Ana Rita; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2012-02-15

    The high dose requirements of biopharmaceutical products led to the development of mammalian cell culture technologies that increase biomanufacturing capacity. The disposable Wave bioreactor is one of the most promising technologies, providing ease of operation and no cross-contamination, and using an innovative undulation movement that ensures good mixing and oxygen transfer without cell damage. However, its recentness demands further characterization. This study evaluated the residence time distribution (RTD) in Wave, allowing the characterization of mixing and flow and the comparison with ideal models and a Stirred tank reactor (STR) used for mammalian cell culture. RTD was determined using methylene blue with pulse input methodology, at three flow rates common in mammalian cell culture (3.3×10(-5)m(3)/h, 7.9×10(-5)m(3)/h, and 1.25×10(-4)m(3)/h) and one typical of microbial culture (5×10(-3)m(3)/h). Samples were taken periodically and the absorbance read at 660nm. It was observed that Wave behavior diverted from ideal models, but was similar to STR. Therefore, the deviations are not related to the particular Wave rocking mechanism, but could be associated with the inadequacy of these reactors to operate in continuous mode or to a possible inability of the theoretical models to properly describe the behavior of reactors designed for mammalian cell culture. Thus, the development of new theoretical models could better characterize the performance of these reactors.

  11. Eicosanoid signaling and vascular dysfunction: methylmercury-induced phospholipase D activation in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwani, Shariq I; Pabon, Sheila; Patel, Rishi B; Sayyid, Muzzammil M; Hagele, Thomas; Kotha, Sainath R; Magalang, Ulysses J; Maddipati, Krishna R; Parinandi, Narasimham L

    2013-11-01

    Mercury, especially methylmercury (MeHg), is implicated in the etiology of cardiovascular diseases. Earlier, we have reported that MeHg induces phospholipase D (PLD) activation through oxidative stress and thiol-redox alteration. Hence, we investigated the mechanism of the MeHg-induced PLD activation through the upstream regulation by phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and lipid oxygenases such as cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in the bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAECs). Our results showed that MeHg significantly activated both PLA2 (release of [(3)H]arachidonic acid, AA) and PLD (formation of [(32)P]phosphatidylbutanol) in BPAECs in dose- (0-10 μM) and time-dependent (0-60 min) fashion. The cPLA2-specific inhibitor, arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF3), significantly attenuated the MeHg-induced [(3)H]AA release in ECs. MeHg-induced PLD activation was also inhibited by AACOCF3 and the COX- and LOX-specific inhibitors. MeHg also induced the formation of COX- and LOX-catalyzed eicosanoids in ECs. MeHg-induced cytotoxicity (based on lactate dehydrogenase release) was protected by PLA2-, COX-, and LOX-specific inhibitors and 1-butanol, the PLD-generated PA quencher. For the first time, our studies showed that MeHg activated PLD in vascular ECs through the upstream action of cPLA2 and the COX- and LOX-generated eicosanoids. These results offered insights into the mechanism(s) of the MeHg-mediated vascular endothelial cell lipid signaling as an underlying cause of mercury-induced cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Biophysical induction of vascular smooth muscle cell podosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Young Kim

    Full Text Available Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration and matrix degradation occurs with intimal hyperplasia associated with atherosclerosis, vascular injury, and restenosis. One proposed mechanism by which VSMCs degrade matrix is through the use of podosomes, transient actin-based structures that are thought to play a role in extracellular matrix degradation by creating localized sites of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP secretion. To date, podosomes in VSMCs have largely been studied by stimulating cells with phorbol esters, such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu, however little is known about the physiological cues that drive podosome formation. We present the first evidence that physiological, physical stimuli mimicking cues present within the microenvironment of diseased arteries can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. Both microtopographical cues and imposed pressure mimicking stage II hypertension induce podosome formation in A7R5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Moreover, wounding using a scratch assay induces podosomes at the leading edge of VSMCs. Notably the effect of each of these biophysical stimuli on podosome stimulation can be inhibited using a Src inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that physical cues can induce podosome formation in VSMCs.

  13. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE HUMAN GASTRIC CARCINOMA CELL AND THE HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To definite the interactions between the human gastric carcinoma cell and the human vascular endothelial cell during the establishment and maintenance of the tumor vascular system and the tumor hematogenous metastasis.Methods We prepared the conditioned mediums of each cell so as to study the effect of the conditioned medium on itself or others by MTT colorimetry. The comprehensive effect of interactions between two cells was determined by stratified transfilter co-culture or direct contact co-culture.Results The conditioned medium of human gastric carcinoma cell can stimulate the proliferation of the human vascular endothelial cell, but the CM of HVEC can inhibit the growth of HGCC. Both kinds of cells can inhibit the growth of itself. The ultimate comprehensive effect of the interactions between two kinds of cells was increase of total cell numbers.Conclusion There exist the complicated interactions between the human gastric carcinoma cell and the human vascular endothelial cell during the tumor angiogenesis and the tumor hematogenous metastasis. The ultimate comprehensive effect of the interactions is increase of total cells numbers and tumor volume.

  14. Ageing induced vascular smooth muscle cell senescence in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uryga, Anna K; Bennett, Martin R

    2016-04-15

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of ageing in that its incidence and prevalence increase with age. However, atherosclerosis is also associated with biological ageing, manifest by a number of typical hallmarks of ageing in the atherosclerotic plaque. Thus, accelerated biological ageing may be superimposed on the effects of chronological ageing in atherosclerosis. Tissue ageing is seen in all cells that comprise the plaque, but particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hallmarks of ageing include evidence of cell senescence, DNA damage (including telomere attrition), mitochondrial dysfunction, a pro-inflammatory secretory phenotype, defects in proteostasis, epigenetic changes, deregulated nutrient sensing, and exhaustion of progenitor cells. In this model, initial damage to DNA (genomic, telomeric, mitochondrial and epigenetic changes) results in a number of cellular responses (cellular senescence, deregulated nutrient sensing and defects in proteostasis). Ultimately, ongoing damage and attempts at repair by continued proliferation overwhelm reparative capacity, causing loss of specialised cell functions, cell death and inflammation. This review summarises the evidence for accelerated biological ageing in atherosclerosis, the functional consequences of cell ageing on cells comprising the plaque, and the causal role that VSMC senescence plays in atherogenesis. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Samay; Horstmann, Sarah A.; Richens, Tiffany R.; Tanaka, Takeshi; Doe, Jenna M.; Boe, Darren M.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Janssen, William J.; Lee, Chun G.; Elias, Jack A.; Bratton, Donna; Tuder, Rubin M.; Henson, Peter M.; Vandivier, R. William

    2012-01-01

    Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the lung by alveolar macrophages is important for the maintenance of tissue structure and function. Lung tissue from humans with emphysema contains increased numbers of apoptotic cells and decreased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Mice treated with VEGF receptor inhibitors have increased numbers of apoptotic cells and develop emphysema. We hypothesized that VEGF regulates apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages (AM) via its interaction with VEGF receptor 1 (VEGF R1). Our data show that the uptake of apoptotic cells by murine AMs and human monocyte-derived macrophages is inhibited by depletion of VEGF and that VEGF activates Rac1. Antibody blockade or pharmacological inhibition of VEGF R1 activity also decreased apoptotic cell uptake ex vivo. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF significantly enhanced apoptotic cell uptake by AMs in vivo. These results indicate that VEGF serves a positive regulatory role via its interaction with VEGF R1 to activate Rac1 and enhance AM apoptotic cell clearance. PMID:22307908

  16. Growth hormone increases vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Krarup; Fisker, Sanne; Dall, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the impact of GH administration on endothelial adhesion molecules, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin, in vivo and in vitro. Soluble VCAM-1, E-selectin, and C-reactive protein concentrations were measured before and after treatment in 25 healthy subjects...... and 25 adult GH-deficient (GHD) patients randomized to GH treatment or placebo. Furthermore, we studied the direct effect of GH and IGF-I and serum from GH-treated subjects on basal and TNF alpha-stimulated expression of VCAM-1 and E-selectin on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Baseline...... levels of VCAM-1, but not E-selectin, were significantly lower in GHD patients than in healthy subjects (362 +/- 15 microg/liter vs. 516 +/- 21 microg/liter, P treatment, compared with placebo [net difference between groups 151.8 microg/liter (95...

  17. Characterization of nicardipine hydrochloride-induced cell injury in human vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Masanori; Kawai, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Toyoda, Hiromu

    2015-02-01

    Nicardipine hydrochloride (NIC), a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocking agent, has been widely used for the treatment of hypertension. Especially, nicardipine hydrochloride injection is used as first-line therapy for emergency treatment of abnormally high blood pressure. Although NIC has an attractive pharmacological profile, one of the dose-limiting factors of NIC is severe peripheral vascular injury after intravenous injection. The goal of this study was to better understand and thereby reduce NIC-mediated vascular injury. Here, we investigated the mechanism of NIC-induced vascular injury using human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). NIC decreased cell viability and increased percent of dead cells in a dose-dependent manner (10-30 μg/mL). Although cell membrane injury was not significant over 9 hr exposure, significant changes of cell morphology and increases in vacuoles in HMVECs were observed within 30 min of NIC exposure (30 μg/mL). Autophagosome labeling with monodansylcadaverine revealed increased autophagosomes in the NIC-treated cells, whereas caspase 3/7 activity was not increased in the NIC-treated cells (30 μg/mL). Additionally, NIC-induced reduction of cell viability was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagosome formation. These findings suggest that NIC causes severe peripheral venous irritation via induction of autophagic cell death and that inhibition of autophagy could contribute to the reduction of NIC-induced vascular injury.

  18. Viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells exposed to uniaxial stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Chew, Thomas; Loury, Phillip; Haga, Jason; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Chien, Shu

    2011-11-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (VECs) line the interior of blood vessels and regulate a variety of functions in the cardiovascular system. It is widely accepted that VECs will remodel themselves in response to mechanical stimuli, but few studies have analyzed the mechanical properties of these cells under stretch. We hypothesize that uniaxial stretch will cause an anisotropic realignment of actin filaments, and a change in the viscoelastic properties of the cell. To test this hypothesis, VECs were grown on a thin, transparent membrane mounted on a microscope. The membrane was stretched, consequently stretching the cells. Time-lapse sequences of the cells were taken every hour with a time resolution of 10 Hz. The random trajectories of intracellular endogenous particles were tracked using in-house algorithms. These trajectories were analyzed using a novel particle tracking microrheology formulation that takes into account the anisotropy of the cytoplasm of VECs. Supported by NSF CBET-1055697 CAREER Award (JCA) and NIH grants BRP HL064382 (SC), 1R01 HL080518 (SC).

  19. Direct cell-cell contact with the vascular niche maintains quiescent neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottone, Cristina; Krusche, Benjamin; Whitby, Ariadne; Clements, Melanie; Quadrato, Giorgia; Pitulescu, Mara E.; Adams, Ralf H.; Parrinello, Simona

    2014-01-01

    The vasculature is a prominent component of the subventricular zone neural stem cell niche. Although quiescent neural stem cells physically contact blood vessels at specialised endfeet, the significance of this interaction is not understood. In contrast, it is well established that vasculature-secreted soluble factors promote lineage progression of committed progenitors. Here we specifically investigated the role of cell-cell contact-dependent signalling in the vascular niche. Unexpectedly, we find that direct cell-cell interactions with endothelial cells enforces quiescence and promotes stem cell identity. Mechanistically, endothelial ephrinB2 and Jagged1 mediate these effects by suppressing cell-cycle entry downstream of mitogens and inducing stemness genes to jointly inhibit differentiation. In vivo, endothelial-specific ablation of either of the genes which encode these proteins, Efnb2 and Jag1 respectively, aberrantly activates quiescent stem cells, resulting in depletion. Thus, we identify the vasculature as a critical niche compartment for stem cell maintenance, furthering our understanding of how anchorage to the niche maintains stem cells within a pro-differentiative microenvironment. PMID:25283993

  20. Vascular endothelial cells and dysfunctions: role of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Favero, Gaia; Foglio, Eleonora; Rossini, Claudia; Castrezzati, Stefania; Lonati, Claudio; Rezzani, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Several pathological conditions, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes, ischemia/reperfusion injury and nicotine-induced vasculopathy, are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction characterized by altered secretory output of endothelial cells. Therefore there is a search for molecules and interventions that could restore endothelial function, in particular augmenting NO production, reducing the generation of free radicals and vasoconstrictors and preventing undesired inflammation. The pineal hormone melatonin exhibits several endothelium protective properties: it scavenges free radicals, activates antioxidant defence enzymes, normalizes lipid and blood pressure profile and increases NO bioavailability. Melatonin improved vascular function in experimental hypertension, reducing intimal infiltration and restoring NO production. Melatonin improved the NO pathway also in animal models for the study of diabetes and prevented NO down-regulation and adhesive molecules up-regulation in nicotine-induced vasculopathy. The protection against endothelial damage, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation and leukocyte infiltration might contribute to the beneficial effects against ischemia-reperfusion injury by melatonin. Therefore, melatonin administration has endothelium-protective potential in several pathological conditions. Nevertheless, it still needs to be established, whether melatonin is able to revert already established endothelial dysfunction in these conditions.

  1. Remanent cell traction force in renal vascular smooth muscle cells induced by integrin-mediated mechanotransduction

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian, Lavanya; Lo, Chun-Min; Sham, James S. K.; Yip, Kay-Pong

    2013-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated in isolated renal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) that integrin-mediated mechanotransduction triggers intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, which is the hallmark of myogenic response in VSMCs. To test directly whether integrin-mediated mechanotransduction results in the myogenic response-like behavior in renal VSMCs, cell traction force microscopy was used to monitor cell traction force when the cells were pulled with fibronectin-coated or low density lipoprotei...

  2. Biophysical characteristics of gap junctions in vascular wall cells: implications for vascular biology and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R. Brink

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available The role gap junction channels play in the normal and abnormal functioning of the vascular wall is the subject of much research. The biophysical properties of gap junctions are an essential component in understanding how gap junctions function to allow coordinated relaxation and contraction of vascular smooth muscle. This study reviews the properties thus far elucidated and relates those properties to tissue function. We ask how biophysical and structural properties such as gating, permselectivity, subconductive states and channel type (heteromeric vs homotypic vs heterotypic might affect vascular smooth muscle tone.

  3. Insulin attenuates vascular smooth muscle calcification but increases vascular smooth muscle cell phosphate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cecilia C Low; Sorribas, Victor; Sharma, Girish; Levi, Moshe; Draznin, Boris

    2007-11-01

    Medial artery vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification increases the risk of cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetes. However, the influence of insulin on VSMC calcification is unclear. We explored the effects of insulin on rat VSMC calcification in vitro and found that in a dose-dependent fashion, insulin attenuates VSMC calcification induced by high phosphate conditions as quantified by the o-cresolphthalein calcium (OCPC) method. In an in vitro model of insulin resistance in which cells are exposed to elevated insulin concentrations and the PI 3-kinase pathway is selectively inhibited, increased VSMC calcification was observed, suggesting that the PI 3-kinase pathway is involved in this attenuating effect of insulin. We postulated that insulin may also have an effect on phosphate or calcium transport in VSMC. We found that insulin increases phosphate transport at 3 and 24 h. This effect was mediated by increased Vmax for phosphate transport but not Km. Because type III sodium-phosphate co-transporters Pit-1 and Pit-2 are found in VSMC, we examined their expression by Western blot and real-time RT-PCR. Insulin stimulates Pit-1 mRNA modestly (*p<0.01 versus control), an effect inhibited by PD98059 but not by wortmannin. Pit-1 protein expression is induced by insulin, an effect also inhibited by PD98059 (*p<0.001 versus insulin alone). Our results suggest a role for insulin in attenuating VSMC calcification which may be disrupted in selective insulin signaling impairment seen in insulin resistance. This effect of insulin contrasts with its effect to induce phosphate transport in VSMC.

  4. Curcumin Attenuates Rapamycin-induced Cell Injury of Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Chen, Fangyuan; Zhou, Juan; Fang, Yuan; Li, Hongbing; Luo, Yongbai; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Although drug-eluting stents (DES) effectively improve the clinical efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention, a high risk of late stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis also exists after DES implantation. Anti-smooth muscle proliferation drugs, such as rapamycin, coating stents, not only inhibit the growth of vascular smooth muscle cells but also inhibit vascular endothelial cells and delay the reendothelialization. Therefore, the development of an ideal agent that protects vascular endothelial cells from rapamycin-eluting stents is of great importance for the next generation of DES. In this study, we demonstrated that rapamycin significantly inhibited the growth of rat aortic endothelial cells in both dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro. Cell apoptosis was increased and migration was decreased by rapamycin treatments in rat aortic endothelial cells in vitro. Surprisingly, treatment with curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric, significantly reversed these detrimental effects of rapamycin. Moreover, curcumin increased the expression of vascular nitric oxide synthases (eNOS), which was decreased by rapamycin. Furthermore, caveolin-1, the inhibitor of eNOS, was decreased by curcumin. Knockdown of eNOS by small interfering RNA significantly abrogated the protective effects of curcumin. Taken together, our results suggest that curcumin antagonizes the detrimental effect of rapamycin on aortic endothelial cells in vitro through upregulating eNOS. Therefore, curcumin is a promising combined agent for the rescue of DES-induced reendothelialization delay.

  5. Cryopreservation of human vascular umbilical cord cells under good manufacturing practice conditions for future cell banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polchow Bianca

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro fabricated tissue engineered vascular constructs could provide an alternative to conventional substitutes. A crucial factor for tissue engineering of vascular constructs is an appropriate cell source. Vascular cells from the human umbilical cord can be directly isolated and cryopreserved until needed. Currently no cell bank for human vascular cells is available. Therefore, the establishment of a future human vascular cell bank conforming to good manufacturing practice (GMP conditions is desirable for therapeutic applications such as tissue engineered cardiovascular constructs. Materials and methods A fundamental step was the adaption of conventional research and development starting materials to GMP compliant starting materials. Human umbilical cord artery derived cells (HUCAC and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC were isolated, cultivated, cryopreserved (short- and long-term directly after primary culture and recultivated subsequently. Cell viability, expression of cellular markers and proliferation potential of fresh and cryopreserved cells were studied using trypan blue staining, flow cytometry analysis, immunofluorescence staining and proliferation assays. Statistical analyses were performed using Student’s t-test. Results Sufficient numbers of isolated cells with acceptable viabilities and homogenous expression of cellular markers confirmed that the isolation procedure was successful using GMP compliant starting materials. The influence of cryopreservation was marginal, because cryopreserved cells mostly maintain phenotypic and functional characteristics similar to those of fresh cells. Phenotypic studies revealed that fresh cultivated and cryopreserved HUCAC were positive for alpha smooth muscle actin, CD90, CD105, CD73, CD29, CD44, CD166 and negative for smoothelin. HUVEC expressed CD31, CD146, CD105 and CD144 but not alpha smooth muscle actin. Functional analysis demonstrated acceptable

  6. Construction of three-dimensional vascularized cardiac tissue with cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2015-05-10

    Construction of three-dimensional (3D) tissues with pre-isolated cells is a promising achievement for novel medicine and drug-discovery research. Our laboratory constructs 3D tissues with an innovative and unique method for layering multiple cell sheets. Cell sheets maintain a high-efficiently regenerating function, because of the higher cell density and higher transplantation efficiency, compared to other cell-delivery methods. Cell sheets have already been applied in clinical applications for regenerative medicine in treating patients with various diseases. Therefore, in our search to develop a more efficient treatment with cell sheets, we are constructing 3D tissues by layering cell sheets. Native animal tissues and organs have an abundance of capillaries to supply oxygen and nutrients, and to remove waste molecules. In our investigation of vascularized cardiac cell sheets, we have found that endothelial cells within cell sheets spontaneously form blood vessel networks as in vivo capillaries. To construct even thicker 3D tissues by layering multiple cell sheets, it is critical to have a medium or blood flow within the vascular networks of the cell sheets. Therefore, to perfuse medium or blood in the cell sheet vascular network to maintain the viability of all cells, we developed two types of vascular beds; (1) a femoral muscle-based vascular bed, and (2) a synthetic collagen gel-based vascular bed. Both vascular beds successfully provide the critical flow of culture medium, which allows 12-layer cell sheets to survive. Such bioreactor systems, when combined with cell sheet engineering techniques, have produced functional vascularized 3D tissues. Here we explain and discuss the various processes to obtain vascular networks by properly connecting cell sheets and the engineering of 3D tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Opioid-induced proliferation of vascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Leo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Sandra Leo1,2, Rony Nuydens1, Theo F Meert11Pain and Neurology, CNS Department, Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, a division of Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V, Beerse, Belgium; 2Laboratory of Biological Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, BelgiumAbstract: Angiogenesis is an important issue in cancer research and opioids are often used to treat pain in cancer patients. Therefore it is important to know if the use of opioids is associated with an aberrant stimulation of tumor growth triggered by the stimulation of angiogenesis in cancer patients. Some studies in the literature have suggested the presence of the μ3 opioid receptor, known as the receptor for many opioids, on endothelial cells, which are key players in the process of angiogenesis. In this study we used endothelial cells known to express the μ3 opioid receptor (MOR3, to evaluate the effects of morphine on angiogenesis. We first investigated the effect of morphine on the proliferation of endothelial cells. We showed that morphine is able to stimulate vascular endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. This effect of morphine is mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway as pre-treatment with PD98059 inhibited this excessive proliferation. Because previous studies indicated nitric oxide (NO as a downstream messenger we investigated the role of NO in the aberrant proliferation of endothelial cells. Our data could not confirm these findings using intracellular NO measurements and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The potential use and pitfalls of opioids in cancer patients is discussed in light of these negative findings. Keywords: endothelial cells, morphine, cell proliferation, MAPK, nitric oxide, μ3 opioid receptor, angiogenesis

  8. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Luo

    Full Text Available The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation.A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell's initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9 μm, 4.6±0.6 μm and 6.2±1.8 μm (mean±SD. In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°.A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function.

  9. Nano- and microstructured materials for in vitro studies of the physiology of vascular cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Biela, Sarah A; Kaufmann, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular environment of vascular cells in vivo is complex in its chemical composition, physical properties, and architecture. Consequently, it has been a great challenge to study vascular cell responses in vitro, either to understand their interaction with their native environment or to investigate their interaction with artificial structures such as implant surfaces. New procedures and techniques from materials science to fabricate bio-scaffolds and surfaces have enabled novel studies of vascular cell responses under well-defined, controllable culture conditions. These advancements are paving the way for a deeper understanding of vascular cell biology and materials–cell interaction. Here, we review previous work focusing on the interaction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) with materials having micro- and nanostructured surfaces. We summarize fabrication techniques for surface topographies, materials, geometries, biochemical functionalization, and mechanical properties of such materials. Furthermore, various studies on vascular cell behavior and their biological responses to micro- and nanostructured surfaces are reviewed. Emphasis is given to studies of cell morphology and motility, cell proliferation, the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions, and signal transduction pathways of vascular cells. We finalize with a short outlook on potential interesting future studies. PMID:28144512

  10. Nano- and microstructured materials for in vitro studies of the physiology of vascular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Greiner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular environment of vascular cells in vivo is complex in its chemical composition, physical properties, and architecture. Consequently, it has been a great challenge to study vascular cell responses in vitro, either to understand their interaction with their native environment or to investigate their interaction with artificial structures such as implant surfaces. New procedures and techniques from materials science to fabricate bio-scaffolds and surfaces have enabled novel studies of vascular cell responses under well-defined, controllable culture conditions. These advancements are paving the way for a deeper understanding of vascular cell biology and materials–cell interaction. Here, we review previous work focusing on the interaction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and endothelial cells (ECs with materials having micro- and nanostructured surfaces. We summarize fabrication techniques for surface topographies, materials, geometries, biochemical functionalization, and mechanical properties of such materials. Furthermore, various studies on vascular cell behavior and their biological responses to micro- and nanostructured surfaces are reviewed. Emphasis is given to studies of cell morphology and motility, cell proliferation, the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions, and signal transduction pathways of vascular cells. We finalize with a short outlook on potential interesting future studies.

  11. Cell-penetrating peptides modulate the vascular action of phenylephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocić, Ivan; Ruczyński, Jarosław; Szczepańska, Renata; Olkowicz, Mariola; Parfianowicz, Brygida; Rusiecka, Izabela; Rekowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are a family of peptides able to penetrate the cell membrane. This group of compounds has attracted consideration as potential therapeutic tools for the delivery of various substances into cells. Here, we investigated possible interactions between several CPP synthesized in our laboratory and the vascular action of phenylephrine. We used isolated rat tail artery and examined the influence of pretreatment by seven different CPP on the concentration-response curve induced by the α1 receptor agonist phenylephrine. Peptides were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) using the 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) method. Among the seven different polypeptides, i.e., TP10 (transportan-10), [Lys(AAc)13]TP, [Lys(CAc)13]TP, [Lys(GAc)13]TP, [Lys(TAc)13]TP, [Lys(UAc)13]TP and [Lys(Ac)13]TP, only TP10 and [Lys(AAc)13]TP, both at a concentration of 1 μM (the lowest concentration inducing a significant change in the contraction of isolated rat stomach in our pilot study), rendered rat tail artery more sensitive to phenylephrine; the relative potency increased significantly. Conversely, [Lys(Ac)13]TP strongly decreased the efficacy of phenylephrine.

  12. Glucocorticoids and dopamine-1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Balmforth, A; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Kurihara, N; Takeda, T

    1989-06-01

    The effect of glucocorticoids on the dopamine (DA)-mediated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by intact vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) was studied in rats. Cultured VSMC were obtained from renal arteries of 14-week-old Wistar-Kyoto rats by explant method. Micromolar concentrations of dexamethasone (DEX) pretreatment for 48 hours potentiated DA-mediated response without any change of affinity constant. However, micromolar concentrations of aldosterone pretreatment for 48 hours had almost no effect on DA-mediated response. The DEX-induced facilitation began at 6 hours and reached maximum at 24 hours after DEX administration in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of protein and RNA synthesis blocked this glucocorticoid effect. The basal activity of adenylate cyclase in DEX-treated cells was twofold higher than that in control cells. Treatment of VSMC with DEX increased cholera toxin-stimulated and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. However, pertussis toxin treatment did not augment or reduce the effect of DEX treatment. These results suggest that glucocorticoids increase DA-mediated cAMP formation by VSMC through glucocorticoid type II receptors and the induction of protein synthesis and that the activation of the catalytic unit may play some role in this facilitation.

  13. Study on the biological characteristics of pancreatic cancer vascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雷

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the biological characteristics of pancreatic cancer vascular endothelial cells,including the aspects of morphology,species,genetics,vascular formation ability,and proliferation ability in vitro. Methods The human pancreatic cancer cells were inoculated in nude mice pancreas to get pancreatic cancer

  14. Calcium and TRP channels in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberg, Judd W; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2004-04-01

    Ca(2+) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and a stimulus for pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The transient receptor potential cation channels participate in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) and thus vascular contractility and cell proliferation. Upregulation of genes encoding these channels is involved in the development of pulmonary hypertension.

  15. Hypoxia, leptin, and vascular endothelial growth factor stimulate vascular endothelial cell differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhite, Mohamed M; Finkensieper, Andreas; Rebhan, Jennifer; Huse, Stephanie; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Sauer, Heinrich; Wartenberg, Maria

    2014-02-15

    The plasticity of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) is promising, but differentiation in vitro toward endothelial cells is poorly understood. Flow cytometry demonstrated that hASCs isolated from excised fat tissue were positive for CD29, CD44, CD70, CD90, CD105, and CD166 and negative for the endothelial marker CD31, and the hematopoietic cell markers CD34 and CD133. hASCs differentiated into adipocytes after cultivation in adipogenic medium. Exposure of hASCs for 10 days under hypoxia (3% oxygen) in combination with leptin increased the percentage of CD31(+) endothelial cells as well as CD31, VE-Cadherin, Flk-1, Tie2, von Willebrand factor, and endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression. This was enhanced on co-incubation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and leptin, whereas VEGF alone was not sufficient. Moreover, hASCs cultured on a matrigel surface under hypoxia/VEGF/leptin, showed a stable branching network. Hypoxic conditions significantly decreased apoptosis as evaluated by cleaved caspase-3, and increased prolyl hydroxylase domain 3 mRNA expression. Hypoxia increased expression of VEGF as well as leptin transcripts, which were significantly inhibited on co-incubation with either VEGF or leptin or a combination of both. Furthermore, leptin treatment of hypoxic cells increased the expression of the long/signaling form of the leptin receptor (ObRL), which was augmented on co-incubation with VEGF. The observed endothelial differentiation was dependent on the Akt pathway, as co-administration with Akt inhibitor abolished the observed effects. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that hASCs can be efficiently differentiated to endothelial cells by mimicking the hypoxic and pro-angiogenic microenvironment of adipose tissue.

  16. D609 induces vascular endothelial cells and marrow stromal cells differentiation into neuron-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan WANG; Chun-qing DU; Shao-shan WANG; Kun XIE; Shang-li ZHANG; Jun-ying MIAO

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of tricyclodecane-9-yl-xanthogenate (D609) on cell differentiation in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and marrow stromal cells (MSCs). METHODS: Morphological changes were observed under phase contrast microscope. Electron microscope and immunostaining were used for VECs identification. The expressions of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: After 6 h of induction with D609, some VECs showed morphological changes characteristic of neurones. 9 h later, more VECs became neuron-like cells. About 30.8 % of VECs displayed positive NSE (P<0.01), while the expression of GFAP was negative. When MSCs were exposed to D609, the cells displayed neuronal morphologies, such as pyramidal cell bodies and processes formed extensive networks at 3 h. 6 h later, almost all of the cells exhibited a typical neuronal appearance, and 85.6 % of MSCs displayed intensive positive NSE, but GFAP did not express. CONCLUSION: D609 induces VECs and MSCs differentiation into neuron-like cells.

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinases: Inflammatory Regulators of Cell Behaviors in Vascular Formation and Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qishan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling contribute to pathogenesis of a number of disorders such as tumor, arthritis, atherosclerosis, restenosis, hypertension, and neurodegeneration. During angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, behaviors of stem/progenitor cells, endothelial cells (ECs, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and its interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM play a critical role in the processes. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, well-known inflammatory mediators are a family of zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes that degrade various components of ECM and non-ECM molecules mediating tissue remodeling in both physiological and pathological processes. MMPs including MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-12, and MT1-MMP, are stimulated and activated by various stimuli in vascular tissues. Once activated, MMPs degrade ECM proteins or other related signal molecules to promote recruitment of stem/progenitor cells and facilitate migration and invasion of ECs and VSMCs. Moreover, vascular cell proliferation and apoptosis can also be regulated by MMPs via proteolytically cleaving and modulating bioactive molecules and relevant signaling pathways. Regarding the importance of vascular cells in abnormal angiogenesis and vascular remodeling, regulation of vascular cell behaviors through modulating expression and activation of MMPs shows therapeutic potential.

  18. Lung-resident γδ T cells and their roles in lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Min; Hu, Shilian

    2017-08-01

    γδ T cells are greatly enriched in mucosal and epithelial sites, such as the skin, respiratory, digestive and reproductive tracts, and they are defined as tissue-resident immune cells. In these tissues, the characteristics and biological roles of γδ T cells are distinguished from each other. The lungs represent the most challenging immunological dilemma for the host, and they have their own effective immune system. The abundance of γδ T cells, an estimated 8-20% of resident pulmonary lymphocytes in the lung, maintains lung tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the recent research progress regarding lung-resident γδ T cells, including their development, residency and immune characteristics, and discuss the involvement of γδ T cells in infectious diseases of the lung, including bacterial, viral and fungal infections; lung allergic disease; lung inflammation and fibrosis; and lung cancer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Hepatic Stellate Cells Support Hematopoiesis and are Liver-Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Kordes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hematopoiesis can occur in the liver, when the bone marrow fails to provide an adequate environment for hematopoietic stem cells. Hepatic stellate cells possess characteristics of stem/progenitor cells, but their contribution to hematopoiesis is not known thus far. Methods: Isolated hepatic stellate cells from rats were characterized with respect to molecular markers of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and treated with adipocyte or osteocyte differentiation media. Stellate cells of rats were further co-cultured with murine stem cell antigen-1+ hematopoietic stem cells selected by magnetic cell sorting. The expression of murine hematopoietic stem cell markers was analyzed by mouse specific quantitative PCR during co-culture. Hepatic stellate cells from eGFP+ rats were transplanted into lethally irradiated wild type rats. Results: Desmin-expressing stellate cells were associated with hematopoietic sites in the fetal rat liver. Hepatic stellate cells expressed MSC markers and were able to differentiate into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro. Stellate cells supported hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells during co-culture similar to bone marrow MSC, but failed to differentiate into blood cell lineages after transplantation. Conclusion: Hepatic stellate cells are liver-resident MSC and can fulfill typical functions of bone marrow MSC such as the differentiation into adipocytes or osteocytes and support of hematopoiesis.

  20. Synergism of matrix stiffness and vascular endothelial growth factor on mesenchymal stem cells for vascular endothelial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Kathryn; Floren, Michael; Tan, Yan; Tseng, Pi Ou Nancy; Tan, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold tremendous potential for vascular tissue regeneration. Research has demonstrated that individual factors in the cell microenvironment such as matrix elasticity and growth factors regulate MSC differentiation to vascular lineage. However, it is not well understood how matrix elasticity and growth factors combine to direct the MSC fate. This study examines the combined effects of matrix elasticity and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on both MSC differentiation into endothelial lineage and MSC paracrine signaling. MSCs were seeded in soft nanofibrous matrices with or without VEGF, and in Petri dishes with or without VEGF. Only MSCs seeded in three-dimensional soft matrices with VEGF showed significant increases in the expression of endothelial markers (vWF, eNOS, Flt-1, and Flk-1), while eliminating the expression of smooth muscle marker (SM-α-actin). MSCs cultured in VEGF alone on two-dimensional dishes showed increased expression of both early-stage endothelial and smooth muscle markers, indicating immature vascular differentiation. Furthermore, MSCs cultured in soft matrices with VEGF showed faster upregulation of endothelial markers compared with MSCs cultured in VEGF alone. Paracrine signaling studies found that endothelial cells cultured in the conditioned media from MSCs differentiated in the soft matrix and VEGF condition exhibited increased migration and formation of capillary-like structures. These results demonstrate that VEGF and soft matrix elasticity act synergistically to guide MSC differentiation into mature endothelial phenotype while enhancing paracrine signaling. Therefore, it is critical to control both mechanical and biochemical factors to safely regenerate vascular tissues with MSCs.

  1. Cell Therapy Applications for Retinal Vascular Diseases: Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S

    2016-04-01

    Retinal vascular conditions, such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, remain leading causes of vision loss. No therapy exists to restore vision loss resulting from retinal ischemia and associated retinal degeneration. Tissue regeneration is possible with cell therapy. The goal would be to restore or replace the damaged retinal vasculature and the retinal neurons that are damaged and/or degenerating from the hypoxic insult. Currently, various adult cell therapies have been explored as potential treatment. They include mesenchymal stem cells, vascular precursor cells (i.e., CD34+ cells, hematopoietic cells or endothelial progenitor cells), and adipose stromal cells. Preclinical studies show that all these cells have a paracrine trophic effect on damaged ischemic tissue, leading to tissue preservation. Endothelial progenitor cells and adipose stromal cells integrate into the damaged retinal vascular wall in preclinical models of diabetic retinopathy and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Mesenchymal stem cells do not integrate as readily but appear to have a primary paracrine trophic effect. Early phase clinical trials have been initiated and ongoing using mesenchymal stem cells or autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells injected intravitreally as potential therapy for diabetic retinopathy or retinal vein occlusion. Adipose stromal cells or pluripotent stem cells differentiated into endothelial colony-forming cells have been explored in preclinical studies and show promise as possible therapies for retinal vascular disorders. The relative safety or efficacy of these various cell therapies for treating retinal vascular disorders have yet to be determined.

  2. Levamisole induced apoptosis in cultured vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artwohl, Michaela; Hölzenbein, Thomas; Wagner, Ludwig; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Waldhäusl, Werner; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M

    2000-01-01

    To better understand the anticancer activity of Levamisole (LMS), which serves as an adjuvant in colon cancer therapy in combination with 5-Fluorouracil, this study analyses LMS' ability to induce apoptosis and growth arrest in cultured human micro- and macrovascular endothelial cells (ECs) and fibroblasts. Cells exposed (24 h) to Levamisole (range: 0.5–2 mmol l−1) alone or in combination with antioxidants (10 mmol l−1 glutathione or 5 mmol l−1 N-Acetylcysteine or 0.1 mmol l−1 Tocopherol) were evaluated for apoptosis (3H-thymidine assays, in situ staining), mRNA/protein expression (Northern/Western blot), and proliferation (3H-thymidine incorporation). Levamisole dose-dependently increased apoptosis in ECs to 230% (HUVECs-human umbilical vein ECs), 525% (adult human venous ECs) and 600% (human uterine microvascular ECs) but not in fibroblasts compared to control cells (set as 100%). Levamisole increased in ECs integrin-dependent matrix adhesion, inhibited proliferation (−70%), reduced expression of survival factors such as clusterin (−30%), endothelin-1 (−43%), bcl-2 (−34%), endothelial NO-synthase (−32%) and pRb (Retinoblastoma protein: −89%), and increased that of growth arrest/death signals such as p21 (+73%) and bak (+50%). LMS (2 mmol l−1)-induced apoptosis was inhibited by glutathione (−50%) and N-Acetylcysteine (−36%), which also counteracted reduction by Levamisole of pRb expression, suggesting reactive oxygen species and pRb play a role in these processes. The ability of LMS to selectively induce apoptosis and growth arrest in endothelial cells potentially hints at vascular targeting to contribute to Levamisole's anticancer activity. PMID:11139434

  3. Effect of reconstructive vascular surgery on red cell deformability--preliminary results.

    OpenAIRE

    Irwin, S. T.; Rocks, M J; McGuigan, J. A.; Patterson, C C; Morris, T. C.; O'Reilly, M J

    1983-01-01

    Using a simple filtration method, red cell deformability was measured in healthy control subjects and in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Impaired red cell deformability was demonstrated in patients with rest pain or gangrene and in patients with intermittent claudication. An improvement in red cell deformability was demonstrated after successful reconstructive vascular surgery in both patient groups. An improvement in red cell deformability was demonstrated in patients undergoing m...

  4. Additive effect of red blood cell rigidity and adherence to endothelial cells in inducing vascular resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, D K; Koshkaryev, A; Artmann, G; Barshtein, G; Yedgar, S

    2008-10-01

    To explore the contribution of red blood cell (RBC) deformability and interaction with endothelial cells (ECs) to circulatory disorders, these RBC properties were modified by treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and their effects on vascular resistance were monitored following their infusion into rat mesocecum vasculature. Treatment with 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) increased RBC/EC adherence without significant alteration of RBC deformability. At 5.0 mM H(2)O(2), RBC deformability was considerably reduced, inducing a threefold increase in the number of undeformable cells, whereas RBC/EC adherence was not further affected by the increased H(2)O(2) concentration. This enabled the selective manipulation of RBC adherence and deformability and the testing of their differential effect on vascular resistance. Perfusion of RBCs with enhanced adherence and unchanged deformability (treatment with 0.5 mM H(2)O(2)) increased vascular resistance by about 35% compared with untreated control RBCs. Perfusion of 5.0 mM H(2)O(2)-treated RBCs, with reduced deformability (without additional increase of adherence), further increased vascular resistance by about 60% compared with untreated control RBCs. These results demonstrate the specific effects of elevated adherence and reduced deformability of oxidized RBCs on vascular resistance. These effects can be additive, depending on the oxidation conditions. The oxidation-induced changes applied in this study are moderate compared with those observed in RBCs in pathological states. Yet, they caused a considerable increase in vascular resistance, thus demonstrating the potency of RBC/EC adherence and RBC deformability in determining resistance to blood flow in vivo.

  5. [The effects of microgravity on blood vessels and vascular endothelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Na-Ping; Li, Hua; Qiu, Yun-Liang; Zhou, Guo-Mina; Wang, Yan; Ma, Jing; Mei, Qi-Bing

    2014-10-01

    The dysfunction of vascular system is one of the main causes of orthostatic intolerance induced by microgravity. Vascular endothelial cell is a single layer on the inner wall of the blood vessel and is the important component of the blood vessel wall. Vascular endothelial cell plays a pivotal role in the regulation of vascular functions, such as serving as a permeability barrier, regulating vasoconstriction and vasodilatation. Recent studies have demonstrated that microgravity may have different effects on vascular sys- tem and vascular endothelial cells in different parts of the body, such as increasing vasoconstrictor reactivity and decreasing vasodilator reactivity of cerebral arteries, decreasing vasoconstrictor and vasodilator reactivity of carotid and abdominal aortic arteries, decreasing vasoconstrictor reactivity and increasing vasodilator reactivity of pulmonary arteries, decreasing vasoconstrictor reactivity of mesenteric arteries and veins and lower extremity arteries. In addition, microgravity can promote the growth of vascular endothelial cells in the large vessels and inhibit the growth of microvascular endothelial cells. This paper summarized the research progress in the effects of microgravity on blood vessels and vascular endothelial cells.

  6. Remanent cell traction force in renal vascular smooth muscle cells induced by integrin-mediated mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Lavanya; Lo, Chun-Min; Sham, James S K; Yip, Kay-Pong

    2013-02-15

    It was previously demonstrated in isolated renal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) that integrin-mediated mechanotransduction triggers intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, which is the hallmark of myogenic response in VSMCs. To test directly whether integrin-mediated mechanotransduction results in the myogenic response-like behavior in renal VSMCs, cell traction force microscopy was used to monitor cell traction force when the cells were pulled with fibronectin-coated or low density lipoprotein (LDL)-coated paramagnetic beads. LDL-coated beads were used as a control for nonintegrin-mediated mechanotransduction. Pulling with LDL-coated beads increased the cell traction force by 61 ± 12% (9 cells), which returned to the prepull level after the pulling process was terminated. Pulling with noncoated beads had a minimal increase in the cell traction force (12 ± 9%, 8 cells). Pulling with fibronectin-coated beads increased the cell traction force by 56 ± 20% (7 cells). However, the cell traction force was still elevated by 23 ± 14% after the pulling process was terminated. This behavior is analogous to the changes of vascular resistance in pressure-induced myogenic response, in which vascular resistance remains elevated after myogenic constriction. Fibronectin is a native ligand for α(5)β(1)-integrins in VSMCs. Similar remanent cell traction force was found when cells were pulled with beads coated with β(1)-integrin antibody (Ha2/5). Activation of β(1)-integrin with soluble antibody also triggered variations of cell traction force and Ca(2+) mobilization, which were abolished by the Src inhibitor. In conclusion, mechanical force transduced by α(5)β(1)-integrins triggered a myogenic response-like behavior in isolated renal VSMCs.

  7. Advanced Glycation End-Products Induce Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: A Mechanism for Vascular Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayo Koike

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification, especially medial artery calcification, is associated with cardiovascular death in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD. To determine the underlying mechanism of vascular calcification, we have demonstrated in our previous report that advanced glycation end-products (AGEs stimulated calcium deposition in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs through excessive oxidative stress and phenotypic transition into osteoblastic cells. Since AGEs can induce apoptosis, in this study we investigated its role on VSMC apoptosis, focusing mainly on the underlying mechanisms. A rat VSMC line (A7r5 was cultured, and treated with glycolaldehyde-derived AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE3-BSA. Apoptotic cells were identified by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. To quantify apoptosis, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for histone-complexed DNA fragments was employed. Real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA levels. Treatment of A7r5 cells with AGE3-BSA from 100 µg/mL concentration markedly increased apoptosis, which was suppressed by Nox inhibitors. AGE3-BSA significantly increased the mRNA expression of NAD(PH oxidase components including Nox4 and p22phox, and these findings were confirmed by protein levels using immunofluorescence. Dihydroethidisum assay showed that compared with cBSA, AGE3-BSA increased reactive oxygen species level in A7r5 cells. Furthermore, AGE3-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nox4 or p22phox. Double knockdown of Nox4 and p22phox showed a similar inhibitory effect on apoptosis as single gene silencing. Thus, our results demonstrated that NAD(PH oxidase-derived oxidative stress are involved in AGEs-induced apoptosis of VSMCs. These findings might be important to understand the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in diabetes and CKD.

  8. In-depth evaluation of commercially available human vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype: Implications for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timraz, Sara B H; Farhat, Ilyas A H; Alhussein, Ghada; Christoforou, Nicolas; Teo, Jeremy C M

    2016-05-01

    In vitro research on vascular tissue engineering has extensively used isolated primary human or animal smooth muscle cells (SMC). Research programs that lack such facilities tend towards commercially available primary cells sources. Here, we aim to evaluate the capacity of commercially available human SMC to maintain their contractile phenotype, and determine if dedifferentiation towards the synthetic phenotype occurs in response to conventional cell culture and passaging without any external biochemical or mechanical stimuli. Lower passage SMC adopted a contractile phenotype marked by a relatively slower proliferation rate, higher expression of proteins of the contractile apparatus and smoothelin, elongated morphology, and reduced deposition of collagen types I and III. As the passage number increased, migratory capacity was enhanced, average cell speed, total distance and net distance travelled increased up to passage 8. Through the various assays, corroborative evidence pinpoints SMC at passage 7 as the transition point between the contractile and synthetic phenotypes, while passage 8 distinctly and consistently exhibited characteristics of synthetic phenotype. This knowledge is particularly useful in selecting SMC of appropriate passage number for the target vascular tissue engineering application, for example, a homeostatic vascular graft for blood vessel replacement versus recreating atherosclerotic blood vessel model in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells cocultured on polyglycolic acid (70/30) scaffold in tissue engineered vascular graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Shao-jun; ZHAO Li-min; WANG Shen-guo; LI Jing-xing; CHEN Hua-ying; LIU Jie-lin; LIU Ya; LUO Yi; Roo Changizi

    2007-01-01

    Background Current prosthetic, small diameter vascular grafts showing poor long term patency rates have led to the pursuit of other biological materials. Biomaterials that successfully integrate into surrounding tissue should match not only the mechanical properties of tissues, but also topography. Polyglycolic acid (70/30) has been used as synthetic grafts to determine whether human vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells attach, survive and secrete endothelin and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-keto-PGF1α).Methods Endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells were isolated from adult human great saphenous vein. They were seeded on polyglycolic acid scaffold in vitro separately to grow vascular patch (Groups A and B respectively) and cocultured in vitro to grow into vascular patch (Group C). Smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were identified by immunohistochemical analysis and growth of cells on polyglycolic acid was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The levels of endothelin and 6-keto-PGF1α in the culturing solutions were examined by radioimmunology to measure endothelial function.Results Seed smooth muscle cells adhered to polyglycolic acid scaffold and over 28 days grew in the interstices to form a uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold. Then seed endothelial cells formed a complete endothelial layer on the smooth muscle cells. The levels of endothelin and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha in the culturing solution were (234±29) pg/ml and (428+98) pg/ml respectively in Group C and (196+30) pg/ml and (346±120) pg/ml in Group B; both significantly higher than in Groups A and D (blank control group, all P<0.05 ).Conclusions Cells could be grown successfully on polyglycolic acid and retain functions of secretion. Our next step is to use human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells to grow tubular vascular grafts in vitro.

  10. Reactive oxygen species and angiotensin II signaling in vascular cells: implications in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touyz R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes are associated with vascular functional and structural changes including endothelial dysfunction, altered contractility and vascular remodeling. Cellular events underlying these processes involve changes in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC growth, apoptosis/anoikis, cell migration, inflammation, and fibrosis. Many factors influence cellular changes, of which angiotensin II (Ang II appears to be amongst the most important. The physiological and pathophysiological actions of Ang II are mediated primarily via the Ang II type 1 receptor. Growing evidence indicates that Ang II induces its pleiotropic vascular effects through NADPH-driven generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS function as important intracellular and intercellular second messengers to modulate many downstream signaling molecules, such as protein tyrosine phosphatases, protein tyrosine kinases, transcription factors, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and ion channels. Induction of these signaling cascades leads to VSMC growth and migration, regulation of endothelial function, expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, and modification of extracellular matrix. In addition, ROS increase intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i, a major determinant of vascular reactivity. ROS influence signaling molecules by altering the intracellular redox state and by oxidative modification of proteins. In physiological conditions, these events play an important role in maintaining vascular function and integrity. Under pathological conditions ROS contribute to vascular dysfunction and remodeling through oxidative damage. The present review focuses on the biology of ROS in Ang II signaling in vascular cells and discusses how oxidative stress contributes to vascular damage in cardiovascular disease.

  11. Comparison of cells free in coelomic and water-vascular system of sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Qi, Rui-rong; Wang, Yi-nan; Ye, Shi-gen; Qiao, Guo; Li, Hua

    2013-11-01

    The sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus possesses a variety of cells populating in both the coelomic (cells in the coelomic are called coelomocytes) and water-vascular system. In this study, we compared cells in these two systems of A. japonicus on total cell number, cell types and surface antigens through monoclonal antibodies against coelomocytes. The results demonstrated that the cell types observed in coelomic also could be found in water-vascular system, but the total cell number and percentages of each type were different. The total number of coelomocytes was 2-3 times of that in water-vascular system. Lymphoid cells were numerically dominant in coelomic system, while spherulocytes with pseudopods in water-vascular system. Results of indirect immunofluorescence assay technique showed that both coelomocytes and cells in water-vascular system could be recognized by the corresponding MAbs, and the distribution of its positive signals was not different. In conclusion, cell types and surface antigens in coelomic and water-vascular system were same, but the total cell number and percentages of each type were different. And further researches are needed on whether there are differences in functions of the different composition.

  12. Alcohol and cardiovascular disease--modulation of vascular cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Paul A; Redmond, Eileen M

    2012-04-01

    Alcohol is a commonly used drug worldwide. Epidemiological studies have identified alcohol consumption as a factor that may either positively or negatively influence many diseases including cardiovascular disease, certain cancers and dementia. Often there seems to be a differential effect of various drinking patterns, with frequent moderate consumption of alcohol being salutary and binge drinking or chronic abuse being deleterious to one's health. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating the many effects of alcohol consumption is beginning to emerge, as well as a clearer picture as to whether these effects are due to the direct actions of alcohol itself, or caused in part by its metabolites, e.g., acetaldehyde, or by incidental components present in the alcoholic beverage (e.g., polyphenols in red wine). This review will discuss evidence to date as to how alcohol (ethanol) might affect atherosclerosis that underlies cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, and the putative mechanisms involved, focusing on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell effects.

  13. The mast cell - B-cell axis in lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitling, Siegfried; Hui, Zhang; Zabini, Diana; Hu, Yijie; Hoffmann, Julia; Goldenberg, Neil M; Tabuchi, Arata; Buelow, Roland; Dos Santos, Claudia; Kuebler, Wolfgang Michael

    2017-02-24

    Over the past years, a critical role for the immune system and in particular, for mast cells, in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) has emerged. However, the way in which mast cells promote PH is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which mast cells may contribute to PH, specifically focusing on the interaction between the innate and adaptive immune response and the role of B-cells and autoimmunity. Experiments were performed in Sprague Dawley rats and B-cell deficient JH-KO rats in the monocrotaline, sugen-hypoxia and the aortic banding model of PH. Hemodynamics, cell infiltration, IL-6 expression, and vascular remodeling were analyzed. Gene array analyses revealed constituents of immunoglobulins as most prominently regulated mast cell dependent genes in the lung in experimental PH. IL-6 was shown to link mast cells to B-cells, as a) IL-6 was upregulated and colocalized with mast cells and was reduced by mast cell stabilizers, and b) IL-6 or mast cell blockade reduced B-cells in lungs of monocrotaline-treated rats. A functional role for B-cells in PH was demonstrated, in that either blocking B-cells by an anti-CD20 antibody or B-cell deficiency in JH-KO rats attenuated right ventricular systolic pressure and vascular remodeling in experimental PH. We here identify a mast cell - B-cell axis driven by IL-6 as critical immune pathway in the pathophysiology of PH. Our results provide novel insights into the role of the immune system in PH, which may be therapeutically exploited by targeted immunotherapy.

  14. Evolution of plant conducting cells: perspectives from key regulators of vascular cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Misato; Akiyoshi, Nobuhiro; Takenaka, Yuto; Sano, Ryosuke; Demura, Taku

    2017-01-01

    One crucial problem that plants faced during their evolution, particularly during the transition to growth on land, was how to transport water, nutrients, metabolites, and small signaling molecules within a large, multicellular body. As a solution to this problem, land plants developed specific tissues for conducting molecules, called water-conducting cells (WCCs) and food-conducting cells (FCCs). The well-developed WCCs and FCCs in extant plants are the tracheary elements and sieve elements, respectively, which are found in vascular plants. Recent molecular genetic studies revealed that transcriptional networks regulate the differentiation of tracheary and sieve elements, and that the networks governing WCC differentiation are largely conserved among land plant species. In this review, we discuss the molecular evolution of plant conducting cells. By focusing on the evolution of the key transcription factors that regulate vascular cell differentiation, the NAC transcription factor VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN for WCCs and the MYB-coiled-coil (CC)-type transcription factor ALTERED PHLOEM DEVELOPMENT for sieve elements, we describe how land plants evolved molecular systems to produce the specialized cells that function as WCCs and FCCs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL) Reveals the Sequential Differentiation of Sieve Element-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yuki; Nurani, Alif Meem; Saito, Chieko; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Saito, Masato; Yamazaki, Kyoko; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    Cell differentiation is a complex process involving multiple steps, from initial cell fate specification to final differentiation. Procambial/cambial cells, which act as vascular stem cells, differentiate into both xylem and phloem cells during vascular development. Recent studies have identified regulatory cascades for xylem differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying phloem differentiation is largely unexplored due to technical challenges. Here, we established an ectopic induction system for phloem differentiation named Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL). Our results verified similarities between VISUAL-induced Arabidopsis thaliana phloem cells and in vivo sieve elements. We performed network analysis using transcriptome data with VISUAL to dissect the processes underlying phloem differentiation, eventually identifying a factor involved in the regulation of the master transcription factor gene APL. Thus, our culture system opens up new avenues not only for genetic studies of phloem differentiation, but also for future investigations of multidirectional differentiation from vascular stem cells. PMID:27194709

  16. Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Connexin 43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamani eJoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Connexin 43 (Cx43, the principal gap junction protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, regulates movement of ions and other signaling molecules through gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and plays important roles in maintaining normal vessel function; however, many of the signaling mechanisms controlling Cx43 in VSMCs are not clearly described. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms of Cx43 regulation with respect to VSMC proliferation. Treatment of rat primary VSMCs with the cAMP analog 8Br-cAMP, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 (BAY, or the Cx inducer diallyl disulfide (DADS significantly reduced proliferation after 72 h compared to vehicle controls. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake revealed reduction (p<.001 in DNA synthesis after 6 h and flow cytometry showed reduced (40% S phase cell numbers after 16 h in DADS-treated cells compared to controls. Cx43 expression significantly increased after 270 min treatment with 8Br-cAMP, 8Br-cGMP, BAY or DADS. Inhibition of PKA, PKG or PKC reversed 8Br-cAMP-stimulated increases in Cx43 expression, whereas only PKG or PKC inhibition reversed 8Br-cGMP- and BAY-stimulated increases in total Cx43. Interestingly, stimulation of Cx43 expression by DADS was not dependent on PKA, PKG or PKC. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, only 8Br-cAMP or DADS increased GJIC with 8Br-cAMP mediated by PKC and DADS mediated by PKG. Further, DADS significantly increased phosphorylation at the MAPK-sensitive serine (Ser255 and Ser279, the cell cycle regulatory kinase-sensitive Ser262 and the PKC-sensitive Ser368 after 30 min while 8Br-cAMP significantly increased phosphorylation only at Ser279 compared to controls. This study demonstrates that 8Br-cAMP- and DADS-enhanced GJIC rather than Cx43 expression and/or phosphorylation plays an important role in regulation of VSMC proliferation and provides new insights into the growth-regulatory capacities of Cx43 in VSMCs.

  17. Patient-specific cardiovascular progenitor cells derived from integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells for vascular tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiang; Wang, Yongyu; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhao, Chao; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhanpeng; Forde, Kaitlynn; Wang, Lunchang; Wang, Jiangang; Baylink, David J; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Gao, Shaorong; Yang, Bo; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in regenerating a live vascular replacement. However, the vascular cell source is limited, and it is crucial to develop a scaffold that accommodates new type of vascular progenitor cells and facilitates in vivo lineage specification of the cells into functional vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to regenerate vascular tissue. In the present study, integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were established from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells through episomal vector nucleofection of reprogramming factors. The established hiPSCs were then induced into mesoderm-originated cardiovascular progenitor cells (CVPCs) with a highly efficient directed lineage specification method. The derived CVPCs were demonstrated to be able to differentiate into functional VSMCs. Subcutaneous implantation of CVPCs seeded on macroporous nanofibrous poly(l-lactide) scaffolds led to in vivo VSMC lineage specification and matrix deposition inside the scaffolds. In summary, we established integration-free patient-specific hiPSCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, derived CVPCs through directed lineage specification, and developed an advanced scaffold for these progenitor cells to further differentiate in vivo into VSMCs and regenerate vascular tissue in a subcutaneous implantation model. This study has established an efficient patient-specific approach towards in vivo regeneration of vascular tissue.

  18. Surgical approaches to complex vascular lesions: the use of virtual reality and stereoscopic analysis as a tool for resident and student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Schmitt, Paul J; Sukul, Vishad; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2012-08-01

    Virtual reality training for complex tasks has been shown to be of benefit in fields involving highly technical and demanding skill sets. The use of a stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) virtual reality environment to teach a patient-specific analysis of the microsurgical treatment modalities of a complex basilar aneurysm is presented. Three different surgical approaches were evaluated in a virtual environment and then compared to elucidate the best surgical approach. These approaches were assessed with regard to the line-of-sight, skull base anatomy and visualisation of the relevant anatomy at the level of the basilar artery and surrounding structures. Overall, the stereoscopic 3D virtual reality environment with fusion of multimodality imaging affords an excellent teaching tool for residents and medical students to learn surgical approaches to vascular lesions. Future studies will assess the educational benefits of this modality and develop a series of metrics for student assessments.

  19. Clarification of mural cell coverage of vascular endothelial cells by live imaging of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Izumi, Nanae; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hajime; Kelsh, Robert N; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2016-04-15

    Mural cells (MCs) consisting of vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes cover the endothelial cells (ECs) to regulate vascular stability and homeostasis. Here, we clarified the mechanism by which MCs develop and cover ECs by generating transgenic zebrafish lines that allow live imaging of MCs and by lineage tracing in vivo To cover cranial vessels, MCs derived from either neural crest cells or mesoderm emerged around the preformed EC tubes, proliferated and migrated along EC tubes. During their migration, the MCs moved forward by extending their processes along the inter-EC junctions, suggesting a role for inter-EC junctions as a scaffold for MC migration. In the trunk vasculature, MCs derived from mesoderm covered the ventral side of the dorsal aorta (DA), but not the posterior cardinal vein. Furthermore, the MCs migrating from the DA or emerging around intersegmental vessels (ISVs) preferentially covered arterial ISVs rather than venous ISVs, indicating that MCs mostly cover arteries during vascular development. Thus, live imaging and lineage tracing enabled us to clarify precisely how MCs cover the EC tubes and to identify the origins of MCs.

  20. Clarification of mural cell coverage of vascular endothelial cells by live imaging of zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Izumi, Nanae; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hajime; Kelsh, Robert N.; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells (MCs) consisting of vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes cover the endothelial cells (ECs) to regulate vascular stability and homeostasis. Here, we clarified the mechanism by which MCs develop and cover ECs by generating transgenic zebrafish lines that allow live imaging of MCs and by lineage tracing in vivo. To cover cranial vessels, MCs derived from either neural crest cells or mesoderm emerged around the preformed EC tubes, proliferated and migrated along EC tubes. During their migration, the MCs moved forward by extending their processes along the inter-EC junctions, suggesting a role for inter-EC junctions as a scaffold for MC migration. In the trunk vasculature, MCs derived from mesoderm covered the ventral side of the dorsal aorta (DA), but not the posterior cardinal vein. Furthermore, the MCs migrating from the DA or emerging around intersegmental vessels (ISVs) preferentially covered arterial ISVs rather than venous ISVs, indicating that MCs mostly cover arteries during vascular development. Thus, live imaging and lineage tracing enabled us to clarify precisely how MCs cover the EC tubes and to identify the origins of MCs. PMID:26952986

  1. Nuclear import mechanism for myocardin family members and their correlation with vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Seiji; Hayashi, Ken'ichiro; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Egusa, Hiroshi; Yatani, Hirofumi; Sobue, Kenji

    2010-11-26

    Myocardin (Mycd), which is essential for the differentiation of the smooth muscle cell lineage, is constitutively located in the nucleus, although its family members, myocardin-related transcription factors A and B (MRTF-A/B), mostly reside in the cytoplasm and translocate to the nucleus in response to Rho signaling. The mechanism for their nuclear import is unclear. Here we investigated the mechanism for the nuclear import of Mycd family members and demonstrated any correlation between such mechanism and the phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In cultured VSMCs, the knockdown of importin β1 inhibited the nuclear import of Mycd and MRTF-A/B. Their NH(2)-terminal basic domain was identified as a binding site for importin α/β1 by in vitro analyses. However, Mycd had a higher affinity for importin α/β1 than did MRTF-A/B, even in the absence of G-actin, and Mycd affinity for importin α1/β1 was stronger than for any other importin α/β1 heterodimers. The binding of Mycd to importin α/β1 was insensitive to G-actin, whereas that of MRTF-A/B was differently inhibited by G-actin. In dedifferentiated VSMCs, the levels of importins α1 and β1 were reduced concomitant with down-regulation of Mycd, serum response factor, and smooth muscle cell markers. By contrast, in differentiated VSMCs, their expressions were up-regulated. Thus, the nuclear import of Mycd family members in VSMCs depends on importin α/β1, and their relative affinities for importin α/β1 heterodimers determine Mycd nuclear import. The expression of Mycd nuclear import machineries is related to the expression levels of VSMC phenotype-dependent smooth muscle cell markers.

  2. The role of vascular peroxidase 1 in ox-LDL-induced vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yixin; Xu, Qian; Peng, Haiyang; Liu, Zhaoya; Yang, Tianlun; Yu, Zaixin; Cheng, Guangjie; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Guogang; Shi, Ruizheng

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is associated with the pathogenesis of vascular calcification. Vascular peroxidase 1 (VPO1), a peroxidase in the cardiovascular system, utilizes the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by co-expressed NADPH oxidases to produce hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and catalyze peroxidative reactions. The aim of this study was to determine whether VPO1 plays a role in the osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs in the setting of the vascular calcification induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). In cultured primary rat VSMCs, we observed that the expression of VPO1 was significantly increased in combination with increases in calcification, as demonstrated via increased mineralization, as well as increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expression in ox-LDL-treated cells. Ox-LDL-induced VSMC calcification and Runx2 expression were both inhibited by knockdown of VPO1 using a small interfering RNA or by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Moreover, the knockdown of VPO1 in VSMCs suppressed the production of HOCl and the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK and P38 MAPK. Furthermore, HOCl treatment facilitated the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and P38 MAPK and the expression of Runx2, whereas LY294002 (a specific inhibitor of PI3K), U0126 (a specific inhibitor of ERK1/2) and SB203580 (a specific inhibitor of P38 MAPK) significantly attenuated the HOCl-induced up-regulation of Runx2. Collectively, these results demonstrated that VPO1 promotes ox-LDL-induced VSMC calcification via the VPO1/HOCl/PI3K/AKT, ERK1/2, and P38 MAPK/Runx2 signaling pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cheiradone: a vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nessar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature is associated with physiological (for example wound healing and pathological conditions (tumour development. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF are the major angiogenic regulators. We have identified a natural product (cheiradone isolated from a Euphorbia species which inhibited in vivo and in vitro VEGF- stimulated angiogenesis but had no effect on FGF-2 or EGF activity. Two primary cultures, bovine aortic and human dermal endothelial cells were used in in vitro (proliferation, wound healing, invasion in Matrigel and tube formation and in vivo (the chick chorioallantoic membrane models of angiogenesis in the presence of growth factors and cheiradone. In all cases, the concentration of cheiradone which caused 50% inhibition (IC50 was determined. The effect of cheiradone on the binding of growth factors to their receptors was also investigated. Results Cheiradone inhibited all stages of VEGF-induced angiogenesis with IC50 values in the range 5.20–7.50 μM but did not inhibit FGF-2 or EGF-induced angiogenesis. It also inhibited VEGF binding to VEGF receptor-1 and 2 with IC50 values of 2.9 and 0.61 μM respectively. Conclusion Cheiradone inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis by binding to VEGF receptors -1 and -2 and may be a useful investigative tool to study the specific contribution of VEGF to angiogenesis and may have therapeutic potential.

  4. Cancer Immunosurveillance by Tissue-Resident Innate Lymphoid Cells and Innate-like T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadi, Saïda; Chhangawala, Sagar; Whitlock, Benjamin M; Franklin, Ruth A; Luo, Chong T; Oh, Soyoung A; Toure, Ahmed; Pritykin, Yuri; Huse, Morgan; Leslie, Christina S; Li, Ming O

    2016-01-28

    Malignancy can be suppressed by the immune system in a process termed immunosurveillance. However, to what extent immunosurveillance occurs in spontaneous cancers and the composition of participating cell types remains obscure. Here, we show that cell transformation triggers a tissue-resident lymphocyte response in oncogene-induced murine cancer models. Non-circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes, derived from innate, T cell receptor (TCR)αβ, and TCRγδ lineages, expand in early tumors. Characterized by high expression of NK1.1, CD49a, and CD103, these cells share a gene-expression signature distinct from those of conventional NK cells, T cells, and invariant NKT cells. Generation of these lymphocytes is dependent on the cytokine IL-15, but not the transcription factor Nfil3 that is required for the differentiation of tumor-infiltrating NK cells, and IL-15 deficiency, but not Nfil3 deficiency, results in accelerated tumor growth. These findings reveal a tumor-elicited immunosurveillance mechanism that engages unconventional type-1-like innate lymphoid cells and type 1 innate-like T cells.

  5. Smooth muscle architecture within cell-dense vascular tissues influences functional contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Zaw; Vrla, Geoffrey D; Steucke, Kerianne E; Sevcik, Emily N; Hald, Eric S; Alford, Patrick W

    2014-12-01

    The role of vascular smooth muscle architecture in the function of healthy and dysfunctional vessels is poorly understood. We aimed at determining the relationship between vascular smooth muscle architecture and contractile output using engineered vascular tissues. We utilized microcontact printing and a microfluidic cell seeding technique to provide three different initial seeding conditions, with the aim of influencing the cellular architecture within the tissue. Cells seeded in each condition formed confluent and aligned tissues but within the tissues, the cellular architecture varied. Tissues with a more elongated cellular architecture had significantly elevated basal stress and produced more contractile stress in response to endothelin-1 stimulation. We also found a correlation between the contractile phenotype marker expression and the cellular architecture, contrary to our previous findings in non-confluent tissues. Taken with previous results, these data suggest that within cell-dense vascular tissues, smooth muscle contractility is strongly influenced by cell and tissue architectures.

  6. Embryonic origins of human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for in vitro modeling and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sanjay; Iyer, Dharini; Granata, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) arise from multiple origins during development, raising the possibility that differences in embryological origins between SMCs could contribute to site-specific localization of vascular diseases. In this review, we first examine the developmental pathways and embryological origins of vascular SMCs and then discuss in vitro strategies for deriving SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We then review in detail the potential for vascular disease modeling using iPSC-derived SMCs and consider the pathological implications of heterogeneous embryonic origins. Finally, we touch upon the role of human ESC-derived SMCs in therapeutic revascularization and the challenges remaining before regenerative medicine using ESC- or iPSC-derived cells comes of age.

  7. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  8. Characterisation of K+ Channels in Human Fetoplacental Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Brereton, Melissa F.; Mark Wareing; Rebecca L Jones; Greenwood, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Adequate blood flow through placental chorionic plate resistance arteries (CPAs) is necessary for oxygen and nutrient transfer to the fetus and a successful pregnancy. In non-placental vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), K(+) channels regulate contraction, vascular tone and blood flow. Previous studies showed that K(+) channel modulators alter CPA tone, but did not distinguish between effects on K(+) channels in endothelial cells and SMCs. In this study, we developed a preparation of freshly...

  9. Regulatory T Cell-Enriching Microparticles for Promoting Vascularized Composite Allotransplant Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0244 TITLE: Regulatory T Cell-Enriching Microparticles for Promoting Vascularized Composite Allotransplant Survival...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Regulatory T Cell-Enriching Microparticles for Promoting Vascularized Composite Allotransplant Survival... trauma , sepsis/disease, cancer, and congenital defects. In most cases, current reconstructive strategies are sub-optimal or fail to provide optimal

  10. Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (PECAM-1/CD31): A Multifunctional Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisser, H M; Baldwin, H S; Albelda, S M

    1997-08-01

    PECAM-1/CD31 is a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily found on platelets, leukocytes, and endothelial cells, where it concentrates at cell-cell borders. It has been shown to both mediate cell-cell adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic interactions and to transduce intracellular signals that upregulate the function of integrins on leukocytes. Its cellular distribution and ability to mediate adhesive and signaling phenomena suggested that PECAM-1 was a multifunctional vascular cell adhesion molecule involved in leukocyte-endothelial and endothelial-endothelial interactions. These initial suggestions have been largely confirmed as recent studies have implicated PECAM-1 in the inflammatory process and in the formation of blood vessels. As our understanding of the molecular and functional properties of PECAM-1 grows, new insights will be gained that may have therapeutic implications for cardiovascular development and disease. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:203-210). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  11. Development of cell technologies for design of cell contained vascular grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    И. С. Захарова

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new protocol for production of functional endothelial and mural cells from human cardiac explants has been developed. The endothelial cells are characterized by the presence of mature endothelial markers: CD 31, VE-cadherin and VEGFR2. Functionally they could take up ac-LDL, form tube-like structure in matrigel, contains functional cytoplasmic microvesicles Weibel-Palade bodies, in cytoplasm microvesicles – metabolized form of acetylated low-density lipoprotein, form capillary-like structures in Matrigel and produces extracellular matrix. The smooth muscle cells expressed a specific marker aSMA and produces extracellular matrix. The derived cell populations exhibit functional properties in hindlimb ischemia model. It was shown that the endothelial and the smooth muscle cells retain their specific surface antigens and the ability to produce an extracellular matrix on polycaprolactone and polylactide-co-glycolide surfaces. These cells can be used to develop a vascular tissue-graft.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression in non-small cell lung cancer patients: relation to prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnesen, Barbara; Pappot, Helle; Holmstav, Julie;

    2009-01-01

    elements in neoplastic cells and their microenvironment have recently been and are continuously developed including drugs inhibiting the angiogenic system. Angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) seem to play key...

  13. Reciprocal interactions between endothelial cells and macrophages in angiogenic vascular niches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Caroline; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo [The Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa, E-mail: arispe@mcdb.ucla.edu [The Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology and Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles 90095, CA (United States); De Palma, Michele, E-mail: michele.depalma@epfl.ch [The Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    The ability of macrophages to promote vascular growth has been associated with the secretion and local delivery of classic proangiogenic factors (e.g., VEGF-A and proteases). More recently, a series of studies have also revealed that physical contact of macrophages with growing blood vessels coordinates vascular fusion of emerging sprouts. Interestingly, the interactions between macrophages and vascular endothelial cells (ECs) appear to be bidirectional, such that activated ECs also support the expansion and differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages from myeloid progenitors. Here, we discuss recent findings suggesting that dynamic angiogenic vascular niches might also exist in vivo, e.g. in tumors, where sprouting blood vessels and immature myeloid cells like monocytes engage in heterotypic interactions that are required for angiogenesis. Finally, we provide an account of emerging mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication that rely on secreted microvesicles, such as exosomes, which can offer a vehicle for the rapid exchange of molecules and genetic information between macrophages and ECs engaged in angiogenesis. -- Highlights: • Macrophages promote angiogenesis by secreting proangiogenic factors. • Macrophages modulate angiogenesis via cell-to-cell contacts with endothelial cells. • Endothelial cells promote the differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages. • Macrophages and endothelial cells may cooperate to form angiogenic vascular niches.

  14. Synergistic actions of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in vascularizing bioengineered tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo K Moioli

    Full Text Available Poor angiogenesis is a major road block for tissue repair. The regeneration of virtually all tissues is limited by angiogenesis, given the diffusion of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products is limited to a few hundred micrometers. We postulated that co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells improves angiogenesis of tissue repair and hence the outcome of regeneration. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using bone as a model whose regeneration is impaired unless it is vascularized. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs were isolated from each of three healthy human bone marrow samples and reconstituted in a porous scaffold. MSCs were seeded in micropores of 3D calcium phosphate (CP scaffolds, followed by infusion of gel-suspended CD34(+ hematopoietic cells. Co-transplantation of CD34(+ HSCs and CD34(- MSCs in microporous CP scaffolds subcutaneously in the dorsum of immunocompromised mice yielded vascularized tissue. The average vascular number of co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSC scaffolds was substantially greater than MSC transplantation alone. Human osteocalcin was expressed in the micropores of CP scaffolds and was significantly increased upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Human nuclear staining revealed the engraftment of transplanted human cells in vascular endothelium upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Based on additional in vitro results of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, we adsorbed VEGF with co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSCs in the microporous CP scaffolds in vivo, and discovered that vascular number and diameter further increased, likely owing to the promotion of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by VEGF. Together, co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may improve the regeneration of vascular dependent tissues such as bone

  15. RESIDENT PROGENITOR CARDIAC CELLS IN PATIENTS WITH DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY AND CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Kulikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study content of resident progenitor cardiomyocytes in endomyocardial biopsy samples of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM and heart failure (HF at different disease stages and relate it to patient clinical characteristics.Material and methods. Resident progenitor cardiomyocytes were studied in endomyocardial biopsy samples from 14 patients (age from 26 to 52 years old with DCM and HF by immunofluorescence method. Results were analyzed individually for each patient.Results. Resident progenitor cardiomyocytes expressing simultaneously stem cell markers c-kit, MDR-1 and early cardiomyocyte differentiation markers GATA-4 and Nkx2.5 were found in endomyocardial biopsy samples from patients with DCM and HF. Resident progenitor cardiomyocytes detected by these cell markers were found in all patients at all disease stages.Conclusion. Results show that the myocardial regenerative processes exist at all stages of the disease progression.

  16. RESIDENT PROGENITOR CARDIAC CELLS IN PATIENTS WITH DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY AND CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Kulikova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study content of resident progenitor cardiomyocytes in endomyocardial biopsy samples of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM and heart failure (HF at different disease stages and relate it to patient clinical characteristics.Material and methods. Resident progenitor cardiomyocytes were studied in endomyocardial biopsy samples from 14 patients (age from 26 to 52 years old with DCM and HF by immunofluorescence method. Results were analyzed individually for each patient.Results. Resident progenitor cardiomyocytes expressing simultaneously stem cell markers c-kit, MDR-1 and early cardiomyocyte differentiation markers GATA-4 and Nkx2.5 were found in endomyocardial biopsy samples from patients with DCM and HF. Resident progenitor cardiomyocytes detected by these cell markers were found in all patients at all disease stages.Conclusion. Results show that the myocardial regenerative processes exist at all stages of the disease progression.

  17. Skin-resident T cells sense ultraviolet radiation-induced injury and contribute to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Amanda S; Rudolph, Ross; Corriden, Ross; Ye, Ivan; Garijo, Olivia; Havran, Wendy L

    2014-06-15

    Skin-resident T cells have been shown to play important roles in tissue homeostasis and wound repair, but their role in UV radiation (UVR)-mediated skin injury and subsequent tissue regeneration is less clear. In this study, we demonstrate that acute UVR rapidly activates skin-resident T cells in humans and dendritic epidermal γδ T cells (DETCs) in mice through mechanisms involving the release of ATP from keratinocytes. Following UVR, extracellular ATP leads to an increase in CD69 expression, proliferation, and IL-17 production, and to changes in DETC morphology. Furthermore, we find that the purinergic receptor P2X7 and caspase-1 are necessary for UVR-induced IL-1 production in keratinocytes, which increases IL-17 secretion by DETCs. IL-17, in turn, induces epidermal TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis and growth arrest and DNA damage-associated gene 45, two molecules linked to the DNA repair response. Finally, we demonstrate that DETCs and human skin-resident T cells limit DNA damage in keratinocytes. Taken together, our findings establish a novel role for skin-resident T cells in the UVR-associated DNA repair response and underscore the importance of skin-resident T cells to overall skin regeneration.

  18. Resident macrophages influence stem cell activity in the mammary gland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyorki, D.E.; Asselin-Labat, M.L.; Rooijen, van N.; Lindeman, G.J.; Visvader, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages in the mammary gland are essential for morphogenesis of the ductal epithelial tree and have been implicated in promoting breast tumor metastasis. Although it is well established that macrophages influence normal mammopoiesis, the mammary cell types that these accessory cells

  19. Transmembrane Protein 184A Is a Receptor Required for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Raymond J; Slee, Joshua B; Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Li, Yaqiu; Barthol, Trista; Patton, Walter A; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Vascular cell responses to exogenous heparin have been documented to include decreased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation following decreased ERK pathway signaling. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin interacts with cells to induce those responses has remained unclear. Previously characterized monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to vascular cells have been found to mimic heparin effects. In this study, those antibodies were employed to isolate a heparin binding protein. MALDI mass spectrometry data provide evidence that the protein isolated is transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A). Commercial antibodies against three separate regions of the TMEM184A human protein were used to identify the TMEM184A protein in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. A GFP-TMEM184A construct was employed to determine colocalization with heparin after endocytosis. Knockdown of TMEM184A eliminated the physiological responses to heparin, including effects on ERK pathway activity and BrdU incorporation. Isolated GFP-TMEM184A binds heparin, and overexpression results in additional heparin uptake. Together, these data support the identification of TMEM184A as a heparin receptor in vascular cells.

  20. VE-cadherin interacts with cell polarity protein Pals1 to regulate vascular lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Hartmann, Christian; Kummer, Daniel; Pajonczyk, Denise; Mirzapourshafiyi, Fatemeh; Nakayama, Masanori; Weide, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Blood vessel tubulogenesis requires the formation of stable cell-to-cell contacts and the establishment of apicobasal polarity of vascular endothelial cells. Cell polarity is regulated by highly conserved cell polarity protein complexes such as the Par3-aPKC-Par6 complex and the CRB3-Pals1-PATJ complex, which are expressed by many different cell types and regulate various aspects of cell polarity. Here we describe a functional interaction of VE-cadherin with the cell polarity protein Pals1. Pals1 directly interacts with VE-cadherin through a membrane-proximal motif in the cytoplasmic domain of VE-cadherin. VE-cadherin clusters Pals1 at cell-cell junctions. Mutating the Pals1-binding motif in VE-cadherin abrogates the ability of VE-cadherin to regulate apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. In a similar way, deletion of the Par3-binding motif at the C-terminus of VE-cadherin impairs apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. Our findings indicate that the biological activity of VE-cadherin in regulating endothelial polarity and vascular lumen formation is mediated through its interaction with the two cell polarity proteins Pals1 and Par3.

  1. Deletion of mineralocorticoid receptors in smooth muscle cells blunts renal vascular resistance following acute cyclosporine administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Cristian A.; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Andre-Gregoire, Gwennan; Placier, Sandrine; Van Huyen, Jean-Paul Duong; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Berger, Stefan; Warnock, David G.; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rieu, Philippe; Jaisser, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors such as cyclosporine A (CsA) are still commonly used after renal transplantation, despite CsA–induced nephrotoxicity (CIN), which is partly related to vasoactive mechanisms. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is now recognized as a key player in the control of vascular tone, and both endothelial cell- and vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC)-MR modulate the vasoactive responses to vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. Here we tested whether vascular MR is involved in renal hemodynamic changes induced by CsA. The relative contribution of vascular MR in acute CsA treatment was evaluated using mouse models with targeted deletion of MR in endothelial cell or SMC. Results indicate that MR expressed in SMC, but not in endothelium, contributes to the increase of plasma urea and creatinine, the appearance of isometric tubular vacuolization, and overexpression of a kidney injury biomarker (neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin) after CsA treatment. Inactivation of MR in SMC blunted CsA–induced phosphorylation of contractile proteins. Finally, the in vivo increase of renal vascular resistance induced by CsA was blunted when MR was deleted from SMC cells, and this was associated with decreased L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Thus, our study provides new insights into the role of vascular MR in renal hemodynamics during acute CIN, and provides rationale for clinical studies of MR antagonism to manage the side effects of calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:26422501

  2. Microvesicles from the plasma of elderly subjects and from senescent endothelial cells promote vascular calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodega, Guillermo; Noci, María Victoria; Troyano, Nuria; Bohórquez, Lourdes; Luna, Carlos; Luque, Rafael; Carmona, Andrés; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen in elderly people, though it can also appear in middle-aged subjects affected by premature vascular aging. The aim of this work is to test the involvement of microvesicles (MVs) produced by senescent endothelial cells (EC) and from plasma of elderly people in vascular calcification. The present work shows that MVs produced by senescent cultured ECs, plus those found in the plasma of elderly subjects, promote calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells. Only MVs from senescent ECs, and from elderly subjects' plasma, induced calcification. This ability correlated with these types of MVs' carriage of: a) increased quantities of annexins (which might act as nucleation sites for calcification), b) increased quantities of bone-morphogenic protein, and c) larger Ca contents. The MVs of senescent, cultured ECs, and those present in the plasma of elderly subjects, promote vascular calcification. The present results provide mechanistic insights into the observed increase in vascular calcification-related diseases in the elderly, and in younger patients with premature vascular aging, paving the way towards novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28278131

  3. Isolation and differentiation of stromal vascular cells to beige/brite cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aune, Ulrike Liisberg; Ruiz, Lauren; Kajimura, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipocytes have the ability to uncouple the respiratory chain in mitochondria and dissipate chemical energy as heat. Development of UCP1-positive brown adipocytes in white adipose tissues (so called beige or brite cells) is highly induced by a variety of environmental cues such as chronic...... cold exposure or by PPARγ agonists, therefore, this cell type has potential as a therapeutic target for obesity treatment. Although most immortalized adipocyte lines cannot recapitulate the process of "browning" of white fat in culture, primary adipocytes isolated from stromal vascular fraction...... in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT) provide a reliable cellular system to study the molecular control of beige/brite cell development. Here we describe a protocol for effective isolation of primary preadipocytes and for inducing differentiation to beige/brite cells in culture. The browning effect can...

  4. Iron acquisition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing within myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanmi, Oyebode; Kesavalu, Banurekha; Abdalla, Maher Y; Britigan, Bradley E

    2013-12-01

    The pathophysiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection is linked to the ability of the organism to grow within macrophages. Lung myeloid dendritic cells are a newly recognized reservoir of M.tb during infection. Iron (Fe) acquisition is critical for M.tb growth. In vivo, extracellular Fe is chelated to transferrin (TF) and lactoferrin (LF). We previously reported that M.tb replicating in human monocyte-dervied macrophages (MDM) can acquire Fe bound to TF, LF, and citrate, as well as from the MDM cytoplasm. Access of M.tb to Fe may influence its growth in macrophages and dendritic cells. In the present work we confirmed the ability of different strains of M.tb to grow in human myeloid dendritic cells in vitro. Fe acquired by M.tb replicating within dendritic cells from externally added Fe chelates varied with the Fe chelate present in the external media: Fe-citrate > Fe-LF > Fe-TF. Fe acquisition rates from each chelate did not vary over 7 days. M.tb within dendritic cells also acquired Fe from the dendritic cell cytoplasm, with the efficiency of Fe acquisition greater from cytoplasmic Fe sources, regardless of the initial Fe chelate from which that cytoplasmic Fe was derived. Growth and Fe acquisition results with human MDM were similar to those with dendritic cells. M.tb grow and replicate within myeloid dendritic cells in vitro. Fe metabolism of M.tb growing in either MDM or dendritic cells in vitro is influenced by the nature of Fe available and the organism appears to preferentially access cytoplasmic rather than extracellular Fe sources. Whether these in vitro data extend to in vivo conditions should be examined in future studies.

  5. Cytokine-Induced Cell Surface Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Vascular Endothelial Cells In vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红辉; 刘昌勤; 孙圣刚; 梅元武; 童萼塘

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of the adhesion molecules expression by cytokine in vascular endothelial cells was investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were stimulated with cytokines, TNF-α (1-250 U/ml) or IL-1β (0.1-50 U/ml) for 24 h. HUVEC were also cultured with cytokines, TNF-α (100 U/ml) or IL-1β (10 U/ml), for 4-72 h, cell surface expression of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) were detected and quantitated by immunocytochemical methods and computerized imaging analysis technique. Adhesion molecules expression were up-regulated by TNF-α, IL-1β in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Some significant differences were observed between the effects of cytokines on the ICAM-1 and on VCAM-1 expression. Cytokines might directly induce the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in vascular endothelial cells. Our observations indicate differential functions of the two adhesion molecules during the evolution of inflammatory responses in stroke.

  6. Taurine inhibits osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells via the ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiao-bo; Zhou, Xin-min; Li, Jian-ming; Yang, Jin-fu; Tan, Zhi-ping; Hu, Zhuo-wei; Liu, Wei; Lu, Ying; Yuan, Ling-qing

    2008-05-01

    Vascular calcification develops within atherosclerotic lesions and results from a process similar to osteogenesis. Taurine is a free beta-amino acid and plays an important physiological role in mammals. We have recently demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) express a functional taurine transporter. To evaluate the possible role of taurine in vascular calcification, we assessed its effects on osteoblastic differentiation of VSMCs in vitro. The results showed that taurine inhibited the beta-glycerophosphate-induced osteoblastic differentiation of VSMCs as evidenced by both the decreasing alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity and expression of the core binding factor alpha1 (Cbfalpha1). Taurine also activated the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway. Inhibition of ERK pathway reversed the effect of taurine on ALP activity and Cbfalpha1 expression. These results suggested that taurine inhibited osteoblastic differentiation of vascular cells via the ERK pathway.

  7. Lipoxin A4 inhibits immune cell binding to salivary epithelium and vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthamani, Sreedevi; Odusanwo, Olutayo; Mondal, Nandini; Nelson, Joel; Neelamegham, Sriram; Baker, Olga J

    2012-04-01

    Lipoxins are formed by leukocytes during cell-cell interactions with epithelial or endothelial cells. Native lipoxin A(4) (LXA(4)) binds to the G protein-coupled lipoxin receptors formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2)/ALX and CysLT1. Furthermore, LXA(4) inhibits recruitment of neutrophils, by attenuating chemotaxis, adhesion, and transmigration across vascular endothelial cells. LXA(4) thus appears to serve as an endogenous "stop signal" for immune cell-mediated tissue injury (Serhan CN; Annu Rev Immunol 25: 101-137, 2007). The role of LXA(4) has not been addressed in salivary epithelium, and little is known about its effects on vascular endothelium. Here, we determined that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) receptor activation in vascular endothelium and salivary epithelium upregulated the expression of adhesion molecules that facilitates the binding of immune cells. We hypothesize that the activation of the ALX/FPR2 and/or CysLT1 receptors by LXA(4) decreases this cytokine-mediated upregulation of cell adhesion molecules that enhance lymphocyte binding to both the vascular endothelium and salivary epithelium. In agreement with this hypothesis, we observed that nanomolar concentrations of LXA(4) blocked IL-1β- and TNF-α-mediated upregulation of E-selectin and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Binding of Jurkat cells to stimulated HUVECs was abrogated by LXA(4). Furthermore, LXA(4) preincubation with human submandibular gland cell line (HSG) also blocked TNF-α-mediated upregulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in these cells, and it reduced lymphocyte adhesion. These findings suggest that ALX/FPR2 and/or CysLT1 receptor activation in endothelial and epithelial cells blocks cytokine-induced adhesion molecule expression and consequent binding of lymphocytes, a critical event in the pathogenesis of Sjögren's syndrome (SS).

  8. Differential Gene Expression of Primary Cultured Lymphatic and Blood Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M. Nelson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs and the developmentally related lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs create complementary, yet distinct vascular networks. Each endothelial cell type interacts with flowing fluid and circulating cells, yet each vascular system has evolved specialized gene expression programs and thus both cell types display different phenotypes. BECs and LECs express distinct genes that are unique to their specific vascular microenvironment. Tumors also take advantage of the molecules that are expressed in these vascular systems to enhance their metastatic potential. We completed transcriptome analyses on primary cultured LECs and BECs, where each comparative set was isolated from the same individual. Differences were resolved in the expression of several major categories, such as cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, cytokines, cytokine receptors. We have identified new molecules that are associated with BECs (e.g., claudin-9, CXCL11, neurexin-1, neurexin-2, the neuronal growth factor regulator-1 and LECs (e.g., claudin-7, CD58, hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 1 (HAPLN1, the poliovirus receptor-related 3 molecule that may lead to novel therapeutic treatments for diseases of lymphatic or blood vessels, including metastasis of cancer to lymph nodes or distant organs.

  9. Incorporation of bone marrow cells in pancreatic pseudoislets improves posttransplant vascularization and endocrine function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Wittig

    Full Text Available Failure of revascularization is known to be the major reason for the poor outcome of pancreatic islet transplantation. In this study, we analyzed whether pseudoislets composed of islet cells and bone marrow cells can improve vascularization and function of islet transplants. Pancreatic islets isolated from Syrian golden hamsters were dispersed into single cells for the generation of pseudoislets containing 4×10(3 cells. To create bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets 2×10(3 islet cells were co-cultured with 2×10(3 bone marrow cells. Pseudoislets and bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets were transplanted syngeneically into skinfold chambers to study graft vascularization by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Native islet transplants served as controls. Bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets showed a significantly improved vascularization compared to native islets and pseudoislets. Moreover, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets but not pseudoislets normalized blood glucose levels after transplantation of 1000 islet equivalents under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals, although the bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets contained only 50% of islet cells compared to pseudoislets and native islets. Fluorescence microscopy of bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets composed of bone marrow cells from GFP-expressing mice showed a distinct fraction of cells expressing both GFP and insulin, indicating a differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells to an insulin-producing cell-type. Thus, enrichment of pseudoislets by bone marrow cells enhances vascularization after transplantation and increases the amount of insulin-producing tissue. Accordingly, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets may represent a novel approach to increase the success rate of islet transplantation.

  10. Transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to smooth muscle cells play an important role in vascular remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Musri, Melina Mara; Ivo, Victor; Barberà, Joan Albert; Tura-Ceide, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary artery remodelling it is a major feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is characterised by cellular and structural changes of the pulmonary arteries causing higher pulmonar vascular resistance and right ventricular failure. Abnormal deposition of smooth muscle-like (SM-like) cells in normally non-muscular, small diameter vessels and a deregulated control of endothelial cells are considered pathological features of PH. The origin of the SM-like cells and the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this remodelling process are not understood. Endothelial cells within the intima may migrate from their organised layer of cells and transition to mesenchymal or SM-like phenotype in a process called endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Traditionally, Waddington’s epigenetic landscape illustrates that fates of somatic cells are progressively determined to compulsorily follow a downhill differentiation pathway. EnMT induces the transformation of cells with stem cell traits, therefore contrasting Waddington’s theory and confirming that cell fate seems to be far more flexible than previously thought. The prospect of therapeutic inhibition of EnMT to delay or prevent PH may represent a promising new treatment modality. PMID:25973327

  11. Transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to smooth muscle cells play an important role in vascular remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Musri, Melina Mara; Ivo, Victor; Barberà, Joan Albert; Tura-Ceide, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary artery remodelling it is a major feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is characterised by cellular and structural changes of the pulmonary arteries causing higher pulmonar vascular resistance and right ventricular failure. Abnormal deposition of smooth muscle-like (SM-like) cells in normally non-muscular, small diameter vessels and a deregulated control of endothelial cells are considered pathological features of PH. The origin of the SM-like cells and the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this remodelling process are not understood. Endothelial cells within the intima may migrate from their organised layer of cells and transition to mesenchymal or SM-like phenotype in a process called endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Traditionally, Waddington's epigenetic landscape illustrates that fates of somatic cells are progressively determined to compulsorily follow a downhill differentiation pathway. EnMT induces the transformation of cells with stem cell traits, therefore contrasting Waddington's theory and confirming that cell fate seems to be far more flexible than previously thought. The prospect of therapeutic inhibition of EnMT to delay or prevent PH may represent a promising new treatment modality.

  12. An altered endometrial CD8 tissue resident memory T cell population in recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southcombe, J H; Mounce, G; McGee, K; Elghajiji, A; Brosens, J; Quenby, S; Child, T; Granne, I

    2017-01-23

    When trying to conceive 1% of couples have recurrent miscarriages, defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses. This is not accounted for by the known incidence of chromosomal aneuploidy in miscarriage, and it has been suggested that there is an immunological aetiology. The endometrial mucosa is populated by a variety of immune cells which in addition to providing host pathogen immunity must facilitate pregnancy. Here we characterise the endometrial CD8-T cell population during the embryonic window of implantation and find that the majority of cells are tissue resident memory T cells with high levels of CD69 and CD103 expression, proteins that prevent cells egress. We demonstrate that unexplained recurrent miscarriage is associated with significantly decreased expression of the T-cell co-receptor CD8 and tissue residency marker CD69. These cells differ from those found in control women, with less expression of CD127 indicating a lack of homeostatic cell control through IL-7 signalling. Nevertheless this population is resident in the endometrium of women who have RM, more than three months after the last miscarriage, indicating that the memory CD8-T cell population is altered in RM patients. This is the first evidence of a differing pre-pregnancy phenotype in endometrial immune cells in RM.

  13. Sphingosine induces phospholipase D and mitogen activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, M M; Abd-Elfattah, A S; Sholley, M M

    1998-12-01

    The enzymes phospholipase D and diacylglycerol kinase generate phosphatidic acid which is considered to be a mitogen. Here we report that sphingosine produced a significant amount of phosphatidic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59 949 partially depressed sphingosine induced phosphatidic acid formation, suggesting that activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid produced and that additional pathways such as phospholipase D may contribute to this. Further, we have shown that phosphatidylethanol was produced by sphingosine when vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated in the presence of ethanol. Finally, as previously shown for other cell types, sphingosine stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  14. PRIMING EFFECT OF HOMOCYSTEINE ON INDUCIBLE VASCULAR CELL ADHESION MOLECULE-1 EXPRESSION IN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguin, Chantal; Abid, Md. Ruhul; Spokes, Katherine C.; Schoots, Ivo G; Brkovic, Alexandre; Sirois, Martin G.; Aird, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis, as well as for arterial and venous thrombosis. However, the mechanisms through which elevated circulating levels of homocysteine cause vascular injury and promote thrombosis remain unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that homocysteine (Hcy) sensitizes endothelial cells to the effect of inflammatory mediators. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were incubated with Hcy 1.0 mM for varying time points, and then treated in the absence or presence of 1.5 U/ml thrombin or 10 ng/ml lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Hcy alone had no effect on the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. However, Hcy enhanced thrombin- and LPS-mediated induction of VCAM-1 mRNA and protein levels. Consistent with these results, pretreatment of HUVEC with Hcy resulted in a two-fold increase in LSP-mediated induction of leukocyte adhesion. The latter effect was significantly inhibited by anti-VCAM-1 antibodies. Together, these findings suggest that Hcy sensitizes HUVEC to the effect of inflammatory mediators thrombin and LPS, at least in part through VCAM-1 expression and function. PMID:18406566

  15. Tissue-resident natural killer (NK) cells are cell lineages distinct from thymic and conventional splenic NK cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Yang, Liping; Pak-Wittel, Melissa A; Artyomov, Maxim N; Ivanova, Yulia; Zhong, Chao; Chase, Julie M; Rothman, Paul B; Yu, Jenny; Riley, Joan K; Zhu, Jinfang; Tian, Zhigang; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system; they can control virus infections and developing tumors by cytotoxicity and producing inflammatory cytokines. Most studies of mouse NK cells, however, have focused on conventional NK (cNK) cells in the spleen. Recently, we described two populations of liver NK cells, tissue-resident NK (trNK) cells and those resembling splenic cNK cells. However, their lineage relationship was unclear; trNK cells could be developing cNK cells, related to thymic NK cells, or a lineage distinct from both cNK and thymic NK cells. Herein we used detailed transcriptomic, flow cytometric, and functional analysis and transcription factor-deficient mice to determine that liver trNK cells form a distinct lineage from cNK and thymic NK cells. Taken together with analysis of trNK cells in other tissues, there are at least four distinct lineages of NK cells: cNK, thymic, liver (and skin) trNK, and uterine trNK cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01659.001 PMID:24714492

  16. Vascular Repair by Circumferential Cell Therapy Using Magnetic Nanoparticles and Tailored Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosen, Sarah; Rieck, Sarah; Heidsieck, Alexandra; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Zimmermann, Katrin; Bloch, Wilhelm; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Plank, Christian; Gleich, Bernhard; Pfeifer, Alexander; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Wenzel, Daniela

    2016-01-26

    Cardiovascular disease is often caused by endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and atherosclerotic plaque formation at predilection sites. Also surgical procedures of plaque removal cause irreversible damage to the EC layer, inducing impairment of vascular function and restenosis. In the current study we have examined a potentially curative approach by radially symmetric re-endothelialization of vessels after their mechanical denudation. For this purpose a combination of nanotechnology with gene and cell therapy was applied to site-specifically re-endothelialize and restore vascular function. We have used complexes of lentiviral vectors and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to overexpress the vasoprotective gene endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in ECs. The MNP-loaded and eNOS-overexpressing cells were magnetic, and by magnetic fields they could be positioned at the vascular wall in a radially symmetric fashion even under flow conditions. We demonstrate that the treated vessels displayed enhanced eNOS expression and activity. Moreover, isometric force measurements revealed that EC replacement with eNOS-overexpressing cells restored endothelial function after vascular injury in eNOS(-/-) mice ex and in vivo. Thus, the combination of MNP-based gene and cell therapy with custom-made magnetic fields enables circumferential re-endothelialization of vessels and improvement of vascular function.

  17. Statins inhibited erythropoietin-induced proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Tae; Tsuruoka, Shuichi; Fujimura, Akio

    2010-12-15

    Erythropoietin (EPO) directly stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, and this is believed to be one of the mechanisms of vascular access failure of hemodialysis patients. However, precise mechanisms of the EPO-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells are not certain. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are primarily used to reduce cholesterol levels, but also exert other effects, including reno-protective effects. We evaluated the effect of several statins with various hydrophilicities on the EPO-induced proliferation of primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. EPO significantly and concentration-dependently increased DNA synthesis as assessed by [³H]thymidine incorporation, cell proliferation as assessed by WST-1 assay, and activation of the p44/42MAPK pathway. Therapeutic doses of statins (pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin and fluvastatin) in patients with hypercholesterolemia almost completely suppressed all of the EPO-induced effects in a concentration-dependent manner. Co-addition of mevalonic acid almost completely reversed the effects of statins. Statin alone did not affect the basal proliferation capacity of the cells. The effects were almost similar among the statins. We concluded that statins inhibited EPO-induced proliferation in rat VSMCs at least partly through their inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase activity. In the future, statins might prove useful for the treatment of EPO-induced hyperplasia of vascular access. Because the statins all showed comparable effects irrespective of their hydrophilicities, these effects might be a class effect.

  18. Augmented vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion when hypertension is superimposed on aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgel, Nancy L; Sun, Zhe; Hong, Zhongkui; Hunter, William C; Hill, Michael A; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F; Meininger, Gerald A

    2015-02-01

    Hypertension and aging are both recognized to increase aortic stiffness, but their interactions are not completely understood. Most previous studies have attributed increased aortic stiffness to changes in extracellular matrix proteins that alter the mechanical properties of the vascular wall. Alternatively, we hypothesized that a significant component of increased vascular stiffness in hypertension is due to changes in the mechanical and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells, and that aging would augment the contribution from vascular smooth muscle cells when compared with the extracellular matrix. Accordingly, we studied aortic stiffness in young (16-week-old) and old (64-week-old) spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto wild-type controls. Systolic and pulse pressures were significantly increased in young spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with young Wistar-Kyoto rats, and these continued to rise in old spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with age-matched controls. Excised aortic ring segments exhibited significantly greater elastic moduli in both young and old spontaneously hypertensive rats versus Wistar-Kyoto rats. were isolated from the thoracic aorta, and stiffness and adhesion to fibronectin were measured by atomic force microscopy. Hypertension increased both vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion, and these increases were both augmented with aging. By contrast, hypertension did not affect histological measures of aortic collagen and elastin, which were predominantly changed by aging. These findings support the concept that stiffness and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells are novel mechanisms contributing to the increased aortic stiffness occurring with hypertension superimposed on aging.

  19. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  20. Carbon black nanoparticles and vascular dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells and artery segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Lise K; Mikkelsen, Lone; Folkmann, Janne K

    2012-01-01

    surface expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVECs at 100µg/ml. CB exposure was also associated with increased reactive oxygen species production and damage to the cell membranes in the form of increased lactate dehydrogenase leakage...

  1. RNA interference inhibits expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Chun-mei; SUN Bao-chen; LIU Xu-yang; WANG Jin-jin; LI Jun-fa; HAN Song; WANG Ning-li; LU Qing-jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a major cause of vision loss, is the result of the increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. It is important to inhibit the expression of VEGF protein in RPE cells.

  2. Bone morphogenetic proteins regulate osteoprotegerin and its ligands in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kirsten Quyen Nguyen; Olesen, Ping; Ledet, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    in the transformation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (HVSMC) to osteoblast-like cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of BMP-2, BMP-7 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1) on the secretion and mRNA expression of OPG and its ligands receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappabeta ligand (RANKL...

  3. Vascular smooth muscle cells for use in vascular tissue engineering obtained by endothelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EnMT) on collagen matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenning, Guido; Moonen, Jan-Renier A. J.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of the endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) has led to an intensive research effort into progenitor cell-based tissue engineering of (small-diameter) blood vessels. Herein, EPC are differentiated to vascular endothelial cells and serve as the inner lining of bioartificial vessels. As yet,

  4. Lymphoid organ-resident dendritic cells exhibit unique transcriptional fingerprints based on subset and site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutlu G Elpek

    Full Text Available Lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets are thought to play unique roles in determining the fate of T cell responses. Recent studies focusing on a single lymphoid organ identified molecular pathways that are differentially operative in each DC subset and led to the assumption that a given DC subset would more or less exhibit the same genomic and functional profiles throughout the body. Whether the local milieu in different anatomical sites can also influence the transcriptome of DC subsets has remained largely unexplored. Here, we interrogated the transcriptional relationships between lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets from spleen, gut- and skin-draining lymph nodes, and thymus of C57BL/6 mice. For this purpose, major resident DC subsets including CD4 and CD8 DCs were sorted at high purity and gene expression profiles were compared using microarray analysis. This investigation revealed that lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets exhibit divergent genomic programs across lymphoid organs. Interestingly, we also found that transcriptional and biochemical properties of a given DC subset can differ between lymphoid organs for lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets, but not plasmacytoid DCs, suggesting that determinants of the tissue milieu program resident DCs for essential site-specific functions.

  5. Secretion of interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor by spindle cell sarcoma complicating Castleman's disease (so-called 'vascular neoplasia').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, Chihiro; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Hitoshi; Katano, Harutaka; Ishiko, Tositaka; Mukai, Hiroyuki; Kogi, Mieko; Kasuga, Naoki; Takeuchi, Kengo; Yamane, Kenichi; Fukayama, Masashi; Mori, Shigeo

    2002-06-01

    So-called 'vascular neoplasia' (VN) is a rare tumour of unknown origin that complicates hyaline vascular type Castleman's disease (CD). This paper reports a case of VN complicating CD of hyaline vascular type, in which neoplastic cells were shown to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this case, VN first occurred in the retroperitoneum of a 60-year-old male. The lesion showed typical morphology, with three distinct areas: (1) a lymph node-like area with regressively transformed lymph follicles showing hyaline vascular changes and with a hypervascular interfollicular region filled with slit-like vascular channels; (2) an area composed of spindle cell sarcoma; and (3) an area showing angiolipomatous hamartoma. A proportion of the cells in the spindle cell area showed severe pleomorphism. Subcutaneous recurrence after 8 months was composed purely of pleomorphic spindle cells. A karyotypic analysis of the recurrent tumour showed 47, XXY with some instability. Supernatant from primary culture contained high levels of IL-6 and VEGF, suggesting high secretion of these cytokines from neoplastic cells. Immunohistochemically, p53 overexpression was identified only in the pleomorphic spindle cells of the primary lesion and metastatic tumour. No features suggestive of vascular origin were shown on immunohistochemical or electron microscopic analysis of the neoplastic cells. Human herpesvirus type 8 was not detected by immunohistochemistry or PCR analysis. High levels of IL-6 and/or VEGF have been reported to play a role in CD. This is the first case report that clarifies the site of such cytokine production, showing the possibility of CD as a paraneoplastic phenomenon.

  6. The Potential for Resident Lung Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Promote Functional Tissue Regeneration: Understanding Microenvironmental Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Majka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are important regulators of tissue repair or regeneration, fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor formation. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC are currently being considered and tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in patients with such inflammatory lung diseases including, but not limited to, chronic lung disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, pulmonary fibrosis (PF, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD/emphysema and asthma. However, our current understanding of tissue resident lung MSCs remains limited. This review addresses how environmental cues impact on the phenotype and function of this endogenous stem cell pool. In addition, it examines how these local factors influence the efficacy of cell-based treatments for lung diseases.

  7. The potential for resident lung mesenchymal stem cells to promote functional tissue regeneration: understanding microenvironmental cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foronjy, Robert F; Majka, Susan M

    2012-12-01

    Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important regulators of tissue repair or regeneration, fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor formation. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are currently being considered and tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in patients with such inflammatory lung diseases including, but not limited to, chronic lung disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary fibrosis (PF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema and asthma. However, our current understanding of tissue resident lung MSCs remains limited. This review addresses how environmental cues impact on the phenotype and function of this endogenous stem cell pool. In addition, it examines how these local factors influence the efficacy of cell-based treatments for lung diseases.

  8. Azelnidipine inhibits Msx2-dependent osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takehisa; Tanaka, Toru; Iso, Tatsuya; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active and regulated process that is similar to bone formation. While calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have been shown to improve outcomes in atherosclerotic vascular disease, it remains unknown whether CCBs have an effect on the process of vascular calcification. Here we investigated whether CCBs inhibit osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by Msx2, a key factor of vascular calcification. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) were transduced with adenovirus expressing MSX2 and were treated with 3 distinct CCBs. Azelnidipine, a dihydropyridine subclass of CCBs, significantly decreased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of Msx2-overexpressed HASMCs, whereas verapamil and diltiazem had no effect. Furthermore, azelnidipine, but not verapamil and diltiazem, significantly decreased matrix mineralization of Msx2-overexpressing HASMCs. Azelnidipine significantly attenuated the induction of ALP gene expression by Msx2, a key transcription factor in osteogenesis, while it did not reduce enzymatic activity of ALP. Furthermore, azelnidipine inhibited the ability of Msx2 to activate the ALP gene, but had no effect on Notch-induced Msx2 expression. Given that L-type calcium channels are equally blocked by these CCBs, our results suggest that azelnidipine inhibits the Msx2-dependent process of vascular calcification by mechanisms other than inhibition of calcium channel activity.

  9. Construction of a fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to direction vascular cell fate and promotion hemocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Changrong; Wang, Yan; Su, Hong; Yang, Ping; Huang, Nan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials Technology of Ministry of Education, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Maitz, Manfred F. [Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials Dresden, Dresden 01069 (Germany); Zhao, Anshan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials Technology of Ministry of Education, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Surface biofunctional modification of cardiovascular stents is a versatile approach to reduce the adverse effects after implantation. In this work, a novel multifunctional coating was fabricated by coimmobilization of the sulfated polysaccharide of brown algae fucoidan and laminin to biomimic the vascular intimal conditions in order to support rapid endothelialization, prevent restenosis and improve hemocompatibility. The surface properties of the coating such as hydrophilicity, bonding density of biomolecules and stability were evaluated and optimized. According to the biocompatibility tests, the fucoidan/laminin multilayer coated surface displayed less platelet adhesion with favorable anticoagulant property. In addition, the fucoidan/laminin complex showed function to selectively regulate vascular cells growth behavior. The proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) on the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. For the smooth muscle cells (SMCs), inhibitory effects on cell adhesion and proliferation were observed. In conclusion, the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was successfully fabricated with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization properties which show a promising application in the vascular devices such as vascular stents or grafts surface modification. - Highlights: • Construction of fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to biomimic the basement membrane of vascular • The fucoidan/laminin complex demonstrates anti-coagulation property. • The fucoidan/laminin complex can selectively regulate EC and SMC growth behavior to prevent restenosis.

  10. Deregulation of Flk-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in fibroblast growth factor receptor-1-deficient vascular stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Peetra; Rolny, Charlotte; Jakobsson, Lars; Wikner, Charlotte; Wu, Yan; Hicklin, Daniel J; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2004-03-15

    We have employed embryoid bodies derived from murine embryonal stem cells to study effects on vascular development induced by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and FGF receptor-1, in comparison to the established angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and its receptor VEGF receptor-2. Exogenous FGF-2 promoted formation of morphologically distinct, long slender vessels in the embryoid bodies, whereas VEGF-A-treated bodies displayed a compact plexus of capillaries. FGF-2 stimulation of embryonal stem cells under conditions where VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 function was blocked, led to formation of endothelial cell clusters, which failed to develop into vessels. FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies responded to VEGF-A by establishment of the characteristic vascular plexus, but FGF-2 had no effect on vascular development in the absence of FGFR-1. The FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies displayed considerably increased basal level of vessel formation, detected by immunohistochemical staining for platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)/CD31. This basal vascularization was blocked by neutralizing antibodies against VEGFR-2 or VEGF-A and biochemical analyses indicated changes in regulation of VEGFR-2 in the absence of FGFR-1 expression. We conclude that VEGF-A/VEGFR-2-dependent vessel formation occurs in the absence of FGF-2/FGFR-1, which, however, serve to modulate vascular development.

  11. Human progenitor cell recruitment via SDF-1α coacervate-laden PGS vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kee-Won; Johnson, Noah R; Gao, Jin; Wang, Yadong

    2013-12-01

    Host cell recruitment is crucial for vascular graft remodeling and integration into the native blood vessel; it is especially important for cell-free strategies which rely on host remodeling. Controlled release of growth factors from vascular grafts may enhance host cell recruitment. Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α has been shown to induce host progenitor cell migration and recruitment; however, its potential in regenerative therapies is often limited due to its short half-life in vivo. This report describes a coacervate drug delivery system for enhancing progenitor cell recruitment into an elastomeric vascular graft by conferring protection of SDF-1α. Heparin and a synthetic polycation are used to form a coacervate, which is incorporated into poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) scaffolds. In addition to protecting SDF-1α, the coacervate facilitates uniform scaffold coating. Coacervate-laden scaffolds have high SDF-1α loading efficiency and provide sustained release under static and physiologically-relevant flow conditions with minimal initial burst release. In vitro assays showed that coacervate-laden scaffolds enhance migration and infiltration of human endothelial and mesenchymal progenitor cells by maintaining a stable SDF-1α gradient. These results suggest that SDF-1α coacervate-laden scaffolds show great promise for in situ vascular regeneration.

  12. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma.

  13. Epicardial Origin of Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Adult Mammalian Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naisana S. Asli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian heart has added a vital dimension to the field of cardiac regeneration. Cardiac-resident stem cells are likely sequestered as reserve cells within myocardial niches during the course of embryonic cardiogenesis, although they may also be recruited from external sources, such as bone marrow. As we begin to understand the nature of cardiac-resident stem and progenitor cells using a variety of approaches, it is evident that they possess an identity embedded within their gene regulatory networks that favours cardiovascular lineage potential. In addition to contributing lineage descendants, cardiac stem cells may also be stress sensors, offering trophic cues to other cell types, including cardiomyocytes and vasculature cells, and likely other stem cells and immune cells, during adaptation and repair. This presents numerous possibilities for endogenous cardiac stem and progenitor cells to be used in cell therapies or as targets in heart rejuvenation. In this review, we focus on the epicardium as an endogenous source of multi-potential mesenchymal progenitor cells in development and as a latent source of such progenitors in the adult. We track the origin and plasticity of the epicardium in embryos and adults in both homeostasis and disease. In this context, we ask whether directed activation of epicardium-derived progenitor cells might have therapeutic application.

  14. Tissue-resident adult stem cell populations of rapidly self-renewing organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Bartfeld, S.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine, stomach, and skin is continuously exposed to environmental assault, imposing a requirement for regular self-renewal. Resident adult stem cell populations drive this renewal, and much effort has been invested in revealing their identity. Reliable adult stem

  15. Tissue-resident adult stem cell populations of rapidly self-renewing organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Bartfeld, S.; Clevers, H.

    2010-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine, stomach, and skin is continuously exposed to environmental assault, imposing a requirement for regular self-renewal. Resident adult stem cell populations drive this renewal, and much effort has been invested in revealing their identity. Reliable adult stem cel

  16. Role of Cell-Cell bond for the viability and the function of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC viability and homeostasis is regulated by cell-matrix and cell-cell contact: disruption of these interactions are responsible of a switch from a mature to a high proliferative phenotype. VSMCs migration, rate of growth and apoptosis, and the extent of their extracellular matrix (ECM deposition can be also modulated by proatherogenic peptides. Among them, ATII induces the transactivation of IGF I R, which, together with the binding protein IGFBP3, represents a determinant of cell survival, growth and proliferation. Aim of our in vitro study was to verify the role of elective cell-cell bond in moulating the response to ATII. Thus, we evaluated viability, proliferation, IGFIR, IGFBP3 expression and the long term survival and production of ECM in a provisional tissue. A7r5 cell-line was used in adherent cultures or incubated in agarose-coated culture plates to inhibit cell-matrix interactions. Cells, treated or not with ATII 100 nM, were evaluated for apoptosis rate, cell cycle, IGFIR and IGFBP3 protei expression. Fibrin provisional tissue was developed polymerizing a fibrin solution. cantaining A7r5 cells with thrombin. Histological stainings for ECM components were performed on sections of prvisional tissue. An exclusive cell-cell contact resulted to monolayer cell cultures. ATII did not affect the cell survival in both culture conditions, but promoted a 10% decrease in "S" phase and an increases IGFIR expression only in adherent cells. while suspended cell aggregates were resistant to ATII administration; IGFBP3 was reduced both in ATII treated adherent cells and in floating clustered cells, irrespective of the treatmentn. VSMC conditioning in agarose-coated plates before seeding in fibrin provisional matrix reduced, but not abolished, the cell ability to colonize the clot and to produce ECM. This study demonstrates that the elective cell-cell contact induces a quiescent status in cells lacking of cell

  17. Quantification of stromal vascular cell mechanics with a linear cell monolayer rheometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkins, Claire M., E-mail: cma9@stanford.edu; Fuller, Gerald G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Shen, Wen-Jun; Khor, Victor K.; Kraemer, Fredric B. [Division of Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Over the past few decades researchers have developed a variety of methods for measuring the mechanical properties of whole cells, including traction force microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single-cell tensile testing. Though each of these techniques provides insight into cell mechanics, most also involve some nonideal conditions for acquiring live cell data, such as probing only one portion of a cell at a time, or placing the cell in a nonrepresentative geometry during testing. In the present work, we describe the development of a linear cell monolayer rheometer (LCMR) and its application to measure the mechanics of a live, confluent monolayer of stromal vascular cells. In the LCMR, a monolayer of cells is contacted on both top and bottom by two collagen-coated plates and allowed to adhere. The top plate then shears the monolayer by stepping forward to induce a predetermined step strain, while a force transducer attached to the top plate collects stress information. The stress and strain data are then used to determine the maximum relaxation modulus recorded after step-strain, G{sub r}{sup 0}, referred to as the zero-time relaxation modulus of the cell monolayer. The present study validates the ability of the LCMR to quantify cell mechanics by measuring the change in G{sub r}{sup 0} of a confluent cell monolayer upon the selective inhibition of three major cytoskeletal components (actin microfilaments, vimentin intermediate filaments, and microtubules). The LCMR results indicate that both actin- and vimentin-deficient cells had ∼50% lower G{sub r}{sup 0} values than wild-type, whereas tubulin deficiency resulted in ∼100% higher G{sub r}{sup 0} values. These findings constitute the first use of a cell monolayer rheometer to quantitatively distinguish the roles of different cytoskeletal elements in maintaining cell stiffness and structure. Significantly, they are consistent with results obtained using single-cell mechanical testing methods

  18. Degradable poly(apigenin) polymer inhibits tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David B; Gray, Lindsay N; Anderson, Kimberly W; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2016-10-01

    Cancer and the inflammatory system share a complex intertwined relationship. For instance, in response to an injury or stress, vascular endothelial cells will express cell adhesion molecules as a means of recruiting leukocytes. However, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been shown to highjack this expression for the adhesion and invasion during the metastatic cascade. As such, the initiation of endothelial cell inflammation, either by surgical procedures (cancer resection) or chemotherapy can inadvertently increase the metastatic potential of CTCs. Yet, systemic delivery of anti-inflammatories, which weaken the entire immune system, may not be preferred in some treatment settings. In this work, we demonstrate that a long-term releasing flavone-based polymer and subsequent nanoparticle delivery system can inhibit tumor cell adhesion, through the suppression of endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression. The degradation of a this anti-inflammatory polymer provides longer term, localized release profile of active therapeutic drug in nanoparticle form as compared with that of the free drug, permitting more targeted anti-metastatic therapies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1438-1447, 2016.

  19. Efficient engineering of vascularized ectopic bone from human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domev, Hagit; Amit, Michal; Laevsky, Ilana; Dar, Ayelet; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can be derived from various adult and fetal tissues. However, the quality of tissues for the isolation of adult and fetal hMSCs is donor dependent with a nonreproducible yield. In addition, tissue engineering and cell therapy require large-scale production of a pure population of lineage-restricted stem cells that can be easily induced to differentiate into a specific cell type. Therefore, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can provide an alternative, plentiful source for generation of reproducible hMSCs. We have developed efficient differentiation protocols for derivation of hMSCs from hESCs, including coculture with murine OP9 stromal cells and feeder layer-free system. Our protocols have resulted in the generation of up to 49% of hMSCs, which expressed CD105, CD90, CD29, and CD44. The hMSCs exhibited high adipogenic, chondrocytic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The latter correlated with osteocalcin secretion and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production by the differentiating hMSCs. hMSC-derived osteoblasts further differentiated and formed ectopic bone in vivo, and induced the formation of blood vessels in Matrigel implants. Our protocol enables generation of a purified population of hESC-derived MSCs, with the potential of differentiating into several mesodermal lineages, and particularly into vasculogenesis-inducing osteoblasts, which can contribute to the development of bone repair protocols.

  20. Integrin mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) in renal vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, W L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Yip, K P

    2001-01-01

    Peptides with the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif induce vasoconstriction in rat afferent arterioles by increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This finding suggests that occupancy of integrins on the plasma membrane of VSMC might affect...... vascular tone. The purpose of this study was to determine whether occupancy of integrins by exogenous RGD peptides initiates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in cultured renal VSMC. When smooth muscle cells were exposed to 0.1 mM hexapeptide GRGDSP, [Ca(2+)](i) rapidly increased from 91 +/- 4 to 287 +/- 37 n...

  1. Mast Cells and Histamine: Do They Influence Placental Vascular Network and Development in Preeclampsia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Szewczyk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological course of pregnancy is closely related to adequate development of the placenta. Shallow invasion of trophoblast as well as decreased development of the placental vascular network are both common features of preeclampsia. To better understand the proangiogenic features of mast cells, in this study we aim to identify the potential relationship between the distribution of mast cells within the placenta and vascular network development. Material and Methods. Placentas from preeclampsia-complicated pregnancies (=11 and from physiological pregnancies (=11 were acquired after cesarean section. The concentration of histamine was measured, and immunohistochemical staining for mast cell tryptase was performed. Morphometric analysis was then performed. Results. We noticed significant differences between the examined groups. Notably, in the preeclampsia group compared to the control group, we observed a higher mean histamine concentration, higher mast cell density (MCD, lower mean mast cell (MMCA and lower vascular/extravascular (V/EVT index. In physiological pregnancies, a positive correlation was observed between the histamine concentration and V/VEVT index as well as MCD and the V/VEVT index. In contrast, a negative correlation was observed between MMCA and the V/EVT index in physiological pregnancies. Conclusions. Based on the data from our study, we suggest that a differential distribution of mast cells and corresponding changes in the concentration of histamine are involved in the defective placental vascularization seen in preeclamptic placentas.

  2. Replication of the resident Marek's Disease virus genome in synchronized nonproducer MKT-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, R Y; Nonoyama, M

    1980-02-01

    MKT-1, a virus nonproducer lymphoblastoid cell line established from a Marek's disease tumor, was synchronized by double thymidine block to determine the sequence of events in the synthesis of cellular and latent marek's disease virus DNA. Cellular DNA synthesis was measured by incorporation of [3H]thymidine, whereas viral DNA synthesis was determined by DNA-DNA reassociation kinetics. The results of these studies indicate that the resident Marek's disease viral DNA in MKT-1 cells replicates during the early S phase of the cell cycle, before the onset of active cellular DNA synthesis. This observation is similar to that seen in the replication of resident Epstein-Barr virus DNA in synchronized Raji cells.

  3. Intragraft vascular occlusive sickle crisis with early renal allograft loss in occult sickle cell trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lisa; Garfinkel, Marc R; Chang, Anthony; Kadambi, Pradeep V; Meehan, Shane M

    2011-07-01

    Early renal allograft failure due to sickle cell trait is rare. We present clinical and pathologic findings in 2 cases of early renal allograft failure associated with renal vein thrombosis and extensive erythrocyte sickling. Hemoglobin AS was identified in retrospect. In case 1, a 41-year-old female recipient of a deceased donor renal transplant developed abdominal pain and acute allograft failure on day 16, necessitating immediate nephrectomy. In case 2, the transplanted kidney in a 58-year-old female recipient was noted to be mottled blue within minutes of reperfusion. At 24 hours, the patient was oliguric; and the graft was removed. Transplant nephrectomies had diffuse enlargement with diffuse, nonhemorrhagic, cortical, and medullary necrosis. Extensive sickle vascular occlusion was evident in renal vein branches; interlobar, interlobular, and arcuate veins; vasa recta; and peritubular capillaries. The renal arteries had sickle vascular occlusion in case 1. Glomeruli had only focal sickle vascular occlusion. The erythrocytes in sickle vascular occlusion had abundant cytoplasmic filaments by electron microscopy. Acute rejection was not identified in either case. Protein C and S levels, factor V Leiden, and lupus anticoagulant assays were within normal limits. Hemoglobin analysis revealed hemoglobin S of 21.8% and 25.6%, respectively. Renal allograft necrosis with intragraft sickle crisis, characterized by extensive vascular occlusive erythrocyte sickling and prominent renal vein thrombosis, was observed in 2 patients with sickle cell trait. Occult sickle cell trait may be a risk factor for early renal allograft loss.

  4. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-09-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization.

  5. Steroid hormones and the stroma-vascular cells of the adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volat, Fanny; Bouloumié, Anne

    2013-09-01

    The stroma-vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue (AT) is a heterogeneous cell fraction composed of progenitor cells, endothelial cells, and immune cells. SVF plays a key role in AT homeostasis and growth as well as in obesity-associated pathologies. The SVF cell composition and phenotype are distinct according to AT location and adiposity. Such discrepancies influence AT function and are involved in obesity-associated disorders such as chronic inflammation. Investigations performed in recent years in rodents and humans provided evidence that the stroma-vascular cells contribute to the conversion of steroid hormones in AT and are also steroid targets. This review describes the link between steroids and SVF depending on gender, adiposity, and AT location and highlights the potential role of sex and corticosteroid hormones in adipogenesis, angiogenesis, and their contributions in AT inflammation.

  6. Composite vascular grafts with high cell infiltration by co-electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Zhikai, E-mail: tanzk@hnu.edu.cn; Wang, Hongjie; Gao, Xiangkai; Liu, Tong; Tan, Yongjun

    2016-10-01

    There is an increasing demand for functional small-diameter vascular grafts (diameter < 6 mm) to be used in clinical arterial replacement. An ideal vascular graft should have appropriate biomechanical properties and be biocompatible. Electrospinning has become a popular polymer processing technique for vascular tissue engineering, but the grafts fabricated by electrospinning often have relatively small pores and low porosity, which limit cell infiltration into scaffolds and hinder the regeneration and remodeling of grafts. In the present study, we aimed to develop an efficient method to prepare electrospun composite vascular grafts comprising natural and synthetic materials. We fabricated grafts made of polycaprolactone, gelatin, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by co-electrospinning, and the scaffolds were further functionalized by immobilizing heparin on them. The PVA fibers degraded rapidly in vivo and generated electrospun scaffolds with high porosity, which significantly enhanced cell proliferation and infiltration. The mechanical properties of the grafts are suitable for use in artery replacement. Heparin functionalization of the grafts yielded a good antithrombogenic effect, which was demonstrated in platelet adhesion tests. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that the heparin release from the grafts enhanced the growth of endothelial cells, which is important for the endothelium of implanted grafts. The results of this study indicate that our method is effective and controllable for the fabrication of vascular grafts that meet the clinical requirements for blood vessel transplantation. - Highlights: • This study indicate an effective method for the fabrication of vascular grafts that meet the clinical requirements. • Co-electrospinning were used to fabricate grafts made of polycaprolactone (PCL), gelatin (GT), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). • PVA was used to create large pores within the hybrid scaffolds, thereby enhancing cell infiltration

  7. Protective effect of N-acetylcysteine against nicardipine hydrochloride-induced autophagic cell death of human vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Toyoda, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Nicardipine hydrochloride (NIC) injection has been widely used for emergency treatment of abnormally high blood pressure. However, NIC injection often causes severe peripheral vascular injury. The purpose of the present study was to reduce the NIC-induced cell injury in human vascular endothelial cells by use of clinical agents. The mechanism of NIC-induced cell injury was evaluated by time-lapse microscopic imaging, autophagosome staining with monodansylcadaverine, immunostaining of light chain 3 isoform B (LC-3B) and assessment of cell viability after exposure to NIC with or without an inhibitor of autophagosome formation (3-methyladenine, 3-MA). Results from autophagosome labeling and immunostaining of LC-3B revealed an increase of autophagosomes and LC-3B in NIC-treated cells. NIC-mediated reduction of cell viability was inhibited by 3-methyladenine. Moreover, we found that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reduced NIC-induced cell injury in human vascular endothelial cells. These findings suggest that NIC causes severe peripheral venous irritation via induction of autophagic cell death and that inhibition of autophagy with NAC could contribute to the reduction of NIC-induced vascular injury.

  8. Extracellular proteolysis and the migrating vascular smooth muscle cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, R.T.J. van

    1996-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) form the major cell type in the arterial blood vessels. In the undamaged vessel wall they remain in a contractile state characterized by the absence of cell division, a low metabolic activity and a high actin-myosin content. As a reaction to injury of the vessel wall they c

  9. Trans fatty acids induce vascular inflammation and reduce vascular nitric oxide production in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi G Iwata

    Full Text Available Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA, which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived-dairy products and meat on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans, Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans, and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation.

  10. Understanding the effects of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone in physiological fatty tissue for vascularized adipose tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra J

    2015-11-01

    Engineering of large vascularized adipose tissue constructs is still a challenge for the treatment of extensive high-graded burns or the replacement of tissue after tumor removal. Communication between mature adipocytes and endothelial cells is important for homeostasis and the maintenance of adipose tissue mass but, to date, is mainly neglected in tissue engineering strategies. Thus, new co-culture strategies are needed to integrate adipocytes and endothelial cells successfully into a functional construct. This review focuses on the cross-talk of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells and considers their influence on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone. In addition, the properties and challenges with regard to these two cell types for vascularized tissue engineering are highlighted.

  11. Stem cell differentiation on electrospun nanofibrous substrates for vascular tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Lin [Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, No. 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai 201620 (China); Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, E3-05-14, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Prabhakaran, Molamma P., E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.sg [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, E3-05-14, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Qin, Xiaohong, E-mail: xhqin@dhu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, No. 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang, Shanghai 201620 (China); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, E3-05-14, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2013-12-01

    Nanotechnology has enabled the engineering of a variety of materials to meet the current challenges and requirements in vascular tissue regeneration. In our study, poly-L-lactide (PLLA) and hybrid PLLA/collagen (PLLA/Coll) nanofibers (3:1 and 1:1) with fiber diameters of 210 to 430 nm were fabricated by electrospinning. Their morphological, chemical and mechanical characterizations were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), and tensile instrument, respectively. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on electrospun nanofibers that are capable of differentiating into vascular cells have great potential for repair of the vascular system. We investigated the potential of MSCs for vascular cell differentiation in vitro on electrospun PLLA/Coll nanofibrous scaffolds using endothelial differentiation media. After 20 days of culture, MSC proliferation on PLLA/Coll(1:1) scaffolds was found 256% higher than the cell proliferation on PLLA scaffolds. SEM images showed that the MSC differentiated endothelial cells on PLLA/Coll scaffolds showed cobblestone morphology in comparison to the fibroblastic type of undifferentiated MSCs. The functionality of the cells in the presence of ‘endothelial induction media’, was further demonstrated from the immunocytochemical analysis, where the MSCs on PLLA/Coll (1:1) scaffolds differentiated to endothelial cells and expressed the endothelial cell specific proteins such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 or CD31) and Von Willebrand factor (vWF). From the results of the SEM analysis and protein expression studies, we concluded that the electrospun PLLA/Coll nanofibers could mimic the native vascular ECM environment and might be promising substrates for potential application towards vascular regeneration. - Highlights: • PLLA and PLLA/Coll nanofibers were electrospun. • Incorporation of collagen reduced fiber

  12. An Important Method in the Investigation of Vascular Pathologies: Endothelial Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusufhan Yazır

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells line the interior surface of blood vessels and form an interface between circulating blood in the lumen and the rest of the vessel wall. Endothelial cells are involved in many aspects of vascular biology, including barrier function, vasoconstriction, coagulation and inflamation. The endothelial cells in different organs have different functions and surface phenotype. These cells express prostoglandin-I2, platelet activating factor, collagen, endothelin-1, laminin, fibronectin and growth factors including platelet derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor. İn the cell culture, cells can be isolated, maintened and proliferate in the laboratory conditions. The techniques of the cell culture have allowed scientists to use the cells in vitro for experimental studies, such as the production of vaccine, antibody and enzime, drug research, cell-cell interactions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell is a good source for endothelial cell, because it is cheaper, easy to find and has the basic features of the normal endothelial cells.

  13. Harmful effects of the azathioprine metabolite 6-mercaptopurine in vascular cells: induction of mineralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Prüfer

    Full Text Available Vascular mineralization contributes to the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients who suffer from chronic kidney disease and in individuals who have undergone solid organ transplantation. The immunosuppressive regimen used to treat these patients appears to have an impact on vascular alterations. The effect of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP on vascular calcification has not yet been determined. This study investigates the effect of 6-MP on vascular mineralization by the induction of trans-differentiation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. 6-MP not only induces the expression of osteo-chondrocyte-like transcription factors and proteins but also activates alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity and produces calcium deposition in in vitro and ex vivo models. These processes are dependent on 6-MP-induced production of reactive oxygen species, intracellular activation of mitogen-activated kinases and phosphorylation of the transcription factor Cbfa1. Furthermore, the metabolic products of 6-MP, 6-thioguanine nucleotides and 6-methyl-thio-inosine monophosphate have major impacts on cellular calcification. These data provide evidence for a possible harmful effect of the immunosuppressive drug 6-MP in vascular diseases, such as arteriosclerosis.

  14. Blood pressure and amiloride-sensitive sodium channels in vascular and renal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, David G; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Tarjus, Antoine; Sheng, Shaohu; Oberleithner, Hans; Kleyman, Thomas R; Jaisser, Frederic

    2014-03-01

    Sodium transport in the distal nephron is mediated by epithelial sodium channel activity. Proteolytic processing of external domains and inhibition with increased sodium concentrations are important regulatory features of epithelial sodium channel complexes expressed in the distal nephron. By contrast, sodium channels expressed in the vascular system are activated by increased external sodium concentrations, which results in changes in the mechanical properties and function of endothelial cells. Mechanosensitivity and shear stress affect both epithelial and vascular sodium channel activity. Guyton's hypothesis stated that blood pressure control is critically dependent on vascular tone and fluid handling by the kidney. The synergistic effects, and complementary regulation, of the epithelial and vascular systems are consistent with the Guytonian model of volume and blood pressure regulation, and probably reflect sequential evolution of the two systems. The integration of vascular tone, renal perfusion and regulation of renal sodium reabsorption is the central underpinning of the Guytonian model. In this Review, we focus on the expression and regulation of sodium channels, and we outline the emerging evidence that describes the central role of amiloride-sensitive sodium channels in the efferent (vascular) and afferent (epithelial) arms of this homeostatic system.

  15. LOCAL IMMUNITY BY TISSUE-RESIDENT CD8+ MEMORY T CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eGebhardt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial infection primes a CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response that gives rise to a long-lived population of circulating memory cells able to provide protection against systemic reinfection. Despite this, effective CD8+ T cell surveillance of barrier tissues such as skin and mucosa typically wanes with time, resulting in limited T cell-mediated protection in these peripheral tissues. However, recent evidence suggests that a specialized subset of CD103+ memory T cells can permanently lodge and persist in peripheral tissues, and that these cells can compensate for the loss of peripheral immune surveillance by circulating memory T cells. Here, we review evolving concepts regarding the generation and long-term persistence of these tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM in epithelial and neuronal tissues. We further discuss the role of TRM cells in local infection control and their contribution to localized immune phenomena, in both mice and humans.

  16. Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells and Fixed Immune Surveillance in Nonlymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Francis R

    2015-07-01

    T cell immunity is often defined in terms of memory lymphocytes that use the blood to access a range of organs. T cells are involved in two patterns of recirculation. In one, the cells shuttle back and forth between blood and secondary lymphoid organs, whereas in the second, memory cells recirculate between blood and nonlymphoid tissues. The latter is a means by which blood T cells control peripheral infection. It is now clear that there exists a distinct memory T cell subset that is absent from blood but found within nonlymphoid tissues. These nonrecirculating tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells develop within peripheral compartments and never spread beyond their point of lodgement. This review examines fixed immune surveillance by TRM cells, highlighting features that make them potent controllers of infection in nonlymphoid tissues. These features provide clues about TRM cell specialization, such as their ability to deal with sequestered, persisting infections confined to peripheral compartments.

  17. Vascular neuroprotection via TrkB- and Akt-dependent cell survival signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Shuzhen; Som, Angel T.; Waeber, Christian; Lo, Eng H.

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral endothelium can be a vital source of signaling factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) that defend the neuronal parenchyma against stress and injury. But the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully defined. Here, we use cell models to ask how vascular neuroprotection is sustained. Human brain endothelial cells were grown in culture and conditioned media was transferred to primary rat cortical neurons. Brain endothelial cell-conditioned media activated neuronal A...

  18. A Comparative Study on Rat Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Resident Gut Bacteria (ii) Effect of Arsenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to use facultative gut bacteria as an alternate to animals for the initial gastrointestinal toxicity screening of heavy metals, a comparative study on rat intestinal epithelial cells and resident gut bacteria was undertaken.Methods in vitro growth rate of four gut bacteria, dehydrogenase (DHA) and esterase (EA) activity test, intestinal epithelial and bacterial cell membrane enzymes and in situ effect of arsenite were analysed. Results Growth profile of mixed resident population of gut bacteria and pure isolates of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Staphylococcus sp.revealed an arsenite (2-20 ppm) concentration-dependent inhibition. The viability pattern of epithelial cells also showed similar changes. DHA and EA tests revealed significant inhibition (40%-72%) with arsenite exposure of 5 and 10 ppm in isolated gut bacteria and epithelial cells. Decrease in membrane alkaline phosphatase and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase activities was in the range of 33%-55% in four bacteria at the arsenite exposure of 10 ppm, whereas it was 60%-65% in intestinal epithelial villus cells. in situ incubation of arsenite using intestinal loops also showed more or less similar changes in membrane enzymes of resident gut bacterial population and epithelial cells. Conclusion The results indicate that facultative gut bacteria can be used as suitable in vitro model for the preliminary screening of arsenical gastrointestinal cytotoxic effects.

  19. Impaired SIRT1 promotes the migration of vascular smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Long, Chun-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jiao; Chen, Xue; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-07-01

    The formation of fat-laden foam cells, contributing to the fatty streaks of the plaques of atheroma, is the critical early process in atherosclerosis. The previous study demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contain a much larger burden of the excess cholesterol in comparison with monocyte-derived macrophages in human coronary atherosclerosis, as the main origin of foam cells. It is noteworthy that VSMC-derived foam cells are deposited in subintima but not media, where VSMCs normally deposit in. Therefore, migration from media to intima is an indispensable step for a VSMC to accrue neutral lipids and form foam cell. Whether this migration occurs paralleled with or prior to the formation of foam cell is still unclear. Herein, the present study was designed to test the VSMC migratory capability in the process of foam cell formation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). In conclusion, we provide evidence that oxLDL induces the VSMC-derived foam cells formation with increased migration ability and MMP-9 expression, which were partly attributed to the impaired SIRT1 and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. As activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic effects, we investigated its role in oxLDL-treated VSMC migration. It is found that activating TRPV1 by capsaicin inhibits VSMC foam cell formation and the accompanied migration through rescuing the SIRT1 and suppressing NF-κB signaling. The present study provides evidence that SIRT1 may be a promising intervention target of atherosclerosis, and raises the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  20. Spatial partitioning of secretory cargo from Golgi resident proteins in live cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Jamie

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To maintain organelle integrity, resident proteins must segregate from itinerant cargo during secretory transport. However, Golgi resident enzymes must have intimate access to secretory cargo in order to carry out glycosylation reactions. The amount of cargo and associated membrane may be significant compared to the amount of Golgi membrane and resident protein, but upon Golgi exit, cargo and resident are efficiently sorted. How this occurs in live cells is not known. Results We observed partitioning of the fluorescent Golgi resident T2-CFP and fluorescent cargo proteins VSVG3-YFP or VSVG3-SP-YFP upon Golgi exit after a synchronous pulse of cargo was released from the ER. Golgi elements remained stable in overall size, shape and relative position as cargo emptied. Cargo segregated from resident rapidly by blebbing into micron-sized domains that contained little or no detectable resident protein and that appeared to be continuous with the parent Golgi element. Post-Golgi transport carriers (TCs exited repeatedly from these domains. Alternatively, entire cargo domains exited Golgi elements, forming large TCs that fused directly with the plasma membrane. However, domain formation did not appear to be an absolute prerequisite for TC exit, since TCs also exited directly from Golgi elements in the absence of large domains. Quantitative cargo-specific photobleaching experiments revealed transfer of cargo between Golgi regions, but no discrete intra-Golgi TCs were observed. Conclusions Our results establish domain formation via rapid lateral partitioning as a general cellular strategy for segregating different transmembrane proteins along the secretory pathway and provide a framework for consideration of molecular mechanisms of secretory transport.

  1. A ginkgo biloba extract promotes proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells in vascular dementia rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiwei Wang; Wen Chen; Yuliang Wang

    2013-01-01

    The ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 improves memory loss and cognitive impairments in patients with senile dementia. It also promotes proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone in Parkinson's disease model mice and in the hippocampal zone of young epileptic rats. However, it remains unclear whether EGb761 enhances proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells in the brain of rats with vascular dementia. In this study, a vascular dementia model was established by repeatedly clipping and reperfusing the bilateral common carotid arteries of rats in combination with an intraperitoneal injection of a sodium nitroprusside solution. Seven days after establishing the model, rats were intragastrically given EGb761 at 50 mg/kg per day. Learning and memory abilities were assessed using the Morris water maze and proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells in the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus were labeled by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunofluorescence in all rats at 15 days, and 1, 2, and 4 months after model establishment. The escape latencies in Morris water maze tests of rats with vascular dementia after EGb761 treatment were significantly shorter than the model group. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the number and proliferation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells in the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus of the EGb761-treated group were significantly higher than in the model group. These experimental findings suggest that EGb761 enhances proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus, and significantly improves learning and memory in rats with vascular dementia.

  2. Mast Cells Induce Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis via a Toll-Like Receptor 4 Activation Pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, W.K.; Tempel, D.; Bot, I.; Biessen, E.A.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Cheng, C.; Duckers, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Activated mast cells (MCs) release chymase, which can induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis leading to plaque destabilization. Because the mechanism through which MCs release chymase in atherosclerosis is unknown, we studied whether MC-associated VSMC apoptosis is regulated

  3. Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL) Reveals the Sequential Differentiation of Sieve Element-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yuki; Nurani, Alif Meem; Saito, Chieko; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Saito, Masato; Yamazaki, Kyoko; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2016-06-01

    Cell differentiation is a complex process involving multiple steps, from initial cell fate specification to final differentiation. Procambial/cambial cells, which act as vascular stem cells, differentiate into both xylem and phloem cells during vascular development. Recent studies have identified regulatory cascades for xylem differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying phloem differentiation is largely unexplored due to technical challenges. Here, we established an ectopic induction system for phloem differentiation named Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL). Our results verified similarities between VISUAL-induced Arabidopsis thaliana phloem cells and in vivo sieve elements. We performed network analysis using transcriptome data with VISUAL to dissect the processes underlying phloem differentiation, eventually identifying a factor involved in the regulation of the master transcription factor gene APL Thus, our culture system opens up new avenues not only for genetic studies of phloem differentiation, but also for future investigations of multidirectional differentiation from vascular stem cells. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Human vascular smooth muscle cells both express and respond to heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkles, J.A.; Friesel, R.; Burgess, W.H.; Howk, R.; Mehlman, T.; Weinstein, R.; Maciag, T.

    1987-10-01

    The control of vascular endothelial and muscle cell proliferation is important in such processes as tumor angiogenesis, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Class I heparin-binding growth factor (HBGF-I) is a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for human endothelial cells in vitro and will induce angiogenesis in vivo. RNA gel blot hybridization experiments demonstrate that cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not human umbilical cells also synthesize an HBGF-I mRNA. Smooth muscle cells also synthesize an HBGF-I-like polypeptide since (i) extract prepared from smooth muscle cells will compete with /sup 125/I-labeled HBGF-I for binding to the HBGF-I cell surface receptor, and (ii) the competing ligand is eluted from heparin-Sepharose affinity resin at a NaCl concentration similar to that required by purified bovine brain HBGF-I and stimulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, like endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells possess cell-surface-associated HBGF-I receptors and respond to HBGF-I as a mitogen. These results indicate the potential for an additional autocrine component of vascular smooth muscle cell growth control and establish a vessel wall source of HBGF-I for endothelial cell division in vivo.

  5. Heme oxygenase-1-derived carbon monoxide is an autocrine inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Kelly J; Reyna, Sylvia V; Chapman, Gary B; Ensenat, Diana; Liu, Xiao-ming; Wang, Hong; Schafer, Andrew I; Durante, William

    2002-06-15

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) generate carbon monoxide (CO) via the catabolism of heme by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO). In the present study, we found that serum stimulated a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the levels of HO-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in vascular SMCs. The induction of HO-1 expression by serum was inhibited by actinomycin D or cycloheximide. In addition, serum stimulated HO activity, as reflected by an increase in the concentration of bilirubin in the culture media. Treatment of vascular SMCs with serum stimulated DNA synthesis and this was potentiated by the HO inhibitors, zinc and tin protoporphyrin-IX as well as by the CO scavenger, hemoglobin. The iron chelator desferrioxamine had no effect on DNA synthesis. However, exposure of vascular SMCs to exogenous CO inhibited serum-stimulated SMC proliferation and the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. In addition, CO arrested SMCs at the G(1)/S transition phase of the cell cycle and selectively blocked the serum-stimulated expression of cyclin A mRNA and protein without affecting the expression of cyclin D1 and E. CO also inhibited the serum-stimulated activation of cyclin A-associated kinase activity and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity. These results demonstrate that serum stimulates HO-1 gene expression and CO synthesis. Furthermore, they show that CO acts in a negative feedback fashion to inhibit vascular SMC growth by regulating specific components of the cell cycle machinery. The capacity of vascular mitogens to induce CO synthesis may provide a novel mechanism by which these agents modulate cell growth.

  6. A Role of TDIF Peptide Signaling in Vascular Cell Differentiation is Conserved Among Euphyllophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Yuki; Bowman, John L

    2015-01-01

    Peptide signals mediate a variety of cell-to-cell communication crucial for plant growth and development. During Arabidopsis thaliana vascular development, a CLE (CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION-related) family peptide hormone, TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor), regulates procambial cell fate by its inhibitory activity on xylem differentiation. To address if this activity is conserved among vascular plants, we performed comparative analyses of TDIF signaling in non-flowering vascular plants (gymnosperms, ferns and lycophytes). We identified orthologs of TDIF/CLE as well as its receptor TDR/PXY (TDIF RECEPTOR/PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM) in Ginkgo biloba, Adiantum aethiopicum, and Selaginella kraussiana by RACE-PCR. The predicted TDIF peptide sequences in seed plants and ferns were identical to that of A. thaliana TDIF. We examined the effects of exogenous CLE peptide-motif sequences of TDIF in these species. We found that liquid culturing of dissected leaves or shoots was useful for examining TDIF activity during vascular development. TDIF treatment suppressed xylem/tracheary element differentiation of procambial cells in G. biloba and A. aethiopicum leaves. In contrast, neither TDIF nor putative endogenous TDIF inhibited xylem differentiation in developing shoots and rhizophores of S. kraussiana. These data suggest that activity of TDIF in vascular development is conserved among extant euphyllophytes. In addition to the conserved function, via liquid culturing of its bulbils, we found a novel inhibitory activity on root growth in the fern Asplenium × lucrosum suggesting lineage-specific co-option of peptide signaling occurred during the evolution of vascular plant organs.

  7. Influence of Androgen Receptor in Vascular Cells on Reperfusion following Hindlimb Ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxi Wu

    Full Text Available Studies in global androgen receptor knockout (G-ARKO and orchidectomised mice suggest that androgen accelerates reperfusion of the ischaemic hindlimb by stimulating angiogenesis. This investigation used novel, vascular cell-specific ARKO mice to address the hypothesis that the impaired hindlimb reperfusion in G-ARKO mice was due to loss of AR from cells in the vascular wall.Mice with selective deletion of AR (ARKO from vascular smooth muscle cells (SM-ARKO, endothelial cells (VE-ARKO, or both (SM/VE-ARKO were compared with wild type (WT controls. Hindlimb ischaemia was induced in these mice by ligation and removal of the femoral artery. Post-operative reperfusion was reduced in SM-ARKO and SM/VE-ARKO mice. Immunohistochemistry indicated that this was accompanied by a reduced density of smooth muscle actin-positive vessels but no change in the density of isolectin B4-positive vessels in the gastrocnemius muscle. Deletion of AR from the endothelium (VE-ARKO did not alter post-operative reperfusion or vessel density. In an ex vivo (aortic ring culture model of angiogenesis, AR was not detected in vascular outgrowths and angiogenesis was not altered by vascular ARKO or by exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT 10-10-10-7M; 6 days.These results suggest that loss of AR from vascular smooth muscle, but not from the endothelium, contributes to impaired reperfusion in the ischaemic hindlimb of G-ARKO. Impaired reperfusion was associated with reduced collateral formation rather than reduced angiogenesis.

  8. A role of TDIF peptide signaling in vascular cell differentiation is conserved among euphyllophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki eHirakawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Peptide signals mediate a variety of cell-to-cell communication crucial for plant growth and development. During Arabidopsis thaliana vascular development, a CLE (CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION-related family peptide hormone, TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor, regulates procambial cell fate by its inhibitory activity on xylem differentiation. To address if this activity is conserved among vascular plants, we performed comparative analyses of TDIF signaling in non-flowering vascular plants (gymnosperms, monilophytes and lycophytes. We identified orthologs of TDIF/CLE as well as its receptor TDR/PXY (TDIF RECEPTOR/PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM in Ginkgo biloba, Adiantum aethiopicum and Selaginella kraussiana by RACE-PCR. The predicted TDIF peptide sequences in seed plants and monilophytes were identical to that of A. thaliana TDIF. We examined the effects of exogenous CLE peptide-motif sequences of TDIF in these species. We found that liquid culturing of dissected leaves or shoots was useful for examining TDIF activity during vascular development. TDIF treatment suppressed xylem/tracheary element differentiation of procambial cells in G. bioloba and A. aethiopicum leaves. In contrast, neither TDIF nor putative endogenous TDIF inhibited xylem differentiation in developing shoots and rhizophores of S. kraussiana. These data suggest that activity of TDIF in vascular development is conserved among extant euphyllophytes. In addition to the conserved function, via liquid culturing of its bulbils, we found a novel inhibitory activity on root growth in the monilophyte Asplenium x lucrosum suggesting lineage-specific co-option of peptide signaling occurred during the evolution of vascular plant organs.

  9. WOX14 promotes bioactive gibberellin synthesis and vascular cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Erwan; Kbiri, Nadia; Mary, Viviane; Claisse, Gaëlle; Conde E Silva, Natalia; Kreis, Martin; Deveaux, Yves

    2017-05-01

    Procambial and cambial stem cells provide the initial cells that allow the formation of vascular tissues. WOX4 and WOX14 have been shown to act redundantly to promote procambial cell proliferation and differentiation. Gibberellins (GAs), which have an important role in wood formation, also stimulate cambial cell division. Here we show that the loss of WOX14 function phenocopies some traits of GA-deficient mutants that can be complemented by exogenous GA application, whereas WOX14 overexpression stimulates the expression of GA3ox anabolism genes and represses GA2ox catabolism genes, promoting the accumulation of bioactive GA. More importantly, our data clearly indicate that WOX14 but not WOX4 promotes vascular cell differentiation and lignification in inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Knockdown of connexin 43 attenuates balloon injury-induced vascular restenosis through the inhibition of the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Jian; He, Dan; Xu, Liang-Jing; Chen, Min; Wang, Yi-Qi; Feng, Jiu-Geng; Wei, Min-Jun; Hong, Tao; Jiang, Li-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) or atherosclerotic heart disease is one of the most common types of cardiovascular disease. Although percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)] is a mature, well-established technique used to treat atherosclerotic heart disease, its long‑term therapeutic effects are compromised by a high incidence of vascular restenosis (RS) following angioplasty. In our previous study, we found that the principal gap junction protein, connexin 43 (Cx43), in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was involved in the development of vascular RS following angioplasty-induced balloon injury. However, the exact role action of Cx43 in vascular RS remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to further examine whether the knockdown of Cx43 attenuates the development of vascular RS through the inhibition of the proliferation and migration of VSMCs. We found that the use of a lentiviral vector expressing shRNA targeting Cx43 (Cx43‑RNAi-LV) efficiently silenced the mRNA and protein expression of Cx43 in cultured VSMCs. In addition, MTT and Transwell assays were used to examined the proliferation and migration of the VSMCs, respectively. The results revealed that the knockdown of Cx43 by Cx43-RNAi-LV at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of the VSMCs in vitro. Notably, the knockdown of Cx43 also effectively attenuated the development of vascular RS and intimal hyperplasia following balloon injury in vivo. Taken together, our data suggest that Cx43 is involved in the development of vascular RS and intimal hyperplasia through the regulation of the proliferation and migration of VSMCs. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the pathogenesis of vascular RS, and suggests that further comfirms that Cx43 may well be a novel potential pharmacological target for preventing vascular RS following PCI.

  11. Estrogen-induced DNA synthesis in vascular endothelial cells is mediated by ROS signaling

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    Felty Quentin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since estrogen is known to increase vascular endothelial cell growth, elevated estrogen exposure from hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives has the potential to contribute in the development of abnormal proliferative vascular lesions and subsequent thickening of the vasculature. How estrogen may support or promote vascular lesions is not clear. We have examined in this study whether estrogen exposure to vascular endothelial cells increase the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and estrogen-induced ROS is involved in the growth of endothelial cells. Methods The effect of estrogen on the production of intracellular oxidants and the role of estrogen-induced ROS on cell growth was studied in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. ROS were measured by monitoring the oxidation of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescin by spectrofluorometry. Endothelial cell growth was measured by a colorimetric immunoassay based on BrdU incorporation into DNA. Results Physiological concentrations of estrogen (367 fmol and 3.67 pmol triggered a rapid 2-fold increase in intracellular oxidants in endothelial cells. E2-induced ROS formation was inhibited to basal levels by cotreatment with the mitochondrial inhibitor rotenone (2 μM and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol (50 μM. Inhibitors of NAD(PH oxidase, apocynin and DPI, did not block E2-induced ROS formation. Furthermore, the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, did not prevent the increase in E2-induced ROS. These findings indicate both mitochondria and xanthine oxidase are the source of ROS in estrogen treated vascular endothelial cells. E2 treated cells showed a 2-fold induction of BrdU incorporation at 18 h which was not observed in cells exposed to vehicle alone. Cotreatment with ebselen (20 μM and NAC (1 mM inhibited E2-induced BrdU incorporation without affecting the basal levels of DNA synthesis. The observed inhibitory effect of NAC and ebselen on E2-induced DNA synthesis was also shown

  12. Vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell culture on NaOH-treated poly(epsilon-caprolactone) films: a preliminary study for vascular graft development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, María Concepción; Portolés, María Teresa; Vallet-Regí, María; Izquierdo, Isabel; Galletti, Lorenzo; Comas, Juan Valentín; Pagani, Raffaella

    2005-05-23

    Tissue engineering offers the potential of providing vessels that can be used to replace diseased and damaged native blood vessels. The endothelization of a synthetic vascular graft minimizes the failures associated with blood clotting and platelet activation. The aim of this study was to culture vascular-derived endothelial and smooth muscle cells on both untreated and NaOH-treated poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) films, a biocompatible and bio-resorbable polymer, and to evaluate the behavior of both cell types as a preliminary study for vascular graft development. PCL films were prepared by hot pressing; characterized by DSC, IR, SEM, and scanning force microscopy; and treated with NaOH to increase the surface hydrophilicity before cell culture. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells, isolated from pig cava vein, were characterized by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy studies of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and alpha-smooth muscle actin. Good adhesion, growth, viability and morphology of both the endothelial and smooth muscle cells on PCL films were obtained, but a light stimulation of mitochondrial activity was observed during short culture times. NaOH treatment improved the adhesion and enhanced the proliferation in both cell types. This verified the possible use of this modified polymer as a support in the preparation of a synthetic vascular graft. [Diagram: see text] SEM micrograph of smooth muscle cells cultured on NaOH-treated PCL film. (Original magnification: 1000x).

  13. Red light, green light: Signals that control endothelial cell proliferation during embryonic vascular development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The proper regulation of endothelial cell proliferation is critical for vascular development in the embryo. VEGF-A and bFGF, which are important in the induction of mesodermal progenitors to form a capillary plexus, are also key mitogenic signals. Disruption in VEGF-A or bFGF decreases endothelial c...

  14. Construction of a fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to direction vascular cell fate and promotion hemocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Changrong; Wang, Yan; Su, Hong; Yang, Ping; Huang, Nan; F Maitz, Manfred; Zhao, Anshan

    2016-07-01

    Surface biofunctional modification of cardiovascular stents is a versatile approach to reduce the adverse effects after implantation. In this work, a novel multifunctional coating was fabricated by coimmobilization of the sulfated polysaccharide of brown algae fucoidan and laminin to biomimic the vascular intimal conditions in order to support rapid endothelialization, prevent restenosis and improve hemocompatibility. The surface properties of the coating such as hydrophilicity, bonding density of biomolecules and stability were evaluated and optimized. According to the biocompatibility tests, the fucoidan/laminin multilayer coated surface displayed less platelet adhesion with favorable anticoagulant property. In addition, the fucoidan/laminin complex showed function to selectively regulate vascular cells growth behavior. The proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) on the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. For the smooth muscle cells (SMCs), inhibitory effects on cell adhesion and proliferation were observed. In conclusion, the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was successfully fabricated with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization properties which show a promising application in the vascular devices such as vascular stents or grafts surface modification.

  15. Fibulin-2 is present in murine vascular lesions and is important for smooth muscle cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ström, A.; Olin, A. I.; Aspberg, A.;

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion, migration and proliferation-events that are important during the atherosclerotic process. Fibulin-2 is a member of the ECM protein family of fibulins and has been found to cross-link versican/hyaluron...

  16. Intracellular localization of lipoplexed siRNA in vascular endothelial cells of different mouse tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleku, Manuela; Fisch, Gerald; Möpert, Kristin; Keil, Oliver; Arnold, Wolfgang; Kaufmann, Jörg; Santel, Ansgar

    2008-05-01

    Liposomally formulated siRNA can be used for RNAi applications in vivo. Intravenous bolus administration of lipoplexed siRNA has been shown to reduce gene expression in the vascular endothelium. Here, we applied immunofluorescence staining for different endothelial markers (PECAM-1, CD34, laminin) on paraffin sections to compare the respective expression pattern with the intracellular localization of intravenously administered, fluorescently labeled siRNA (siRNA-Cy3-lipoplex). By confocal microscopy, lipoplexed siRNA-Cy3 was detected inside vascular endothelial cells in vivo, which where identified with co-staining of endothelial markers. Consequently, the finding of intracellular siRNA uptake by vascular endothelial cells correlated with RNAi based specific protein reduction in situ as revealed by PECAM-1 specific immunofluorescence staining in lung tissue sections. Therefore, by using a cell biological approach these in situ data emphasize the functional uptake of liposomal siRNA molecules in vascular endothelial cells of different mouse tissues as indicated in our previous molecular study.

  17. Innate Response Activator (IRA) B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappini, Nico; Cantisani, Rocco; Pancotto, Laura; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rosa, Domenico; Manetti, Andrea; Romano, Antonio; Montagnani, Francesca; Bertholet, Sylvie; Castellino, Flora; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA) B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁺ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁻ B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM⁺IgD⁺, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils.

  18. Innate Response Activator (IRA B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro.

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    Nico Chiappini

    Full Text Available Innate response activator (IRA B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁺ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19⁺CD20⁺GM-CSF⁻ B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM⁺IgD⁺, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils.

  19. Thiazolidinediones enhance vascular endothelial growth factor expression and induce cell growth inhibition in non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshizaki Yumiko; Kumei Shima; Tanno Sachie; Motomura Wataru; Yoshizaki Takayuki; Tanno Satoshi; Okumura Toshikatsu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background It is known that thiazolidinediones are involved in regulating the expression of various genes, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ); VEGF is a prognostic biomarker for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of troglitazone and ciglitazone on the mRNA expression of VEGF and its receptors in human NSCLC cell lines, RERF-LC-AI, SK-MES-1, PC-14, and...

  20. Tetraspanin CD9 regulates cell contraction and actin arrangement via RhoA in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Michael J Herr

    Full Text Available The most prevalent cardiovascular diseases arise from alterations in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC morphology and function. Tetraspanin CD9 has been previously implicated in regulating vascular pathologies; however, insight into how CD9 may regulate adverse VSMC phenotypes has not been provided. We utilized a human model of aortic smooth muscle cells to understand the consequences of CD9 deficiency on VSMC phenotypes. Upon knocking down CD9, the cells developed an abnormally small and rounded morphology. We determined that this morphological change was due to a lack of typical parallel actin arrangement. We also found similar total RhoA but decreased GTP-bound (active RhoA levels in CD9 deficient cells. As a result, cells lacking a full complement of CD9 were less contractile than their control treated counterparts. Upon restoration of RhoA activity in the CD9 deficient cells, the phenotype was reversed and cell contraction was restored. Conversely, inhibition of RhoA activity in the control cells mimicked the CD9-deficient cell phenotype. Thus, alteration in CD9 expression was sufficient to profoundly disrupt cellular actin arrangement and endogenous cell contraction by interfering with RhoA signaling. This study provides insight into how CD9 may regulate previously described vascular smooth muscle cell pathophysiology.

  1. Detection of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, A S; Gruetter, C A

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate histamine synthesis capability of human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells by detecting histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA. HDC catalyzes exclusively the formation of histamine in mammalian cells. Experiments utilizing nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (nRT-PCR) were conducted to detect the presence of HDC mRNA. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMC) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured and RNA was extracted and amplified using two sets of HDC-specific primers. Rat liver and kidney RNA were isolated and amplified to serve as positive and negative controls, respectively. Gel electrophoresis of HAoSMC, HAEC and liver mRNA revealed bands coinciding with an expected product size of 440 base pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that the observed bands were the appropriate HDC amplicons. These findings are the first to indicate the presence of HDC mRNA in vascular smooth muscle cells and confirm the presence of HDC mRNA in endothelial cells which is consistent with an ability of these cell types to synthesize histamine in the vascular wall.

  2. Development of a Vascularized Skin Construct Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cells from Debrided Burned Skin

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    Rodney K. Chan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Large body surface area burns pose significant therapeutic challenges. Clinically, the extent and depth of burn injury may mandate the use of allograft for temporary wound coverage while autografts are serially harvested from the same donor areas. The paucity of donor sites in patients with burns involving large surface areas highlights the need for better skin substitutes that can achieve early and complete coverage and retain normal skin durability with minimal donor requirements. We have isolated autologous stem cells from the adipose layer of surgically debrided burned skin (dsASCs, using a point-of-care stem cell isolation device. These cells, in a collagen—polyethylene glycol fibrin-based bilayer hydrogel, differentiate into an epithelial layer, a vascularized dermal layer, and a hypodermal layer. All-trans-retinoic acid and fenofibrate were used to differentiate dsASCs into epithelial-like cells. Immunocytochemical analysis showed a matrix- and time-dependent change in the expression of stromal, vascular, and epithelial cell markers. These results indicate that stem cells isolated from debrided skin can be used as a single autologous cell source to develop a vascularized skin construct without culture expansion or addition of exogenous growth factors. This technique may provide an alternative approach for cutaneous coverage after extensive burn injuries.

  3. Loss of NF1 expression in human endothelial cells promotes autonomous proliferation and altered vascular morphogenesis.

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    Anshika Bajaj

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis is a well known familial tumor syndrome, however these patients also suffer from a number of vascular anomalies. The loss of NFl from the endothelium is embryonically lethal in mouse developmental models, however little is known regarding the molecular regulation by NF1 in endothelium. We investigated the consequences of losing NF1 expression on the function of endothelial cells using shRNA. The loss of NF1 was sufficient to elevate levels of active Ras under non-stimulated conditions. These elevations in Ras activity were associated with activation of downstream signaling including activation of ERK, AKT and mTOR. Cells knocked down in NF1 expression exhibited no cellular senescence. Rather, they demonstrated augmented proliferation and autonomous entry into the cell cycle. These proliferative changes were accompanied by enhanced expression of cyclin D, phosphorylation of p27(KIP, and decreases in total p27(KIP levels, even under growth factor free conditions. In addition, NF1-deficient cells failed to undergo normal branching morphogenesis in a co-culture assay, instead forming planar islands with few tubules and branches. We find the changes induced by the loss of NF1 could be mitigated by co-expression of the GAP-related domain of NF1 implicating Ras regulation in these effects. Using doxycycline-inducible shRNA, targeting NF1, we find that the morphogenic changes are reversible. Similarly, in fully differentiated and stable vascular-like structures, the silencing of NF1 results in the appearance of abnormal vascular structures. Finally, the proliferative changes and the abnormal vascular morphogenesis are normalized by low-dose rapamycin treatment. These data provide a detailed analysis of the molecular and functional consequences of NF1 loss in human endothelial cells. These insights may provide new approaches to therapeutically addressing vascular abnormalities in these patients while underscoring a critical role for

  4. Continuous exposure to low amplitude extremely low frequency electrical fields characterizing the vascular streaming potential alters elastin accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergethon, Peter R; Kindler, Dean D; Hallock, Kevin; Blease, Susan; Toselli, Paul

    2013-07-01

    In normal development and pathology, the vascular system depends on complex interactions between cellular elements, biochemical molecules, and physical forces. The electrokinetic vascular streaming potential (EVSP) is an endogenous extremely low frequency (ELF) electrical field resulting from blood flowing past the vessel wall. While generally unrecognized, it is a ubiquitous electrical biophysical force to which the vascular tree is exposed. Extracellular matrix elastin plays a central role in normal blood vessel function and in the development of atherosclerosis. It was hypothesized that ELF fields of low amplitude would alter elastin accumulation, supporting a link between the EVSP and the biology of vascular smooth muscle cells. Neonatal rat aortic smooth muscle cell cultures were exposed chronically to electrical fields characteristic of the EVSP. Extracellular protein accumulation, DNA content, and electron microscopic (EM) evaluation were performed after 2 weeks of exposure. Stimulated cultures showed no significant change in cellular proliferation as measured by the DNA concentration. The per-DNA normalized protein in the extracellular matrix was unchanged while extracellular elastin accumulation decreased 38% on average. EM analysis showed that the stimulated cells had a 2.85-fold increase in mitochondrial number. These results support the formulation that ELF fields are a potential factor in both normal vessel biology and in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic diseases including heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease.

  5. Effects of vascular endothelial growth factor on angiogenesis of the endothelial cells isolated from cavernous malformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN YuZhen; ZHAO Yao; WANG HaiJie; ZHOU LiangFu; MAO Ying; LIU Rui; SHU Jia; WANG YongFei

    2008-01-01

    Human cerebral cavernous malformation (CM) is a common vascular malformation of the central nervous system. We have investigated the biological characteristics of CM endothelial cells and the cellular and molecular mechanisms of CM angiogenesis to offer new insights into exploring effective measures for treatment of this disease. The endothelial cells were isolated from CM tissue masses dissected during operation and expanded in vitro. Expression of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 was examined with immunocytochemical staining. Proliferation, migration and tube formation of CM endothelial cells were determined using MTT, wounding and transmigration assays, and three-dimensional collagen type Ⅰ gel respectively. The endothelial cells were successfully isolated from the tissue specimens of 25 CMs dissected without dipolar electrocoagulation. The cells show the general characteristics of the vascular endothelial cells. Expression of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 on the cells is higher than that on the normal cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. After treatment with VEGF, numbers of the proliferated and migrated cells, the maximal distance of cell migration and the length and area of capillary-like struc-tures formed in the three-dimensional collagen gel increase significantly. These results demonstrate that expression of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 on CM endothelial cells is up-regulated. By binding to re-ceptors, VEGF may activate the downstream signaling pathways and promote proliferation, migration and tube formation of CM endothelial cells. VEGF/VEGFR signaling pathways play important regulating roles in CM angiogenesis.

  6. The Neurorepellent Slit2 Inhibits Postadhesion Stabilization of Monocytes Tethered to Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukovozov, Ilya; Huang, Yi-Wei; Zhang, Qiuwang; Liu, Guang Ying; Siu, Allan; Sokolskyy, Yaroslav; Patel, Sajedabanu; Hyduk, Sharon J; Kutryk, Michael J B; Cybulsky, Myron I; Robinson, Lisa A

    2015-10-01

    The secreted neurorepellent Slit2, acting through its transmembrane receptor, Roundabout (Robo)-1, inhibits chemotaxis of varied cell types, including leukocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells, toward diverse attractants. The role of Slit2 in regulating the steps involved in recruitment of monocytes in vascular inflammation is not well understood. In this study, we showed that Slit2 inhibited adhesion of monocytic cells to activated human endothelial cells, as well as to immobilized ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Microfluidic live cell imaging showed that Slit2 inhibited the ability of monocytes tethered to endothelial cells to stabilize their actin-associated anchors and to resist detachment in response to increasing shear forces. Transfection of constitutively active plasmids revealed that Slit2 inhibited postadhesion stabilization of monocytes on endothelial cells by preventing activation of Rac1. We further found that Slit2 inhibited chemotaxis of monocytes toward CXCL12 and CCL2. To determine whether Slit2 and Robo-1 modulate pathologic monocyte recruitment associated with vascular inflammation and cardiovascular disease, we tested PBMC from patients with coronary artery disease. PBMC from these patients had reduced surface levels of Robo-1 compared with healthy age- and sex-matched subjects, and Slit2 failed to inhibit chemotaxis of PBMC of affected patients, but not healthy control subjects, toward CCL2. Furthermore, administration of Slit2 to atherosclerosis-prone LDL receptor-deficient mice inhibited monocyte recruitment to nascent atherosclerotic lesions. These results demonstrate that Slit2 inhibits chemotaxis of monocytes, as well as their ability to stabilize adhesions and resist detachment forces. Slit2 may represent a powerful new tool to inhibit pathologic monocyte recruitment in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  7. Diabetic conditions promote binding of monocytes to vascular smooth muscle cells and their subsequent differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Li; Park, Jehyun; Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with significantly accelerated rates of atherosclerosis, key features of which include the presence of excessive macrophage-derived foam cells in the subendothelial space. We examined the hypothesis that enhanced monocyte-vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) interactions leading to subendothelial monocyte retention and differentiation to macrophages under diabetic conditions may be underlying mechanisms. Human aortic VSMCs (HVSMCs) treated with diabetic stimuli high gluco...

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression by interaction between monocytes and vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Takahashi, M; Sakata, Y; Takizawa, T; Okada, K; Saito, T; Shimada, K

    2000-08-01

    There is accumulating evidence of complicated interactions among vascular cells, i.e. endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and monocytes/macrophages, in the regulation of vascular function and remodeling. We have investigated the mechanisms responsible for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression by interactions between monocytes and vascular endothelial cells. THP-1 cells (human monocytic cell line) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cocultured. MMP-1 levels in the culture medium were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Collagenolytic activity in the culture medium was measured by fluorescence labeled-collagen digestion. Immunohistochemistry using an anti-MMP antibody was carried out to determine which types of cell produce MMP-1. The addition of THP-1 cells to HUVECs for 48 h induced increases in MMP-1 levels and collagenolytic activity, which were 5- and 2-fold relative to those of HUVECs alone, respectively. A separate coculture experiment revealed that direct contact of THP-1 cells and HUVECs contributed to enhanced MMP-1 production in the cocolture. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that both types of cell produce MMP-1 in the coculture. Neutralizing anti-interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor- alpha antibodies inhibited MMP-1 production by the coculture. The Src kinase and MEK inhibitors significantly inhibited MMP-1 production by the coculture. Coculture of THP-1 cells and HUVECs induced significant increases in Src and mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activities. Enhanced MMP-1 expression induced by monocyte-endothelial cell interactions may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and plaque rupture.

  9. Invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis strains into vascular cells and tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered a major pathogen in adult periodontitis and is also associated with multiple systemic diseases, for example, cardiovascular diseases. One of its most important virulence factors is invasion of host cells. The invasion process includes attachment, entry/internalization, trafficking, persistence, and exit. The present review discusses these processes related to P. gingivalis in cardiovascular cells and tissue. Although most P. gingivalis strains invade, the invasion capacity of strains and the mechanisms of invasion including intracellular trafficking among them differ. This is consistent with the fact that there are significant differences in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis strains. P. gingivalis invasion mechanisms are also dependent on types of host cells. Although much is known about the invasion process of P. gingivalis, we still have little knowledge of its exit mechanisms. Nevertheless, it is intriguing that P. gingivalis can remain viable in human cardiovascular cells and atherosclerotic plaque and later exit and re-enter previously uninfected host cells.

  10. Composite vascular grafts with high cell infiltration by co-electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhikai; Wang, Hongjie; Gao, Xiangkai; Liu, Tong; Tan, Yongjun

    2016-10-01

    There is an increasing demand for functional small-diameter vascular grafts (diameterElectrospinning has become a popular polymer processing technique for vascular tissue engineering, but the grafts fabricated by electrospinning often have relatively small pores and low porosity, which limit cell infiltration into scaffolds and hinder the regeneration and remodeling of grafts. In the present study, we aimed to develop an efficient method to prepare electrospun composite vascular grafts comprising natural and synthetic materials. We fabricated grafts made of polycaprolactone, gelatin, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by co-electrospinning, and the scaffolds were further functionalized by immobilizing heparin on them. The PVA fibers degraded rapidly in vivo and generated electrospun scaffolds with high porosity, which significantly enhanced cell proliferation and infiltration. The mechanical properties of the grafts are suitable for use in artery replacement. Heparin functionalization of the grafts yielded a good antithrombogenic effect, which was demonstrated in platelet adhesion tests. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that the heparin release from the grafts enhanced the growth of endothelial cells, which is important for the endothelium of implanted grafts. The results of this study indicate that our method is effective and controllable for the fabrication of vascular grafts that meet the clinical requirements for blood vessel transplantation.

  11. Formyl Peptide Receptor Activation Elicits Endothelial Cell Contraction and Vascular Leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenceslau, Camilla F; McCarthy, Cameron G; Webb, R Clinton

    2016-01-01

    The major pathophysiological characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis is the loss of control of vascular tone and endothelial barrier dysfunction. These changes are attributed to pro-inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed that in patients and rats without infection, cell components from damaged tissue are the primary instigators of vascular damage. Mitochondria share several characteristics with bacteria, and when fragments of mitochondria are released into the circulation after injury, they are recognized by the innate immune system. N-Formyl peptides are common molecular signatures of bacteria and mitochondria and are known to play a role in the initiation of inflammation by activating the formyl peptide receptor (FPR). We have demonstrated that infusion of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) leads to sepsis-like symptoms, including vascular leakage. We have also observed that F-MIT, via FPR activation, elicits changes in cytoskeleton-regulating proteins in endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that these FPR-mediated changes in cytoskeleton can cause endothelial cell contraction and, consequently vascular leakage. Here, we propose that endothelial FPR is a key contributor to impaired barrier function in SIRS and sepsis patients following trauma.

  12. Increased expression of osteoprotegerin in vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongshan MOU; Tianhua LEI; Luning ZHAO; Xiaojun ZHU; Mingui FU; Yuqing E CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Background Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a secreted protein of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, which regulates bone mass by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activation. Although OPG is expressed ubiquitously and abundantly in many tissues and cell types including vascular cells, the role of OPG in other tissues is unknown.Our previous studies demonstrated that OPG was highly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and upregulated during vascular lesion formation. Methods and Results We documented, by Northern blot analysis,that the expression of OPG was more prevalent in the aorta and cultured VSMC from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SI-IR) compared to Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). In addition, we found that the expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II)type I receptor (AT1R) in SHR VSMC was at significantly increased levels than in WKY VSMC. Furthermore, Ang II potently induced the expression of OPG in VSMC in a time- and dose-dependent manner through the AT1R signaling pathway. Conclusions OPG expression was substantially greater in SHR VSMC, suggesting that OPG may be an important determinant of vascular remodeling in SHR.

  13. Monocyte-expressed urokinase regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell migration in a coculture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Sergey; Lutter, Steffen; Haller, Hermann; Dietz, Rainer; Lipp, Martin; Dumler, Inna

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with monocytes recruited to the arterial wall at a site of injury, with resultant modulation of VSMC growth and migration, are central to the development of vascular intimal thickening. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expressed by monocytes is a potent chemotactic factor for VSMC and might serve for the acceleration of vascular remodeling. In this report, we demonstrate that coculture of human VSMC with freshly isolated peripheral blood-derived human monocytes results in significant VSMC migration that increases during the coculture period. Accordingly, VSMC adhesion was inhibited with similar kinetics. VSMC proliferation, however, was not affected and remained at the same basal level during the whole period of coculture. The increase of VSMC migration in coculture was equivalent to the uPA-induced migration of monocultured VSMC and was blocked by addition into coculture of soluble uPAR (suPAR). Analysis of uPA and uPAR expression in cocultured cells demonstrated that monocytes are a major source of uPA, whose expression increases in coculture five-fold, whereas VSMC display an increased expression of cell surface-associated uPAR. These findings indicate that upregulated uPA production by monocytes following vascular injury acts most likely as an endogenous activator of VSMC migration contributing to the remodeling of vessel walls.

  14. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Luke T; Norton, Christine R; Gridley, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice.

  15. TDIF peptide signaling regulates vascular stem cell proliferation via the WOX4 homeobox gene in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Yuki; Kondo, Yuki; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2010-08-01

    The indeterminate nature of plant growth and development depends on the stem cell system found in meristems. The Arabidopsis thaliana vascular meristem includes procambium and cambium. In these tissues, cell-cell signaling, mediated by a ligand-receptor pair made of the TDIF (for tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor) peptide and the TDR/PXY (for TDIF RECEPTOR/ PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM) membrane protein kinase, promotes proliferation of procambial cells and suppresses their xylem differentiation. Here, we report that a WUSCHEL-related HOMEOBOX gene, WOX4, is a key target of the TDIF signaling pathway. WOX4 is expressed preferentially in the procambium and cambium, and its expression level was upregulated upon application of TDIF in a TDR-dependent manner. Genetic analyses showed that WOX4 is required for promoting the proliferation of procambial/cambial stem cells but not for repressing their commitment to xylem differentiation in response to the TDIF signal. Thus, at least two intracellular signaling pathways that diverge after TDIF recognition by TDR might regulate independently the behavior of vascular stem cells. Detailed observations in loss-of-function mutants revealed that TDIF-TDR-WOX4 signaling plays a crucial role in the maintenance of the vascular meristem organization during secondary growth.

  16. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Possible Contribution of a Defective Vascular Niche to Myelodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Teofili

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We set a model to replicate the vascular bone marrow niche by using endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs, and we used it to explore the vascular niche function in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. Overall, we investigated 56 patients and we observed higher levels of ECFCs in MDS than in healthy controls; moreover, MDS ECFCs were found variably hypermethylated for p15INK4b DAPK1, CDH1, or SOCS1. MDS ECFCs exhibited a marked adhesive capacity to normal mononuclear cells. When normal CD34+ cells were co-cultured with MDS ECFCs, they generated significant lower amounts of CD11b+ and CD41+ cells than in co-culture with normal ECFCs. At gene expression profile, several genes involved in cell adhesion were upregulated in MDS ECFCs, while several members of the Wingless and int (Wnt pathways were underexpressed. Furthermore, at miRNA expression profile, MDS ECFCs hypo-expressed various miRNAs involved in Wnt pathway regulation. The addition of Wnt3A reduced the expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 on MDS ECFCs and restored the defective expression of markers of differentiation. Overall, our data demonstrate that in low-risk MDS, ECFCs exhibit various primary abnormalities, including putative MDS signatures, and suggest the possible contribution of the vascular niche dysfunction to myelodysplasia.

  17. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote vascular growth in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Roura

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are promising strategies to regenerate human injured tissues, including ischemic myocardium. Here, we examined the acquisition of properties associated with vascular growth by human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs, and whether they promoted vascular growth in vivo. UCBMSCs were induced in endothelial cell-specific growth medium (EGM-2 acquiring new cell markers, increased Ac-LDL uptake, and migratory capacity as assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blotting, indirect immunofluorescence, and invasion assays. Angiogenic and vasculogenic potentials could be anticipated by in vitro experiments showing self organization into Matrigel-mediated cell networks, and activation of circulating angiogenic-supportive myeloid cells. In mice, following subcutaneous co-injection with Matrigel, UCBMSCs modified to co-express bioluminescent (luciferases and fluorescent proteins were demonstrated to participate in the formation of new microvasculature connected with the host circulatory system. Response of UCBMSCs to ischemia was explored in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction (MI. UCBMSCs transplanted using a fibrin patch survived 4 weeks post-implantation and organized into CD31(+network structures above the infarcted myocardium. MI-treated animals showed a reduced infarct scar and a larger vessel-occupied area in comparison with MI-control animals. Taken together, the presented results show that UCBMSCs can be induced in vitro to acquire angiogenic and vasculogenic properties and contribute to vascular growth in vivo.

  18. Emerging role of TRP channels in cell migration: from tumor vascularization to metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eFioro Pla

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential (TRP channels modulate intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, controlling critical cytosolic and nuclear events that are involved in the initiation and progression of cancer. It is not, therefore, surprising that the expression of some TRP channels is altered during tumor growth and metastasis. Cell migration of both epithelial and endothelial cells is an essential step of the so-called metastatic cascade that leads to the spread of the disease within the body. It is in fact required for both tumor vascularization as well as for tumor cell invasion into adjacent tissues and intravasation into blood/lymphatic vessels. Studies from the last 15 years have unequivocally shown that the ion channles and the transport proteins also play important roles in cell migration. On the other hand, recent literature underlies a critical role for TRP channels in the migration process both in cancer cells as well as in tumor vascularization. This will be the main focus of our review. We will provide an overview of recent advances in this field describing TRP channels contribution to the process vascular and cancer cell migration, and we will systematically discuss relevant molecular mechanism involved.

  19. Characterization of ionizing radiation-induced unfolded protein response in human vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, Yoon Jin; Kang, Seong Man [Laboratory of Radiation Effect, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Misfolded or unfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress), viral infection, or amino acid deprivation induce eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α phosphorylation (eIF2α) in eukaryotic cells, repressing global protein synthesis coincident with preferential translation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). ATF4 is a transcriptional activator of genes involved in amino acid metabolism, cellular redox homeostasis, and regulation of apoptosis. When the eIF2α/ATF4 pathway is initiated by ER stress, the pathway is referred toas the unfolded protein response (UPR). In addition to DNA, proteins may be initial and important targets of ionizing radiation (IR), and the damaged protein can trigger ER stress pathway. Recent investigations suggested that IR induces ER stress followed by UPR in various cell types including intestinal epithelial cells. We conducted this study to determine whether IR can activate UPR in human vascular endothelial cells. Our data have shown that IR increased PERK-dependent eIF2α phosphorylation accompanied by induction in ATF4 protein levels in human vascular endothelial cells without alterations in expressions of XBP-1s and GRP78. Based on these data, we suggest that IR selectively activates PERK branch of unfolded protein response in human vascular endothelial cells.

  20. Effects of adipose stem cell-conditioned medium on the migration of vascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts and keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Li; ZHAO, JIAJIA; Liu, Jiarong; Gong, Niya; Chen, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Adipose stem cell-conditioned medium (ASC-CM) has been successfully used to treat multiple types of tissue and organ defects, including skin wounds both in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanisms through which ASC-CM promotes wound healing remain unclear. We hypothesized that the wound healing effect of ASC-CM is mediated in part by the promotion of the migration of vascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts and keratinocytes, the three cell types essential for wound healing. We reported that...

  1. Antibiotic regimen based on population analysis of residing persister cells eradicates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shoufeng; Hay, Iain D; Cameron, David R; Speir, Mary; Cui, Bintao; Su, Feifei; Peleg, Anton Y; Lithgow, Trevor; Deighton, Margaret A; Qu, Yue

    2015-12-21

    Biofilm formation is a major pathogenicity strategy of Staphylococcus epidermidis causing various medical-device infections. Persister cells have been implicated in treatment failure of such infections. We sought to profile bacterial subpopulations residing in S. epidermidis biofilms, and to establish persister-targeting treatment strategies to eradicate biofilms. Population analysis was performed by challenging single biofilm cells with antibiotics at increasing concentrations ranging from planktonic minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) to biofilm MBCs (MBCbiofilm). Two populations of "persister cells" were observed: bacteria that survived antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for 24/48 hours were referred to as dormant cells; those selected with antibiotics at 8 X MICs for 3 hours (excluding dormant cells) were defined as tolerant-but-killable (TBK) cells. Antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells were tested in vitro for their efficacies in eradicating persister cells and intact biofilms. This study confirmed that there are at least three subpopulations within a S. epidermidis biofilm: normal cells, dormant cells, and TBK cells. Biofilms comprise more TBK cells and dormant cells than their log-planktonic counterparts. Using antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells, i.e. effective antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for an extended period, might eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms. Potential uses for this strategy are in antibiotic lock techniques and inhaled aerosolized antibiotics.

  2. Insulin resistance in vascular endothelial cells promotes intestinal tumour formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Häring, M-F; Rathjen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    in tumour endothelial cells produces an activated, proinflammatory state that promotes tumorigenesis. Improvement of endothelial dysfunction may reduce colorectal cancer risk in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes.Oncogene advance online publication, 1 May 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.107....

  3. Mast Cell Inhibition Improves Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelds, Beatrijs; van Loon, Rosa Laura E.; Mohaupt, Saffloer; Wijnberg, Hans; Dickinson, Michael G.; Takens, Janny; van Albada, Mirjam; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Boersma, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive angioproliferative disease with high morbidity and mortality. Although the histopathology is well described, its pathogenesis is largely unknown. We previously identified the increased presence of mast cells and their markers in a ra

  4. Vascular Cell Senescence Contributes to Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Baker, D.J.; Tachibana, M.; Liu, C.C.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Brott, T.G.; Bu, G.; Kanekiyo, T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Age-related changes in the cerebrovasculature, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, are emerging as potential risks for diverse neurological conditions. Because the accumulation of senescent cells in tissues is increasingly recognized as a critical step leading to

  5. The use of fiber-reinforced scaffolds cocultured with Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells to repair rabbit sciatic nerve defect with vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongyang; You, Yang; Zhang, Guoping; Zhao, Feng; Sha, Ziyi; Shen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function.

  6. The Use of Fiber-Reinforced Scaffolds Cocultured with Schwann Cells and Vascular Endothelial Cells to Repair Rabbit Sciatic Nerve Defect with Vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyang Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function.

  7. Silicate bioceramics enhanced vascularization and osteogenesis through stimulating interactions between endothelia cells and bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Xue, Ke; Kong, Ni; Liu, Kai; Chang, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    The facts that biomaterials affect the behavior of single type of cells have been widely accepted. However, the effects of biomaterials on cell-cell interactions have rarely been reported. Bone tissue engineering involves osteoblastic cells (OCs), endothelial cells (ECs) and the interactions between OCs and ECs. It has been reported that silicate biomaterials can stimulate osteogenic differentiation of OCs and vascularization of ECs. However, the effects of silicate biomaterials on the interactions between ECs and OCs during vascularization and osteogenesis have not been reported, which are critical for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) bioceramics on interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and on stimulation of vascularization and osteogenesis in vivo through combining co-cultures with CS containing scaffolds. Specifically, the effects of CS on the angiogenic growth factor VEGF, osteogenic growth factor BMP-2 and the cross-talks between VEGF and BMP-2 in the co-culture system were elucidated. Results showed that CS stimulated co-cultured HBMSCs (co-HBMSCs) to express VEGF and the VEGF activated its receptor KDR on co-cultured HUVECs (co-HUVECs), which was also up-regulated by CS. Then, BMP-2 and nitric oxide expression from the co-HUVECs were stimulated by CS and the former stimulated osteogenic differentiation of co-HBMSCs while the latter stimulated vascularization of co-HVUECs. Finally, the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/CS composite scaffolds with the co-cultured HBMSCs and HUVECs significantly enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, which indicates that it is a promising way to enhance bone regeneration by combining scaffolds containing silicate bioceramics and co-cultures of ECs and OCs.

  8. Iron ion irradiation increases promotes adhesion of monocytic cells to arterial vascular endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucik, Dennis; Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Yu, Tao; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz

    Radiation causes inflammation, and chronic, low-level vascular inflammation is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Consistent with this, exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Part of the inflammatory response to radiation is a change in the adhesiveness of the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, triggering inappropriate accumulation of leukocytes, leading to later, damaging effects of inflammation. Although some studies have been done on the effects of gamma irradiation on vascular endothelium, the response of endothelium to heavy ion radiation likely to be encountered in prolonged space flight has not been determined. We investigated how irradiation of aortic endothelial cells with iron ions affects adhesiveness of cultured aortic endothelial cells for monocytic cells and the consequences of this for development of atherosclerosis. Aortic endothelial cells were irradiated with 600 MeV iron ions at Brookhaven National Laboratory and adhesion-related changes were measured. Cells remained viable for at least 72 hours, and were even able to repair acute damage to cell junctions. We found that iron ion irradiation altered expression levels of specific endothelial cell adhesion molecules. Further, these changes had functional consequences. Using a flow chamber adhesion assay to measure adhesion of monocytic cells to endothelial cells under physiological shear stress, we found that adhesivity of vascular endothelium was enhanced in as little as 24 hours after irradiation. Further, the radiation dose dependence was not monotonic, suggesting that it was not simply the result of endothelial cell damage. We also irradiated aortic arches and carotid arteries of Apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice. Histologic analysis of these mice will be conducted to determine whether effects of radiation on endothelial adhesiveness result in consequences for development of atherosclerosis. (Supported by NSBRI

  9. [Biological activities of exogenous polysaccharides via controlling endogenous proteoglycan metabolism in vascular endothelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Chika; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2008-05-01

    Proteoglycan contains glycosmainoglycans, which are endogenous sulfated polysaccharides, in the molecule. The metabolism of proteoglycans regulates cell behavior and cellular events. It is possible that exogenous polysaccharide-related molecules exhibit their biological activities by two mechanisms. One is the interaction with cells and the other is the interaction with growth factors/cytokines that regulate proteoglycans. In this review, we describe sodium spirulan, a sulfated polysaccharide obtained from a hot-water extract of the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis, as an exogenous polysaccharide that stimulates the release of proteoglycans from vascular endothelial cells. Factors that regulate endothelial proteoglycan metabolism are also being described as possible target molecules of exogenous polysaccharides. Further research is required to obtain exogenous polysaccharide-related molecules that exhibit useful biological activities through controlling endothelial proteoglycan metabolism for protection against vascular lesions such as atheroslcerosis.

  10. The effect of space microgravity on the physiological activity of mammalian resident cardiac stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Zakharov, Eugeny

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness during space flights is known to cause depression of heart function in mammals. The decrease in heart weight and its remodeling under the influence of prolonged weightlessness (or space microgravity) is assumed to be due to both morphological changes of working cardiomyocytes and their progressive loss, as well as to possible depletion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) population, or their inability to self-renewal and regeneration of muscle tissue under conditions of weightlessness. We have previously shown that the presence of different maturity clones formed by resident CSCs not only in culture but also in the mammalian myocardium can be used as an indicator of the regenerative activity of myocardial cells [Belostotskaya, et al., 2013: 2014]. In this study, we were interested to investigate whether the 30-day near-Earth space flight on the spacecraft BION-M1 affects the regenerative potential of resident CSCs. Immediately after landing of the spacecraft, we had examined the presence of resident c-kit+, Sca-1+ and Isl1+ CSCs and their development in suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells of C57BL mice in comparison to controls. Cardiac cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion of the heart [Belostotskaya and Golovanova, 2014]. Immunocytochemically stained preparations of fixed cells were analyzed with confocal microscope Leica TCS SP5 (Germany) in the Resource Center of St-Petersburg State University. CSCs were labeled with appropriate antibodies. CSCs differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes was verified using antibodies to Sarcomeric α-Actinin and Cardiac Troponin T. Antibodies to Connexin43 were used to detect cell-cell contacts. All antibodies were conjugated with Alexa fluorochromes (488, 532, 546, 568, 594 and/or 647 nm), according to Zenon-technology (Invitrogen). It has been shown that, under identical conditions of cell isolation, more complete digestion of heart muscle was observed in

  11. Vascular endothelial dysfunction in β-thalassemia occurs despite increased eNOS expression and preserved vascular smooth muscle cell reactivity to NO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekatherina Stoyanova

    Full Text Available AIMS: The hereditary β-thalassemia major condition requires regular lifelong blood transfusions. Transfusion-related iron overloading has been associated with the onset of cardiovascular complications, including cardiac dysfunction and vascular anomalies. By using an untransfused murine model of β-thalassemia major, we tested the hypothesis that vascular endothelial dysfunction, alterations of arterial structure and of its mechanical properties would occur despite the absence of treatments. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular function and structure were evaluated ex vivo. Compared to the controls, endothelium-dependent vasodilation with acetylcholine was blunted in mesenteric resistance arteries of β-thalassemic mice while the endothelium-independent vasodilator (sodium nitroprusside produced comparable vessel dilation, indicating endothelial cell impairment with preserved smooth muscle cell reactivity to nitric oxide (NO. While these findings suggest a decrease in NO bioavailability, Western blotting showed heightened expression of aortic endothelial NO synthase (eNOS in β-thalassemia. Vascular remodeling of the common carotid arteries revealed increased medial elastin content. Under isobaric conditions, the carotid arteries of β-thalassemic mice exhibited decreased wall stress and softening due to structural changes of the vessel wall. CONCLUSIONS: A complex vasculopathy was identified in untransfused β-thalassemic mice characterized by altered carotid artery structure and endothelial dysfunction of resistance arterioles, likely attributable to reduced NO bioavailability despite enhanced vascular eNOS expression.

  12. Effects of Panax notoginseng saponins on vascular endothelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    關超然; 關加荤

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibition of endothelium-dependent in vitro vascular relaxation induced by the total saponins (gensenosides) from Panax notoginseng ( PNS ) and the effect of PNS on the cytosolic Ca2 + concentration on cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells.METHODS: The endothelial-dependent vascular relaxation was assessed using acetylcholine (ACh) or cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) induced relaxation in endothelium-intact rat aorta. Cytosolic Caa + level was assessed in real time using dynamic digital fluorescence ratio imaging.RESULTS: In addition to its direct relaxation of the smooth muscle cells at high concentrations, PNS, at 100 mg/L having little effect on smooth muscle, caused a marked inhibition of endothelium-dependent relaxation brought about by PNS. This inhibitory effect was due to its inhibition of elevation of cytosolic Ca2 + , which is required for the activation of NO generation and release from the vascular endothelial cells. Nifedipine has no effect on either the endothelium-dependent relaxation or the cytosolic Ca2 + level in the cultured endothelial cells.CONCLUSION: Our findings are consistent with the known action of PNS on receptor-operated Ca2 + channels and support our contention that PNS inhibits endotheliumdependent relaxation by preventing the increase of Ca2 + level in endothelial cells via the receptor-operated Ca2 + channels in the presence of ACh or the non-selective cation channels opened by CPA.

  13. The majority of human memory B cells recognizing RhD and tetanus resides in IgM+ B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Valle, Luciana; Dohmen, Serge E; Verhagen, Onno J H M; Berkowska, Magdalena A; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ellen van der Schoot, C

    2014-08-01

    B cell memory to T cell-dependent (TD) Ags are considered to largely reside in class-switched CD27(+) cells. However, we previously observed that anti-RhD (D) Igs cloned from two donors, hyperimmunized with D(+) erythrocytes, were predominantly of the IgM isotype. We therefore analyzed in this study the phenotype and frequency of D- and tetanus toxoid-specific B cells by culturing B cells in limiting dilution upon irradiated CD40L-expressing EL4.B5 cells and testing the culture supernatant. Most Ag-specific B cells for both TD Ags were found to reside in the IgM-expressing B cells, including CD27(-) B cells, in both hyperimmunized donors and nonhyperimmunized volunteers. Only shortly after immunization a sharp increase in Ag-specific CD27(+)IgG(+) B cells was observed. Next, B cells were enriched with D(+) erythrocyte ghosts and sorted as single cells. Sequencing of IGHV, IGLV, IGKV, and BCL6 genes from these D-specific B cell clones demonstrated that both CD27(-)IgM(+) and CD27(+)IgM(+) B cells harbored somatic mutations, documenting their Ag-selected nature. Furthermore, sequencing revealed a clonal relationship between the CD27(-)IgM(+), CD27(+)IgM(+), and CD27(+)IgG(+) B cell subsets. These data strongly support the recently described multiple layers of memory B cells to TD Ags in mice, where IgM(+) B cells represent a memory reservoir which can re-enter the germinal center and ensure replenishment of class-switched memory CD27(+) B cells from Ag-experienced precursors.

  14. TCR-pMHC encounter differentially regulates transcriptomes of(-) tissue-resident CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Akihiro; Bi, Kevin; Keskin, Derin B; Zhang, Guanglang; Reinhold, Bruce; Reinherz, Ellis L

    2017-09-05

    To investigate the role of TCR-pMHC interaction in regulating lung CD8 tissue-resident T cell (TR ) differentiation, polyclonal responses were compared against NP366-374 /D(b) and PA224-233 /D(b) , two immunodominant epitopes that arise during influenza A infection in mice. Memory niches distinct from iBALTs develop within the lamina propria, supporting CD103+ and CD103- CD8 TR generation and intraepithelial translocation. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) identify dominant TCR, adherence junction, RIG-I-like and NOD-like pattern recognition receptor as well as TGFβ signaling pathways and memory signatures among PA224-233 /D(b) T cells consistent with T resident memory (TRM ) status. In contrast, NP366-374 /D(b) T cells exhibit enrichment of effector signatures, upregulating pro-inflammatory mediators even among TRM . While NP366-374 /D(b) T cells manifest transcripts linked to canonical exhaustion pathways, PA224-233 /D(b) T cells exploit P2xr7 purinoreceptor attenuation. The NP366-374 /D(b) CD103+ subset expresses the antimicrobial lactotransferrin whereas PA224-233 /D(b) CD103+ utilizes pore-forming mpeg-1, with T cell biology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Vascular remodeling and mobilization of bone marrow-derived cells in cuff-induced vascular injury in LDL receptor knockout muce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Vascular remodeling is an important pathologic process in vascular injury for various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis,postangioplasty restenosis and transplant arteriopathy.Recently,pathologic change and the role of bone marrow derived cells were wildly studied in atherosclerosis and restenosis.But the manner of lesion formation in neointima and cell recruitment in vascular remodeling lesion in the present of hypercholesterolemia is not Vet fully understood. Methods Double-transgenic mice knockout of LDL receptor gene (LDL-/-) and expressing ubiquitously green fluorescent protein (GFP) were obtained by cross-breeding LDL-/-mice with the GFP-expressing transgenic mice. LDL-/- mice (22-24 weeks of age) fed high fat diet containing 1.25% (w/w) cholesterol were subjected to 9Gy irradiation and received bone marrow (BM) cells from the double-transgenic mice.Four weeks later,a nonconstrictive cuff was Dlaced around the right femoral artery.After another 2 weeks,both right and left femoral arteries were harvested and subjected to histochemical analysis.Apoptosis was analyzed in situ using TUNEL assay.Resuits Two weeks after cuff placement,atherosclerotic lesions developed in the intima consisting of a massive accumulation of foam cells, The tissue stained with anti-α smooth muscle actin (SMA) antibody,showed a number of SMA-positive cells in the intimal lesion area.They were also positive for GFP,indicating that BM-derived cells can differentiate to SMCs in the intima in cuff-induced vascular remodeling lesions.Numerous small vessels in the adventitia as well as the endothelial lining of the intima were positive both for CD31 and GFP.The intima and media showed a larae number of TUNEL-positive signals after 2 weeks cuff injury,indicating the presence of apoptosis in vascular remodelina.Conclusions Atherosclerotic lesions in mice can be developed in the intima after 2 weeks of cuff-induced vascular inJury under the hypercholesterolemic conditions

  16. High-dose insulin inhibits gap junction intercellular communication in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Ou; Zhang, Haishan; Guan, Qigang; Sun, Yingxian; Zeng, Dingyin

    2015-07-01

    Gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) is important in mediating intercellular substance and signal transmission. Connexin (Cx)43 is a major component involved in GJIC in vascular tissue and its abnormal expression is closely associated with various vascular diseases. Insulin resistance is the central component of metabolic syndrome, and high doses of insulin can affect vascular function through multiple pathways, resulting in cardiovascular disease. However, the effects of insulin on GJIC function and connexin (Cx)43 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) remain unclear. Following treatment of VSMCs with different doses of insulin, a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assay was performed to evaluate GJIC function in treated VSMCs. The results showed that high‑dose insulin suppressed GJIC function. Western blot assays further demonstrated that high‑dose insulin induced the phosphorylation of Cx43 at s368 and downregulated the expression of Cx43. H2O2 release assays demonstrated that high‑dose insulin treatment significantly elevated the cellular H2O2 level. In addition, compared with cells treated with high‑dose insulin, pretreatment with catalase significantly restored the cellular GJIC function, decreased the phosphorylation level of Cx43 at s368, and enhanced Cx43 expression. In conclusion, these data indicate that high‑dose insulin inhibits cellular GJIC function through the oxidative stress‑activated signaling pathway. This phenomenon may also constitute a potential mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and its complications.

  17. Plasma treatment for improving cell biocompatibility of a biodegradable polymer scaffold for vascular graft applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valence, Sarra de; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Chaabane, Chiraz; Gurny, Robert; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Walpoth, Beat H; Möller, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Biodegradable synthetic scaffolds are being evaluated by many groups for the application of vascular tissue engineering. In addition to the choice of the material and the structure of the scaffold, tailoring the surface properties can have an important effect on promoting adequate tissue regeneration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of an increased hydrophilicity of a polycaprolactone vascular graft by treatment with a cold air plasma. To this end, treated and untreated scaffolds were characterized, evaluated in vitro with smooth muscle cells, and implanted in vivo in the rat model for 3 weeks, both in the subcutaneous location and as an aortic replacement. The plasma treatment significantly increased the hydrophilicity of the scaffold, with complete wetting after a treatment of 60 sec, but did not change fiber morphology or mechanical properties. Smooth muscle cells cultured on plasma treated patches adopt a spread out morphology compared to a small, rounded morphology on untreated patches. Subcutaneous implantation revealed a low foreign body reaction for both types of scaffolds and a more extended and dense cellular infiltrate in the plasma treated scaffolds. In the vascular position, the plasma treatment induced a better cellularization of the graft wall, while it did not affect endothelialization rate or intimal hyperplasia. Plasma treatment is therefore an accessible tool to easily increase the biocompatibility of a scaffold and accelerate tissue regeneration without compromising mechanical strength, which are valuable advantages for vascular tissue engineering.

  18. Activated mineralocorticoid receptor regulates micro-RNA-29b in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, Maria; Busch, Bianca; Mueller, Daniel; Nolze, Alexander; Schreier, Barbara; Gekle, Michael; Grossmann, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Inappropriately activated mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a risk factor for vascular remodeling with unclear molecular mechanism. Recent findings suggest that post-transcriptional regulation by micro-RNAs (miRs) may be involved. Our aim was to search for MR-dependent miRs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism and the pathologic relevance. We detected that aldosteroneviathe MR reduces miR-29bin vivoin murine aorta and in human primary and cultured VSMCs (ED50= 0.07 nM) but not in endothelial cells [quantitative PCR (qPCR), luciferase assays]. This effect was mediated by an increased decay of miR-29b in the cytoplasm with unchanged miR-29 family member or primary-miR levels. Decreased miR-29b led to an increase in extracellular matrix measured by ELISA and qPCR and enhanced VSMC migration in single cell-tracking experiments. Additionally, cell proliferation and the apoptosis/necrosis ratio (caspase/lactate dehydrogenase assay) was modulated by miR-29b. Enhanced VSMC migration by aldosterone required miR-29b regulation. Control experiments were performed with scrambled RNA and empty plasmids, by comparing aldosterone-stimulated with vehicle-incubated cells. Overall, our findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of aldosterone-mediated vascular pathogenesis by identifying miR-29b as a pathophysiologic relevant target of activated MR in VSMCs and by highlighting the importance of miR processing for miR regulation.-Bretschneider, M., Busch, B., Mueller, D., Nolze, A., Schreier, B., Gekle, M., Grossmann, C. Activated mineralocorticoid receptor regulates micro-RNA-29b in vascular smooth muscle cells. © FASEB.

  19. Three-dimensional vascular network assembly from diabetic patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Xin Yi; Black, Rebecca; Dickerman, Kayla; Federico, Joseph; Levesque, Mathieu; Mumm, Jeff; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Objective In diabetics, hyperglycemia results in deficient endothelial progenitors and cells, leading to cardiovascular complications. We aim to engineer three-dimensional (3D) vascular networks in synthetic hydrogels from type-1 diabetes (T1D) patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), to serve as a transformative autologous vascular therapy for diabetic patients. Approach and Results We validated and optimized an adherent, feeder free differentiation procedure to derive early vascular cells (EVCs) with high portions of VEcad+ cells from hiPSCs. We demonstrate similar differentiation efficiency from hiPSCs derived from healthy donor and T1D patients. T1D-hiPSC-derived VEcad+ cells can mature to functional endothelial cells (ECs) expressing mature markers: von Willebrand factor and eNOS, are capable of lectin binding and acetylated low density lipoprotein uptake, form cords in Matrigel and respond to tumor necrosis factor alpha. When embedded in engineered hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels, T1D-EVCs undergo morphogenesis and assemble into 3D networks. When encapsulated in a novel hypoxia-inducible (HI) hydrogel, T1D-EVCs respond to low oxygen and form 3D networks. As xenografts, T1D-EVCs incorporate into developing zebrafish vasculature. Conclusion Using our robust protocol, we can direct efficient differentiation of T1D-hiPSC to EVCs. Early ECs derived from T1D-hiPSC are functional when mature. T1D-EVCs self-assembled into 3D networks when embedded in HA and HI hydrogels. The capability of T1D-EVCs to assemble into 3D networks in engineered matrices and to respond to a hypoxic microenvironment is a significant advancement for autologous vascular therapy in diabetic patients and has broad importance for tissue engineering. PMID:26449749

  20. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ji, Yajing [Department of Biomedical Science and Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot [Department of Biology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ash, David E. [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Mohanty, Dillip K., E-mail: Mohan1dk@cmich.edu [Department of Chemistry, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well.

  1. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O; Herbert, Karl E; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J; Goodall, Alison H; Bevington, Alan

    2015-09-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk.

  2. Continuous taurocholic acid exposure promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma progression due to reduced cell loss resulting from enhanced vascular development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Sato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Refluxogenic effects of smoking and alcohol abuse may be related to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. The present study attempts to clarify the effects of continuous taurocholic acid (TCA exposure, which is neither mutagenic nor genotoxic, on ESCC progression. METHODS: A squamous carcinoma cell line (ESCC-DR was established from a tumor induced in a rat model of gastroduodenal reflux. ESCC-DR cells were incubated with 2 mM TCA for ≥2 months. The effects of continuous TCA exposure were evaluated in vitro on cell morphology, growth, and invasion and in vivo on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, the mean level of secreted transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF proteins in cell culture supernatants and mRNA synthesis of TGF-β1 and VEGF-A of ESCC cells were measured. The angiogenic potential was further examined by a migration assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. RESULTS: Continuous TCA exposure induced marked formation of filopodia in vitro. Expression levels of angiogenic factors were significantly higher in the cells treated with TCA than in control cells. Tumor xenografts derived from cells pre-exposed to TCA were larger and more vascularized than those derived from control cells. In addition, TCA exposure increased HUVEC migration. CONCLUSION: Continuous TCA exposure enhanced ESCC progression due to reduced cell loss in vivo. Cell loss was inhibited by TCA-induced vascular endothelial cell migration, which was mediated by TGF-β1 and VEGF-A released from ESCC cells.

  3. Terapia celular no acidente vascular cerebral Cell therapy in strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia Mendez-Otero

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available O AVC é o recordista em número de óbitos e a maior causa de incapacidade no Brasil. Apesar das inúmeras pesquisas realizadas ao longo dos últimos anos não há terapias farmacológicas adequadas para este quadro e, neste cenário, as terapias celulares vêm sendo consideradas como alternativas terapêuticas para diminuir as perdas funcionais decorrentes do AVC. Nesta revisão comentaremos os resultados de diversos estudos pré-clinicos e de alguns clínicos que utilizaram diferentes tipos de células-tronco em AVC.Stroke is the leading cause of death and incapacity in Brazil. Over the last few years, numerous preclinical and clinical studies have been carried out, however to date, none of the drugs tested in these studies were effective in patients. The emerging field of stem cell research has raised hope of therapy to ameliorate the functional loss after strokes. In this review we will discuss the results of several preclinical studies and clinical trials using different types of stem cells in the treatment of strokes.

  4. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine [Pôle de Recherche Cardiovasculaire, IREC, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Morel, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.morel@uclouvain.be [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  5. Improvement of endothelial progenitor outgrowth cell (EPOC)-mediated vascularization in gelatin-based hydrogels through pore size manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiayin; Wiraja, Christian; Muhammad, Hamizan B; Xu, Chenjie; Wang, Dong-An

    2017-08-01

    In addition to chemical compositions, physical properties of scaffolds, such as pore size, can also influence vascularization within the scaffolds. A larger pore has been shown to improve host vascular tissue invasion into scaffolds. However, the influence of pore sizes on vascularization by endothelial cells directly encapsulated in hydrogels remains unknown. In this study, micro-cavitary hydrogels with different pore sizes were created in gelatin-methacrylate hydrogels with dissolvable gelatin microspheres (MS) varying in sizes. The effect of pore sizes on vascular network formation by endothelial progenitor outgrowth cells (EPOCs) encapsulated in hydrogels was then investigated both in vitro and in vivo. When cultured in vitro, vascular networks were formed around pore structures in micro-cavitary hydrogels. The middle pore size supported best differentiation of EPOCs and thus best hydrogel vascularization in vitro. When implantation in vivo, functional connections between encapsulated EPOCs and host vasculature micro-cavitary hydrogels were established. Vascularization in vivo was promoted best in hydrogels with the large pore size due to the increased vascular tissue invasion. These results highlight the difference between in vitro and in vivo culture conditions and indicate that pore sizes shall be designed for in vitro and in vivo hydrogel vascularization respectively. Pore sizes for hydrogel vascularization in vitro shall be middle ones and pore sizes for hydrogel vascularization in vivo shall be large ones. This study reveals that the optimal pore size for hydrogel vascularization in vitro and in vivo is different. The middle pore size supported best differentiation of EPOCs and thus best hydrogel vascularization in vitro, while vascularization in vivo was promoted best in hydrogels with the large pore size due to the increased vascular tissue invasion. These results highlight the difference between in vitro and in vivo culture conditions and indicate that

  6. Zinc oxide particles induce inflammatory responses in vascular endothelial cells via NF-{kappa}B signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsou, Tsui-Chun, E-mail: tctsou@nhri.org.tw [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Szu-Ching; Tsai, Feng-Yuan; Lin, Ho-Jane [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Tsun-Jen [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chao, How-Ran [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Neipu, Pingtung, Taiwan (China); Tai, Lin-Ai [Center for Nanomedicine Research, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-15

    This study investigated inflammatory effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) particles on vascular endothelial cells. The effects of 50 and 100-nm ZnO particles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were characterized by assaying cytotoxicity, cell proliferation, and glutathione levels. A marked drop in survival rate was observed when ZnO concentration was increased to 45 {mu}g/ml. ZnO concentrations of {<=}3 {mu}g/ml resulted in increased cell proliferation, while those of {<=}45 {mu}g/ml caused dose-dependent increases in oxidized glutathione levels. Treatments with ZnO concentrations {<=}45 {mu}g/ml were performed to determine the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) protein, an indicator of vascular endothelium inflammation, revealing that ZnO particles induced a dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression and marked increases in NF-{kappa}B reporter activity. Overexpression of I{kappa}B{alpha} completely inhibited ZnO-induced ICAM-1 expression, suggesting NF-{kappa}B plays a pivotal role in regulation of ZnO-induced inflammation in HUVECs. Additionally, TNF-{alpha}, a typical inflammatory cytokine, induced ICAM-1 expression in an NF-{kappa}B-dependent manner, and ZnO synergistically enhanced TNF-{alpha}-induced ICAM-1 expression. Both 50 and 100-nm ZnO particles agglomerated to similar size distributions. This study reveals an important role for ZnO in modulating inflammatory responses of vascular endothelial cells via NF-{kappa}B signaling, which could have important implications for treatments of vascular disease.

  7. Small diameter vascular graft with fibroblast cells and electrospun poly (L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) scaffolds: Cell Matrix Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bong Seok; Cheon, Ja Young; Kim, Soo Hyun; Park, Won Ho

    2017-08-23

    Electrospun scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering due to their similar structure to native extracellular matrices (ECM). However, one of the obstacles limiting the application of electrospun scaffolds for tissue engineering is the nano-sized pores, which inhibit cell infiltration into the scaffolds. To overcome this limitation, we approached to make layers which are consisted of cells onto the electrospun sheet and then tubular structure was constructed by rolling. We called this as 'Cell Matrix Engineering' because the electrospun sheets were combined with the cells to form one matrix. They maintained 3-D tubular structures well and their diameters were 4.1 mm (±0.1 mm). We compared the mechanical and biological properties of various vascular grafts with the electrospun PLCL sheets of different thickness. In these experiments, the vascular graft made with thin sheets showed a better cell proliferation and attachment than the grafts made with thick sheets because the thin layer allowed for more efficient mass transfer and better permeability than the thick layer. Culturing under physiological pulsatile flow condition was demonstrated in this work. These dynamic conditions provided the improved mass transport and aerobic cell metabolism. Therefore, the Cell Matrix Engineered vascular graft holds a great promise for clinical applications by overcoming the limitations associated with conventional scaffolds.

  8. Smooth muscle cell-derived carbon monoxide is a regulator of vascular cGMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, T; Perrella, M A; Lee, M E; Kourembanas, S

    1995-02-28

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO; EC 1.14.99.3). In vascular smooth muscle cells, exogenously administered CO increases cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which is an important regulator of vessel tone. We report here that smooth muscle cells produce CO via HO and that it regulates cGMP levels in these cells. Hypoxia, which has profound effects on vessel tone, significantly increased the transcriptional rate of the HO-1 gene resulting in corresponding increases of its mRNA and HO enzymatic activity. In addition, under the same conditions, rat aortic and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells accumulated high levels of cGMP following a similar time course to that of HO-1 production. The increased accumulation of cGMP in smooth muscle cells required the enzymatic activity of HO, since it was abolished by a specific HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin. In contrast, N omega-nitro-L-arginine, a potent inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, had no effect on cGMP produced by smooth muscle cells, indicating that NO is not responsible for the activation of guanylyl cyclase in this setting. Furthermore, conditioned medium from hypoxic smooth muscle cells stimulated cGMP production in recipient cells and this stimulation was completely inhibited by tin protoporphyrin or hemoglobin, an inhibitor of CO production and a scavenger of CO, respectively. This report shows that HO-1 is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells and that its product, CO, may regulate vascular tone under physiologic and pathophysiologic (such as hypoxic) conditions.

  9. Smooth muscle cell-derived carbon monoxide is a regulator of vascular cGMP.

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, T.; Perrella, M A; Lee, M E; Kourembanas, S

    1995-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO; EC 1.14.99.3). In vascular smooth muscle cells, exogenously administered CO increases cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which is an important regulator of vessel tone. We report here that smooth muscle cells produce CO via HO and that it regulates cGMP levels in these cells. Hypoxia, which has profound effects on vessel tone, significantly increased the transcriptional rate of the HO-1 gene resulting in correspondi...

  10. Onychin inhibits proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating cell cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming YANG; Hong-lin HUANG; Bing-yang ZHU; Qin-hui TUO; Duan-fang LIAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of onychin on the proliferation of cultured rat artery vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the presence of 10% new-borncalf serum (NCS). Methods: Rat VSMCs were incubated with onychin 1-50 μmol/L or genistein 10 μmol/L in the presence of 10% NCS for 24 h. The proliferation of VSMCs was measured by cell counting and MTS/PMS colorimetric assays. Cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry. Retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation, and expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E were measured by Western blot assays. The tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was examined by immunoprecipitation techniques using anti-phospho-tyrosine antibodies. Results: The proliferation of VSMCs was accelerated significantly in the presence of 10% NCS. Onychin reduced the metabolic rate of MTS and the cell number of VSMCs in the presence of 10% NCS in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analy sis revealed that the G1-phase fraction ratio in the onychin group was higher than that in the 10% NCS group (85.2% vs 70.0%, P<0.01), while the S-phase fraction ratio in the onychin group was lower than that in 10% NCS group (4.3% vs 16.4%, P<0.01). Western blot analysis showed that onychin inhibited Rb phos phorylation and reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E. The effects of onychin on proliferation, the cell cycle and the expression of cyclins in VSMCs were similar to those of genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinase. Furthermore immunoprecipitation studies showed that both onychin and genistein markedly inhibited the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2 induced by 10% NCS.Conclusion: Onychin inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs through G1 phase cell cycle arrest by decreasing the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and sequentially inhibiting Rb phosphorylation.

  11. Recent advances in understanding the roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Tetsuo; Futamura, Kyoko; Orihara, Kanami; Emi-Sugie, Maiko; Saito, Hirohisa; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsuda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic disorders commonly involve both chronic tissue inflammation and remodeling caused by immunological reactions to various antigens on tissue surfaces. Due to their anatomical location, vascular endothelial cells are the final responders to interact with various exogenous factors that come into contact with the epithelial surface, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and antigens. Recent studies have shed light on the important roles of endothelial cells in the development and exacerbation of allergic disorders. For instance, endothelial cells have the greatest potential to produce several key molecules that are deeply involved in allergic inflammation, such as periostin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17). Additionally, endothelial cells were recently shown to be important functional targets for IL-33--an essential regulator of allergic inflammation. Notably, almost all endothelial cell responses and functions involved in allergic inflammation are not suppressed by corticosteroids. These corticosteroid-refractory endothelial cell responses and functions include TNF-α-associated angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, IL-33-mediated responses and periostin and TARC production. Therefore, these unique responses and functions of endothelial cells may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of various allergic disorders, especially their refractory processes. Here, we review recent studies, including ours, which have elucidated previously unknown pathophysiological roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation and discuss the possibility of endothelium-targeted therapy for allergic disorders.

  12. Recent advances in understanding the roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Shoda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic disorders commonly involve both chronic tissue inflammation and remodeling caused by immunological reactions to various antigens on tissue surfaces. Due to their anatomical location, vascular endothelial cells are the final responders to interact with various exogenous factors that come into contact with the epithelial surface, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and antigens. Recent studies have shed light on the important roles of endothelial cells in the development and exacerbation of allergic disorders. For instance, endothelial cells have the greatest potential to produce several key molecules that are deeply involved in allergic inflammation, such as periostin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17. Additionally, endothelial cells were recently shown to be important functional targets for IL-33—an essential regulator of allergic inflammation. Notably, almost all endothelial cell responses and functions involved in allergic inflammation are not suppressed by corticosteroids. These corticosteroid-refractory endothelial cell responses and functions include TNF-α-associated angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, IL-33-mediated responses and periostin and TARC production. Therefore, these unique responses and functions of endothelial cells may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of various allergic disorders, especially their refractory processes. Here, we review recent studies, including ours, which have elucidated previously unknown pathophysiological roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation and discuss the possibility of endothelium-targeted therapy for allergic disorders.

  13. The use of suicide gene systems in vascular cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XULINGFEI; DEHUAXU; 等

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the efficiency of suicide gene systems on vascular cells,HSV-tk/GCV and EC-CD/5-FC systems were established on vascular endothelial cells in vitro by retroviral transduction.Both modified cell lines were highly sensitive to prodrugs,the IC50 for GCV was less than 0.4 μM,and IC50 for 5-FC was less than 75μM,while the parental endothelial cells were insensitive even at the highest concentrations of prodrugs in this experiment.Mixed cellular assay showed that significant bystander effect was exhibited in modifed endothelial cells,when only 10% or 30% of the mixed cells were tk positive and exposed to 20μM GCV for 6 days.more than 60% or 90% of the wholoe polulation was killed.Similar result was also found in CD positve cells.These results indicated that both HSV-tk/GCV and EC-CD/5-FC systems could efficiently suppress endothelial cell growth in vitro.

  14. Vascular smooth muscle cell spreading onto fibrinogen is regulated by calpains and phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulhe, F; Bogyo, A; Chap, H; Perret, B; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2001-11-09

    Fibrinogen deposition and smooth muscle cell migration are important causes of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. Involvement of calpains in vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion onto fibrinogen was investigated. Using calpain inhibitors, we showed that activation of calpains was required for smooth muscle cell spreading. An increase of (32)P-labeled phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, respective products of phospholipase C and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activities, was measured in adherent cells. Addition of the calpain inhibitor calpeptin strongly decreased phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. However, smooth muscle cell spreading was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but poorly modified by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002. Moreover, PLC was found to act upstream of the PI 3-kinase IA isoform. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that calpains are required for smooth muscle cell spreading. Further, phospholipase C activation is pointed as a key step of cell-spreading regulation by calpains.

  15. Sulforaphane inhibits restenosis by suppressing inflammation and the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jin-Sook; Joung, Hosouk; Kim, Yong Sook; Shim, Young-Sun; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kee, Hae Jin

    2012-11-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring organosulfur compound in broccoli, has chemopreventive properties in cancer. However, the effects of sulforaphane in vascular diseases have not been examined. We therefore aimed to investigate the effects of sulforaphane on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and neointimal formation and the related mechanisms. The expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was examined in VSMCs. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and GATA6 expression was examined in VSMCs and in a carotid artery injury model by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. We also investigated whether local delivery of sulforaphane affected neointimal formation. Sulforaphane inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of VCAM-1 induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with sulforaphane blocked TNF-α-induced IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 and GATA6 expression. Furthermore, NF-κB p65 and GATA6 expression were reduced in sulforaphane-treated carotid injury sections. Notably, binding of GATA6 to the VCAM-1 promoter was dramatically reduced by sulforaphane. The MTT, BrdU incorporation, and in vitro scratch assays revealed that the proliferation and migration of VSMCs were reduced by sulforaphane. Furthermore, local administration of sulforaphane significantly reduced neointima formation 14 days after vascular injury in rats. Our results indicate that sulforaphane inhibits neointima formation via targeting of adhesion molecules through the suppression of NF-κB/GATA6. Furthermore, sulforaphane regulates migration and proliferation in VSMCs. Sulforaphane may be a potential therapeutic agent for preventing restenosis after vascular injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MIXED HYALINE VASCULAR AND PLASMA CELL TYPE CASTLEMAN’S DISEASE: REPORT OF A CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Asgarani

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease (angiofollicular lymphoid hyperplasia includes a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders. The cause of this disease remains uncertain. There are two types of localized Castleman’s disease: the more common hyaline vascular and the plasma cell types. Mixed variant is an uncommon localized lesion in general population. The lesions can occur in any part of the body that contains lymphoid tissue, although seventy percent are found in the anterior mediastinum. We report a thirty years old boy with Castleman’s disease who presented with fever, anorexia, weight loss,sweating, anemia and abdominal mass. The histologic examination of the biopsy specimens revealed a mixed hyaline vascular and plasma cell type of Castleman’s disease.

  17. Combined strategy of endothelial cells coating, Sertoli cells coculture and infusion improves vascularization and rejection protection of islet graft.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Improving islet graft revascularization and inhibiting rejection become crucial tasks for prolonging islet graft survival. Endothelial cells (ECs are the basis of islet vascularization and Sertoli cells (SCs have the talent to provide nutritional support and exert immunosuppressive effects. We construct a combined strategy of ECs coating in the presence of nutritious and immune factors supplied by SCs in a co-culture system to investigate the effect of vascularization and rejection inhibition for islet graft. In vivo, the combined strategy improved the survival and vascularization as well as inhibited lymphocytes and inflammatory cytokines. In vitro, we found the combinatorial strategy improved the function of islets and the effect of ECs-coating on islets. Combined strategy treated islets revealed higher levels of anti-apoptotic signal molecules (Bcl-2 and HSP-32, survival and function related molecules (PDX-1, Ki-67, ERK1/2 and Akt and demonstrated increased vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (KDR and angiogenesis signal molecules (FAk and PLC-γ. SCs effectively inhibited the activation of lymphocyte stimulated by islets and ECs. Predominantly immunosuppressive cytokines could be detected in culture supernatants of the SCs coculture group. These results suggest that ECs-coating and Sertoli cells co-culture or infusion synergistically enhance islet survival and function after transplantation.

  18. A novel tumor-promoting function residing in the 5' non-coding region of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Masuda

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF is one of the key regulators of tumor development, hence it is considered to be an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment. However, clinical trials have suggested that anti-VEGF monotherapy was less effective than standard chemotherapy. On the basis of the evidence, we hypothesized that vegf mRNA may have unrecognized function(s in cancer cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Knockdown of VEGF with vegf-targeting small-interfering (si RNAs increased susceptibility of human colon cancer cell line (HCT116 to apoptosis caused with 5-fluorouracil, etoposide, or doxorubicin. Recombinant human VEGF165 did not completely inhibit this apoptosis. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF165 increased resistance to anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis, while an anti-VEGF165-neutralizing antibody did not completely block the resistance. We prepared plasmids encoding full-length vegf mRNA with mutation of signal sequence, vegf mRNAs lacking untranslated regions (UTRs, or mutated 5'UTRs. Using these plasmids, we revealed that the 5'UTR of vegf mRNA possessed anti-apoptotic activity. The 5'UTR-mediated activity was not affected by a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. We established HCT116 clones stably expressing either the vegf 5'UTR or the mutated 5'UTR. The clones expressing the 5'UTR, but not the mutated one, showed increased anchorage-independent growth in vitro and formed progressive tumors when implanted in athymic nude mice. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses indicated that the vegf 5'UTR-expressing tumors had up-regulated anti-apoptotic genes, multidrug-resistant genes, and growth-promoting genes, while pro-apoptotic genes were down-regulated. Notably, expression of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1 was markedly repressed in the 5'UTR-expressing tumors, resulting in down-regulation of a STAT1-responsive cluster of genes (43 genes. As a result, the

  19. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Tanaka

    Full Text Available In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+ cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+ c-Kit(+ hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+ c-Kit(+ cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  20. Multiple receptor-ligand interactions direct tissue resident gamma delta T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Witherden

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gamma delta T cells represent a major T cell population in epithelial tissues, such as skin, intestine, and lung, where they function in maintenance of the epithelium and provide a crucial first line defense against environmental and pathogenic insults. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanisms directing their activation and function have remained elusive. Epithelial resident gamma delta T cells function through constant communication with neighboring cells, either via direct cell-to-cell contact or cell-to-matrix interactions. These intimate relationships allow gamma delta T cells to facilitate the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis, tissue repair following injury, inflammation, and protection from malignancy. Recent studies have identified a number of molecules involved in these complex interactions, under both homeostatic conditions, as well as following perturbation of these barrier tissues. These interactions are crucial to the timely production of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins for restoration of homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the mechanisms directing epithelial-T cell crosstalk and the distinct roles played by individual receptor-ligand pairs of cell surface molecules in this process.

  1. Use of fuel cells in residences and commercial establishments; Uso de celulas combustiveis em residencias e estabelecimentos comerciais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Eduardo T. [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-05-01

    This paper analyses the present technological stage and the economical feasibility of the application of low power fuel cells for meeting of the residence and small commercial units electric power consumption needs.

  2. Tissue resident memory T cells in the human conjunctiva and immune signatures in human dry eye disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tanima Bose; Ryan Lee; Aihua Hou; Louis Tong; K George Chandy

    2017-01-01

    Non-recirculating resident memory (TRM ) and recirculating T cells mount vigorous immune responses to both self and foreign antigens in barrier tissues like the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract...

  3. Use of tritiated thymidine as a marker to compare the effects of matrix proteins on adult human vascular endothelial cell attachment: implications for seeding of vascular prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasson, J.E.; Wiebe, D.H.; Sharefkin, J.B.; D' Amore, P.A.; Abbott, W.M.

    1986-11-01

    We have developed a technique to measure attachment of adult human vascular endothelial cells to test surfaces with tritiated thymidine used as a marker. With this technique, we measured attachment of adult human vascular endothelial cells to a series of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin-coated (10 micrograms/cm/sup 2/), laminin-coated (10 micrograms/cm/sup 2/), and collagen-coated (1% gelatin) surfaces because of the role of these proteins in promoting cell attachment and growth. For a typical experiment, in the presence of serum, initial attachment (at 1 hour) was greatest on fibronectin-coated (63%) and gelatin-coated (60%) tissue culture plastic (polystyrene) and was least on laminin-coated (28%) or untreated polystyrene (18%). The data suggest that fibronectin, either alone, or with a more complex combination of extracellular components may need to be present on prosthetic surfaces to produce maximal cell attachment and subsequent growth to confluence in vivo. The described method of measuring attachment is independent of surface properties, ensures complete recovery of cells, and will allow systematic exploration of those properties that best support human endothelial cell attachment to vascular prosthetic surfaces.

  4. Nitroglycerin induces DNA damage and vascular cell death in the setting of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Fahrer, Jörg; Oelze, Matthias; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Steven, Sebastian; Welschof, Philipp; Zinßius, Elena; Stamm, Paul; Kashani, Fatemeh; Roohani, Siyer; Kress, Joana Melanie; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Tran, Lan P; Schulz, Eberhard; Epe, Bernd; Kaina, Bernd; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) and other organic nitrates are widely used vasodilators. Their side effects are development of nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Given the potential of GTN to induce nitro-oxidative stress, we investigated the interaction between nitro-oxidative DNA damage and vascular dysfunction in experimental nitrate tolerance. Cultured endothelial hybridoma cells (EA.hy 926) and Wistar rats were treated with GTN (ex vivo: 10-1000 µM; in vivo: 10, 20 and 50 mg/kg/day for 3 days, s.c.). The level of DNA strand breaks, 8-oxoguanine and O (6)-methylguanine DNA adducts was determined by Comet assay, dot blot and immunohistochemistry. Vascular function was determined by isometric tension recording. DNA adducts and strand breaks were induced by GTN in cells in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. GTN in vivo administration leads to endothelial dysfunction, nitrate tolerance, aortic and cardiac oxidative stress, formation of DNA adducts, stabilization of p53 and apoptotic death of vascular cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Mice lacking O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase displayed more vascular O (6)-methylguanine adducts and oxidative stress under GTN therapy than wild-type mice. Although we were not able to prove a causal role of DNA damage in the etiology of nitrate tolerance, the finding of GTN-induced DNA damage such as the mutagenic and toxic adduct O (6)-methylguanine, and cell death supports the notion that GTN based therapy may provoke adverse side effects, including endothelial function. Further studies are warranted to clarify whether GTN pro-apoptotic effects are related to an impaired recovery of patients upon myocardial infarction.

  5. Differential effects of Bartonella henselae on human and feline macro- and micro-vascular endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Berrich, Moez; Kieda, Claudine; Grillon, Catherine; Monteil, Martine; Lamerant, Nathalie; Gavard, Julie; Haddad, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    Bartonella henselae, a zoonotic agent, induces tumors of endothelial cells (ECs), namely bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis in immunosuppressed humans but not in cats. In vitro studies on ECs represent to date the only way to explore the interactions between Bartonella henselae and vascular endothelium. However, no comparative study of the interactions between Bartonella henselae and human (incidental host) ECs vs feline (reservoir host) ECs has been carried out because of the absence of ...

  6. Differential Effects of Bartonella henselae on Human and Feline Macro- and Micro-Vascular Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moez Berrich; Claudine Kieda; Catherine Grillon; Martine Monteil; Nathalie Lamerant; Julie Gavard; Henri Jean Boulouis; Nadia Haddad

    2011-01-01

    Bartonella henselae, a zoonotic agent, induces tumors of endothelial cells (ECs), namely bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis in immunosuppressed humans but not in cats. In vitro studies on ECs represent to date the only way to explore the interactions between Bartonella henselae and vascular endothelium. However, no comparative study of the interactions between Bartonella henselae and human (incidental host) ECs vs feline (reservoir host) ECs has been carried out because of the absence of any...

  7. Inhibitive effects of anti-oxidative vitamins on mannitol-induced apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Kai-yu; Shen, Mei-ping; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Dai, Xiao-na; Shang, Shi-qiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Study blood vessel injury and gene expression indicating vascular endothelial cell apoptosis induced by mannitol with and without administration of anti-oxidative vitamins. Methods: Healthy rabbits were randomly divided into four groups. Mannitol was injected into the vein of the rabbit ear in each animal. Pre-treatment prior to mannitol injection was performed with normal saline (group B), vitamin C (group C) and vitamin E (group D). Blood vessel injury was assessed under electron...

  8. Mitochondrial metabolism and the control of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eChiong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation and dedifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are essential processes of vascular development. VSMCs have biosynthetic, proliferative and contractile roles in the vessel wall. Alterations in the differentiated state of the VSMCs play a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension and vascular stenosis. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in the control of VSMC proliferation, with particular focus on mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondrial activity can be controlled by regulating mitochondrial dynamics, i.e. mitochondrial fusion and fission, and by regulating mitochondrial calcium handling through the interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Alterations in both VSMC proliferation and mitochondrial function can be triggered by dysregulation of mitofusin-2, a small GTPase associated with mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial-ER interaction. Several lines of evidence highlight the relevance of mitochondrial metabolism in the control of VSMC proliferation, indicating a new area to be explored in the treatment of vascular diseases.

  9. Proliferating resident microglia express the stem cell antigen CD34 in response to acute neural injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladeby, Rune; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Dalmau, Ishar

    2005-01-01

    following transection of the entorhino-dentate perforant path projection. To investigate the possible link between microglia and hematopoietic precursors, we analyzed the expression of the stem cell marker CD34 by lesion-reactive microglia in conjunction with the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine (Brd......U) and the use of radiation bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice. We found that CD34 is upregulated on early-activated resident microglia, rather than by infiltrating bone marrow-derived cells. The number of CD34(+) microglia peaked at day 3 when 67% of the resident CD11b/Mac-1(+) microglia co-expressed CD34, and all...... CD34(+) cells co-expressed Mac-1, and decreased sharply toward day 5, unlike Mac-1, which was maximally expressed at day 5. Approximately 80% of the CD34(+) cells in the denervated dentate gyrus had incorporated BrdU into their nuclei at day 3. We also showed that CD34 is upregulated on early...

  10. Original and regenerating lizard tail cartilage contain putative resident stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    Regeneration of cartilaginous tissues is limited in mammals but it occurs with variable extension in lizards (reptiles), including in their vertebrae. The ability of lizard vertebrae to regenerate cartilaginous tissue that is later replaced with bone has been analyzed using tritiated thymidine autoradiography and 5BrdU immunocytochemistry after single pulse or prolonged-pulse and chase experiments. The massive cartilage regeneration that can restore broad vertebral regions and gives rise to a long cartilaginous tube in the regenerating tail, depends from the permanence of some chondrogenic cells within adult vertebrae. Few cells that retain tritiated thymidine or 5-bromodeoxy-uridine for over 35 days are mainly localized in the inter-vertebral cartilage and in sparse chondrogenic regions of the neural arch of the vertebrae, suggesting that they are putative resident stem/progenitor cells. The study supports previous hypothesis indicating that the massive regeneration of the cartilaginous tissue in damaged vertebrae and in the regenerating tail of lizards derive from resident stem cells mainly present in the cartilaginous areas of the vertebrae including in the perichondrium that are retained in adult lizards as growing centers for most of their lifetime.

  11. Preparation of cDNA libraries from vascular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, M E; Taubman, M B

    1999-01-01

    The vast majority of past and present efforts in the molecular cloning of expressed sequences involve isolation of clones from cDNA libraries constructed in bacteriophage lambda (1,2). As discussed in Chapter 6 , screening these cDNA libraries using labeled probes remains the most straightforward method to isolate full length cDNAs for which some partial sequence information is known. Although the availability of high quality reagents and kits over the past decade has made the process of library construction increasingly straightforward, generation of high-quality libraries is a task that still requires a fair amount of dedicated effort. Because alternative PCR-based cloning strategies have become increasingly popular alternatives to cDNA library screening, it is useful to consider the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy before embarking on a project to construct a cDNA library (Table 1). In our opinion, it is worthwhile to construct a cDNA library when the transcript of interest is not exceedingly rare (i.e., can readily be detected by Northern blot analysis of total RNA), when multiple cDNAs will need to be cloned over a period of time, and in situations where occasional mutations can not be tolerated (for example, if the cDNA is to be expressed in mammalian cells to examine function). In situations where the transcript of interest is expressed at exceedingly low levels, or when only a single cDNA needs to be cloned, a PCR-based strategy should be considered. When the tissue source is precious (such as a unique clinical specimen), successful construction of a phage library provides a resource that can be amplified and used for multiple cloning projects over many years, but runs the risk of consuming the available RNA if the library construction fails. Table 1 Comparison of Relative Advantages of cDNA Cloning from Lambda Phage Libraries by Plaque Hybridization Compared to Newer PCR- Based Strategies Lambda phage cDNA library PCR-based strategy Freedom

  12. In Vivo Vascularization of Endothelial Cells Derived from Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in SCID Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allameh Abdolamir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective In vivo and in vitro stem cell differentiation into endothelial cells is a promising area of research for tissue engineering and cell therapy. Materials and Methods We induced human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to differentiate to endothelial cells that had the ability to form capillaries on an extracellular matrix (ECM gel. Thereafter, the differentiated endothelial cells at early stage were characterized by expression of specific markers such as von Willebrand factor (vWF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor 2, and CD31. In this experimental model, the endothelial cells were transplanted into the groins of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice. After 30 days, we obtained tissue biopsies from the transplantation sites. Biopsies were processed for histopathological and double immunohistochemistry (DIHC staining. Results Endothelial cells at the early stage of differentiation expressed endothelial markers. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining, in addition to DIHC demonstrated homing of the endothelial cells that underwent vascularization in the injected site. Conclusion The data clearly showed that endothelial cells at the early stage of differentiation underwent neovascularization in vivo in SCID mice. Endothelial cells at their early stage of differentiation have been proven to be efficient for treatment of diseases with impaired vasculogenesis.

  13. Biological effects of fucoidan isolated from Fucus vesiculosus on thrombosis and vascular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kyu-Won; Cho, Kil-Sang; Hahn, Ok-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Hyung; Lee, Boo-Yong; Ko, Jung-Jae; Chung, Kwang-Hoe

    2010-03-01

    Fucoidan is a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan, which has a molecular structure similar to that of heparin. The antithrombotic effects of fucoidan in vitro have been widely reported, but its antithrombotic effects in vivo as well as its other biological properties in vitro have not been well investigated. This study investigated the effects and mechanism of fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus on thrombosis both in vitro and in vivo. A ferric chloride-induced mouse carotid artery thrombosis model was used to determine the antithrombotic effects of fucoidan in vivo. Additionally, changes in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were examined in vascular cells treated with fucoidan. In vivo studies employing a ferric chloride-induced mouse carotid artery thrombosis model indicated that fucoidan had a stronger antithrombotic activity than heparin. Further, vascular cells treated with fucoidan demonstrated a decrease in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production as well as inhibition of proliferation. The major findings of this study showed that fucoidan has a stronger antithrombotic effect than heparin in vivo and that fucoidan has an inhibitory effect on proinflammatory cytokine production and proliferation of vascular cells.

  14. Anti-Proliferative Effect of an Aqueous Extract of Prunella vulgaris in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Hwang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs in arterial walls is an important pathogenic factor of vascular disorders such as diabetic atherosclerosis. We have reported the anti-inflammatory effect of an aqueous extract from Prunella vulgaris (APV in vascular endothelial cell. In the present study, APV exhibited inhibitory effects on high glucose-stimulated VSMC proliferation, migration, and invasion activities, inducing G1 cell cycle arrest with downregulation of cyclins and CDKs and upregulation of the CKIs, p21waf1/cip1 and p27kip1. Furthermore, APV dose dependently suppressed the high glucose-induced matrix metalloproteinase activity. High glucose-induced phosphorylation of ERK, p38 MAPK, was decreased by the pretreatment of APV. NF-κB activation by high glucose was attenuated by APV, as an antioxidant. APV attenuated the high glucose-induced decrease of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 translocation and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression. Intracellular cGMP level was also increased by APV treatment. These results demonstrate that APV may inhibit VSMC proliferation via downregulating ROS/NF-κB /ERK/p38 MAPK pathways. In addition, APV has a beneficial effect by the interaction of Nrf2-mediated NO/cGMP with HO-1, suggesting that Prunella vulgaris may be useful in preventing diabetic atherosclerosis.

  15. Functions of Müller cell-derived vascular endothelial growthfactor in diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Müller cells are macroglia and play many essentialroles as supporting cells in the retina. To respond topathological changes in diabetic retinopathy (DR), amajor complication in the eye of diabetic patients,retinal Müller glia produce a high level of vascularendothelial growth factor (VEGF or VEGF-A). As VEGFis expressed by multiple retinal cell-types and Müllerglia comprise only a small portion of cells in the retina,it has been a great challenge to reveal the function ofVEGF or other globally expressed proteins produced byMüller cells. With the development of conditional genetargeting tools, it is now possible to dissect the functionof Müller cell-derived VEGF in vivo . By using conditionalgene targeting approach, we demonstrate that Müllerglia are a major source of retinal VEGF in diabetic miceand Müller cell-derived VEGF plays a significant role inthe alteration of protein expression and peroxynitration,which leads to retinal inflammation, neovascularization,vascular leakage, and vascular lesion, key pathologicalchanges in DR. Therefore, Müller glia are a potentialcellular target for the treatment of DR, a leading causeof blindness.

  16. Establishment of the model of vascular endothelial cell membrane chromatography and its preliminary application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YiPing; HE LangChong

    2007-01-01

    A model of vascular endothelial cell membrane chromatography was established by using an ECV304 cell membrane stationary phase (ECV304 CMSP) prepared by immobilizing the ECV304 cell membrane onto the surface of silica carrier. The surface and chromatographic characteristics of ECV304 CMSP were studied. The active component from Caulophyllum robustum was screened by using the model of vascular endothelial cell membrane chromatography. The interaction between the active component and membrane receptor was determined by using a replace experiments. The effect of the active component was tested by using tube formation of ECV304 cell. The results indicated that the model of ECV304 cell membrane chromatograph (ECV304 CMC) can stimulate the interaction between drug and receptor in vitro and the retention characteristics of taspine as active component was similar to that of model molecule in the model of ECV304 CMC. And therefore, taspine acted on VEGFR2 and inhibited the tube formation of ECV304 cell induced by VEGF. This model can be used to screen definite active component as a screening model.

  17. Leishmania infantum antigens modulate memory cell subsets of liver resident T lymphocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A; Claro, M; Alexandre-Pires, G; Santos-Mateus, D; Martins, C; Valério-Bolas, A; Rafael-Fernandes, M; Pereira, M A; Pereira da Fonseca, I; Tomás, A M; Santos-Gomes, G

    2017-02-01

    In the recent years, the liver has been recognized as an important immune organ with major regulatory functions and immune memory, adding to the well-described vital metabolic functions. There are evidences from experimental infections performed with visceral Leishmania species that immune responses to parasite infection can be organ-specific. The liver is the compartment of acute resolving infection, with minimal tissue damage and resistance to reinfection, whereas the spleen is the compartment of parasite persistence. Control of hepatic infection in mice requires a coordinated immune response that involves the development of inflammatory granulomas. It is also described that the liver harbors populations of resident lymphocytes, which may exhibit memory characteristics. Therefore, the present study aims to address the role of the liver as an immune memory organ in the context of Leishmania infantum infection, by characterizing phenotypically resident liver T lymphocytes. The dynamics of memory T cells in L. infantum infected BALB/c mice and the effect of anti-leishmanial treatment in the differentiation of memory cell subsets were analyzed. The potential of recognition, differentiation and selection of memory lymphocytes by three L. infantum recombinant proteins were also explored. L. infantum infection generates effector and central memory T cells, but the cells did not expand when recalled, demonstrating a possible parasite silencing effect. The treatment with a leishmanicidal drug (antimoniate meglumine) increases the levels of memory and effector T cells, eliciting a more robust hepatic immune response. L. infantum parasites with a decreased sensitivity to the leishmanicidal drug favor the expansion of memory CD8(+) T cell subset, but inhibit the proliferation of CD8(+) T effector cells, possibly assuring their own survival. The recombinant proteins LirCyp1 and LirSOD are strongly recognized by memory cells of treated mice, indicating that these proteins

  18. Enhanced adherence of mouse fibroblast and vascular cells to plasma modified polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznickova, Alena, E-mail: alena.reznickova@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Novotna, Zdenka, E-mail: zdenka1.novotna@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kolska, Zdenka [Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkyně University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Rimpelova, Silvie [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Svorcik, Vaclav [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    Since the last decade, tissue engineering has shown a sensational promise in providing more viable alternatives to surgical procedures for harvested tissues, implants and prostheses. Biomedical polymers, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), were activated by Ar plasma discharge. Degradation of polymer chains was examined by determination of the thickness of ablated layer. The amount of an ablated polymer layer was measured by gravimetry. Contact angle, measured by goniometry, was studied as a function of plasma exposure and post-exposure aging times. Chemical structure of modified polymers was characterized by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface chemistry and polarity of the samples were investigated by electrokinetic analysis. Changes in surface morphology were followed using atomic force microscopy. Cytocompatibility of plasma activated polyethylene foils was studied using two distinct model cell lines; VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) as a model for vascular graft testing and connective tissue cells L929 (mouse fibroblasts) approved for standardized material cytotoxicity testing. Specifically, the cell number, morphology, and metabolic activity of the adhered and proliferated cells on the polyethylene matrices were studied in vitro. It was found that the plasma treatment caused ablation of the polymers, resulting in dramatic changes in their surface morphology and roughness. ARXPS and electrokinetic measurements revealed oxidation of the polymer surface. It was found that plasma activation has a positive effect on the adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs and L929 cells. - Highlights: • Plasma activation of LDPE, HDPE and UHMWPE • Study of surface properties by several techniques: ARXPS, AFM, zeta-potential, and goniometry • Investigation of adhesion and spreading of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and mouse fibroblasts (L929)

  19. Antagonism of Stem Cell Factor/c-kit Signaling Attenuates Neonatal Chronic Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Karen C; Torres, Eneida; Hehre, Dorothy; Wu, Shu; Suguihara, Cleide; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that c-kit positive cells are present in the remodeled pulmonary vasculature bed of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether stem cell factor (SCF)/ c-kit regulated pathways potentiate pulmonary vascular remodeling is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that attenuated c-kit signaling would decrease chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling by decreasing pulmonary vascular cell mitogenesis. Methods Neonatal FVB/NJ mice treated with non-immune IgG (PL), or c-kit neutralizing antibody (ACK2) as well as c-kit mutant mice (WBB6F1- Kit W− v/ +) and their congenic controls, were exposed to normoxia (FiO2=0.21) or hypoxia (FiO2=0.12) for two weeks. Following this exposure, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling were evaluated. Results As compared to chronically hypoxic controls, c-kit mutant mice had decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular remodeling and proliferation. Consistent with these findings, administration of ACK2 to neonatal mice with chronic hypoxia-induced PH decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling. This attenuation in PH was accompanied by decreased extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Conclusion SCF/c-kit signaling may potentiate chronic hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling by modulating ERK activation. Inhibition of c-kit activity may be a potential strategy to alleviate PH. PMID:26705118

  20. Adipose progenitor cells reside among the mature adipocytes: morphological research using an organotypic culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anayama, Hisashi; Fukuda, Ryo; Yamate, Jyoji

    2015-11-01

    The precise localization and biological characteristics of the adipose progenitor cells are still a focus of debate. In this study, the localization of the adipose progenitor cells was determined using an organotypic culture system of adipose tissue slices. The tissue slices of subcutaneous white adipose tissue from rats were placed on a porous membrane and cultured at the interface between air and the culture medium for up to 5 days with or without adipogenic stimulation. The structure of adipose tissue components was sufficiently preserved during the culture and, following adipogenic stimulation with insulin, dexamethasone, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, numerous multilocular adipocytes appeared in the interstitium among the mature adipocytes. Histomorphological 3-D observation using confocal laser microscopy revealed the presence of small mesenchymal cells containing little or no fat residing in the perivascular region and on the mature adipocytes and differentiation from the pre-existing mesenchymal cells to multilocular adipocytes. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that these cells were initially present within the fibronectin-positive extracellular matrix (ECM). The adipose differentiation of the mesenchymal cells was confirmed by the enhanced expression of C/EBP-β suggesting adipose differentiation and the concurrent advent of CD105-expressing mesenchymal cells within the interstitium of the mature adipocytes. Based on the above, the mesenchymal cells embedded in the ECM around the mature adipocytes were confirmed to be responsible for adipogenesis because the transition of the mesenchymal cells to the stem state contributed to the increase in the number of adipocytes in rat adipose tissue.

  1. Serpins promote cancer cell survival and vascular co-option in brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Manuel; Obenauf, Anna C; Jin, Xin; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Lee, Derek J; Chaft, Jamie E; Kris, Mark G; Huse, Jason T; Brogi, Edi; Massagué, Joan

    2014-02-27

    Brain metastasis is an ominous complication of cancer, yet most cancer cells that infiltrate the brain die of unknown causes. Here, we identify plasmin from the reactive brain stroma as a defense against metastatic invasion, and plasminogen activator (PA) inhibitory serpins in cancer cells as a shield against this defense. Plasmin suppresses brain metastasis in two ways: by converting membrane-bound astrocytic FasL into a paracrine death signal for cancer cells, and by inactivating the axon pathfinding molecule L1CAM, which metastatic cells express for spreading along brain capillaries and for metastatic outgrowth. Brain metastatic cells from lung cancer and breast cancer express high levels of anti-PA serpins, including neuroserpin and serpin B2, to prevent plasmin generation and its metastasis-suppressive effects. By protecting cancer cells from death signals and fostering vascular co-option, anti-PA serpins provide a unifying mechanism for the initiation of brain metastasis in lung and breast cancers.

  2. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 3 Controls Neural Stem Cell Activation in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinah Han

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs continuously produce new neurons within the adult mammalian hippocampus. NSCs are typically quiescent but activated to self-renew or differentiate into neural progenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms of NSC activation remain poorly understood. Here, we show that adult hippocampal NSCs express vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR 3 and its ligand VEGF-C, which activates quiescent NSCs to enter the cell cycle and generate progenitor cells. Hippocampal NSC activation and neurogenesis are impaired by conditional deletion of Vegfr3 in NSCs. Functionally, this is associated with compromised NSC activation in response to VEGF-C and physical activity. In NSCs derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, VEGF-C/VEGFR3 mediates intracellular activation of AKT and ERK pathways that control cell fate and proliferation. These findings identify VEGF-C/VEGFR3 signaling as a specific regulator of NSC activation and neurogenesis in mammals.

  3. Thiazolidinediones enhance vascular endothelial growth factor expression and induce cell growth inhibition in non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshizaki Yumiko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that thiazolidinediones are involved in regulating the expression of various genes, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF gene via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ; VEGF is a prognostic biomarker for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of troglitazone and ciglitazone on the mRNA expression of VEGF and its receptors in human NSCLC cell lines, RERF-LC-AI, SK-MES-1, PC-14, and A549. These mRNA expressions were evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis. We also studied the effect of Je-11, a VEGF inhibitor, on the growth of these cells. Results In NSCLC cells, thiazolidinediones increased the mRNA expression of VEGF and neuropilin-1, but not that of other receptors such as fms-like tyrosine kinase and kinase insert domain receptor-1. Furthermore, the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 completely reversed this thiazolidinedione-induced increase in VEGF expression. Furthermore, the addition of VEGF inhibitors into the culture medium resulted in the reversal of thiazolidinedione-induced growth inhibition. Conclusions Our results indicated that thiazolidinediones enhance VEGF and neuropilin-1 expression and induce the inhibition of cell growth. We propose the existence of a pathway for arresting cell growth that involves the interaction of thiazolidinedione-induced VEGF and neuropilin-1 in NSCLC.

  4. Interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells enhances matrix metalloproteinase-1 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Takahashi, M; Shimada, K

    2000-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) plays an important role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of MMP-1 by cell-to-cell interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cells) were cocultured. MMP-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Collagenolytic activity was determined by fluorescent labeled-collagen digestion. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cells produce MMP-1. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs markedly increased the MMP-1 levels and activity of the culture media. MMP-1 levels were maximal when the cellular ratio of THP-1 cells/VSMCs was 1.0. Immunohistochemistry revealed that both types of cells in the coculture produced MMP-1. Separated coculture experiments showed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to MMP-1 production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibodies inhibited coculture conditioned medium-induced MMP-1 production by VSMCs and THP-1 cells. Protein kinase C inhibitors, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and a mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor significantly inhibited MMP-1 production by cocultures. Direct cell-to-cell interaction between THP-1 cells and VSMCs enhanced MMP-1 synthesis in both types of cells. Increased local MMP-1 production and activity induced by monocyte-VSMC interaction play an important pathogenic role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

  5. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Aging-associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung Chul, E-mail: hcchoi@med.yu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Aging-associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  6. Differential effects of Bartonella henselae on human and feline macro- and micro-vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrich, Moez; Kieda, Claudine; Grillon, Catherine; Monteil, Martine; Lamerant, Nathalie; Gavard, Julie; Boulouis, Henri Jean; Haddad, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    Bartonella henselae, a zoonotic agent, induces tumors of endothelial cells (ECs), namely bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis in immunosuppressed humans but not in cats. In vitro studies on ECs represent to date the only way to explore the interactions between Bartonella henselae and vascular endothelium. However, no comparative study of the interactions between Bartonella henselae and human (incidental host) ECs vs feline (reservoir host) ECs has been carried out because of the absence of any available feline endothelial cell lines.To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development sites such as skin, versus macro-vascular ECs, such as umbilical vein.Our model revealed intrinsic differences between human (Human Skin Microvascular ECs -HSkMEC and Human Umbilical Vein ECs - iHUVEC) and feline ECs susceptibility to Bartonella henselae infection.While no effect was observed on the feline ECs upon Bartonella henselae infection, the human ones displayed accelerated angiogenesis and wound healing.Noticeable differences were demonstrated between human micro- and macro-vasculature derived ECs both in terms of pseudo-tube formation and healing. Interestingly, Bartonella henselae effects on human ECs were also elicited by soluble factors.Neither Bartonella henselae-infected Human Skin Microvascular ECs clinically involved in bacillary angiomatosis, nor feline ECs increased cAMP production, as opposed to HUVEC.Bartonella henselae could stimulate the activation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) in homologous cellular systems and trigger VEGF production by HSkMECs only, but not iHUVEC or any feline ECs tested.These results may explain the decreased pathogenic potential of Bartonella henselae infection for cats as compared to humans and strongly suggest that an autocrine secretion of VEGF by human skin

  7. Differential effects of Bartonella henselae on human and feline macro- and micro-vascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moez Berrich

    Full Text Available Bartonella henselae, a zoonotic agent, induces tumors of endothelial cells (ECs, namely bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis in immunosuppressed humans but not in cats. In vitro studies on ECs represent to date the only way to explore the interactions between Bartonella henselae and vascular endothelium. However, no comparative study of the interactions between Bartonella henselae and human (incidental host ECs vs feline (reservoir host ECs has been carried out because of the absence of any available feline endothelial cell lines.To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development sites such as skin, versus macro-vascular ECs, such as umbilical vein.Our model revealed intrinsic differences between human (Human Skin Microvascular ECs -HSkMEC and Human Umbilical Vein ECs - iHUVEC and feline ECs susceptibility to Bartonella henselae infection.While no effect was observed on the feline ECs upon Bartonella henselae infection, the human ones displayed accelerated angiogenesis and wound healing.Noticeable differences were demonstrated between human micro- and macro-vasculature derived ECs both in terms of pseudo-tube formation and healing. Interestingly, Bartonella henselae effects on human ECs were also elicited by soluble factors.Neither Bartonella henselae-infected Human Skin Microvascular ECs clinically involved in bacillary angiomatosis, nor feline ECs increased cAMP production, as opposed to HUVEC.Bartonella henselae could stimulate the activation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2 in homologous cellular systems and trigger VEGF production by HSkMECs only, but not iHUVEC or any feline ECs tested.These results may explain the decreased pathogenic potential of Bartonella henselae infection for cats as compared to humans and strongly suggest that an autocrine secretion of VEGF by human

  8. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induced the differentiation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruyu; Lu, Ying; Li, Ju; Wang, Jia; Liu, Caixia; Gao, Fang; Sun, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are a novel source of stem cells that are isolated and cultured from second trimester amniocentesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) acts as a tissue morphogen and regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This study investigated the effect of an adenovirus-mediated GDNF gene, which was engineered into AFSCs, on the cells' biological properties and whether GDNF in combination with AFSCs can be directionally differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro. AFSCs were isolated and cultured using the plastic adherence method in vitro and identified by the transcription factor Oct-4, which is the primary marker of pluripotent stem cells. AFSCs were efficiently transfected by a GFP-labeled plasmid system of an adenovirus vector carrying the GDNF gene (Ad-GDNF-GFP). Transfected AFSCs stably expressed GDNF. Transfected AFSCs were cultured in endothelial growth medium-2 containing vascular endothelial growth factor. After 1 week, AFSCs were positive for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31, which are markers of endothelial cells, and the recombinant GDNF group was significantly higher than undifferentiated controls and the GFP only group. These results demonstrated that AFSCs differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro, and recombinant GDNF promoted differentiation. The differentiation-induced AFSCs may be used as seed cells to provide a new manner of cell and gene therapies for transplantation into the vascular injury site to promote angiogenesis.

  9. Mobilization of endothelial precursor cells: systemic vascular response to musculoskeletal trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, A J

    2012-02-03

    Postnatal vasculogenesis, the process by which vascular committed bone marrow stem cells or endothelial precursor cells (EPC) migrate, differentiate, and incorporate into the nacent endothelium contributing to physiological and pathological neovascularization, has stimulated much interest. Its contribution to tumor nonvascularization, wound healing, and revascularization associated with skeletal and cardiac muscles ischaemia is established. We evaluated the mobilization of EPCs in response to musculoskeletal trauma. Blood from patients (n = 15) following AO type 42a1 closed diaphyseal tibial fractures was analyzed for CD34 and AC133 cell surface marker expression. Immunomagnetically enriched CD34+ mononuclear cell (MNC(CD34+)) populations were cultured and examined for phenotypic and functional vascular endothelial differentiation. Circulating MNC(CD34+) levels increased sevenfold by day 3 postinjury. Circulating MNC(AC133+) increased 2.5-fold. Enriched MNC(CD34+) populations from day 3 samples in culture exhibited cell cluster formation with sprouting spindles. These cells bound UEA-1 and incorporated fluorescent DiI-Ac-LDL intracellularily. Our findings suggest a systemic provascular response is initiated in response to musculoskeletal trauma. Its therapeutic manipulation may have implications for the potential enhancement of fracture healing.

  10. The flavonoid quercetin induces apoptosis and inhibits JNK activation in intimal vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco; Bishop-Bailley, David; Lodi, Federica; Duarte, Juan; Cogolludo, Angel; Moreno, Laura; Bosca, Lisardo; Mitchell, Jane A; Warner, Timothy D

    2006-08-04

    Quercetin, the most abundant dietary flavonol, exerts vasodilator, anti-hypertensive, and anti-atherogenic effects and reduces the vascular remodelling associated with elevated blood pressure. Here, we have compared the effects of quercetin in intimal- and medial-type rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in culture. After 48 h, quercetin reduced the viability of a polyclonal intimal-type cell line derived from neonatal aorta but not of a medial-type cell line derived from adult aorta. These differential effects were similar in both proliferating and quiescent VSMC. Quercetin also preferentially reduced the viability of intimal-type over medial-type VSMC in primary cultures derived from balloon-injured carotid arteries. The effects of quercetin on cell viability were mainly dependent upon induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by nuclear condensation and fragmentation, and were unrelated to PPARgamma, pro-oxidant effects or nitric oxide. The expression of MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK) and ERK phosphorylation were not different between intimal- and medial-type VSMC. p38 phosphorylation was negligible in both cell types. Medial-type showed a weak JNK phosphorylation while this was markedly increased in intimal-type cells. Quercetin reduced JNK phosphorylation but had no consistent effect on ERK phosphorylation. In conclusion, quercetin preferentially produced apoptosis in intimal-type compared to medial-type VSMC. This might play a role in the anti-atherogenic and anti-hypertensive effects of quercetin.

  11. Recellularization of biological heart valves with human vascular cells: in vitro hemocompatibility assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopka, Simon; Schmid, Franz-Xaver; Hirt, Stephan; Birnbaum, Dietrich E; Schmid, Christof; Lehle, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Coverage of cardiovascular bioprostheses with autologous endothelium is used for the purpose of improving blood compatibility. The aim of our study was to analyze endothelialization potential of glutaraldehyde-fixed heart valves, cellular functions of seeded endothelial cells (EC), and the impact of a two-stage seeding protocol using human vascular fibroblasts (FB) and EC from saphenous veins (HSVEC) on cellular functional properties in vitro. Adherence and morphology of adhered cells were assessed by scanning electronic microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Reproducible, complete surface coverage with EC was established on decellularized and glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine pericardium. Analyzing functional properties of cells directly adhered to biomaterial revealed nonproliferative cells, which were capable of inflammatory stimulation in terms of TNF-induced increase in interleukin-6 secretion and adhesion of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, EC showed sustained antithrombotic properties quantified by platelet adhesion onto EC and prostacyclin secretion by EC. Preseeding with vascular fibroblasts using a two-stage seeding protocol induced EC proliferation and improved inflammatory and anti-thrombotic functions. Cardiovascular biomaterials differ significantly in their potential to allow for adhesion of human EC. Successfully endothelialized biomaterial, however, revealed cellular properties which are likely to be favorable to improving performance of biomaterials. Two-stage seeding adds regenerative potential and improves cell functions of adherent EC.

  12. Construction and analysis of SSH cDNA library of human vascular endothelial cells related to gastrocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct subtracted cDNA libraries of human vascular endothelial cells (VECs) related to gastrocarcinoma using suppression substractive hybridization (SSH) and to analyze cDNA libraries of gastrocarcinoma and VECs in Cancer Gene Anatomy Project (CGAP) database.

  13. Cannabinoid receptor CB2 is expressed on vascular cells, but not astroglial cells in the post-mortem human Huntington's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowie, Megan J; Grimsey, Natasha L; Hoffman, Therri; Faull, Richard L M; Glass, Michelle

    2014-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurological disease with motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Characterised by neuronal degeneration, HD pathology is initially apparent in the striatum and cortex. Considerable research has recently suggested that the neurological immune response apparent in brain injury and disease may provide a valuable therapeutic target. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors are localised and up-regulated on a number of peripheral immune cell types following inflammation and injury. However, their cellular location within the human brain during inflammation has not been well characterised. The present study shows CB2 is expressed in human post-mortem striatum in HD. Quantification revealed a trend towards an increase in CB2 staining with disease, but no significant difference was measured compared to neurologically normal controls. In HD striatal tissue, there is an up-regulation of the brains' resident immune cells, with a significant increase in GFAP-positive astrocyte staining at both grade 1 (685±118%) and grade 3 (1145±163%) and Iba1-positive microglia at grade 1 (299±27%) but not grade 3 (119±48%), compared to neurologically normal controls. Both cell types exhibit irregular cell morphology, particularly at higher grades. Using double-labelled immunohistochemistry CB2 receptors are demonstrated not to be expressed on microglia or astrocytes and instead appear to be localised on CD31-positive blood vessel endothelium and vascular smooth muscle. Co-expression analysis suggests that CB2 may be more highly expressed on CD31 positive cells in HD brains than in control brains. Contrasting with evidence from rodent studies suggesting CB2 glial cell localisation, our observation that CB2 is present on blood vessel cells, with increased CD31 co-localisation in HD may represent a new context for CB2 therapeutic approaches to neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Identification of nitric oxide as an endogenous inhibitor of 26S proteasomes in vascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Liu

    Full Text Available The 26S proteasome plays a fundamental role in almost all eukaryotic cells, including vascular endothelial cells. However, it remains largely unknown how proteasome functionality is regulated in the vasculature. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO synthase (eNOS-derived NO is known to be essential to maintain endothelial homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to establish the connection between endothelial NO and 26S proteasome functionality in vascular endothelial cells. The 26S proteasome reporter protein levels, 26S proteasome activity, and the O-GlcNAcylation of Rpt2, a key subunit of the proteasome regulatory complex, were assayed in 26S proteasome reporter cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, and mouse aortic tissues isolated from 26S proteasome reporter and eNOS knockout mice. Like the other selective NO donors, NO derived from activated eNOS (by pharmacological and genetic approach increased O-GlcNAc modification of Rpt2, reduced proteasome chymotrypsin-like activity, and caused 26S proteasome reporter protein accumulation. Conversely, inactivation of eNOS reversed all the effects. SiRNA knockdown of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT, the key enzyme that catalyzes protein O-GlcNAcylation, abolished NO-induced effects. Consistently, adenoviral overexpression of O-GlcNAcase (OGA, the enzyme catalyzing the removal of the O-GlcNAc group, mimicked the effects of OGT knockdown. Finally, compared to eNOS wild type aortic tissues, 26S proteasome reporter mice lacking eNOS exhibited elevated 26S proteasome functionality in parallel with decreased Rpt2 O-GlcNAcylation, without changing the levels of Rpt2 protein. In conclusion, the eNOS-derived NO functions as a physiological suppressor of the 26S proteasome in vascular endothelial cells.

  15. Substance-specific importance of EGFR for vascular smooth muscle cells motility in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Barbara; Schwerdt, Gerald; Heise, Christian; Bethmann, Daniel; Rabe, Sindy; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Gekle, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Besides their importance for the vascular tone, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) also contribute to pathophysiological vessel alterations. Various G-protein coupled receptor ligands involved in vascular dysfunction and remodeling can transactivate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of VSMC, yet the importance of EGFR transactivation for the VSMC phenotype is incompletely understood. The aims of this study were (i) to characterize further the importance of the VSMC-EGFR for proliferation, migration and marker gene expression for inflammation, fibrosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and (ii) to test the hypothesis that vasoactive substances (endothelin-1, phenylephrine, thrombin, vasopressin and ATP) rely differentially on the EGFR with respect to the abovementioned phenotypic alterations. In primary, aortic VSMC from mice without conditional deletion of the EGFR, proliferation, migration, marker gene expression (inflammation, fibrosis and ROS homeostasis) and cell signaling (ERK 1/2, intracellular calcium) were analyzed. VSMC-EGFR loss reduced collective cell migration and single cell migration probability, while no difference between the genotypes in single cell velocity, chemotaxis or marker gene expression could be observed under control conditions. EGF promoted proliferation, collective cell migration, chemokinesis and chemotaxis and leads to a proinflammatory gene expression profile in wildtype but not in knockout VSMC. Comparing the impact of five vasoactive substances (all reported to transactivate EGFR and all leading to an EGFR dependent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation), we demonstrate that the importance of EGFR for their action is substance-dependent and most apparent for crowd migration but plays a minor role for gene expression regulation.

  16. Polymicrobial sepsis impairs bystander recruitment of effector cells to infected skin despite optimal sensing and alarming function of skin resident memory CD8 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Qiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Harty, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic infection that enhances host vulnerability to secondary infections normally controlled by T cells. Using CLP sepsis model, we observed that sepsis induces apoptosis of circulating memory CD8 T-cells (TCIRCM) and diminishes their effector functions, leading to impaired CD8 T-cell mediated protection to systemic pathogen re-infection. In the context of localized re-infections, tissue resident memory CD8 T-cells (TRM) provide robust protection in a variety of infectious models. TRM rapidly ‘sense’ infection in non-lymphoid tissues and ‘alarm’ the host by enhancing immune cell recruitment to the site of the infection to accelerate pathogen clearance. Here, we show that compared to pathogen-specific TCIRCM, sepsis does not invoke significant numerical decline of Vaccinia virus induced skin-TRM keeping their effector functions (e.g., Ag-dependent IFN-γ production) intact. IFN-γ-mediated recruitment of immune cells to the site of localized infection was, however, reduced in CLP hosts despite TRM maintaining their ‘sensing and alarming’ functions. The capacity of memory CD8 T-cells in the septic environment to respond to inflammatory cues and arrive to the site of secondary infection/antigen exposure remained normal suggesting T-cell-extrinsic factors contributed to the observed lesion. Mechanistically, we showed that IFN-γ produced rapidly during sepsis-induced cytokine storm leads to reduced IFN-γR1 expression on vascular endothelium. As a consequence, decreased expression of adhesion molecules and/or chemokines (VCAM1 and CXCL9) on skin endothelial cells in response to TRM-derived IFN-γ was observed, leading to sub-optimal bystander-recruitment of effector cells and increased susceptibility to pathogen re-encounter. Importantly, as visualized by intravital 2-photon microscopy, exogenous administration of CXCL9/10 was sufficient to correct sepsis-induced impairments in recruitment of effector cells at the localized site of TRM

  17. Polymicrobial sepsis impairs bystander recruitment of effector cells to infected skin despite optimal sensing and alarming function of skin resident memory CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek B Danahy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic infection that enhances host vulnerability to secondary infections normally controlled by T cells. Using CLP sepsis model, we observed that sepsis induces apoptosis of circulating memory CD8 T-cells (TCIRCM and diminishes their effector functions, leading to impaired CD8 T-cell mediated protection to systemic pathogen re-infection. In the context of localized re-infections, tissue resident memory CD8 T-cells (TRM provide robust protection in a variety of infectious models. TRM rapidly 'sense' infection in non-lymphoid tissues and 'alarm' the host by enhancing immune cell recruitment to the site of the infection to accelerate pathogen clearance. Here, we show that compared to pathogen-specific TCIRCM, sepsis does not invoke significant numerical decline of Vaccinia virus induced skin-TRM keeping their effector functions (e.g., Ag-dependent IFN-γ production intact. IFN-γ-mediated recruitment of immune cells to the site of localized infection was, however, reduced in CLP hosts despite TRM maintaining their 'sensing and alarming' functions. The capacity of memory CD8 T-cells in the septic environment to respond to inflammatory cues and arrive to the site of secondary infection/antigen exposure remained normal suggesting T-cell-extrinsic factors contributed to the observed lesion. Mechanistically, we showed that IFN-γ produced rapidly during sepsis-induced cytokine storm leads to reduced IFN-γR1 expression on vascular endothelium. As a consequence, decreased expression of adhesion molecules and/or chemokines (VCAM1 and CXCL9 on skin endothelial cells in response to TRM-derived IFN-γ was observed, leading to sub-optimal bystander-recruitment of effector cells and increased susceptibility to pathogen re-encounter. Importantly, as visualized by intravital 2-photon microscopy, exogenous administration of CXCL9/10 was sufficient to correct sepsis-induced impairments in recruitment of effector cells at the localized site of TRM

  18. Tissue-Resident T Cells as the Central Paradigm of Chlamydia Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond M; Brunham, Robert C

    2016-04-01

    For almost 2 decades, results from Chlamydia pathogenesis investigations have been conceptualized using a cytokine polarization narrative. Recent viral immunity studies identifying protective tissue-resident memory T cells (Trm) suggest an alternative paradigm based on localized immune networks. As Chlamydia vaccines enter the preclinical pipeline and, in the case of an attenuated trachoma vaccine, are given to human subjects, it may be useful to ask whether cytokine polarization is the appropriate framework for understanding and evaluating vaccine efficacy. In this review, we revisit C. trachomatis pathogenesis data from mice and humans using a Trm narrative and note a comfortable concordance with the Chlamydia pathogenesis literature.

  19. Lens stem cells may reside outside the lens capsule: an hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Rita A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we consider the ocular lens in the context of contemporary developments in biological ideas. We attempt to reconcile lens biology with stem cell concepts and a dearth of lens tumors. Historically, the lens has been viewed as a closed system, in which cells at the periphery of the lens epithelium differentiate into fiber cells. Theoretical considerations led us to question whether the intracapsular lens is indeed self-contained. Since stem cells generate tumors and the lens does not naturally develop tumors, we reasoned that lens stem cells may not be present within the capsule. We hypothesize that lens stem cells reside outside the lens capsule, in the nearby ciliary body. Our ideas challenge the existing lens biology paradigm. We begin our discussion with lens background information, in order to describe our lens stem cell hypothesis in the context of published data. Then we present the ciliary body as a possible source for lens stem cells, and conclude by comparing the ocular lens with the corneal epithelium.

  20. CD49a Expression Defines Tissue-Resident CD8+ T Cells Poised for Cytotoxic Function in Human Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheuk, Stanley; Schlums, Heinrich; Sérézal, Irène Gallais

    2017-01-01

    Tissue-resident memory T (Trm) cells form a heterogeneous population that provides localized protection against pathogens. Here, we identify CD49a as a marker that differentiates CD8+ Trm cells on a compartmental and functional basis. In human skin epithelia, CD8+CD49a+ Trm cells produced...

  1. Gene Expression Analysis of Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Treated by Ouabain in Pathological Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任延平; 吕卓人

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To study the gene expression of human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) treated by ouabain in pathological concentration. Methods The response of endothelial cells to ouabain of 1.8 nmol/L was explored with a complementary DNA microarray representing 8 464 different human genes. Results The results of mRNA profiles analysis indicated that 129 of the genes were differently expressed, 26 were upregulated. Conclusions The pathological role of ouabain on HUVEC may be involved in the controlling of DNA transcription、protein translation、 metabolism and signal transduction.

  2. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Laila C. Roudsari; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted...

  3. SIRT1 inhibits angiotensin Ⅱ-induced vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Chihchuan Liang; Peng Gao; Huina Zhang; Houzao Chen; Wei Zheng; Xiang Lv; Tingting Xu; Yusheng Wei; Depei Liu

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy as a critical event in the development of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis.Sirtuin (SIRT) 1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dependent deacetylase, has been demonstrated to exert protective effects in atherosclerosis by promoting endo-thelium-dependent vascular relaxation and reducing macrophage foam cell formation, but its role in VSMC hypertrophy remains unknown. In this study, we tried to investigate the effect of SIRTI on Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC hypertrophy. Results showed that adenoviral-mediated over-expression of SIRT1 significantly inhibited Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC hypertrophy, while knockdown of SIRT1 by RNAi resulted in an increased [3H]-leucine incorpor-ation of VSMC. Accordingly, nicotinamide adenine dinu-cleotide phosphate oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression induced by Ang Ⅱ was inhibited by SIRT1 in VSMCs. SIRT1 acti-vator resveratrol decreased, whereas endogenous SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide increased Nox1 expression in A7r5 VSMCs. Furthermore, transcription factor GATA-6 was involved in the down-regulation of Nox1 expression by SIRT1. These results provide new insight into SIRTI's anti-atherogenic properties by suppressing Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC hypertrophy.

  4. Highly enhanced compatibility of human brain vascular pericyte cells on monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2017-01-02

    We introduce a method for increasing the compatibility of human brain vascular pericyte (HBVP) cells on a glass substrate, based on wet transferred monolayer graphene without any treatment. As a novel material, graphene has key properties for incubating cells, such as chemical stability, transparency, appropriate roughness, hydrophobicity and high electrical conductivity. These outstanding properties of graphene were examined by Raman spectroscopy, water contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. The performance of this graphene-based implant was investigated by a cell compatibility test, comparing the growth rate of cells on the graphene surface and that on a bare glass substrate. After an incubation period of 72 h, the number of live HBVP cells on a graphene surface with an area of 1×1 mm(2) was 1.83 times greater than that on the glass substrate.

  5. E-Cigarette Aerosol Exposure Induces Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Damage, and Cell Death in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Chastain; Majeste, Andrew; Hanus, Jakub; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-12-01

    Cigarette smoking remains one of the leading causes of preventable death worldwide. Vascular cell death and dysfunction is a central or exacerbating component in the majority of cigarette smoking related pathologies. The recent development of the electronic nicotine delivery systems known as e-cigarettes provides an alternative to conventional cigarette smoking; however, the potential vascular health risks of e-cigarette use remain unclear. This study evaluates the effects of e-cigarette aerosol extract (EAE) and conventional cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). A laboratory apparatus was designed to produce extracts from e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes according to established protocols for cigarette smoking. EAE or conventional CSE was applied to human vascular endothelial cells for 4-72 h, dependent on the assay. Treated cells were assayed for reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, cell viability, and markers of programmed cell death pathways. Additionally, the anti-oxidants α-tocopherol and n-acetyl-l-cysteine were used to attempt to rescue e-cigarette induced cell death. Our results indicate that e-cigarette aerosol is capable of inducing reactive oxygen species, causing DNA damage, and significantly reducing cell viability in a concentration dependent fashion. Immunofluorescent and flow cytometry analysis indicate that both the apoptosis and programmed necrosis pathways are triggered by e-cigarette aerosol treatment. Additionally, anti-oxidant treatment provides a partial rescue of the induced cell death, indicating that reactive oxygen species play a causal role in e-cigarette induced cytotoxicity.

  6. SNS-032 Prevents Tumor Cell-Induced Angiogenesis By Inhibiting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aktar Ali

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation, migration, and capillary network formation of endothelial cells are the fundamental steps for angiogenesis, which involves the formation of new blood vessels. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of a novel aminothiazole SNS-032 on these critical steps for in vitro angiogenesis using a coculture system consisting of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and human glioblastoma cells (U87MG. SNS-032 is a potent selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 7, and 9, and inhibits both transcription and cell cycle. In this study, we examined the proliferation and viability of HUVECs and U87MG cells in the presence of SNS-032 and observed a dose-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation in both cell lines. SNS-032 inhibited threedimensional capillary network formations of endothelial cells. In a coculture study, SNS-032 completely prevented U87MG cell-mediated capillary formation of HUVECs. This inhibitor also prevented the migration of HUVECs when cultured alone or cocultured with U87MG cells. In addition, SNS-032 significantly prevented the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in both cell lines, whereas SNS-032 was less effective in preventing capillary network formation and migration of endothelial cells when an active recombinant VEGF was added to the medium. In conclusion, SNS-032 prevents in vitro angiogenesis, and this action is attributable to blocking of VEGF.

  7. Dimethylfumarate attenuates restenosis after acute vascular injury by cell-specific and Nrf2-dependent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Joo Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and incomplete re-endothelialization is a major clinical problem limiting the long-term efficacy of percutaneous coronary angioplasty. We tested if dimethylfumarate (DMF, an anti-psoriasis drug, could inhibit abnormal vascular remodeling via NF−E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2-NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 activity. DMF significantly attenuated neointimal hyperplasia induced by balloon injury in rat carotid arteries via suppression of the G1 to S phase transition resulting from induction of p21 protein in VSMCs. Initially, DMF increased p21 protein stability through an enhancement in Nrf2 activity without an increase in p21 mRNA. Later on, DMF stimulated p21 mRNA expression through a process dependent on p53 activity. However, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 or NQO1 activity, well-known target genes induced by Nrf2, were dispensable for the DMF induction of p21 protein and the effect on the VSMC proliferation. Likewise, DMF protected endothelial cells from TNF-α-induced apoptosis and the dysfunction characterized by decreased eNOS expression. With knock-down of Nrf2 or NQO1, DMF failed to prevent TNF-α-induced cell apoptosis and decreased eNOS expression. Also, CD31 expression, an endothelial specific marker, was restored in vivo by DMF. In conclusion, DMF prevented abnormal proliferation in VSMCs by G1 cell cycle arrest via p21 upregulation driven by Nrf2 and p53 activity, and had a beneficial effect on TNF-α-induced apoptosis and dysfunction in endothelial cells through Nrf2–NQO1 activity suggesting that DMF might be a therapeutic drug for patients with vascular disease.

  8. Real-time measurements of endogenous CO production from vascular cells using an ultrasensitive laser sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Y.; Durante, W.; Lancaster, D. G.; Klattenhoff, J.; Tittel, F. K.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been implicated as a biological messenger molecule analogous to nitric oxide. A compact gas sensor based on a midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy was developed for direct and real-time measurement of trace levels (in approximate pmol) of CO release by vascular cells. The midinfrared light is generated by difference frequency mixing of two nearinfrared lasers in a nonlinear optical crystal. A strong infrared absorption line of CO (4.61 microm) is chosen for convenient CO detection without interference from other gas species. The generation of CO from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells was detected every 20 s without any chemical modification to the CO. The sensitivity of the sensor reached 6.9 pmol CO. CO synthesis was measured from untreated control cells (0.25 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), sodium nitroprusside-treated cells (0.29 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), and hemin-treated cells (0.49 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). The sensor also detected decreases in CO production after the addition of the heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitor tin protoporphyrin-IX (from 0.49 to 0.02 nmol per 10(7) cells/h) and increases after the administration of the HO substrate hemin (from 0.27 to 0.64 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). These results demonstrate that midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy is a useful technique for the noninvasive and real-time detection of trace levels of CO from biological tissues.

  9. IL-9 signaling affects central nervous system resident cells during inflammatory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoli; Cao, Fang; Cui, Langjun; Ciric, Bogoljub; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin (IL) 9, a dominant cytokine in Th9 cells, has been proven to play a pathogenic role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), by augmenting T cell activation and differentiation; however, whether IL-9 signaling affects central nervous system (CNS)-resident cells during CNS autoimmunity remains unknown. In the present study, we found that the IL-9 receptor (IL-9R) was highly expressed in astrocytes, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), oligodendrocytes and microglia cells, and that its expression was significantly upregulated in brain and spinal cord during EAE. In addition, IL-9 increased chemokine expression, including CXCL9, CCL20 and MMP3, in primary astrocytes. Although IL-9 had no effect on the proliferation of microglia cells, it decreased OPC proliferation and differentiation when in combination with other pro-inflammatory cytokines, but not with IFN-γ. IL-9 plus IFN-γ promoted OPC proliferation and differentiation. These findings indicate that CNS-restricted IL-9 signaling may be involved in the pathogenesis of MS/EAE, thus providing a potential therapeutic target for future MS/EAE treatment through disruption of CNS cell-specific IL-9 signaling.

  10. Insulin sensitizers prevent fine particulate matter-induced vascular insulin resistance and changes in endothelial progenitor cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberzettl, Petra; McCracken, James P; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to fine particular matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. Because blood vessels are sensitive targets of air pollutant exposure, we examined the effects of concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) on vascular insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which reflect cardiovascular health. We found that CAP exposure for 9 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the aorta of mice maintained on control diet. This change was accompanied by the induction of IL-1β and increases in the abundance of cleaved IL-18 and p10 subunit of Casp-1, consistent with the activation of the inflammasome pathway. CAP exposure also suppressed circulating levels of EPCs (Flk-1(+)/Sca-1(+) cells), while enhancing the bone marrow abundance of these cells. Although similar changes in vascular insulin signaling and EPC levels were observed in mice fed high-fat diet, CAP exposure did not exacerbate diet-induced changes in vascular insulin resistance or EPC homeostasis. Treatment with an insulin sensitizer, metformin or rosiglitazone, prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and NF-κB and inflammasome activation and restored peripheral blood and bone marrow EPC levels. These findings suggest that PM2.5 exposure induces diet-independent vascular insulin resistance and inflammation and prevents EPC mobilization, and that this EPC mobilization defect could be mediated by vascular insulin resistance. Impaired vascular insulin sensitivity may be an important mechanism underlying PM2.5-induced vascular injury, and pharmacological sensitization to insulin action could potentially prevent deficits in vascular repair and mitigate vascular inflammation due to exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Engineering interaction between bone marrow derived endothelial cells and electrospun surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Furqan; Dutta, Naba K; Zannettino, Andrew; Vandyke, Kate; Choudhury, Namita Roy

    2014-04-14

    The aim of this investigation was to understand and engineer the interactions between endothelial cells and the electrospun (ES) polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) nanofiber surfaces and evaluate their potential for endothelialization. Elastomeric PVDF-HFP samples were electrospun to evaluate their potential use as small diameter artificial vascular graft scaffold (SDAVG) and compared with solvent cast (SC) PVDF-HFP films. We examined the consequences of fibrinogen adsorption onto the ES and SC samples for endothelialisation. Bone marrow derived endothelial cells (BMEC) of human origin were incubated with the test and control samples and their attachment, proliferation, and viability were examined. The nature of interaction of fibrinogen with SC and ES samples was investigated in detail using ELISA, XPS, and FTIR techniques. The pristine SC and ES PVDF-HFP samples displayed hydrophobic and ultrahydrophobic behavior and accordingly, exhibited minimal BMEC growth. Fibrinogen adsorbed SC samples did not significantly enhance endothelial cell binding or proliferation. In contrast, the fibrinogen adsorbed electrospun surfaces showed a clear ability to modulate endothelial cell behavior. This system also represents an ideal model system that enables us to understand the natural interaction between cells and their extracellular environment. The research reported shows potential of ES surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications.

  12. Inhibitory effects of roscovitine on proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang-shuang; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Chong-qiang; Xie, Min-jie; Li, Wen-yu; Yang, Xiang-li; Lv, Jia-gao

    2014-12-01

    Abnormal proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are the major cause of in-stent restenosis (ISR). Intervention proliferation and migration of VSMCs is an important strategy for antirestenotic therapy. Roscovitine, a second-generation cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, can inhibit cell cycle of multiple cell types. We studied the effects of roscovitine on cell cycle distribution, proliferation and migration of VSMCs in vitro by flow cytometry, BrdU incorporation and wound healing assay, respectively. Our results showed that roscovitine increased the proportion of G0/G1 phase cells after 12 h (69.57±3.65 vs. 92.50±1.68, P=0.000), 24 h (80.87±2.24 vs. 90.25±0.79, P=0.000) and 48 h (88.08±3.86 vs. 88.87±2.43, P=0.427) as compared with control group. Roscovitine inhibited proliferation and migration of VSMCs in a concentration-dependent way. With the increase of concentration, roscovitine showed increased capacity for growth and migration inhibition. Roscovitine (30 μmol/L) led to an almost complete VSMCs growth and migration arrest. Combined with its low toxicity and selective inhibition to ISR-VSMCs, roscovitine may be a potential drug in the treatment of vascular stenosis diseases and particularly useful in the prevention and treatment of ISR.

  13. Hypothyroidism Affects Vascularization and Promotes Immune Cells Infiltration into Pancreatic Islets of Female Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castelán, Julia; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Castelán, Francisco; Cuevas, Estela

    2015-01-01

    Thyroidectomy induces pancreatic edema and immune cells infiltration similarly to that observed in pancreatitis. In spite of the controverted effects of hypothyroidism on serum glucose and insulin concentrations, the number and proliferation of Langerhans islet cells as well as the presence of extracellular matrix are affected depending on the islet size. In this study, we evaluated the effect of methimazole-induced hypothyroidism on the vascularization and immune cells infiltration into islets. A general observation of pancreas was also done. Twelve Chinchilla-breed female adult rabbits were divided into control (n = 6) and hypothyroid groups (n = 6, methimazole, 0.02% in drinking water for 30 days). After the treatment, rabbits were sacrificed and their pancreas was excised, histologically processed, and stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) or Masson's Trichrome techniques. Islets were arbitrarily classified into large, medium, and small ones. The external and internal portions of each islet were also identified. Student-t-test and Mann-Whitney-U test or two-way ANOVAs were used to compare variables between groups. In comparison with control rabbits, hypothyroidism induced a strong infiltration of immune cells and a major presence of collagen and proteoglycans in the interlobular septa. Large islets showed a high vascularization and immune cells infiltration. The present results show that hypothyroidism induces pancreatitis and insulitis. PMID:26175757

  14. Inhibitive effects of anti-oxidative vitamins on mannitol-induced apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kai-yu; Shen, Mei-ping; Ye, Zhi-hong; Dai, Xiao-na; Shang, Shi-qiang

    2006-10-01

    Study blood vessel injury and gene expression indicating vascular endothelial cell apoptosis induced by mannitol with and without administration of anti-oxidative vitamins. Healthy rabbits were randomly divided into four groups. Mannitol was injected into the vein of the rabbit ear in each animal. Pre-treatment prior to mannitol injection was performed with normal saline (group B), vitamin C (group C) and vitamin E (group D). Blood vessel injury was assessed under electron and light microscopy. In a second experiment, cell culture specimen of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with mannitol. Pre-treatment was done with normal saline (sample B), vitamin C (sample C) and vitamin E (sample D). Total RNA was extracted with the original single step procedure, followed by hybridisation and analysis of gene expression. In the animal experiment, serious blood vessel injury was seen in group A and group B. Group D showed light injury only, and normal tissue without pathological changes was seen in group C. Of all 330 apoptosis-related genes analysed in human cell culture specimen, no significant difference was seen after pre-treatment with normal saline, compared with the gene chip without pre-treatment. On the gene chip pre-treated with vitamin C, 45 apoptosis genes were down-regulated and 34 anti-apoptosis genes were up-regulated. Pre-treatment with vitamin E resulted in the down-regulation of 3 apoptosis genes. Vitamin C can protect vascular endothelial cells from mannitol-induced injury.

  15. Effect of crocetin on vascular smooth muscle cells migration induced by advanced glycosylation end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Min; Yang, Runlin; Zhang, Yaqin; Wu, Pingping; Wang, Lizhen; Gao, Zhenyu; Wang, Jianmei

    2017-02-13

    Crocetin is a major active constituent of Gardenia jasminoides J. Ellis, and can aid in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The effect and possible mechanism of crocetin on the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) were investigated. VSMCs were pre-incubated with or without crocetin and exposed to AGEs subsequently. The invasion of the cells was investigated using a 24-well Cell Invasion Chamber. The anti-proliferative activity of crocetin was evaluated by MTT assay and VSMCs cell-cycle distribution was examined by flow cytometry. Cytokine TNF-α and IL-6 secreted by VSMCs and the amount of matrix metalloproteinase MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the culture supernatant were detected by ELISA. The expression level of RAGE (AGEs receptor), in cells was analyzed by western blot. The results demonstrated that AGEs increased about two-fold migration of VSMCs compared with control (OD=0.778±0.191 vs OD=0.413±0.214, Pvalue of MMP-2 and MMP-9 compared with the AGEs group (2.81±0.35ng/ml vs 6.40±0.85ng/ml, 2.69±0.25ng/ml vs 4.32±0.57ng/ml, respectively). In summary, crocetin inhibits the migration of VSMCs induced by AGEs through RAGE-dependent signaling pathway. And it is meaningful to diabetic vascular complications.

  16. Metabolomic profiling of cellular responses to carvedilol enantiomers in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxuan Wang

    Full Text Available Carvedilol is a non-selective β-blocker indicated in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. Although the differential pharmacological effects of individual Carvedilol enantiomer is supported by preceding studies, the cellular response to each enantiomer is not well understood. Here we report the use of GC-MS metabolomic profiling to study the effects of Carvedilol enantiomers on vascular smooth muscle cells (A7r5 and to shed new light on molecular events underlying Carvedilol treatment. The metabolic analysis revealed alternations in the levels of 8 intracellular metabolites and 5 secreted metabolites in A7r5 cells incubated separately with S- and R-Carvedilol. Principal component analysis of the metabolite data demonstrated the characteristic metabolic signatures in S- and R-Carvedilol-treated cells. A panel of metabolites, including L-serine, L-threonine, 5-oxoproline, myristic acid, palmitic acid and inositol are closely correlated to the vascular smooth muscle contraction. Our findings reveal the differentiating metabolites for A7r5 cells incubated with individual enantiomer of Carvedilol, which opens new perspectives to employ metabolic profiling platform to study chiral drug-cell interactions and aid their incorporation into future improvement of β-blocker therapy.

  17. Hypothyroidism Affects Vascularization and Promotes Immune Cells Infiltration into Pancreatic Islets of Female Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Rodríguez-Castelán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroidectomy induces pancreatic edema and immune cells infiltration similarly to that observed in pancreatitis. In spite of the controverted effects of hypothyroidism on serum glucose and insulin concentrations, the number and proliferation of Langerhans islet cells as well as the presence of extracellular matrix are affected depending on the islet size. In this study, we evaluated the effect of methimazole-induced hypothyroidism on the vascularization and immune cells infiltration into islets. A general observation of pancreas was also done. Twelve Chinchilla-breed female adult rabbits were divided into control n=6 and hypothyroid groups (n=6, methimazole, 0.02% in drinking water for 30 days. After the treatment, rabbits were sacrificed and their pancreas was excised, histologically processed, and stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS or Masson’s Trichrome techniques. Islets were arbitrarily classified into large, medium, and small ones. The external and internal portions of each islet were also identified. Student-t-test and Mann-Whitney-U test or two-way ANOVAs were used to compare variables between groups. In comparison with control rabbits, hypothyroidism induced a strong infiltration of immune cells and a major presence of collagen and proteoglycans in the interlobular septa. Large islets showed a high vascularization and immune cells infiltration. The present results show that hypothyroidism induces pancreatitis and insulitis.

  18. The clinical impact of MTHFR polymorphism on the vascular complications of sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Moreira Neto

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is one of the most common inherited diseases in the world and the patients present notorious clinical heterogeneity. It is known that patients with SCD present activation of the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, especially during vaso-occlusive crises, but also during the steady state of the disease. We determined if the presence of the factor V gene G1691A mutation (factor V Leiden, the prothrombin gene G20210A variant, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T polymorphism may be risk factors for vascular complications in individuals with SCD. We studied 53 patients with SCD (60% being women, 29 with SS (sickle cell anemia; 28 years, range: 13-52 years and 24 with SC (sickle-hemoglobin C disease; 38.5 years, range: 17-72 years hemoglobinopathy. Factor V Leiden, MTHFR C677T polymorphism, and prothrombin G20210A variant were identified by PCR followed by further digestion of the PCR product with specific endonucleases. The following vascular complications were recorded: stroke, retinopathy, acute thoracic syndrome, and X-ray-documented avascular necrosis. Only one patient was heterozygous for factor V Leiden (1.8% and there was no prothrombin G20210A variant. MTHFR 677TT polymorphism was detected in 1 patient (1.8% and the heterozygous form 677TC was observed in 18 patients (34%, 9 with SS and 9 with SC disease, a prevalence similar to that reported by others. No association was detected between the presence of the MTHFR 677T allele and other genetic modulation factors, such as alpha-thalassemia, ß-globin gene haplotype and fetal hemoglobin. The presence of the MTHFR 677T allele was associated with the occurrence of vascular complications in SCD, although this association was not significant when each complication was considered separately. In conclusion, MTHFR C677T polymorphism might be a risk factor for vascular complications in SCD.

  19. IL-27 Regulates IL-18 binding protein in skin resident cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Wittmann

    Full Text Available IL-18 is an important mediator involved in chronic inflammatory conditions such as cutaneous lupus erythematosus, psoriasis and chronic eczema. An imbalance between IL-18 and its endogenous antagonist IL-18 binding protein (BP may account for increased IL-18 activity. IL-27 is a cytokine with dual function displaying pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. Here we provide evidence for a yet not described anti-inflammatory mode of action on skin resident cells. Human keratinocytes and surprisingly also fibroblasts (which do not produce any IL-18 show a robust, dose-dependent and highly inducible mRNA expression and secretion of IL-18BP upon IL-27 stimulation. Other IL-12 family members failed to induce IL-18BP. The production of IL-18BP peaked between 48-72 h after stimulation and was sustained for up to 96 h. Investigation of the signalling pathway showed that IL-27 activates STAT1 in human keratinocytes and that a proximal GAS site at the IL-18BP promoter is of importance for the functional activity of IL-27. The data are in support of a significant anti-inflammatory effect of IL-27 on skin resident cells. An important novel property of IL-27 in skin pathobiology may be to counter-regulate IL-18 activities by acting on keratinocytes and importantly also on dermal fibroblasts.

  20. Eph family receptors and ligands in vascular cell targeting and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, E; Schoecklmann, H; Daniel, T O

    1997-11-01

    Members of the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases determine neural cell aggregation and targeting behavior, functions that are also critical in vascular assembly and remodeling. Among this class of diverse receptors, EphA2 (Eck) and EphB1 (ELK) represent prototypes for two receptor subfamilies distinguished by high-affinity interaction with either glycerophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked or transmembrane ligands, respectively. EphA2 participates in angiogenic responses to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) through an autocrine loop affecting endothelial cell migration. EphB1 and its ligand Ephrin-B1 (LERK-2) are important determinants of assembly of endothelial cells from the microvasculature of the kidney, where both are expressed in endothelial progenitors and in glomerular microvascular endothelial cells. Ephrin-B1 activation of EphB1 promotes assembly of these cells into capillary-like structures. Interaction trap approaches have identified downstream signaling proteins that complex with ligand-activated EphA2 or EphB1, including nonreceptor tyrosine kinases and SH2 domain-containing adapter proteins. The Grb 10 adapter is one of a subset that binds activated EphB1, but not EphA2, defining distinct signaling mechanisms for these related endothelial receptors. On the basis of observations in vascular endothelial cells and recent results defining Eph receptor and ligand roles in neural cell targeting, we propose that these receptors direct cell-cell recognition events that are critical in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:329-334). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  1. Effect of essential fatty acids on glucose-induced cytotoxicity to retinal vascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Junhui

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of dysregulated hyperglycemia. Retinal vascular endothelial cell dysfunction is an early event in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Studies showed that hyperglycemia-induced excess proliferation of retinal vascular endothelial cells can be abrogated by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 ω-3 and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 ω-3. The influence of dietary omega-3 PUFA on brain zinc metabolism has been previously implied. Zn2+ is essential for the activity of Δ6 desaturase as a co-factor that, in turn, converts essential fatty acids to their respective long chain metabolites. Whether essential fatty acids (EFAs α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid have similar beneficial effect remains poorly understood. Methods RF/6A cells were treated with different concentrations of high glucose, α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid and Zn2+. The alterations in mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase enzyme activity, cell membrane fluidity, reactive oxygen species generation, SOD enzyme and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion were evaluated. Results Studies showed that hyperglycemia-induced excess proliferation of retinal vascular endothelial cells can be abrogated by both linoleic acid (LA and α-linolenic acid (ALA, while the saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid was ineffective. A dose–response study with ALA showed that the activity of the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase enzyme was suppressed at all concentrations of glucose tested to a significant degree. High glucose enhanced fluorescence polarization and microviscocity reverted to normal by treatment with Zn2+ and ALA. ALA was more potent that Zn2+. Increased level of high glucose caused slightly increased ROS generation that correlated with corresponding decrease in SOD activity. ALA suppressed ROS generation to a significant degree in a dose dependent fashion and raised SOD activity significantly. ALA suppressed

  2. A novel adipocytokine, chemerin exerts anti-inflammatory roles in human vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamawaki, Hideyuki, E-mail: yamawaki@vmas.kitasato-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Aomori 034-8628 (Japan); Kameshima, Satoshi; Usui, Tatsuya; Okada, Muneyoshi; Hara, Yukio [Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Aomori 034-8628 (Japan)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is a novel adipocytokine with almost unknown function in vasculature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin activates Akt/eNOS/NO pathways in endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-induced VCAM-1 via suppressing NF-{kappa}B and p38 signal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is anti-inflammatory through producing NO in vascular endothelium. -- Abstract: Chemerin is a recently identified adipocytokine which plays a role on inflammation and adipocytes metabolism. However, its function in vasculature is largely unknown. We examined the effects of chemerin on vascular endothelial inflammatory states. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with chemerin (300 ng/ml, 20 min) induced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177). Consistently, chemerin increased intracellular cyclic GMP content. Pretreatment with chemerin (1-300 ng/ml, 24 h) significantly inhibited phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B p65 (Ser536) and p38 as well as vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} (5 ng/ml, 20 min-6 h). Inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B or p38 significantly inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression. Chemerin also inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in rat isolated aorta. Moreover, chemerin significantly inhibited monocytes adhesion to TNF-{alpha}-stimulated endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect of chemerin on TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 was reversed by a NOS inhibitor. Conversely, an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside significantly inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1. The present results for the first time demonstrate that chemerin plays anti-inflammatory roles by preventing TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocytes adhesion in vascular

  3. Vascular development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zheng-Hua; Freshour, Glenn; Hahn, Michael G; Burk, David H; Zhong, Ruiqin

    2002-01-01

    Vascular tissues, xylem and phloem, form a continuous network throughout the plant body for transport of water, minerals, and food. Characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in various aspects of vascular formation has demonstrated that Arabidopsis is an ideal system for investigating the molecular mechanisms controlling vascular development. The processes affected in these mutants include initiation or division of procambium or vascular cambium, formation of continuous vascular cell files, differentiation of procambium or vascular cambium into vascular tissues, cell elongation, patterned secondary wall thickening, and biosynthesis of secondary walls. Identification of the genes affected by some of these mutations has revealed essential roles in vascular development for a cytokinin receptor and several factors mediating auxin transport or signaling. Mutational studies have also identified a number of Arabidopsis mutants defective in leaf venation pattern or vascular tissue organization in stems. Genetic evidence suggests that the vascular tissue organization is regulated by the same positional information that determines organ polarity.

  4. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viitanen, Matti [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Geriatrics, Turku City Hospital and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Sundström, Erik [Division of Neurodegeneration, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Baumann, Marc [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Poyhonen, Minna [Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Hospital, HUSLAB, Helsinki (Finland); Tikka, Saara [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Behbahani, Homira, E-mail: homira.behbahani@ki.se [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  5. Arterial calcification: Finger-pointing at resident and circulating stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco; Vasuri; Silvia; Fittipaldi; Gianandrea; Pasquinelli

    2014-01-01

    The term "Stammzelle"(stem cells) originally appeared in 1868 in the works of Ernst Haeckel who used it to describe the ancestor unicellular organism from which he presumed all multicellular organisms evolved. Since then stem cells have been studied in a wide spectrum of normal and pathological conditions; it is remarkable to note that ectopic arterial calcification was considered a passive deposit of calcium since its original discovering in 1877; in the last decades, resident and circulating stem cells were imaged to drive arterial calcification through chondro-osteogenic differentiation thus opening the idea that an active mechanism could be at the basis of the process that clinically shows a Janus effect: calcifications either lead to the stabilization or rupture of the atherosclerotic plaques. A review of the literature underlines that 130 years after stem cell discovery, antigenic markers of stem cells are still debated and the identification of the osteoprogenitor phenotype is even more elusive due to tissue degradation occurring at processing and manipulation. It is necessary to find a consensus to perform comparable studies that implies phenotypic recognition of stem cells antigens. A hypothesis is based on the singular morphology and amitotic mechanism of division of osteoclasts: it constitutes the opening to a new approach on osteoprogenitors markers and recognition. Our aim was to highlight all the present evidences of the active calcification process, summarize the different cellular types involved, and discuss a novel approach to discover osteoprogenitor phenotypes in arterial wall.

  6. Arterial calcification: Finger-pointing at resident and circulating stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasuri, Francesco; Fittipaldi, Silvia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea

    2014-11-26

    The term ''Stammzelle'' (stem cells) originally appeared in 1868 in the works of Ernst Haeckel who used it to describe the ancestor unicellular organism from which he presumed all multicellular organisms evolved. Since then stem cells have been studied in a wide spectrum of normal and pathological conditions; it is remarkable to note that ectopic arterial calcification was considered a passive deposit of calcium since its original discovering in 1877; in the last decades, resident and circulating stem cells were imaged to drive arterial calcification through chondro-osteogenic differentiation thus opening the idea that an active mechanism could be at the basis of the process that clinically shows a Janus effect: calcifications either lead to the stabilization or rupture of the atherosclerotic plaques. A review of the literature underlines that 130 years after stem cell discovery, antigenic markers of stem cells are still debated and the identification of the osteoprogenitor phenotype is even more elusive due to tissue degradation occurring at processing and manipulation. It is necessary to find a consensus to perform comparable studies that implies phenotypic recognition of stem cells antigens. A hypothesis is based on the singular morphology and amitotic mechanism of division of osteoclasts: it constitutes the opening to a new approach on osteoprogenitors markers and recognition. Our aim was to highlight all the present evidences of the active calcification process, summarize the different cellular types involved, and discuss a novel approach to discover osteoprogenitor phenotypes in arterial wall.

  7. Target engagement and drug residence time can be observed in living cells with BRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robers, Matthew B; Dart, Melanie L; Woodroofe, Carolyn C; Zimprich, Chad A; Kirkland, Thomas A; Machleidt, Thomas; Kupcho, Kevin R; Levin, Sergiy; Hartnett, James R; Zimmerman, Kristopher; Niles, Andrew L; Ohana, Rachel Friedman; Daniels, Danette L; Slater, Michael; Wood, Monika G; Cong, Mei; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Wood, Keith V

    2015-12-03

    The therapeutic action of drugs is predicated on their physical engagement with cellular targets. Here we describe a broadly applicable method using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) to reveal the binding characteristics of a drug with selected targets within intact cells. Cell-permeable fluorescent tracers are used in a competitive binding format to quantify drug engagement with the target proteins fused to Nanoluc luciferase. The approach enabled us to profile isozyme-specific engagement and binding kinetics for a panel of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Our analysis was directed particularly to the clinically approved prodrug FK228 (Istodax/Romidepsin) because of its unique and largely unexplained mechanism of sustained intracellular action. Analysis of the binding kinetics by BRET revealed remarkably long intracellular residence times for FK228 at HDAC1, explaining the protracted intracellular behaviour of this prodrug. Our results demonstrate a novel application of BRET for assessing target engagement within the complex milieu of the intracellular environment.

  8. Vascular disease modeling using induced pluripotent stem cells: Focus in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitrez, P R; Rosa, S C; Praça, C; Ferreira, L

    2016-05-06

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent today an invaluable tool to create disease cell models for modeling and drug screening. Several lines of iPSCs have been generated in the last 7 years that changed the paradigm for studying diseases and the discovery of new drugs to treat them. In this article we focus our attention to vascular diseases in particular Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a devastating premature aging disease caused by a mutation in the lamin A gene. In general, patients die because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Because the patients are fragile the isolation of a particular type of cells is very difficult. Therefore in the last 5 years, researchers have used cells derived from iPSCs to model aspects of the HGPS and to screen libraries of chemicals to retard or treat the disease.

  9. Arachidonic metabolism and radiation toxicity in cultures of vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldor, A.; Vlodavsky, I.; Fuks, Z.; Matzner, Y.; Rubin, D.B. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel) Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke' s Medical Center, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1989-06-01

    The authors conclude that the observed changes in eicosanoid production by vascular endothelial cells exposed to ionizing irradiation may be relevant to the pathogenesis of post-radiation injury in small and large blood vessels. Anomalies of PGI{sub 2} production may lead to thrombosis and accelerated arteriosclerosis which are observed in irradiated vessels. The generation of potent cells may greatly facilitate inflammation in irradiated vessels. The model of irradiated cultured endothelial cells may also be useful for the study of various methods and agents aimed at reducing the radiation induced damage to blood vessels. Evaluation of the capacity of cultured endothelial cells to produce eicosanoids may serve as an appropriate index for the metabolic damage induced by radiation. (author).

  10. RNA interference-mediated gene silencing of vascular endothelial growth factor in colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To inhibit the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in colon cancer cell line by RNA interference (RNAi). METHODS: Followed the service of E-RNAi, we designed and constructed two kinds of shRNA expression vectors aiming at the VEGF gene, then transfected them into colon cancer HT29 cells by lipofectamineTM 2000. The level of VEGF mRNA was investigated by RT-PCR and Northern blotting. The protein expression of VEGF was observed by immunofluoresence staining and Western blotting. RESULTS: We got two kinds of VEGF specific shRNA expression vectors which could efficiently inhibit the expression of VEGF in HT29 cells. RT-PCR, Northern blotting, immunofluoresence staining and Western blotting showed that inhibition rate for VEGF expression was up to 42%, 89%, 73% and 82%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The expression of VEGF can be inhibited by RNA interference in HT29 cells.

  11. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarel K. Gandhi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC, within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating.

  12. Multiple Congenital Granular Cell Epulis: Case Report and Immunohistochemical Profile with Emphasis on Vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Roccon Bianchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital granular cell epulis is a rare benign soft tissue lesion arising from the alveolar ridge in neonates. A rare case of multiple congenital granular cell epulis is reported, alongside a description of its vascular immunohistochemical profile. A female newborn presented with two exophytic pedunculated red nodules located on the alveolar ridge between the future eruption sites of the incisors and canines of the mandible and maxilla. A conservative surgical excision was performed on the second day of life. Histology revealed proliferation of round granular cells containing an abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm with basophilic nuclei, ranging from round to oval in shape. Numerous blood vessels were also seen. Immunohistochemical analysis of the granular cells revealed positivity for CD68, D2-40, Ki67, VEGF, and FGF and negativity for S100, CD34, and CD105. Immunostaining for CD34, CD105, and D2-40 confirmed the presence of a large number of blood and lymphatic vessels. Although rare, an understanding of this lesion is paramount for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment. In the present report, the immunohistochemical profile confirmed increased vascularization, proving that these lesions are composed of not only new and preexisting blood vessels, but also lymphatic vessels.

  13. A cellular Potts model analyzing differentiated cell behavior during in vivo vascularization of a hypoxic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scianna, Marco; Bassino, Eleonora; Munaron, Luca

    2015-08-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessel networks from existing capillary or post-capillary venules, is an intrinsically multiscale process occurring in several physio-pathological conditions. In particular, hypoxic tissue cells activate downstream cascades culminating in the secretion of a wide range of angiogenic factors, including VEGF isoforms. Such diffusive chemicals activate the endothelial cells (ECs) forming the external walls of the nearby vessels that chemotactically migrate toward the hypoxic areas of the tissue as multicellular sprouts. A functional network eventually emerges by further branching and anastomosis processes. We here propose a CPM-based approach reproducing selected features of the angiogenic progression necessary for the reoxygenation of a hypoxic tissue. Our model is able to span the different scale involved in the angiogenic progression as it incorporates reaction-diffusion equations for the description of the evolution of microenvironmental variables in a discrete mesoscopic cellular Potts model (CPM) that reproduces the dynamics of the vascular cells. A key feature of this work is the explicit phenotypic differentiation of the ECs themselves, distinguished in quiescent, stalk and tip. The simulation results allow identifying a set of key mechanisms underlying tissue vascularization. Further, we provide evidence that the nascent pattern is characterized by precise topological properties. Finally, we link abnormal sprouting angiogenesis with alteration in selected cell behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of TRPM7 channels in hyperglycemia-mediated injury of vascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Sun

    Full Text Available This study investigated the change of transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7 expression by high glucose and its role in hyperglycemia induced injury of vascular endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were incubated in the presence or absence of high concentrations of D-glucose (HG for 72 h. RT-PCR, Real-time PCR, Western blotting, Immunofluorescence staining and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings showed that TRPM7 mRNA, TRPM7 protein expression and TRPM7-like currents were increased in HUVECs following exposure to HG. In contrast to D-glucose, exposure of HUVECs to high concentrations of L-glucose had no effect. HG increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, cytotoxicity and decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression, which could be attenuated by knockdown of TRPM7 with TRPM7 siRNA. The protective effect of silencing TRPM7 against HG induced endothelial injury was abolished by U0126, an inhibitor of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. These observations suggest that TRPM7 channels play an important role in hyperglycemia-induced injury of vascular endothelial cells.

  15. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 enhances vascular endothelial growth factor secretion by human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Rhonda R; Unda, Richard; Yeh, Lee-Chuan C; Vidro, Eileen K; Lee, John C; Tsin, Andrew T

    2006-08-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a cytokine known to promote angiogenesis. Results from RNase protection assays (RPAs) show that RPE from non-diabetic human donors and from adult retinal pigment epithelium-19 (ARPE-19) cells expressed significant bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) message. In addition, ARPE-19 cells cultured in high glucose (25 mM), compared to those in physiological glucose (5.5 mM) released significantly more BMP-4 into the conditioned media (CM). However, the effect of BMP-4 on the release of VEGF by ARPE-19 cells has not been studied. Accordingly, ARPE-19 cells were treated with BMP-4 to determine VEGF secretion. BMP-4 and VEGF levels in the CM and cell lysates were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cells treated with exogenous BMP-4 had higher VEGF in the CM and this treatment effect was dose- and time-dependent, while cell lysates had low levels of VEGF. Addition of cycloheximide (CHX) or actinomycin-D (ACT) significantly reduced VEGF secretion from cells treated with BMP-4, suggesting that the BMP-4-induced secretion of VEGF requires new RNA and protein synthesis. Our results suggest that BMP-4 may play a role in the regulation of ocular angiogenesis associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) by stimulating VEGF release from RPE cells.

  16. Preparation of Biotubes with vascular cells component by in vivo incubation using adipose-derived stromal cell-exuding multi-microporous molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Ryosuke; Tsujinaka, Takahiro; Nakayama, Yasuhide

    2015-12-01

    Biotubes, prepared using in-body tissue architecture (IBTA) technology, have adequate mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility for vascular grafts. However, they have thin walls, lack vascular constructing cells, and are composed of subcutaneous connective tissues consisting mainly of collagen and fibroblasts. This study aimed to prepare Biotubes with a vascular-like structure including an endothelial cell lining and a smooth muscle cell by IBTA using adipose-derived vascular stromal cell (ADSCs)-exuding specially designed multiporous tubes (outer diameter 5 mm, length 24 mm, pore size 500 μm, pore number 180, cell number/tube >3.0 × 10(6)). ADSCs were separated from rat subcutaneous fat, suspended in a Matrigel™ solution at 4 °C, and then filled into the tubes. After the tubes were embedded into dorsal subcutaneous pouches of the same rats for 2 weeks, robust Biotubes with a wall thickness of >600 μm were formed surrounding the tubes. The luminal layer of the obtained Biotubes was dominated by the cells positive for an endothelial marker. Almost the entire intima, with a thickness of about 400 μm, was occupied with cells positive for a smooth muscle marker. Both cells were derived from ADSCs. Biotube walls were constructed by fusing ADSC-derived vascular constructing cells exuded from the tubes and fibroblasts and collagen from the surrounding connective tissue. A robust Biotubes with vascular cells component, were formed after only 2 weeks of subcutaneous incubation of ADSCs-exuding multiporous tubes.

  17. Direct and indirect effects of immune and central nervous system-resident cells on human oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Craig S; Cui, Qiao-Ling; Warsi, Nebras M; Durafourt, Bryce A; Zorko, Nika; Owen, David R; Antel, Jack P; Bar-Or, Amit

    2015-01-15

    In multiple sclerosis, successful remyelination within the injured CNS is largely dependent on the survival and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. During inflammatory injury, oligodendrocytes and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells within lesion sites are exposed to secreted products derived from both infiltrating immune cell subsets and CNS-resident cells. Such products may be considered either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory and have the potential to contribute to both injury and repair processes. Within the CNS, astrocytes also contribute significantly to oligodendrocyte biology during development and following inflammatory injury. The overall objective of the current study was to determine how functionally distinct proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory human immune cell subsets, implicated in multiple sclerosis, can directly and/or indirectly (via astrocytes) impact human oligodendrocyte progenitor cell survival and differentiation. Proinflammatory T cell (Th1/Th17) and M1-polarized myeloid cell supernatants had a direct cytotoxic effect on human A2B5(+) neural progenitors, resulting in decreased O4(+) and GalC(+) oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Astrocyte-conditioned media collected from astrocytes pre-exposed to the same proinflammatory supernatants also resulted in decreased oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation without an apparent increase in cell death and was mediated through astrocyte-derived CXCL10, yet this decrease in differentiation was not observed in the more differentiated oligodendrocytes. Th2 and M2 macrophage or microglia supernatants had neither a direct nor an indirect impact on oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation. We conclude that proinflammatory immune cell responses can directly and indirectly (through astrocytes) impact the fate of immature oligodendrocyte-lineage cells, with oligodendrocyte progenitor cells more vulnerable to injury compared with mature oligodendrocytes.

  18. Inhibition of rac1 reduces PDGF-induced reactive oxygen species and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    In vascular smooth muscle cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were known to mediate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced cell proliferation and NADH/NADPH oxidase is the major source of ROS. NADH/NADPH oxidase is controlled by rac1 in non-phagocytic cells. In this study, we examined whether the inhibition of rac1 by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of a dominant negative rac1 gene product (Ad.N17rac1) could reduce the proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC)...

  19. Poised Regeneration of Zebrafish Melanocytes Involves Direct Differentiation and Concurrent Replenishment of Tissue-Resident Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Sharanya; Kasheta, Melissa; Ceol, Craig J

    2015-06-22

    Efficient regeneration following injury is critical for maintaining tissue function and enabling organismal survival. Cells reconstituting damaged tissue are often generated from resident stem or progenitor cells or from cells that have dedifferentiated and become proliferative. While lineage-tracing studies have defined cellular sources of regeneration in many tissues, the process by which these cells execute the regenerative process is largely obscure. Here, we have identified tissue-resident progenitor cells that mediate regeneration of zebrafish stripe melanocytes and defined how these cells reconstitute pigmentation. Nearly all regeneration melanocytes arise through direct differentiation of progenitor cells. Wnt signaling is activated prior to differentiation, and inhibition of Wnt signaling impairs regeneration. Additional progenitors divide symmetrically to sustain the pool of progenitor cells. Combining direct differentiation with symmetric progenitor divisions may serve as a means to rapidly repair injured tissue while preserving the capacity to regenerate.

  20. The development of blood-retinal barrier during the interaction of astrocytes with vascular wall cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanling Yao; Tianshi Wang; Jiexin Deng; Ding Liu; Xiaofei Li; Jinbo Deng

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are intimately involved in the formation and development of retinal vessels. Astrocyte dysfunction is a major cause of blood-retinal barrier injury and other retinal vascular diseases. In this study, the development of the retinal vascular system and the formation of the blood-ret-inal barrier in mice were investigated using immunolfuorescence staining, gelatin-ink perfusion, and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the retinal vascular system of mice develops from the optic disc after birth, and radiates out gradually to cover the entire retina, taking the papilla optica as the center. First, the superifcial vasculature is formed on the inner retinal layer;then, the vasculature extends into the inner and outer edges of the retinal inner nuclear layer, forming the deep vasculature that is parallel to the superifcial vasculature. The blood-retinal barrier is mainly composed of endothelium, basal lamina and the end-feet of astrocytes, which become mature during mouse development. Initially, the naive endothelial cells were immature with few organelles and many microvilli. The basal lamina was uniform in thickness, and the glial end-feet surrounded the outer basal lamina incompletely. In the end, the blood-retinal barrier matures with smooth endothelia connected through tight junctions, rela-tively thin and even basal lamina, and relatively thin glial cell end-feet. These ifndings indicate that the development of the vasculature in the retina follows the rules of“center to periphery”and“superifcial layer to deep layers”. Its development and maturation are spatially and tempo-rally consistent with the functional performance of retinal neurons and photosensitivity. The blood-retinal barrier gradually becomes mature via the process of interactions between astro-cytes and blood vessel cells.

  1. Regulation of SIRT1 in vascular smooth muscle cells from streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Toniolo

    Full Text Available Sirtuins enzymes are a conserved family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD-dependent deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases that mediate responses to oxidative stress, fasting and dietary restriction in mammals. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are involved in many mechanisms that regulate vascular biology in vivo but the role of SIRT1 has not been explored in much detail. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SIRT1 in cultured VSMCs under various stress conditions including diabetes. Sprague-Dawley rats were made diabetic by injecting a single dose of streptozotocin (65 mg/Kg, and aortic VSMCs were isolated after 4 weeks. Immunocytochemistry showed that SIRT1 was localized predominantly in the nucleus, with lower staining in VSMCs from STZ-diabetic as compared with normoglycemic rats. Previous diabetes induction in vivo and high glucose concentrations in vitro significantly downregulated SIRT1 amounts as detected in Western blot assays, whereas TNF-α (30 ng/ml stimulation failed to induce significant changes. Because estrogen signaling affects several pathways of oxidative stress control, we also investigated SIRT1 modulation by 17β-estradiol. Treatment with the hormone (10 nM or a selective estrogen receptor-α agonist decreased SIRT1 levels in VSMCs from normoglycemic but not in those from STZ-diabetic animals. 17β-estradiol treatment also enhanced activation of AMP-dependent kinase, which partners with SIRT1 in a signaling axis. SIRT1 downregulation by 17β-estradiol could be observed as well in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a cell type in which SIRT1 downregulation is associated with insulin resistance and subclinical atherosclerosis. These data suggest that SIRT1 protein levels are regulated by diverse cellular stressors to a variable extent in VSMCs from diabetic and normoglycemic rats, warranting further investigation on SIRT1 as a modulator of VSMC activity in settings of vascular inflammation.

  2. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling is involved in phenylephrine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao PANG; Ning-ling SUN

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Catecholamine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is one of the major events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling. The calcineurin-NFAT pathway plays a role in regulating growth and differentiation in various cell types. We investigated whether the calcineurin-NFAT pathway was involved in the regulation of phenylephrine-induced VSMC proliferation.Methods: Proliferation of VSMC was measured using an MTT assay and cell counts. Localization of NFATcl was detected by immunofluorescence staining. NFATcl-DNA binding was determined by EMSA and luciferase activity analyses.NFATcl and calcineurin levels were assayed by immunoprecipitation.Results: Phenylephrine (PE, an α1-adrenoceptor agonist) increased VSMC proliferation and cell number. Prazosin (an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), cyclosporin A (CsA, an inhibitor of calcineurin) and chelerythrine (an inhibitor of PKC)decreased PE-induced proliferation and cell number. Additional treatment of VSMC with CsA or chelerythrine further inhibited proliferation and cell number in the chelerythrine-pretreatment group and the CsA-pretreatment group. CsA and chelerythrine alone had no effect on either absorbance or cell number. CsA decreased PE-induced calcineurin levels and activity. NFATc1 was translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus upon treatment with PE. This translocation was reversed by CsA. CsA decreased the PE-induced NFATc1 level in the nucleus. PE increased NFAT's DNA binding activity and NFAT-dependent reporter gene expression. CsA blocked these effects.Conclusion: CsA partially suppresses PE-induced VSMC proliferation by inhibiting calcineurin activity and NFATc1 nuclear translocation. The calcineurin-NFATc1 pathway is involved in the hyperplastic growth of VSMC induced by phenylephrine.

  3. Differentiation of bovine intramuscular and subcutaneous stromal-vascular cells exposed to dexamethasone and troglitazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A C; Ortiz-Colón, G; Doumit, M E; Tempelman, R J; Buskirk, D D

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of these experiments were to compare differentiation of bovine stromal-vascular (S-V) cells isolated from i.m. and s.c. adipose tissues in response to a glucocorticoid and a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist. Stromal-vascular cells were isolated from i.m. and s.c. fat depots of 3 Angus steers and propagated in culture. Cells were exposed to differentiation media containing 0.25 microM dexamethasone (DEX), a glucocorticoid analog, and 40 microM troglitazone (TRO), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist, or both. Cells treated with DEX and TRO had greater (P TRO, and depot (P > 0.59) or depot differences (P = 0.41) in glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity were found. Morphological assessment of adipogenic colonies showed that DEX induced a 1.8-fold increase in the percentage of adipogenic colonies (P = 0.03), whereas TRO increased the proportion of adipogenic colonies by 1.9-fold (P = 0.02) compared with those not treated with DEX or TRO, respectively. Depots had a similar percentage of adipogenic colonies (P = 0.18); however, the percentage of differentiated cells within adipogenic colonies was found to be 6.4-fold greater in s.c. isolates compared with i.m. (P TRO increased the proportion of differentiated cells within colonies by 10-fold compared with those of nontreated colonies (P TRO, and these effects were additive. Most importantly, inherent differences in the capacity to differentiate exist between adipogenic bovine i.m. and s.c. S-V cells.

  4. Mononuclear Phagocyte-Derived Microparticulate Caspase-1 Induces Pulmonary Vascular Endothelial Cell Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srabani Mitra

    Full Text Available Lung endothelial cell apoptosis and injury occurs throughout all stages of acute lung injury (ALI/ARDS and impacts disease progression. Lung endothelial injury has traditionally been focused on the role of neutrophil trafficking to lung vascular integrin receptors induced by proinflammatory cytokine expression. Although much is known about the pathogenesis of cell injury and death in ALI/ARDS, gaps remain in our knowledge; as a result of which there is currently no effective pharmacologic therapy. Enzymes known as caspases are essential for completion of the apoptotic program and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that caspase-1 may serve as a key regulator of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC apoptosis in ALI/ARDS. Our recent experiments confirm that microparticles released from stimulated monocytic cells (THP1 induce lung endothelial cell apoptosis. Microparticles pretreated with the caspase-1 inhibitor, YVAD, or pan-caspase inhibitor, ZVAD, were unable to induce cell death of HPMVEC, suggesting the role of caspase-1 or its substrate in the induction of HPMVEC cell death. Neither un-induced microparticles (control nor direct treatment with LPS induced apoptosis of HPMVEC. Further experiments showed that caspase-1 uptake into HPMVEC and the induction of HPMVEC apoptosis was facilitated by caspase-1 interactions with microparticulate vesicles. Altering vesicle integrity completely abrogated apoptosis of HPMVEC suggesting an encapsulation requirement for target cell uptake of active caspase-1. Taken together, we confirm that microparticle centered caspase-1 can play a regulator role in endothelial cell injury.

  5. Cytotoxic effects of the lipid peroxidation product 2,4-decadienal in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabré, Anna; Girona, Josefa; Vallvé, Joan-C; Heras, Mercedes; Masana, Lluís

    2003-08-01

    It is well known that oxidized LDL can be cytotoxic to smooth muscle cells (SMC) and then contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis. Nevertheless, which oxidized compound and which mechanism are involved in cell death is still under study. In this work we have studied the role of two representative apolar aldehydes (hexanal and 2,4-decadienal (2,4-DDE)), derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids oxidation, on human SMC cytotoxicity. Cell cytotoxicity was assessed by means of lactate deshydrogenase (LDH) release, cell morphology and DNA fragmentation. Results showed that hexanal up to 50 microM for 24 h was not cytotoxic to cells. However, 2,4-DDE at 50 microM for 24 h induced a 48% LDH leakage. The observed cytotoxic effect of 2,4-DDE was not due to a programmed cell death as no DNA ladder was detected. After aldehydes exposition a decreased expression of p53 and c-myc mRNA, genes involved in cell death regulation, was also demonstrated by RT-PCR. These observations suggest that 2,4-DDE may be the molecular cause of lipid oxidation cytotoxicity to human vascular SMC. By inducing cell necrosis in advanced stages, lipid oxidation may contribute to the cell debris core which is growing in the atherosclerotic lesion leading to a weakened and unstable plaque.

  6. Interleukin-27 induces the endothelial differentiation in Sca-1+ cardiac resident stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Obana, Masanori; Mohri, Tomomi; Ebara, Masaki; Otani, Yuta; Maeda, Makiko; Fujio, Yasushi

    2015-10-01

    Cytokines play important roles in cardiac repair and regeneration. Recently, we demonstrated that interleukin (IL)-6 family cytokines induce the endothelial differentiation of Sca-1+ cardiac resident stem cells through STAT3/Pim-1 signaling pathway. In contrast, the biological functions of IL-12 family cytokines in heart remain to be elucidated, though they show structural homology with IL-6. In the present study, we examined the effects of IL-12 family cytokines on the transdifferentiation of cardiac Sca-1+ cells into cardiac cells. RT-PCR analyses revealed that IL-27 receptor α (IL-27Rα), but not IL-12R or IL-23R, was expressed in cardiac Sca-1+ cells. The transcript expression of IL-27 was elevated in murine hearts in cardiac injury models. Intriguingly, IL-27 stimulation for 14 days induced the endothelial cell (EC) marker genes, such as CD-31 and VE-cadherin. Immunoblot analyses clarified that IL-27 treatment rapidly phosphorylated STAT3. IL-27 upregulated the expression of Pim-1, but the overexpression of dominant negative STAT3 abrogated the induction of Pim-1 by IL-27. Finally, adenoviral transfection of dominant negative Pim-1 inhibited IL-27-induced EC differentiation of cardiac Sca-1+ cells. These findings demonstrated that IL-27 promoted the commitment of cardiac stem cells into the EC lineage, possibly leading to neovascularization as a novel biological function. IL-27 could not only regulate the inflammation but also contribute to the maintenance of the tissue homeostasis through stem cell differentiation at inflammatory sites. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. PCB 77 dechlorination products modulate pro-inflammatory events in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eske, Katryn; Newsome, Bradley; Han, Sung Gu; Murphy, Margaret; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar; Hennig, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are associated with detrimental health outcomes including cardiovascular diseases. Remediation of these compounds is a critical component of environmental policy. Although remediation efforts aim to completely remove toxicants, little is known about the effects of potential remediation byproducts. We previously published that Fe/Pd nanoparticles effectively dechlorinate PCB 77 to biphenyl, thus eliminating PCB-induced endothelial dysfunction using primary vascular endothelial cells. Herein, we analyzed the toxic effects of PCB congener mixtures (representative mixtures of commercial PCBs based on previous dechlorination data) produced at multiple time points during the dechlorination of PCB 77 to biphenyl. Compared with pure PCB 77, exposing endothelial cells to lower chlorinated PCB byproducts led to improved cellular viability, decreased superoxide production, and decreased nuclear factor kappa B activation based on duration of remediation. Presence of the parent compound, PCB 77, led to significant increases in mRNA and protein inflammatory marker expression. These data implicate that PCB dechlorination reduces biological toxicity to vascular endothelial cells.

  8. Matrine inhibits the expression of adhesion molecules in activated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Lihua; Ren, Yingang; Gao, Yanli; Kang, Li; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Matrine is a main active ingredient of Sophora flavescens roots, which are used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in VSMCs have largely remained elusive. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The results showed that matrine inhibited the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 (VCAM‑1) and intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. Matrine markedly inhibited the TNF‑α‑induced expression of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB p65 and prevented the TNF‑α‑caused degradation of inhibitor of NF‑κB; it also inhibited TNF‑α‑induced activation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, matrine inhibited the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that matrine inhibited the expression of VCAM‑1 and ICAM‑1 in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs via the suppression of ROS production as well as NF‑κB and MAPK pathway activation. Therefore, matrine may have a potential therapeutic use for preventing the advancement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  9. Effect of Ligustrazine Injection on Vascular Endothelial Cell of The Patients with Arteriosclerosis Obliterans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of ligustrazine injection (LI) on vascular endothelial cell of the patients with arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO) and explore the new pathway of investigating effective vascular protective agents in Chinese medicinal herbs. Methods: Forty-six patients with ASO in the LI group treated by LI were observed, their circulating endothelial cells (CEC) were detected quantitatively before and after treatment. The results were compared with the CEC of 53 cases of healthy persons (control group) in the same period. Results: In the LI group, the immediate cure rate was 45.7% (21 cases), markedly effective rate 36.9% (17 cases) and the effective rate 17.4% (8 cases). The CEC of patients before treatment was 4.39±1.76/0.9μl, which was significantly higher than that of the healthy persons (1.53±0.42/0.9μl). It could be reduced after treatment, along with the improvement of symptoms and signs, to 2.43±0.87/0.9μl, P<0.01. Conclusion: LI in treating ASO not only displays extraordinary effect, but also has good effect in curing the damage of endothelial cells.

  10. Growth arrest of vascular smooth muscle cells in suspension culture using low-acyl gellan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natori, Tomomi; Fujiyoshi, Masachika; Uchida, Masashi; Abe, Natsuki; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ishii, Itsuko

    2017-03-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) causes restenosis in biomaterial vascular grafts. The purposes of this study were to establish a suspension culture system for SMCs by using a novel substrate, low-acyl gellan gum (GG) and to maintain SMCs in a state of growth inhibition. When SMCs were cultured in suspension with GG, their proliferation was inhibited. Their viability was 70% at day 2, which was maintained at more than 50% until day 5. In contrast, the viability of cells cultured in suspension without GG was 5.6% at day 2. By cell cycle analysis, the ratio of SMCs in the S phase when cultured in suspension with GG was lower than when cultured on plastic plates. In SMCs cultured in suspension with GG, the ratio of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) protein to Rb protein was decreased and p27(Kip1) expression was unchanged in comparison with SMCs cultured on plastic plates. In addition, SMCs could be induced to proliferate again by changing the culture condition from suspension with GG to plastic plates. These results suggest that our established culturing method for SMCs is useful to maintain SMCs in a state of growth inhibition with high viability.

  11. American ginseng inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via suppressing Jak/Stat pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Wang, Wenjuan; Li, Siying; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Windust, Anthony; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-01-01

    Ethnopharmcological relevance Ginseng, a folk medicine which has been used for thousands of years in Asia, has been promoted for the treatment or prevention of health problems including cardiovascular disease. However, the molecular mechanism of ginseng-induced cardiovascular protection is unclear. Thus, we investigated signaling mechanism by which American ginseng inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, a key feature of diverse vascular disease. Materials and methods A standardized crude extract of American ginseng was supplied by the National Research Council of Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) were exposed to fetal bovine serum (FBS), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin, or angiotensin II (Ang II) to induce proliferation that was examined by measuring DNA synthesis and cell numbers. Western blot was applied to determine the activations of Jak, Stat, Akt, and ERK. Results American ginseng inhibited RASMC proliferation induced by FBS, PDGF, insulin or Ang II. American ginseng slightly increased both basal and FBS-, PDGF- or Ang II-induced activities of Akt and ERK in RASMCs; however, it dramatically inhibited the activation of Jak2 and Stat3. Conclusion These results demonstrate that American ginseng inhibits VSMC proliferation through suppressing the Jak/Stat pathway. PMID:23041701

  12. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R. [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Redondo, Santiago [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Peçanha, Franck [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Martín, Angela [Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922, Alcorcón (Spain); Fortuño, Ana [Área de Ciencias Cardiovasculares, Centro de Investigación Médica Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31008, Pamplona (Spain); Cachofeiro, Victoria [Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Tejerina, Teresa [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  13. Autologous stromal vascular fraction cells: a tool for facilitating tolerance in rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichim, Thomas E; Harman, Robert J; Min, Wei-Ping; Minev, Boris; Solano, Fabio; Rodriguez, Jorge Paz; Alexandrescu, Doru T; De Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Hu, Xiang; Marleau, Annette M; Riordan, Neil H

    2010-01-01

    Since the days of Medawar, the goal of therapeutic tolerogenesis has been a "Holy Grail" for immunologists. While knowledge of cellular and molecular mechanisms of this process has been increasing at an exponential rate, clinical progress has been minimal. To provide a mechanistic background of tolerogenesis, we overview common processes in the naturally occurring examples of: pregnancy, cancer, oral tolerance and anterior chamber associated immune deviation. The case is made that an easily accessible byproduct of plastic surgery, the adipose stromal vascular fraction, contains elements directly capable of promoting tolerogenesis such as T regulatory cells and inhibitory macrophages. The high content of mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cells from this source provides the possibility of trophic/regenerative potential, which would augment tolerogenic processes by decreasing ongoing inflammation. We discuss the application of this autologous cell source in the context of rheumatoid arthritis, concluding with some practical examples of its applications.

  14. Involvement of phospholipase D in store-operated calcium influx in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M; Tepel, M; Nofer, J R; Neusser, M; Assmann, G; Zidek, W

    2000-08-11

    In non-excitable cells, sustained intracellular Ca2+ increase critically depends on influx of extracellular Ca2+. Such Ca2+ influx is thought to occur by a 'store-operated' mechanism, i.e. the signal for Ca2+ entry is believed to result from the initial release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular stores. Here we show that the depletion of cellular Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin or bradykinin is functionally linked to a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase D (PLD) activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), and that phosphatidic acid formed via PLD enhances sustained calcium entry in this cell type. These results suggest a regulatory role for PLD in store-operated Ca2+ entry in VSMC.

  15. Arterial grafts exhibiting unprecedented cellular infiltration and remodeling in vivo: the role of cells in the vascular wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Sindhu; Peng, Haofan; Schlaich, Evan M; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Andreadis, Stelios T; Swartz, Daniel D

    2015-05-01

    To engineer and implant vascular grafts in the arterial circulation of a pre-clinical animal model and assess the role of donor medial cells in graft remodeling and function. Vascular grafts were engineered using Small Intestinal Submucosa (SIS)-fibrin hybrid scaffold and implanted interpositionally into the arterial circulation of an ovine model. We sought to demonstrate implantability of SIS-Fibrin based grafts; examine the remodeling; and determine whether the presence of vascular cells in the medial wall was necessary for cellular infiltration from the host and successful remodeling of the implants. We observed no occlusions or anastomotic complications in 18 animals that received these grafts. Notably, the grafts exhibited unprecedented levels of host cell infiltration that was not limited to the anastomotic sites but occurred through the lumen as well as the extramural side, leading to uniform cell distribution. Incoming cells remodeled the extracellular matrix and matured into functional smooth muscle cells as evidenced by expression of myogenic markers and development of vascular reactivity. Interestingly, tracking the donor cells revealed that their presence was beneficial but not necessary for successful grafting. Indeed, the proliferation rate and number of donor cells decreased over time as the vascular wall was dominated by host cells leading to significant remodeling and development of contractile function. These results demonstrate that SIS-Fibrin grafts can be successfully implanted into the arterial circulation of a clinically relevant animal model, improve our understanding of vascular graft remodeling and raise the possibility of engineering mural cell-free arterial grafts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Osteoblast-conditioned media influence the expression of E-selectin on bone-derived vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Lauren A; Sosnoski, Donna M; Gay, Carol V

    2006-08-01

    Breast cancer cells frequently metastasize to the ends of long bones, ribs and vertebrae, structures which contain a rich microvasculature that is closely juxtaposed to metabolically active trabecular bone surfaces. This study focuses on the effects of osteoblast secretions on the surface presentation of adhesive proteins on skeletal vascular endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial cells were isolated from trabecular bone regions of the long bones of 7-week-old Swiss Webster mice and also from the central marrow cavity where trabecular bone is absent. Both types of endothelial cells were placed in culture for 7 days, then exposed 24 h to conditioned media from MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. Conditioned medium (CM) from two different stages of osteoblast development were tested: (1) from immature MC3T3-E1 cells cultured for 5-7 days and (2) from mature MC3T3-E1 cells cultured for 28-30 days. The immature osteoblasts were in a stage of rapid proliferation; the mature osteoblasts formed a matrix that mineralized. Following exposure to the conditioned media, the vascular cells were exposed to anti-P-selectin, anti-E-selectin, anti-ICAM-1, and anti-VCAM-1 to detect the corresponding adhesive proteins on their surfaces. Breast cancer cells are known to bind to these adhesive proteins. Of the four proteins evaluated, E-selectin was consistently found on more cell surfaces (approximately 30%) of bone-derived vascular endothelial cells (BVECs) when exposed to the immature CM whereas vascular endothelial cells from marrow (MVECs) did not show this response to either immature CM or mature CM. These studies suggest that the BVEC blood vessels near immature bone cells express more surface adhesive protein that could enhance entrapment and extravasation of breast cancer cells. Once cancer cells have undergone extravasation into marrow adjacent to bone, they could be readily attracted to nearby bone surfaces.

  17. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  18. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Benjamin B.; Thompson, David A.; Howard, Laura L.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Weiss, Robert H.

    2002-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, in its myriad incarnations the foremost killer disease in the industrialized world, is characterized by aberrant proliferation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells in part as a result of the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the blood vessel wall. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids are synthesized from arachidonic acid in a reaction catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 system and are vasoactive substances. Metabolism of these compounds by epoxide hydrolases results in the formation of compounds that affect the vasculature in a pleiotropic manner. As an outgrowth of our observations that urea inhibitors of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats as well as the findings of other investigators that these compounds possess antiinflammatory actions, we have examined the effect of sEH inhibitors on VSM cell proliferation. We now show that the sEH inhibitor 1-cyclohexyl-3-dodecyl urea (CDU) inhibits human VSM cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and is associated with a decrease in the level of cyclin D1. In addition, cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid mimics the growth-suppressive activity of CDU; there is no evidence of cellular toxicity or apoptosis in CDU-treated cells when incubated with 20 μM CDU for up to 48 h. These results, in light of the antiinflammatory and antihypertensive properties of these compounds that have been demonstrated already, suggest that the urea class of sEH inhibitors may be useful for therapy for diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis characterized by exuberant VSM cell proliferation and vascular inflammation.

  19. Role of vascular peroxidase 1 in senescence of endothelial cells in diabetes rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Si-Yu; Yuan, Qiong; Li, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Chang-Ping; Hu, Rong; Zhang, Guo-Gang; Li, Dai; Li, Yuan-Jian

    2015-10-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought as a major reason of vascular injury in diabetes. Vascular peroxidase 1 (VPO1) is a newly found peroxidase playing an important role in inducing oxidative stress. In the present experiment, we tested the role of VPO1 in senescence of endothelial cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and cultured endothelial cells. Blood samples were collected from carotid arteries. Vasodilator responses to acetylcholine (Ach) in the isolated aortic rings were measured, serum concentration of glucose, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the expression of VPO1 in the aorta were determined. Endothelial cells were treated with high glucose or H2O2, the concentrations of MCP-1, TNF-α and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and the expression of VPO1 were determined. shRNA of VPO1 was used for mechanism research in cultured cells. Vasodilator responses to Ach were impaired markedly and the serum concentrations of glucose, TNF-α and MCP-1 were significantly increased in diabetic rats. The expression of VPO1 in the aorta was upregulated in diabetic rats. High glucose treatment significantly decreased cell viability and elevated the levels of MCP-1, TNF-α and HOCl and upregulated the expression of VPO1. H2O2 treatment significantly induced cellular senescence, inhibited eNOS expression and NO production. The effects of high glucose and H2O2 were attenuated by shRNA interference of VPO1. VPO1 plays an important role in senescence of endothelial cells and endothelial dysfunction by induction of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction in type 2 diabetic rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization.

  1. In Vivo FRET Imaging of Tumor Endothelial Cells Highlights a Role of Low PKA Activity in Vascular Hyperpermeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kamioka, Yuji; Yano, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-09-15

    Vascular hyperpermeability is a pathological hallmark of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated roles of various signaling molecules in vascular hyperpermeability; however, the activities of such signaling molecules have not been examined in live tumor tissues for technical reasons. Here, by in vivo two-photon excitation microscopy with transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer, we examined the activity of protein kinase A (PKA), which maintains endothelial barrier function. The level of PKA activity was significantly lower in the intratumoral endothelial cells than the subcutaneous endothelial cells. PKA activation with a cAMP analogue alleviated the tumor vascular hyperpermeability, suggesting that the low PKA activity in the endothelial cells may be responsible for the tumor-tissue hyperpermeability. Because the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a canonical inducer of vascular hyperpermeability and a molecular target of anticancer drugs, we examined the causality between VEGF receptor activity and the PKA activity. Motesanib, a kinase inhibitor for VEGF receptor, activated tumor endothelial PKA and reduced the vascular permeability in the tumor. Conversely, subcutaneous injection of VEGF decreased endothelial PKA activity and induced hyperpermeability of subcutaneous blood vessels. Notably, in cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, VEGF activated PKA rather than decreasing its activity, highlighting the remarkable difference between its actions in vitro and in vivo These data suggested that the VEGF receptor signaling pathway increases vascular permeability, at least in part, by reducing endothelial PKA activity in the live tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5266-76. ©2016 AACR.

  2. Electrostatic endothelial cell seeding technique for small-diameter (<6 mm) vascular prostheses: feasibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlin, G L; Rittgers, S E

    1997-01-01

    Multiple studies have indicated the importance of surface charge in the adhesion of multiple cardiovascular cell lines including platelets and endothelial cells on the substrate materials (1,4,7-10,12-15). It is the purpose of this article to report a feasibility study conducted using an electrostatic endothelial cell seeding technique. The feasibility study was conducted using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), a static pool apparatus, a voltage source, and a parallel plate capacitor. The HUVEC concentration and seeding times were constant at 560,000 HUVEC/ml and 30 min, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy examination of the endothelial cell adhesion indicated that an induced temporary positive surface charge on e-PTFE graft material enhances the number and the maturation (flattening) of HUVECs adhered. The results indicated that the total number of endothelial cells adhered (70.9 mm2) was increased from 9198 +/- 1194 HUVECs on the control (no induced surface charge) e-PTFE to 22,482 +/- 4814 HUVECs (2.4 x control) on the maximum induced positive surface charge. The total number of cells in the flattened phase of adhesion increased from 837 +/- 275 to 6785 +/- 1012 HUVECs (8.1x) under identical conditions. Thus, the results of the feasibility study support the premise that electrostatic interaction is an important factor in both the endothelial cell adhesion and spreading processes and suggest that the electrostatic seeding technique may lead to an increased patency of small diameter (<6 mm) vascular prostheses.

  3. Angiotensin II upregulates the expression of placental growth factor in human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yingqiang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is now recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Angiotensin II (Ang II is a critical factor in inflammatory responses, which promotes the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Placental growth factor (PlGF is a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family cytokines and is associated with inflammatory progress of atherosclerosis. However, the potential link between PlGF and Ang II has not been investigated. In the current study, whether Ang II could regulate PlGF expression, and the effect of PlGF on cell proliferation, was investigated in human vascular endothelial cells (VECs and smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. Results In growth-arrested human VECs and VSMCs, Ang II induced PlGF mRNA expression after 4 hour treatment, and peaked at 24 hours. 10-6 mol/L Ang II increased PlGF protein production after 8 hour treatment, and peaked at 24 hours. Stimulation with Ang II also induced mRNA expression of VEGF receptor-1 and -2(VEGFR-1 and -2 in these cells. The Ang II type I receptor (AT1R antagonist blocked Ang II-induced PlGF gene expression and protein production. Several intracellular signals elicited by Ang II were involved in PlGF synthesis, including activation of protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and PI3-kinase. A neutralizing antibody against PlGF partially inhibited the Ang II-induced proliferation of VECs and VSMCs. However, this antibody showed little effect on the basal proliferation in these cells, whereas blocking antibody of VEGF could suppress both basal and Ang II-induced proliferation in VECs and VSMCs. Conclusion Our results showed for the first time that Ang II could induce the gene expression and protein production of PlGF in VECs and VSMCs, which might play an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  4. Muse cells, newly found non-tumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, reside in human mesenchymal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakao, Shohei; Akashi, Hideo; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been presumed to include a subpopulation of pluripotent-like cells as they differentiate not only into the same mesodermal-lineage cells but also into ectodermal- and endodermal-lineage cells and exert tissue regenerative effects in a wide variety of tissues. A novel type of pluripotent stem cell, Multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells, was recently discovered in mesenchymal tissues such as the bone marrow, adipose tissue, dermis and connective tissue of organs, as well as in cultured fibroblasts and bone marrow-MSCs. Muse cells are able to differentiate into all three germ layers from a single cell and to self-renew, and yet exhibit non-tumorigenic and low telomerase activities. They can migrate to and target damaged sites in vivo, spontaneously differentiate into cells compatible with the targeted tissue, and contribute to tissue repair. Thus, Muse cells may account for the wide variety of differentiation abilities and tissue repair effects that have been observed in MSCs. Muse cells are unique in that they are pluripotent stem cells that belong in the living body, and are thus assumed to play an important role in 'regenerative homeostasis' in vivo.

  5. Protocatechuic aldehyde inhibits migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and intravascular thrombosis

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    Moon, Chang Yoon [The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT (United States); Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Cheol Ryong [Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yoon Hee, E-mail: wooriminji@gmail.com [Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Jig, E-mail: ejlee423@yuhs.ac [Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Endocrinology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA) inhibits ROS production in VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA inhibits proliferation and migration in PDGF-induced VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA has anti-platelet effects in ex vivo rat whole blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the potential therapeutic role of PCA in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and formation of intravascular thrombosis play crucial roles in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. This study examined the effects of protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA), a compound isolated from the aqueous extract of the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a variety of vascular diseases, on the migration and proliferation of VSMCs and platelets due to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). DNA 5-bromo-2 Prime -deoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation and wound-healing assays indicated that PCA significantly attenuated PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs at a pharmacologically relevant concentration (100 {mu}M). On a molecular level, we observed down-regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, both of which regulate key enzymes associated with migration and proliferation. We also found that PCA induced S-phase arrest of the VSMC cell cycle and suppressed cyclin D2 expression. In addition, PCA inhibited PDGF-BB-stimulated reactive oxygen species production in VSMCs, indicating that PCA's antioxidant properties may contribute to its suppression of PDGF-induced migration and proliferation in VSMCs. Finally, PCA exhibited an anti-thrombotic effect related to its inhibition of platelet aggregation, confirmed with an aggregometer. Together, these findings suggest a potential therapeutic role of PCA in the treatment of atherosclerosis and angioplasty-induced vascular restenosis.

  6. The vascular smooth muscle cell: a therapeutic target in Type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Karen E; Riches, Kirsten

    2013-08-01

    The rising epidemic of T2DM (Type 2 diabetes mellitus) worldwide is of significant concern. The inherently silent nature of the disease in its early stages precludes early detection; hence cardiovascular disease is often established by the time diabetes is diagnosed. This increased cardiovascular risk leads to significant morbidity and mortality in these individuals. Progressive development of complications as a result of previous exposure to metabolic disturbances appears to leave a long-lasting impression on cells of the vasculature that is not easily reversed and is termed 'metabolic memory'. SMCs (smooth muscle cells) of blood vessel walls, through their inherent ability to switch between a contractile quiescent phenotype and an active secretory state, maintain vascular homoeostasis in health and development. This plasticity also confers SMCs with the essential capacity to adapt and remodel in pathological states. Emerging clinical and experimental studies propose that SMCs in diabetes may be functionally impaired and thus contribute to the increased incidence of macrovascular complications. Although this idea has general support, the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently unknown and hence are the subject of intense research. The aim of the present review is to explore and evaluate the current literature relating to the problem of vascular disease in T2DM and to discuss the critical role of SMCs in vascular remodelling. Possibilities for therapeutic strategies specifically at the level of T2DM SMCs, including recent novel advances in the areas of microRNAs and epigenetics, will be evaluated. Since restoring glucose control in diabetic patients has limited effect in ameliorating their cardiovascular risk, discovering alternative strategies that restrict or reverse disease progression is vital. Current research in this area will be discussed.

  7. Every breath you take: The impact of environment on resident memory CD8 T cells in the lung

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    Hillary eShane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Resident memory T cells (TRM are broadly defined as a population of T cells which persist in non-lymphoid sites long term, do not re-enter the circulation, and are distinct from central memory T cells (TCM and circulating effector memory T cells (TEM. Recent studies have described populations of TRM cells in the skin, gut, lungs and nervous tissue. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the specific environment in which the TRM reside can further refine their phenotypical and functional properties. Here, we focus on the TRM cells that develop following respiratory infection and reside in the lungs and the lung airways. Specifically, we will review recent studies that have described some of the requirements for establishment of TRM cells in these tissues, and the defining characteristics of TRM in the lungs and lung airways. With continual bombardment of the respiratory tract by both pathogenic and environmental antigens, dynamic fluctuations in the local milieu including homeostatic resources and niche restrictions can impact TRM longevity. Beyond a comprehensive characterization of lung TRM cells, special attention will be placed on studies which have defined how the microenvironment of the lung influences memory T cell survival at this site. As memory T cell populations in the lung airways are requisite for protection yet wane numerically over time, developing a comprehensive picture of factors which may influence TRM development and persistence at these sites is important for improving T cell-based vaccine design.

  8. Expression pattern of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), their receptors and antagonists in primary endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, M; Wirz, W; Tag, C G; Mavituna, M; Emans, N; Korff, T; Stoldt, V; Gressner, A M; Kiefer, P

    2005-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are important angiogenic growth factors. While basic FGF (FGF2) is well established as a potent inducer of angiogenesis much less is known about other FGFs possibly expressed by EC. We investigated the expression of all known FGFs, their main tyrosine kinase receptors and antagonists by RT-PCR analysis in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) to obtain a complete expression profile of this important growth factor system in model endothelial cells (EC). In addition to FGFR1IIIc, which is considered as the major FGF receptor in EC, HUVECs express similar levels of FGFR3IIIc, detectable amounts of FGFR2IIIc and a new FGF receptor without an intracellular kinase domain (FGFR5). HUVECs express several secreted FGFs, including FGF5, 7, 8, 16 and 18 and two members of the fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs), not yet reported to be expressed in EC. The expression panel was compared with that obtained from human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and human aortic tissue. Human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) and HUVECs express the identical FGF receptor and ligand panel implicating that both cell types act, according the FGF signals more as an entity than as individual cell types. Expression of Fgf1, 2, 7, 16 and 18 and the antagonists Sprouty 2,3 and 4 was demonstrated for all analysed cDNAs. The IIIc isoforms of FGFR1 and 2 and the novel FGFR5 were expressed in the aorta, but expression of the FGF receptor 3 was not detected in cDNAs derived from aortic tissue. In the VSMC of rat aortic tissue and in HUASM cultured cells we could demonstrate FGF18 immunoreactivity in the nucleus of the cells. The expression of several secreted FGFs by EC may focus the view more on their paracrine effects on neighbouring cells during tissue regeneration or tumor formation.

  9. Modulating the vascular behavior of metastatic breast cancer cells by curcumin treatment

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    Anna Lisa ePalange

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The spreading of tumor cells to secondary sites (tumor metastasis is a complex process that involves multiple, sequential steps. Vascular adhesion and extravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs is one, critical step. Curcumin, a natural compound extracted from Curcuma longa, is known to have anti-tumoral, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory properties and affect the expression of cell adhesion molecules, mostly by targeting the NF-κB transcription factor. Here, upon treatment with Curcumin, the vascular behavior of three different estrogen receptor negative (ER– breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 is analyzed using a microfluidic system. First, the dose response to curcumin is characterized at 24, 48 and 72h using a XTT assay. For all three cell lines, an IC50 larger than 20 µM is observed at 72 h; whereas no significant reduction in cell viability is detected for curcumin concentrations up to 10 µM. Upon 24 h treatment at 10 µM of curcumin, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 cells show a decrease in adhesion propensity of 40% (p = 0.02 and 47% (p = 0.001, respectively. No significant change is documented for the less metastatic MDA-MB-468 cells. All three treated cell lines show a 20% increase in rolling velocity from 48.3 to 58.7 µm/s in SK-BR-3, from 64.1 to 73.77 µm/s in MDA-MB-231 and from 57.5 to 74.4 µm/s in MDA-MB-468. Collectively, these results suggest that mild curcumin treatments could limit the metastatic potential of these adenocarcinoma cell lines, possibly by altering the expression of adhesion molecules, and the organization and stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton. Future studies will elucidate the biophysical mechanisms regulating this curcumin-induced behavior and further explore the clinical relevance of these findings.

  10. Effect of Oxysterol-Induced Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells on Experimental Hypercholesterolemia

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    Sonia Perales

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cells (SMCs undergo changes related to proliferation and apoptosis in the physiological remodeling of vessels and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recent studies also have demonstrated the vascular cell proliferation and programmed cell death contribute to changes in vascular architecture in normal development and in disease. The present study was designed to investigate the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, using an in vivo/in vitro cell model in which SMCs were isolated and culture from chicken exposed to an atherogenic cholesterol-rich diet (SMC-Ch and/or an antiatherogenic fish oil-rich diet (SMC-Ch-FO. Cells were exposed in vitro to 25-hydroxycholesterol to study levels of apoptosis and apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bax and the expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL, genes. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and the Immunoblotting western blot analysis showed that 25-hydroxycholesterol produces apoptosis in SMCs, mediated by a high increase in Bax protein and Bax gene expression. These changes were more marked in SMC-Ch than in SMC-Ch-FO, indicating that dietary cholesterol produces changes in SMCs that make them more susceptible to 25-hydroxycholesterol-mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that the replacement of a cholesterol-rich diet with a fish oil-rich diet produces some reversal of cholesterol-induced changes in the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, making SMCs more resistant to apoptosis.

  11. Inhibitive effects of anti-oxidative vitamins on mannitol-induced apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Kai-yu; SHEN Mei-ping; YE Zhi-hong; DAI Xiao-na; SHANG Shi-qiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Study blood vessel injury and gene expression indicating vascular endothelial cell apoptosis induced by mannitol with and without administration of anti-oxidative vitamins. Methods: Healthy rabbits were randomly divided into four groups. Mannitol was injected into the vein of the rabbit ear in each animal. Pre-treatment prior to mannitol injection was performed with normal saline (group B), vitamin C (group C) and vitamin E (group D). Blood vessel injury was assessed under electron and light microscopy. In a second experiment, cell culture specimen of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with mannitol. Pre-treatment was done with normal saline (sample B), vitamin C (sample C) and vitamin E (sample D).Total RNA was extracted with the original single step procedure, followed by hybridisation and analysis of gene expression.Results: In the animal experiment, serious blood vessel injury was seen in group A and group B. Group D showed light injury only,and normal tissue without pathological changes was seen in group C. Of all 330 apoptosis-related genes analysed in human cell culture specimen, no significant difference was seen after pre-treatment with normal saline, compared with the gene chip without pre-treatment. On the gene chip pre-treated with vitamin C, 45 apoptosis genes were down-regulated and 34 anti-apoptosis genes were up-regulated. Pre-treatment with vitamin E resulted in the down-regulation of 3 apoptosis genes. Conclusion: Vitamin C can protect vascular endothelial cells from mannitol-induced injury.

  12. Soluble forms of VEGF receptor-1 and -2 promote vascular maturation via mural cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorquet, Sophie; Berndt, Sarah; Blacher, Silvia; Gengoux, Emily; Peulen, Olivier; Maquoi, Erik; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Munaut, Carine; Péqueux, Christel

    2010-10-01

    Two soluble forms of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2, are physiologically released and overproduced in some pathologies. They are known to act as anti-VEGF agents. Here we report that these soluble receptors contribute to vessel maturation by mediating a dialogue between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells that leads to blood vessel stabilization. Through a multidisciplinary approach, we provide evidence that these soluble VEGF receptors promote mural cell migration through a paracrine mechanism involving interplay in ECs between VEGF/VEGFR-2 and sphingosine-1-phosphate type-1 (S1P)/S1P1 pathways that leads to endothelial nitric oxyde synthase (eNOS) activation. This new paradigm is supported by the finding that sVEGFR-1 and -2 perform the following actions: 1) induce an eNOS-dependent outgrowth of a mural cell network in an ex vivo model of angiogenesis, 2) increase the mural cell coverage of neovessels in vitro and in vivo, 3) promote mural cell migration toward ECs, and 4) stimulate endothelial S1P1 overproduction and eNOS activation that promote the migration and the recruitment of neighboring mural cells. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms regulating physiological and pathological angiogenesis and vessel stabilization.

  13. Disturbance of copper homeostasis is a mechanism for homocysteine-induced vascular endothelial cell injury.

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    Daoyin Dong

    Full Text Available Elevation of serum homocysteine (Hcy levels is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies suggested that Hcy interferes with copper (Cu metabolism in vascular endothelial cells. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that Hcy-induced disturbance of Cu homeostasis leads to endothelial cell injury. Exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs to concentrations of Hcy at 0.01, 0.1 or 1 mM resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability and an increase in necrotic cell death. Pretreatment of the cells with a final concentration of 5 µM Cu in cultures prevented the effects of Hcy. Hcy decreased intracellular Cu concentrations. HPLC-ICP-MS analysis revealed that Hcy caused alterations in the distribution of intracellular Cu; more Cu was redistributed to low molecular weight fractions. ESI-Q-TOF detected the formation of Cu-Hcy complexes. Hcy also decreased the protein levels of Cu chaperone COX17, which was accompanied by a decrease in the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO and a collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. These effects of Hcy were all preventable by Cu pretreatment. The study thus demonstrated that Hcy disturbs Cu homeostasis and limits the availability of Cu to critical molecules such as COX17 and CCO, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and endothelial cell injury.

  14. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppresses oxidized low density lipoprotein induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

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    Lin Sheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between the suppression of Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA on the oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and the mRNA and protein expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and mitogen activated protein kinase phospholipase-1 (MAKP-1, VSMCs were treated with HSYA at 10 ?mol/L and/or ox-LDL at 35 mg/L for 48 h. MTT assay was done to measure cell survival rate, flow cytometry to detect cell cycle, reverse transcription PCR and Western blot to detect the expression of ERK1/2 and MAKP-1. When compared to cells treated with ox-LDL alone, the survival rate of cells treated with two reagents was reduced and the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase significantly increased, with increased MKP-1 expression. The study suggests HSYA can inhibit VSMC proliferation via increasing MKP-1 expression, reducing p-ERK1/2 activity and suppressing cell cycle.

  15. Uhrf2 is important for DNA damage response in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tao; Cui, Shijun; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2013-11-08

    Emerging evidence shows that Uhrf1 plays an important role in DNA damage response for maintaining genomic stability. Interestingly, Uhrf1 has a paralog Uhrf2 in mammals. Uhrf1 and Uhrf2 share similar domain architectures. However, the role of Uhrf2 in DNA damage response has not been studied yet. During the analysis of the expression level of Uhrf2 in different tissues, we found that Uhrf2 is highly expressed in aorta and aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Thus, we studied the role of Uhrf2 in DNA damage response in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Using laser microirradiation, we found that like Uhrf1, Uhrf2 was recruited to the sites of DNA damage. We dissected the functional domains of Uhrf2 and found that the TTD, PHD and SRA domains are important for the relocation of Uhrf2 to the sites of DNA damage. Moreover, depletion of Uhrf2 suppressed DNA damage-induced H2AX phosphorylation and DNA damage repair. Taken together, our results demonstrate the function of Uhrf2 in DNA damage response.

  16. Telmisartan Activates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase via Ser1177 Phosphorylation in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myojo, Masahiro; Nagata, Daisuke; Fujita, Daishi; Kiyosue, Arihiro; Takahashi, Masao; Satonaka, Hiroshi; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Akimoto, Tetsu; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2014-01-01

    Because endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has anti-inflammatory and anti-arteriosclerotic functions, it has been recognized as one of the key molecules essential for the homeostatic control of blood vessels other than relaxation of vascular tone. Here, we examined whether telmisartan modulates eNOS function through its pleiotropic effect. Administration of telmisartan to mice significantly increased the phosphorylation level of eNOS (Ser1177) in the aortic endothelium, but administration of valsartan had no effect. Similarly, telmisartan treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells significantly increased the phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (Thr172) and eNOS and the concentration of intracellular guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). Furthermore, pretreatment with a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) inhibitor suppressed the increased phosphorylation level of eNOS and intracellular cGMP concentration. These data show that telmisartan increases eNOS activity through Ser1177 phosphorylation in vascular endothelial cells mainly via p38 MAPK signaling. PMID:24827148

  17. Telmisartan activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase via Ser1177 phosphorylation in vascular endothelial cells.

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    Masahiro Myojo

    Full Text Available Because endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS has anti-inflammatory and anti-arteriosclerotic functions, it has been recognized as one of the key molecules essential for the homeostatic control of blood vessels other than relaxation of vascular tone. Here, we examined whether telmisartan modulates eNOS function through its pleiotropic effect. Administration of telmisartan to mice significantly increased the phosphorylation level of eNOS (Ser1177 in the aortic endothelium, but administration of valsartan had no effect. Similarly, telmisartan treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells significantly increased the phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (Thr172 and eNOS and the concentration of intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP. Furthermore, pretreatment with a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK inhibitor suppressed the increased phosphorylation level of eNOS and intracellular cGMP concentration. These data show that telmisartan increases eNOS activity through Ser1177 phosphorylation in vascular endothelial cells mainly via p38 MAPK signaling.

  18. Erythropoietin employs cell longevity pathways of SIRT1 to foster endothelial vascular integrity during oxidant stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jinling; Wang, Shaohui; Shang, Yan Chen; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Maiese, Kenneth

    2011-08-01

    Given the cytoprotective ability of erythropoietin (EPO) in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) and the invaluable role of ECs in the central nervous system, it is imperative to elucidate the cellular pathways for EPO to protect ECs against brain injury. Here we illustrate that EPO relies upon the modulation of SIRT1 (silent mating type information regulator 2 homolog 1) in cerebral microvascular ECs to foster cytoprotection during oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). SIRT1 activation which results in the inhibition of apoptotic early membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and subsequent DNA degradation during OGD becomes a necessary component for EPO protection in ECs, since inhibition of SIRT1 activity or diminishing its expression by gene silencing abrogates cell survival supported by EPO during OGD. Furthermore, EPO promotes the subcellular trafficking of SIRT1 to the nucleus which is necessary for EPO to foster vascular protection. EPO through SIRT1 averts apoptosis through activation of protein kinase B (Akt1) and the phosphorylation and cytoplasmic retention of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO3a. SIRT1 through EPO activation also utilizes mitochondrial pathways to prevent mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, and Bad, caspase 1, and caspase 3 activation. Our work identifies novel pathways for EPO in the vascular system that can govern the activity of SIRT1 to prevent apoptotic injury through Akt1, FoxO3a phosphorylation and trafficking, mitochondrial membrane permeability, Bad activation, and caspase 1 and 3 activities in ECs during oxidant stress.

  19. C-peptide protects against hyperglycemic memory and vascular endothelial cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Mahendra Prasad; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Jung, Se-Hui; Kim, Yong Ho; Hwang, Jong Yun; Han, Eun-Taek; Park, Won Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2016-10-01

    C-peptide exerts protective effects against diabetic complications; however, its role in inhibiting hyperglycemic memory (HGM) has not been elucidated. We investigated the beneficial effect of C-peptide on HGM-induced vascular damage in vitro and in vivo using human umbilical vein endothelial cells and diabetic mice. HGM induced apoptosis by persistent generation of intracellular ROS and sustained formation of ONOO(-) and nitrotyrosine. These HGM-induced intracellular events were normalized by treatment with C-peptide, but not insulin, in endothelial cells. C-peptide also inhibited persistent upregulation of p53 and activation of mitochondrial adaptor p66(shc) after glucose normalization. Further, C-peptide replacement therapy prevented persistent generation of ROS and ONOO(-) in the aorta of diabetic mice whose glucose levels were normalized by the administration of insulin. C-peptide, but not insulin, also prevented HGM-induced endothelial apoptosis in the murine diabetic aorta. This study highlights a promising role for C-peptide in preventing HGM-induced intracellular events and diabetic vascular damage.

  20. Higher expression of Bax in regulatory T cells increases vascular inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zeyu; Song, Jian; Yan, Yan; Huang, Yajue; Cowan, Alan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2008-05-01

    This study is to examine our hypothesis that CD4+CD25(high)Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) have an interleukin-2 (IL-2) withdrawal-triggered apoptosis pathway, and modulation of Treg apoptosis pathway affects development of vascular inflammation. We found that pro-apoptotic protein Bax upregulation in Tregs is induced by IL-2 withdrawal. Treg apoptosis induced by IL-2 withdrawal is inhibited by a Bax inhibitor, suggesting that highly expressed Bax is functional. To define the role of upregulated Bax in Treg apoptosis, we established a Tregs-specific Bax transgenic mouse model. Enforced expression of Bax in Tregs promotes Treg apoptosis triggered by IL-2 withdrawal and other apoptosis stimuli, suggesting pro-apoptotic role of highly expressed Bax in wild-type Tregs. Finally, higher expression of Bax in Tregs decreases the striking threshold of vascular inflammation due to the failure of suppression of inflammatory cells resulting from Treg apoptosis. These results have demonstrated the proof of principle that the modulation of Tregs apoptosis/survival could be used as a new therapeutic approach for inflammatory cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Tissue engineered pre-vascularized buccal mucosa equivalents utilizing a primary triculture of epithelial cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, M; Frerick-Ochs, E V; Bauer, H-K; Schiegnitz, E; Flesch, D; Brieger, J; Stein, R; Al-Nawas, B; Brochhausen, C; Thüroff, J W; Unger, R E; Brenner, W

    2016-01-01

    Artificial generated buccal mucosa equivalents are a promising approach for the reconstruction of urethral defects. Limiting in this approach is a poor blood vessel supply after transplantation, resulting in increased morbidity and necrosis. We generated a pre-vascularized buccal mucosa equivalent in a tri-culture of primary buccal epithelial cells, fibroblasts and microvascular endothelial cells, using a native collagen membrane as a scaffold. A successful pre-vascularization and dense formation of capillary-like structures at superficial areas was demonstrated. The lumen size of pre-formed blood vessels corresponded to the capillary size in vivo (10-30 μm). Comparing native with a highly cross-linked collagen membrane we found a distinct higher formation of capillary-like structures on the native membrane, apparently caused by higher secretion of angiogenic factors such as PDGF, IL-8 and angiopoietin by the cells. These capillary-like structures became functional blood vessels through anastomosis with the host vasculature after implantation in nude mice. This in vitro method should result in an accelerated blood supply to the biomaterial with cells after transplantation and increase the succes rates of the implant material.

  2. Effects of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab on lens epithelial cells

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    Jun JH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jong Hwa Jun,1 Wern-Joo Sohn,2 Youngkyun Lee,2 Jae-Young Kim21Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University, 2Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, IHBR, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South KoreaAbstract: The molecular and cellular effects of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab on lens epithelial cells (LECs were examined using both an immortalized human lens epithelial cell line and a porcine capsular bag model. After treatment with various concentrations of bevacizumab, cell viability and proliferation patterns were evaluated using the water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The scratch assay and Western blot analysis were employed to validate the cell migration pattern and altered expression levels of signaling molecules related to the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT. Application of bevacizumab induced a range of altered cellular events in a concentration-dependent manner. A 0.1–2 mg/mL concentration demonstrated dose-dependent increase in proliferation and viability of LECs. However, 4 mg/mL decreased cell proliferation and viability. Cell migrations displayed dose-dependent retardation from 0.1 mg/mL bevacizumab treatment. Transforming growth factor-β2 expression was markedly increased in a dose-dependent manner, and α-smooth muscle actin, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and vimentin expression levels showed dose-dependent changes in a B3 cell line. Microscopic observation of porcine capsular bag revealed changes in cellular morphology and a decline in cell density compared to the control after 2 mg/mL treatment. The central aspect of posterior capsule showed delayed confluence, and the factors related to EMT revealed similar expression patterns to those identified in the cell line. Based on these results, bevacizumab modulates the proliferation

  3. A pro-inflammatory role of deubiquitinating enzyme cylindromatosis (CYLD) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shuai [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Lv, Jiaju [Department of Urology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Han, Liping; Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Wang, Wenjuan; Li, Siying [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Wang, Xing Li [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@pathology.ufl.edu [Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610-0275 (United States); Cui, Taixing, E-mail: taixing.cui@uscmed.sc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency suppresses pro-inflammatory phenotypic switch of VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency inhibits MAPK rather than NF-kB activity in inflamed VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD is up-regulated in the coronary artery with neointimal hyperplasia. -- Abstract: CYLD, a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), is a critical regulator of diverse cellular processes, ranging from proliferation and differentiation to inflammatory responses, via regulating multiple key signaling cascades such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. CYLD has been shown to inhibit vascular lesion formation presumably through suppressing NF-{kappa}B activity in vascular cells. However, herein we report a novel role of CYLD in mediating pro-inflammatory responses in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via a mechanism independent of NF-{kappa}B activity. Adenoviral knockdown of Cyld inhibited basal and the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-induced mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (Mcp-1), intercellular adhesion molecule (Icam-1) and interleukin-6 (Il-6) in rat adult aortic SMCs (RASMCs). The CYLD deficiency led to increases in the basal NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity in RASMCs; however, did not affect the TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. Intriguingly, the TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B phosphorylation was enhanced in the CYLD deficient RASMCs. While knocking down of Cyld decreased slightly the basal expression levels of I{kappa}B{alpha} and I{kappa}B{beta} proteins, it did not alter the kinetics of TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B protein degradation in RASMCs. These results indicate that CYLD suppresses the basal NF-{kappa}B activity and TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B kinase activation without affecting TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity in VSMCs. In addition, knocking down of Cyld suppressed TNF{alpha}-induced activation of mitogen activated protein

  4. Amniotic fluid stem cells morph into a cardiovascular lineage: analysis of a chemically induced cardiac and vascular commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maioli, Margherita; Contini, Giovanni; Santaniello, Sara; Bandiera, Pasquale; Pigliaru, Gianfranco; Sanna, Raimonda; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Delitala, Alessandro P; Montella, Andrea; Bagella, Luigi; Ventura, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells were previously observed along with mesenchymal stem cells from different sources, after being treated with a mixed ester of hyaluronan with butyric and retinoic acids, to show a significant increase in the yield of cardiogenic and vascular differentiated elements. The aim of the present study was to determine if stem cells derived from primitive fetal cells present in human amniotic fluid (hAFSCs) and cultured in the presence of a mixture of hyaluronic (HA), butyric (BU), and retinoic (RA) acids show a higher yield of differentiation toward the cardiovascular phenotype as compared with untreated cells. During the differentiation process elicited by exposure to HA + BU + RA, genes controlling pluripotency and plasticity of stem cells, such as Sox2, Nanog, and Oct4, were significantly downregulated at the transcriptional level. At this point, a significant increase in expression of genes controlling the appearance of cardiogenic and vascular lineages in HA + BU + RA-treated cells was observed. The protein expression levels typical of cardiac and vascular phenotypes, evaluated by Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry, were higher in hAFSCs cultured in the presence of HA + BU + RA, as compared with untreated control cells. Appearance of the cardiac phenotype was further inferred by ultrastructural analysis using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. These results demonstrate that a mixture of HA + BU + RA significantly increased the yield of elements committed toward cardiac and vascular phenotypes, confirming what we have previously observed in other cellular types.

  5. Endogenous activated protein C limits cancer cell extravasation through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1-mediated vascular endothelial barrier enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.L. van Sluis; T.M.H. Niers; C.T. Esmon; W. Tigchelaar; D.J. Richel; H.R. Buller; C.J.F. van Noorden; C.A. Spek

    2009-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC) has both anticoagulant activity and direct cell-signaling properties. APC has been reported to promote cancer cell migration/invasion and to inhibit apoptosis and therefore may exacerbate metastasis. Opposing these activities, APC signaling protects the vascular endothelial

  6. Sertoli Cells Modulate Testicular Vascular Network Development, Structure, and Function to Influence Circulating Testosterone Concentrations in Adult Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebourcet, Diane; Wu, Junxi; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Smith, Sarah E; Milne, Laura; Fernando, Anuruddika; Wallace, Robert J; Gray, Calum D; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Mitchell, Rod T; O'Shaughnessy, Peter J; Smith, Lee B

    2016-06-01

    The testicular vasculature forms a complex network, providing oxygenation, micronutrients, and waste clearance from the testis. The vasculature is also instrumental to testis function because it is both the route by which gonadotropins are delivered to the testis and by which T is transported away to target organs. Whether Sertoli cells play a role in regulating the testicular vasculature in postnatal life has never been unequivocally demonstrated. In this study we used models of acute Sertoli cell ablation and acute germ cell ablation to address whether Sertoli cells actively influence vascular structure and function in the adult testis. Our findings suggest that Sertoli cells play a key role in supporting the structure of the testicular vasculature. Ablating Sertoli cells (and germ cells) or germ cells alone results in a similar reduction in testis size, yet only the specific loss of Sertoli cells leads to a reduction in total intratesticular vascular volume, the number of vascular branches, and the numbers of small microvessels; loss of germ cells alone has no effect on the testicular vasculature. These perturbations to the testicular vasculature leads to a reduction in fluid exchange between the vasculature and testicular interstitium, which reduces gonadotropin-stimulated circulating T concentrations, indicative of reduced Leydig cell stimulation and/or reduced secretion of T into the vasculature. These findings describe a new paradigm by which the transport of hormones and other factors into and out of the testis may be influenced by Sertoli cells and highlights these cells as potential targets for enhancing this endocrine relationship.

  7. METACASPASE9 modulates autophagy to confine cell death to the target cells during Arabidopsis vascular xylem differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacha Escamez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We uncovered that the level of autophagy in plant cells undergoing programmed cell death determines the fate of the surrounding cells. Our approach consisted of using Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures capable of differentiating into two different cell types: vascular tracheary elements (TEs that undergo programmed cell death (PCD and protoplast autolysis, and parenchymatic non-TEs that remain alive. The TE cell type displayed higher levels of autophagy when expression of the TE-specific METACASPASE9 (MC9 was reduced using RNAi (MC9-RNAi. Misregulation of autophagy in the MC9-RNAi TEs coincided with ectopic death of the non-TEs, implying the existence of an autophagy-dependent intercellular signalling from within the TEs towards the non-TEs. Viability of the non-TEs was restored when AUTOPHAGY2 (ATG2 was downregulated specifically in MC9-RNAi TEs, demonstrating the importance of autophagy in the spatial confinement of cell death. Our results suggest that other eukaryotic cells undergoing PCD might also need to tightly regulate their level of autophagy to avoid detrimental consequences for the surrounding cells.

  8. Roscovitine inhibits ERK1/2 activation induced by angiotensin II in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ai-Ying; Han, Mei; Zheng, Bin; Wen, Jin-Kun

    2008-01-23

    Roscovitine is a potent CDK inhibitor often used as a biological tool in cell-cycle studies, but its working mechanism and real targets in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) remain unclear. In this study, we observed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by Ang II was abrogated by pretreating VSMCs with roscovitine for 15h. Pretreating VSMCs with roscovitine also inhibited Ang II-induced c-Jun expression and phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that roscovitine could suppress the DNA binding activity of c-Jun and activation of angiotensinogen promoter by Ang II. These results suggest that roscovitine represses Ang II-induced angiotensinogen expression by inhibiting activation of ERK1/2 and c-Jun.

  9. Cell therapy for ischaemic heart disease: focus on the role of resident cardiac stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A.J. Chamuleau; K.R. Vrijsen; D.G. Rokosh; X.L. Tang; J.J. Piek; R. Bolli

    2009-01-01

    Myocardial infarction results in loss of cardiomyocytes, scar formation, ventricular remodelling, and eventually heart failure. In recent years, cell therapy has emerged as a potential new strategy for patients with ischaemic heart disease. This includes embryonic and bone marrow derived stem cells.

  10. SDF-1 promotes ox-LDL induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Xing; Zhang, Xian-Feng; Bai, Xue; Tong, Qian

    2013-09-01

    The mechanism of the regulatory roles of stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C motif receptor 4 (CXCR4) on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via the protein kinase C (PKC) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathways have been investigated. Rat aortic VSMCs were treated with control or an oxidised low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) atherosclerosis (AS) model. Cells exposed to the AS model were treated with SDF-1 plus inhibitors specific for PKC (Ro31-8220), CXCR4 (12G5) or NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, PDTC). Cell proliferation was measured with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and apoptosis by flow cytometry. NF-κB protein expression was analysed using Western blotting. The proliferation rate in the AS model group was significantly higher than the control group, but lower than the SDF-1 group (P SDF-1 group was significantly lower than the normal control group (P SDF-1 group was significantly higher than the AS model (ox-LDL) group (P SDF-1 can promote the proliferation of VSMCs induced by ox-LDL and inhibit cell apoptosis, via the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  11. Tensile properties of single stress fibers isolated from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Shinji; Ohashi, Toshiro; Sato, Masaaki

    2006-01-01

    Stress fibers (SFs), a contractile bundle of actin filaments, play a critical role in mechanotransduction in adherent cells; yet, the mechanical properties of SFs are poorly understood. Here, we measured tensile properties of single SFs by in vitro manipulation with cantilevers. SFs were isolated from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells with a combination of low ionic-strength extraction and detergent extraction and were stretched until breaking. The breaking force and the Young's modulus (assuming that SFs were isotropic) were, on average, 377 nN and 1.45 MPa, which were approximately 600-fold greater and three orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of actin filaments reported previously. Strain-induced stiffening was observed in the force-strain curve. We also found that the extracted SFs shortened to approximately 80% of the original length in an ATP-independent manner after they were dislodged from the substrate, suggesting that SFs had preexisting strain in the cytoplasm. The force required for stretching the single SFs from the zero-stress length back to the original length was approximately 10 nN, which was comparable with the traction force level applied by adherent cells at single adhesion sites to maintain cell integrity. These results suggest that SFs can bear intracellular stresses that may affect overall cell mechanical properties and will impact interpretation of intracellular stress distribution and force-transmission mechanism in adherent cells.

  12. Bisphenol A Disrupts Transcription and Decreases Viability in Aging Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna; Pereira, H. Sofia; Monteiro, Sara; Neves, Elsa; Brito, Luísa; Boavida Ferreira, Ricardo; Viegas, Wanda; Delgado, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely utilized endocrine disruptor capable of mimicking endogenous hormones, employed in the manufacture of numerous consumer products, thereby interfering with physiological cellular functions. Recent research has shown that BPA alters epigenetic cellular mechanisms in mammals and may be correlated to enhanced cellular senescence. Here, the effects of BPA at 10 ng/mL and 1 µg/mL, concentrations found in human samples, were analyzed on HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) transcriptional analysis of the Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1) retroelement showed that BPA induces global transcription deregulation in both cell lines, although with more pronounced effects in HUVEC cells. Whereas there was an increase in global transcription in HT29 exclusively after 24 h of exposure, this chemical had prolonged effects on HUVEC. Immunoblotting revealed that this was not accompanied by alterations in the overall content of H3K9me2 and H3K4me3 epigenetic marks. Importantly, cell viability assays and transcriptional analysis indicated that prolonged BPA exposure affects aging processes in senescent HUVEC. To our knowledge this is the first report that BPA interferes with senescence in primary vascular endothelial cells, therefore, suggesting its association to the etiology of age-related human pathologies, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:25207595

  13. MicroRNAome comparison between intramuscular and subcutaneous vascular stem cell adipogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxue Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As an important factor affecting meat quality, intramuscular fat (IMF content is a topic of worldwide concern. Emerging evidences indicate that microRNAs play important roles in adipocyte differentiation. However, miRNAome has neither been studied during porcine intramuscular preadipocyte differentiation, nor compared with subcutaneous preadipocytes. The objectives of this study were to identify porcine miRNAs involved in adipogenesis in primary preadipocytes, and to determine whether intramuscular and subcutaneous adipocytes differ in the expression and regulation of miRNAs. RESULTS: miRNAomes in primary intramuscular and subcutaneous adipocytes during differentiation were first sequenced using the Solexa deep sequencing method. The sequences and relative expression levels of 224 known (98.2% in miRbase 18.0 and 280 potential porcine miRNAs were identified. Fifty-four of them changed in similar pattern between intramuscular vascular stem cells (IVSC and subcutaneous vascular stem cells (SVSC differentiation, such as miR-210, miR-10b and miR-99a. Expression levels of 10 miRNAs were reversely up-or down-regulated between IVSC and SVSC differentiation, 19 were up-or down-regulated only during IVSC differentiation and 55 only during SVSC differentiation. Additionally, 30 miRNAs showed fat-depot specific expression pattern (24 in cells of intramuscular origin and 6 in cells of subcutaneous origin. These adipogenesis-related miRNAs mainly functioned by targeting similar pathways in adipogenesis, obesity and syndrome. CONCLUSION: Comparison of miRNAomes in IVSC and SVSC during differentiation revealed that many different miRNAs are involved in adipogenesis, and they regulate SVSC and IVSC differentiation through similar pathways. These miRNAs may serve as biomarkers or targets for enhancing IMF content, and uncovering their function in IMF development will be of great value in the near future.

  14. Vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion to collagen I modified by vasoactive agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongkui Hong

    Full Text Available In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM proteins play important roles in sustaining vascular tone and resistance. The main goal of this study was to determine whether VSMCs adhesion to type I collagen (COL-I was altered in parallel with the changes in the VSMCs contractile state induced by vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. VSMCs were isolated from rat cremaster skeletal muscle arterioles and maintained in primary culture without passage. Cell adhesion and cell E-modulus were assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM by repetitive nano-indentation of the AFM probe on the cell surface at 0.1 Hz sampling frequency and 3200 nm Z-piezo travelling distance (approach and retraction. AFM probes were tipped with a 5 μm diameter microbead functionalized with COL-I (1 mg\\ml. Results showed that the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (ANG-II; 10-6 significantly increased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability to COL-I by approximately 35% and 33%, respectively. In contrast, the vasodilator adenosine (ADO; 10-4 significantly decreased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability by approximately -33% and -17%, respectively. Similarly, the NO donor (PANOate, 10-6 M, a potent vasodilator, also significantly decreased (p<0.05 the VSMC E-modulus and COL-I adhesion probability by -38% and -35%, respectively. These observations support the hypothesis that integrin-mediated VSMC adhesion to the ECM protein COL-I is dynamically regulated in parallel with VSMC contractile activation. These data suggest that the signal transduction pathways modulating VSMC contractile activation and relaxation, in addition to ECM adhesion, interact during regulation of contractile state.

  15. Resident adult neural stem cells in Parkinson's disease--the brain's own repair system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berge, Simone A; van Strien, Miriam E; Hol, Elly M

    2013-11-05

    One important pathological process in the brain of Parkinson disease (PD) patients is the degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which leads to a decline in striatal dopamine levels and motor dysfunction. A major clinical problem is that this degenerative process currently cannot be stopped or reversed. Expectations from the restorative capacity of neural stem cells (NSCs) are high, as these cells can potentially replace the degenerating neurons. The discovery of the presence of NSCs in the adult human brain has instigated research into the potential of these cells as a resource to promote brain repair in neurodegenerative diseases. Neural stem and progenitor cells reside in the subventricular zone (SVZ), which is closely situated to the striatum, which is affected in PD. Therefore, restoring the dopamine levels in the striatum of PD patients through stimulating endogenous NSCs in the nearby SVZ to migrate into the striatum and differentiate into dopaminergic neurons might thus be an attractive future therapeutic approach. We will review the reported changes in NSCs in the SVZ of PD animal models and PD patients, which are due to a lack of striatal dopamine. Furthermore, we will summarise the reports that describe efforts to stimulate NSCs to replace dopaminergic cells in the SN and restore striatal dopamine levels. In our opinion, mobilizing the endogenous SVZ NSCs to replenish striatal dopamine is an attractive approach to alleviate the motor symptoms in PD patients, without the ethical and immunological challenges of transplantation of NSCs and foetal brain tissue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. PML-RARa modulates the vascular signature of extracellular vesicles released by acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Garnier, Delphine; Lee, Tae Hoon; D'Asti, Esterina; Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation is believed to impact the vascular phenotype and microenvironment in cancer, at least in part, through mechanisms involving extracellular vesicles (EVs). We explored these questions in the context of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells (NB4) expressing oncogenic fusion protein, PML-RARa and exquisitely sensitive to its clinically used antagonist, the all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). We report that NB4 cells produce considerable numbers of EVs, which are readily taken up by cultured endothelial cells triggering their increased survival. NB4 EVs contain PML-RARa transcript, but no detectable protein, which is also absent in endothelial cells upon the vesicle uptake, thereby precluding an active intercellular trafficking of this oncogene in this setting. ATRA treatment changes the emission profile of NB4-related EVs resulting in preponderance of smaller vesicles, an effect that occurs in parallel with the onset of cellular differentiation. ATRA also increases IL-8 mRNA and protein content in NB4 cells and their EVs, while decreasing the levels of VEGF and tissue factor (TF). Endothelial cell uptake of NB4-derived EVs renders these cells more TF-positive and procoagulant, and this effect is diminished by pre-treatment of EV donor cells with ATRA. Profiling angiogenesis-related transcripts in intact and ATRA-treated APL cells and their EVs reveals multiple differences attributable to cellular responses and EV molecular packaging. These observations point to the potential significance of changes in the angiogenic signature and activity associated with EVs released from tumor cells subjected to targeted therapy.

  17. Mesoporous silica particle-PLA-PANI hybrid scaffolds for cell-directed intracellular drug delivery and tissue vascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokry, Hussein; Vanamo, Ulriika; Wiltschka, Oliver; Niinimäki, Jenni; Lerche, Martina; Levon, Kalle; Linden, Mika; Sahlgren, Cecilia

    2015-08-01

    Instructive materials are expected to revolutionize stem cell based tissue engineering. As many stem cell cues have adverse effects on normal tissue homeostasis, there is a need to develop bioactive scaffolds which offer locally retained and cell-targeted drug delivery for intracellular release in targeted cell populations. Further, the scaffolds need to support vascularization to promote tissue growth and function. We have developed an electrospun PLA-PANI fiber scaffold, and incorporated mesoporous silica nanoparticles within the scaffold matrix to obtain cell-targeted and localized drug delivery. The isotropy of the scaffold can be tuned to find the optimal morphology for a given application and the scaffold is electroactive to support differentiation of contractile tissues. We demonstrate that there is no premature drug release from particles under physiological conditions over a period of one week and that the drug is released upon internalization of particles by cells within the scaffold. The scaffold is biocompatible, supports muscle stem cell differentiation and cell-seeded scaffolds are vascularized in vivo upon transplantation on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. The scaffold is a step towards instructive biomaterials for local control of stem cell differentiation, and tissue formation supported by vascularization and without adverse effects on the homeostasis of adjacent tissues due to diffusion of biological cues.Instructive materials are expected to revolutionize stem cell based tissue engineering. As many stem cell cues have adverse effects on normal tissue homeostasis, there is a need to develop bioactive scaffolds which offer locally retained and cell-targeted drug delivery for intracellular release in targeted cell populations. Further, the scaffolds need to support vascularization